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Sample records for meiotic nuclear reorganization

  1. IAEA reorganizes nuclear information services

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, E.

    2012-08-15

    As part of an overall restructuring of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Department of Nuclear Energy, the agency has established the Nuclear Information Section (NIS). The restructuring, recently announced by IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano, also includes the creation of a separate Nuclear Knowledge Management (NKM) Section, as demand for assistance in this area is growing among member countries. According to the NIS Web site, 'This restructuring and the creation of the NIS provides an opportunity for further enhancing existing information products and services and introducing new ones-all with an eye towards advancing higher organizational efficiency and effectiveness.'

  2. Self-organization of dynein motors generates meiotic nuclear oscillations.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Sven K; Pavin, Nenad; Maghelli, Nicola; Jülicher, Frank; Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva M

    2009-04-21

    Meiotic nuclear oscillations in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe are crucial for proper chromosome pairing and recombination. We report a mechanism of these oscillations on the basis of collective behavior of dynein motors linking the cell cortex and dynamic microtubules that extend from the spindle pole body in opposite directions. By combining quantitative live cell imaging and laser ablation with a theoretical description, we show that dynein dynamically redistributes in the cell in response to load forces, resulting in more dynein attached to the leading than to the trailing microtubules. The redistribution of motors introduces an asymmetry of motor forces pulling in opposite directions, leading to the generation of oscillations. Our work provides the first direct in vivo observation of self-organized dynamic dynein distributions, which, owing to the intrinsic motor properties, generate regular large-scale movements in the cell. PMID:19385717

  3. Transient Structure Associated with the Spindle Pole Body Directs Meiotic Microtubule Reorganization in S. pombe

    PubMed Central

    Funaya, Charlotta; Samarasinghe, Shivanthi; Pruggnaller, Sabine; Ohta, Midori; Connolly, Yvonne; Müller, Jan; Murakami, Hiroshi; Grallert, Agnes; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Smith, Duncan; Antony, Claude; Tanaka, Kayoko

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Vigorous chromosome movements driven by cytoskeletal assemblies are a widely conserved feature of sexual differentiation to facilitate meiotic recombination. In fission yeast, this process involves the dramatic conversion of arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules (MTs), generated from multiple MT organizing centers (MTOCs), into a single radial MT (rMT) array associated with the spindle pole body (SPB), the major MTOC during meiotic prophase. The rMT is then dissolved upon the onset of meiosis I when a bipolar spindle emerges to conduct chromosome segregation. Structural features and molecular mechanisms that govern these dynamic MT rearrangements are poorly understood. Results Electron tomography of the SPBs showed that the rMT emanates from a newly recognized amorphous structure, which we term the rMTOC. The rMTOC, which resides at the cytoplasmic side of the SPB, is highly enriched in γ-tubulin reminiscent of the pericentriolar material of higher eukaryotic centrosomes. Formation of the rMTOC depends on Hrs1/Mcp6, a meiosis-specific SPB component that is located at the rMTOC. At the onset of meiosis I, Hrs1/Mcp6 is subject to strict downregulation by both proteasome-dependent degradation and phosphorylation leading to complete inactivation of the rMTOC. This ensures rMT dissolution and bipolar spindle formation. Conclusions Our study reveals the molecular basis for the transient generation of a novel MTOC, which triggers a program of MT rearrangement that is required for meiotic differentiation. PMID:22425159

  4. Modeling meiotic chromosome pairing: nuclear envelope attachment, telomere-led active random motion, and anomalous diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Wallace F.; Fung, Jennifer C.

    2016-04-01

    The recognition and pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiosis is a complex physical and molecular process involving a combination of polymer dynamics and molecular recognition events. Two highly conserved features of meiotic chromosome behavior are the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope and the active random motion of telomeres driven by their interaction with cytoskeletal motor proteins. Both of these features have been proposed to facilitate the process of homolog pairing, but exactly what role these features play in meiosis remains poorly understood. Here we investigate the roles of active motion and nuclear envelope tethering using a Brownian dynamics simulation in which meiotic chromosomes are represented by a Rouse polymer model subjected to tethering and active forces at the telomeres. We find that tethering telomeres to the nuclear envelope slows down pairing relative to the rates achieved by unattached chromosomes, but that randomly directed active forces applied to the telomeres speed up pairing dramatically in a manner that depends on the statistical properties of the telomere force fluctuations. The increased rate of initial pairing cannot be explained by stretching out of the chromosome conformation but instead seems to correlate with anomalous diffusion of sub-telomeric regions.

  5. Global Reorganization of the Nuclear Landscape in Senescent Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Tamir; Ewels, Philip Andrew; Schoenfelder, Stefan; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Wingett, Steven William; Kirschner, Kristina; Thuret, Jean-Yves; Andrews, Simon; Fraser, Peter; Reik, Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cellular senescence has been implicated in tumor suppression, development, and aging and is accompanied by large-scale chromatin rearrangements, forming senescence-associated heterochromatic foci (SAHF). However, how the chromatin is reorganized during SAHF formation is poorly understood. Furthermore, heterochromatin formation in senescence appears to contrast with loss of heterochromatin in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria. We mapped architectural changes in genome organization in cellular senescence using Hi-C. Unexpectedly, we find a dramatic sequence- and lamin-dependent loss of local interactions in heterochromatin. This change in local connectivity resolves the paradox of opposing chromatin changes in senescence and progeria. In addition, we observe a senescence-specific spatial clustering of heterochromatic regions, suggesting a unique second step required for SAHF formation. Comparison of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), somatic cells, and senescent cells shows a unidirectional loss in local chromatin connectivity, suggesting that senescence is an endpoint of the continuous nuclear remodelling process during differentiation. PMID:25640177

  6. Sperm nuclear expansion and meiotic maturation in normal and gynogenetic eggs of the scallop, Chlamys farreri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Ying; Li, Qi; Yu, Ruihai; Wang, Rucai

    2008-02-01

    Sperm nuclear expansion, meiosis and the association of the male and female pronuclei leading to the four-cell stage in normal Chlamys farreri eggs were observed under a fluorescence microscope. The effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on the fertilizing sperm were also examined. Both normal and UV-irradiated sperm nuclei enlarged at three distinct phases (phase A, metaphase I; phase B, polar body formation; and phase C, female pronuclear development and expansion) that were temporally correlated with meiotic process of the maternal chromosomes. Sperm nuclei underwent a rapid, initial enlargement during phase A, but condensed slightly during phase B, then re-enlarged during phase C. The effects of UV irradiation were not apparent during transformation of the sperm nucleus into a male pronucleus, and there was not any apparent effect on meiotic maturation and development of the female pronucleus. However, the rate of expansion of the UV-irradiated sperm nuclei and the size of male pronuclei were reduced apparently. Unlike the female pronucleus, the male pronucleus derived from sperm genome inactivated by UV irradiation did not form chromosomes, but became a dense chromatin body (DCB). At mitotic anaphase, DCB did not participate in the karyokinesis of the first cleavage as evidenced by chromosomal nondisjunction, demonstrating the effectiveness of using UV irradiation to induce gynogenetic scallop embryos.

  7. Rhn1, a Nuclear Protein, Is Required for Suppression of Meiotic mRNAs in Mitotically Dividing Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hada, Kazumasa; Niwa, Ryusuke

    2012-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, many meiotic mRNAs are transcribed during mitosis and meiosis and selectively eliminated in mitotic cells. However, this pathway for mRNA decay, called the determinant of selective removal (DSR)-Mmi1 system, targets only some of the numerous meiotic mRNAs that are transcribed in mitotic cells. Here we describe Rhn1, a nuclear protein involved in meiotic mRNA suppression in vegetative fission yeast. Rhn1 is homologous to budding yeast Rtt103 and localizes to one or a few discrete nuclear dots in growing vegetative cells. Rhn1 colocalizes with a pre-mRNA 3′-end processing factor, Pcf11, and with the 5′–3′ exoribonuclease, Dhp1; moreover, Rhn1 coimmunoprecipitates with Pcf11. Loss of rhn1 results in elevated sensitivity to high temperature, to thiabendazole (TBZ), and to UV. Interestingly, meiotic mRNAs—including moa1+, mcp5+, and mug96+—accumulate in mitotic rhn1Δ cells. Accumulation of meiotic mRNAs also occurs in strains lacking Lsk1, a kinase that phosphorylates serine 2 (Ser-2) in the C-terminal domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), and in strains lacking Sen1, an ATP-dependent 5′–3′ RNA/DNA helicase: notably, both Lsk1 and Sen1 have been implicated in termination of Pol II-dependent transcription. Furthermore, RNAi knockdown of cids-2, a Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of rhn1+, leads to elevated expression of a germline-specific gene, pgl-1, in somatic cells. These results indicate that Rhn1 contributes to the suppression of meiotic mRNAs in vegetative fission yeast and that the mechanism by which Rhn1 downregulates germline-specific transcripts may be conserved in unicellular and multicellular organisms. PMID:22912768

  8. Reorganization of Nuclear Pore Complexes and the Lamina in Late-Stage Parvovirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, Elina; Niskanen, Einari A; Ihalainen, Teemu O; Vihinen-Ranta, Maija

    2015-11-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection induces reorganization of nuclear structures. Our studies indicated that late-stage infection induces accumulation of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and lamin B1 concomitantly with a decrease of lamin A/C levels on the apical side of the nucleus. Newly formed CPV capsids are located in close proximity to NPCs on the apical side. These results suggest that parvoviruses cause apical enrichment of NPCs and reorganization of nuclear lamina, presumably to facilitate the late-stage infection. PMID:26311881

  9. Reorganization of Nuclear Pore Complexes and the Lamina in Late-Stage Parvovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mäntylä, Elina; Niskanen, Einari A.; Ihalainen, Teemu O.

    2015-01-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) infection induces reorganization of nuclear structures. Our studies indicated that late-stage infection induces accumulation of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and lamin B1 concomitantly with a decrease of lamin A/C levels on the apical side of the nucleus. Newly formed CPV capsids are located in close proximity to NPCs on the apical side. These results suggest that parvoviruses cause apical enrichment of NPCs and reorganization of nuclear lamina, presumably to facilitate the late-stage infection. PMID:26311881

  10. A Link between Meiotic Prophase Progression and CrossoverControl

    SciTech Connect

    Carlton, Peter M.; Farruggio, Alfonso P.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-07-06

    During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4) and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency.

  11. A Link between Meiotic Prophase Progression and Crossover Control

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Peter M; Farruggio, Alfonso P; Dernburg, Abby F

    2006-01-01

    During meiosis, most organisms ensure that homologous chromosomes undergo at least one exchange of DNA, or crossover, to link chromosomes together and accomplish proper segregation. How each chromosome receives a minimum of one crossover is unknown. During early meiosis in Caenorhabditis elegans and many other species, chromosomes adopt a polarized organization within the nucleus, which normally disappears upon completion of homolog synapsis. Mutations that impair synapsis even between a single pair of chromosomes in C. elegans delay this nuclear reorganization. We quantified this delay by developing a classification scheme for discrete stages of meiosis. Immunofluorescence localization of RAD-51 protein revealed that delayed meiotic cells also contained persistent recombination intermediates. Through genetic analysis, we found that this cytological delay in meiotic progression requires double-strand breaks and the function of the crossover-promoting heteroduplex HIM-14 (Msh4) and MSH-5. Failure of X chromosome synapsis also resulted in impaired crossover control on autosomes, which may result from greater numbers and persistence of recombination intermediates in the delayed nuclei. We conclude that maturation of recombination events on chromosomes promotes meiotic progression, and is coupled to the regulation of crossover number and placement. Our results have broad implications for the interpretation of meiotic mutants, as we have shown that asynapsis of a single chromosome pair can exert global effects on meiotic progression and recombination frequency. PMID:16462941

  12. Nuclear F-actin formation and reorganization upon cell spreading.

    PubMed

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-05-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  13. Nuclear substructure reorganization during late stageerythropoiesis is selective and does not involve caspase cleavage ofmajor nuclear substructural proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Krauss, Sharon Wald; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Koury, MarkJ.; Mohandas, Narla; Chasis, Joel Anne

    2005-04-06

    Enucleation, a rare feature of mammalian differentiation, occurs in three cell types: erythroblasts, lens epithelium and keratinocytes. Previous investigations suggest that caspase activation functions in lens epithelial and keratinocyte enucleation, as well as in early erythropoiesis encompassing BFU-E differentiation to proerythroblast. To determine whether caspase activation contributes to later erythropoiesis and whether nuclear substructures other than chromatin reorganize, we analyzed distributions of nuclear subcompartment proteins and assayed for caspase-induced cleavage of subcompartmental target proteins in mouse erythroblasts. We found that patterns of lamin B in the filamentous network interacting with both the nuclear envelope and DNA, nuclear matrix protein NuMA, and splicing factors Sm and SC35 persisted during nuclear condensation, consistent with effective transcription of genes expressed late in differentiation. Thus nuclear reorganization prior to enucleation is selective, allowing maintenance of critical transcriptional processes independent of extensive chromosomal reorganization. Consistent with these data, we found no evidence for caspase-induced cleavage of major nuclear subcompartment proteins during late erythropoiesis, in contrast to what has been observed in early erythropoiesis and in lens epithelial and keratinocyte differentiation. These findings imply that nuclear condensation and extrusion during terminal erythroid differentiation involve novel mechanisms that do not entail major activation of apoptotic machinery.

  14. Cell-by-Cell Dissection of Gene Expression and Chromosomal Interactions Reveals Consequences of Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The functional consequences of long-range nuclear reorganization were studied in a cell-by-cell analysis of gene expression and long-range chromosomal interactions in the Drosophila eye and eye imaginal disk. Position-effect variegation was used to stochastically perturb gene expression and probe nuclear reorganization. Variegating genes on rearrangements of Chromosomes X, 2, and 3 were probed for long-range interactions with heterochromatin. Studies were conducted only in tissues known to express the variegating genes. Nuclear structure was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes to the variegating gene and heterochromatin. Gene expression was determined alternately by immunofluorescence against specific proteins and by eye pigment autofluorescence. This allowed cell-by-cell comparisons of nuclear architecture between cells in which the variegating gene was either expressed or silenced. Very strong correlations between heterochromatic association and silencing were found. Expressing cells showed a broad distribution of distances between variegating genes and their own centromeric heterochromatin, while silenced cells showed a very tight distribution centered around very short distances, consistent with interaction between the silenced genes and heterochromatin. Spatial and temporal analysis of interactions with heterochromatin indicated that variegating genes primarily associate with heterochromatin in cells that have exited the cell cycle. Differentiation was not a requirement for association, and no differences in association were observed between cell types. Thus, long-range interactions between distal chromosome regions and their own heterochromatin have functional consequences for the organism. PMID:15737020

  15. Essential role of the Cdk2 activator RingoA in meiotic telomere tethering to the nuclear envelope

    PubMed Central

    Mikolcevic, Petra; Isoda, Michitaka; Shibuya, Hiroki; del Barco Barrantes, Ivan; Igea, Ana; Suja, José A.; Shackleton, Sue; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Nebreda, Angel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play key roles in cell cycle regulation. Genetic analysis in mice has revealed an essential role for Cdk2 in meiosis, which renders Cdk2 knockout (KO) mice sterile. Here we show that mice deficient in RingoA, an atypical activator of Cdk1 and Cdk2 that has no amino acid sequence homology to cyclins, are sterile and display meiotic defects virtually identical to those observed in Cdk2 KO mice including non-homologous chromosome pairing, unrepaired double-strand breaks, undetectable sex-body and pachytene arrest. Interestingly, RingoA is required for Cdk2 targeting to telomeres and RingoA KO spermatocytes display severely affected telomere tethering as well as impaired distribution of Sun1, a protein essential for the attachment of telomeres to the nuclear envelope. Our results identify RingoA as an important activator of Cdk2 at meiotic telomeres, and provide genetic evidence for a physiological function of mammalian Cdk2 that is not dependent on cyclins. PMID:27025256

  16. Meiotic abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 19, describes meiotic abnormalities. These include nondisjunction of autosomes and sex chromosomes, genetic and environmental causes of nondisjunction, misdivision of the centromere, chromosomally abnormal human sperm, male infertility, parental age, and origin of diploid gametes. 57 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Nuclear Import of β-Dystroglycan Is Facilitated by Ezrin-Mediated Cytoskeleton Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Vásquez-Limeta, Alejandra; Wagstaff, Kylie M.; Ortega, Arturo; Crouch, Dorothy H.; Jans, David A.; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2014-01-01

    The β-dystroglycan (β-DG) protein has the ability to target to multiple sites in eukaryotic cells, being a member of diverse protein assemblies including the transmembranal dystrophin-associated complex, and a nuclear envelope-localised complex that contains emerin and lamins A/C and B1. We noted that the importin α2/β1-recognised nuclear localization signal (NLS) of β-DG is also a binding site for the cytoskeletal-interacting protein ezrin, and set out to determine whether ezrin binding might modulate β-DG nuclear translocation for the first time. Unexpectedly, we found that ezrin enhances rather than inhibits β-DG nuclear translocation in C2C12 myoblasts. Both overexpression of a phosphomimetic activated ezrin variant (Ez-T567D) and activation of endogenous ezrin through stimulation of the Rho pathway resulted in both formation of actin-rich surface protrusions and significantly increased nuclear translocation of β-DG as shown by quantitative microscopy and subcellular fractionation/Western analysis. In contrast, overexpression of a nonphosphorylatable inactive ezrin variant (Ez-T567A) or inhibition of Rho signaling, decreased nuclear translocation of β-DG concomitant with a lack of cell surface protrusions. Further, a role for the actin cytoskeleton in ezrin enhancement of β-DG nuclear translocation was implicated by the observation that an ezrin variant lacking its actin-binding domain failed to enhance nuclear translocation of β-DG, while disruption of the actin cytoskeleton led to a reduction in β-DG nuclear localization. Finally, we show that ezrin-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization enhances nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic but not the transmembranal fraction of β-DG. This is the first study showing that cytoskeleton reorganization can modulate nuclear translocation of β-DG, with the implication that β-DG can respond to cytoskeleton-driven changes in cell morphology by translocating from the cytoplasm to the nucleus to orchestrate

  18. Meiotic Instability of Pythium Sylvaticum as Demonstrated by Inheritance of Nuclear Markers and Karyotype Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, F.

    1995-01-01

    Progeny from a sexual outcross between opposite mating types of Pythium sylvaticum were analyzed for inheritance of RFLP and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Although most were inherited in expected Mendelian frequencies, several were not. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis was employed to examine these unexpected patterns of marker inheritance at a karyotypic level. Parental oogonial and antheridial isolates had different electrophoretic karyotypes and minimum number of chromosome-sized DNAs (13 and 12, respectively), however, summation of the sizes of all chromosomal bands for each isolate was similar at ~37 Mb. Progeny karyotypes differed significantly from each other and the parental isolates, ranging in estimated minimum number of chromosome-sized DNAs from 9 to 13 and the summation of band sizes within each isolate from 28.1 to 39.0 Mb. For the eight isolates most extensively analyzed, 80% of the progeny chromosome-sized DNAs were nonparental in size or hybridization grouping of cDNA clones and isolated RAPD markers. Based on the results of Southern analysis it appears that length mutations and perhaps aneuploidy and translocations have contributed to generation of karyotypic polymorphisms. Nineteen field isolates of P. sylvaticum collected from the same location also exhibited significantly different karyotypes, suggesting that the meiotic instability observed in the laboratory also is occurring in field populations. PMID:7768436

  19. Live imaging of rapid chromosome movements in meiotic prophase I in maize

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Moira J.; Pawlowski, Wojciech P.

    2009-01-01

    The ability of chromosomes to move across the nuclear space is essential for the reorganization of the nucleus that takes place in early meiotic prophase. Chromosome dynamics of prophase I have been studied in budding and fission yeasts, but little is known about this process in higher eukaryotes, where genomes and chromosomes are much larger and meiosis takes a longer time to complete. This knowledge gap has been mainly caused by difficulties in culturing isolated live meiocytes of multicellular eukaryotes. To study the nuclear dynamics during meiotic prophase in maize, we established a system to observe live meiocytes inside intact anthers. We found that maize chromosomes exhibited extremely dynamic and complex motility in zygonema and pachynema. The movement patterns differed dramatically between the two stages. Chromosome movements included rotations of the entire chromatin and movements of individual chromosome segments, which were mostly telomere-led. Chromosome motility was coincident with dynamic deformations of the nuclear envelope. Both, chromosome and nuclear envelope motility depended on actin microfilaments as well as tubulin. The complexity of the nuclear movements implies that several different mechanisms affect chromosome motility in early meiotic prophase in maize. We propose that the vigorous nuclear motility provides a mechanism for homologous loci to find each other during zygonema. PMID:19926853

  20. LIA5 Is Required for Nuclear Reorganization and Programmed DNA Rearrangements Occurring during Tetrahymena Macronuclear Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Annie Wan Yi; Chalker, Douglas L.

    2013-01-01

    During macronuclear differentiation of the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, genome-wide DNA rearrangements eliminate nearly 50 Mbp of germline derived DNA, creating a streamlined somatic genome. The transposon-like and other repetitive sequences to be eliminated are identified using a piRNA pathway and packaged as heterochromatin prior to their removal. In this study, we show that LIA5, which encodes a zinc-finger protein likely of transposon origin, is required for both chromosome fragmentation and DNA elimination events. Lia5p acts after the establishment of RNAi-directed heterochromatin modifications, but prior to the excision of the modified sequences. In ∆LIA5 cells, DNA elimination foci, large nuclear sub-structures containing the sequences to be eliminated and the essential chromodomain protein Pdd1p, do not form. Lia5p, unlike Pdd1p, is not stably associated with these structures, but is required for their formation. In the absence of Lia5p, we could recover foci formation by ectopically inducing DNA damage by UV treatment. Foci in both wild-type or UV-treated ∆LIA5 cells contain dephosphorylated Pdd1p. These studies of LIA5 reveal that DNA elimination foci form after the excision of germ-line limited sequences occurs and indicate that Pdd1p reorganization is likely mediated through a DNA damage response. PMID:24069402

  1. A nuclear factor required for specific translation of cyclin B may control the timing of first meiotic cleavage in starfish oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Galas, S; Barakat, H; Dorée, M; Picard, A

    1993-01-01

    In most animals, the rate of cyclin B synthesis increases after nuclear envelope breakdown during the first meiotic cell cycle. We have found that cyclin B-cdc2 kinase activity drops earlier in emetine-treated than in control starfish oocytes, although the protein synthesis inhibitor does not activate the cyclin degradation pathway prematurely. Moreover, protein synthesis is required to prevent meiotic cleavage to occur prematurely, sometimes before chromosomes have segregated on the metaphase plate. In normal conditions, increased synthesis of cyclin B after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) balances cyclin degradation and increases the time required for cyclin B-cdc2 kinase to drop below the level that inhibits cleavage. Taken together, these results point to cyclin B as a possible candidate that could explain the need for increased protein synthesis during meiosis I. Although direct experimental evidence was not provided in the present work, cyclin B synthesis after GVBD may be important for correct segregation of homologous chromosomes at the end of first meiotic metaphase, as shown by a variety of cytological disorders that accompany premature cleavage. Although the overall stimulation of protein synthesis because of cdc2 kinase activation is still observed in oocytes from which the germinal vesicle has been removed before hormonal stimulation, the main increase of cyclin B synthesis normally observed after germinal vesicle breakdown is suppressed. The nuclear factor required for specific translation of cyclin B after GVBD is not cyclin B mRNA, as shown by using a highly sensitive reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction procedure that failed to detect any cyclin B mRNA in isolated germinal vesicles. Images PMID:7513215

  2. Reorganization of actin filaments by ADF/cofilin is involved in formation of microtubule structures during Xenopus oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Yuka; Abe, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We examined the reorganization of actin filaments and microtubules during Xenopus oocyte maturation. Surrounding the germinal vesicle (GV) in immature oocytes, the cytoplasmic actin filaments reorganized to accumulate beneath the vegetal side of the GV, where the microtubule-organizing center and transient microtubule array (MTOC-TMA) assembled, just before GV breakdown (GVBD). Immediately after GVBD, both Xenopus ADF/cofilin (XAC) and its phosphatase Slingshot (XSSH) accumulated into the nuclei and intranuclear actin filaments disassembled from the vegetal side with the shrinkage of the GV. As the MTOC-TMA developed well, cytoplasmic actin filaments were retained at the MTOC-TMA base region. Suppression of XAC dephosphorylation by anti-XSSH antibody injection inhibited both actin filament reorganization and proper formation and localization of both the MTOC-TMA and meiotic spindles. Stabilization of actin filaments by phalloidin also inhibited formation of the MTOC-TMA and disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments without affecting nuclear shrinkage. Nocodazole also caused the MTOC-TMA and the cytoplasmic actin filaments at its base region to disappear, which further impeded disassembly of intranuclear actin filaments from the vegetal side. XAC appears to reorganize cytoplasmic actin filaments required for precise assembly of the MTOC and, together with the MTOC-TMA, regulate the intranuclear actin filament disassembly essential for meiotic spindle formation. PMID:26424802

  3. Nuclear reorganization of mammalian DNA synthesis prior to cell cycle exit.

    PubMed

    Barbie, David A; Kudlow, Brian A; Frock, Richard; Zhao, Jiyong; Johnson, Brett R; Dyson, Nicholas; Harlow, Ed; Kennedy, Brian K

    2004-01-01

    In primary mammalian cells, DNA replication initiates in a small number of perinucleolar, lamin A/C-associated foci. During S-phase progression in proliferating cells, replication foci distribute to hundreds of sites throughout the nucleus. In contrast, we find that the limited perinucleolar replication sites persist throughout S phase as cells prepare to exit the cell cycle in response to contact inhibition, serum starvation, or replicative senescence. Proteins known to be involved in DNA synthesis, such as PCNA and DNA polymerase delta, are concentrated in perinucleolar foci throughout S phase under these conditions. Moreover, chromosomal loci are redirected toward the nucleolus and overlap with the perinucleolar replication foci in cells poised to undergo cell cycle exit. These same loci remain in the periphery of the nucleus during replication under highly proliferative conditions. These results suggest that mammalian cells undergo a large-scale reorganization of chromatin during the rounds of DNA replication that precede cell cycle exit. PMID:14701733

  4. Nuclear F-actin Formation and Reorganization upon Cell Spreading*♦

    PubMed Central

    Plessner, Matthias; Melak, Michael; Chinchilla, Pilar; Baarlink, Christian; Grosse, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We recently discovered signal-regulated nuclear actin network assembly. However, in contrast to cytoplasmic actin regulation, polymeric nuclear actin structures and functions remain only poorly understood. Here we describe a novel molecular tool to visualize real-time nuclear actin dynamics by targeting the Actin-Chromobody-TagGFP to the nucleus, thus establishing a nuclear Actin-Chromobody. Interestingly, we observe nuclear actin polymerization into dynamic filaments upon cell spreading and fibronectin stimulation, both of which appear to be triggered by integrin signaling. Furthermore, we show that nucleoskeletal proteins such as the LINC (linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton) complex and components of the nuclear lamina couple cell spreading or integrin activation by fibronectin to nuclear actin polymerization. Spreading-induced nuclear actin polymerization results in serum response factor (SRF)-mediated transcription through nuclear retention of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A). Our results reveal a signaling pathway, which links integrin activation by extracellular matrix interaction to nuclear actin polymerization through the LINC complex, and therefore suggest a role for nuclear actin polymerization in the context of cellular adhesion and mechanosensing. PMID:25759381

  5. Role of Loc1p in assembly and reorganization of nuclear ASH1 messenger ribonucleoprotein particles in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Niedner, Annika; Müller, Marisa; Moorthy, Balaji T.; Jansen, Ralf-Peter; Niessing, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    Directional transport of mRNA is a universal feature in eukaryotes, requiring the assembly of motor-dependent RNA-transport particles. The cytoplasmic transport of mRNAs is preceded by the nuclear assembly of pre-messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs). In budding yeast, the asymmetric synthesis of HO 1 (ASH1) pre-mRNP originates already cotranscriptionally and passes through the nucleolus before its nuclear export. The nucleolar localization of ASH1 mRNA protein 1 (Loc1p) is required for efficient ASH1 mRNA localization. Immunoprecipitation experiments have revealed that Loc1p forms cocomplexes with other components of the ASH1 transport complex. However, it remains unclear how Loc1p is recruited into this mRNP and why Loc1p is important for ASH1 mRNA localization. Here we demonstrate that Loc1p undergoes a direct and specific interaction with the ASH1 mRNA-binding Swi5p-dependent HO expression protein 2 (She2p). This cocomplex shows higher affinity and specificity for RNA bearing localization elements than the individual proteins. It also stabilizes the otherwise transient binding of She2p to ASH1 mRNA, suggesting that cooperative mRNA binding of Loc1p with She2p is the required nuclear function of Loc1p for ASH1 mRNA localization. After nuclear export, myosin-bound She3p joins the ASH1 mRNP to form a highly specific cocomplex with She2p and ASH1 mRNA. Because Loc1p is found only in the nucleus, it must be removed from the complex directly before or after export. In vitro and in vivo experiments indicate that the synergistic interaction of She2p and She3p displaces Loc1p from the ASH1 complex, allowing free Loc1p to rapidly reenter the nucle(ol)us. Together these findings suggest an ordered process of nuclear assembly and reorganization for the maturation of localizing ASH1 mRNPs. PMID:24324176

  6. Chromatin decondensation and nuclear reorganization of the HoxB locus upon induction of transcription.

    PubMed

    Chambeyron, Séverine; Bickmore, Wendy A

    2004-05-15

    The colinearity of genes in Hox clusters suggests a role for chromosome structure in gene regulation. We reveal programmed changes in chromatin structure and nuclear organization upon induction of Hoxb expression by retinoic acid. There is an early increase in the histone modifications that are marks of active chromatin at both the early expressed gene Hoxb1, and also at Hoxb9 that is not expressed until much later. There is also a visible decondensation of the chromatin between Hoxb1 and Hoxb9 at this early stage. However, a further change in higher-order chromatin structure, looping out of genes from the chromosome territory, occurs in synchrony with the execution of the gene expression program. We suggest that higher-order chromatin structure regulates the expression of the HoxB cluster at several levels. Locus-wide changes in chromatin structure (histone modification and chromatin decondensation) may establish a transcriptionally poised state but are not sufficient for the temporal program of gene expression. The choreographed looping out of decondensed chromatin from chromosome territories may then allow for activation of high levels of transcription from the sequence of genes along the cluster. PMID:15155579

  7. Meiotic chromosomes move by linkage to dynamic actin cables with transduction of force through the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed

    Koszul, R; Kim, K P; Prentiss, M; Kleckner, N; Kameoka, S

    2008-06-27

    Chromosome movement is prominent during meiosis. Here, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we elucidate the basis for dynamic mid-prophase telomere-led chromosome motion in budding yeast. Diverse findings reveal a process in which, at the pachytene stage, individual telomere/nuclear envelope (NE) ensembles attach passively to, and then move in concert with, nucleus-hugging actin cables that are continuous with the global cytoskeletal actin network. Other chromosomes move in concert with lead chromosome(s). The same process, in modulated form, explains the zygotene "bouquet" configuration in which, immediately preceding pachytene, chromosome ends colocalize dynamically in a restricted region of the NE. Mechanical properties of the system and biological roles of mid-prophase movement for meiosis, including recombination, are discussed. PMID:18585353

  8. Drilling reorganizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    As the first in a proposed series of steps that would move scientific ocean drilling from its own niche within the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Astronomical, Atmospheric, Earth, and Ocean Sciences (AAEO) into the agency's Division of Ocean Sciences, Grant Gross, division director, has been appointed acting director of the Office of Scientific Ocean Drilling (OSOD). Gross will retain the directorship of the division, which also is part of AAEO. Allen M. Shinn, Jr., OSOD director for nearly 2 years, has been reassigned effective July 10 to a position in NSF's Office of Planning and Resource Management.The move aims to tie drilling operations more closely to the science with which it is associated, Gross said. This first step is an organizational response to the current leaning toward using a commercial drilling vessel as the drilling platform, he said. Before the market for such commercial drill ships opened (Eos, February 22, 1983, p . 73), other ship options for scientific ocean drilling included refurbishing the aging Glomar Challenger or renovating, at great expense, the Glomar Explorer. A possible next step in the reorganization is to make OSOD the third section within the Ocean Sciences Division. Currently, the division is divided into the Oceanographic Facilities and Support Section and the Ocean Sciences Research Section.

  9. Dynamic properties of meiosis-specific lamin C2 and its impact on nuclear envelope integrity

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Daniel; Schramm, Sabine; Benavente, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    A hallmark of meiosis is the precise pairing and the stable physical connection (synapsis) of the homologous chromosomes. These processes are essential prerequisite for their proper segregation. Pairing of the homologs during meiotic prophase I critically depends on characteristic movements of chromosomes. These movements, in turn, require attachment of meiotic telomeres to the nuclear envelope and their subsequent dynamic repositioning. Dynamic repositioning of meiotic telomeres goes along with profound structural reorganization of the nuclear envelope. The short A-type lamin C2 is thought to play a critical role in this process due to its specific expression during meiotic prophase I and the unique localization surrounding telomere attachments. Consistent with this notion, here we provide compelling evidence that meiosis-specific lamin C2 features a significantly increased mobility compared to somatic lamins as revealed by photobleaching techniques. We show that this property can be clearly ascribed to the lack of the N-terminal head and the significantly shorter α-helical coil domain. Moreover, expression of lamin C2 in somatic cells induces nuclear deformations and alters the distribution of the endogenous nuclear envelope proteins lamin B1, LAP2, SUN1 and SUN2. Together, our data define lamin C2 as a “natural lamin deletion mutant” that confers unique properties to the nuclear envelope which would be essential for dynamic telomere repositioning during meiotic prophase I. PMID:21327075

  10. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  11. Meiotic recombination mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a specialized cell division at the origin of the haploid cells that eventually develop into the gametes. It therefore lies at the heart of Mendelian heredity. Recombination and redistribution of the homologous chromosomes arising during meiosis constitute an important source of genetic diversity, conferring to meiosis a particularly important place in the evolution and the diversification of the species. Our understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing meiotic recombination has considerably progressed these last decades, benefiting from complementary approaches led on various model species. An overview of these mechanisms will be provided as well as a discussion on the implications of these recent discoveries. PMID:27180110

  12. Control of Oocyte Growth and Meiotic Maturation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seongseop; Spike, Caroline; Greenstein, David

    2013-01-01

    In sexually reproducing animals, oocytes arrest at diplotene or diakinesis and resume meiosis (meiotic maturation) in response to hormones. Chromosome segregation errors in female meiosis I are the leading cause of human birth defects, and age-related changes in the hormonal environment of the ovary are a suggested cause. C. elegans is emerging as a genetic paradigm for studying hormonal control of meiotic maturation. The meiotic maturation processes in C. elegans and mammals share a number of biological and molecular similarities. Major sperm protein (MSP) and luteinizing hormone (LH), though unrelated in sequence, both trigger meiotic resumption using somatic Gαs-adenylate cyclase pathways and soma-germline gap-junctional communication. At a molecular level, the oocyte responses apparently involve the control of conserved protein kinase pathways and post-transcriptional gene regulation in the oocyte. At a cellular level, the responses include cortical cytoskeletal rearrangement, nuclear envelope breakdown, assembly of the acentriolar meiotic spindle, chromosome segregation, and likely changes important for fertilization and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. This chapter focuses on signaling mechanisms required for oocyte growth and meiotic maturation in C. elegans and discusses how these mechanisms coordinate the completion of meiosis and the oocyte-to-embryo transition. PMID:22872481

  13. MPS3 mediates meiotic bouquet formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Michael N; Lee, Chih-Ying; Wilkerson, Joseph L; Dresser, Michael E

    2007-05-22

    In meiotic prophase, telomeres associate with the nuclear envelope and accumulate adjacent to the centrosome/spindle pole to form the chromosome bouquet, a well conserved event that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the meiotic telomere protein Ndj1p. Ndj1p interacts with Mps3p, a nuclear envelope SUN domain protein that is required for spindle pole body duplication and for sister chromatid cohesion. Removal of the Ndj1p-interaction domain from MPS3 creates an ndj1 Delta-like separation-of-function allele, and Ndj1p and Mps3p are codependent for stable association with the telomeres. SUN domain proteins are found in the nuclear envelope across phyla and are implicated in mediating interactions between the interior of the nucleus and the cytoskeleton. Our observations indicate a general mechanism for meiotic telomere movements. PMID:17495028

  14. Telomeres Cluster De Novo before the Initiation of Synapsis: A Three-dimensional Spatial Analysis of Telomere Positions before and during Meiotic Prophase

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Hank W.; Marshall, Wallace F.; Sedat, John W.; Agard, David A.; Cande, W. Zacheus

    1997-01-01

    We have analyzed the progressive changes in the spatial distribution of telomeres during meiosis using three-dimensional, high resolution fluorescence microscopy. Fixed meiotic cells of maize (Zea mays L.) were subjected to in situ hybridization under conditions that preserved chromosome structure, allowing identification of stage-dependent changes in telomere arrangements. We found that nuclei at the last somatic prophase before meiosis exhibit a nonrandom, polarized chromosome organization resulting in a loose grouping of telomeres. Quantitative measurements on the spatial arrangements of telomeres revealed that, as cells passed through premeiotic interphase and into leptotene, there was an increase in the frequency of large telomere-to-telomere distances and a decrease in the bias toward peripheral localization of telomeres. By leptotene, there was no obvious evidence of telomere grouping, and the large, singular nucleolus was internally located, nearly concentric with the nucleus. At the end of leptotene, telomeres clustered de novo at the nuclear periphery, coincident with a displacement of the nucleolus to one side. The telomere cluster persisted throughout zygotene and into early pachytene. The nucleolus was adjacent to the cluster at zygotene. At the pachytene stage, telomeres rearranged again by dispersing throughout the nuclear periphery. The stagedependent changes in telomere arrangements are suggestive of specific, active telomere-associated motility processes with meiotic functions. Thus, the formation of the cluster itself is an early event in the nuclear reorganizations associated with meiosis and may reflect a control point in the initiation of synapsis or crossing over. PMID:9105032

  15. Unfertilized frog eggs die by apoptosis following meiotic exit

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A characteristic feature of frog reproduction is external fertilization accomplished outside the female's body. Mature fertilization-competent frog eggs are arrested at the meiotic metaphase II with high activity of the key meiotic regulators, maturation promoting factor (MPF) and cytostatic factor (CSF), awaiting fertilization. If the eggs are not fertilized within several hours of ovulation, they deteriorate and ultimately die by as yet unknown mechanism. Results Here, we report that the vast majority of naturally laid unfertilized eggs of the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis spontaneously exit metaphase arrest under various environmental conditions and degrade by a well-defined apoptotic process within 48 hours after ovulation. The main features of this process include cytochrome c release, caspase activation, ATP depletion, increase of ADP/ATP ratio, apoptotic nuclear morphology, progressive intracellular acidification, and egg swelling. Meiotic exit seems to be a prerequisite for execution of the apoptotic program, since (i) it precedes apoptosis, (ii) apoptotic events cannot be observed in the eggs maintaining high activity of MPF and CSF, and (iii) apoptosis in unfertilized frog eggs is accelerated upon early meiotic exit. The apoptotic features cannot be observed in the immature prophase-arrested oocytes, however, the maturation-inducing hormone progesterone renders oocytes susceptible to apoptosis. Conclusions The study reveals that naturally laid intact frog eggs die by apoptosis if they are not fertilized. A maternal apoptotic program is evoked in frog oocytes upon maturation and executed after meiotic exit in unfertilized eggs. The meiotic exit is required for execution of the apoptotic program in eggs. The emerging anti-apoptotic role of meiotic metaphase arrest needs further investigation. PMID:22195698

  16. S. 946: A Bill to reorganize the functions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to promote more effective regulation of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, May 9, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 946 is a bill to reorganize the functions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to promote more effective regulation of atomic energy for peaceful purposes. The Bill proposes the reorganization of the NRC activities under the structure and functions of a Nuclear Safety Agency.

  17. Reproductive toxicity and meiotic dysfunction following exposure to the pesticides Maneb, Diazinon and Fenarimol† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4tx00141a Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file. Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Daniela A, Parodi; Jasmine, Sjarif; Yichang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive identification and mechanistic analysis of reproductive toxicants constitutes one of the major hurdles in the toxicological assessment of chemicals originating from the large number of chemicals to be tested and the difficulty in examining germ cells at various stages of their development. We previously described the development of an assay in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans that allows the detection of chemicals bearing aneugenic activity and that could be used for the detection of germline toxicity. We present here new evidence for the reproductive toxicity of three pesticides identified in our germline toxicity assay: Maneb, Diazinon and Fenarimol. We show that all three pesticides cause an acute germline nuclear loss in exposed nematodes in a dose-dependent fashion. The loss of germline nuclei coincides with the meiotic stage of pachytene during Prophase I and is dependent on the germline apoptotic machinery suggesting activation of a meiotic checkpoint. Further investigation revealed a profound dysregulation of the meiotic program as evidenced by (1) an alteration of the kinetics of double strand repair, (2) the disruption of the process of chromosome morphogenesis at the end of Prophase I and (3) the reorganization of the meiotic differentiation gradient inherent to the C. elegans germline following exposure to Maneb and Diazinon. These defects correlate with a significant increase in embryonic lethality and a corresponding decrease in the number of progeny. These results therefore provide strong evidence for the reproductive toxicity of Maneb, Diazinon and Fenarimol rooted in the alteration of early steps of germ cell differentiation. PMID:25984295

  18. Meiotic process and aneuploidy

    SciTech Connect

    Grell, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The process of meiosis is analyzed by dissecting it into its component parts using the early oocyte of Drosophila as a model. Entrance of the oocytes into premeiotic interphase signals initiation of DNA replication which continues for 30 h. Coincidentally, extensive synaptonemal complexes appear, averaging 50 ..mu..m (132 h), peaking at 75 ..mu..m (144 h) and continuing into early vitellarial stages. Recombinational response to heat, evidenced by enhancement or induction of exchange, is limited to the S-phase with a peak at 144 h coinciding with maximal extension of the SC. Coincidence of synapsis and recombination response with S at premeiotic interphase is contrary to their conventional localization at meiotic prophase. The interrelationship between exchange and nondisjunction has been clarified by the Distributive Pairing Model of meiosis. Originally revealed through high frequencies of nonrandom assortment of nonhomologous chromosomes, distributive pairing has been shown to follow and to be noncompetitive with exchange, to be based on size-recognition, not homology, and as a raison d'etre, to provide a segregational mechanism for noncrossover homologues. Rearrangements, recombination mutants and aneuploids may contribute noncrossover chromosomes to the distributive pool and so promote the nonhomologous associations responsible for nondisjunction of homologues and regular segregation of nonhomologues. 38 references, 15 figures. (ACR)

  19. BLEOMYCIN EFFECTS ON MOUSE MEIOTIC CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of a radiomimetic chemical, bleomycin (BLM), on meiotic chromosomes was evaluated in mice. hromosome aberrations were analyzed at meiotic metaphase I, and damage to the synaptonemal complex was analyzed in meiotic prophase cells. n the metaphase aberration studies, an...

  20. Nup132 modulates meiotic spindle attachment in fission yeast by regulating kinetochore assembly

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui-Ju; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, the kinetochore undergoes substantial reorganization to establish monopolar spindle attachment. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the KNL1–Spc7-Mis12-Nuf2 (KMN) complex, which constitutes the outer kinetochore, is disassembled during meiotic prophase and is reassembled before meiosis I. Here, we show that the nucleoporin Nup132 is required for timely assembly of the KMN proteins: In the absence of Nup132, Mis12 and Spc7 are precociously assembled at the centromeres during meiotic prophase. In contrast, Nuf2 shows timely dissociation and reappearance at the meiotic centromeres. We further demonstrate that depletion of Nup132 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint in meiosis I, possibly because of the increased incidence of erroneous spindle attachment at sister chromatids. These results suggest that precocious assembly of the kinetochores leads to the meiosis I defects observed in the nup132-disrupted mutant. Thus, we propose that Nup132 plays an important role in establishing monopolar spindle attachment at meiosis I through outer kinetochore reorganization at meiotic prophase. PMID:26483559

  1. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    PubMed Central

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation. PMID:25322156

  2. Backcrossing to increase meiotic stability in triticale.

    PubMed

    Giacomin, R M; Assis, R; Brammer, S P; Nascimento Junior, A; Da-Silva, P R

    2015-01-01

    Triticale (X Triticosecale Wittmack) is an intergeneric hybrid derived from a cross between wheat and rye. As a newly created allopolyploid, the plant shows instabilities during the meiotic process, which may result in the loss of fertility. This genomic instability has hindered the success of triticale-breeding programs. Therefore, strategies should be developed to obtain stable triticale lines for use in breeding. In some species, backcrossing has been effective in increasing the meiotic stability of lineages. To assess whether backcrossing has the same effect in triticale, indices of meiotic abnormalities, meiotic index, and pollen viability were determined in genotypes from multiple generations of triticale (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1a, and BC1b). All analyzed genotypes exhibited instability during meiosis, and their meiotic index values were all lower than normal. However, the backcrosses BC1a and BC1b showed the lowest mean meiotic abnormalities and the highest meiotic indices, demonstrating higher stability. All genotypes showed a high rate of pollen viability, with the backcrosses BC1a and BC1b again exhibiting the best values. Statistical analyses confirmed that backcrossing positively affects the meiotic stability of triticale. Our results show that backcrossing should be considered by breeders aiming to obtain triticale lines with improved genomic stability. PMID:26400358

  3. The fission yeast MTREC and EJC orthologs ensure the maturation of meiotic transcripts during meiosis.

    PubMed

    Marayati, Bahjat Fadi; Hoskins, Victoria; Boger, Robert W; Tucker, James F; Fishman, Emily S; Bray, Andrew S; Zhang, Ke

    2016-09-01

    Meiosis is a highly regulated process by which genetic information is transmitted through sexual reproduction. It encompasses unique mechanisms that do not occur in vegetative cells, producing a distinct, well-regulated meiotic transcriptome. During vegetative growth, many meiotic genes are constitutively transcribed, but most of the resulting mRNAs are rapidly eliminated by the Mmi1-MTREC (Mtl1-Red1 core) complex. While Mmi1-MTREC targets premature meiotic RNAs for degradation by the nuclear 3'-5' exoribonuclease exosome during mitotic growth, its role in meiotic gene expression during meiosis is not known. Here, we report that Red5, an essential MTREC component, interacts with pFal1, an ortholog of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4aIII in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe In mammals, together with MAGO (Mnh1), Rnps1, and Y14, elF4AIII (pFal1) forms the core of the exon junction complex (EJC), which is essential for transcriptional surveillance and localization of mature mRNAs. In fission yeast, two EJC orthologs, pFal1 and Mnh1, are functionally connected with MTREC, specifically in the process of meiotic gene expression during meiosis. Although pFal1 interacts with Mnh1, Y14, and Rnps1, its association with Mnh1 is not disrupted upon loss of Y14 or Rnps1. Mutations of Red1, Red5, pFal1, or Mnh1 produce severe meiotic defects; the abundance of meiotic transcripts during meiosis decreases; and mRNA maturation processes such as splicing are impaired. Since studying meiosis in mammalian germline cells is difficult, our findings in fission yeast may help to define the general mechanisms involved in accurate meiotic gene expression in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27365210

  4. The fission yeast MTREC and EJC orthologs ensure the maturation of meiotic transcripts during meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Marayati, Bahjat Fadi; Hoskins, Victoria; Boger, Robert W.; Tucker, James F.; Fishman, Emily S.; Bray, Andrew S.; Zhang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a highly regulated process by which genetic information is transmitted through sexual reproduction. It encompasses unique mechanisms that do not occur in vegetative cells, producing a distinct, well-regulated meiotic transcriptome. During vegetative growth, many meiotic genes are constitutively transcribed, but most of the resulting mRNAs are rapidly eliminated by the Mmi1-MTREC (Mtl1-Red1 core) complex. While Mmi1-MTREC targets premature meiotic RNAs for degradation by the nuclear 3′–5′ exoribonuclease exosome during mitotic growth, its role in meiotic gene expression during meiosis is not known. Here, we report that Red5, an essential MTREC component, interacts with pFal1, an ortholog of eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4aIII in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In mammals, together with MAGO (Mnh1), Rnps1, and Y14, elF4AIII (pFal1) forms the core of the exon junction complex (EJC), which is essential for transcriptional surveillance and localization of mature mRNAs. In fission yeast, two EJC orthologs, pFal1 and Mnh1, are functionally connected with MTREC, specifically in the process of meiotic gene expression during meiosis. Although pFal1 interacts with Mnh1, Y14, and Rnps1, its association with Mnh1 is not disrupted upon loss of Y14 or Rnps1. Mutations of Red1, Red5, pFal1, or Mnh1 produce severe meiotic defects; the abundance of meiotic transcripts during meiosis decreases; and mRNA maturation processes such as splicing are impaired. Since studying meiosis in mammalian germline cells is difficult, our findings in fission yeast may help to define the general mechanisms involved in accurate meiotic gene expression in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27365210

  5. Unions and Workplace Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nissen, Bruce, Ed.

    The 11 chapters in this book focus on "The New American Workplace" and assess its adequacy or inadequacy as a guide for the U.S. labor movement in relation to new work systems. "Unions and Workplace Reorganization" (Bruce Nissen) introduces the subject. "The New American Workplace: A Labor Perspective" (AFL-CIO Committee on the Evolution of Work,…

  6. Confocal Analysis of Nuclear Lamina Behavior during Male Meiosis and Spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fabbretti, Fabiana; Iannetti, Ilaria; Guglielmi, Loredana; Perconti, Susanna; Evangelistella, Chiara; Proietti De Santis, Luca; Bongiorni, Silvia; Prantera, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Lamin family proteins are structural components of a filamentous framework, the nuclear lamina (NL), underlying the inner membrane of nuclear envelope. The NL not only plays a role in nucleus mechanical support and nuclear shaping, but is also involved in many cellular processes including DNA replication, gene expression and chromatin positioning. Spermatogenesis is a very complex differentiation process in which each stage is characterized by nuclear architecture dramatic changes, from the early mitotic stage to the sperm differentiation final stage. Nevertheless, very few data are present in the literature on the NL behavior during this process. Here we show the first and complete description of NL behavior during meiosis and spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. By confocal imaging, we characterized the NL modifications from mitotic stages, through meiotic divisions to sperm differentiation with an anti-laminDm0 antibody against the major component of the Drosophila NL. We observed that continuous changes in the NL structure occurred in parallel with chromatin reorganization throughout the whole process and that meiotic divisions occurred in a closed context. Finally, we analyzed NL in solofuso meiotic mutant, where chromatin segregation is severely affected, and found the strict correlation between the presence of chromatin and that of NL. PMID:26963718

  7. Mechanism and regulation of meiotic recombination initiation

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Isabel; Keeney, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination involves the formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the conserved Spo11 protein. This review summarizes recent studies pertaining to the formation of meiotic DSBs, including the mechanism of DNA cleavage by Spo11, proteins required for break formation, and mechanisms that control the location, timing, and number of DSBs. Where appropriate, findings in different organisms are discussed to highlight evolutionary conservation or divergence. PMID:25324213

  8. Spermatogenesis-Specific Features of the Meiotic Program in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shakes, Diane C.; Wu, Jui-ching; Sadler, Penny L.; LaPrade, Kristen; Moore, Landon L.; Noritake, Alana; Chu, Diana S.

    2009-01-01

    In most sexually reproducing organisms, the fundamental process of meiosis is implemented concurrently with two differentiation programs that occur at different rates and generate distinct cell types, sperm and oocytes. However, little is known about how the meiotic program is influenced by such contrasting developmental programs. Here we present a detailed timeline of late meiotic prophase during spermatogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans using cytological and molecular landmarks to interrelate changes in chromosome dynamics with germ cell cellularization, spindle formation, and cell cycle transitions. This analysis expands our understanding C. elegans spermatogenesis, as it identifies multiple spermatogenesis-specific features of the meiotic program and provides a framework for comparative studies. Post-pachytene chromatin of spermatocytes is distinct from that of oocytes in both composition and morphology. Strikingly, C. elegans spermatogenesis includes a previously undescribed karyosome stage, a common but poorly understood feature of meiosis in many organisms. We find that karyosome formation, in which chromosomes form a constricted mass within an intact nuclear envelope, follows desynapsis, involves a global down-regulation of transcription, and may support the sequential activation of multiple kinases that prepare spermatocytes for meiotic divisions. In spermatocytes, the presence of centrioles alters both the relative timing of meiotic spindle assembly and its ultimate structure. These microtubule differences are accompanied by differences in kinetochores, which connect microtubules to chromosomes. The sperm-specific features of meiosis revealed here illuminate how the underlying molecular machinery required for meiosis is differentially regulated in each sex. PMID:19696886

  9. Meiotic crossing-over in nondisjoined chromosomes of children with trisomy 21 and a congenital heart defect

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, C.M.; Davis, G.E.; Farrer, M.J.; Cullen, L.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Williamson, R.; Wyse, R.K.H.; Palmer, R.; Kessling, A.M. )

    1993-08-01

    The authors have used DNA polymorphisms to study meiotic crossovers of chromosome 21q in 27 nuclear families. Each family had a child with Down syndrome and a congenital heart defect. Twenty DNA polymorphisms on chromosome 21 were used to determine parental and meiotic origin of nondisjunction and to identify crossovers. Twenty-four cases were of maternal origin, and three were of paternal origin. Twenty-two unequivocal crossover events were identified. Sixteen crossovers were observed in 22 chromosome pairs nondisjoining at the first meiotic division (MI), and six crossovers were observed in five chromosome pairs disjoining at the second meiotic division. Fifty percent of crossover events in MI nondisjunction are detectable by molecular genetic means. Thus, the results suggest that, in this sample, each nondisjoined chromosome 21 pair has been involved in at least one crossover event. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  10. Meiotic origin of triploidy in the frog detected by genetic analysis of enzyme polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Wright, D A; Huang, C P; Chuoke, B D

    1976-10-01

    A female frog heterozygous at two unlinked loci, specifying electrophoretic forms of mannosephosphate isomerase (MPI) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) was crossed to male frogs homozygous for different alleles at each locus. In the offspring approximately ten percent proved to be triploid according to nucleolar and chromosome counts of tail tip cells. Most of these triploids had both maternal alleles at the MDH and MPI loci suggesting that the first meiotic division was repressed. Others seemed to represent a repressed second meiotic division and one animal, a pentaploid, could only have resulted from inhibition of both meiotic divisions of the egg. Densitometer tracings of starch gels stained for 6 phosphogluconate and isocitrate dehydrogenases, expected to be heterozygous in a particular cross, demonstrated that the triploids had twice as much maternal as paternal gene product for each locus, similar to patterns found in triploids produced by nuclear transplantation. PMID:1087260

  11. HIM-8 Binds to the X Chromosome Pairing Center and Mediates Chromosome-Specific Meiotic Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton, Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregation of the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Here we show that loss of him-8 function causes profound X chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairing and synapsis. him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc-finger protein that is expressed during meiosis and concentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as the meiotic pairing center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supported by genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations. HIM-8 bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE) throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 that retains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilize pairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate that stabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which the tethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is not sufficient. PMID:16360035

  12. Female meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in chicken.

    PubMed

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W; Laven, Joop S E; Grootegoed, J Anton; Baarends, Willy M

    2009-05-01

    During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW), whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, gammaH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of gammaH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses gammaH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis. PMID:19461881

  13. Female Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation in Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Schoenmakers, Sam; Wassenaar, Evelyne; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W.; Laven, Joop S. E.; Grootegoed, J. Anton; Baarends, Willy M.

    2009-01-01

    During meiotic prophase in male mammals, the heterologous X and Y chromosomes remain largely unsynapsed, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI) leads to formation of the transcriptionally silenced XY body. In birds, the heterogametic sex is female, carrying Z and W chromosomes (ZW), whereas males have the homogametic ZZ constitution. During chicken oogenesis, the heterologous ZW pair reaches a state of complete heterologous synapsis, and this might enable maintenance of transcription of Z- and W chromosomal genes during meiotic prophase. Herein, we show that the ZW pair is transiently silenced, from early pachytene to early diplotene using immunocytochemistry and gene expression analyses. We propose that ZW inactivation is most likely achieved via spreading of heterochromatin from the W on the Z chromosome. Also, persistent meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) may contribute to silencing of Z. Surprisingly, γH2AX, a marker of DSBs, and also the earliest histone modification that is associated with XY body formation in mammalian and marsupial spermatocytes, does not cover the ZW during the synapsed stage. However, when the ZW pair starts to desynapse, a second wave of γH2AX accumulates on the unsynapsed regions of Z, which also show a reappearance of the DSB repair protein RAD51. This indicates that repair of meiotic DSBs on the heterologous part of Z is postponed until late pachytene/diplotene, possibly to avoid recombination with regions on the heterologously synapsed W chromosome. Two days after entering diplotene, the Z looses γH2AX and shows reactivation. This is the first report of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in a species with female heterogamety, providing evidence that this mechanism is not specific to spermatogenesis. It also indicates the presence of an evolutionary force that drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation independent of the final achievement of synapsis. PMID:19461881

  14. Mammalian meiotic silencing exhibits sexually dimorphic features.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, J M; Mahadevaiah, S K; ElInati, E; Tóth, A; Turner, James

    2016-06-01

    During mammalian meiotic prophase I, surveillance mechanisms exist to ensure that germ cells with defective synapsis or recombination are eliminated, thereby preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes and embryos. Meiosis in females is more error-prone than in males, and this is in part because the prophase I surveillance mechanisms are less efficient in females. A mechanistic understanding of this sexual dimorphism is currently lacking. In both sexes, asynapsed chromosomes are transcriptionally inactivated by ATR-dependent phosphorylation of histone H2AFX. This process, termed meiotic silencing, has been proposed to perform an important prophase I surveillance role. While the transcriptional effects of meiotic silencing at individual genes are well described in the male germ line, analogous studies in the female germ line have not been performed. Here we apply single- and multigene RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA FISH) to oocytes from chromosomally abnormal mouse models to uncover potential sex differences in the silencing response. Notably, we find that meiotic silencing in females is less efficient than in males. Within individual oocytes, genes located on the same asynapsed chromosome are silenced to differing extents, thereby generating mosaicism in gene expression profiles across oocyte populations. Analysis of sex-reversed XY female mice reveals that the sexual dimorphism in silencing is determined by gonadal sex rather than sex chromosome constitution. We propose that sex differences in meiotic silencing impact on the sexually dimorphic prophase I response to asynapsis. PMID:26712235

  15. SISTER CHROMATID EXCHANGES IN MAMMALIAN MEIOTIC CHROMOSOMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Very little is known about sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in meiotic cells--only that they occur (1) and reveal frequency and distribution patterns apparently unaffected by cross-over (CO) exchange conditions in those cells; (2) unfortunately, the number of studies from which ...

  16. Mechanism and regulation of rapid telomere prophase movements in mouse meiotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Ying; Horn, Henning F.; Stewart, Colin L.; Burke, Brian; Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Schimenti, John C.; Dresser, Michael E.; Pezza, Roberto J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Telomere-led rapid prophase movements (RPMs) in meiotic prophase have been observed in diverse eukaryote species. A shared feature of RPMs is that the force that drives the chromosomal movements is transmitted from the cytoskeleton, through the nuclear envelope, to the telomeres. Studies in mice suggested that dynein movement along microtubules is transmitted to telomeres through SUN1/KASH5 nuclear envelope bridges to generate RPMs. We monitored RPMs in mouse seminiferous tubules using four-dimensional fluorescence imaging and quantitative motion analysis to characterize patterns of movement in the RPM process. We find that RPMs reflect a combination of nuclear rotation and individual chromosome movements. The telomeres move along microtubule tracks which are apparently continuous with the cytoskeletal network, and exhibit characteristic arrangements at different stages of prophase. Quantitative measurements confirmed that SUN1/KASH5, microtubules, and dynein but not actin were necessary for RPMs and that defects in meiotic recombination and synapsis resulted in altered RPMs. PMID:25892231

  17. Mechanism and regulation of rapid telomere prophase movements in mouse meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Ying; Horn, Henning F; Stewart, Colin L; Burke, Brian; Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Schimenti, John C; Dresser, Michael E; Pezza, Roberto J

    2015-04-28

    Telomere-led rapid prophase movements (RPMs) in meiotic prophase have been observed in diverse eukaryote species. A shared feature of RPMs is that the force that drives the chromosomal movements is transmitted from the cytoskeleton, through the nuclear envelope, to the telomeres. Studies in mice suggested that dynein movement along microtubules is transmitted to telomeres through SUN1/KASH5 nuclear envelope bridges to generate RPMs. We monitored RPMs in mouse seminiferous tubules using 4D fluorescence imaging and quantitative motion analysis to characterize patterns of movement in the RPM process. We find that RPMs reflect a combination of nuclear rotation and individual chromosome movements. The telomeres move along microtubule tracks that are apparently continuous with the cytoskeletal network and exhibit characteristic arrangements at different stages of prophase. Quantitative measurements confirmed that SUN1/KASH5, microtubules, and dynein, but not actin, were necessary for RPMs and that defects in meiotic recombination and synapsis resulted in altered RPMs. PMID:25892231

  18. Microsporogenesis in the endangered species Cupressus dupreziana A. Camus: evidence for meiotic defects yielding unreduced and abortive pollen.

    PubMed

    El Maâtaoui, M; Pichot, C

    2001-08-01

    To understand the reproductive biology of Cupressus dupreziana A. Camus (Cupressaceae), a highly endangered Mediterranean conifer, the processes of microsporogenesis and pollen differentiation were investigated cytologically. Pre-meiotic development proved to be similar to the coniferous pattern: the microsporangia differentiated sporogenous tissue in which microsporocytes separated and underwent meiosis. As the meiotic steps proceeded, unexpected irregularities were observed concerning chromosomal and nuclear behaviour. This mainly included: abnormal chromosome segregation and cytokinesis, and nuclear fusion of the meiotic products. The result was the formation, in the same microsporangium, of heterogeneous microspore populations arranged in monads, dyads, triads, tetrads, and polyads, and cytoplasts giving rise to pollen grains of different sizes. This indicates that in C. dupreziana both abortive and unreduced pollen grains are generated. The significance of the finding is discussed in relation to reproductive biology and vulnerability to extinction. PMID:11556786

  19. A Guide to School District Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Allan K.

    School district reorganization is a process that requires considerable planning. This guide provides information on school district reorganization in the state of Nebraska, to interested boards of education and county and citizen reorganization committees. Topics discussed include planning for reorganization, establishing citizen committees, using…

  20. Mature cystic teratomas arise from meiotic oocytes, but not from pre-meiotic oogonia.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Hiroshi; Usui, Hirokazu; Qu, Jia; Shozu, Makio

    2016-04-01

    Mature cystic teratomas (MCTs) in the ovaries have been thought to originate from germ cells from all developmental stages, i.e., from pre-meiotic oogonia through meiotic oocytes to mature post-meiotic ova. This view was based on research on MCTs by classical methods, including those involving centromeric heteromorphisms in karyotypes, enzyme polymorphisms, and DNA polymorphisms. However, insufficient genomic information was obtained in those studies. The current study aimed to confirm the cytogenetic origin of ovarian MCTs by using short tandem repeat (STR) polymorphism analysis to obtain sufficient genomic information, especially in connection with centromeric loci. Tissue samples of MCTs (57 ovaries from 51 patients, 91 MCTs, 156 specimens in total) obtained from cystectomies or oophorectomies were used. We categorized the specimens into two groups: i) solid components of MCTs and ii) cyst walls. The numbers of solid components of MCTs from pre-meiotic oogonia, primary oocytes, secondary oocytes, and ova were 0, 33, 16, and 15, respectively. There were no pre-meiotic oogonia in this series of solid-component specimens. We propose a hypothesis for the tumorigenesis of ovarian MCTs: the precursors of ovarian MCTs are not functional oocytes or ova, but are primary oocytes that have escaped from meiotic arrest. This hypothesis could satisfactorily explain the lack of pre-meiotic teratomas observed in this study and the nearly equal distribution of teratomas originating from primary oocytes, secondary oocytes, and ova in previous studies. Furthermore, this hypothesis could provide a starting point for determining the mechanism underlying tumorigenesis of ovarian MCTs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26791142

  1. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Tim J.; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J.

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  2. Med1 regulates meiotic progression during spermatogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huszar, Jessica M.; Jia, Yuzhi; Reddy, Janardan K.; Payne, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a highly coordinated process. Signaling from nuclear hormone receptors, like those for retinoic acid, is important for normal spermatogenesis. However, the mechanisms regulating these signals are poorly understood. Mediator complex subunit 1 (MED1) is a transcriptional enhancer that directly modulates transcription from nuclear hormone receptors. MED1 is present in male germ cells throughout mammalian development, but its function during spermatogenesis is unknown. To determine its role, we generated mice lacking Med1 specifically in their germ cells beginning just before birth. Conditional Med1 knockout males are fertile, exhibiting normal testis weights and siring ordinary numbers of offspring. Retinoic acid-responsive gene products Stimulated by retinoic acid gene 8 (STRA8) and Synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3) are first detected in knockout spermatogonia at the expected time points during the first wave of spermatogenesis and persist with normal patterns of cellular distribution in adult knockout testes. Meiotic progression, however, is altered in the absence of Med1. At postnatal day 7 (P7), zygotene-stage knockout spermatocytes are already detected, unlike in control testes, with fewer pre-leptotene-stage cells and more leptotene spermatocytes observed in the knockouts. At P9, Med1 knockout spermatocytes prematurely enter pachynema. Once formed, greater numbers of knockout spermatocytes remain in pachynema relative to the other stages of meiosis throughout testis development and its maintenance in the adult. Meiotic exit is not inhibited. We conclude that MED1 regulates the temporal progression of primary spermatocytes through meiosis, with its absence resulting in abbreviated pre-leptotene, leptotene and zygotene stages, and a prolonged pachytene stage. PMID:25778538

  3. Meiotic recombination and genome evolution in plants.

    PubMed

    Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Shilo, Shay; Levy, Avraham A

    2016-04-01

    Homologous recombination affects genome evolution through crossover, gene conversion and point mutations. Whole genome sequencing together with a detailed epigenome analysis have shed new light on our understanding of how meiotic recombination shapes plant genes and genome structure. Crossover events are associated with DNA sequence motifs, together with an open chromatin signature (hypomethylated CpGs, low nucleosome occupancy or specific histone modifications). The crossover landscape may differ between male and female meiocytes and between species. At the gene level, crossovers occur preferentially in promoter regions in Arabidopsis. In recent years, there is rising support suggesting that biased mismatch repair during meiotic recombination may increase GC content genome-wide and may be responsible for the GC content gradient found in many plant genes. PMID:26939088

  4. The telomere bouquet regulates meiotic centromere assembly.

    PubMed

    Klutstein, Michael; Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2015-04-01

    The role of the conserved meiotic telomere bouquet has been enigmatic for over a century. We showed previously that disruption of the fission yeast bouquet impairs spindle formation in approximately half of meiotic cells. Surprisingly, bouquet-deficient meiocytes with functional spindles harbour chromosomes that fail to achieve spindle attachment. Kinetochore proteins and the centromeric histone H3 variant Cnp1 fail to localize to those centromeres that exhibit spindle attachment defects in the bouquet's absence. The HP1 orthologue Swi6 also fails to bind these centromeres, suggesting that compromised pericentromeric heterochromatin underlies the kinetochore defects. We find that centromeres are prone to disassembly during meiosis, but this is reversed by localization of centromeres to the telomere-proximal microenvironment, which is conducive to heterochromatin formation and centromere reassembly. Accordingly, artificially tethering a centromere to a telomere rescues the tethered centromere but not other centromeres. These results reveal an unanticipated level of control of centromeres by telomeres. PMID:25774833

  5. The meiotic transcriptome architecture of plants

    PubMed Central

    Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Chen, Changbin

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of genes that play key roles during the meiotic process have been characterized in great detail, the whole process of meiosis is still not completely unraveled. To gain insight into the bigger picture, large-scale approaches like RNA-seq and microarray can help to elucidate the transcriptome landscape during plant meiosis, discover co-regulated genes, enriched processes, and highly expressed known and unknown genes which might be important for meiosis. These high-throughput studies are gaining more and more popularity, but their beginnings in plant systems reach back as far as the 1960's. Frequently, whole anthers or post-meiotic pollen were investigated, while less data is available on isolated cells during meiosis, and only few studies addressed the transcriptome of female meiosis. For this review, we compiled meiotic transcriptome studies covering different plant species, and summarized and compared their key findings. Besides pointing to consistent as well as unique discoveries, we finally draw conclusions what can be learned from these studies so far and what should be addressed next. PMID:24926296

  6. Meiotic drive of chromosomal knobs reshaped the maize genome.

    PubMed Central

    Buckler, E S; Phelps-Durr, T L; Buckler, C S; Dawe, R K; Doebley, J F; Holtsford, T P

    1999-01-01

    Meiotic drive is the subversion of meiosis so that particular genes are preferentially transmitted to the progeny. Meiotic drive generally causes the preferential segregation of small regions of the genome; however, in maize we propose that meiotic drive is responsible for the evolution of large repetitive DNA arrays on all chromosomes. A maize meiotic drive locus found on an uncommon form of chromosome 10 [abnormal 10 (Ab10)] may be largely responsible for the evolution of heterochromatic chromosomal knobs, which can confer meiotic drive potential to every maize chromosome. Simulations were used to illustrate the dynamics of this meiotic drive model and suggest knobs might be deleterious in the absence of Ab10. Chromosomal knob data from maize's wild relatives (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and mexicana) and phylogenetic comparisons demonstrated that the evolution of knob size, frequency, and chromosomal position agreed with the meiotic drive hypothesis. Knob chromosomal position was incompatible with the hypothesis that knob repetitive DNA is neutral or slightly deleterious to the genome. We also show that environmental factors and transposition may play a role in the evolution of knobs. Because knobs occur at multiple locations on all maize chromosomes, the combined effects of meiotic drive and genetic linkage may have reshaped genetic diversity throughout the maize genome in response to the presence of Ab10. Meiotic drive may be a major force of genome evolution, allowing revolutionary changes in genome structure and diversity over short evolutionary periods. PMID:10471723

  7. Cyclin B-cdk activity stimulates meiotic rereplication in budding yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Strich, Randy; Mallory, Michael J; Jarnik, Michal; Cooper, Katrina F

    2004-01-01

    Haploidization of gametes during meiosis requires a single round of premeiotic DNA replication (meiS) followed by two successive nuclear divisions. This study demonstrates that ectopic activation of cyclin B/cyclin-dependent kinase in budding yeast recruits up to 30% of meiotic cells to execute one to three additional rounds of meiS. Rereplication occurs prior to the meiotic nuclear divisions, indicating that this process is different from the postmeiotic mitoses observed in other fungi. The cells with overreplicated DNA produced asci containing up to 20 spores that were viable and haploid and demonstrated Mendelian marker segregation. Genetic tests indicated that these cells executed the meiosis I reductional division and possessed a spindle checkpoint. Finally, interfering with normal synaptonemal complex formation or recombination increased the efficiency of rereplication. These studies indicate that the block to rereplication is very different in meiotic and mitotic cells and suggest a negative role for the recombination machinery in allowing rereplication. Moreover, the production of haploids, regardless of the genome content, suggests that the cell counts replication cycles, not chromosomes, in determining the number of nuclear divisions to execute. PMID:15342503

  8. Rab3A, Rab27A, and Rab35 regulate different events during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, H H; Cui, Q; Zhang, T; Wang, Z B; Ouyang, Y C; Shen, W; Ma, J Y; Schatten, H; Sun, Q Y

    2016-06-01

    Rab family members play important roles in membrane trafficking, cell growth, and differentiation. Almost all components of the cell endomembrane system, the nucleus, and the plasma membrane are closely related to RAB proteins. In this study, we investigated the distribution and functions of three members of the Rab family, Rab3A, Rab27A, and Rab35, in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and activation. The three Rab family members showed different localization patterns in oocytes. Microinjection of siRNA, antibody injection, or inhibitor treatment showed that (1) Rab3A regulates peripheral spindle and cortical granule (CG) migration, polarity establishment, and asymmetric division; (2) Rab27A regulates CG exocytosis following MII-stage oocyte activation; and (3) Rab35 plays an important role in spindle organization and morphology maintenance, and thus meiotic nuclear maturation. These results show that Rab proteins play important roles in mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and activation and that different members exert different distinct functions. PMID:26791531

  9. Human male infertility: chromosome anomalies, meiotic disorders, abnormal spermatozoa and recurrent abortion.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, S; Blanco, J; Vendrell, J M; García, F; Veiga, A; Aran, B; Barri, P N; Vidal, F; Egozcue, J

    2000-01-01

    Human male infertility is often related to chromosome abnormalities. In chromosomally normal infertile males, the rates of chromosome 21 and sex chromosome disomy in spermatozoa are increased. Higher incidences of trisomy 21 (seldom of paternal origin) and sex chromosome aneuploidy are also found. XXY and XYY patients produce increased numbers of XY, XX and YY spermatozoa, indicating an increased risk of production of XXY, XYY and XXX individuals. Since XXYs can reproduce using intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), this could explain the slight increase of sex chromosome anomalies in ICSI series. Carriers of structural reorganizations produce unbalanced spermatozoa, and risk having children with duplications and/or deficiencies. In some cases, this risk is considerably lower or higher than average. These patients also show increased diploidy, and a higher risk of producing diandric triploids. Meiotic disorders are frequent in infertile males, and increase with severe oligoasthenozoospemia (OA) and/or high follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations. These patients produce spermatozoa with autosomal and sex chromosome disomies, and diploid spermatozoa. Their contribution to recurrent abortion depends on the production of trisomies, monosomies and of triploids. The most frequent sperm chromosome anomaly in infertile males is diploidy, originated by either meiotic mutations or by a compromised testicular environment. PMID:10711834

  10. HIM-8 binds to the X chromosome pairing center and mediateschromosome-specific meiotic synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Carolyn M.; Wong, Chihunt; Bhalla, Needhi; Carlton,Peter M.; Weiser, Pinky; Meneely, Philip M.; Dernburg, Abby F.

    2005-06-05

    The him-8 gene is essential for proper meiotic segregationof the X chromosomes in C. elegans. Herewe show that loss of him-8function causes profound X-chromosome-specific defects in homolog pairingand synapsis.him-8 encodes a C2H2 zinc finger protein that is expressedduring meiosis andconcentrates at a site on the X chromosome known as themeiotic Pairing Center (PC). A role for HIM-8 in PC function is supportedby genetic interactions between PC lesions and him-8 mutations.HIM-8-bound chromosome sites associate with the nuclear envelope (NE)throughout meiotic prophase. Surprisingly, a point mutation in him-8 thatretains both chromosome binding and NE localization fails to stabilizepairing or promote synapsis. These observations indicate thatstabilization of homolog pairing is an active process in which thetethering of chromosome sites to the NE may be necessary but is notsufficient.

  11. Characterization of the Pre-meiotic S Phase through Incorporation of BrdU during Spermatogenesis in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Velasco, Israel; Ortíz, Rosario; Echeverría, Olga M.; Escobar, María L.

    2013-01-01

    Seminiferous tubules in mammals have histological arrangements defined by the associations between somatic cells and germ cells. The processes of DNA synthesis in meiotic and mitotic cells have different features that are not easily distinguishable through morphological means. In order to characterize the pre-meiotic S phase, 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected intraperitoneally into Wistar rats, which were sacrificed 30 min, 2 hr, and 24 hr after injection. We found three different labeling patterns. One of these patterns was characterized by a distribution of the label in the form of speckles, most of which were associated with the nuclear envelope (labeling type I). We suggest that this pattern is due to mitotic DNA synthesis of type B spermatogonia. Labeling type II consisted of labeled foci scattered throughout the nuclear volume, which can be correlated with preleptotenic cells in pre-meiotic DNA synthesis. After 24 hr of incorporation, a third type of labeling, characterized by large speckles, was found to be related to cells in the “bouquet” stage; that is, cells in transition between the leptotene and zygotene phases. Our results indicate that BrdU incorporation induces different labeling patterns in the mitotic and pre-meiotic S phases and thus makes it possible to identify somatic and germinal cells. PMID:23776014

  12. Characterization of the pre-meiotic S phase through incorporation of BrdU during spermatogenesis in the rat.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Velasco, Israel; Ortíz, Rosario; Echeverría, Olga M; Escobar, María L; Vázquez-Nin, Gerardo H

    2013-09-01

    Seminiferous tubules in mammals have histological arrangements defined by the associations between somatic cells and germ cells. The processes of DNA synthesis in meiotic and mitotic cells have different features that are not easily distinguishable through morphological means. In order to characterize the pre-meiotic S phase, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) was injected intraperitoneally into Wistar rats, which were sacrificed 30 min, 2 hr, and 24 hr after injection. We found three different labeling patterns. One of these patterns was characterized by a distribution of the label in the form of speckles, most of which were associated with the nuclear envelope (labeling type I). We suggest that this pattern is due to mitotic DNA synthesis of type B spermatogonia. Labeling type II consisted of labeled foci scattered throughout the nuclear volume, which can be correlated with preleptotenic cells in pre-meiotic DNA synthesis. After 24 hr of incorporation, a third type of labeling, characterized by large speckles, was found to be related to cells in the "bouquet" stage; that is, cells in transition between the leptotene and zygotene phases. Our results indicate that BrdU incorporation induces different labeling patterns in the mitotic and pre-meiotic S phases and thus makes it possible to identify somatic and germinal cells. PMID:23776014

  13. ``sex Ratio'' Meiotic Drive in Drosophila Testacea

    PubMed Central

    James, A. C.; Jaenike, J.

    1990-01-01

    We document the occurrence of ``sex ratio'' meiotic drive in natural populations of Drosophila testacea. ``Sex ratio'' males sire >95% female offspring. Genetic analysis reveals that this effect is due to a meiotically driven X chromosome, as in other species of Drosophila in which ``sex ratio'' has been found. In contrast to other drosophilids, the ``sex ratio'' and standard chromosomes of D. testacea do not differ in gene arrangement, implying that the effect may be due to a single genetic factor in this species. In all likelihood, the ``sex ratio'' condition has evolved independently in D. testacea and in the Drosophila obscura species group, as the loci responsible for the effect occur on different chromosomal elements. An important ecological consequence of ``sex ratio'' is that natural populations of D. testacea exhibit a strong female bias. Because D. testacea mates, oviposits, and feeds as adults and larvae on mushrooms, this species provides an excellent opportunity to study the selective factors in nature that prevent ``sex ratio'' chromosomes from increasing to fixation and causing the extinction of the species. PMID:2249763

  14. Functional Redundancy in the Maize Meiotic Kinetochore

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Guo; Dawe, R. Kelly

    2000-01-01

    Kinetochores can be thought of as having three major functions in chromosome segregation: (a) moving plateward at prometaphase; (b) participating in spindle checkpoint control; and (c) moving poleward at anaphase. Normally, kinetochores cooperate with opposed sister kinetochores (mitosis, meiosis II) or paired homologous kinetochores (meiosis I) to carry out these functions. Here we exploit three- and four-dimensional light microscopy and the maize meiotic mutant absence of first division 1 (afd1) to investigate the properties of single kinetochores. As an outcome of premature sister kinetochore separation in afd1 meiocytes, all of the chromosomes at meiosis II carry single kinetochores. Approximately 60% of the single kinetochore chromosomes align at the spindle equator during prometaphase/metaphase II, whereas acentric fragments, also generated by afd1, fail to align at the equator. Immunocytochemistry suggests that the plateward movement occurs in part because the single kinetochores separate into half kinetochore units. Single kinetochores stain positive for spindle checkpoint proteins during prometaphase, but lose their staining as tension is applied to the half kinetochores. At anaphase, ∼6% of the kinetochores develop stable interactions with microtubules (kinetochore fibers) from both spindle poles. Our data indicate that maize meiotic kinetochores are plastic, redundant structures that can carry out each of their major functions in duplicate. PMID:11018059

  15. Parp2 is required for the differentiation of post-meiotic germ cells: Identification of a spermatid-specific complex containing Parp1, Parp2, TP2 and HSPA2

    SciTech Connect

    Quenet, Delphine; Mark, Manuel; Govin, Jerome; Dorsselear, A. van; Schreiber, Valerie; Khochbin, Saadi; Dantzer, Francoise

    2009-10-01

    Spermiogenesis is a complex male germ cell post-meiotic differentiation process characterized by dramatic changes in chromatin structure and function, including chromatin condensation, transcriptional inhibition and the sequential replacement of histones by transition proteins and protamines. Recent advances, in mammalian cells, suggest a possible role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation catalyzed by Parp1 and/or Parp2 in this process. We have recently reported severely compromised spermiogenesis in Parp2-deficient mice characterized by a marked delay in nuclear elongation whose molecular mechanisms remain however unknown. Here, using in vitro protein-protein interaction assays, we show that Parp2 interacts significantly with both the transition protein TP2 and the transition chaperone HSPA2, whereas Parp1 binds weakly to HSPA2. Parp2-TP2 interaction is partly mediated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Only Parp1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ates HSPA2. In addition, a detailed analysis of spermatid maturation in Parp2-deficient mice, combining immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic approaches, reveals a loss of spermatids expressing TP2, a defect in chromatin condensation and abnormal formation of the manchette microtubules that, together, contribute to spermatid-specific cell death. In conclusion, we propose both Parps as new participants of a spermatid-specific protein complex involved in genome reorganization throughout spermiogenesis.

  16. Eccentric localization of catalase to protect chromosomes from oxidative damages during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Park, Yong Seok; You, Seung Yeop; Cho, Sungrae; Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; Lee, Sukchan; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-09-01

    The maintenance of genomic integrity and stability is essential for the survival of every organism. Unfortunately, DNA is vulnerable to attack by a variety of damaging agents. Oxidative stress is a major cause of DNA damage because reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced as by-products of normal cellular metabolism. Cells have developed eloquent antioxidant defense systems to protect themselves from oxidative damage along with aerobic metabolism. Here, we show that catalase (CAT) is present in mouse oocytes to protect the genome from oxidative damage during meiotic maturation. CAT was expressed in the nucleus to form unique vesicular structures. However, after nuclear envelope breakdown, CAT was redistributed in the cytoplasm with particular focus at the chromosomes. Inhibition of CAT activity increased endogenous ROS levels, but did not perturb meiotic maturation. In addition, CAT inhibition produced chromosomal defects, including chromosome misalignment and DNA damage. Therefore, our data suggest that CAT is required not only to scavenge ROS, but also to protect DNA from oxidative damage during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. PMID:27160095

  17. Spindle assembly checkpoint proteins regulate and monitor meiotic synapsis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Bohr, Tisha; Nelson, Christian R.; Klee, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Homologue synapsis is required for meiotic chromosome segregation, but how synapsis is initiated between chromosomes is poorly understood. In Caenorhabditis elegans, synapsis and a checkpoint that monitors synapsis depend on pairing centers (PCs), cis-acting loci that interact with nuclear envelope proteins, such as SUN-1, to access cytoplasmic microtubules. Here, we report that spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) components MAD-1, MAD-2, and BUB-3 are required to negatively regulate synapsis and promote the synapsis checkpoint response. Both of these roles are independent of a conserved component of the anaphase-promoting complex, indicating a unique role for these proteins in meiotic prophase. MAD-1 and MAD-2 localize to the periphery of meiotic nuclei and interact with SUN-1, suggesting a role at PCs. Consistent with this idea, MAD-1 and BUB-3 require full PC function to inhibit synapsis. We propose that SAC proteins monitor the stability of pairing, or tension, between homologues to regulate synapsis and elicit a checkpoint response. PMID:26483555

  18. The Inhibition of Polo Kinase by Matrimony Maintains G2 Arrest in the Meiotic Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Youbin; Takeo, Satomi; Florens, Laurence; Hughes, Stacie E; Huo, Li-Jun; Gilliland, William D; Swanson, Selene K; Teeter, Kathy; Schwartz, Joel W; Washburn, Michael P; Jaspersen, Sue L; Hawley, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    Many meiotic systems in female animals include a lengthy arrest in G2 that separates the end of pachytene from nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB). However, the mechanisms by which a meiotic cell can arrest for long periods of time (decades in human females) have remained a mystery. The Drosophila Matrimony (Mtrm) protein is expressed from the end of pachytene until the completion of meiosis I. Loss-of-function mtrm mutants result in precocious NEB. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments reveal that Mtrm physically interacts with Polo kinase (Polo) in vivo, and multidimensional protein identification technology mass spectrometry analysis reveals that Mtrm binds to Polo with an approximate stoichiometry of 1:1. Mutation of a Polo-Box Domain (PBD) binding site in Mtrm ablates the function of Mtrm and the physical interaction of Mtrm with Polo. The meiotic defects observed in mtrm/+ heterozygotes are fully suppressed by reducing the dose of polo+, demonstrating that Mtrm acts as an inhibitor of Polo. Mtrm acts as a negative regulator of Polo during the later stages of G2 arrest. Indeed, both the repression of Polo expression until stage 11 and the inactivation of newly synthesized Polo by Mtrm until stage 13 play critical roles in maintaining and properly terminating G2 arrest. Our data suggest a model in which the eventual activation of Cdc25 by an excess of Polo at stage 13 triggers NEB and entry into prometaphase. PMID:18052611

  19. A new light on the meiotic DSB catalytic complex.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Vrielynck, Nathalie; Mézard, Christine; de Massy, Bernard; Grelon, Mathilde

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic recombination is initiated by the formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). More than 15 years ago, Spo11 was identified as the protein responsible for meiotic DSB formation, notably because of its striking similarities with the A subunit of topoisomerase VI (TopoVI). TopoVI are enzymes that modify DNA topology by generating transient DSBs and are active as heterotetramers, composed of two A and two B subunits. A2 dimers catalyse the DNA cleavage reaction, whereas the B subunits regulate A2 conformation, DNA capture, cleavage and re-ligation. The recent identification in plants and mammals of a B-like TopoVI subunit that interacts with SPO11 and is required for meiotic DSB formation makes us to reconsider our understanding of the meiotic DSB catalytic complex. We provide here an overview of the knowledge on TopoVI structure and mode of action and we compare them with their meiotic counterparts. This allows us to discuss the nature, structure and functions of the meiotic TopoVI-like complex during meiotic DSB formation. PMID:26995551

  20. Evidence for meiotic sex in bdelloid rotifers.

    PubMed

    Signorovitch, Ana; Hur, Jae; Gladyshev, Eugene; Meselson, Matthew

    2016-08-22

    In their study of genetic exchange in the bdelloid rotifer Adineta vaga, Debortoli et al. [1] conclude that the patchwork pattern of allele sharing among three individuals in the genomic regions they examined is "…unlikely to arise in cases of PTH (Oenothera-like) meiosis since haplotypes are transferred as entire blocks…" and therefore that "Genetic exchange among bdelloid rotifers is more likely due to horizontal gene transfer than to meiotic sex." This assumes without justification that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) in bdelloids precludes the sexual transmission of entire haplotypes, for which we have reported evidence in the bdelloid Macrotrachela quadricornifera[2]. And it does not consider the contribution to such a patchwork pattern that would result from conversion and subsequent outcrossing, even in Oenothera-like systems. PMID:27554650

  1. Diversity in meiotic spindle origin and determination of cytokinetic planes in sporogenesis of complex thalloid liverworts (Marchantiopsida).

    PubMed

    Brown, Roy C; Lemmon, Betty E; Shimamura, Masaki

    2010-07-01

    As the earliest divergent land plants, bryophytes (mosses, hornworts, and liverworts) provide insight into the evolution of the unique plant process of sporogenesis by which meiosis results in heavy walled spores. New immunohistochemical data on microtubules and gamma-tubulin in four genera of complex thalloid liverworts combined with previously published data on another four genera demonstrate grades in the evolution of spindle organization in meiosis. We have discovered that all recognized forms of microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs) in plant cells (plastid MTOCs, spheroid cytoplasmic MTOCs, polar organizers, and nuclear envelope MTOCs) occur in organization of the meiotic spindle of complex thalloid liverworts. In addition, all aspects of pre-meiotic preparation for quadripartitioning of the sporocyte into a tetrad of spores occur, with the exception of pre-meiotic wall precursors found in certain simple thalloids. The preparation includes morphogenetic plastid migration, cortical bands of microtubules that mark future cytokinetic planes in pre-meiosis, quadrilobing of the cytoplasm during meiotic prophase, and quadripolar microtubule systems that are transformed into functionally bipolar metaphase I spindles. Quadripolar spindle origin is typical of bryophyte sporogenesis even though the MTOCs involved may differ. However, in certain crown taxa of complex thalloids the spindle develops with no traces of quadripolarity and placement of intersporal walls is determined after meiosis, as is typical of higher plants. PMID:20039093

  2. Cytoplasmic Determination of Meiotic Spindle Size Revealed by a Unique Inter-Species Germinal Vesicle Transfer Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong-Wei; Zhang, Guang-Li; Schatten, Heide; Carroll, John; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Spindle sizes are different in diverse species and cell types. In frogs, the meiotic spindle size is positively correlated with the egg cell volume. Across species, relatively small mouse oocytes (70–80 μm) have a relatively large spindle while larger pig oocytes (about 120 μm) have a considerably smaller spindle. In this study we investigated whether species-specific oocyte spindle size was determined by cytoplasmic or nuclear factors. By exchanging the germinal vesicle between mouse and pig oocytes, we obtained two kinds of reconstructed oocytes: one with mouse ooplasm and pig GV (mCy-pGV oocyte), and the other with pig ooplasm and mouse GV (pCy-mGV oocyte). We show that the MII spindle size of the mCy-pGV oocyte is similar to that of the mouse meiotic spindle and significantly larger than that of the pig meiotic spindle. The timing of oocyte maturation also followed that of the species from which the oocyte cytoplasm arose, although some impact of the origin of the GV was observed. These data suggest that spindle size and the timing of meiotic progression are governed by cytoplasmic components rather than cytoplasmic volume and GV materials. PMID:26813698

  3. Coevolutionary dynamics of polyandry and sex-linked meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Holman, Luke; Price, Thomas A R; Wedell, Nina; Kokko, Hanna

    2015-03-01

    Segregation distorters located on sex chromosomes are predicted to sweep to fixation and cause extinction via a shortage of one sex, but in nature they are often found at low, stable frequencies. One potential resolution to this longstanding puzzle involves female multiple mating (polyandry). Because many meiotic drivers severely reduce the sperm competitive ability of their male carriers, females are predicted to evolve more frequent polyandry and thereby promote sperm competition when a meiotic driver invades. Consequently, the driving chromosome's relative fitness should decline, halting or reversing its spread. We used formal modeling to show that this initially appealing hypothesis cannot resolve the puzzle alone: other selective pressures (e.g., low fitness of drive homozygotes) are required to establish a stable meiotic drive polymorphism. However, polyandry and meiotic drive can strongly affect one another's frequency, and polyandrous populations may be resistant to the invasion of rare drive mutants. PMID:25565579

  4. Complex elaboration: making sense of meiotic cohesin dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Susannah

    2015-01-01

    In mitotically dividing cells, the cohesin complex tethers sister chromatids, the products of DNA replication, together from the time they are generated during S phase until anaphase. Cohesion between sister chromatids ensures accurate chromosome segregation, and promotes normal gene regulation and certain kinds of DNA repair. In somatic cells, the core cohesin complex is composed of four subunits: Smc1, Smc3, Rad21 and an SA subunit. During meiotic cell divisions meiosis-specific isoforms of several of the cohesin subunits are also expressed and incorporated into distinct meiotic cohesin complexes. The relative contributions of these meiosis-specific forms of cohesin to chromosome dynamics during meiotic progression have not been fully worked out. However, the localization of these proteins during chromosome pairing and synapsis, and their unique loss-of-function phenotypes, suggest non-overlapping roles in controlling meiotic chromosome behavior. Many of the proteins that regulate cohesin function during mitosis also appear to regulate cohesin during meiosis. Here we review how cohesin contributes to meiotic chromosome dynamics, and explore similarities and differences between cohesin regulation during the mitotic cell cycle and meiotic progression. A deeper understanding of the regulation and function of cohesin in meiosis will provide important new insights into how the cohesin complex is able to promote distinct kinds of chromosome interactions under diverse conditions. PMID:25895170

  5. Lansing Community College Reorganization Overview Document.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansing Community Coll., MI.

    In response to an unstable economy and diminishing resources, Lansing Community College, in Michigan, initiated a college-wide reorganization in July 1993 to improve institutional effectiveness and increase efficiency. This paper provides a description of the reorganization process and organizational structure before and after the change. First, a…

  6. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers.

    PubMed

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills. PMID:26976813

  7. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus.

    PubMed Central

    Leeflang, E. P.; McPeek, M. S.; Arnheim, N.

    1996-01-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. PMID:8808606

  8. Analysis of meiotic segregation, using single-sperm typing: Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Leeflang, E.P.; Arnheim, N.; McPeek, M.S.

    1996-10-01

    Meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus has recently been suggested as being responsible for maintaining the frequency, in the human population, of DM chromosomes capable of expansion to the disease state. In order to test this hypothesis, we have studied samples of single sperm from three individuals heterozygous at the DM locus, each with one allele larger and one allele smaller than 19 CTG repeats. To guard against the possible problem of differential PCR amplification rates based on the lengths of the alleles, the sperm were also typed at another closely linked marker whose allele size was unrelated to the allele size at the DM locus. Using statistical models specifically designed to study single-sperm segregation data, we find no evidence of meiotic segregation distortion. The upper limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval for the estimate of the common segregation probability for the three donors is at or below .515 for all models considered, and no statistically significant difference from .5 is detected in any of the models. This suggests that any greater amount of segregation distortion at the myotonic dystrophy locus must result from events following sperm ejaculation. The mathematical models developed make it possible to study segregation distortion with high resolution by using sperm-typing data from any locus. 26 refs., 1 fig., 8 tabs.

  9. Meiotic Telomere Protein Ndj1p Is Required for Meiosis-Specific Telomere Distribution, Bouquet Formation and Efficient Homologue Pairing

    PubMed Central

    Trelles-Sticken, Edgar; Dresser, Michael E.; Scherthan, Harry

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the requirements for NDJ1 in meiotic telomere redistribution and clustering in synchronized cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On induction of wild-type meiosis, telomeres disperse from premeiotic aggregates over the nuclear periphery, and then cluster near the spindle pole body (bouquet arrangement) before dispersing again. In ndj1Δ meiocytes, telomeres are scattered throughout the nucleus and fail to form perinuclear meiosis-specific distribution patterns, suggesting that Ndj1p may function to tether meiotic telomeres to the nuclear periphery. Since ndj1Δ meiocytes fail to cluster their telomeres at any prophase stage, Ndj1p is the first protein shown to be required for bouquet formation in a synaptic organism. Analysis of homologue pairing by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes to regions on III, IX, and XI revealed that disruption of bouquet formation is associated with a significant delay (>2 h) of homologue pairing. An increased and persistent fraction of ndj1Δ meiocytes with Zip1p polycomplexes suggests that chromosome polarization is important for synapsis progression. Thus, our observations support the hypothesis that meiotic telomere clustering contributes to efficient homologue alignment and synaptic pairing. Under naturally occurring conditions, bouquet formation may allow for rapid sporulation and confer a selective advantage. PMID:11018056

  10. The reorganization of a monographic reference collection.

    PubMed

    Jeuell, C A

    1976-07-01

    Reference monographs in the Health Sciences Library of the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey were reorganized recently according to form, in order to enable both librarians and patrons to utilize these materials more efficiently. This reorganization reflects the unique characteristics of reference books as differentiated from the regular monographic collection, since reference materials are frequently consulted for quick "look-ups." A reference category scheme was developed and implemented, based on observations of and comparisons with reference collections of eight medical libraries in the New York metropolitan area. The reorganization enhances the retrievability of materials from this collection. PMID:938775

  11. Meiotic recombination and the crossover assurance checkpoint in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhouliang; Kim, Yumi; Dernburg, Abby F

    2016-06-01

    During meiotic prophase, chromosomes pair and synapse with their homologs and undergo programmed DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation to initiate meiotic recombination. These DSBs are processed to generate a limited number of crossover recombination products on each chromosome, which are essential to ensure faithful segregation of homologous chromosomes. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has served as an excellent model organism to investigate the mechanisms that drive and coordinate these chromosome dynamics during meiosis. Here we focus on our current understanding of the regulation of DSB induction in C. elegans. We also review evidence that feedback regulation of crossover formation prolongs the early stages of meiotic prophase, and discuss evidence that this can alter the recombination pattern, most likely by shifting the genome-wide distribution of DSBs. PMID:27013114

  12. Functional links between Drosophila Nipped-B and cohesin in somatic and meiotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Gause, Maria; Webber, Hayley A.; Misulovin, Ziva; Haller, Gabe; Rollins, Robert A.; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Bickel, Sharon E.

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila Nipped-B is an essential protein that has multiple functions. It facilitates expression of homeobox genes and is also required for sister chromatid cohesion. Nipped-B is conserved from yeast to man, and its orthologs also play roles in deoxyribonucleic acid repair and meiosis. Mutation of the human ortholog, Nipped-B-Like (NIPBL), causes Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS), associated with multiple developmental defects. The Nipped-B protein family is required for the cohesin complex that mediates sister chromatid cohesion to bind to chromosomes. A key question, therefore, is whether the Nipped-B family regulates gene expression, meiosis, and development by controlling cohesin. To gain insights into Nipped-B's functions, we compared the effects of several Nipped-B mutations on gene expression, sister chromatid cohesion, and meiosis. We also examined association of Nipped-B and cohesin with somatic and meiotic chromosomes by immunostaining. Missense Nipped-B alleles affecting the same HEAT repeat motifs as CdLS-causing NIPBL mutations have intermediate effects on both gene expression and mitotic chromatid cohesion, linking these two functions and the role of NIPBL in human development. Nipped-B colocalizes extensively with cohesin on chromosomes in both somatic and meiotic cells and is present in soluble complexes with cohesin subunits in nuclear extracts. In meiosis, Nipped-B also colocalizes with the synaptonemal complex and contributes to maintenance of meiotic chromosome cores. These results support the idea that direct regulation of cohesin function underlies the diverse functions of Nipped-B and its orthologs. PMID:17909832

  13. Yeast meiotic mutants proficient for the induction of ectopic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Masse, S; Davis, L; Rose, K; Kessel, T

    1998-01-01

    A screen was designed to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants that were defective in meiosis yet proficient for meiotic ectopic recombination in the return-to-growth protocol. Seven mutants alleles were isolated; two are important for chromosome synapsis (RED1, MEK1) and five function independently of recombination (SPO14, GSG1, SPOT8/MUM2, 3, 4). Similar to the spoT8-1 mutant, mum2 deletion strains do not undergo premeiotic DNA synthesis, arrest prior to the first meiotic division and fail to sporulate. Surprisingly, although DNA replication does not occur, mum2 mutants are induced for high levels of ectopic recombination. gsg1 diploids are reduced in their ability to complete premeiotic DNA synthesis and the meiotic divisions, and a small percentage of cells produce spores. mum3 mutants sporulate poorly and the spores produced are inviable. Finally, mum4-1 mutants produce inviable spores. The meiotic/sporulation defects of gsg1, mum2, and mum3 are not relieved by spo11 or spo13 mutations, indicating that the mutant defects are not dependent on the initiation of recombination or completion of both meiotic divisions. In contrast, the spore inviability of the mum4-1 mutant is rescued by the spo13 mutation. The mum4-1 spo13 mutant undergoes a single, predominantly equational division, suggesting that MUM4 functions at or prior to the first meiotic division. Although recombination is variably affected in the gsg1 and mum mutants, we hypothesize that these mutants define genes important for aspects of meiosis not directly related to recombination. PMID:9504908

  14. Neural reorganization and compensation in aging.

    PubMed

    Morcom, Alexa M; Johnson, Wendy

    2015-07-01

    According to prominent theories of aging, the brain may reorganize to compensate for neural deterioration and prevent or offset cognitive decline. A frequent and striking finding in functional imaging studies is that older adults recruit additional regions relative to young adults performing the same task. This is often interpreted as evidence for functional reorganization, suggesting that, as people age, different regions or networks may support the same cognitive functions. Associations between additional recruitment and better performance in older adults have led to the suggestion that the additional recruitment may contribute to preserved cognitive function in old age and may explain some of the variation among individuals in preservation of function. However, many alternative explanations are possible, and recent findings and methodological developments have highlighted the need for more systematic approaches to determine whether reorganization occurs with age and whether it benefits performance. We reevaluate current evidence for compensatory functional reorganization in the light of recent moves to address these challenges. PMID:25603025

  15. Human X-linked Intellectual Disability Factor CUL4B Is Required for Post-meiotic Sperm Development and Male Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chen, Chun-Yu; Yu, Chih-Hsiang; Yu, I-Shing; Lin, Shu-Rung; Wu, June-Tai; Lin, Ying-Hung; Kuo, Pao-Lin; Wu, Jui-Ching; Lin, Shu-Wha

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate that an E3-ubiquitin ligase associated with human X-linked intellectual disability, CUL4B, plays a crucial role in post-meiotic sperm development. Initially, Cul4bΔ/Y male mice were found to be sterile and exhibited a progressive loss in germ cells, thereby leading to oligoasthenospermia. Adult Cul4b mutant epididymides also contained very low numbers of mature spermatozoa, and these spermatazoa exhibited pronounced morphological abnormalities. In post-meiotic spermatids, CUL4B was dynamically expressed and mitosis of spermatogonia and meiosis of spermatocytes both appeared unaffected. However, the spermatids exhibited significantly higher levels of apoptosis during spermiogenesis, particularly during the acrosome phase through the cap phase. Comparative proteomic analyses identified a large-scale shift between wild-type and Cul4b mutant testes during early post-meiotic sperm development. Ultrastructural pathology studies further detected aberrant acrosomes in spermatids and nuclear morphology. The protein levels of both canonical and non-canonical histones were also affected in an early spermatid stage in the absence of Cul4b. Thus, X-linked CUL4B appears to play a critical role in acrosomal formation, nuclear condensation, and in regulating histone dynamics during haploid male germ cell differentiation in relation to male fertility in mice. Thus, it is possible that CUL4B-selective substrates are required for post-meiotic sperm morphogenesis. PMID:26832838

  16. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3... COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize to become a mutual holding company, or join in a mutual holding company reorganization as an...

  17. Depletion of the LINC complex disrupts cytoskeleton dynamics and meiotic resumption in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yibo; Lee, In-Won; Jo, Yu-Jin; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    The SUN (Sad-1/UNC-84) and KASH (Klarsicht/ANC-1/Syne/homology) proteins constitute the linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complex on the nuclear envelope. To date, the SUN1/KASH5 complex is known to function as meiotic-specific factors. In this study, gene-silencing methods were used to explore the roles of SUN1 and KASH5 in mouse oocytes after prophase. SUN1 was detected throughout the nucleus; however, KASH5 was dispersed through the cell. After germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), SUN1 and KASH5 migrated during spindle formation and localized to the spindle poles at the MII stage. Most oocytes were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage after depletion of either SUN1 or KASH5. The DNA damage response was triggered in SUN1-depleted oocytes and thus gave rise to the G2/M checkpoint protein, p-CHK1. Oocytes that underwent GVBD had relatively small and abnormal spindles and lower levels of cytoplasm F-actin mesh. Immunofluorescence results also indicated the dislocation of pericentrin and P150Glued after SUN1 or KASH5 depletion. Furthermore, KASH5 localized exclusively near the oocyte cortex after SUN1 depletion, but SUN1 localization was unaffected in KASH5-depleted oocytes. Taken together, the results suggest that SUN1 and KASH5 are essential factors in the regulation of meiotic resumption and spindle formation. PMID:26842404

  18. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Perturbs Cell Cycle Progression and Spindle Organization in Porcine Meiotic Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Wang, Yan-Kui; Song, Zhi-Qiang; Du, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Cai-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic maturation of mammalian oocytes is a precisely orchestrated and complex process. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a widely used solvent, drug, and cryoprotectant, is capable of disturbing asymmetric cytokinesis of oocyte meiosis in mice. However, in pigs, DMSO’s effect on oocyte meiosis still remains unknown. We aimed to evaluate if DMSO treatment will affect porcine oocyte meiosis and the underlying molecular changes as well. Interestingly, we did not observe the formation of the large first polar body and symmetric division for porcine oocytes treated with DMSO, contrary to findings reported in mice. 3% DMSO treatment could inhibit cumulus expansion, increase nuclear abnormality, disturb spindle organization, decrease reactive oxygen species level, and elevate mitochondrial membrane potential of porcine oocytes. There was no effect on germinal vesicle breakdown rate regardless of DMSO concentration. 3% DMSO treatment did not affect expression of genes involved in spindle organization (Bub1 and Mad2) and apoptosis (NF-κB, Pten, Bcl2, Caspase3 and Caspase9), however, it significantly decreased expression levels of pluripotency genes (Oct4, Sox2 and Lin28) in mature oocytes. Therefore, we demonstrated that disturbed cumulus expansion, chromosome alignment, spindle organization and pluripotency gene expression could be responsible for DMSO-induced porcine oocyte meiotic arrest and the lower capacity of subsequent embryo development. Our results provide new insights on DMSO’s effect on porcine oocyte meiosis and raise safety concerns over DMSO’s usage on female reproduction in both farm animals and humans. PMID:27348312

  19. Biochemistry of Meiotic Recombination: Formation, Processing, and Resolution of Recombination Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Ehmsen, Kirk T.

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic recombination ensures accurate chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division and provides a mechanism to increase genetic heterogeneity among the meiotic products. Unlike homologous recombination in somatic (vegetative) cells, where sister chromatid interactions prevail and crossover formation is avoided, meiotic recombination is targeted to involve homologs, resulting in crossovers to connect the homologs before anaphase of the first meiotic division. The mechanisms responsible for homolog choice and crossover control are poorly understood, but likely involve meiosis-specific recombination proteins, as well as meiosis-specific chromosome organization and architecture. Much progress has been made to identify and biochemically characterize many of the proteins acting during meiotic recombination. This review will focus on the proteins that generate and process heteroduplex DNA, as well as those that process DNA junctions during meiotic recombination, with particular attention to how recombination activities promote crossover resolution between homologs. PMID:20098639

  20. Meiotic Segregation and Male Recombination in Interspecific Hybrids of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, Jerry A.

    1986-01-01

    Male hybrids between three pairs of Drosophila species show no substantial distortion of Mendelian segregation and no appreciable male recombination. These results do not support the theories that meiotic drive alleles of large effect are often fixed within species and that transposable genetic elements cause speciation. PMID:3021573

  1. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate recombination structures is central to driving the specific outcomes of DSB repair during meiosis. Replication protein A (RPA) is the main ssDNA-binding protein complex involved in DNA metabolism. However, the existence of RPA orthologs in plants and the recent discovery of meiosis specific with OB domains (MEIOB), a widely conserved meiosis-specific RPA1 paralog, strongly suggest that multiple RPA complexes evolved and specialized to subdivide their roles during DNA metabolism. Here we review ssDNA formation and maturation during mitotic and meiotic recombination underlying the meiotic specific features. We describe and discuss the existence and properties of MEIOB and multiple RPA subunits in plants and highlight how they can provide meiosis-specific fates to ssDNA processing during homologous recombination. Understanding the functions of these RPA homologs and how they interact with the canonical RPA subunits is of major interest in the fields of meiosis and DNA repair. PMID:26520106

  2. ATM controls meiotic double-strand-break formation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Julian; Pan, Jing; Cole, Francesca; Thelen, Michael P; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott

    2011-11-10

    In many organisms, developmentally programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs) formed by the SPO11 transesterase initiate meiotic recombination, which promotes pairing and segregation of homologous chromosomes. Because every chromosome must receive a minimum number of DSBs, attention has focused on factors that support DSB formation. However, improperly repaired DSBs can cause meiotic arrest or mutation; thus, having too many DSBs is probably as deleterious as having too few. Only a small fraction of SPO11 protein ever makes a DSB in yeast or mouse and SPO11 and its accessory factors remain abundant long after most DSB formation ceases, implying the existence of mechanisms that restrain SPO11 activity to limit DSB numbers. Here we report that the number of meiotic DSBs in mouse is controlled by ATM, a kinase activated by DNA damage to trigger checkpoint signalling and promote DSB repair. Levels of SPO11-oligonucleotide complexes, by-products of meiotic DSB formation, are elevated at least tenfold in spermatocytes lacking ATM. Moreover, Atm mutation renders SPO11-oligonucleotide levels sensitive to genetic manipulations that modulate SPO11 protein levels. We propose that ATM restrains SPO11 via a negative feedback loop in which kinase activation by DSBs suppresses further DSB formation. Our findings explain previously puzzling phenotypes of Atm-null mice and provide a molecular basis for the gonadal dysgenesis observed in ataxia telangiectasia, the human syndrome caused by ATM deficiency. PMID:22002603

  3. Meiotic behavior and H3K4m distribution in B chromosomes of Characidium gomesi (Characiformes, Crenuchidae).

    PubMed

    Serrano, Érica Alves; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Characidium gomesi Travasso, 1956 specimens from the Pardo River have up to four heterochromatic supernumerary chromosomes, derived from the sex chromosomes. To access the meiotic behavior and distribution of an active chromatin marker, males and females of Characidium gomesi with two or three B chromosomes were analyzed. Mitotic chromosomes were characterized using C-banding and FISH with B chromosome probes. Meiocytes were subjected to immunofluorescence-FISH assay using anti-SYCP3, anti-H3K4m, and B chromosomes probes. Molecular homology of supernumeraries was confirmed by FISH and by its bivalent conformation in individuals with two of these chromosomes. In individuals with three Bs, these elements formed a bivalent and a univalent. Supernumerary and sex chromosomes exhibited H3K4m signals during pachytene contrasting with their heterochromatic and asynaptic nature, which suggest a more structural role than functional of this histone modification. The implications of this result are discussed in light of the homology, meiotic nuclear organization, and meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chomatin. PMID:27551347

  4. Meiotic behavior and H3K4m distribution in B chromosomes of Characidium gomesi (Characiformes, Crenuchidae)

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Érica Alves; Araya-Jaime, Cristian; Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y.; Oliveira, Claudio; Foresti, Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Characidium gomesi Travasso, 1956 specimens from the Pardo River have up to four heterochromatic supernumerary chromosomes, derived from the sex chromosomes. To access the meiotic behavior and distribution of an active chromatin marker, males and females of Characidium gomesi with two or three B chromosomes were analyzed. Mitotic chromosomes were characterized using C-banding and FISH with B chromosome probes. Meiocytes were subjected to immunofluorescence-FISH assay using anti-SYCP3, anti-H3K4m, and B chromosomes probes. Molecular homology of supernumeraries was confirmed by FISH and by its bivalent conformation in individuals with two of these chromosomes. In individuals with three Bs, these elements formed a bivalent and a univalent. Supernumerary and sex chromosomes exhibited H3K4m signals during pachytene contrasting with their heterochromatic and asynaptic nature, which suggest a more structural role than functional of this histone modification. The implications of this result are discussed in light of the homology, meiotic nuclear organization, and meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chomatin. PMID:27551347

  5. Sex Chromosome Meiotic Drive in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Presgraves, D. C.; Severance, E.; Wilkinson, G. S.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotically driven sex chromosomes can quickly spread to fixation and cause population extinction unless balanced by selection or suppressed by genetic modifiers. We report results of genetic analyses that demonstrate that extreme female-biased sex ratios in two sister species of stalk-eyed flies, Cyrtodiopsis dalmanni and C. whitei, are due to a meiotic drive element on the X chromosome (X(d)). Relatively high frequencies of X(d) in C. dalmanni and C. whitei (13-17% and 29%, respectively) cause female-biased sex ratios in natural populations of both species. Sex ratio distortion is associated with spermatid degeneration in male carriers of X(d). Variation in sex ratios is caused by Y-linked and autosomal factors that decrease the intensity of meiotic drive. Y-linked polymorphism for resistance to drive exists in C. dalmanni in which a resistant Y chromosome reduces the intensity and reverses the direction of meiotic drive. When paired with X(d), modifying Y chromosomes (Y(m)) cause the transmission of predominantly Y-bearing sperm, and on average, production of 63% male progeny. The absence of sex ratio distortion in closely related monomorphic outgroup species suggests that this meiotic drive system may predate the origin of C. whitei and C. dalmanni. We discuss factors likely to be involved in the persistence of these sex-linked polymorphisms and consider the impact of X(d) on the operational sex ratio and the intensity of sexual selection in these extremely sexually dimorphic flies. PMID:9383060

  6. MEIOTIC F-BOX Is Essential for Male Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Rice[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong; Yu, Junping; Zong, Jie; Lu, Pingli

    2016-01-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large superfamily in plants and play important roles in controlling many biological processes, but the roles of F-box proteins in male meiosis in plants remain unclear. Here, we identify the rice (Oryza sativa) F-box gene MEIOTIC F-BOX (MOF), which is essential for male meiotic progression. MOF belongs to the FBX subfamily and is predominantly active during leptotene to pachytene of prophase I. mof meiocytes display disrupted telomere bouquet formation, impaired pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and arrested meiocytes at late prophase I, followed by apoptosis. Although normal, programmed double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) form in mof mutants, foci of the phosphorylated histone variant γH2AX, a marker for DSBs, persist in the mutant, indicating that many of the DSBs remained unrepaired. The recruitment of Completion of meiosis I (COM1) and Radiation sensitive51C (RAD51C) to DSBs is severely compromised in mutant meiocytes, indicating that MOF is crucial for DSB end-processing and repair. Further analyses showed that MOF could physically interact with the rice SKP1-like Protein1 (OSK1), indicating that MOF functions as a component of the SCF E3 ligase to regulate meiotic progression in rice. Thus, this study reveals the essential role of an F-box protein in plant meiosis and provides helpful information for elucidating the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in plant meiotic progression. PMID:27436711

  7. MEIOTIC F-BOX Is Essential for Male Meiotic DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Rice.

    PubMed

    He, Yi; Wang, Chong; Higgins, James D; Yu, Junping; Zong, Jie; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dabing; Liang, Wanqi

    2016-08-01

    F-box proteins constitute a large superfamily in plants and play important roles in controlling many biological processes, but the roles of F-box proteins in male meiosis in plants remain unclear. Here, we identify the rice (Oryza sativa) F-box gene MEIOTIC F-BOX (MOF), which is essential for male meiotic progression. MOF belongs to the FBX subfamily and is predominantly active during leptotene to pachytene of prophase I. mof meiocytes display disrupted telomere bouquet formation, impaired pairing and synapsis of homologous chromosomes, and arrested meiocytes at late prophase I, followed by apoptosis. Although normal, programmed double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) form in mof mutants, foci of the phosphorylated histone variant γH2AX, a marker for DSBs, persist in the mutant, indicating that many of the DSBs remained unrepaired. The recruitment of Completion of meiosis I (COM1) and Radiation sensitive51C (RAD51C) to DSBs is severely compromised in mutant meiocytes, indicating that MOF is crucial for DSB end-processing and repair. Further analyses showed that MOF could physically interact with the rice SKP1-like Protein1 (OSK1), indicating that MOF functions as a component of the SCF E3 ligase to regulate meiotic progression in rice. Thus, this study reveals the essential role of an F-box protein in plant meiosis and provides helpful information for elucidating the roles of the ubiquitin proteasome system in plant meiotic progression. PMID:27436711

  8. The GTPase SPAG-1 orchestrates meiotic program by dictating meiotic resumption and cytoskeleton architecture in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chunjie; Wu, Di; Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Jiao, Xiaofei; Guan, Kaifeng; Huo, Lijun

    2016-06-01

    In mammals, a finite population of oocytes is generated during embryogenesis, and proper oocyte meiotic divisions are crucial for fertility. Sperm-associated antigen 1 (SPAG-1) has been implicated in infertility and tumorigenesis; however, its relevance in cell cycle programs remains rudimentary. Here we explore a novel role of SPAG-1 during oocyte meiotic progression. SPAG-1 associated with meiotic spindles and its depletion severely compromised M-phase entry (germinal vesicle breakdown [GVBD]) and polar body extrusion. The GVBD defect observed was due to an increase in intraoocyte cAMP abundance and decrease in ATP production, as confirmed by the activation of AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK). SPAG-1 RNA interference (RNAi)-elicited defective spindle morphogenesis was evidenced by the dysfunction of γ-tubulin, which resulted from substantially reduced phosphorylation of MAPK and irregularly dispersed distribution of phospho-MAPK around spindles instead of concentration at spindle poles. Significantly, actin expression abruptly decreased and formation of cortical granule-free domains, actin caps, and contractile ring disrupted by SPAG-1 RNAi. In addition, the spindle assembly checkpoint remained functional upon SPAG-1 depletion. The findings broaden our knowledge of SPAG-1, showing that it exerts a role in oocyte meiotic execution via its involvement in AMPK and MAPK signaling pathways. PMID:27053660

  9. Massive cortical reorganization in sighted Braille readers

    PubMed Central

    Siuda-Krzywicka, Katarzyna; Bola, Łukasz; Paplińska, Małgorzata; Sumera, Ewa; Jednoróg, Katarzyna; Marchewka, Artur; Śliwińska, Magdalena W; Amedi, Amir; Szwed, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The brain is capable of large-scale reorganization in blindness or after massive injury. Such reorganization crosses the division into separate sensory cortices (visual, somatosensory...). As its result, the visual cortex of the blind becomes active during tactile Braille reading. Although the possibility of such reorganization in the normal, adult brain has been raised, definitive evidence has been lacking. Here, we demonstrate such extensive reorganization in normal, sighted adults who learned Braille while their brain activity was investigated with fMRI and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Subjects showed enhanced activity for tactile reading in the visual cortex, including the visual word form area (VWFA) that was modulated by their Braille reading speed and strengthened resting-state connectivity between visual and somatosensory cortices. Moreover, TMS disruption of VWFA activity decreased their tactile reading accuracy. Our results indicate that large-scale reorganization is a viable mechanism recruited when learning complex skills. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10762.001 PMID:26976813

  10. Cortical reorganization in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Gilley, Phillip M; Sharma, Anu; Dorman, Michael F

    2008-11-01

    Congenital deafness leads to atypical organization of the auditory nervous system. However, the extent to which auditory pathways reorganize during deafness is not well understood. We recorded cortical auditory evoked potentials in normal hearing children and in congenitally deaf children fitted with cochlear implants. High-density EEG and source modeling revealed principal activity from auditory cortex in normal hearing and early implanted children. However, children implanted after a critical period of seven years revealed activity from parietotemporal cortex in response to auditory stimulation, demonstrating reorganized cortical pathways. Reorganization of central auditory pathways is limited by the age at which implantation occurs, and may help explain the benefits and limitations of implantation in congenitally deaf children. PMID:18775684

  11. Reorganizing the nursing home industry: a proposal.

    PubMed

    Shulman, D; Galanter, R

    1976-01-01

    This paper proposes a reorganization of the nursing home industry with capital facilities owned by government, but with management conducted through a system of competitive contracts with the private sector. The paper explicity demonstrates in real estate finance terms how the present system of private ownership of capital facilities inherently impedes providing a high quality of care. The authors believe that in the proposed industry reorganization, market forces, instead of working against quality care, would be supportive of quality care in a framework that would involve generally less regulation than exists today. PMID:1272543

  12. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Josie K.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Merriman, Julie A.; Jones, Keith T.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule–kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  13. DNA damage induces a meiotic arrest in mouse oocytes mediated by the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Collins, Josie K; Lane, Simon I R; Merriman, Julie A; Jones, Keith T

    2015-01-01

    Extensive damage to maternal DNA during meiosis causes infertility, birth defects and abortions. However, it is unknown if fully grown oocytes have a mechanism to prevent the creation of DNA-damaged embryos. Here we show that DNA damage activates a pathway involving the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) in response to chemically induced double strand breaks, UVB and ionizing radiation. DNA damage can occur either before or after nuclear envelope breakdown, and provides an effective block to anaphase-promoting complex activity, and consequently the formation of mature eggs. This contrasts with somatic cells, where DNA damage fails to affect mitotic progression. However, it uncovers a second function for the meiotic SAC, which in the context of detecting microtubule-kinetochore errors has hitherto been labelled as weak or ineffectual in mammalian oocytes. We propose that its essential role in the detection of DNA damage sheds new light on its biological purpose in mammalian female meiosis. PMID:26522232

  14. DNA methylation and demethylation events during meiotic prophase in the mouse testis.

    PubMed Central

    Trasler, J M; Hake, L E; Johnson, P A; Alcivar, A A; Millette, C F; Hecht, N B

    1990-01-01

    The genes encoding three different mammalian testis-specific nuclear chromatin proteins, mouse transition protein 1, mouse protamine 1, and mouse protamine 2, all of which are expressed postmeiotically, are marked by methylation early during spermatogenesis in the mouse. Analysis of DNA from the testes of prepubertal mice and isolated testicular cells revealed that transition protein 1 became progressively less methylated during spermatogenesis, while the two protamines became progressively more methylated; in contrast, the methylation of beta-actin, a gene expressed throughout spermatogenesis, did not change. These findings provide evidence that both de novo methylation and demethylation events are occurring after the completion of DNA replication, during meiotic prophase in the mouse testis. Images PMID:2320009

  15. A Nucleoporin at the Meiotic Kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Amanda M; Hawley, R Scott

    2016-09-12

    In this issue of Developmental Cell, Hattersley et al. (2016) use the unique biology of meiosis I, in which the cell can exit the division without reforming the nuclear envelope, to uncover an intriguing role of the nucleoporin MEL-28 in mediating chromosome segregation via its interaction with PP1 at the kinetochore. PMID:27623378

  16. Effects of clinostat rotation on mouse meiotic maturation in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, D. J.; Grills, G. S.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on meiosis, fertilization, and early embryonic development in mammals are being examined by using a clinostat to reorient the cells with respect to the gravity vector. A clinostat capable of supporting mammalian cells in tissue culture has been developed. Initial studies have focused on examining the effects of clinostat rotation on meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. Oocytes recovered from ovarian follicles were subjected to clinostat rotation on a horizontal or vertical axis or to static conditions for a 16 hr period. No gross morphological changes and no effects on germinal vesicle breakdown were observed under any rotation conditions (1/4, 1, 10, 30, 100 RPM). Success of meiotic progression to Metaphase II was comparable among experimental and control groups except at 100 RPM, where a slight inhibition was observed.

  17. A computational model predicts Xenopus meiotic spindle organization

    PubMed Central

    Loughlin, Rose

    2010-01-01

    The metaphase spindle is a dynamic bipolar structure crucial for proper chromosome segregation, but how microtubules (MTs) are organized within the bipolar architecture remains controversial. To explore MT organization along the pole-to-pole axis, we simulated meiotic spindle assembly in two dimensions using dynamic MTs, a MT cross-linking force, and a kinesin-5–like motor. The bipolar structures that form consist of antiparallel fluxing MTs, but spindle pole formation requires the addition of a NuMA-like minus-end cross-linker and directed transport of MT depolymerization activity toward minus ends. Dynamic instability and minus-end depolymerization generate realistic MT lifetimes and a truncated exponential MT length distribution. Keeping the number of MTs in the simulation constant, we explored the influence of two different MT nucleation pathways on spindle organization. When nucleation occurs throughout the spindle, the simulation quantitatively reproduces features of meiotic spindles assembled in Xenopus egg extracts. PMID:21173114

  18. Alternative meiotic chromatid segregation in the holocentric plant Luzula elegans

    PubMed Central

    Heckmann, Stefan; Jankowska, Maja; Schubert, Veit; Kumke, Katrin; Ma, Wei; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Holocentric chromosomes occur in a number of independent eukaryotic lineages. They form holokinetic kinetochores along the entire poleward chromatid surfaces, and owing to this alternative chromosome structure, species with holocentric chromosomes cannot use the two-step loss of cohesion during meiosis typical for monocentric chromosomes. Here we show that the plant Luzula elegans maintains a holocentric chromosome architecture and behaviour throughout meiosis, and in contrast to monopolar sister centromere orientation, the unfused holokinetic sister centromeres behave as two distinct functional units during meiosis I, resulting in sister chromatid separation. Homologous non-sister chromatids remain terminally linked after metaphase I, by satellite DNA-enriched chromatin threads, until metaphase II. They then separate at anaphase II. Thus, an inverted sequence of meiotic sister chromatid segregation occurs. This alternative meiotic process is most likely one possible adaptation to handle a holocentric chromosome architecture and behaviour during meiosis. PMID:25296379

  19. Replication Origin Selection Regulates the Distribution of Meiotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pei-Yun Jenny; Nurse, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Summary The program of DNA replication, defined by the temporal and spatial pattern of origin activation, is altered during development and in cancers. However, whether changes in origin usage play a role in regulating specific biological processes remains unknown. We investigated the consequences of modifying origin selection on meiosis in fission yeast. Genome-wide changes in the replication program of premeiotic S phase do not affect meiotic progression, indicating that meiosis neither activates nor requires a particular origin pattern. In contrast, local changes in origin efficiencies between different replication programs lead to changes in Rad51 recombination factor binding and recombination frequencies in these domains. We observed similar results for Rad51 when changes in efficiencies were generated by directly targeting expression of the Cdc45 replication factor. We conclude that origin selection is a key determinant for organizing meiotic recombination, providing evidence that genome-wide modifications in replication program can modulate cellular physiology. PMID:24560273

  20. SEX-RATIO MEIOTIC DRIVE AND INTERSPECIFIC COMPETITION

    PubMed Central

    Unckless, Robert L.; Clark, Andrew G.

    2014-01-01

    It has long been known that processes occurring within a species may impact the interactions between species. For example, since competitive ability is sensitive to parameters including reproductive rate, carrying capacity and competition efficiency, the outcome of interspecific competition may be influenced by any process that alters these attributes. While several such scenarios have been discussed, the influence of selfish genetic elements within one species on competition between species has not received theoretical treatment. We show that, with strong competition, sex-ratio meiotic drive systems can result in a significant shift in community composition because the effective birth rate in the population may be increased by a female-biased sex-ratio. Using empirical data we attempt to estimate the magnitude of this effect in several Drosophila species. We infer that meiotic drive elements, selfish genetic elements within species, can provide a substantial competitive advantage to that species within a community. PMID:24835887

  1. Real-time imaging of meiotic chromosomes in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Koszul, Romain; Weiner, Beth M.

    2016-01-01

    Important information on cellular physiology can be obtained by directly observing living cells. The nucleus and the chromatin within are of particular interest to many researchers. Monitoring the behavior of specific DNA loci in the living cell is now commonly achieved through the insertion of binding sites for fluorescently tagged proteins at the sequence of interest (e.g. reference 1). However, visualizing the behavior of full length chromosomes can only be achieved when they constitute discrete, relatively well individualized units. During meiotic mid-prophase, chromosomes of budding yeast are well-organized structures that present such characteristics, making them remarkably suited for visualization. Here we describe the optimized protocols and techniques that allow monitoring of chromosome behavior during meiotic prophase in budding yeast. PMID:19685320

  2. Fiscal Implications of School District Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, L. Dean

    1979-01-01

    In states with a large number of small school districts, such as Colorado (exemplified by the the case study examined in this paper), reorganization would seemingly result in significant economies of scale and equalization of the tax bases that support the schools. (Author)

  3. Reorganizing the Biological Sciences at Berkeley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trow, Martin A.

    1983-01-01

    The University of California at Berkeley's substantial reorganization of the biological sciences due to internal and external needs is chronicled, focusing on the coordinated efforts of the institution and the strong, supportive leadership of the chancellor. The story is presented as an unusual case of institutional leadership within a highly…

  4. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 8, GRADE EIGHT SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE FOURTEENTH IN A SERIES OF 17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE EIGHTH GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. A CHART INDICATES CONCEPT BRIEF SUMMARY OF SUBJECT MATTER CONTENT FOR GRADE 8, AND A CHART OF THE GRADE CONTENT FOR…

  5. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 1, GRADE ONE SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE SECOND IN A SERIES OF17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE FIRST GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. A CHART INDICATES CONCEPT TO BE TAUGHT IN GRADES K-3 FOR EACH OF THE FOUR AREAS AROUND WHICH THE PROGRAM…

  6. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 3, GRADE THREE SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE FOURTH IN A SERIES OF 17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE THIRD GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. A CHART INDICATES CONCEPTS TO BE TAUGHT IN GRADES K-3 FOR EACH OF THE FOUR AREAS AROUND WHICH THE PROGRAM…

  7. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 2, GRADE TWO SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE THIRD IN A SERIES OF 17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE SECOND GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. A CHART INDICATES CONCEPTS TO BE TAUGHT IN GRADES K-3, IN EACH OF THE FOUR AREAS AROUND WHICH THE PROGRAM…

  8. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, K, KINDERGARTEN SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE KINDERGARTEN TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. A CHART INDICATES CONCEPTS TO BE TAUGHT IN GRADES K-3 FOR EACH OF THE FOUR AREAS AROUND WHICH THE PROGRAM IS DESIGNED. THE AREAS ARE (1) THE…

  9. Implementation of meiosis prophase I programme requires a conserved retinoid-independent stabilizer of meiotic transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Abby, Emilie; Tourpin, Sophie; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Daniel, Katrin; Messiaen, Sébastien; Moison, Delphine; Guerquin, Justine; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Armengaud, Jean; Langa, Francina; Toth, Attila; Martini, Emmanuelle; Livera, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is crucially dependent on meiosis, a conserved, specialized cell division programme that is essential for the production of haploid gametes. Here we demonstrate that fertility and the implementation of the meiotic programme require a previously uncharacterized meiosis-specific protein, MEIOC. Meioc invalidation in mice induces early and pleiotropic meiotic defects in males and females. MEIOC prevents meiotic transcript degradation and interacts with an RNA helicase that binds numerous meiotic mRNAs. Our results indicate that proper engagement into meiosis necessitates the specific stabilization of meiotic transcripts, a previously little-appreciated feature in mammals. Remarkably, the upregulation of MEIOC at the onset of meiosis does not require retinoic acid and STRA8 signalling. Thus, we propose that the complete induction of the meiotic programme requires both retinoic acid-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The latter process involving post-transcriptional regulation likely represents an ancestral mechanism, given that MEIOC homologues are conserved throughout multicellular animals. PMID:26742488

  10. The role of chromatin modifications in progression through mouse meiotic prophase.

    PubMed

    Crichton, James H; Playfoot, Christopher J; Adams, Ian R

    2014-03-20

    Meiosis is a key event in gametogenesis that generates new combinations of genetic information and is required to reduce the chromosome content of the gametes. Meiotic chromosomes undergo a number of specialised events during prophase to allow meiotic recombination, homologous chromosome synapsis and reductional chromosome segregation to occur. In mammalian cells, DNA physically associates with histones to form chromatin, which can be modified by methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and acetylation to help regulate higher order chromatin structure, gene expression, and chromosome organisation. Recent studies have identified some of the enzymes responsible for generating chromatin modifications in meiotic mammalian cells, and shown that these chromatin modifying enzymes are required for key meiosis-specific events that occur during meiotic prophase. This review will discuss the role of chromatin modifications in meiotic recombination, homologous chromosome synapsis and regulation of meiotic gene expression in mammals. PMID:24656230

  11. Implementation of meiosis prophase I programme requires a conserved retinoid-independent stabilizer of meiotic transcripts.

    PubMed

    Abby, Emilie; Tourpin, Sophie; Ribeiro, Jonathan; Daniel, Katrin; Messiaen, Sébastien; Moison, Delphine; Guerquin, Justine; Gaillard, Jean-Charles; Armengaud, Jean; Langa, Francina; Toth, Attila; Martini, Emmanuelle; Livera, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is crucially dependent on meiosis, a conserved, specialized cell division programme that is essential for the production of haploid gametes. Here we demonstrate that fertility and the implementation of the meiotic programme require a previously uncharacterized meiosis-specific protein, MEIOC. Meioc invalidation in mice induces early and pleiotropic meiotic defects in males and females. MEIOC prevents meiotic transcript degradation and interacts with an RNA helicase that binds numerous meiotic mRNAs. Our results indicate that proper engagement into meiosis necessitates the specific stabilization of meiotic transcripts, a previously little-appreciated feature in mammals. Remarkably, the upregulation of MEIOC at the onset of meiosis does not require retinoic acid and STRA8 signalling. Thus, we propose that the complete induction of the meiotic programme requires both retinoic acid-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The latter process involving post-transcriptional regulation likely represents an ancestral mechanism, given that MEIOC homologues are conserved throughout multicellular animals. PMID:26742488

  12. In vitro follicle growth supports human oocyte meiotic maturation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shuo; Zhang, Jiyang; Romero, Megan M.; Smith, Kristin N.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro follicle growth is a potential approach to preserve fertility for young women who are facing a risk of premature ovarian failure (POF) caused by radiation or chemotherapy. Our two-step follicle culture strategy recapitulated the dynamic human follicle growth environment in vitro. Follicles developed from the preantral to antral stage, and, for the first time, produced meiotically competent metaphase II (MII) oocytes after in vitro maturation (IVM). PMID:26612176

  13. In vitro follicle growth supports human oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shuo; Zhang, Jiyang; Romero, Megan M; Smith, Kristin N; Shea, Lonnie D; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2015-01-01

    In vitro follicle growth is a potential approach to preserve fertility for young women who are facing a risk of premature ovarian failure (POF) caused by radiation or chemotherapy. Our two-step follicle culture strategy recapitulated the dynamic human follicle growth environment in vitro. Follicles developed from the preantral to antral stage, and, for the first time, produced meiotically competent metaphase II (MII) oocytes after in vitro maturation (IVM). PMID:26612176

  14. Evidence for meiotic drive at the myotonic dystrophy locus

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, A.M.; Barnetson, R.A.; Phillips, M.F.

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM), an autosomal dominant disorder, is the most common form of adult muscular dystrophy, affecting at least 1 in 8000 of the population. It is a multisystemic disorder, primarily characterized by myotonia, muscle wasting and cataract. The molecular basis of DM is an expanded CTG repeat located within the 3{prime} untranslated region of a putative serine-threonine protein kinase on chromosome 19q13.3. DM exhibits anticipation, that is, with successive generations there is increasing disease severity and earlier age of onset. This mechanism and the fact that the origin of the disease has been attributed to one or a small number of founder chromosomes suggests that, in time, DM should die out. Meiotic drive has been described as a way in which certain alleles are transmitted to succeeding generations in preference to others: preferential transmission of large CTG alleles may account for their continued existence in the gene pool. There is evidence that a CTG allele with > 19 repeats may gradually increase in repeat number over many generations until it is sufficiently large to give a DM phenotype. We report a study of 495 transmissions from individuals heterozygous for the CTG repeat and with repeat numbers within the normal range (5-30). Alleles were simply classified as large or small relative to the other allele in an individual. Of 242 male meioses, 126 transmissions from parent to child were of the larger allele to their offspring (57.7%, p=0.014). This shows that there is strong evidence for meiotic drive favoring the transmission of the larger DM allele in unaffected individuals. Contrary to a previous report of meiotic drive in the male, we have shown that females preferentially transmit the larger DM allele. Taken together, the data suggest the occurrence of meiotic drive in both males and females in this locus.

  15. Unresolved issues in pre-meiotic anther development

    PubMed Central

    Kelliher, Timothy; Egger, Rachel L.; Zhang, Han; Walbot, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the diversity of other floral organs, the steps in anther ontogeny, final cell types, and overall organ shape are remarkably conserved among Angiosperms. Defects in pre-meiotic anthers that alter cellular composition or function typically result in male-sterility. Given the ease of identifying male-sterile mutants, dozens of genes with key roles in early anther development have been identified and cloned in model species, ordered by time of action and spatiotemporal expression, and used to propose explanatory models for critical steps in cell fate specification. Despite rapid progress, fundamental issues in anther development remain unresolved, and it is unclear if insights from one species can be applied to others. Here we construct a comparison of Arabidopsis, rice, and maize immature anthers to pinpoint distinctions in developmental pace. We analyze the mechanisms by which archesporial (pre-meiotic) cells are specified distinct from the soma, discuss what constitutes meiotic preparation, and review what is known about the secondary parietal layer and its terminal periclinal division that generates the tapetal and middle layers. Finally, roles for small RNAs are examined, focusing on the grass-specific phasiRNAs. PMID:25101101

  16. TDM1 Regulation Determines the Number of Meiotic Divisions.

    PubMed

    Cifuentes, Marta; Jolivet, Sylvie; Cromer, Laurence; Harashima, Hirofumi; Bulankova, Petra; Renne, Charlotte; Crismani, Wayne; Nomura, Yuko; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Sugimoto, Keiko; Schnittger, Arp; Riha, Karel; Mercier, Raphael

    2016-02-01

    Cell cycle control must be modified at meiosis to allow two divisions to follow a single round of DNA replication, resulting in ploidy reduction. The mechanisms that ensure meiosis termination at the end of the second and not at the end of first division are poorly understood. We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana TDM1, which has been previously shown to be essential for meiotic termination, interacts directly with the Anaphase-Promoting Complex. Further, mutations in TDM1 in a conserved putative Cyclin-Dependant Kinase (CDK) phosphorylation site (T16-P17) dominantly provoked premature meiosis termination after the first division, and the production of diploid spores and gametes. The CDKA;1-CYCA1.2/TAM complex, which is required to prevent premature meiotic exit, phosphorylated TDM1 at T16 in vitro. Finally, while CYCA1;2/TAM was previously shown to be expressed only at meiosis I, TDM1 is present throughout meiosis. These data, together with epistasis analysis, lead us to propose that TDM1 is an APC/C component whose function is to ensure meiosis termination at the end of meiosis II, and whose activity is inhibited at meiosis I by CDKA;1-TAM-mediated phosphorylation to prevent premature meiotic exit. This provides a molecular mechanism for the differential decision of performing an additional round of division, or not, at the end of meiosis I and II, respectively. PMID:26871453

  17. TDM1 Regulation Determines the Number of Meiotic Divisions

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes, Marta; Jolivet, Sylvie; Cromer, Laurence; Harashima, Hirofumi; Bulankova, Petra; Renne, Charlotte; Crismani, Wayne; Nomura, Yuko; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Sugimoto, Keiko; Schnittger, Arp; Riha, Karel; Mercier, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle control must be modified at meiosis to allow two divisions to follow a single round of DNA replication, resulting in ploidy reduction. The mechanisms that ensure meiosis termination at the end of the second and not at the end of first division are poorly understood. We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana TDM1, which has been previously shown to be essential for meiotic termination, interacts directly with the Anaphase-Promoting Complex. Further, mutations in TDM1 in a conserved putative Cyclin-Dependant Kinase (CDK) phosphorylation site (T16-P17) dominantly provoked premature meiosis termination after the first division, and the production of diploid spores and gametes. The CDKA;1-CYCA1.2/TAM complex, which is required to prevent premature meiotic exit, phosphorylated TDM1 at T16 in vitro. Finally, while CYCA1;2/TAM was previously shown to be expressed only at meiosis I, TDM1 is present throughout meiosis. These data, together with epistasis analysis, lead us to propose that TDM1 is an APC/C component whose function is to ensure meiosis termination at the end of meiosis II, and whose activity is inhibited at meiosis I by CDKA;1-TAM-mediated phosphorylation to prevent premature meiotic exit. This provides a molecular mechanism for the differential decision of performing an additional round of division, or not, at the end of meiosis I and II, respectively. PMID:26871453

  18. Meiotic behaviour of evolutionary sex-autosome translocations in Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Vozdova, Miluse; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Fernandez, Jonathan; Cernohorska, Halina; Frohlich, Jan; Sebestova, Hana; Kubickova, Svatava; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    The recurrent occurrence of sex-autosome translocations during mammalian evolution suggests common mechanisms enabling a precise control of meiotic synapsis, recombination and inactivation of sex chromosomes. We used immunofluorescence and FISH to study the meiotic behaviour of sex chromosomes in six species of Bovidae with evolutionary sex-autosome translocations (Tragelaphus strepsiceros, Taurotragus oryx, Tragelaphus imberbis, Tragelaphus spekii, Gazella leptoceros and Nanger dama ruficollis). The autosomal regions of fused sex chromosomes showed normal synapsis with their homologous counterparts. Synapsis in the pseudoautosomal region (PAR) leads to the formation of characteristic bivalent (in T. imberbis and T. spekii with X;BTA13/Y;BTA13), trivalent (in T. strepsiceros and T. oryx with X/Y;BTA13 and G. leptoceros with X;BTA5/Y) and quadrivalent (in N. dama ruficollis with X;BTA5/Y;BTA16) structures at pachynema. However, when compared with other mammals, the number of pachynema lacking MLH1 foci in the PAR was relatively high, especially in T. imberbis and T. spekii, species with both sex chromosomes involved in sex autosome translocations. Meiotic transcriptional inactivation of the sex-autosome translocations assessed by γH2AX staining was restricted to their gonosomal regions. Despite intraspecies differences, the evolutionary fixation of sex-autosome translocations among bovids appears to involve general mechanisms ensuring sex chromosome pairing, synapsis, recombination and inactivation. PMID:27136937

  19. Unresolved issues in pre-meiotic anther development.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, Timothy; Egger, Rachel L; Zhang, Han; Walbot, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Compared to the diversity of other floral organs, the steps in anther ontogeny, final cell types, and overall organ shape are remarkably conserved among Angiosperms. Defects in pre-meiotic anthers that alter cellular composition or function typically result in male-sterility. Given the ease of identifying male-sterile mutants, dozens of genes with key roles in early anther development have been identified and cloned in model species, ordered by time of action and spatiotemporal expression, and used to propose explanatory models for critical steps in cell fate specification. Despite rapid progress, fundamental issues in anther development remain unresolved, and it is unclear if insights from one species can be applied to others. Here we construct a comparison of Arabidopsis, rice, and maize immature anthers to pinpoint distinctions in developmental pace. We analyze the mechanisms by which archesporial (pre-meiotic) cells are specified distinct from the soma, discuss what constitutes meiotic preparation, and review what is known about the secondary parietal layer and its terminal periclinal division that generates the tapetal and middle layers. Finally, roles for small RNAs are examined, focusing on the grass-specific phasiRNAs. PMID:25101101

  20. A meiotic DNA polymerase from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed Central

    Takami, K; Matsuda, S; Sono, A; Sakaguchi, K

    1994-01-01

    A meiotic DNA polymerase [DNA nucleotidyltransferase (DNA-directed), EC 2.7.7.7], which likely has a role in meiotic DNA repair, was isolated from a mushroom, Agaricus bisporus. The purified fraction displays three bands in SDS/PAGE, at molecular masses of 72 kDa, 65 kDa and 36 kDa. Optimal activity is at pH 7.0-8.0 in the presence of 5 mM Mg2+ and 50 mM KCl and at 28-30 degrees C, which is the temperature for meiosis. This enzyme is resistant to N-ethylmaleimide and sensitive to 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, suggesting that it is a beta-like DNA polymerase. These characteristics are similar to those of Coprinus DNA polymerase beta [Sakaguchi and Lu (1982) Mol. Cell. Biol. 2, 752-757]. In Western-blot analysis, the antiserum against the Coprinus polymerase reacts only with the 65 kDa band, which coincides with the molecular mass of the Coprinus polymerase. Western-blot analysis also showed that the antiserum could react with crude extracts not only from the Agaricales family, to which Agaricus and Coprinus belong, but also from different mushroom families and Saccharomyces. The Agaricus polymerase activity can be found only in the meiotic-cell-rich fraction, but the enzyme is also present in the somatic cells in an inactive state. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8172591

  1. Cilostazol Improves Developmental Competence of Pig Oocytes by Increasing Intraoocyte Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Level and Delaying Meiotic Resumption.

    PubMed

    Elahi, F; Lee, H; Lee, Y; Park, B; Lee, J; Hyun, S-H; Lee, E

    2016-04-01

    Cilostazol (CLZ) is a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) modulator that influences the steady state of the meiotic stage. This study was conducted to determine the effects of CLZ treatment during in vitro maturation (IVM) on developmental competence of pig oocytes. Immature oocytes were exposed to 0 (control), 0.5, 2 and 4 μm CLZ during the first 22 h of IVM. Nuclear maturation, intraoocyte glutathione content and embryo cleavage after parthenogenesis (PA) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) were not influenced by CLZ at any concentrations. However, 4 μm CLZ significantly (p < 0.05) improved blastocyst formation after PA (52.1% vs 38.7-46.0%) and SCNT relative to other concentrations (40.8% vs 25.0-30.7%). The mean cell numbers of SCNT blastocysts were significantly increased by 4 μm CLZ compared to the control (42.6 cells vs 35.3 cells/blastocyst). CLZ treatment significantly increased the intraoocyte cAMP level and effectively arrested oocytes at the germinal vesicle (GV) and GV break down stages compared to the control (74.5% vs 45.4%). Our results demonstrated that improved developmental competence of PA and SCNT pig embryos occurred via better synchronization of nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation induced by increased cAMP and delayed meiotic resumption after CLZ treatment. PMID:26834044

  2. An expanded inventory of conserved meiotic genes provides evidence for sex in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Shehre-Banoo; Pightling, Arthur W; Stefaniak, Lauren M; Schurko, Andrew M; Logsdon, John M

    2008-01-01

    Meiosis is a defining feature of eukaryotes but its phylogenetic distribution has not been broadly determined, especially among eukaryotic microorganisms (i.e. protists)-which represent the majority of eukaryotic 'supergroups'. We surveyed genomes of animals, fungi, plants and protists for meiotic genes, focusing on the evolutionarily divergent parasitic protist Trichomonas vaginalis. We identified homologs of 29 components of the meiotic recombination machinery, as well as the synaptonemal and meiotic sister chromatid cohesion complexes. T. vaginalis has orthologs of 27 of 29 meiotic genes, including eight of nine genes that encode meiosis-specific proteins in model organisms. Although meiosis has not been observed in T. vaginalis, our findings suggest it is either currently sexual or a recent asexual, consistent with observed, albeit unusual, sexual cycles in their distant parabasalid relatives, the hypermastigotes. T. vaginalis may use meiotic gene homologs to mediate homologous recombination and genetic exchange. Overall, this expanded inventory of meiotic genes forms a useful "meiosis detection toolkit". Our analyses indicate that these meiotic genes arose, or were already present, early in eukaryotic evolution; thus, the eukaryotic cenancestor contained most or all components of this set and was likely capable of performing meiotic recombination using near-universal meiotic machinery. PMID:18663385

  3. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3 Section 575.3 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize...

  4. 12 CFR 575.3 - Mutual holding company reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Mutual holding company reorganizations. 575.3 Section 575.3 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.3 Mutual holding company reorganizations. A mutual savings association may reorganize...

  5. 12 CFR 575.6 - Contents of Reorganization Plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contents of Reorganization Plans. 575.6 Section 575.6 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES § 575.6 Contents of Reorganization Plans. Each Reorganization Plan shall contain a complete description of all significant terms of...

  6. Seafloor Spreading Reorganization South of Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, R. N.; Martinez, F.; Benediktsdottir, A.; Hoskuldsson, A.

    2011-12-01

    There is a major ongoing diachronous reorganization of North Atlantic seafloor spreading occurring at present south of Iceland, from an orthogonal ridge/transform geometry to the present oblique spreading geometry without transform faults on the Reykjanes Ridge. This reorganization is presently interpreted as a thermal phenomenon, with a pulse of warmer mantle expanding away from the Iceland plume causing a progressive change in subaxial mantle rheology from brittle to ductile, so that transform faults can no longer be maintained. Given that this is certainly the most obvious and arguably the type-example of active plate boundary reorganization, it is somewhat surprising that a thermal mechanism has near universal acceptance here whereas most if not all other seafloor spreading reorganizations are equally universally thought to result from the tectonic rift propagation mechanism. This suggests the possibility that either the thermal model might be wrong here, or that the propagating rift (PR) model might be wrong elsewhere. The reason the PR alternative was ignored here was that the younger seafloor record flanking the Reykjanes Ridge consisting of V-shaped ridges, troughs & scarps (VSRs) enclosed by the reorganization wake seemed to prove that there had been no rift propagation. It had long been thought that these VSRs were symmetric about the spreading axis, & if this conventional wisdom (that led directly to the pulsing Iceland plume model) were true, rift propagation, which must produce asymmetry, could not have occurred. However, our expedition collected marine geophysical data that showed that the VSRs actually have an asymmetric geometry consistent with rift propagation, not with previous pulsing plume models, & thus they can no longer be considered convincing proof of a pulsing Iceland plume. Although we had previously noted that plume pulses might drive the propagators away from Iceland, a significant new result (Benediktsdóttir et al., 2011) is that

  7. The Dissection of Meiotic Chromosome Movement in Mice Using an In Vivo Electroporation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Shibuya, Hiroki; Morimoto, Akihiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis, the rapid movement of telomeres along the nuclear envelope (NE) facilitates pairing/synapsis of homologous chromosomes. In mammals, the mechanical properties of chromosome movement and the cytoskeletal structures responsible for it remain poorly understood. Here, applying an in vivo electroporation (EP) technique in live mouse testis, we achieved the quick visualization of telomere, chromosome axis and microtubule organizing center (MTOC) movements. For the first time, we defined prophase sub-stages of live spermatocytes morphologically according to GFP-TRF1 and GFP-SCP3 signals. We show that rapid telomere movement and subsequent nuclear rotation persist from leptotene/zygotene to pachytene, and then decline in diplotene stage concomitant with the liberation of SUN1 from telomeres. Further, during bouquet stage, telomeres are constrained near the MTOC, resulting in the transient suppression of telomere mobility and nuclear rotation. MTs are responsible for these movements by forming cable-like structures on the NE, and, probably, by facilitating the rail-tacking movements of telomeres on the MT cables. In contrast, actin regulates the oscillatory changes in nuclear shape. Our data provide the mechanical scheme for meiotic chromosome movement throughout prophase I in mammals. PMID:25502938

  8. Meiotic recombination initiated by a double-strand break in rad50{Delta} yeast cells otherwise unable to initiate meiotic recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Malkova, A.; Haber, J.E.; Dawson, D.

    1996-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have developed a system to compare the properties of meiotic DSBs with those created by the site-specific HO endonuclease. HO endonuclease was expressed under the control of the meiotic-specific SPO13 promoter, creating a DSB at a single site on one of yeast`s 16 chromosomes. In Rad{sup +} strains the times of appearance of the HO-induced DSBs and of subsequent recombinants are coincident with those induced by normal meiotic DSBs. Physical monitoring of DNA showed that SPO13::HO induced gene conversions both in Rad{sup +} and in rad50{Delta} cells that cannot initiate normal meiotic DSBs. We find that the RAD50 gene is important, but not essential, for recombination even after a DSB has been created in a meiotic cell. In rad50{Delta} cells, some DSBs are not repaired until a broken chromosome has been packaged into a spore and is subsequently germinated. This suggests that a broken chromosome does not signal an arrest of progression through meiosis. The recombination defect in rad50{Delta} diploids is not, however, meiotic specific, as mitotic rad50 diploids, experiencing an HO-induced DSB, exhibit similar departures from wild-type recombination. 57 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Actin-mediated motion of meiotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Koszul, R.; Kim, K. P.; Prentiss, M.; Kleckner, N.; Kameoka, S.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Chromosome movement is prominent during meiosis. Here, using a combination of in vitro and in vivo approaches, we elucidate the basis for dynamic mid-prophase chromosome movement in budding yeast. Diverse finding reveal a process in which, at the pachytene stage, individual telomere/nuclear envelope (NE) ensembles attach passively to, and then move in concert with, nucleus-hugging actin cables that are continuous with the global cytoskeletal actin network. Other chromosomes move in concert with lead chromosome(s). The same process, in modulated form, explains the zygotene "bouquet" configuration in which, immediately preceding pachytene, chromosome ends colocalize dynamically in a restricted region of the NE. Mechanical properties of the system and biological roles of mid-prophase movement for meiosis, including recombination, are discussed. PMID:18585353

  10. Neonatal bisphenol A exposure induces meiotic arrest and apoptosis of spermatogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Meina; Bu, Pengli; Li, Fengjie; Lan, Shijian; Wu, Hongjuan; Yuan, Lu; Wang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used industrial plasticizer, which is ubiquitously present in the environment and organisms. As an endocrine disruptor, BPA has caused significant concerns regarding its interference with reproductive function. However, little is known about the impact of BPA exposure on early testicular development. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of neonatal BPA exposure on the first wave of spermatogenesis. Newborn male mice were subcutaneously injected with BPA (0.01, 0.1 and 5 mg/kg body weight) daily from postnatal day (PND) 1 to 21. Histological analysis of testes at PND 22 revealed that BPA-treated testes contained mostly spermatogonia and spermatocytes with markedly less round spermatids, indicating signs of meiotic arrest. Terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay showed that BPA treatment significantly increased the number of apoptotic germ cells per tubule, which corroborated the observation of meiotic arrest. In addition, BPA caused abnormal proliferation of germ cells as revealed by Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemical staining. Mechanistically, BPA-treated testes displayed a complete lack of BOULE expression, which is a conserved key regulator for spermatogenesis. Moreover, BPA significantly increased the expression of estrogen receptor (ER) α and β in the developing testis. The present study demonstrated that neonatal BPA exposure disrupted meiosis progression during the first wave of spermatogenesis, which may be, at least in part, due to inhibition of BOULE expression and/or up-regulation of ERα/β expression in BPA-exposed developing testis. PMID:26863571

  11. Mouse Emi2 as a distinctive regulatory hub in second meiotic metaphase.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toru; Suzuki, Emi; Yoshida, Naoko; Kubo, Atsuko; Li, Hongmei; Okuda, Erina; Amanai, Manami; Perry, Anthony C F

    2010-10-01

    The oocytes of vertebrates are typically arrested at metaphase II (mII) by the cytostatic factor Emi2 until fertilization. Regulatory mechanisms in Xenopus Emi2 (xEmi2) are understood in detail but contrastingly little is known about the corresponding mechanisms in mammals. Here, we analyze Emi2 and its regulatory neighbours at the molecular level in intact mouse oocytes. Emi2, but not xEmi2, exhibited nuclear targeting. Unlike xEmi2, separable N- and C-terminal domains of mouse Emi2 modulated metaphase establishment and maintenance, respectively, through indirect and direct mechanisms. The C-terminal activity was mapped to the potential phosphorylation target Tx(5)SxS, a destruction box (D-box), a lattice of Zn(2+)-coordinating residues and an RL domain. The minimal region of Emi2 required for its cytostatic activity was mapped to a region containing these motifs, from residue 491 to the C terminus. The cytostatic factor Mos-MAPK promoted Emi2-dependent metaphase establishment, but Mos autonomously disappeared from meiotically competent mII oocytes. The N-terminal Plx1-interacting phosphodegron of xEmi2 was apparently shifted to within a minimal fragment (residues 51-300) of mouse Emi2 that also contained a calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylation motif and which was efficiently degraded during mII exit. Two equimolar CaMKII gamma isoform variants were present in mII oocytes, neither of which phosphorylated Emi2 in vitro, consistent with the involvement of additional factors. No evidence was found that calcineurin is required for mouse mII exit. These data support a model in which mammalian meiotic establishment, maintenance and exit converge upon a modular Emi2 hub via evolutionarily conserved and divergent mechanisms. PMID:20724447

  12. Reorganizing the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Rettig, Richard A

    2004-01-01

    A committee of the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine recently released a report on reorganizing the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This report responds to a request by Congress in connection with the fiscal year 2001 budget for the NIH. The report contains some pragmatic proposals, avoids postulating an ideal NIH but does propose a radical new "special programs office" that would function as does the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and advocates that clinical research be strengthened. PMID:15002650

  13. Cortical Reorganization following Injury Early in Life

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Moran; Shiran, Shelly Irene; Weinstein, Maya; Myers, Vicki; Tarrasch, Ricardo; Schertz, Mitchell; Fattal-Valevski, Aviva; Miller, Elka; Gordon, Andrew M.; Green, Dido; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2016-01-01

    The brain has a remarkable capacity for reorganization following injury, especially during the first years of life. Knowledge of structural reorganization and its consequences following perinatal injury is sparse. Here we studied changes in brain tissue volume, morphology, perfusion, and integrity in children with hemiplegia compared to typically developing children, using MRI. Children with hemiplegia demonstrated reduced total cerebral volume, with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and reduced total white matter volumes, with no differences in total gray matter volume, compared to typically developing children. An increase in cortical thickness at the hemisphere contralateral to the lesion (CLH) was detected in motor and language areas, which may reflect compensation for the gray matter loss in the lesion area or retention of ipsilateral pathways. In addition, reduced cortical thickness, perfusion, and surface area were detected in limbic areas. Increased CSF volume and precentral cortical thickness and reduced white matter volume were correlated with worse motor performance. Brain reorganization of the gray matter within the CLH, while not necessarily indicating better outcome, is suggested as a response to neuronal deficits following injury early in life. PMID:27298741

  14. Maternal Setdb1 Is Required for Meiotic Progression and Preimplantation Development in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesun; Zhao, Hongbo; Dan, Jiameng; Kim, Soojin; Hardikar, Swanand; Hollowell, Debra; Lin, Kevin; Lu, Yue; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Chen, Taiping

    2016-04-01

    Oocyte meiotic progression and maternal-to-zygote transition are accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. The functional significance of these changes and the key epigenetic regulators involved are largely unknown. Here we show that Setdb1, a lysine methyltransferase, controls the global level of histone H3 lysine 9 di-methyl (H3K9me2) mark in growing oocytes. Conditional deletion of Setdb1 in developing oocytes leads to meiotic arrest at the germinal vesicle and meiosis I stages, resulting in substantially fewer mature eggs. Embryos derived from these eggs exhibit severe defects in cell cycle progression, progressive delays in preimplantation development, and degeneration before reaching the blastocyst stage. Rescue experiments by expressing wild-type or inactive Setdb1 in Setdb1-deficient oocytes suggest that the catalytic activity of Setdb1 is essential for meiotic progression and early embryogenesis. Mechanistically, up-regulation of Cdc14b, a dual-specificity phosphatase that inhibits meiotic progression, greatly contributes to the meiotic arrest phenotype. Setdb1 deficiency also leads to derepression of transposons and increased DNA damage in oocytes, which likely also contribute to meiotic defects. Thus, Setdb1 is a maternal-effect gene that controls meiotic progression and is essential for early embryogenesis. Our results uncover an important link between the epigenetic machinery and the major signaling pathway governing meiotic progression. PMID:27070551

  15. Maternal Setdb1 Is Required for Meiotic Progression and Preimplantation Development in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dan, Jiameng; Kim, Soojin; Hardikar, Swanand; Hollowell, Debra; Lin, Kevin; Lu, Yue; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Chen, Taiping

    2016-01-01

    Oocyte meiotic progression and maternal-to-zygote transition are accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. The functional significance of these changes and the key epigenetic regulators involved are largely unknown. Here we show that Setdb1, a lysine methyltransferase, controls the global level of histone H3 lysine 9 di-methyl (H3K9me2) mark in growing oocytes. Conditional deletion of Setdb1 in developing oocytes leads to meiotic arrest at the germinal vesicle and meiosis I stages, resulting in substantially fewer mature eggs. Embryos derived from these eggs exhibit severe defects in cell cycle progression, progressive delays in preimplantation development, and degeneration before reaching the blastocyst stage. Rescue experiments by expressing wild-type or inactive Setdb1 in Setdb1-deficient oocytes suggest that the catalytic activity of Setdb1 is essential for meiotic progression and early embryogenesis. Mechanistically, up-regulation of Cdc14b, a dual-specificity phosphatase that inhibits meiotic progression, greatly contributes to the meiotic arrest phenotype. Setdb1 deficiency also leads to derepression of transposons and increased DNA damage in oocytes, which likely also contribute to meiotic defects. Thus, Setdb1 is a maternal-effect gene that controls meiotic progression and is essential for early embryogenesis. Our results uncover an important link between the epigenetic machinery and the major signaling pathway governing meiotic progression. PMID:27070551

  16. Disruption of pairing and synapsis of chromosomes causes stage-specific apoptosis of male meiotic cells.

    PubMed

    Hamer, G; Novak, I; Kouznetsova, A; Höög, C

    2008-02-01

    During meiosis, DNA replication is followed by two successive rounds of chromosome segregation (meiosis I and II), which give rise to genetically diverse haploid gametes. The prophase of the first meiotic division is highly regulated and alignment and synapsis of the homologous chromosomes during this stage are mediated by the synaptonemal complex. Incorrect assembly of the synaptonemal complex results in cell death, impaired meiotic recombination and aneuploidy. Oocytes with meiotic defects often survive the first meiotic prophase and give rise to aneuploid gametes. Similarly affected spermatocytes, on the other hand, almost always undergo apoptosis at a male-specific meiotic checkpoint, located specifically at epithelial stage IV during spermatogenesis. Many examples of this stage IV-specific arrest have been described for several genetic mouse models in which DNA repair or meiotic recombination are abrogated. Interestingly, in C. elegans, meiotic recombination and synapsis are monitored by two separate checkpoint pathways. Therefore we studied spermatogenesis in several knockout mice (Sycp1(-/-), Sycp3(-/-), Smc1beta(-/-) and Sycp3/Sycp1 and Sycp3/Smc1beta double-knockouts) that are specifically defective in meiotic pairing and synapsis. Like for recombination defects, we found that all these genotypes also specifically arrest at epithelial stage IV. It seems that the epithelial stage IV checkpoint eliminates spermatocytes that fail a certain quality check, being either synapsis or DNA damage related. PMID:17997150

  17. REC-1 and HIM-5 distribute meiotic crossovers and function redundantly in meiotic double-strand break formation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chung, George; Rose, Ann M.; Petalcorin, Mark I.R.; Martin, Julie S.; Kessler, Zebulin; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Ponting, Chris P.; Yanowitz, Judith L.; Boulton, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans gene rec-1 was the first genetic locus identified in metazoa to affect the distribution of meiotic crossovers along the chromosome. We report that rec-1 encodes a distant paralog of HIM-5, which was discovered by whole-genome sequencing and confirmed by multiple genome-edited alleles. REC-1 is phosphorylated by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) in vitro, and mutation of the CDK consensus sites in REC-1 compromises meiotic crossover distribution in vivo. Unexpectedly, rec-1; him-5 double mutants are synthetic-lethal due to a defect in meiotic double-strand break formation. Thus, we uncovered an unexpected robustness to meiotic DSB formation and crossover positioning that is executed by HIM-5 and REC-1 and regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:26385965

  18. Meiotic Clade AAA ATPases: Protein Polymer Disassembly Machines.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Nicole; Hill, Christopher P

    2016-05-01

    Meiotic clade AAA ATPases (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities), which were initially grouped on the basis of phylogenetic classification of their AAA ATPase cassette, include four relatively well characterized family members, Vps4, spastin, katanin and fidgetin. These enzymes all function to disassemble specific polymeric protein structures, with Vps4 disassembling the ESCRT-III polymers that are central to the many membrane-remodeling activities of the ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) pathway and spastin, katanin p60 and fidgetin affecting multiple aspects of cellular dynamics by severing microtubules. They share a common domain architecture that features an N-terminal MIT (microtubule interacting and trafficking) domain followed by a single AAA ATPase cassette. Meiotic clade AAA ATPases function as hexamers that can cycle between the active assembly and inactive monomers/dimers in a regulated process, and they appear to disassemble their polymeric substrates by translocating subunits through the central pore of their hexameric ring. Recent studies with Vps4 have shown that nucleotide-induced asymmetry is a requirement for substrate binding to the pore loops and that recruitment to the protein lattice via MIT domains also relieves autoinhibition and primes the AAA ATPase cassettes for substrate binding. The most striking, unifying feature of meiotic clade AAA ATPases may be their MIT domain, which is a module that is found in a wide variety of proteins that localize to ESCRT-III polymers. Spastin also displays an adjacent microtubule binding sequence, and the presence of both ESCRT-III and microtubule binding elements may underlie the recent findings that the ESCRT-III disassembly function of Vps4 and the microtubule-severing function of spastin, as well as potentially katanin and fidgetin, are highly coordinated. PMID:26555750

  19. Genetic scrambling as a defence against meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Haig, D; Grafen, A

    1991-12-21

    Genetic recombination has important consequences, including the familiar rules of Mendelian genetics. Here we present a new argument for the evolutionary function of recombination based on the hypothesis that meiotic drive systems continually arise to threaten the fairness of meiosis. These drive systems act at the expense of the fitness of the organism as a whole for the benefit of the genes involved. We show that genes increasing crossing over are favoured, in the process of breaking up drive systems and reducing the fitness loss to organisms. PMID:1806752

  20. Chromosome numbers and meiotic analysis in the pre-breeding of Brachiaria decumbens (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Ricci, Gléia Cristina Laverde; De Souza-Kaneshima, Alice Maria; Felismino, Mariana Ferrari; Mendes-Bonato, Andrea Beatriz; Pagliarini, Maria Suely; Do Valle, Cacilda Borges

    2011-08-01

    A total of 44 accessions of Brachiaria decumbens were analysed for chromosome count and meiotic behaviour in order to identify potential progenitors for crosses. Among them, 15 accessions presented 2n = 18; 27 accessions, 2n = 36; and 2 accessions, 2n = 45 chromosomes. Among the diploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities was low, ranging from 0.82% to 7.93%. In the 27 tetraploid accessions, the rate of meiotic abnormalities ranged from 18.41% to 65.83%. The most common meiotic abnormalities were related to irregular chromosome segregation, but chromosome stickiness and abnormal cytokinesis were observed in low frequency. All abnormalities can compromise pollen viability by generating unbalanced gametes. Based on the chromosome number and meiotic stability, the present study indicates the apomictic tetraploid accessions that can act as male genitor to produce interspecific hybrids with B. ruziziensis or intraspecific hybrids with recently artificially tetraploidized accessions. PMID:21869477

  1. Axin-1 Regulates Meiotic Spindle Organization in Mouse Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fei; Zhang, Zhen; Shen, Yu-Ting; Xu, Lin; Chen, Ming-Huang; Wang, Ya-Long; Xu, Bai-Hui; Yang, Xiang-Jun; Wang, Hai-Long

    2016-01-01

    Axin-1, a negative regulator of Wnt signaling, is a versatile scaffold protein involved in centrosome separation and spindle assembly in mitosis, but its function in mammalian oogenesis remains unknown. Here we examined the localization and function of Axin-1 during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that Axin-1 was localized around the spindle. Knockdown of the Axin1 gene by microinjection of specific short interfering (si)RNA into the oocyte cytoplasm resulted in severely defective spindles, misaligned chromosomes, failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion, and impaired pronuclear formation. However, supplementing the culture medium with the Wnt pathway activator LiCl improved spindle morphology and pronuclear formation. Downregulation of Axin1 gene expression also impaired the spindle pole localization of γ-tubulin/Nek9 and resulted in retention of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein BubR1 at kinetochores after 8.5 h of culture. Our results suggest that Axin-1 is critical for spindle organization and cell cycle progression during meiotic maturation in mouse oocytes. PMID:27284927

  2. XGef Mediates Early CPEB Phosphorylation during Xenopus Oocyte Meiotic Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Susana E.; Yuan, Lei; Lacza, Charlemagne; Ransom, Heather; Mahon, Gwendolyn M.; Whitehead, Ian P.; Hake, Laura E.

    2005-01-01

    Polyadenylation-induced translation is an important regulatory mechanism during metazoan development. During Xenopus oocyte meiotic progression, polyadenylation-induced translation is regulated by CPEB, which is activated by phosphorylation. XGef, a guanine exchange factor, is a CPEB-interacting protein involved in the early steps of progesterone-stimulated oocyte maturation. We find that XGef influences early oocyte maturation by directly influencing CPEB function. XGef and CPEB interact during oogenesis and oocyte maturation and are present in a c-mos messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP). Both proteins also interact directly in vitro. XGef overexpression increases the level of CPEB phosphorylated early during oocyte maturation, and this directly correlates with increased Mos protein accumulation and acceleration of meiotic resumption. To exert this effect, XGef must retain guanine exchange activity and the interaction with CPEB. Overexpression of a guanine exchange deficient version of XGef, which interacts with CPEB, does not enhance early CPEB phosphorylation. Overexpression of a version of XGef that has significantly reduced interaction with CPEB, but retains guanine exchange activity, decreases early CPEB phosphorylation and delays oocyte maturation. Injection of XGef antibodies into oocytes blocks progesterone-induced oocyte maturation and early CPEB phosphorylation. These findings indicate that XGef is involved in early CPEB activation and implicate GTPase signaling in this process. PMID:15635100

  3. Senataxin controls meiotic silencing through ATR activation and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Abrey J; Becherel, Olivier J; Luff, John E; Graham, Mark E; Richard, Derek; Lavin, Martin F

    2015-01-01

    Senataxin, defective in ataxia oculomotor apraxia type 2, protects the genome by facilitating the resolution of RNA–DNA hybrids (R-loops) and other aspects of RNA processing. Disruption of this gene in mice causes failure of meiotic recombination and defective meiotic sex chromosome inactivation, leading to male infertility. Here we provide evidence that the disruption of Setx leads to reduced SUMOylation and disruption of protein localization across the XY body during meiosis. We demonstrate that senataxin and other DNA damage repair proteins, including ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner, are SUMOylated, and a marked downregulation of both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein-interacting partner and TopBP1 leading to defective activation and signaling through ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein occurs in the absence of senataxin. Furthermore, chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4, a component of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase chromatin remodeler that interacts with both ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein and senataxin was not recruited efficiently to the XY body, triggering altered histone acetylation and chromatin conformation in Setx−/− pachytene-staged spermatocytes. These results demonstrate that senataxin has a critical role in ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein- and chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4-mediated transcriptional silencing and chromatin remodeling during meiosis providing greater insight into its critical role in gene regulation to protect against neurodegeneration. PMID:27462424

  4. Transcription dynamically patterns the meiotic chromosome-axis interface

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoji; Huang, Lingzhi; Markowitz, Tovah E; Blitzblau, Hannah G; Chen, Doris; Klein, Franz; Hochwagen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic chromosomes are highly compacted yet remain transcriptionally active. To understand how chromosome folding accommodates transcription, we investigated the assembly of the axial element, the proteinaceous structure that compacts meiotic chromosomes and promotes recombination and fertility. We found that the axial element proteins of budding yeast are flexibly anchored to chromatin by the ring-like cohesin complex. The ubiquitous presence of cohesin at sites of convergent transcription provides well-dispersed points for axis attachment and thus chromosome compaction. Axis protein enrichment at these sites directly correlates with the propensity for recombination initiation nearby. A separate modulating mechanism that requires the conserved axial-element component Hop1 biases axis protein binding towards small chromosomes. Importantly, axis anchoring by cohesin is adjustable and readily displaced in the direction of transcription by the transcriptional machinery. We propose that such robust but flexible tethering allows the axial element to promote recombination while easily adapting to changes in chromosome activity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07424.001 PMID:26258962

  5. Extensive Recombination of a Yeast Diploid Hybrid through Meiotic Reversion

    PubMed Central

    Laureau, Raphaëlle; Loeillet, Sophie; Salinas, Francisco; Bergström, Anders; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Liti, Gianni; Nicolas, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In somatic cells, recombination between the homologous chromosomes followed by equational segregation leads to loss of heterozygosity events (LOH), allowing the expression of recessive alleles and the production of novel allele combinations that are potentially beneficial upon Darwinian selection. However, inter-homolog recombination in somatic cells is rare, thus reducing potential genetic variation. Here, we explored the property of S. cerevisiae to enter the meiotic developmental program, induce meiotic Spo11-dependent double-strand breaks genome-wide and return to mitotic growth, a process known as Return To Growth (RTG). Whole genome sequencing of 36 RTG strains derived from the hybrid S288c/SK1 diploid strain demonstrates that the RTGs are bona fide diploids with mosaic recombined genome, derived from either parental origin. Individual RTG genome-wide genotypes are comprised of 5 to 87 homozygous regions due to the loss of heterozygous (LOH) events of various lengths, varying between a few nucleotides up to several hundred kilobases. Furthermore, we show that reiteration of the RTG process shows incremental increases of homozygosity. Phenotype/genotype analysis of the RTG strains for the auxotrophic and arsenate resistance traits validates the potential of this procedure of genome diversification to rapidly map complex traits loci (QTLs) in diploid strains without undergoing sexual reproduction. PMID:26828862

  6. Meiotic chromosome pairing in triploid and tetraploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Loidl, J.

    1995-04-01

    Meiotic chromosome pairing in isogenic triploid and tetraploid strains of yeast and the consequences of polyploidy on meiotic chromosome segregation are studied. Synaptonemal complex formation at pachytene was found to be different in the triploid and in the tetraploid. In the triploid, triple-synapsis, that is, the connection of three homologues at a given site, is common. It can even extend all the way along the chromosomes. In the tetraploid, homologous chromosomes mostly come in pairs of synapsed bivalents. Multiple synapsis, that is, synapsis of more than two homologues in one and the same region, was virtually absent in the tetraploid. About five quadrivalents per cell occurred due to the switching of pairing partners. From the frequency of pairing partner switches it can be deduced that in most chromosomes synapsis is initiated primarily at one end, occasionally at both ends and rarely at an additional intercalary position. In contrast to a considerably reduced spore viability ({approximately}40%) in the triploid, spore viability is only mildly affected in the tetraploid. The good spore viability is presumably due to the low frequency of quadrivalents and to the highly regular 2:2 segregation of the few quadrivalents that do occur. Occasionally, however, quadrivalents appear to be subject to 3:1 nondisjunction that leads to spore death in the second generation. 29 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Meiotic recombination analysis in female ducks (Anas platyrhynchos).

    PubMed

    Pigozzi, M I; Del Priore, L

    2016-06-01

    Meiotic recombination in female ducks was directly studied by immunolocalization of MLH1 protein, a mismatch repair protein of mature recombination nodules. In total, 6820 crossovers were scored along the autosomal synaptonemal complexes in 122 meiotic nuclei. From this analysis we predict that the female map length of the duck is 2845 cM, with a genome wide recombination rate of 2 cM/Mb. MLH1-focus mapping along the six largest bivalents shows regional variations of recombination frequencies that can be linked to differences in chromosome morphology. From this MLH1 mapping it can be inferred that distally located markers will appear more separated in genetic maps than physically equidistant markers located near the centromeres on bivalents 1 and 2. Instead, markers at interstitial positions on the acrocentric bivalents 3-6 will appear more tightly linked than expected on the basis of their physical distance because recombination is comparatively lower at the mid region of these chromosomes. The present results provide useful information to complement linkage mapping in ducks and extend previous knowledge about the variation of recombination rates among domestic Galloanserae. PMID:27115519

  8. Evidence of cortical reorganization in hemiparetic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Brion, J.P.; Demeurisse, G.; Capon, A. )

    1989-08-01

    We studied the mechanisms underlying the recovery of motor function of the hand using a bidimensional xenon-133 inhalation technique to measure regional cerebral blood flow at rest and during the performance of a motor task (test condition). The regional cerebral blood flow patterns under rest and test conditions were compared in normal control and in stroke patients with either a cortico-subcortical or a deep-seated lesion. Functional recovery appears to depend upon cortical reorganization involving both hemispheres, particularly in both parietal regions in the subgroup of patients with cortico-subcortical lesions.

  9. Dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Gressin, Laurène; Théry, Manuel; Blanchoin, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Cellular processes, including morphogenesis, polarization, and motility, rely on a variety of actin-based structures. Although the biochemical composition and filament organization of these structures are different, they often emerge from a common origin. This is possible because the actin structures are highly dynamic. Indeed, they assemble, grow, and disassemble in a time scale of a second to a minute. Therefore, the reorganization of a given actin structure can promote the formation of another. Here, we discuss such transitions and illustrate them with computer simulations. PMID:26989473

  10. RanGTP is required for meiotic spindle organization and the initiation of embryonic development in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cesario, J.; McKim, K. S.

    2011-01-01

    RanGTP is important for chromosome-dependent spindle assembly in Xenopus extracts. Here we report on experiments to determine the role of the Ran pathway on microtubule dynamics in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. Females expressing a dominant-negative form of Ran have fertility defects, suggesting that RanGTP is required for normal fertility. This is not, however, because of a defect in acentrosomal meiotic spindle assembly. Therefore, RanGTP does not appear to be essential or sufficient for the formation of the acentrosomal spindle. Instead, the most important function of the Ran pathway in spindle assembly appears to be in the tapering of microtubules at the spindle poles, which might be through regulation of proteins such as TACC and the HURP homolog, Mars. One consequence of this spindle organization defect is an increase in the nondisjunction of achiasmate chromosomes. However, the meiotic defects are not severe enough to cause the decreased fertility. Reductions in fertility occur because RanGTP has a role in microtubule assembly that is not directly nucleated by the chromosomes. This includes microtubules nucleated from the sperm aster, which are required for pronuclear fusion. We propose that following nuclear envelope breakdown, RanGTP is released from the nucleus and creates a cytoplasm that is activated for assembling microtubules, which is important for processes such as pronuclear fusion. Around the chromosomes, however, RanGTP might be redundant with other factors such as the chromosome passenger complex. PMID:22100918

  11. The pam1 gene is required for meiotic bouquet formation and efficient homologous synapsis in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed Central

    Golubovskaya, Inna N; Harper, Lisa C; Pawlowski, Wojciech P; Schichnes, Denise; Cande, W Zacheus

    2002-01-01

    The clustering of telomeres on the nuclear envelope (NE) during meiotic prophase to form the bouquet arrangement of chromosomes may facilitate homologous chromosome synapsis. The pam1 (plural abnormalities of meiosis 1) gene is the first maize gene that appears to be required for telomere clustering, and homologous synapsis is impaired in pam1. Telomere clustering on the NE is arrested or delayed at an intermediate stage in pam1. Telomeres associate with the NE during the leptotene-zygotene transition but cluster slowly if at all as meiosis proceeds. Intermediate stages in telomere clustering including miniclusters are observed in pam1 but not in wild-type meiocytes. The tight bouquet normally seen at zygotene is a rare event. In contrast, the polarization of centromeres vs. telomeres in the nucleus at the leptotene-zygotene transition is the same in mutant and wild-type cells. Defects in homologous chromosome synapsis include incomplete synapsis, nonhomologous synapsis, and unresolved interlocks. However, the number of RAD51 foci on chromosomes in pam1 is similar to that of wild type. We suggest that the defects in homologous synapsis and the retardation of prophase I arise from the irregularity of telomere clustering and propose that pam1 is involved in the control of bouquet formation and downstream meiotic prophase I events. PMID:12524364

  12. Lipopolysaccharide initiates inflammation in bovine granulosa cells via the TLR4 pathway and perturbs oocyte meiotic progression in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bromfield, John J.; Sheldon, I. Martin

    2012-01-01

    Infections of the reproductive tract or mammary gland with Gram-negative bacteria perturb ovarian function, follicular growth and fecundity in cattle. We hypothesised that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Gram-negative bacteria stimulates an inflammatory response by ovarian granulosa cells that is mediated by TLR4. The present study tested the capacity of bovine ovarian granulosa cells to initiate an inflammatory response to pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and determined subsequent effects on the in vitro maturation of oocytes. Granulosa cells elicited an inflammatory response to PAMPs (LPS, lipoteichoic acid, peptidoglycan or Pam3CSK4) with accumulation of the cytokine IL-6, and the chemokine IL-8, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Granulosa cells responded acutely to LPS with rapid phosphorylation of TLR signaling components, p38 and ERK, and increased expression of IL6 and IL8 mRNA, although nuclear translocation of p65 was not evident. Targeting TLR4 with siRNA, attenuated granulosa cell accumulation of IL-6 in response to LPS. Endocrine function of granulosa cells is regulated by FSH, but here FSH also enhanced responsiveness to LPS, increasing IL-6 and IL-8 accumulation. Furthermore, LPS stimulated IL-6 secretion and expansion by cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs), and increased rates of meiotic arrest and germinal vesicle breakdown failure. In conclusion, bovine granulosa cells initiate an innate immune response to LPS via the TLR4 pathway leading to inflammation and to perturbation of meiotic competence. PMID:21990308

  13. Prolonged reorganization of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Das, Kaushik; Konovalov, Oleg

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged reorganization behaviour of mono-, di-, tri- and multi-layer films of Au nanoparticles prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on hydrophobic Si(001) substrates have been studied by using X-ray scattering techniques. Out-of-plane study shows that although at the initial stage the reorganization occurs through the compaction of the films keeping the layered structure unchanged but finally all layered structures modify to monolayer structure. Due to this reorganization the Au density increases within the nanometer thick films. In-plane study shows that inside the reorganized films Au nanoparticles are distributed randomly and the particle size modifies as the metallic core of Au nanoparticles coalesces.

  14. Fas expression correlates with human germ cell degeneration in meiotic and post-meiotic arrest of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, Sandro; D'Abrizio, Piera; Cordeschi, Giuliana; Pelliccione, Fiore; Necozione, Stefano; Ulisse, Salvatore; Properzi, Giuliana; Francavilla, Felice

    2002-03-01

    Degeneration of human male germ cells was analysed by means of light (LM) and transmission electron (TEM) microscopy. The frequency of degenerating cells was correlated with that of Fas-expressing germ cells in human testes with normal spermatogenesis (n = 10), complete early maturation arrest (EMA) (n = 10) or incomplete late maturation arrest (LMA; n = 10) of spermatogenesis. LM analysis of testis sections with normal spermatogenesis indicated that degenerating germ cells were localized in the adluminal compartment of the seminiferous epithelium. TEM showed that apoptotic cells were mostly primary spermatocytes and, to a lesser extent, round or early elongating spermatids. Apoptotic germ cells appeared to be eliminated either in the seminiferous lumen or by Sertoli cell phagocytosis. An increased number of degenerating cells was observed in testes with LMA as compared with normal testes and testes with EMA of spermatogenesis (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon's rank sum test). Comparison of these results with those obtained from immunohistochemistry experiments demonstrated a tight correlation between the number of apoptotic cells and the number of Fas-expressing germ cells (P = 0.001, Spearman's rank = 0.69). These findings suggest that altered meiotic and post-meiotic germ cell maturation might be associated with an up-regulation of Fas gene expression capable of triggering apoptotic elimination of defective germ cells. PMID:11870228

  15. Sisters unbound is required for meiotic centromeric cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B; McKee, Bruce D

    2014-11-01

    Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires sister centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when sister chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between sister centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called sisters unbound (sunn), which is required for stable sister chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162

  16. Meiotic cohesin-based chromosome structure is essential for homologous chromosome pairing in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ding, Da-Qiao; Matsuda, Atsushi; Okamasa, Kasumi; Nagahama, Yuki; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2016-06-01

    Chromosome structure is dramatically altered upon entering meiosis to establish chromosomal architectures necessary for the successful progression of meiosis-specific events. An early meiotic event involves the replacement of the non-SMC mitotic cohesins with their meiotic equivalents in most part of the chromosome, forming an axis on meiotic chromosomes. We previously demonstrated that the meiotic cohesin complex is required for chromosome compaction during meiotic prophase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These studies revealed that chromosomes are elongated in the absence of the meiotic cohesin subunit Rec8 and shortened in the absence of the cohesin-associated protein Pds5. In this study, using super-resolution structured illumination microscopy, we found that Rec8 forms a linear axis on chromosomes, which is required for the organized axial structure of chromatin during meiotic prophase. In the absence of Pds5, the Rec8 axis is shortened whereas chromosomes are widened. In rec8 or pds5 mutants, the frequency of homologous chromosome pairing is reduced. Thus, Rec8 and Pds5 play an essential role in building a platform to support the chromosome architecture necessary for the spatial alignment of homologous chromosomes. PMID:26511279

  17. The functional role of oxytocin in the induction of oocyte meiotic resumption in cattle.

    PubMed

    De Cesaro, M P; Trois, R L; Gutierrez, K; Siqueira, L; Rigo, M L; Glanzner, W G; Oliveira, J F; Gonçalves, P B

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role of oxytocin (OT) in the progesterone (P4) and prostaglandins (PGs) pathway to induce oocyte meiotic resumption. Cumulus-oocyte complexes were co-cultured with follicular hemisections for 15 h to determine the effects of different doses of OT or atosiban (ATO; oxytocin receptor antagonist) on oocyte meiotic resumption. In another experiment, we examined the effect of the interaction between P4, OT and PGs on the regulatory cascade of the oocyte meiotic resumption. Oxytocin at 1 μm was effective in inducing meiotic resumption in oocytes co-cultured with follicular cells (84.0%), not differing from the positive control group (74.4%). Atosiban inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the positive effect of OT on the meiotic resumption (27.6% metaphase I with 10 μm of ATO, which did not differ from the 25.5% of the negative control group). Furthermore, a third experiment showed that P4 was able to induce oocyte meiotic resumption, which was inhibited by ATO. However, the OT positive effect was not blocked by mifepristone (P4 antagonist), but was inhibited by indomethacin (a non-selective PTGS2 inhibitor). Collectively, these data suggest a sequential role of P4, OT and PGs in the induction of oocyte meiotic resumption. PMID:23691948

  18. Formation of interference-sensitive meiotic cross-overs requires sufficient DNA leading-strand elongation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiyue; Cheng, Zhihao; Wang, Cong; Hong, Yue; Su, Hang; Wang, Jun; Copenhaver, Gregory P.; Ma, Hong; Wang, Yingxiang

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis halves diploid genomes to haploid and is essential for sexual reproduction in eukaryotes. Meiotic recombination ensures physical association of homologs and their subsequent accurate segregation and results in the redistribution of genetic variations among progeny. Most organisms have two classes of cross-overs (COs): interference-sensitive (type I) and -insensitive (type II) COs. DNA synthesis is essential for meiotic recombination, but whether DNA synthesis has a role in differentiating meiotic CO pathways is unknown. Here, we show that Arabidopsis POL2A, the homolog of the yeast DNA polymerase-ε (a leading-strand DNA polymerase), is required for plant fertility and meiosis. Mutations in POL2A cause reduced fertility and meiotic defects, including abnormal chromosome association, improper chromosome segregation, and fragmentation. Observation of prophase I cell distribution suggests that pol2a mutants likely delay progression of meiotic recombination. In addition, the residual COs in pol2a have reduced CO interference, and the double mutant of pol2a with mus81, which affects type II COs, displayed more severe defects than either single mutant, indicating that POL2A functions in the type I pathway. We hypothesize that sufficient leading-strand DNA elongation promotes formation of some type I COs. Given that meiotic recombination and DNA synthesis are conserved in divergent eukaryotes, this study and our previous study suggest a novel role for DNA synthesis in the differentiation of meiotic recombination pathways. PMID:26392549

  19. Sisters Unbound Is Required for Meiotic Centromeric Cohesion in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Badri; Thomas, Sharon E.; Yan, Rihui; Yamada, Hirotsugu; Zhulin, Igor B.; McKee, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Regular meiotic chromosome segregation requires sister centromeres to mono-orient (orient to the same pole) during the first meiotic division (meiosis I) when homologous chromosomes segregate, and to bi-orient (orient to opposite poles) during the second meiotic division (meiosis II) when sister chromatids segregate. Both orientation patterns require cohesion between sister centromeres, which is established during meiotic DNA replication and persists until anaphase of meiosis II. Meiotic cohesion is mediated by a conserved four-protein complex called cohesin that includes two structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) subunits (SMC1 and SMC3) and two non-SMC subunits. In Drosophila melanogaster, however, the meiotic cohesion apparatus has not been fully characterized and the non-SMC subunits have not been identified. We have identified a novel Drosophila gene called sisters unbound (sunn), which is required for stable sister chromatid cohesion throughout meiosis. sunn mutations disrupt centromere cohesion during prophase I and cause high frequencies of non-disjunction (NDJ) at both meiotic divisions in both sexes. SUNN co-localizes at centromeres with the cohesion proteins SMC1 and SOLO in both sexes and is necessary for the recruitment of both proteins to centromeres. Although SUNN lacks sequence homology to cohesins, bioinformatic analysis indicates that SUNN may be a structural homolog of the non-SMC cohesin subunit stromalin (SA), suggesting that SUNN may serve as a meiosis-specific cohesin subunit. In conclusion, our data show that SUNN is an essential meiosis-specific Drosophila cohesion protein. PMID:25194162

  20. Functional interactions between SPO11 and REC102 during initiation of meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kee, Kehkooi; Keeney, Scott

    2002-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, formation of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that initiate meiotic recombination requires the products of at least 10 genes. Spo11p is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the DNA cleaving activity, but the roles of the other proteins, and the interactions among them, are not well understood. This study demonstrates genetic and physical interactions between the products of SPO11 and another early meiotic gene required for DSB formation, REC102. We found that epitope-tagged versions of SPO11 and REC102 that by themselves were capable of supporting normal or nearly normal levels of meiotic recombination conferred a severe synthetic cold-sensitive phenotype when combined in the same cells. DSB formation, meiotic gene conversion, and spore viability were drastically reduced in the doubly tagged strain at a nonpermissive temperature. This conditional defect could be partially rescued by expression of untagged SPO11, but not by expression of untagged REC102, indicating that tagged REC102 is fully dominant for this synthetic phenotype. Both tagged and wild-type Spo11p co-immunoprecipitated with tagged Rec102p from meiotic cell extracts, indicating that these proteins are present in a common complex in vivo. Tagged Rec102p localized to the nucleus in whole cells and to chromatin on spread meiotic chromosomes. Our results are consistent with the idea that a multiprotein complex that includes Spo11p and Rec102p promotes meiotic DSB formation. PMID:11805049

  1. Constitutive heterochromatin reorganization during somatic cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Fussner, Eden; Djuric, Ugljesa; Strauss, Mike; Hotta, Akitsu; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Lanner, Fredrik; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Ellis, James; Bazett-Jones, David P

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming is a gradual epigenetic process that reactivates the pluripotent transcriptional network by erasing and establishing repressive epigenetic marks. In contrast to loci-specific epigenetic changes, heterochromatin domains undergo epigenetic resetting during the reprogramming process, but the effect on the heterochromatin ultrastructure is not known. Here, we characterize the physical structure of heterochromatin domains in full and partial mouse iPS cells by correlative electron spectroscopic imaging. In somatic and partial iPS cells, constitutive heterochromatin marked by H3K9me3 is highly compartmentalized into chromocentre structures of densely packed chromatin fibres. In contrast, chromocentre boundaries are poorly defined in pluripotent embryonic stem and full iPS cells, and are characterized by unusually dispersed 10 nm heterochromatin fibres in high Nanog-expressing cells, including pluripotent cells of the mouse blastocyst before differentiation. This heterochromatin reorganization accompanies retroviral silencing during conversion of partial iPS cells by MEK/GSK3 2i inhibitor treatment. Thus, constitutive heterochromatin is compacted in partial iPS cells but reorganizes into dispersed 10 nm chromatin fibres as the fully reprogrammed iPS cell state is acquired. PMID:21468033

  2. Corticospinal reorganization after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Oudega, Martin; Perez, Monica A

    2012-01-01

    The corticospinal tract (CST) is a major descending pathway contributing to the control of voluntary movement in mammals. During the last decades anatomical and electrophysiological studies have demonstrated significant reorganization in the CST after spinal cord injury (SCI) in animals and humans. In animal models of SCI, anatomical evidence showed corticospinal sprouts rostral and caudal to the lesion and their integration into intraspinal axonal circuits. Electrophysiological data suggested that indirect connections from the primary motor cortex to forelimb motoneurons, via brainstem nuclei and spinal cord interneurons, or direct connections from slow uninjured corticospinal axons, might contribute to the control of movement after a CST injury. In humans with SCI, post mortem spinal cord tissue revealed anatomical changes in the CST some of which were similar but others markedly different from those found in animal models of SCI. Human electrophysiological studies have provided ample evidence for corticospinal reorganization after SCI that may contribute to functional recovery. Together these studies have revealed a large plastic capacity of the CST after SCI. There is also a limited understanding of the relationship between anatomical and electrophysiological changes in the CST and control of movement after SCI. Increasing our knowledge of the role of CST plasticity in functional restoration after SCI may support the development of more effective repair strategies. PMID:22586214

  3. A Gene Regulatory Program for Meiotic Prophase in the Fetal Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Mark E.; Mueller, Jacob L.; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Page, David C.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal program of meiotic prophase, comprising events such as laying down of meiotic cohesins, synapsis between homologs, and homologous recombination, must be preceded and enabled by the regulated induction of meiotic prophase genes. This gene regulatory program is poorly understood, particularly in organisms with a segregated germline. We characterized the gene regulatory program of meiotic prophase as it occurs in the mouse fetal ovary. By profiling gene expression in the mouse fetal ovary in mutants with whole tissue and single-cell techniques, we identified 104 genes expressed specifically in pre-meiotic to pachytene germ cells. We characterized the regulation of these genes by 1) retinoic acid (RA), which induces meiosis, 2) Dazl, which is required for germ cell competence to respond to RA, and 3) Stra8, a downstream target of RA required for the chromosomal program of meiotic prophase. Initial induction of practically all identified meiotic prophase genes requires Dazl. In the presence of Dazl, RA induces at least two pathways: one Stra8-independent, and one Stra8-dependent. Genes vary in their induction by Stra8, spanning fully Stra8-independent, partially Stra8-independent, and fully Stra8-dependent. Thus, Stra8 regulates the entirety of the chromosomal program but plays a more nuanced role in governing the gene expression program. We propose that Stra8-independent gene expression enables the stockpiling of selected meiotic structural proteins prior to the commencement of the chromosomal program. Unexpectedly, we discovered that Stra8 is required for prompt down-regulation of itself and Rec8. Germ cells that have expressed and down-regulated Stra8 are refractory to further Stra8 expression. Negative feedback of Stra8, and subsequent resistance to further Stra8 expression, may ensure a single, restricted pulse of Stra8 expression. Collectively, our findings reveal a gene regulatory logic by which germ cells prepare for the chromosomal program of

  4. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step in homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.

  5. Repression of harmful meiotic recombination in centromeric regions.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Mridula; Smith, Gerald R

    2016-06-01

    During the first division of meiosis, segregation of homologous chromosomes reduces the chromosome number by half. In most species, sister chromatid cohesion and reciprocal recombination (crossing-over) between homologous chromosomes are essential to provide tension to signal proper chromosome segregation during the first meiotic division. Crossovers are not distributed uniformly throughout the genome and are repressed at and near the centromeres. Rare crossovers that occur too near or in the centromere interfere with proper segregation and can give rise to aneuploid progeny, which can be severely defective or inviable. We review here how crossing-over occurs and how it is prevented in and around the centromeres. Molecular mechanisms of centromeric repression are only now being elucidated. However, rapid advances in understanding crossing-over, chromosome structure, and centromere functions promise to explain how potentially deleterious crossovers are avoided in certain chromosomal regions while allowing beneficial crossovers in others. PMID:26849908

  6. The Ecology and Evolutionary Dynamics of Meiotic Drive.

    PubMed

    Lindholm, Anna K; Dyer, Kelly A; Firman, Renée C; Fishman, Lila; Forstmeier, Wolfgang; Holman, Luke; Johannesson, Hanna; Knief, Ulrich; Kokko, Hanna; Larracuente, Amanda M; Manser, Andri; Montchamp-Moreau, Catherine; Petrosyan, Varos G; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Presgraves, Daven C; Safronova, Larisa D; Sutter, Andreas; Unckless, Robert L; Verspoor, Rudi L; Wedell, Nina; Wilkinson, Gerald S; Price, Tom A R

    2016-04-01

    Meiotic drivers are genetic variants that selfishly manipulate the production of gametes to increase their own rate of transmission, often to the detriment of the rest of the genome and the individual that carries them. This genomic conflict potentially occurs whenever a diploid organism produces a haploid stage, and can have profound evolutionary impacts on gametogenesis, fertility, individual behaviour, mating system, population survival, and reproductive isolation. Multiple research teams are developing artificial drive systems for pest control, utilising the transmission advantage of drive to alter or exterminate target species. Here, we review current knowledge of how natural drive systems function, how drivers spread through natural populations, and the factors that limit their invasion. PMID:26920473

  7. 16 CFR 802.10 - Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations... INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 EXEMPTION RULES § 802.10 Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations. (a) The acquisition of voting securities pursuant to a stock split...

  8. 12 CFR 575.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... proposal by a reorganizing association or any acquiree association to capitalize a mutual holding company... association or the acquiree association would fail to be “adequately capitalized” as defined under 12 CFR part 565. (2) Proposals by reorganizing associations and acquiree associations to capitalize mutual...

  9. 12 CFR 239.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations. 239.4 Section 239.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239.4 Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations....

  10. 75 FR 31320 - Agency Reorganization and Delegations of Authority; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... Federal Register on May 26, 2010 (75 FR 29451) concerning the reorganization of the Commission. The...-41309, 42101-42109, 44101-44106; Reorganization Plan No. 7 of 1961, 26 FR 7315, August 12, 1961; Pub. L... Organization Chart. DATES: Effective June 3, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Rebecca A....

  11. Postural reorganization induced by torso cutaneous covibration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Beom-Chan; Martin, Bernard J; Ho, Allison; Sienko, Kathleen H

    2013-05-01

    Cutaneous information from joints has been attributed proprioceptive properties similar to those of muscle spindles. This study aimed to assess whether vibration-induced changes in torso cutaneous information contribute to whole-body postural reorganization in humans. Ten healthy young adults stood in normal and Romberg stances with six vibrating actuators positioned on the torso in contact with the skin over the left and right external oblique, internal oblique, and erector spinae muscle locations at the L4/L5 vertebrae level. Vibrations around the torso were randomly applied at two locations simultaneously (covibration) or at all locations simultaneously. Kinematic analysis of the body segments indicated that covibration applied to the skin over the internal oblique muscles induced shifts of both the head and torso in the anterior direction (torso flexion) while the hips shifted in the posterior direction (ankle plantar flexion). Conversely, covibration applied to the skin over the erector spinae muscle locations produced opposite effects. However, covibration applied to the skin over the left internal oblique and left erector spinae, the right internal oblique and right erector spinae, or at all locations simultaneously did not induce any significant postural changes. In addition, the center of pressure position as measured by the force plate was unaffected by all covibration conditions tested. These results were independent of stance and suggest an integrated and coordinated reorganization of posture in response to vibration-induced changes in cutaneous information. In addition, combinations of vibrotactile stimuli over multiple locations exhibit directional summation properties in contrast to the individual responses we observed in our previous work. PMID:23637178

  12. INVESTIGATION OF POSSIBLE AGE EFFECTS ON MEIOTIC CHROMOSOMAL RECOMBINATION AND SEGREGATION IN ARMENIAN HAMSTER SPERMATOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Male Armenian hamsters (Cricetulus migratorius; 2N:22) were evaluated for age effects upon meiotic recombination and aneuploidy incidence. Primary spermatocytes from young and old animals revealed similar chiasma frequencies. The incidence of terminal-type chiasmata in sex bivale...

  13. Analysis of Yeast Sporulation Efficiency, Spore Viability, and Meiotic Recombination on Solid Medium.

    PubMed

    Börner, G Valentin; Cha, Rita S

    2015-11-01

    Under conditions of nutrient deprivation, yeast cells initiate a differentiation program in which meiosis is induced and spores are formed. During meiosis, one round of genome duplication is followed by two rounds of chromosome segregation (meiosis I and meiosis II) to generate four haploid nuclei. Meiotic recombination occurs during prophase I. During sporogenesis, each nucleus becomes surrounded by an individual spore wall, and all four haploid spores become contained as a tetrad within an ascus. Important insights into the meiotic function(s) of a gene of interest can be gained by observing the effects of gene mutations on spore viability and viability patterns among tetrads. Moreover, recombination frequencies among viable spores can reveal potential involvement of the gene during meiotic exchange between homologous chromosomes. Here, we describe methods for inducing spore formation on solid medium, determining spore viability, and measuring, via tetrad analysis, frequencies of crossing over and gene conversion as indicators of meiotic chromosome exchange. PMID:26527763

  14. Meiotic Spindle Assessment in Mouse Oocytes by siRNA-mediated Silencing.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Claudia; Viveiros, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    Errors in chromosome segregation during meiotic division in gametes can lead to aneuploidy that is subsequently transmitted to the embryo upon fertilization. The resulting aneuploidy in developing embryos is recognized as a major cause of pregnancy loss and congenital birth defects such as Down's syndrome. Accurate chromosome segregation is critically dependent on the formation of the microtubule spindle apparatus, yet this process remains poorly understood in mammalian oocytes. Intriguingly, meiotic spindle assembly differs from mitosis and is regulated, at least in part, by unique microtubule organizing centers (MTOCs). Assessment of MTOC-associated proteins can provide valuable insight into the regulatory mechanisms that govern meiotic spindle formation and organization. Here, we describe methods to isolate mouse oocytes and deplete MTOC-associated proteins using a siRNA-mediated approach to test function. In addition, we describe oocyte fixation and immunofluorescence analysis conditions to evaluate meiotic spindle formation and organization. PMID:26485537

  15. Meiotic Crossing over between Nonhomologous Chromosomes Affects Chromosome Segregation in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Jinks-Robertson, S.; Sayeed, S.; Murphy, T.

    1997-01-01

    Meiotic recombination between artificial repeats positioned on nonhomologous chromosomes occurs efficiently in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both gene conversion and crossover events have been observed, with crossovers yielding reciprocal translocations. In the current study, 5.5-kb ura3 repeats positioned on chromosomes V and XV were used to examine the effect of ectopic recombination on meiotic chromosome segregation. Ura(+) random spores were selected and gene conversion vs. crossover events were distinguished by Southern blot analysis. Approximately 15% of the crossover events between chromosomes V and XV were associated with missegregation of one of these chromosomes. The missegregation was manifest as hyperploid spores containing either both translocations plus a normal chromosome, or both normal chromosomes plus one of the translocations. In those cases where it could be analyzed, missegregation occurred at the first meiotic division. These data are discussed in terms of a model in which ectopic crossovers compete efficiently with normal allelic crossovers in directing meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:9136001

  16. 5 CFR 842.213 - Voluntary early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring. 842... early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or..., reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring or...

  17. The Role of Microfilaments in Early Meiotic Maturation of Mouse Oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calarco, Patricia G.

    2005-04-01

    Mouse oocyte microfilaments (MF) were perturbed by depolymerization (cytochalasin B) or stabilization (jasplakinolide) and correlated meiotic defects examined by confocal microscopy. MF, microtubules, and mitochondria were vitally stained; centrosomes ([gamma]-tubulin), after fixation. MF depolymerization by cytochalasin in culture medium did not affect central migration of centrosomes, mitochondria, or nuclear breakdown (GVBD); some MF signal was localized around the germinal vesicle (GV). In maturation-blocking medium (containing IBMX), central movement was curtailed and cortical MF aggregations made the plasma membrane wavy. Occasional long MF suggested that not all MF were depolymerized. MF stabilization by jasplakinolide led to MF aggregations throughout the cytoplasm. GVBD occurred (unless IBMX was present) but no spindle formed. Over time, most oocytes constricted creating a dumbbell shape with MF concentrated under one-half of the oocyte cortex and on either side of the constriction. In IBMX medium, the MF-containing half of the dumbbell over time sequestered the GV, MF, mitochondria, and one to two large cortical centrosomes; the non-MF half appeared empty. Cumulus processes contacted the oocyte surface (detected by microtubule content) and mirrored MF distribution. Results demonstrated that MF play an essential role in meiosis, primarily through cortically mediated events, including centrosome localization, spindle (or GV) movement to the periphery, activation of (polar body) constriction, and establishment of oocyte polarity. The presence of a cortical “organizing pole” is hypothesized.

  18. Telomeres and centromeres have interchangeable roles in promoting meiotic spindle formation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Alex; Fernández-Álvarez, Alfonso; Tomita, Kazunori

    2015-01-01

    Telomeres and centromeres have traditionally been considered to perform distinct roles. During meiotic prophase, in a conserved chromosomal configuration called the bouquet, telomeres gather to the nuclear membrane (NM), often near centrosomes. We found previously that upon disruption of the fission yeast bouquet, centrosomes failed to insert into the NM at meiosis I and nucleate bipolar spindles. Hence, the trans-NM association of telomeres with centrosomes during prophase is crucial for efficient spindle formation. Nonetheless, in approximately half of bouquet-deficient meiocytes, spindles form properly. Here, we show that bouquet-deficient cells can successfully undergo meiosis using centromere–centrosome contact instead of telomere–centrosome contact to generate spindle formation. Accordingly, forced association between centromeres and centrosomes fully rescued the spindle defects incurred by bouquet disruption. Telomeres and centromeres both stimulate focal accumulation of the SUN domain protein Sad1 beneath the centrosome, suggesting a molecular underpinning for their shared spindle-generating ability. Our observations demonstrate an unanticipated level of interchangeability between the two most prominent chromosomal landmarks. PMID:25688135

  19. Aurora B inhibitor barasertib prevents meiotic maturation and subsequent embryo development in pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ju, Shiqiang; Peng, Xu; Yang, Xiaoliu; Sozar, Sparksi; Muneri, Caroline W; Xu, Yaping; Chen, Changchao; Cui, Panpan; Xu, Weichao; Rui, Rong

    2016-07-15

    Barasertib, a highly selective Aurora B inhibitor, has been widely used in a variety of cells to investigate the role of Aurora B kinase, which has been implicated in various functions in the mitotic process. However, effects of barasertib on the meiotic maturation process are not fully understood, particularly in porcine oocyte meiotic maturation. In the present study, the effects of barasertib on the meiotic maturation and developmental competence of pig oocytes were investigated, and the possible roles of Aurora B were also evaluated in porcine oocytes undergoing meiosis. Initially, we examined the expression and subcellular localization of Aurora B using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescent staining. Aurora B was found to express and exhibit specific dynamic intracellular localization during porcine oocyte meiotic maturation. Aurora B was observed around the chromosomes after germinal vesicle breakdown. Then it was transferred to the spindle region after metaphase I stage, and was particularly concentrated at the central spindles at telophase I stage. barasertib treatment resulted in the failure of polar body extrusion in pig oocytes, with a larger percentage of barasertib-treated oocytes remaining at the pro-metaphase I stage. Additional results reported that barasertib treatment had no effect on chromosome condensation but resulted in a significantly higher percentage of the treated oocytes with aberrant spindles and misaligned chromosomes during the first meiotic division. In addition, inhibition of Aurora B with lower concentrations of barasertib during pig oocyte meiotic maturation decreased the subsequent embryo developmental competence. Thus, these results illustrate that barasertib has significant effects on porcine oocyte meiotic maturation and subsequent development through Aurora B inhibition, and this regulation is related to its effects on spindle formation and chromosome alignment during the first meiotic division in porcine oocytes. PMID

  20. Male eyespan size is associated with meiotic drive in wild stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni).

    PubMed

    Cotton, A J; Földvári, M; Cotton, S; Pomiankowski, A

    2014-04-01

    This study provides the first direct evidence from wild populations of stalk-eyed flies to support the hypothesis that male eyespan is a signal of meiotic drive. Several stalk-eyed fly species are known to exhibit X-linked meiotic drive. A recent quantitative trait locus analysis in Teleopsis dalmanni found a potential link between variation in male eyespan, a sexually selected ornamental trait, and the presence of meiotic drive. This was based on laboratory populations subject to artificial selection for male eyespan. In this study, we examined the association between microsatellite markers and levels of sex ratio bias (meiotic drive) in 12 wild T. dalmanni populations. We collected two data sets: (a) brood sex ratios of wild-caught males mated to standard laboratory females and (b) variation in a range of phenotypic traits associated with reproductive success of wild-caught males and females. In each case, we typed individuals for eight X-linked microsatellite markers, including several that previously were shown to be associated with male eyespan and meiotic drive. We found that one microsatellite marker was very strongly associated with meiotic drive, whereas a second showed a weaker association. We also found that, using both independent data sets, meiotic drive was strongly associated with male eyespan, with smaller eyespan males being associated with more female-biased broods. These results suggest that mate preference for exaggerated male eyespan allows females to avoid mating with males carrying the meiotic drive gene and is thus a potential mechanism for the maintenance and evolution of female mate preference. PMID:24398884

  1. Hybrid Sterility Locus on Chromosome X Controls Meiotic Recombination Rate in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Balcova, Maria; Faltusova, Barbora; Gergelits, Vaclav; Bhattacharyya, Tanmoy; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Knopf, Corinna; Fotopulosova, Vladana; Chvatalova, Irena; Gregorova, Sona; Forejt, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination safeguards proper segregation of homologous chromosomes into gametes, affects genetic variation within species, and contributes to meiotic chromosome recognition, pairing and synapsis. The Prdm9 gene has a dual role, it controls meiotic recombination by determining the genomic position of crossover hotspots and, in infertile hybrids of house mouse subspecies Mus m. musculus (Mmm) and Mus m. domesticus (Mmd), it further functions as the major hybrid sterility gene. In the latter role Prdm9 interacts with the hybrid sterility X 2 (Hstx2) genomic locus on Chromosome X (Chr X) by a still unknown mechanism. Here we investigated the meiotic recombination rate at the genome-wide level and its possible relation to hybrid sterility. Using immunofluorescence microscopy we quantified the foci of MLH1 DNA mismatch repair protein, the cytological counterparts of reciprocal crossovers, in a panel of inter-subspecific chromosome substitution strains. Two autosomes, Chr 7 and Chr 11, significantly modified the meiotic recombination rate, yet the strongest modifier, designated meiotic recombination 1, Meir1, emerged in the 4.7 Mb Hstx2 genomic locus on Chr X. The male-limited transgressive effect of Meir1 on recombination rate parallels the male-limited transgressive role of Hstx2 in hybrid male sterility. Thus, both genetic factors, the Prdm9 gene and the Hstx2/Meir1 genomic locus, indicate a link between meiotic recombination and hybrid sterility. A strong female-specific modifier of meiotic recombination rate with the effect opposite to Meir1 was localized on Chr X, distally to Meir1. Mapping Meir1 to a narrow candidate interval on Chr X is an important first step towards positional cloning of the respective gene(s) responsible for variation in the global recombination rate between closely related mouse subspecies. PMID:27104744

  2. Progression of meiotic recombination requires structural maturation of the central element of the synaptonemal complex.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Geert; Wang, Hong; Bolcun-Filas, Ewelina; Cooke, Howard J; Benavente, Ricardo; Höög, Christer

    2008-08-01

    The synaptonemal complex is an elaborate meiosis-specific supramolecular protein assembly that promotes chromosome synapsis and meiotic recombination. We inactivated the meiosis-specific gene Tex12 and found that TEX12 is essential for progression of meiosis in both male and female germ cells. Structural analysis of the synaptonemal complex in Tex12-/- meiocytes revealed a disrupted central element structure, a dense structure residing between the synapsed homologous chromosomes. Chromosome synapsis is initiated at multiple positions along the paired homologous chromosomes in Tex12-/- meiotic cells, but fails to propagate along the chromosomes. Furthermore, although meiotic recombination is initiated in Tex12-/- meiotic cells, these early recombination events do not develop into meiotic crossovers. Hence, the mere initiation of synapsis is not sufficient to support meiotic crossing-over. Our results show that TEX12 is a component of the central element structure of the synaptonemal complex required for propagation of synapsis along the paired homologous chromosomes and maturation of early recombination events into crossovers. PMID:18611960

  3. Selective Regulation of Oocyte Meiotic Events Enhances Progress in Fertility Preservation Methods

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Onder; Celik, Nilufer; Gungor, Sami; Haberal, Esra Tustas; Aydin, Suleyman

    2015-01-01

    Following early embryonic germ cell migration, oocytes are surrounded by somatic cells and remain arrested at diplotene stage until luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. Strict regulation of both meiotic arrest and meiotic resumption during dormant stage are critical for future fertility. Inter-cellular signaling system between the somatic compartment and oocyte regulates these meiotic events and determines the follicle quality. As well as the collected number of eggs, their qualities are also important for in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. In spontaneous and IVF cycles, germinal vesicle (GV)–stage oocytes, premature GV breakdown, and persistence of first meiotic arrest limit the reproductive performance. Likewise, both women with premature ovarian aging and young cancer women are undergoing chemoradiotherapy under the risk of follicle loss because of unregulated meiotic events. Understanding of oocyte meiotic events is therefore critical for the prevention of functional ovarian reserve. High levels of cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP), cyclic adenosine monophophate (cAMP) and low phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3A enzyme activity inside the oocyte are responsible for maintaining of meiotic arrest before the LH surge. cGMP is produced in the somatic compartment, and natriuretic peptide precursor C (Nppc) and natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (Npr2) regulate its production. cGMP diffuses into the oocyte and reduces the PDE3A activity, which inhibits the conversion of cAMP to the 5′AMP, and cAMP levels are enhanced. In addition, oocyte itself has the ability to produce cAMP. Taken together, accumulation of cAMP inside the oocyte induces protein kinase activity, which leads to the inhibition of maturation-promoting factor and meiotic arrest also continues. By stimulating the expression of epidermal growth factor, LH inhibits the Nppc/Npr2 system, blocks cGMP synthesis, and initiates meiotic resumption. Oocytes lacking the functional of this pathway may lead to persistence

  4. Ethanol exposure during peripubertal period increases the mast cell number and impairs meiotic and spermatic parameters in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Paula Franco Punhagui, Ana; Rodrigues Vieira, Henrique; Eloisa Munhoz De Lion Siervo, Gláucia; da Rosa, Renata; Scantamburlo Alves Fernandes, Glaura

    2016-06-01

    Puberty is characterized by psychosomatic alterations, whereas chronic ethanol consumption is associated with morphophysiological changes in the male reproductive system. The purpose of this study was to show the toxic effects on testis and epididymal morphophysiology after ethanol administration during peripuberty. To this end, male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: ethanol (E) group: received a 2 g dose of ethanol/kg in 25% (v/v); and control (C) group: received the same volume of filtered water; both were treated by gavage for 54 days. On the 55th day of the experiment, epididymis, and testis were collected for sperm count, histopathology, mast cell count, and morphometry. The vas deferens was collected for sperm motility analysis. The femur and testicle were used for cytogenetic analysis. Ethanol exposure caused reduction in daily sperm production (DSP) and in sperm motility, multinucleated cells or those having no chromosomal content, and late chromosome migrations. No changes were observed in the number of chromosomes in the mitotic analysis. However, some alterations could be seen in meiocytes at different stages of cell division. Stereological analysis of the epididymis indicated reorganization of its component in the 2A and 5A/B regions. The epididymal cauda had greater recruitment, and both degranulated and full mast cells showed an increase in the initial segment, in the ethanol group. In conclusion, ethanol administration during the pubertal phase affects epididymis and testis in adult rats, as indicated mainly by our new findings related to mast cell number and meiotic impact. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:541-549, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27058992

  5. High efficiency of meiotic gynogenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rinchard, J.; Dabrowski, K.; Garcia-Abiado, M. -A.

    2006-01-01

    Induction of androgenesis and gynogenesis by applying a pressure (PS) or heat shock (HS) to double the haploid chromosomal set results in progenies possessing only chromosomes from a single parent. This has never been accomplished in representatives of Agnatha. The objective of this study was to induce gynogenesis and androgenesis in sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. For gynogenesis experiments, ultraviolet (UV)-irradiated sperm was used to activate sea lamprey eggs and HS or PS were applied to inhibit the second meiotic division and consequently induce diploidy in the embryos. The UV irradiation of immobilized sperm was performed for 1 min at 1,719 J m-2. HS of 35 ?? 1??C for 2 min and PS of 9,000 psi for 4 min were applied at different times after egg activation (8, 12, 20, and 24 min or 8, 16, and 24 min for HS or PS, respectively). Regardless of the induction time of the HS, survivals at pre-hatching stage were similar. In contrast, PS applied 8 min after activation appears to increase survival rate of pre-hatched embryos in comparison to 16 and 24 min after activation. In control groups, without shock treatment (no diploidization), there were no survivors. All deformed, gynogenetic embryos were confirmed to be haploids and died prior to burying themselves in the sand. We confirmed by flow cytometry that progenies produced using both shock methods surviving to the next stage, burying in the substrate, were diploid gynogenetic. For the androgenesis experiments, UV-irradiated eggs (1,719 J m-2 for 1 min) were fertilized with non-treated sperm and HS was applied to restore diploidy of the eggs. Several attempts have been made to optimize the parameters used. HS of 35 ?? 1??C was applied 110, 140, 170, 200, and 230 min after activation for 2 min. Low yields of androgens were obtained and all animals died within a week after hatching. These techniques will allow to establish meiotic gynogenetic lines of sea lamprey for determining sex differentiation in this species

  6. Time course of the meiotic arrest in sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes treated with roscovitine.

    PubMed

    Crocomo, Letícia Ferrari; Marques Filho, Wolff Camargo; Ackermann, Camila Louise; Paschoal, Daniela Martins; Guastali, Midyan Daroz; Dias Maziero, Rosiára Rosária; Sudano, Mateus José; Landim-Alvarenga, Fernanda da Cruz; Bicudo, Sony Dimas

    2016-04-01

    Temporary meiosis arrest with cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors has been proposed in order to improve the quality of in vitro matured oocytes. In sheep, however, this phenomenon has been rarely investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different incubation times with roscovitine on nuclear maturation and cumulus cell expansion of sheep cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). For this, COCs were cultured for 0, 6, 12 or 20 h in basic maturation medium (Control) containing 75 μM roscovitine (Rosco). After, they were in vitro matured (IVM) for 18 h in the presence of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). At the end of each treatment, cumulus cell expansion and nuclear maturation were assessed under a stereomicroscope and by Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. In the Control and Rosco groups, the absence of cumulus cell expansion prevailed at 0, 6, 12 and 20 h. After IVM for 18 h, total cumulus cell expansion in the Rosco treatments was dependent on the exposure time to roscovitine. A significantly high percentage of oocytes treated with roscovitine for 6 h (87%), 12 h or 20 h (65%) were arrested at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. In contrast, 23% GVBD, 54% metaphase I (MI) and 61% MII oocytes were observed in the Control groups at 6, 12 and 20 h, respectively. In all treatments, a significant percentage of oocytes reached MII after IVM for 18 h. Therefore, roscovitine reversibly arrested the meiosis of sheep oocytes during different culture times with the maximal efficiency of meiotic inhibition reached at 6 h. In addition, reversibility of its inhibitory action on cumulus cells was exposure-time dependent. PMID:26170094

  7. Case managers reorganize to challenge claims denials.

    PubMed

    1999-08-01

    A combination of diminished reimbursement, decreased funding for residency programs, an epidemic of claims denials, and the skilled nursing crisis has imperiled teaching hospitals across the country. Increasingly, these hospitals are looking to case management departments as potential saviors. In the short term, that could mean more staff and a beefier budget, but if your department can't produce, cuts later on could be drastic. The University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia lost $90 million in FY1998 and responded by cutting 1,100 positions--9% of its work force. The case management department lost eight positions and is trying to take up the slack with a massive reorganization of its care delivery system and a rigorous education program designed to reduce claims denials. At Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, DC, however, case management staff and resources have been increased for now. The department is using its new-found prosperity to thoroughly screen all incoming patients for appropriateness of admission, upgrade its discharge planning capabilities, and hire a full-time employee to appeal denied claims. PMID:10557727

  8. Microtubule-targeting-dependent reorganization of filopodia.

    PubMed

    Schober, Joseph M; Komarova, Yulia A; Chaga, Oleg Y; Akhmanova, Anna; Borisy, Gary G

    2007-04-01

    Interaction between the microtubule system and actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a fundamental process required for spatial regulation of cell protrusion and retraction activities. In our current studies, analysis of digital fluorescence images revealed targeting of microtubules to filopodia in B16F1 melanoma cells and fibroblasts. We investigated the functional consequence of targeting on filopodia reorganization and examined mechanisms by which microtubules may be guided to, or interact with, filopodia. Live cell imaging studies show that targeting events in lamellipodia wings temporally correlated with filopodia turning toward the lamellipodium midline and with filopodia merging. Rapid uncoupling of targeting with nocodazole decreased filopodia merging events and increased filopodia density. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy identified microtubules near the ventral surface and upward movement of targeted filopodia. The role of adhesion sites and microtubule plus-end proteins in targeting was investigated. Correlation of adhesion sites with microtubule targeting to filopodia was not observed and depletion of microtubule plus-end proteins did not significantly alter targeting frequency. We propose that microtubules target filopodia, independent of focal adhesions and plus-end proteins, causing filopodia movement and microtubules regulate filopodia density in lamellipodia wings through filopodia merging events. PMID:17356063

  9. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization drives fibrosis through CTGF-dependent fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Norihiko; Chun, Jerold; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Wada, Takashi; Luster, Andrew D.; Tager, Andrew M.

    2013-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling through one of its receptors, LPA1, in fibrotic diseases, but the mechanisms by which LPA-LPA1 signaling promotes pathological fibrosis remain to be fully elucidated. Using a mouse peritoneal fibrosis model, we demonstrate central roles for LPA and LPA1 in fibroblast proliferation. Genetic deletion or pharmacological antagonism of LPA1 protected mice from peritoneal fibrosis, blunting the increases in peritoneal collagen by 65.4 and 52.9%, respectively, compared to control animals and demonstrated that peritoneal fibroblast proliferation was highly LPA1 dependent. Activation of LPA1 on mesothelial cells induced these cells to express connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), driving fibroblast proliferation in a paracrine fashion. Activation of mesothelial cell LPA1 induced CTGF expression by inducing cytoskeleton reorganization in these cells, causing nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)-A and MRTF-B. Pharmacological inhibition of MRTF-induced transcription also diminished CTGF expression and fibrosis in the peritoneal fibrosis model, mitigating the increase in peritoneal collagen content by 57.9% compared to controls. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization therefore makes a previously unrecognized but critically important contribution to the profibrotic activities of LPA by driving MRTF-dependent CTGF expression, which, in turn, drives fibroblast proliferation.—Sakai, N., Chun, J., Duffield, J. S., Wada, T., Luster, A. D., Tager, A. M. LPA1-induced cytoskeleton reorganization drives fibrosis through CTGF-dependent fibroblast proliferation. PMID:23322166

  10. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step inmore » homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.« less

  11. Meiotic Chromosome Analysis of the Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus

    PubMed Central

    Wisoram, Wijit; Saengthong, Pradit; Ngernsiri, Lertluk

    2013-01-01

    The giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Lepeletier and Serville) (Heteroptera: Belostomatidae), a native species of Southeast Asia, is one of the largest insects belonging to suborder Heteroptera. In this study, the meiotic chromosome of L. indicus was studied in insect samples collected from Thailand, Myanmar, Loas, and Cambodia. Testicular cells stained with lacto-acetic orcein, Giemsa, DAPI, and silver nitrate were analyzed. The results revealed that the chromosome complement of L. indicus was 2n = 22A + neo-XY + 2m, which differed from that of previous reports. Each individual male contained testicular cells with three univalent patterns. The frequency of cells containing neo-XY chromosome univalent (∼5%) was a bit higher than that of cells with autosomal univalents (∼3%). Some cells (∼0.5%) had both sex chromosome univalents and a pair of autosomal univalents. None of the m-chromosome univalents were observed during prophase I. In addition, this report presents clear evidence about the existence of m-chromosomes in Belostomatidae. PMID:23895100

  12. Analysis of chromatin structure at meiotic DSB sites in yeasts.

    PubMed

    Hirota, Kouji; Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Takatomi; Ohta, Kunihiro

    2009-01-01

    One of the major features of meiosis is a high frequency of homologous recombination that not only confers genetic diversity to a successive generation but also ensures proper segregation of chromosomes. Meiotic recombination is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks that require many proteins including the catalytic core, Spo11. In this regard, like transcription and repair, etc., recombination is hindered by a compacted chromatin structure because trans-acting factors cannot easily access the DNA. Such inhibitory effects must be alleviated prior to recombination initiation. Indeed, a number of groups showed that chromatin around recombination hotspots is less condensed, by using nucleases as a probe to assess local DNA accessibility. Here we describe a method to analyze chromatin structure of a recombination hotspot in the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This method, combining micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion ofchromatin DNA and subsequent Southern blotting, is expected to provide information as to chromatin context around a hotspot. Moreover, by virtue of MNase preferentially targeting linker DNA, positions of several nucleosomes surrounding a hotspot can also be determined. Our protocol is a very powerful way to analyze several-kb regions of interest and can be applied to other purposes. PMID:19799187

  13. The evolution of meiotic sex and its alternatives.

    PubMed

    Mirzaghaderi, Ghader; Hörandl, Elvira

    2016-09-14

    Meiosis is an ancestral, highly conserved process in eukaryotic life cycles, and for all eukaryotes the shared component of sexual reproduction. The benefits and functions of meiosis, however, are still under discussion, especially considering the costs of meiotic sex. To get a novel view on this old problem, we filter out the most conserved elements of meiosis itself by reviewing the various modifications and alterations of modes of reproduction. Our rationale is that the indispensable steps of meiosis for viability of offspring would be maintained by strong selection, while dispensable steps would be variable. We review evolutionary origin and processes in normal meiosis, restitutional meiosis, polyploidization and the alterations of meiosis in forms of uniparental reproduction (apomixis, apomictic parthenogenesis, automixis, selfing) with a focus on plants and animals. This overview suggests that homologue pairing, double-strand break formation and homologous recombinational repair at prophase I are the least dispensable elements, and they are more likely optimized for repair of oxidative DNA damage rather than for recombination. Segregation, ploidy reduction and also a biparental genome contribution can be skipped for many generations. The evidence supports the theory that the primary function of meiosis is DNA restoration rather than recombination. PMID:27605505

  14. On the origin of sex chromosomes from meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Úbeda, Francisco; Patten, Manus M; Wild, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Most animals and many plants make use of specialized chromosomes (sex chromosomes) to determine an individual's sex. Best known are the XY and ZW sex-determination systems. Despite having evolved numerous times, sex chromosomes present something of an evolutionary puzzle. At their origin, alleles that dictate development as one sex or the other (primitive sex chromosomes) face a selective penalty, as they will be found more often in the more abundant sex. How is it possible that primitive sex chromosomes overcome this disadvantage? Any theory for the origin of sex chromosomes must identify the benefit that outweighs this cost and enables a sex-determining mutation to establish in the population. Here we show that a new sex-determining allele succeeds when linked to a sex-specific meiotic driver. The new sex-determining allele benefits from confining the driving allele to the sex in which it gains the benefit of drive. Our model requires few special assumptions and is sufficiently general to apply to the evolution of sex chromosomes in outbreeding cosexual or dioecious species. We highlight predictions of the model that can discriminate between this and previous theories of sex-chromosome origins. PMID:25392470

  15. Meiotic behaviour of individual chromosomes in allotriploid Alstroemeria hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kamstra, S A; de Jong, J H; Jacobsen, E; Ramanna, M S; Kuipers, A G J

    2004-07-01

    Chromosome association and chiasma formation were studied in pollen mother cells at metaphase I of four allotriplod BC1 plants (2n=3x=24) obtained from the backcross of the hybrid Alstroemeria aurea x A. inodora with its parent A. inodora. We distinguished the chromosomes of both parental species by genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), whereas the individual chromosomes were identified on the basis of their multicolour FISH banding patterns obtained after a second hybridization with two species-specific satellite repeats as probes. All the four BC1 plants possessed two genomes of A. inodora and one of A. aurea. Variable numbers of recombinant chromosomes, resulting from meiotic recombination in the interspecific hybrid, were present in these plants. The homologous A. inodora chromosomes generally formed bivalents, leaving the homoeologous A. aurea chromosomes unassociated. High frequencies of trivalents were observed for the chromosome sets that contained recombinant chromosomes, even when the recombinant segments were small. Chromosome associations in the trivalents were restricted to homologous segments. The implications of the absence of homoeologous chromosome pairing on gamete constitution and prospects for introgression in Alstroemeria are discussed. PMID:15100711

  16. Administrative Control in Academic Departments and Response to Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Doris W.

    1970-01-01

    Studies the response of 15 academic departments at Ohio State University to reorganization. Implications of the study deal with methods of introducing change, the importance of group norms, and the link between informal norms and existing formal structure. (MK)

  17. Treatment of recurrent nightmares by the dream reorganization approach.

    PubMed

    Palace, E M; Johnston, C

    1989-09-01

    Dream reorganization is introduced as a new theoretical and treatment approach to the alleviation of recurrent nightmares, derived from the principles of the Seligman and Yellen (1987) theory of dream construction. The cognitive-behavioral dream reorganization treatment package consists of two treatment components. Systematic desensitization with coping self-statements is employed to alter the emotional episode by counterconditioning a relaxation response to anxiety-evoking nightmare content. Guided rehearsal of mastery endings to dream content hierarchy items is added to modify the secondary visual stimuli associated with recurrent nightmares. The dream reorganization approach is presented in the case of a 10-year-old male with a fear of sleeping alone due to recurrent nightmares. Following treatment, the client reported 100% reduction in nightmares and demonstrated 100% reduction in night time arrival in the parents' room. The present report provides a theoretical rationale for dream reorganization, and future directions for research in the treatment of recurrent nightmares. PMID:2576657

  18. Cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury: always for good?

    PubMed Central

    Moxon, Karen A.; Oliviero, Antonio; Aguilar, Juan; Foffani, Guglielmo

    2015-01-01

    Plasticity constitutes the basis of behavioral changes as a result of experience. It refers to neural network shaping and re-shaping at the global level and to synaptic contacts remodeling at the local level, either during learning or memory encoding, or as a result of acute or chronic pathological conditions. ‘Plastic’ brain reorganization after central nervous system lesions has a pivotal role in the recovery and rehabilitation of sensory and motor dysfunction, but can also be “maladaptive”. Moreover, it is clear that brain reorganization it is not a “static” phenomenon but rather a very dynamic process. Spinal cord injury immediately initiates a change in brain state and starts cortical reorganization. In the long term, the impact of injury – with or without accompanying therapy – on the brain is a complex balance between supraspinal reorganization and spinal recovery. The degree of cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury is highly variable, and can range from no reorganization (i.e. “silencing”) to massive cortical remapping. This variability critically depends on the species, the age of the animal when the injury occurs, the time after the injury has occurred, and the behavioral activity and possible therapy regimes after the injury. We will briefly discuss these dependencies, trying to highlight their translational value. Overall, it is not only necessary to better understand how the brain can reorganize after injury with or without therapy, it is also necessary to clarify when and why brain reorganization can be either “good” or “bad” in terms of its clinical consequences. This information is critical in order to develop and optimize cost-effective therapies to maximize functional recovery while minimizing maladaptive states after spinal cord injury. PMID:24997269

  19. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  20. Mmi1 RNA surveillance machinery directs RNAi complex RITS to specific meiotic genes in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hiriart, Edwige; Vavasseur, Aurélia; Touat-Todeschini, Leila; Yamashita, Akira; Gilquin, Benoit; Lambert, Emeline; Perot, Jonathan; Shichino, Yuichi; Nazaret, Nicolas; Boyault, Cyril; Lachuer, Joel; Perazza, Daniel; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Verdel, André

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) silences gene expression by acting both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in a broad range of eukaryotes. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the RNA-Induced Transcriptional Silencing (RITS) RNAi complex mediates heterochromatin formation at non-coding and repetitive DNA. However, the targeting and role of RITS at other genomic regions, including protein-coding genes, remain unknown. Here we show that RITS localizes to specific meiotic genes and mRNAs. Remarkably, RITS is guided to these meiotic targets by the RNA-binding protein Mmi1 and its associated RNA surveillance machinery that together degrade selective meiotic mRNAs during vegetative growth. Upon sexual differentiation, RITS localization to the meiotic genes and mRNAs is lost. Large-scale identification of Mmi1 RNA targets reveals that RITS subunit Chp1 associates with the vast majority of them. In addition, loss of RNAi affects the effective repression of sexual differentiation mediated by the Mmi1 RNA surveillance machinery. These findings uncover a new mechanism for recruiting RNAi to specific meiotic genes and suggest that RNAi participates in the control of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. PMID:22522705

  1. MEIOB Targets Single-Strand DNA and Is Necessary for Meiotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Hervé, Roxane; Finsterbusch, Friederike; Tourpin, Sophie; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Duquenne, Clotilde; Messiaen, Sébastien; Martini, Emmanuelle; Bernardino-Sgherri, Jacqueline; Toth, Attila; Habert, René; Livera, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is a mandatory process for sexual reproduction. We identified a protein specifically implicated in meiotic homologous recombination that we named: meiosis specific with OB domain (MEIOB). This protein is conserved among metazoan species and contains single-strand DNA binding sites similar to those of RPA1. Our studies in vitro revealed that both recombinant and endogenous MEIOB can be retained on single-strand DNA. Those in vivo demonstrated the specific expression of Meiob in early meiotic germ cells and the co-localization of MEIOB protein with RPA on chromosome axes. MEIOB localization in Dmc1 −/− spermatocytes indicated that it accumulates on resected DNA. Homologous Meiob deletion in mice caused infertility in both sexes, due to a meiotic arrest at a zygotene/pachytene-like stage. DNA double strand break repair and homologous chromosome synapsis were impaired in Meiob −/− meiocytes. Interestingly MEIOB appeared to be dispensable for the initial loading of recombinases but was required to maintain a proper number of RAD51 and DMC1 foci beyond the zygotene stage. In light of these findings, we propose that RPA and this new single-strand DNA binding protein MEIOB, are essential to ensure the proper stabilization of recombinases which is required for successful homology search and meiotic recombination. PMID:24068956

  2. Five RecA-like proteins of Schizosaccharomyces pombe are involved in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Grishchuk, A L; Kohli, J

    2003-01-01

    The genome of Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains five genes that code for proteins with sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli recombination protein RecA: rad51+, rhp55+, rhp57+, rlp1+, and dmc1+. We analyzed the effect of deletion of each of these genes on meiotic recombination and viability of spores. Meiotic recombination levels were different from wild type in all recA-related mutants in several genetic intervals, suggesting that all five RecA homologs of S. pombe are required for normal levels of meiotic recombination. Spore viability was reduced in rad51, rhp55, and rhp57 mutants, but not in rlp1 and dmc1. It is argued that reduction of crossover is not the only cause for the observed reduction of spore viability. Analysis of double and triple mutants revealed that Rad51 and Dmc1 play major and partially overlapping roles in meiotic recombination, while Rhp55, Rhp57, and Rlp1 play accessory roles. Remarkably, deletion of Rlp1 decreases the frequency of intergenic recombination (crossovers), but increases intragenic recombination (gene conversion). On the basis of our results, we present a model for the involvement of five RecA-like proteins of S. pombe in meiotic recombination and discuss their respective roles. PMID:14668362

  3. DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting a chromatin signature permissive for meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Zamudio, Natasha; Barau, Joan; Teissandier, Aurélie; Walter, Marius; Borsos, Maté; Servant, Nicolas; Bourc'his, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is essential for protecting the mammalian germline against transposons. When DNA methylation-based transposon control is defective, meiotic chromosome pairing is consistently impaired during spermatogenesis: How and why meiosis is vulnerable to transposon activity is unknown. Using two DNA methylation-deficient backgrounds, the Dnmt3L and Miwi2 mutant mice, we reveal that DNA methylation is largely dispensable for silencing transposons before meiosis onset. After this, it becomes crucial to back up to a developmentally programmed H3K9me2 loss. Massive retrotransposition does not occur following transposon derepression, but the meiotic chromatin landscape is profoundly affected. Indeed, H3K4me3 marks gained over transcriptionally active transposons correlate with formation of SPO11-dependent double-strand breaks and recruitment of the DMC1 repair enzyme in Dnmt3L−/− meiotic cells, whereas these features are normally exclusive to meiotic recombination hot spots. Here, we demonstrate that DNA methylation restrains transposons from adopting chromatin characteristics amenable to meiotic recombination, which we propose prevents the occurrence of erratic chromosomal events. PMID:26109049

  4. Meiotic chromosome mobility in fission yeast is resistant to environmental stress

    PubMed Central

    Illner, Doris; Lorenz, Alexander; Scherthan, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The formation of healthy gametes requires pairing of homologous chromosomes (homologs) as a prerequisite for their correct segregation during meiosis. Initially, homolog alignment is promoted by meiotic chromosome movements feeding into intimate homolog pairing by homologous recombination and/or synaptonemal complex formation. Meiotic chromosome movements in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, depend on astral microtubule dynamics that drag the nucleus through the zygote; known as horsetail movement. The response of microtubule-led meiotic chromosome movements to environmental stresses such as ionizing irradiation (IR) and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not known. Here, we show that, in contrast to budding yeast, the horsetail movement is largely radiation-resistant, which is likely mediated by a potent antioxidant defense. IR exposure of sporulating S. pombe cells induced misrepair and irreparable DNA double strand breaks causing chromosome fragmentation, missegregation and gamete death. Comparing radiation outcome in fission and budding yeast, and studying meiosis with poisoned microtubules indicates that the increased gamete death after IR is innate to fission yeast. Inhibition of meiotic chromosome mobility in the face of IR failed to influence the course of DSB repair, indicating that paralysis of meiotic chromosome mobility in a genotoxic environment is not a universal response among species. PMID:27074839

  5. Progesterone-induced changes in the phosphoryl potential during the meiotic divisions in amphibian oocytes: Role of Na/K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Progesterone triggers resumption of the first meiotic division in the Rana pipiens oocyte by binding to the N-terminal external loop of the catalytic subunit of Na/K-ATPase, releasing a cascade of lipid second messengers. This is followed by internalization of specific membrane proteins, plasma membrane depolarization and nuclear membrane breakdown, culminating in arrest at second metaphase. Results Progesterone initiates an increase in phosphoryl potential during the first meiotic division, resulting in the accumulation of high energy protein phosphate by second metaphase arrest. 31P-NMR, with saturation transfer, demonstrates that the phosphocreatine level rises ~2 fold and that the "pseudo" first order rate constant for the creatine kinase reaction falls to ~20% of the control by the onset of nuclear membrane breakdown. 32PO4 pulse-labeling reveals a net increase in phosphorylation of yolk protein phosvitin during this period. The increased yolk protein phosphorylation coincides with internalization of membrane Na/K-ATPase and membrane depolarizatio Conclusions These results indicate that progesterone binding to the catalytic subunit of the Na-pump diverts ATP from cation regulation at the plasma membrane to storage of high energy phosphate in yolk protein. Phosvitin serves as a major energy source during fertilization and early cleavage stages and is also a storage site for cations (e.g. Na+, K+, Ca2+, Fe2+/3+) essential for embryonic development. PMID:22054214

  6. MEI4 – a central player in the regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajeev; Ghyselinck, Norbert; Ishiguro, Kei-ichiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kouznetsova, Anna; Höög, Christer; Strong, Edward; Schimenti, John; Daniel, Katrin; Toth, Attila; de Massy, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    The formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the beginning of meiotic prophase marks the initiation of meiotic recombination. Meiotic DSB formation is catalyzed by SPO11 and their repair takes place on meiotic chromosome axes. The evolutionarily conserved MEI4 protein is required for meiotic DSB formation and is localized on chromosome axes. Here, we show that HORMAD1, one of the meiotic chromosome axis components, is required for MEI4 localization. Importantly, the quantitative correlation between the level of axis-associated MEI4 and DSB formation suggests that axis-associated MEI4 could be a limiting factor for DSB formation. We also show that MEI1, REC8 and RAD21L are important for proper MEI4 localization. These findings on MEI4 dynamics during meiotic prophase suggest that the association of MEI4 to chromosome axes is required for DSB formation, and that the loss of this association upon DSB repair could contribute to turning off meiotic DSB formation. PMID:25795304

  7. A meiotic drive element in the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides is located within a 102-kb region of chromosome V

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium verticillioides is an agriculturally important fungus because of its association with maize and its propensity to contaminate grain with toxic compounds. Some isolates of the fungus harbor a meiotic drive element known as Spore killer (SkK) that causes nearly all surviving meiotic progeny f...

  8. MEI4 – a central player in the regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Ghyselinck, Norbert; Ishiguro, Kei-ichiro; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kouznetsova, Anna; Höög, Christer; Strong, Edward; Schimenti, John; Daniel, Katrin; Toth, Attila; de Massy, Bernard

    2015-05-01

    The formation of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the beginning of meiotic prophase marks the initiation of meiotic recombination. Meiotic DSB formation is catalyzed by SPO11 and their repair takes place on meiotic chromosome axes. The evolutionarily conserved MEI4 protein is required for meiotic DSB formation and is localized on chromosome axes. Here, we show that HORMAD1, one of the meiotic chromosome axis components, is required for MEI4 localization. Importantly, the quantitative correlation between the level of axis-associated MEI4 and DSB formation suggests that axis-associated MEI4 could be a limiting factor for DSB formation. We also show that MEI1, REC8 and RAD21L are important for proper MEI4 localization. These findings on MEI4 dynamics during meiotic prophase suggest that the association of MEI4 to chromosome axes is required for DSB formation, and that the loss of this association upon DSB repair could contribute to turning off meiotic DSB formation. PMID:25795304

  9. Mutations in TUBB8 and Human Oocyte Meiotic Arrest.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ruizhi; Sang, Qing; Kuang, Yanping; Sun, Xiaoxi; Yan, Zheng; Zhang, Shaozhen; Shi, Juanzi; Tian, Guoling; Luchniak, Anna; Fukuda, Yusuke; Li, Bin; Yu, Min; Chen, Junling; Xu, Yao; Guo, Luo; Qu, Ronggui; Wang, Xueqian; Sun, Zhaogui; Liu, Miao; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Hongyan; Feng, Yi; Shao, Ruijin; Chai, Renjie; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Rui; Nogales, Eva; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Gupta, Mohan L; Cowan, Nicholas J; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-21

    Background Human reproduction depends on the fusion of a mature oocyte with a sperm cell to form a fertilized egg. The genetic events that lead to the arrest of human oocyte maturation are unknown. Methods We sequenced the exomes of five members of a four-generation family, three of whom had infertility due to oocyte meiosis I arrest. We performed Sanger sequencing of a candidate gene, TUBB8, in DNA samples from these members, additional family members, and members of 23 other affected families. The expression of TUBB8 and all other β-tubulin isotypes was assessed in human oocytes, early embryos, sperm cells, and several somatic tissues by means of a quantitative reverse-transcriptase-polymerase-chain-reaction assay. We evaluated the effect of the TUBB8 mutations on the assembly of the heterodimer consisting of one α-tubulin polypeptide and one β-tubulin polypeptide (α/β-tubulin heterodimer) in vitro, on microtubule architecture in HeLa cells, on microtubule dynamics in yeast cells, and on spindle assembly in mouse and human oocytes. Results We identified seven mutations in the primate-specific gene TUBB8 that were responsible for oocyte meiosis I arrest in 7 of the 24 families. TUBB8 expression is unique to oocytes and the early embryo, in which this gene accounts for almost all the expressed β-tubulin. The mutations affect chaperone-dependent folding and assembly of the α/β-tubulin heterodimer, disrupt microtubule behavior on expression in cultured cells, alter microtubule dynamics in vivo, and cause catastrophic spindle-assembly defects and maturation arrest on expression in mouse and human oocytes. Conclusions TUBB8 mutations have dominant-negative effects that disrupt microtubule behavior and oocyte meiotic spindle assembly and maturation, causing female infertility. (Funded by the National Basic Research Program of China and others.). PMID:26789871

  10. Mutations in TUBB8 cause human oocyte meiotic arrest

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruizhi; Sang, Qing; Kuang, Yanping; Sun, Xiaoxi; Yan, Zheng; Zhang, Shaozhen; Shi, Juanzi; Tian, Guoling; Luchniak, Anna; Fukuda, Yusuke; Li, Bin; Yu, Min; Chen, Junling; Xu, Yao; Guo, Luo; Qu, Ronggui; Wang, Xueqian; Sun, Zhaogui; Liu, Miao; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Hongyan; Feng, Yi; Shao, Ruijin; Chai, Renjie; Li, Qiaoli; Xing, Qinghe; Zhang, Rui; Nogales, Eva; Jin, Li; He, Lin; Gupta, Mohan L.; Cowan, Nicholas J.; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Successful human reproduction depends on the fusion of a mature oocyte with a sperm cell to form a fertilized egg. The genetic events that lead to human oocyte maturation arrest are unknown. Methods We recruited a rare four-generation family with female infertility as a consequence of oocyte meiosis I arrest. We applied whole-exome and direct Sanger sequencing to an additional 23 patients following identification of mutations in a candidate gene, TUBB8. Expression of TUBB8 and all other β-tubulin isotypes was measured in human oocytes, early embryos, sperm cells and several somatic tissues by qRT-PCR. The effect of the TUBB8 mutations was assessed on α/β tubulin heterodimer assembly in vitro, on microtubule architecture in HeLa cells, on microtubule dynamics in yeast cells, and on spindle assembly in mouse and human oocytes via microinjection of the corresponding cRNAs. Results We identified seven mutations in the primate-specific gene TUBB8 that are responsible for human oocyte meiosis I arrest in seven families. TUBB8 expression is unique to oocytes and the early embryo, where this gene accounts for almost all of the expressed β-tubulin. The mutations affect the chaperone-dependent folding and assembly of the α/β-tubulin heterodimer, induce microtubule chaos upon expression in cultured cells, alter microtubule dynamics in vivo, and cause catastrophic spindle assembly defects and maturation arrest upon expression in mouse and human oocytes. Conclusions TUBB8 mutations function via dominant negative effects that massively disrupt proper microtubule behavior. TUBB8 is a key gene involved in human oocyte meiotic spindle assembly and maturation. PMID:26789871

  11. Insertion DNA Accelerates Meiotic Interchromosomal Recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ding-Hong; Xue, Jia-Yu; Yang, Si-Hai; Zhang, Yan-Mei; Li, Mi-Mi; Hang, Yue-Yu

    2016-08-01

    Nucleotide insertions/deletions are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes, and the resulting hemizygous (unpaired) DNA has significant, heritable effects on adjacent DNA. However, little is known about the genetic behavior of insertion DNA. Here, we describe a binary transgenic system to study the behavior of insertion DNA during meiosis. Transgenic Arabidopsis lines were generated to carry two different defective reporter genes on nonhomologous chromosomes, designated as "recipient" and "donor" lines. Double hemizygous plants (harboring unpaired DNA) were produced by crossing between the recipient and the donor, and double homozygous lines (harboring paired DNA) via self-pollination. The transfer of the donor's unmutated sequence to the recipient generated a functional β-glucuronidase gene, which could be visualized by histochemical staining and corroborated by polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing. More than 673 million seedlings were screened, and the results showed that meiotic ectopic recombination in the hemizygous lines occurred at a frequency  >6.49-fold higher than that in the homozygous lines. Gene conversion might have been exclusively or predominantly responsible for the gene correction events. The direct measurement of ectopic recombination events provided evidence that an insertion, in the absence of an allelic counterpart, could scan the entire genome for homologous counterparts with which to pair. Furthermore, the unpaired (hemizygous) architectures could accelerate ectopic recombination between itself and interchromosomal counterparts. We suggest that the ectopic recombination accelerated by hemizygous architectures may be a general mechanism for interchromosomal recombination through ubiquitously dispersed repeat sequences in plants, ultimately contributing to genetic renovation and eukaryotic evolution. PMID:27189569

  12. Reorganization of the interchromosomal network during keratinocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Nitasha; Seifert, Brandon; Ding, Hu; Chen, Zihe; Stojkovic, Branislav; Bhattacharya, Sambit; Xu, Jinhui; Berezney, Ronald

    2016-06-01

    The well-established human epidermal keratinocyte (HEK) differentiation model was investigated to determine possible alterations in chromosome territory (CT) association during differentiation. The seven human chromosomes (1, 4, 11, 12, 16, 17, and 18) selected for this analysis are representative of the chromosome size and gene density range of the overall human genome as well as including a majority of genes involved in epidermal development and differentiation (CT1, 12, and 17). Induction with calcium chloride (Ca(2+)) resulted in morphological changes characteristic of keratinocyte differentiation. Combined multi-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and computational image analysis on the undifferentiated (0 h) and differentiated (24 h after Ca(2+) treatment) HEK revealed that (a) increases in CT volumes correspond to overall nuclear volume increases, (b) radial positioning is gene density-dependent at 0 h but neither gene density- nor size-dependent at 24 h, (c) the average number of interchromosomal associations for each CT is gene density-dependent and similar at both time points, and (d) there are striking differences in the single and multiple pairwise interchromosomal association profiles. Probabilistic network models of the overall interchromosomal associations demonstrate major reorganization of the network during differentiation. Only ~40 % of the CT pairwise connections in the networks are common to both 0 and 24 h HEK. We propose that there is a probabilistic chromosome positional code which can be significantly altered during cell differentiation in coordination with reprogramming of gene expression. PMID:26490167

  13. Evolution of a MCM complex in flies promoting meiotic crossovers by blocking BLM helicase

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Kathryn P.; Jones, Corbin D.; Sekelsky, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Generation of meiotic crossovers in many eukaryotes requires the elimination of anti-crossover activities by utilizing the Msh4–Msh5 heterodimer to block helicases. Msh4 and Msh5 have been lost from the flies Drosophila and Glossina but we identified a complex of mini-chromosome maintenance (MCM) proteins that functionally replace Msh4–Msh5. REC, an ortholog of MCM8 that evolved under strong positive selection in flies, interacts with MEI-217 and MEI-218, which arose from a previously undescribed metazoan-specific MCM protein. Meiotic crossovers are reduced in Drosophila rec, mei-217, and mei-218 mutants; however, removal of the Bloom syndrome helicase ortholog restores crossovers. Thus, MCMs were co-opted into a novel complex that replaces the meiotic pro-crossover function of Msh4–Msh5 in flies. PMID:23224558

  14. Double-strand break repair on sex chromosomes: challenges during male meiotic prophase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin-Yu; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    During meiotic prophase, DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair-mediated homologous recombination (HR) occurs for exchange of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. Unlike autosomes or female sex chromosomes, human male sex chromosomes X and Y share little homology. Although DSBs are generated throughout male sex chromosomes, homologous recombination does not occur for most regions and DSB repair process is significantly prolonged. As a result, male sex chromosomes are coated with many DNA damage response proteins and form a unique chromatin structure known as the XY body. Interestingly, associated with the prolonged DSB repair, transcription is repressed in the XY body but not in autosomes, a phenomenon known as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which is critical for male meiosis. Here using mice as model organisms, we briefly summarize recent progress on DSB repair in meiotic prophase and focus on the mechanism and function of DNA damage response in the XY body. PMID:25565522

  15. Nek11 regulates asymmetric cell division during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Wang, Hong-Hui; Zhang, Teng; Qi, Shu-Tao; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Hou, Yi; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2016-06-10

    Nek11, a member of the never in mitosis gene A (NIMA) family, is activated in somatic cells associated with G1/S or G2/M arrest. However, its function in meiosis is unknown. In this research, the expression, localization and functions of NEK11 in the mouse oocyte meiotic maturation were examined. Western blotting indicated that NEK11S was the major NEK11 protein in mouse oocyte. MYC-tagged Nek11 mRNA microinjection and immunofluorescent staining showed that NEK11 was localized to the meiotic spindles at MI and MII stage. Knockdown of Nek11 by microinjection of siRNA did not affect germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and the first polar body extrusion, but caused formation of 2-cell-like eggs. These results demonstrate that Nek11 regulates asymmetric cell division during oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:27150633

  16. Analyzing maize meiotic chromosomes with super-resolution structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chung-Ju Rachel

    2013-01-01

    The success of meiosis depends on intricate coordination of a series of unique cellular processes to ensure proper chromosome segregation. Many proteins involved in these cellular events are directly or indirectly associated with chromosomes, especially those required for homologous recombination. These meiotic processes have been explored extensively by conventional light microscopy. However, many features of interest, such as chromatin organization, recombination nodules, or the synaptonemal complex are beyond the resolution of conventional wide-field microscopy. Moreover, in most sample preparation techniques for light microscopy, meiotic cells are squashed, which destroys the spatial organization of the nucleus. Here, I describe a protocol to analyze maize meiotic chromosomes by three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM), a recently developed high-resolution microscopy technique. This protocol can be used to examine protein localizations at a high resolution level by immunofluorescence. PMID:23559203

  17. The Rec102 Mutant of Yeast Is Defective in Meiotic Recombination and Chromosome Synapsis

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, J.; Engebrecht, J. A.; Roeder, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    A mutation at the REC102 locus was identified in a screen for yeast mutants that produce inviable spores. rec102 spore lethality is rescued by a spo13 mutation, which causes cells to bypass the meiosis I division. The rec102 mutation completely eliminates meiotically induced gene conversion and crossing over but has no effect on mitotic recombination frequencies. Cytological studies indicate that the rec102 mutant makes axial elements (precursors to the synaptonemal complex), but homologous chromosomes fail to synapse. In addition, meiotic chromosome segregation is significantly delayed in rec102 strains. Studies of double and triple mutants indicate that the REC102 protein acts before the RAD52 gene product in the meiotic recombination pathway. The REC102 gene was cloned based on complementation of the mutant defect and the gene was mapped to chromosome XII between CDC25 and STE11. PMID:1732169

  18. Human Adult Cortical Reorganization and Consequent Visual Distortion

    PubMed Central

    Dilks, Daniel D.; Serences, John T.; Rosenau, Benjamin J.; Yantis, Steven; McCloskey, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Neural and behavioral evidence for cortical reorganization in the adult somatosensory system after loss of sensory input (e.g., amputation) has been well documented. In contrast, evidence for reorganization in the adult visual system is far less clear: neural evidence is the subject of controversy, behavioral evidence is sparse, and studies combining neural and behavioral evidence have not previously been reported. Here, we report converging behavioral and neuroimaging evidence from a stroke patient (B.L.) in support of cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system. B.L.’s stroke spared the primary visual cortex (V1), but destroyed fibers that normally provide input to V1 from the upper left visual field (LVF). As a consequence, B.L. is blind in the upper LVF, and exhibits distorted perception in the lower LVF: stimuli appear vertically elongated, toward and into the blind upper LVF. For example, a square presented in the lower LVF is perceived as a rectangle extending upward. We hypothesized that the perceptual distortion was a consequence of cortical reorganization in V1. Extensive behavioral testing supported our hypothesis, and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) confirmed V1 reorganization. Together, the behavioral and fMRI data show that loss of input to V1 after a stroke leads to cortical reorganization in the adult human visual system, and provide the first evidence that reorganization of the adult visual system affects visual perception. These findings contribute to our understanding of the human adult brain’s capacity to change and has implications for topics ranging from learning to recovery from brain damage. PMID:17804619

  19. Aging predisposes oocytes to meiotic nondisjunction when the cohesin subunit SMC1 is reduced.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V; Bickel, Sharon E

    2008-11-01

    In humans, meiotic chromosome segregation errors increase dramatically as women age, but the molecular defects responsible are largely unknown. Cohesion along the arms of meiotic sister chromatids provides an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to keep recombinant chromosomes associated until anaphase I. One attractive hypothesis to explain age-dependent nondisjunction (NDJ) is that loss of cohesion over time causes recombinant homologues to dissociate prematurely and segregate randomly during the first meiotic division. Using Drosophila as a model system, we have tested this hypothesis and observe a significant increase in meiosis I NDJ in experimentally aged Drosophila oocytes when the cohesin protein SMC1 is reduced. Our finding that missegregation of recombinant homologues increases with age supports the model that chiasmata are destabilized by gradual loss of cohesion over time. Moreover, the stage at which Drosophila oocytes are most vulnerable to age-related defects is analogous to that at which human oocytes remain arrested for decades. Our data provide the first demonstration in any organism that, when meiotic cohesion begins intact, the aging process can weaken it sufficiently and cause missegregation of recombinant chromosomes. One major advantage of these studies is that we have reduced but not eliminated the SMC1 subunit. Therefore, we have been able to investigate how aging affects normal meiotic cohesion. Our findings that recombinant chromosomes are at highest risk for loss of chiasmata during diplotene argue that human oocytes are most vulnerable to age-induced loss of meiotic cohesion at the stage at which they remain arrested for several years. PMID:19008956

  20. Aging Predisposes Oocytes to Meiotic Nondisjunction When the Cohesin Subunit SMC1 Is Reduced

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V.; Bickel, Sharon E.

    2008-01-01

    In humans, meiotic chromosome segregation errors increase dramatically as women age, but the molecular defects responsible are largely unknown. Cohesion along the arms of meiotic sister chromatids provides an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to keep recombinant chromosomes associated until anaphase I. One attractive hypothesis to explain age-dependent nondisjunction (NDJ) is that loss of cohesion over time causes recombinant homologues to dissociate prematurely and segregate randomly during the first meiotic division. Using Drosophila as a model system, we have tested this hypothesis and observe a significant increase in meiosis I NDJ in experimentally aged Drosophila oocytes when the cohesin protein SMC1 is reduced. Our finding that missegregation of recombinant homologues increases with age supports the model that chiasmata are destabilized by gradual loss of cohesion over time. Moreover, the stage at which Drosophila oocytes are most vulnerable to age-related defects is analogous to that at which human oocytes remain arrested for decades. Our data provide the first demonstration in any organism that, when meiotic cohesion begins intact, the aging process can weaken it sufficiently and cause missegregation of recombinant chromosomes. One major advantage of these studies is that we have reduced but not eliminated the SMC1 subunit. Therefore, we have been able to investigate how aging affects normal meiotic cohesion. Our findings that recombinant chromosomes are at highest risk for loss of chiasmata during diplotene argue that human oocytes are most vulnerable to age-induced loss of meiotic cohesion at the stage at which they remain arrested for several years. PMID:19008956

  1. Analyses of the involvement of PKA regulation mechanism in meiotic incompetence of porcine growing oocytes.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takanori; Fujii, Wataru; Kano, Kiyoshi; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko

    2012-09-01

    Mammalian growing oocytes (GOs) lack the ability to resume meiosis, although the molecular mechanism of this limitation is not fully understood. In the present study, we cloned cDNAs of cAMP-dependent protein-kinase (PKA) subunits from porcine oocytes and analyzed the involvement of the PKA regulation mechanism in the meiotic incompetence of GOs at the molecular level. We found a cAMP-independent high PKA activity in GOs throughout the in vitro culture using a porcine PKA assay system we established, and inhibition of the activity by injection of the antisense RNA of the PKA catalytic subunit (PKA-C) induced meiotic resumption in GOs. Then we examined the possibility that the amount of the PKA regulatory subunit (PKA-R), which can bind and inhibit PKA-C, was insufficient to suppress PKA activity in GOs because of the overexpression of two PKA-Rs, PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A. We found that neither of them affected PKA activity and induced meiotic resumption in GO although PRKAR2A could inhibit PKA activity and induce meiosis in cAMP-treated full-grown oocytes (FGOs). Finally, we analyzed the subcellular localization of PKA subunits and found that all the subunits were localized in the cytoplasm during meiotic arrest and that PKA-C and PRKAR2A, but not PRKAR1A, entered into the nucleus just before meiotic resumption in FGOs, whereas all of them remained in the cytoplasm in GOs throughout the culture period. Our findings suggest that the continuous high PKA activity is a primary cause of the meiotic incompetence of porcine GOs and that this PKA activity is not simply caused by an insufficient expression level of PKA-R, but can be attributed to more complex spatial-temporal regulation mechanisms. PMID:22674394

  2. Visualizing and Analyzing Branching Microtubule Nucleation Using Meiotic Xenopus Egg Extracts and TIRF Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    King, Matthew; Petry, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Mitotic and meiotic spindles consist primarily of microtubules, which originate from centrosomes and within the vicinity of chromatin. Indirect evidence suggested that microtubules also originate throughout the spindle, but the high microtubule density within the spindle precludes the direct observation of this phenomenon. By using meiotic Xenopus laevis egg extract and employing total internal reflection (TIRF) microscopy, microtubule nucleation from preexisting microtubules could be demonstrated and analyzed. Branching microtubule nucleation is an ideal mechanism to assemble and maintain a mitotic spindle, because microtubule numbers are amplified while preserving their polarity. Here, we describe the assays that made these findings possible and the experiments that helped identify the key molecular players involved. PMID:27193844

  3. Live Imaging of Intracellular Dynamics During Meiotic Maturation in Mouse Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Shuhei; Sakakibara, Yogo; Kitajima, Tomoya S

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence live imaging is a powerful approach to study intracellular dynamics during cellular events such as cell division. By applying automated confocal live imaging to mouse oocytes, in which meiotic maturation can be induced in vitro after the introduction of fluorescent proteins through microinjection, the meiotic dynamics of intracellular structures, such as chromosomes, can be monitored at high resolution. A combination of this method with approaches for the perturbation of specific proteins opens up opportunities for understanding the molecular and intracellular basis of mammalian meiosis. PMID:27557586

  4. Reorganization of neuronal circuits in growing visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keil, Wolfgang; Loewel, Siegrid; Wolf, Fred; Kaschube, Matthias

    2009-03-01

    The dynamics of reorganization of large cortical circuits is rooted in plasticity of individual synapses, but rules governing the collective behavior of large networks of neurons are only poorly understood. The postnatal brain growth partly evoked by extensive formation of new synaptic connections may expose cortical areas to a 'natural perturbation' sufficiently strong to observe signatures of large scale reorganization. Quantifying large sets of imaging data from juvenile cat visual cortex, we observe a novel mode of reorganization of domains that prefer inputs from one eye or the other. Our theoretical analysis shows that this mode can be explained quantitatively by the so called Zigzag instability, a dynamical reorganization, well-known in the field of pattern formation in physics, by which 2D isotropic Turing patterns respond to an increase in their typical spatial scale with a zigzag-like bending of domains. We point out that this instability has in fact been predicted, albeit implicitly, by most models of visual cortical development that have been proposed so far. We conclude that cortical networks can undergo large scale reorganizations during normal postnatal development.

  5. Deprivation-induced cortical reorganization in children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anu; Gilley, Phillip M; Dorman, Michael F; Baldwin, Robert

    2007-09-01

    A basic finding in developmental neurophysiology is that some areas of the cortex cortical areas will reorganize following a period of stimulus deprivation. In this review, we discuss mainly electroencephalography (EEG) studies of normal and deprivation-induced abnormal development of the central auditory pathways in children and in animal models. We describe age cut-off for sensitive periods for central auditory development in congenitally deaf children who are fitted with a cochlear implant. We speculate on mechanisms of decoupling and reorganization which may underlie the end of the sensitive period. Finally, we describe new magentoencephalography (MEG) evidence of somatosensory cross-modal plasticity following long-term auditory deprivation. PMID:17828665

  6. A model for chromosome structure during the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles.

    PubMed

    Stack, S M; Anderson, L K

    2001-01-01

    The chromosome scaffold model in which loops of chromatin are attached to a central, coiled chromosome core (scaffold) is the current paradigm for chromosome structure. Here we present a modified version of the chromosome scaffold model to describe chromosome structure and behavior through the mitotic and meiotic cell cycles. We suggest that a salient feature of chromosome structure is established during DNA replication when sister loops of DNA extend in opposite directions from replication sites on nuclear matrix strands. This orientation is maintained into prophase when the nuclear matrix strand is converted into two closely associated sister chromatid cores with sister DNA loops extending in opposite directions. We propose that chromatid cores are contractile and show, using a physical model, that contraction of cores during late prophase can result in coiled chromatids. Coiling accounts for the majority of chromosome shortening that is needed to separate sister chromatids within the confines of a cell. In early prophase I of meiosis, the orientation of sister DNA loops in opposite directions from axial elements assures that DNA loops interact preferentially with homologous DNA loops rather than with sister DNA loops. In this context, we propose a bar code model for homologous presynaptic chromosome alignment that involves weak paranemic interactions of homologous DNA loops. Opposite orientation of sister loops also suppresses crossing over between sister chromatids in favor of crossing over between homologous non-sister chromatids. After crossing over is completed in pachytene and the synaptonemal complex breaks down in early diplotene (= diffuse stage), new contractile cores are laid down along each chromatid. These chromatid cores are comparable to the chromatid cores in mitotic prophase chromosomes. As an aside, we propose that leptotene through early diplotene represent the 'missing' G2 period of the premeiotic interphase. The new chromosome cores, along

  7. Cuf2 Is a Transcriptional Co-Regulator that Interacts with Mei4 for Timely Expression of Middle-Phase Meiotic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ioannoni, Raphaël; Brault, Ariane; Labbé, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe cuf2+ gene encodes a nuclear regulator that is required for timely activation and repression of several middle-phase genes during meiotic differentiation. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the mechanism by which Cuf2 regulates meiotic gene expression. Using a chromatin immunoprecipitation approach, we demonstrate that Cuf2 is specifically associated with promoters of both activated and repressed target genes, in a time-dependent manner. In case of the fzr1+ gene whose transcription is positively affected by Cuf2, promoter occupancy by Cuf2 results in a concomitant increased association of RNA polymerase II along its coding region. In marked contrast, association of RNA polymerase II with chromatin decreases when Cuf2 negatively regulates target gene expression such as wtf13+. Although Cuf2 operates through a transcriptional mechanism, it is unable to perform its function in the absence of the Mei4 transcription factor, which is a member of the conserved forkhead protein family. Using coimmunoprecipitation experiments, results showed that Cuf2 is a binding partner of Mei4. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation experiments brought further evidence that an association between Cuf2 and Mei4 occurs in the nucleus. Analysis of fzr1+ promoter regions revealed that two FLEX-like elements, which are bound by the transcription factor Mei4, are required for chromatin occupancy by Cuf2. Together, results reported here revealed that Cuf2 and Mei4 co-regulate the timely expression of middle-phase genes during meiosis. PMID:26986212

  8. Cyclin B synthesis and rapamycin-sensitive regulation of protein synthesis during starfish oocyte meiotic divisions.

    PubMed

    Lapasset, Laure; Pradet-Balade, Bérengère; Vergé, Valérie; Lozano, Jean-Claude; Oulhen, Nathalie; Cormier, Patrick; Peaucellier, Gérard

    2008-11-01

    Translation of cyclin mRNAs represents an important event for proper meiotic maturation and post-fertilization mitoses in many species. Translational control of cyclin B mRNA has been described to be achieved through two separate but related mechanisms: translational repression and polyadenylation. In this paper, we evaluated the contribution of global translational regulation by the cap-dependent translation repressor 4E-BP (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein) on the cyclin B protein synthesis during meiotic maturation of the starfish oocytes. We used the immunosupressant drug rapamycin, a strong inhibitor of cap-dependent translation, to check for the involvement of this protein synthesis during this physiological process. Rapamycin was found to prevent dissociation of 4E-BP from the initiation factor eIF4E and to suppress correlatively a burst of global protein synthesis occurring at the G2/M transition. The drug had no effect on first meiotic division but defects in meiotic spindle formation prevented second polar body emission, demonstrating that a rapamycin-sensitive pathway is involved in this mechanism. While rapamycin affected the global protein synthesis, the drug altered neither the specific translation of cyclin B mRNA nor the expression of the Mos protein. The expression of these two proteins was correlated with the phosphorylation and the dissociation of the cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding protein from eIF4E. PMID:18361417

  9. Structural damage to meiotic chromosomes impairs DNA recombination and checkpoint control in mammalian oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Höög, Christer

    2006-05-22

    Meiosis in human oocytes is a highly error-prone process with profound effects on germ cell and embryo development. The synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3) transiently supports the structural organization of the meiotic chromosome axis. Offspring derived from murine Sycp3(-)(/)(-) females die in utero as a result of aneuploidy. We studied the nature of the proximal chromosomal defects that give rise to aneuploidy in Sycp3(-)(/)(-) oocytes and how these errors evade meiotic quality control mechanisms. We show that DNA double-stranded breaks are inefficiently repaired in Sycp3(-)(/)(-) oocytes, thereby generating a temporal spectrum of recombination errors. This is indicated by a strong residual gammaH2AX labeling retained at late meiotic stages in mutant oocytes and an increased persistence of recombination-related proteins associated with meiotic chromosomes. Although a majority of the mutant oocytes are rapidly eliminated at early postnatal development, a subset with a small number of unfinished crossovers evades the DNA damage checkpoint, resulting in the formation of aneuploid gametes. PMID:16717125

  10. Meiotic genes and sexual reproduction in the green algal class Trebouxiophyceae (Chlorophyta).

    PubMed

    Fučíková, Karolina; Pažoutová, Marie; Rindi, Fabio

    2015-06-01

    Sexual reproduction is widespread in eukaryotes and is well documented in chlorophytan green algae. In this lineage, however, the Trebouxiophyceae represent a striking exception: in contrast to its relatives Chlorophyceae and Ulvophyceae this group appears to be mostly asexual, as fertilization has been rarely observed. Assessments of sexual reproduction in the Trebouxiophyceae have been based on microscopic observation of gametes fusing. New genomic data offer now the opportunity to check for the presence of meiotic genes, which represent an indirect evidence of a sexual life cycle. Using genomic and transcriptomic data for 12 taxa spanning the phylogenetic breadth of the class, we tried to clarify whether genuine asexuality or cryptic sexuality is the most likely case for the numerous putatively asexual trebouxiophytes. On the basis of these data and a bibliographic review, we conclude that the view of trebouxiophytes as primarily asexual is incorrect. In contrast to the limited number of reports of fertilization, meiotic genes were found in all genomes and transcriptomes examined, even in species presumed asexual. In the taxa examined the totality or majority of the genes were present, Helicosporidium and Auxenochlorella being the only partial exceptions (only four genes present). The evidence of sex provided by the meiotic genes is phylogenetically widespread in the class and indicates that sexual reproduction is not associated with any particular morphological or ecological trait. On the basis of the results, we expect that the existence of the meiotic genes will be documented in all trebouxiophycean genomes that will become available in the future. PMID:26986659

  11. The kinase VRK1 is required for normal meiotic progression in mammalian oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schober, Carolyn S; Aydiner, Fulya; Booth, Carmen J; Seli, Emre; Reinke, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    The kinase VRK1 has been implicated in mitotic and meiotic progression in invertebrate species, but whether it mediates these events during mammalian gametogenesis is not completely understood. Previous work has demonstrated a role for mammalian VRK1 in proliferation of male spermatogonia, yet whether VRK1 plays a role in meiotic progression, as seen in Drosophila, has not been determined. Here, we have established a mouse strain bearing a gene trap insertion in the VRK1 locus that disrupts Vrk1 expression. In addition to the male proliferation defects, we find that reduction of VRK1 activity causes a delay in meiotic progression during oogenesis, results in the presence of lagging chromosomes during formation of the metaphase plate, and ultimately leads to the failure of oocytes to be fertilized. The activity of at least one phosphorylation substrate of VRK1, p53, is not required for these defects. These results are consistent with previously defined functions of VRK1 in meiotic progression in Drosophila oogenesis, and indicate a conserved role for VRK1 in coordinating proper chromosomal configuration in female meiosis. PMID:21277975

  12. Meiotic cohesin STAG3 is required for chromosome axis formation and sister chromatid cohesion.

    PubMed

    Winters, Tristan; McNicoll, Francois; Jessberger, Rolf

    2014-06-01

    The cohesin complex is essential for mitosis and meiosis. The specific meiotic roles of individual cohesin proteins are incompletely understood. We report in vivo functions of the only meiosis-specific STAG component of cohesin, STAG3. Newly generated STAG3-deficient mice of both sexes are sterile with meiotic arrest. In these mice, meiotic chromosome architecture is severely disrupted as no bona fide axial elements (AE) form and homologous chromosomes do not synapse. Axial element protein SYCP3 forms dot-like structures, many partially overlapping with centromeres. Asynapsis marker HORMAD1 is diffusely distributed throughout the chromatin, and SYCP1, which normally marks synapsed axes, is largely absent. Centromeric and telomeric sister chromatid cohesion are impaired. Centromere and telomere clustering occurs in the absence of STAG3, and telomere structure is not severely affected. Other cohesin proteins are present, localize throughout the STAG3-devoid chromatin, and form complexes with cohesin SMC1β. No other deficiency in a single meiosis-specific cohesin causes a phenotype as drastic as STAG3 deficiency. STAG3 emerges as the key STAG cohesin involved in major functions of meiotic cohesin. PMID:24797474

  13. Identification of novel Drosophila meiotic genes recovered in a P-element screen.

    PubMed Central

    Sekelsky, J J; McKim, K S; Messina, L; French, R L; Hurley, W D; Arbel, T; Chin, G M; Deneen, B; Force, S J; Hari, K L; Jang, J K; Laurençon, A C; Madden, L D; Matthies, H J; Milliken, D B; Page, S L; Ring, A D; Wayson, S M; Zimmerman, C C; Hawley, R S

    1999-01-01

    The segregation of homologous chromosomes from one another is the essence of meiosis. In many organisms, accurate segregation is ensured by the formation of chiasmata resulting from crossing over. Drosophila melanogaster females use this type of recombination-based system, but they also have mechanisms for segregating achiasmate chromosomes with high fidelity. We describe a P-element mutagenesis and screen in a sensitized genetic background to detect mutations that impair meiotic chromosome pairing, recombination, or segregation. Our screen identified two new recombination-deficient mutations: mei-P22, which fully eliminates meiotic recombination, and mei-P26, which decreases meiotic exchange by 70% in a polar fashion. We also recovered an unusual allele of the ncd gene, whose wild-type product is required for proper structure and function of the meiotic spindle. However, the screen yielded primarily mutants specifically defective in the segregation of achiasmate chromosomes. Although most of these are alleles of previously undescribed genes, five were in the known genes alphaTubulin67C, CycE, push, and Trl. The five mutations in known genes produce novel phenotypes for those genes. PMID:10353897

  14. Searching for a Spore killer: A meiotic drive element in Neurospora fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mendelian inheritance predicts that different alleles of the same gene will have an equal chance of being transmitted to the next generation. However, meiotic drive is a phenomenon where certain alleles evolve the ability to bias transmission in their own favor. In this study we are investigating a ...

  15. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  16. Replication protein A is required for meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Soustelle, Christine; Vedel, Michèle; Kolodner, Richard; Nicolas, Alain

    2002-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, meiotic recombination is initiated by transient DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). These DSBs undergo a 5' --> 3' resection to produce 3' single-stranded DNA ends that serve to channel DSBs into the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway. In vitro studies strongly suggest that several proteins of this pathway--Rad51, Rad52, Rad54, Rad55, Rad57, and replication protein A (RPA)--play a role in the strand exchange reaction. Here, we report a study of the meiotic phenotypes conferred by two missense mutations affecting the largest subunit of RPA, which are localized in the protein interaction domain (rfa1-t11) and in the DNA-binding domain (rfa1-t48). We find that both mutant diploids exhibit reduced sporulation efficiency, very poor spore viability, and a 10- to 100-fold decrease in meiotic recombination. Physical analyses indicate that both mutants form normal levels of meiosis-specific DSBs and that the broken ends are processed into 3'-OH single-stranded tails, indicating that the RPA complex present in these rfa1 mutants is functional in the initial steps of meiotic recombination. However, the 5' ends of the broken fragments undergo extensive resection, similar to what is observed in rad51, rad52, rad55, and rad57 mutants, indicating that these RPA mutants are defective in the repair of the Spo11-dependent DSBs that initiate homologous recombination during meiosis. PMID:12072452

  17. LSD1 is essential for oocyte meiotic progression by regulating CDC25B expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeesun; Singh, Anup Kumar; Takata, Yoko; Lin, Kevin; Shen, Jianjun; Lu, Yue; Kerenyi, Marc A; Orkin, Stuart H; Chen, Taiping

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at prophase I until puberty when hormonal signals induce the resumption of meiosis I and progression to meiosis II. Meiotic progression is controlled by CDK1 activity and is accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. Although the signalling pathways regulating CDK1 activity are well defined, the functional significance of epigenetic changes remains largely unknown. Here we show that LSD1, a lysine demethylase, regulates histone H3 lysine 4 di-methylation (H3K4me2) in mouse oocytes and is essential for meiotic progression. Conditional deletion of Lsd1 in growing oocytes results in precocious resumption of meiosis and spindle and chromosomal abnormalities. Consequently, most Lsd1-null oocytes fail to complete meiosis I and undergo apoptosis. Mechanistically, upregulation of CDC25B, a phosphatase that activates CDK1, is responsible for precocious meiotic resumption and also contributes to subsequent spindle and chromosomal defects. Our findings uncover a functional link between LSD1 and the major signalling pathway governing meiotic progression. PMID:26626423

  18. Shu1 Promotes Homolog Bias of Meiotic Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Soogil; Kim, Keun Pil

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination occurs closely between homologous chromatids with highly ordered recombinosomes through RecA homologs and mediators. The present study demonstrates this relationship during the period of “partner choice” in yeast meiotic recombination. We have examined the formation of recombination intermediates in the absence or presence of Shu1, a member of the PCSS complex, which also includes Psy3, Csm2, and Shu2. DNA physical analysis indicates that Shu1 is essential for promoting the establishment of homolog bias during meiotic homologous recombination, and the partner choice is switched by Mek1 kinase activity. Furthermore, Shu1 promotes both crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) pathways of meiotic recombination. The inactivation of Mek1 kinase allows for meiotic recombination to progress efficiently, but is lost in homolog bias where most double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired via stable intersister joint molecules. Moreover, the Srs2 helicase deletion cells in the budding yeast show slightly reduced COs and NCOs, and Shu1 promotes homolog bias independent of Srs2. Our findings reveal that Shu1 and Mek1 kinase activity have biochemically distinct roles in partner choice, which in turn enhances the understanding of the mechanism associated with the precondition for homolog bias. PMID:24213600

  19. Meiotic cohesin STAG3 is required for chromosome axis formation and sister chromatid cohesion

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Tristan; McNicoll, Francois; Jessberger, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The cohesin complex is essential for mitosis and meiosis. The specific meiotic roles of individual cohesin proteins are incompletely understood. We report in vivo functions of the only meiosis-specific STAG component of cohesin, STAG3. Newly generated STAG3-deficient mice of both sexes are sterile with meiotic arrest. In these mice, meiotic chromosome architecture is severely disrupted as no bona fide axial elements (AE) form and homologous chromosomes do not synapse. Axial element protein SYCP3 forms dot-like structures, many partially overlapping with centromeres. Asynapsis marker HORMAD1 is diffusely distributed throughout the chromatin, and SYCP1, which normally marks synapsed axes, is largely absent. Centromeric and telomeric sister chromatid cohesion are impaired. Centromere and telomere clustering occurs in the absence of STAG3, and telomere structure is not severely affected. Other cohesin proteins are present, localize throughout the STAG3-devoid chromatin, and form complexes with cohesin SMC1β. No other deficiency in a single meiosis-specific cohesin causes a phenotype as drastic as STAG3 deficiency. STAG3 emerges as the key STAG cohesin involved in major functions of meiotic cohesin. PMID:24797474

  20. LSD1 is essential for oocyte meiotic progression by regulating CDC25B expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeesun; Singh, Anup Kumar; Takata, Yoko; Lin, Kevin; Shen, Jianjun; Lu, Yue; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Orkin, Stuart H.; Chen, Taiping

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes are arrested at prophase I until puberty when hormonal signals induce the resumption of meiosis I and progression to meiosis II. Meiotic progression is controlled by CDK1 activity and is accompanied by dynamic epigenetic changes. Although the signalling pathways regulating CDK1 activity are well defined, the functional significance of epigenetic changes remains largely unknown. Here we show that LSD1, a lysine demethylase, regulates histone H3 lysine 4 di-methylation (H3K4me2) in mouse oocytes and is essential for meiotic progression. Conditional deletion of Lsd1 in growing oocytes results in precocious resumption of meiosis and spindle and chromosomal abnormalities. Consequently, most Lsd1-null oocytes fail to complete meiosis I and undergo apoptosis. Mechanistically, upregulation of CDC25B, a phosphatase that activates CDK1, is responsible for precocious meiotic resumption and also contributes to subsequent spindle and chromosomal defects. Our findings uncover a functional link between LSD1 and the major signalling pathway governing meiotic progression. PMID:26626423

  1. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Polakova, Silvia; Molnarova, Lucia; Hyppa, Randy W; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-06-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  2. Beclin-1 knockdown shows abscission failure but not autophagy defect during oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    You, Seung Yeop; Park, Yong Seok; Jeon, Hyuk-Joon; Cho, Dong-Hyung; Jeon, Hong Bae; Kim, Sung Hyun; Chang, Jong Wook; Kim, Jae-Sung; Oh, Jeong Su

    2016-06-17

    Cytokinesis is the final step in cell division that results in the separation of a parent cell into daughter cells. Unlike somatic cells that undergo symmetric division, meiotic division is highly asymmetric, allowing the preservation of maternal resources for embryo development. Beclin-1/BECN1, the mammalian homolog of yeast Atg6, is a key molecule of autophagy. As part of a class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K-III) complex, BECN1 initiates autophagosome formation by coordinating membrane trafficking. However, emerging evidence suggests that BECN1 regulates chromosome segregation and cytokinesis during mitosis. Thus, we investigated the function of BECN1 during oocyte meiotic maturation. BECN1 was widely distributed during meiotic maturation forming small vesicles. Interestingly, BECN1 is also detected at the midbody ring during cytokinesis. Depletion of BECN1 impaired the cytokinetic abscission, perturbing the recruitment of ZFYVE26 at the midbody. Similar phenotypes were observed when PI3K-III activity was inhibited. However, inhibition of autophagy by depleting Atg14L did not disturb meiotic maturation. Therefore, our results not only demonstrate that BECN1 as a PI3K-III component is essential for cytokinesis, but also suggest that BECN1 is not associated with autophagy pathway in mouse oocytes. PMID:27149384

  3. Meiotic recombination errors, the origin of sperm aneuploidy and clinical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Tempest, Helen G

    2011-02-01

    Since the early 1990s male infertility has successfully been treated by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), nevertheless concerns have been raised regarding the genetic risk of ICSI. Chromosome aneuploidy (the presence of extra or missing chromosomes) is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and mental retardation in humans. While the majority of chromosome aneuploidies are maternal in origin, the paternal contribution to aneuploidy is clinically relevant particularly for the sex chromosomes. Given that it is difficult to study female gametes investigations are predominantly conducted in male meiotic recombination and sperm aneuploidy. Research suggests that infertile men have increased levels of sperm aneuploidy and that this is likely due to increased errors in meiotic recombination and chromosome synapsis within these individuals. It is perhaps counterintuitive but there appears to be no selection against chromosomally aneuploid sperm at fertilization. In fact the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm appears to be mirrored in conceptions. Given this information this review will cover our current understanding of errors in meiotic recombination and chromosome synapsis and how these may contribute to increased sperm aneuploidy. Frequencies of sperm aneuploidy in infertile men and individuals with constitutional karyotypic abnormalities are reviewed, and based on these findings, indications for clinical testing of sperm aneuploidy are discussed. In addition, the application of single nucleotide arrays for the analysis of meiotic recombination and identification of parental origin of aneuploidy are considered. PMID:21204593

  4. Meiotic onset is reliant on spatial distribution but independent of germ cell number in the mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Arora, Ripla; Abby, Emilie; Ross, Adam D J; Cantu, Andrea V; Kissner, Michael D; Castro, Vianca; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Livera, Gabriel; Laird, Diana J

    2016-07-01

    Mouse ovarian germ cells enter meiosis in a wave that propagates from anterior to posterior, but little is known about contribution of germ cells to initiation or propagation of meiosis. In a Ror2 mutant with diminished germ cell number and migration, we find that overall timing of meiotic initiation is delayed at the population level. We use chemotherapeutic depletion to exclude a profoundly reduced number of germ cells as a cause for meiotic delay. We rule out sex reversal or failure to specify somatic support cells as contributors to the meiotic phenotype. Instead, we find that anomalies in the distribution of germ cells as well as gonad shape in mutants contribute to aberrant initiation of meiosis. Our analysis supports a model of meiotic initiation via diffusible signal(s), excludes a role for germ cells in commencing the meiotic wave and furnishes the first phenotypic demonstration of the wave of meiotic entry. Finally, our studies underscore the importance of considering germ cell migration defects while studying meiosis to discern secondary effects resulting from positioning versus primary meiotic entry phenotypes. PMID:27199373

  5. Arabidopsis Cell Division Cycle 20.1 Is Required for Normal Meiotic Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Baixiao; Wang, Liudan; Ren, Ding; Ren, Ren

    2015-01-01

    Cell division requires proper spindle assembly; a surveillance pathway, the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), monitors whether the spindle is normal and correctly attached to kinetochores. The SAC proteins regulate mitotic chromosome segregation by affecting CDC20 (Cell Division Cycle 20) function. However, it is unclear whether CDC20 regulates meiotic spindle assembly and proper homolog segregation. Here, we show that the Arabidopsis thaliana CDC20.1 gene is indispensable for meiosis and male fertility. We demonstrate that cdc20.1 meiotic chromosomes align asynchronously and segregate unequally and the metaphase I spindle has aberrant morphology. Comparison of the distribution of meiotic stages at different time points between the wild type and cdc20.1 reveals a delay of meiotic progression from diakinesis to anaphase I. Furthermore, cdc20.1 meiocytes exhibit an abnormal distribution of a histone H3 phosphorylation mark mediated by the Aurora kinase, providing evidence that CDC20.1 regulates Aurora localization for meiotic chromosome segregation. Further evidence that CDC20.1 and Aurora are functionally related was provided by meiosis-specific knockdown of At-Aurora1 expression, resulting in meiotic chromosome segregation defects similar to those of cdc20.1. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role for CDC20.1 in SAC-dependent meiotic chromosome segregation. PMID:26672070

  6. The Tension at the Top of the Animal Pole Decreases during Meiotic Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Setsuko K.; Tsuchi, Akifumi; Satoh, Ryohei; Miyoshi, Hiromi; Hamaguchi, Miyako S.; Hamaguchi, Yukihisa

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic maturation is essential for the reproduction procedure of many animals. During this process an oocyte produces a large egg cell and tiny polar bodies by highly asymmetric division. In this study, to fully understand the sophisticated spatiotemporal regulation of accurate oocyte meiotic division, we focused on the global and local changes in the tension at the surface of the starfish (Asterina pectinifera) oocyte in relation to the surface actin remodeling. Before the onset of the bulge formation, the tension at the animal pole globally decreased, and started to increase after the onset of the bulge formation. Locally, at the onset of the bulge formation, tension at the top of the animal pole began to decrease, whereas that at the base of the bulge remarkably increased. As the bulge grew, the tension at the base of the bulge additionally increased. Such a change in the tension at the surface was similar to the changing pattern of actin distribution. Therefore, meiotic cell division was initiated by the bulging of the cortex, which had been weakened by actin reduction, and was followed by contraction at the base of the bulge, which had been reinforced by actin accumulation. The force generation system is assumed to allow the meiotic apparatus to move just under the membrane in the small polar body. Furthermore, a detailed comparison of the tension at the surface and the cortical actin distribution indicated another sophisticated feature, namely that the contraction at the base of the bulge was more vigorous than was presumed based on the actin distribution. These features of the force generation system will ensure the precise chromosome segregation necessary to produce a normal ovum with high accuracy in the meiotic maturation. PMID:24260212

  7. Unisexual reproduction drives meiotic recombination and phenotypic and karyotypic plasticity in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Sheng; Billmyre, R Blake; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Heitman, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    In fungi, unisexual reproduction, where sexual development is initiated without the presence of two compatible mating type alleles, has been observed in several species that can also undergo traditional bisexual reproduction, including the important human fungal pathogens Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. While unisexual reproduction has been well characterized qualitatively, detailed quantifications are still lacking for aspects of this process, such as the frequency of recombination during unisexual reproduction, and how this compares with bisexual reproduction. Here, we analyzed meiotic recombination during α-α unisexual and a-α bisexual reproduction of C. neoformans. We found that meiotic recombination operates in a similar fashion during both modes of sexual reproduction. Specifically, we observed that in α-α unisexual reproduction, the numbers of crossovers along the chromosomes during meiosis, recombination frequencies at specific chromosomal regions, as well as meiotic recombination hot and cold spots, are all similar to those observed during a-α bisexual reproduction. The similarity in meiosis is also reflected by the fact that phenotypic segregation among progeny collected from the two modes of sexual reproduction is also similar, with transgressive segregation being observed in both. Additionally, we found diploid meiotic progeny were also produced at similar frequencies in the two modes of sexual reproduction, and transient chromosomal loss and duplication likely occurs frequently and results in aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity that can span entire chromosomes. Furthermore, in both α-α unisexual and a-α bisexual reproduction, we observed biased allele inheritance in regions on chromosome 4, suggesting the presence of fragile chromosomal regions that might be vulnerable to mitotic recombination. Interestingly, we also observed a crossover event that occurred within the MAT locus during α-α unisexual reproduction. Our results

  8. Meiotic behavior of aneuploid chromatin in mouse models of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, L. G.; Czechanski, A.; Kamdar, S.; King, B. L.; Sun, F.; Handel, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Aneuploidy, which leads to unpaired chromosomal axes during meiosis, is frequently accompanied by infertility. We previously showed, using three mouse models of Down syndrome, that it is an extra chromosome, but not extra gene dose, that is associated with male infertility and virtual absence of post-meiotic gem cells. Here we test the hypothesis that aneuploid segments are differentially modified and expressed during meiosis, depending on whether they are present as an extra chromosome or not. In all three models examined, the trisomic region lacks a pairing partner, but in one case, spermatocytes have an extra (and unpaired) chromosome, while the two other models involve translocation of the trisomic region rather than an extra chromosome. An extra unpaired chromosome was always modified by phosphorylation of histone H2AX and lacked RNA PolII. But in the case of trisomic regions attached to a paired chromosome, assembly of these protein modifications was affected by the position of a trisomic region relative to a centromere and the physical extent of the unpaired chromatin. Analysis of gene expression in testes revealed that extra copy number alone was not sufficient for meiotic up-regulation of genes in the trisomic interval. Additionally and unexpectedly, presence of meiotic gene silencing chromatin modifications was not sufficient for down-regulation of genes in unpaired trisomic chromatin. Thus the meiotic chromatin modifications that are cytologically visible are unlikely to be directly involved in sterility versus fertility of DS models. Finally, the presence of an extra, unpaired chromosome, but not the presence of extra (trisomic) genes, caused global deregulation of transcription in spermatocytes. These results reveal mechanisms by which an extra chromosome, but not trisomic gene dose, impact on meiotic progress and infertility. PMID:19639331

  9. Meiotic recombination counteracts male-biased mutation (male-driven evolution).

    PubMed

    Mawaribuchi, Shuuji; Ito, Michihiko; Ogata, Mitsuaki; Oota, Hiroki; Katsumura, Takafumi; Takamatsu, Nobuhiko; Miura, Ikuo

    2016-01-27

    Meiotic recombination is believed to produce greater genetic variation despite the fact that deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)-replication errors are a major source of mutations. In some vertebrates, mutation rates are higher in males than in females, which developed the theory of male-driven evolution (male-biased mutation). However, there is little molecular evidence regarding the relationships between meiotic recombination and male-biased mutation. Here we tested the theory using the frog Rana rugosa, which has both XX/XY- and ZZ/ZW-type sex-determining systems within the species. The male-to-female mutation-rate ratio (α) was calculated from homologous sequences on the X/Y or Z/W sex chromosomes, which supported male-driven evolution. Surprisingly, each α value was notably higher in the XX/XY-type group than in the ZZ/ZW-type group, although α should have similar values within a species. Interestingly, meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes did not occur except at terminal regions in males of this species. Then, by subdividing α into two new factors, a replication-based male-to-female mutation-rate ratio (β) and a meiotic recombination-based XX-to-XY/ZZ-to-ZW mutation-rate ratio (γ), we constructed a formula describing the relationship among a nucleotide-substitution rate and the two factors, β and γ. Intriguingly, the β- and γ-values were larger and smaller than 1, respectively, indicating that meiotic recombination might reduce male-biased mutations. PMID:26791621

  10. Rural School District Reorganization on the Great Plains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Miles

    2002-01-01

    Rural school district reorganization and school consolidation are put into perspective by reviewing the large population increases that fueled small-school growth in the Great Plains, 1870-1930. Since the Dust Bowl and Great Depression, population losses, improvements in transportation, and arguments advocating economies of scale and increased…

  11. Connectome Reorganization Associated With Surgical Outcome in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Gong-Jun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Xu, Qiang; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhengge; Yang, Fang; Sun, Kangjian; Jiao, Qing; Liao, Wei; Lu, Guangming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To identify the distinct pattern of anatomical network reorganization in surgically refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) patients using a longitudinal design. We collected longitudinal diffusion-weighted images of 19 MTLE patients before and after anterior temporal lobectomy. Patients were classified as seizure-free (SF) or nonseizure-free (NSF) at least 1 year after surgery. We constructed whole-brain anatomical networks derived from white matter tractography and evaluated network connectivity measures by graph theoretical analysis. The reorganization trajectories of network measures in SF and NSF patients were investigated by two-way mixed analysis of variance, with factors “group” (SF vs NSF) and “treatment” (presurgery vs postsurgery). Widespread brain structures showed opposite reorganization trajectories in FS and NSF groups (interaction effect). Most of them showed group difference before surgery and then converge after surgery, suggesting that surgery remodeled these structures into a similar status. Conversly, contralateral amygdala-planum-temporale and thalamic-parietal tracts showed higher connectivity strength in NSF than in SF patients after surgery, indicating maladaptive neuroplastic responses to surgery in NSF patients. Our findings suggest that surgical outcomes are associated not only with the preoperative pattern of anatomical connectivity, but also with connectome reconfiguration following surgery. The reorganization of contralateral temporal lobe and corticothalamic tracts may be particularly important for seizure control in MTLE. PMID:26448031

  12. Expediting Scientific Data Analysis with Reorganization of Data

    SciTech Connect

    Byna, Surendra; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-08-19

    Data producers typically optimize the layout of data files to minimize the write time. In most cases, data analysis tasks read these files in access patterns different from the write patterns causing poor read performance. In this paper, we introduce Scientific Data Services (SDS), a framework for bridging the performance gap between writing and reading scientific data. SDS reorganizes data to match the read patterns of analysis tasks and enables transparent data reads from the reorganized data. We implemented a HDF5 Virtual Object Layer (VOL) plugin to redirect the HDF5 dataset read calls to the reorganized data. To demonstrate the effectiveness of SDS, we applied two parallel data organization techniques: a sort-based organization on a plasma physics data and a transpose-based organization on mass spectrometry imaging data. We also extended the HDF5 data access API to allow selection of data based on their values through a query interface, called SDS Query. We evaluated the execution time in accessing various subsets of data through existing HDF5 Read API and SDS Query. We showed that reading the reorganized data using SDS is up to 55X faster than reading the original data.

  13. Reorganization of Science in Secondary Schools. Bulletin, 1920, No. 26

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1920

    1920-01-01

    The committee on science of the Commission on the Reorganization of Secondary Education has carried on its work by means of discussions, correspondence, and formulation of preliminary reports for over seven years. The discussion of preliminary reports by groups, committees, and at meetings of science teachers has revealed progressive work already…

  14. 12 CFR 575.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... association or the acquiree association would fail to be “adequately capitalized” as defined under 12 CFR part... capitalization of the mutual holding company fails to meet the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section; (4... that fails to meet the standards established by that section; (5) The reorganizing association or...

  15. 12 CFR 575.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... association or the acquiree association would fail to be “adequately capitalized” as defined under 12 CFR part... capitalization of the mutual holding company fails to meet the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section; (4... that fails to meet the standards established by that section; (5) The reorganizing association or...

  16. East Texas Oilfield Schools: Expansion, Diminution and Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeCompte, Karon; Nicol, Tom

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the rise, diminution, and reorganization of East Texas Oilfield schools which was defined by the socio-economic conditions of the oil era, from the mid-nineteenth century until the third quarter of the twentieth century. Citizens of East Texas seized the opportunity at the time of oil discovery to provide superior school…

  17. A Model for Reorganization Applying Quality Principles and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lynne Branche; Stanley, Nancy Markle

    This paper chronicles ongoing alterations to the organizational structure of the acquisitions department at Pennsylvania State University using the tenets of total quality management (TQM). The movement toward reorganizing for process improvement began in late 1992 when the associate dean of libraries called the acquisitions department together to…

  18. Reorganizing the Career Resource Center in a Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelemen, Paul; Thorpe, Diane

    In response to the failure of North Lake College's Career Resource Center to meet its intended objectives, this report reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the original center proposal, assesses the present organization of the center, and outlines steps for its reorganization. The paper begins by providing background on the college and the…

  19. 12 CFR 575.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... association or the acquiree association would fail to be “adequately capitalized” as defined under 12 CFR part....4 Section 575.4 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL... disapprove a proposed mutual holding company reorganization pursuant to § 575.3(b) of this part if:...

  20. 12 CFR 239.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239... proposed mutual holding company reorganization filed pursuant to § 239.3(a) if: (1) Disapproval is... the mutual holding company fails to meet the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section; (4)...

  1. 12 CFR 575.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... association or the acquiree association would fail to be “adequately capitalized” as defined under 12 CFR part....4 Section 575.4 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MUTUAL... disapprove a proposed mutual holding company reorganization pursuant to § 575.3(b) of this part if:...

  2. 12 CFR 239.4 - Grounds for disapproval of reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Mutual Holding Companies § 239... proposed mutual holding company reorganization filed pursuant to § 239.3(a) if: (1) Disapproval is... the mutual holding company fails to meet the requirements of paragraph (b) of this section; (4)...

  3. 26 CFR 1.585-4 - Reorganizations and asset acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Banking Institutions § 1.585-4 Reorganizations and asset... provided by § 1.585-2(e)(1). If § 1.585-2(e)(1) provides the more recent base year, the balance of the... corporations) at the close of what would have been their respective base years determined under §...

  4. Solvent reorganization of electron transitions in viscous solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Ghorai, Pradip K.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2006-04-14

    We develop a model of electron transfer reactions at conditions of nonergodicity when the time of solvent relaxation crosses the observation time window set up by the reaction rate. Solvent reorganization energy of intramolecular electron transfer in a charge-transfer molecule dissolved in water and acetonitrile is studied by molecular dynamics simulations at varying temperatures. We observe a sharp decrease of the reorganization energy at a temperature identified as the temperature of structural arrest due to cage effect, as discussed by the mode-coupling theory. This temperature also marks the onset of the enhancement of translational diffusion relative to rotational relaxation signaling the breakdown of the Stokes-Einstein relation. The change in the reorganization energy at the transition temperature reflects the dynamical arrest of the slow, collective relaxation of the solvent related to the relaxation of the solvent dipolar polarization. An analytical theory proposed to describe this effect agrees well with both the simulations and experimental Stokes shift data. The theory is applied to the analysis of charge-transfer kinetics in a low-temperature glass former. We show that the reorganization energy is substantially lower than its equilibrium value for the low-temperature portion of the data. The theory predicts the possibility of discontinuous changes in the dependence of the electron transfer rate on the free energy gap when the reaction switches between ergodic and nonergodic regimes.

  5. 16 CFR 802.10 - Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE HART-SCOTT-RODINO ANTITRUST IMPROVEMENTS ACT OF 1976 EXEMPTION RULES § 802.10 Stock dividends and splits; reorganizations. (a) The acquisition of voting securities pursuant to a stock split or... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Stock dividends and splits;...

  6. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 7A, GRADE SEVEN SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE TWELFTH IN A SERIES OF 17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE SEVENTH GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. THE SEVENTH GRADE SUPPLEMENT IS IN TWO VOLUMES. VOLUME 7A CONTAINS INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL, A BRIEF…

  7. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 6A, SIXTH GRADE SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE NINTH IN A SERIES OF 17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE SIXTH GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. THE SIXTH GRADE SUPPLEMENT IS IN THREE VOLUMES. VOLUME 6A HAS A DETAILED OUTLINE OF THE SUBJECT MATTER FOR…

  8. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 4A, FOURTH GRADE SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE FIFTH IN A SERIES OF 17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE FOURTH GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. THERE IS A DETAILED OUTLINE OF THE CONTENT FOR GRADE 4 FOR EACH OF THE FOLLOWING MAJOR AREAS AROUND WHICH…

  9. REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM, 5A, FIFTH GRADE SUPPLEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Special School District 1, Minn.

    THE SEVENTH IN A SERIES OF 17 VOLUMES, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES THE FIFTH GRADE TEACHER WITH A GUIDE TO THE REORGANIZED SCIENCE CURRICULUM OF THE MINNEAPOLIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS. THE MATERIALS ARE INTENDED TO BE AUGMENTED AND REVISED AS THE NEED ARISES. THERE IS A DETAILED OUTLINE OF SUBJECT MATTER FOR GRADE 5 FOR EACH OF THE FOLLOWING MAJOR AREAS AROUND…

  10. Chinese and English Infants' Tone Perception: Evidence for Perceptual Reorganization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattock, Karen; Burnham, Denis

    2006-01-01

    Over half the world's population speaks a tone language, yet infant speech perception research has typically focused on consonants and vowels. Very young infants can discriminate a wide range of native and nonnative consonants and vowels, and then in a process of "perceptual reorganization" over the 1st year, discrimination of most nonnative…

  11. 5 CFR 831.114 - Voluntary early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring. 831...-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce..., reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring or reshaping, consistent...

  12. 5 CFR 842.213 - Voluntary early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring. 842... early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or... budgetary situation that will result in an excess of personnel because of a substantial...

  13. 5 CFR 831.114 - Voluntary early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring. 831...-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce... situation that will result in an excess of personnel because of a substantial delayering,...

  14. 5 CFR 842.213 - Voluntary early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring. 842... early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or... budgetary situation that will result in an excess of personnel because of a substantial...

  15. 5 CFR 842.213 - Voluntary early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring. 842... early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or... budgetary situation that will result in an excess of personnel because of a substantial...

  16. 5 CFR 831.114 - Voluntary early retirement-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce restructuring. 831...-substantial delayering, reorganization, reduction in force, transfer of function, or other workforce... situation that will result in an excess of personnel because of a substantial delayering,...

  17. Simulating Dynamics: Using Role-Playing to Teach the Process of Bankruptcy Reorganization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, Patricia Brumfield

    1987-01-01

    A course focusing on bankruptcy reorganization uses simulation and role-playing to increase the depth and speed of students' comprehension of the substantive concepts inherent in reorganization proceedings and their place in the process. (MSE)

  18. Mammary epithelial cell phagocytosis downstream of TGF-β3 is characterized by adherens junction reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Fornetti, J; Flanders, K C; Henson, P M; Tan, A-C; Borges, V F; Schedin, P

    2016-01-01

    After weaning, during mammary gland involution, milk-producing mammary epithelial cells undergo apoptosis. Effective clearance of these dying cells is essential, as persistent apoptotic cells have a negative impact on gland homeostasis, future lactation and cancer susceptibility. In mice, apoptotic cells are cleared by the neighboring epithelium, yet little is known about how mammary epithelial cells become phagocytic or whether this function is conserved between species. Here we use a rat model of weaning-induced involution and involuting breast tissue from women, to demonstrate apoptotic cells within luminal epithelial cells and epithelial expression of the scavenger mannose receptor, suggesting conservation of phagocytosis by epithelial cells. In the rat, epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is increased during involution, a pathway known to promote phagocytic capability. To test whether TGF-β enhances the phagocytic ability of mammary epithelial cells, non-transformed murine mammary epithelial EpH4 cells were cultured to achieve tight junction impermeability, such as occurs during lactation. TGF-β3 treatment promoted loss of tight junction impermeability, reorganization and cleavage of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin (E-cad), and phagocytosis. Phagocytosis correlated with junction disruption, suggesting junction reorganization is necessary for phagocytosis by epithelial cells. Supporting this hypothesis, epithelial cell E-cad reorganization and cleavage were observed in rat and human involuting mammary glands. Further, in the rat, E-cad cleavage correlated with increased γ-secretase activity and β-catenin nuclear localization. In vitro, pharmacologic inhibitors of γ-secretase or β-catenin reduced the effect of TGF-β3 on phagocytosis to near baseline levels. However, β-catenin signaling through LiCl treatment did not enhance phagocytic capacity, suggesting a model in which both reorganization of cell junctions and

  19. Mammary epithelial cell phagocytosis downstream of TGF-β3 is characterized by adherens junction reorganization.

    PubMed

    Fornetti, J; Flanders, K C; Henson, P M; Tan, A-C; Borges, V F; Schedin, P

    2016-02-01

    After weaning, during mammary gland involution, milk-producing mammary epithelial cells undergo apoptosis. Effective clearance of these dying cells is essential, as persistent apoptotic cells have a negative impact on gland homeostasis, future lactation and cancer susceptibility. In mice, apoptotic cells are cleared by the neighboring epithelium, yet little is known about how mammary epithelial cells become phagocytic or whether this function is conserved between species. Here we use a rat model of weaning-induced involution and involuting breast tissue from women, to demonstrate apoptotic cells within luminal epithelial cells and epithelial expression of the scavenger mannose receptor, suggesting conservation of phagocytosis by epithelial cells. In the rat, epithelial transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling is increased during involution, a pathway known to promote phagocytic capability. To test whether TGF-β enhances the phagocytic ability of mammary epithelial cells, non-transformed murine mammary epithelial EpH4 cells were cultured to achieve tight junction impermeability, such as occurs during lactation. TGF-β3 treatment promoted loss of tight junction impermeability, reorganization and cleavage of the adherens junction protein E-cadherin (E-cad), and phagocytosis. Phagocytosis correlated with junction disruption, suggesting junction reorganization is necessary for phagocytosis by epithelial cells. Supporting this hypothesis, epithelial cell E-cad reorganization and cleavage were observed in rat and human involuting mammary glands. Further, in the rat, E-cad cleavage correlated with increased γ-secretase activity and β-catenin nuclear localization. In vitro, pharmacologic inhibitors of γ-secretase or β-catenin reduced the effect of TGF-β3 on phagocytosis to near baseline levels. However, β-catenin signaling through LiCl treatment did not enhance phagocytic capacity, suggesting a model in which both reorganization of cell junctions and

  20. The Utilization during Mitotic Cell Division of Loci Controlling Meiotic Recombination and Disjunction in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Bruce S.; Carpenter, Adelaide T. C.; Ripoll, P.

    1978-01-01

    To inquire whether the loci identified by recombination-defective and disjunction-defective meiotic mutants in Drosophila are also utilized during mitotic cell division, the effects of 18 meiotic mutants (representing 13 loci) on mitotic chromosome stability have been examined genetically. To do this, meiotic-mutant-bearing flies heterozygous for recessive somatic cell markers were examined for the frequencies and types of spontaneous clones expressing the cell markers. In such flies, marked clones can arise via mitotic recombination, mutation, chromosome breakage, nondisjunction or chromosome loss, and clones from these different origins can be distinguished. In addition, meiotic mutants at nine loci have been examined for their effects on sensitivity to killing by UV and X rays.—Mutants at six of the seven recombination-defective loci examined (mei-9, mei-41, c(3)G, mei-W68, mei-S282, mei-352, mei-218) cause mitotic chromosome instability in both sexes, whereas mutants at one locus (mei-218) do not affect mitotic chromosome stability. Thus many of the loci utilized during meiotic recombination also function in the chromosomal economy of mitotic cells.—The chromosome instability produced by mei-41 alleles is the consequence of chromosome breakage, that of mei-9 alleles is primarily due to chromosome breakage and, to a lesser extent, to an elevated frequency of mitotic recombination, whereas no predominant mechanism responsible for the instability caused by c(3)G alleles is discernible. Since these three loci are defective in their responses to mutagen damage, their effects on chromosome stability in nonmutagenized cells are interpreted as resulting from an inability to repair spontaneous lesions. Both mei-W68 and mei-S282 increase mitotic recombination (and in mei-W68, to a lesser extent, chromosome loss) in the abdomen but not the wing. In the abdomen, the primary effect on chromosome stability occurs during the larval period when the abdominal histoblasts

  1. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 24 - Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act A Appendix A... ENERGY REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1974, AS AMENDED Pt. 24, App. A Appendix A to Part 24—Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act ER18JA11.003...

  2. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 24 - Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act A Appendix... ENERGY REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1974, AS AMENDED Pt. 24, App. A Appendix A to Part 24—Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act ER18JA11.003...

  3. 29 CFR 24.114 - District court jurisdiction of retaliation complaints under the Energy Reorganization Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the Energy Reorganization Act. 24.114 Section 24.114 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES... Provisions § 24.114 District court jurisdiction of retaliation complaints under the Energy Reorganization Act... the Energy Reorganization Act, and there is no showing that there has been delay due to the bad...

  4. The TopoVIB-Like protein family is required for meiotic DNA double-strand break formation.

    PubMed

    Robert, T; Nore, A; Brun, C; Maffre, C; Crimi, B; Bourbon, H-M; de Massy, B

    2016-02-26

    Meiotic recombination is induced by the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by SPO11, the ortholog of subunit A of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase (TopoVIA). TopoVI activity requires the interaction between A and B subunits. We identified a conserved family of plant and animal proteins [the TOPOVIB-Like (TOPOVIBL) family] that share strong structural similarity to the TopoVIB subunit of TopoVI DNA topoisomerase. We further characterize the meiotic recombination proteins Rec102 (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Rec6 (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), and MEI-P22 (Drosophila melanogaster) as homologs to the transducer domain of TopoVIB. We demonstrate that the mouse TOPOVIBL protein interacts and forms a complex with SPO11 and is required for meiotic DSB formation. We conclude that meiotic DSBs are catalyzed by a complex involving SPO11 and TOPOVIBL. PMID:26917764

  5. The Arabidopsis BLAP75/Rmi1 Homologue Plays Crucial Roles in Meiotic Double-Strand Break Repair

    PubMed Central

    Chelysheva, Liudmila; Vezon, Daniel; Belcram, Katia; Gendrot, Ghislaine; Grelon, Mathilde

    2008-01-01

    In human cells and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, BLAP75/Rmi1 acts together with BLM/Sgs1 and TopoIIIα/Top3 to maintain genome stability by limiting crossover (CO) formation in favour of NCO events, probably through the dissolution of double Holliday junction intermediates (dHJ). So far, very limited data is available on the involvement of these complexes in meiotic DNA repair. In this paper, we present the first meiotic study of a member of the BLAP75 family through characterisation of the Arabidopsis thaliana homologue. In A. thaliana blap75 mutants, meiotic recombination is initiated, and recombination progresses until the formation of bivalent-like structures, even in the absence of ZMM proteins. However, chromosome fragmentation can be detected as soon as metaphase I and is drastic at anaphase I, while no second meiotic division is observed. Using genetic and imunolocalisation studies, we showed that these defects reflect a role of A. thaliana BLAP75 in meiotic double-strand break (DSB) repair—that it acts after the invasion step mediated by RAD51 and associated proteins and that it is necessary to repair meiotic DSBs onto sister chromatids as well as onto the homologous chromosome. In conclusion, our results show for the first time that BLAP75/Rmi1 is a key protein of the meiotic homologous recombination machinery. In A. thaliana, we found that this protein is dispensable for homologous chromosome recognition and synapsis but necessary for the repair of meiotic DSBs. Furthermore, in the absence of BLAP75, bivalent formation can happen even in the absence of ZMM proteins, showing that in blap75 mutants, recombination intermediates exist that are stable enough to form bivalent structures, even when ZMM are absent. PMID:19096505

  6. Proof that univalent chromosomes undergoing equational division at anaphase I are not lost during the second meiotic division

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Monosomics in a diploid organism are ideal for characterizing the behavior of univalent chromosomes because each meiotic cell contains a univalent chromosome. We have isolated microsporocyte samples from all monosomic types except monosomics 3 and 5 and have carried out extensive analyses of the meiotic behavior in each of the different available monosomic types. It is demonstrated that univalent chromosomes can undergo equational division at the first anaphase and the resultant monads are not lost during the remainder of meiosis.

  7. A bipartite operator interacts with a heat shock element to mediate early meiotic induction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP82

    SciTech Connect

    Szent-Gyorgyi, C.

    1995-12-01

    This report seeks to characterize the activation of meiotic gene in terms of cis-acting DNA elements and their associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was found that vegetative repression and meiotic induction depend on interactions of the promoter-proximal heat shock element with a nearby bipartite repression element. The experiments described explore how two different regulatory pathways induce transcription by stimulating a single classical activation element, a nonspecific heat shock element. 81 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. The mouse X chromosome is enriched for multi-copy testis genes exhibiting post-meiotic expression

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Jacob L.; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K.; Park, Peter J.; Warburton, Peter E.; Page, David C.; Turner, James M.A.

    2009-01-01

    According to the prevailing view, mammalian X chromosomes are enriched in spermatogenesis genes expressed before meiosis1–3 and deficient in spermatogenesis genes expressed after meiosis2,3. The paucity of post-meiotic genes on the X chromosome has been interpreted as a consequence of Meiotic Sex Chromosome Inactivation (MSCI) – the complete silencing of genes on the XY bivalent at meiotic prophase4,5. Recent studies have concluded that MSCI-initiated silencing persists beyond meiosis6–8 and that most X-genes remain repressed in round spermatids7. We report here that 33 multi-copy gene families, representing ~273 mouse X-linked genes, are expressed in the testis and that this expression is predominantly in post-meiotic cells. RNA FISH and microarray analysis show that the maintenance of X chromosome post-meiotic repression is incomplete. Furthermore, X-linked multi-copy genes exhibit expression levels similar to those of autosomal genes. Thus, not only is the mouse X chromosome enriched for spermatogenesis genes functioning before meiosis, but in addition ~18% of mouse X-linked genes exhibit post-meiotic expression. PMID:18454149

  9. Ploidy-Dependent Unreductional Meiotic Cell Division in Polyploid Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Meiosis includes one round of DNA replication and two successive nuclear divisions, i.e. meiosis I (reductional) and meiosis II (equational). This specialized cell division reduces chromosomes in half and generates haploid gametes in sexual reproduction of eukaryotes. It ensures faithful transmiss...

  10. Kinesin-1 Prevents Capture of the Oocyte Meiotic Spindle by the Sperm Aster

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Karen L.P.; Fabritius, Amy S.; Ellefson, Marina L.; Flynn, Jonathan R.; Milan, Jennifer A.; McNally, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    Centrioles are lost during oogenesis and inherited from the sperm at fertilization. In the zygote, the centrioles recruit pericentriolar proteins from the egg to form a mature centrosome that nucleates a sperm aster. The sperm aster then captures the female pronucleus to join the maternal and paternal genomes. Because fertilization occurs before completion of female meiosis, some mechanism must prevent capture of the meiotic spindle by the sperm aster. Here we show that in wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes, maternal pericentriolar proteins are not recruited to the sperm centrioles until after completion of meiosis. Depletion of kinesin-1 heavy chain or its binding partner resulted in premature centrosome maturation during meiosis and growth of a sperm aster that could capture the oocyte meiotic spindle. Kinesin prevents recruitment of pericentriolar proteins by coating the sperm DNA and centrioles and thus prevents triploidy by a non-motor mechanism. PMID:22465668

  11. Nuf2 is required for chromosome segregation during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Teng; Zhou, Yang; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Qian, Wei-Ping; Ouyang, Ying-Chun; Shen, Wei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Nuf2 plays an important role in kinetochore-microtubule attachment and thus is involved in regulation of the spindle assembly checkpoint in mitosis. In this study, we examined the localization and function of Nuf2 during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. Myc6-Nuf2 mRNA injection and immunofluorescent staining showed that Nuf2 localized to kinetochores from germinal vesicle breakdown to metaphase I stages, while it disappeared from the kinetochores at the anaphase I stage, but relocated to kinetochores at the MII stage. Overexpression of Nuf2 caused defective spindles, misaligned chromosomes, and activated spindle assembly checkpoint, and thus inhibited chromosome segregation and metaphase-anaphase transition in oocyte meiosis. Conversely, precocious polar body extrusion was observed in the presence of misaligned chromosomes and abnormal spindle formation in Nuf2 knock-down oocytes, causing aneuploidy. Our data suggest that Nuf2 is a critical regulator of meiotic cell cycle progression in mammalian oocytes. PMID:26054848

  12. Morphogenetic investigation of metaphase-specific cell death in meiotic spermatocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Kon, Yasuhiro

    2005-09-01

    An MRL/MpJ strain of mice, including Ipr mutants, reveals the complex pathological manifestations of collagen disease, such as systemic vasculitis, glomerulonephritis, arthritis and sialoadenitis, in association with several autoimmune factors. Studies involving this mouse strain have shown that it exhibits a much-enhanced healing response compared with other mouse strains, together with reduced scarring in the periphery. Recently, unique characteristics were found in the testis of the MRL/MpJ mouse: metaphase-specific apoptosis (MSA) of meiotic spermatocytes, heat stress resistance in spermatocytes and the appearance of oocyte-like cells. The present review describes the morphological and genetic analysis of MSA, culminating in the conclusion that inherent mutation of exonuclease 1 induces checkpoint activity during meiotic division in MRL mice. PMID:16158977

  13. Apparent Epigenetic Meiotic Double-Strand-Break Disparity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Franklin W.; Rehan, Maryam Binti Mohamed; Foss, Henriette M.; Borts, Rhona H.

    2016-01-01

    Previously published, and some unpublished, tetrad data from budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) are analyzed for disparity in gene conversion, in which one allele is more often favored than the other (conversion disparity). One such disparity, characteristic of a bias in the frequencies of meiotic double-strand DNA breaks at the hotspot near the His4 locus, is found in diploids that undergo meiosis soon after their formation, but not in diploids that have been cloned and frozen. Altered meiotic DNA breakability associated with altered metabolism-related chromatin states has been previously reported. However, the above observations imply that such differing parental chromatin states can persist through at least one chromosome replication, and probably more, in a common environment. This conclusion may have implications for interpreting changes in allele frequencies in populations. PMID:27356614

  14. Dissecting meiotic recombination based on tetrad analysis by single-microspore sequencing in maize

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Li, Lin; Yan, Jianbing

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic recombination drives eukaryotic sexual reproduction and the generation of genome diversity. Tetrad analysis, which examines the four chromatids resulting from a single meiosis, is an ideal method to study the mechanisms of homologous recombination. Here we develop a method to isolate the four microspores from a single tetrad in maize for the purpose of whole-genome sequencing. A high-resolution recombination map reveals that crossovers are unevenly distributed across the genome and are more likely to occur in the genic than intergenic regions, especially common in the 5′- and 3′-end regions of annotated genes. The direct detection of genomic exchanges suggests that conversions likely occur in most crossover tracts. Negative crossover interference and weak chromatid interference are observed at the population level. Overall, our findings further our understanding of meiotic recombination with implications for both basic and applied research. PMID:25800954

  15. Meiotic Studies in Some Species of Tribe Cichorieae (Asteraceae) from Western Himalayas

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Raghbir Chand; Goyal, Henna; Singh, Vijay; Goel, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    The present paper deals with meiotic studies in 15 species belonging to 6 genera of the tribe Cichorieae from various localities of Western Himalayas. The chromosome number has been reported for the first time in Hieracium crocatum (2n = 10) and Lactuca lessertiana (2n = 2x = 16). Further, intraspecific variability has been reported for the first time in H. umbellatum (2n = 2x = 10 and 2n = 6x = 54), Tragopogon dubius (2n = 2x = 14 and 2n = 4x = 28), and T. gracilis (2n = 2x = 14). The chromosome report of 2n = 2x = 10 in Youngia tenuifolia is made for the first time in India. Maximum numbers of the populations show laggards, chromosome stickiness, and cytomixis from early prophase to telophase-II, leading to the formation of aneuploid cells or meiocytes with double chromosome number. Such meiotic abnormalities produce unreduced pollen grains and the reduced pollen viability. PMID:25489603

  16. Correlation between induction of meiotic delay and aneuploidy in male mouse germ cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, I.D.; Gassner, P.; Schriever-Schwemmer, G.; Min, Zhou Ru

    1993-12-31

    No aneuploidy assays are prescribed in any international guidelines for chemical safety testing up to now. The CEC-sponsored Aneuploidy Project has the aim to validate test methods for aneuploidy induction which could be used as screening tests. Furthermore, one of the major goals is to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which aneuploidy is induced. The present paper describes the investigation of meiotic delay and aneuploidy induction with the drug diazepam (DZ), the environmentally important mutagen acrylamide (AA) and the spindle poison colchicine (COL), which is used as a positive control. The time course of events was investigated. It is concluded that the assessment of meiotic delay can be used to preselect chemicals which require evaluation of aneuploidy induction during MMI in male germ cells.

  17. Loss of MAX results in meiotic entry in mouse embryonic and germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Ayumu; Hirasaki, Masataka; Hishida, Tomoaki; Wu, Jun; Okamura, Daiji; Ueda, Atsushi; Nishimoto, Masazumi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Okuda, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Meiosis is a unique process that allows the generation of reproductive cells. It remains largely unknown how meiosis is initiated in germ cells and why non-germline cells do not undergo meiosis. We previously demonstrated that knockdown of Max expression, a gene encoding a partner of MYC family proteins, strongly activates expression of germ cell-related genes in ESCs. Here we find that complete ablation of Max expression in ESCs results in profound cytological changes reminiscent of cells undergoing meiotic cell division. Furthermore, our analyses uncovers that Max expression is transiently attenuated in germ cells undergoing meiosis in vivo and its forced reduction induces meiosis-like cytological changes in cultured germline stem cells. Mechanistically, Max depletion alterations are, in part, due to impairment of the function of an atypical PRC1 complex (PRC1.6), in which MAX is one of the components. Our data highlight MAX as a new regulator of meiotic onset. PMID:27025988

  18. Meiotic recombination and male infertility: from basic science to clinical reality?

    PubMed

    Hann, Michael C; Lau, Patricio E; Tempest, Helen G

    2011-03-01

    Infertility is a common problem that affects approximately 15% of the population. Although many advances have been made in the treatment of infertility, the molecular and genetic causes of male infertility remain largely elusive. This review will present a summary of our current knowledge on the genetic origin of male infertility and the key events of male meiosis. It focuses on chromosome synapsis and meiotic recombination and the problems that arise when errors in these processes occur, specifically meiotic arrest and chromosome aneuploidy, the leading cause of pregnancy loss in humans. In addition, meiosis-specific candidate genes will be discussed, including a discussion on why we have been largely unsuccessful at identifying disease-causing mutations in infertile men. Finally clinical applications of sperm aneuploidy screening will be touched upon along with future prospective clinical tests to better characterize male infertility in a move towards personalized medicine. PMID:21297654

  19. Dynamic Reorganization and Correlation among Lipid Raft Components.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Mónica M; Hovis, Jennifer S; Moss, Frank R; Boxer, Steven G

    2016-08-10

    Lipid rafts are widely believed to be an essential organizational motif in cell membranes. However, direct evidence for interactions among lipid and/or protein components believed to be associated with rafts is quite limited owing, in part, to the small size and intrinsically dynamic interactions that lead to raft formation. Here, we exploit the single negative charge on the monosialoganglioside GM1, commonly associated with rafts, to create a gradient of GM1 in response to an electric field applied parallel to a patterned supported lipid bilayer. The composition of this gradient is visualized by imaging mass spectrometry using a NanoSIMS. Using this analytical method, added cholesterol and sphingomyelin, both neutral and not themselves displaced by the electric field, are observed to reorganize with GM1. This dynamic reorganization provides direct evidence for an attractive interaction among these raft components into some sort of cluster. At steady state we obtain an estimate for the composition of this cluster. PMID:27447959

  20. Lifespan Extension in a Semelparous Chordate Occurs via Developmental Growth Arrest Just Prior to Meiotic Entry

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, Gunasekaran; Campsteijn, Coen; Thompson, Eric M.

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that the ageing process is linked to signaling from the germline such that the rate of ageing can be adjusted to the state of the reproductive system, allowing these two processes to co-evolve. Mechanistic insight into this link has been primarily derived from iteroparous reproductive models, the nematode C. elegans, and the arthropod Drosophila. Here, we examined to what extent these mechanisms are evolutionarily conserved in a semelparous chordate, Oikopleura dioica, where we identify a developmental growth arrest (GA) in response to crowded, diet-restricted conditions, which can extend its lifespan at least three-fold. Under nutritional stress, the iteroparative models sacrifice germ cells that have entered meiosis, while maintaining a reduced pool of active germline stem cells (GSCs). In contrast, O. dioica only entered GA prior to meiotic entry. Stress conditions encountered after this point led to maturation in a normal time frame but with reduced reproductive output. During GA, TOR signaling was inhibited, whereas MAPK, ERK1/2 and p38 pathways were activated, and under such conditions, activation of these pathways was shown to be critical for survival. Direct inhibition of TOR signaling alone was sufficient to prevent meiotic entry and germline differentiation. This inhibition activated the p38 pathway, but did not activate the ERK1/2 pathway. Thus, the link between reproductive status and lifespan extension in response to nutrient-limited conditions is interpreted in a significantly different manner in these iteroparative versus semelparous models. In the latter case, meiotic entry is a definitive signal that lifespan extension can no longer occur, whereas in the former, meiotic entry is not a unique chronological event, and can be largely erased during lifespan extension in response to nutrient stress, and reactivated from a pool of maintained GSCs when conditions improve. PMID:24695788

  1. New observations on the meiotic process in the marine dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans (Noctilucales, dinophyceae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cheng-Xu; Yan, Xiao-Jun

    2002-03-01

    The meiotic process in Noctiluca scintillans were observed under light microscope. Some abnormal cell divisions, incompletely separated “zoospores” and the changes of the zoospores are described in this paper. Together with the findings of field samplings and the previous results by other researcher, the process of meiosis in N. scintillans was supposed to be a pathway to reduce the extra high density of NH3-N within the cell in order to ensure normal population growth.

  2. 75 FR 29451 - Agency Reorganization and Delegations of Authority

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... administering IT contracts. The Office is also responsible for managing the computer security program. The...; Reorganization Plan No. 7 of 1961, 26 FR 7315, August 12, 1961; Pub. L. 89-56, 70 Stat. 195; 5 CFR Part 2638; Pub..., 41301-41309, 44101-44106; E.O. 11222 of May 8, 1965, 30 FR 6469, 3 CFR 1964-1965 Comp. P. 306; 21...

  3. In Brief: Re-organization of NSF's Earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Judy

    2004-07-01

    The U.S. National Science Foundation announced July 16 that its Division of Earth Sciences would be re-organized into two new Sections. The Surface Earth Processes Section (SEP) will consists of the programs in hydrology (HS), education and human resources (EHR), sedimentary geology and paleobiology (SGP), geobiology and environmental geochemistry (GEG), and geomorphology and land use dynamics (GLD). The current budget for the new section is approximately $50 million per year.

  4. Multiple timescales of body schema reorganization due to plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Iodice, Pierpaolo; Scuderi, Nicolò; Saggini, Raoul; Pezzulo, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Plastic surgery modifies the distribution of mass centers of a person's body segments, changing his or her posture. The functional reorganization processes that lead subjects to re-integrate these body changes into a new stable body (posture) schema is poorly understood but current theories suggest the possible contribution of two components: a feedback mechanism that strongly depends on sensory input and an internal model that is relatively less dependent on sensory input and improves posture control, for example by compensating for delayed feedback. To assess the relative contributions of these two mechanisms during the functional reorganization of a posture scheme, we have conducted a longitudinal postural study in a population of healthy adults who were subject to breast plastic surgery to reduce or augment body weight. We measured participants' orthostatic posture and ground reaction force immediately after, after 4 months, and 1 year after the surgery. To investigate the role of visual sensory information in the reorganization process we tested the participants with eyes open and closed. Our results indicate that participants find a new dynamical equilibrium within a few days. However, posture maintenance remains sub-optimal long after the center of masses and the resultant of ground reaction force stop changing; in some cases, for more than 4 months. Furthermore, the re-adaptation process is faster and more efficient in the eyes-open than in the eyes-closed condition. These results suggest that the reorganization involves different subsystems (responsible for the biomechanical changes, the re-calibration of feedback mechanisms, and the re-adaptation of internal models), which act at different timescales. PMID:25964999

  5. Dynamic Reorganization of Vortex Matter into Partially Disordered Lattices.

    PubMed

    Marziali Bermúdez, M; Eskildsen, M R; Bartkowiak, M; Nagy, G; Bekeris, V; Pasquini, G

    2015-08-01

    We report structural evidence of dynamic reorganization in vortex matter in clean NbSe(2) by joint small-angle neutron scattering and ac susceptibility measurements. The application of oscillatory forces in a transitional region near the order-disorder transition results in robust bulk vortex lattice configurations with an intermediate degree of disorder. These dynamically originated configurations correlate with intermediate pinning responses previously observed, resolving a long-standing debate regarding the origin of such responses. PMID:26296127

  6. The substitution effect on the reorganization energy of metal free phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Choongkeun; Sohlberg, Karl

    2009-03-01

    Many discotic (disk like) materials such as phthalocyanine are of interest for use in organic electronic devices because of their high charge mobility. The mobility of various discotic materials has been studied using the Marcus formalism. In the Marcus formalism, charge mobility is depends on two parameters, reorganization energy and coupling matrix constant. Of these two parameters the reorganization energy has more influence on the charge hopping rate. A small change in reorganization energy leads to a large change of charge mobility. We have employed electronic structure methods to describe substitution effects on the reorganization energy of phthalocyanine. The substitutions on the external phenyl rings have almost no influence on reorganization energy, but the substitutions on the internal nitrogen in phthalocyanine have strong influence on reorganization energy. The detailed relation between reorganization energy and substitution will be presented.

  7. Forelimb training drives transient map reorganization in ipsilateral motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, David T; Schmid, Ariel N; Danaphongse, Tanya T; Flanagan, Kate E; Morrison, Robert A; Kilgard, Michael P; Rennaker, Robert L; Hays, Seth A

    2016-10-15

    Skilled motor training results in reorganization of contralateral motor cortex movement representations. The ipsilateral motor cortex is believed to play a role in skilled motor control, but little is known about how training influences reorganization of ipsilateral motor representations of the trained limb. To determine whether training results in reorganization of ipsilateral motor cortex maps, rats were trained to perform the isometric pull task, an automated motor task that requires skilled forelimb use. After either 3 or 6 months of training, intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) mapping was performed to document motor representations of the trained forelimb in the hemisphere ipsilateral to that limb. Motor training for 3 months resulted in a robust expansion of right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex, demonstrating that skilled motor training drives map plasticity ipsilateral to the trained limb. After 6 months of training, the right forelimb representation in the right motor cortex was significantly smaller than the representation observed in rats trained for 3 months and similar to untrained controls, consistent with a normalization of motor cortex maps. Forelimb map area was not correlated with performance on the trained task, suggesting that task performance is maintained despite normalization of cortical maps. This study provides new insights into how the ipsilateral cortex changes in response to skilled learning and may inform rehabilitative strategies to enhance cortical plasticity to support recovery after brain injury. PMID:27392641

  8. Induced strains and defect continuum theory: Internal reorganization of load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teisseyre, Roman; Górski, Marek

    2012-02-01

    Induced strains play an important role in mining regions and water dam areas. We consider a mechanism of reorganization of the applied stress load by some changes in rock-body defect distribution caused by human activity. A defect content increases with increasing stress load and related deformations; hence, a relationship could appear between seismic risk and deformation level. Recent progress in the Asymmetric Continuum Theory permits to consider some internal reorganization of the applied load due to internal defect content and distribution; in this paper we consider an increase of internal defect densities due to mining works and the appearance of reorganized internal stress distribution. A generalization of the Peach-Koehler forces acting on the defects makes it possible to define formation of induced strains; a character of resulting strains may essentially differ from the applied load. In the case of an axial load, this approach helps to understand formation of shear or rotational micro-fractures, usually recognized as fragmentation and slip motions.

  9. Functional Reorganizations of Brain Network in Prelingually Deaf Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies suggested structural or functional brain reorganizations occurred in prelingually deaf subjects. However, little is known about the reorganizations of brain network architectures in prelingually deaf adolescents. The present study aims to investigate alterations of whole-brain functional network using resting-state fMRI and graph theory analysis. We recruited 16 prelingually deaf adolescents (10~18 years) and 16 normal controls matched in age and gender. Brain networks were constructed from mean time courses of 90 regions. Widely distributed network was observed in deaf subjects, with increased connectivity between the limbic system and regions involved in visual and language processing, suggesting reinforcement of the processing for the visual and verbal information in deaf adolescents. Decreased connectivity was detected between the visual regions and language regions possibly due to inferior reading or speaking skills in deaf subjects. Using graph theory analysis, we demonstrated small-worldness property did not change in prelingually deaf adolescents relative to normal controls. However, compared with healthy adolescents, eight regions involved in visual, language, and auditory processing were identified as hubs only present in prelingually deaf adolescents. These findings revealed reorganization of brain functional networks occurred in prelingually deaf adolescents to adapt to deficient auditory input. PMID:26819781

  10. Experimental evidence of reorganizing landscape under changing climatic forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A.; Tejedor, A.; Zaliapin, I. V.; Reinhardt, L.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.

    2015-12-01

    Quantification of the dynamics of landscape reorganization under changing climatic forcing is important to understand geomorphic transport laws under transient conditions, assess response of landscapes to external perturbations for future predictive modeling, and for interpreting past climate from stratigraphic record. For such an analysis, however, real landscape observations are limited. To this end, a series of controlled laboratory experiments on evolving landscape were conducted at the St. Anthony Falls laboratory at the University of Minnesota. High resolution elevation data at a temporal resolution of 5 mins and spatial resolution of 0.5 mm were collected as the landscape approached steady state (constant uplift and precipitation rate) and in the transient state (under the same uplift and 5 times precipitation rate). Our results reveal rapid topographic re-organization under a five-fold increase in precipitation with the fluvial regime encroaching into the previously debris dominated regime, widening and aggradation of channels and valleys, and accelerated erosion happening at hillslope scales. To better understand the initiation of the observed reorganization, we perform a connectivity and clustering analysis of the erosional and depositional events, showing strikingly different spatial patterns on landscape evolution under steady-state (SS) and transient-state (TS), even when the time under SS is renormalized to match the total volume of eroded and deposited sediment in TS. Our results suggest a regime shift in the behavior of transport processes on the landscape at the intermediate scales i.e., from supply-limited to transport-limited.

  11. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-01

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule's permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  12. Functional Reorganizations of Brain Network in Prelingually Deaf Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjing; Li, Jianhong; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Zhenchang; Xian, Junfang; He, Huiguang

    2016-01-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies suggested structural or functional brain reorganizations occurred in prelingually deaf subjects. However, little is known about the reorganizations of brain network architectures in prelingually deaf adolescents. The present study aims to investigate alterations of whole-brain functional network using resting-state fMRI and graph theory analysis. We recruited 16 prelingually deaf adolescents (10~18 years) and 16 normal controls matched in age and gender. Brain networks were constructed from mean time courses of 90 regions. Widely distributed network was observed in deaf subjects, with increased connectivity between the limbic system and regions involved in visual and language processing, suggesting reinforcement of the processing for the visual and verbal information in deaf adolescents. Decreased connectivity was detected between the visual regions and language regions possibly due to inferior reading or speaking skills in deaf subjects. Using graph theory analysis, we demonstrated small-worldness property did not change in prelingually deaf adolescents relative to normal controls. However, compared with healthy adolescents, eight regions involved in visual, language, and auditory processing were identified as hubs only present in prelingually deaf adolescents. These findings revealed reorganization of brain functional networks occurred in prelingually deaf adolescents to adapt to deficient auditory input. PMID:26819781

  13. A molecularly based theory for electron transfer reorganization energy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Bilin; Wang, Zhen-Gang

    2015-12-14

    Using field-theoretic techniques, we develop a molecularly based dipolar self-consistent-field theory (DSCFT) for charge solvation in pure solvents under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions and apply it to the reorganization energy of electron transfer reactions. The DSCFT uses a set of molecular parameters, such as the solvent molecule’s permanent dipole moment and polarizability, thus avoiding approximations that are inherent in treating the solvent as a linear dielectric medium. A simple, analytical expression for the free energy is obtained in terms of the equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrostatic potential profiles and electric susceptibilities, which are obtained by solving a set of self-consistent equations. With no adjustable parameters, the DSCFT predicts activation energies and reorganization energies in good agreement with previous experiments and calculations for the electron transfer between metallic ions. Because the DSCFT is able to describe the properties of the solvent in the immediate vicinity of the charges, it is unnecessary to distinguish between the inner-sphere and outer-sphere solvent molecules in the calculation of the reorganization energy as in previous work. Furthermore, examining the nonequilibrium free energy surfaces of electron transfer, we find that the nonequilibrium free energy is well approximated by a double parabola for self-exchange reactions, but the curvature of the nonequilibrium free energy surface depends on the charges of the electron-transferring species, contrary to the prediction by the linear dielectric theory.

  14. Functional dynamics of H3K9 methylation during meiotic prophase progression

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Makoto; Nozaki, Masami; Takeda, Naoki; Shinkai, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    Histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methylation is a crucial epigenetic mark of heterochromatin formation and transcriptional silencing. G9a is a major mammalian H3K9 methyltransferase at euchromatin and is essential for mouse embryogenesis. Here we describe the roles of G9a in germ cell development. Mutant mice in which G9a is specifically inactivated in the germ-lineage displayed sterility due to a drastic loss of mature gametes. G9a-deficient germ cells exhibited perturbation of synchronous synapsis in meiotic prophase. Importantly, mono- and di-methylation of H3K9 (H3K9me1 and 2) in G9a-deficient germ cells were significantly reduced and G9a-regulated genes were overexpressed during meiosis, suggesting that G9a-mediated epigenetic gene silencing is crucial for proper meiotic prophase progression. Finally, we show that H3K9me1 and 2 are dynamically and sex-differentially regulated during the meiotic prophase. This genetic and biochemical evidence strongly suggests that a specific set of H3K9 methyltransferase(s) and demethylase(s) coordinately regulate gametogenesis. PMID:17599069

  15. Whole genome approaches to identify early meiotic gene candidates in cereals.

    PubMed

    Bovill, William D; Deveshwar, Priyanka; Kapoor, Sanjay; Able, Jason A

    2009-05-01

    Early events during meiotic prophase I underpin not only viability but the variation of a species from generation to generation. Understanding and manipulating processes such as chromosome pairing and recombination are integral for improving plant breeding. This study uses comparative genetics, quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis and a transcriptomics-based approach to identify genes that might have a role in genome-wide recombination control. Comparative genetics and the analysis of the yeast and Arabidopsis sequenced genomes has allowed the identification of early meiotic candidates that are conserved in wheat, rice and barley. Secondly, scoring recombination frequency as a phenotype for QTL analysis across wheat, rice and barley mapping populations has enabled us to identify genomic regions and candidate genes that could be involved in genome-wide recombination. Transcriptome data for candidate genes indicate that they are expressed in meiotic tissues. Candidates identified included a non-annotated expressed protein, a DNA topoisomerase 2-like candidate, RecG, RuvB and RAD54 homologues. PMID:18836753

  16. Divergent kleisin subunits of cohesin specify mechanisms to tether and release meiotic chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Severson, Aaron F; Meyer, Barbara J

    2014-01-01

    We show that multiple, functionally specialized cohesin complexes mediate the establishment and two-step release of sister chromatid cohesion that underlies the production of haploid gametes. In C. elegans, the kleisin subunits REC-8 and COH-3/4 differ between meiotic cohesins and endow them with distinctive properties that specify how cohesins load onto chromosomes and then trigger and release cohesion. Unlike REC-8 cohesin, COH-3/4 cohesin becomes cohesive through a replication-independent mechanism initiated by the DNA double-stranded breaks that induce crossover recombination. Thus, break-induced cohesion also tethers replicated meiotic chromosomes. Later, recombination stimulates separase-independent removal of REC-8 and COH-3/4 cohesins from reciprocal chromosomal territories flanking the crossover site. This region-specific removal likely underlies the two-step separation of homologs and sisters. Unexpectedly, COH-3/4 performs cohesion-independent functions in synaptonemal complex assembly. This new model for cohesin function diverges from that established in yeast but likely applies directly to plants and mammals, which utilize similar meiotic kleisins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03467.001 PMID:25171895

  17. Self-Organization of Meiotic Recombination Initiation: General Principles and Molecular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Keeney, Scott; Lange, Julian; Mohibullah, Neeman

    2015-01-01

    Recombination in meiosis is a fascinating case study for the coordination of chromosomal duplication, repair, and segregation with each other and with progression through a cell-division cycle. Meiotic recombination initiates with formation of developmentally programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at many places across the genome. DSBs are important for successful meiosis but are also dangerous lesions that can mutate or kill, so cells ensure that DSBs are made only at the right times, places, and amounts. This review examines the complex web of pathways that accomplish this control. We explore how chromosome breakage is integrated with meiotic progression and how feedback mechanisms spatially pattern DSB formation and make it homeostatic, robust, and error-correcting. Common regulatory themes recur in different organisms or in different contexts in the same organism. We review this evolutionary and mechanistic conservation but also highlight where control modules have diverged. The framework that emerges helps explain how meiotic chromosomes behave as a self-organizing system. PMID:25421598

  18. HORMAD2 is essential for synapsis surveillance during meiotic prophase via the recruitment of ATR activity.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Inagaki, Hidehito; Ohye, Tamae; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    Meiotic chromosome segregation requires homologous pairing, synapsis and crossover recombination during meiotic prophase. The checkpoint kinase ATR has been proposed to be involved in the quality surveillance of these processes, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In our present study, we generated mice lacking HORMAD2, a protein that localizes to unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. We show that this Hormad2 deficiency hampers the proper recruitment of ATR activity to unsynapsed chromosomes. Male Hormad2-deficient mice are infertile due to spermatocyte loss as a result of characteristic impairment of sex body formation; an ATR- and γH2AX-enriched repressive chromatin domain is formed, but is partially dissociated from the elongated sex chromosome axes. In contrast to males, Hormad2-deficient females are fertile. However, our analysis of Hormad2/Spo11 double-mutant females shows that the oocyte number is negatively correlated with the frequency of pseudo-sex body formation in a Hormad2 gene dosage-dependent manner. This result suggests that the elimination of Spo11-deficient asynaptic oocytes is associated with the HORMAD2-dependent pseudo-sex body formation that is likely initiated by local concentration of ATR activity in the absence of double-strand breaks. Our results thus show a HORMAD2-dependent quality control mechanism that recognizes unsynapsis and recruits ATR activity during mammalian meiosis. PMID:23039116

  19. SLX2 interacting with BLOS2 is differentially expressed during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Xin-Jie; Shi, Yu-Qiang; Xu, Bo; Chen, Lei; Tang, Wen-Hao; Huang, Jin; Lian, Ying; Liu, Ping; Qiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Gametogenesis is a complex biological process of producing cells for sexual reproduction. Xlr super family members containing a conserved COR1 domain play essential roles in gametogenesis. In the present study, we identified that Slx2, a novel member of Xlr super family, is specifically expressed in the meiotic oocytes, which is demonstrated by western blotting and immunohistochemistry studies. In the first meiotic prophase, SLX2 is unevenly distributed in the nuclei of oocytes, during which phase SLX2 is partly co-localized with SYCP3 in synaptonemal complex and γH2AX in the nucleus of oocytes. Interestingly, the localization of SLX2 was found to be switched into the cytoplasm of oocytes after prometaphase I during oocyte maturation. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that SLX2 interacts with BLOS2, which is a novel centrosome-associated protein, and co-localized with γ-Tubulin, which is a protein marker of chromosome segregation in meiosis. These results indicated that SLX2 might get involved in chromosomes segregation during meiosis by interaction with BLOS2. In conclusion, SLX2 might be a novel gametogenesis-related protein that could play multiple roles in regulation of meiotic processes including synaptonemal complex assembly and chromosome segregation. PMID:24870619

  20. Endogenous Small RNA Mediates Meiotic Silencing of a Novel DNA Transposon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yizhou; Smith, Kristina M.; Taylor, John W.; Freitag, Michael; Stajich, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    Genome defense likely evolved to curtail the spread of transposable elements and invading viruses. A combination of effective defense mechanisms has been shown to limit colonization of the Neurospora crassa genome by transposable elements. A novel DNA transposon named Sly1-1 was discovered in the genome of the most widely used laboratory “wild-type” strain FGSC 2489 (OR74A). Meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA, also simply called meiotic silencing, prevents the expression of regions of the genome that are unpaired during karyogamy. This mechanism is posttranscriptional and is proposed to involve the production of small RNA, so-called masiRNAs, by proteins homologous to those involved in RNA interference−silencing pathways in animals, fungi, and plants. Here, we demonstrate production of small RNAs when Sly1-1 was unpaired in a cross between two wild-type strains. These small RNAs are dependent on SAD-1, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase necessary for meiotic silencing. We present the first case of endogenously produced masiRNA from a novel N. crassa DNA transposable element. PMID:26109355

  1. Sister cohesion and structural axis components mediate homolog bias of meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Keun P.; Weiner, Beth M.; Zhang, Liangran; Jordan, Amy; Dekker, Job; Kleckner, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Meiotic recombination occurs between one chromatid of each maternal and paternal homolog (homolog bias) versus between sister chromatids (sister bias). Physical DNA analysis reveals that meiotic cohesin/axis component Rec8 promotes sister bias, likely via its cohesion activity. Two meiosis-specific axis components, Red1/Mek1kinase, counteract this effect. With this precondition satisfied, other molecules directly specify homolog bias per se. Rec8 also acts positively to maintain homolog bias during crossover recombination. These observations point to sequential release of double-strand break ends from association with their sister. Red1 and Rec8 are found to play distinct roles for sister cohesion, DSB formation and recombination progression kinetics. Also, the two components are enriched in spatially distinct domains of axial structure that develop prior to DSB formation. We propose that Red1 and Rec8 domains provide functionally complementary environments whereby inputs evolved from DSB repair and late-stage chromosome morphogenesis are integrated to give the complete meiotic chromosomal program. PMID:21145459

  2. COSA-1 reveals robust homeostasis and separable licensing and reinforcement steps governing meiotic crossovers.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Rayka; Zawadzki, Karl A; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Drake, Melanie; Arur, Swathi; Villeneuve, Anne M

    2012-03-30

    Crossovers (COs) between homologous chromosomes ensure their faithful segregation during meiosis. We identify C. elegans COSA-1, a cyclin-related protein conserved in metazoa, as a key component required to convert meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) into COs. During late meiotic prophase, COSA-1 localizes to foci that correspond to the single CO site on each homolog pair and indicate sites of eventual concentration of other conserved CO proteins. Chromosomes gain and lose competence to load CO proteins during meiotic progression, with competence to load COSA-1 requiring prior licensing. Our data further suggest a self-reinforcing mechanism maintaining CO designation. Modeling of a nonlinear dose-response relationship between IR-induced DSBs and COSA-1 foci reveals efficient conversion of DSBs into COs when DSBs are limiting and a robust capacity to limit cytologically differentiated CO sites when DSBs are in excess. COSA-1 foci serve as a unique live cell readout for investigating CO formation and CO interference. PMID:22464324

  3. Cep55 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression in meiotic oocyte.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhao-Yang; Ma, Xue-Shan; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Guo, Lei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2015-01-01

    Cep55 is a relatively novel member of the centrosomal protein family. Here, we show that Cep55 is expressed in mouse oocytes from the germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages. Immuostaining and confocal microscopy as well as time lapse live imaging after injection of mRNA encoding fusion protein of Cep55 and GFP identified that Cep55 was localized to the meiotic spindle, especially to the spindle poles at metaphase, while it was concentrated at the midbody in telophase in meiotic oocytes. Knockdown of Cep55 by specific siRNA injection caused the dissociation of γ-tubulin from the spindle poles, resulting in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes, leading to metaphase I arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Correspondingly, cyclin B accumulation and spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation were observed in Cep55 knockdown oocytes. Our results suggest that Cep55 may act as an MTOC-associated protein regulating spindle organization, and thus cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:26582107

  4. A molecular model for the role of SYCP3 in meiotic chromosome organisation

    PubMed Central

    Syrjänen, Johanna Liinamaria; Pellegrini, Luca; Davies, Owen Richard

    2014-01-01

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is an evolutionarily-conserved protein assembly that holds together homologous chromosomes during prophase of the first meiotic division. Whilst essential for meiosis and fertility, the molecular structure of the SC has proved resistant to elucidation. The SC protein SYCP3 has a crucial but poorly understood role in establishing the architecture of the meiotic chromosome. Here we show that human SYCP3 forms a highly-elongated helical tetramer of 20 nm length. N-terminal sequences extending from each end of the rod-like structure bind double-stranded DNA, enabling SYCP3 to link distant sites along the sister chromatid. We further find that SYCP3 self-assembles into regular filamentous structures that resemble the known morphology of the SC lateral element. Together, our data form the basis for a model in which SYCP3 binding and assembly on meiotic chromosomes leads to their organisation into compact structures compatible with recombination and crossover formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02963.001 PMID:24950965

  5. Meiotic Parthenogenesis in a Root-Knot Nematode Results in Rapid Genomic Homozygosity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingli L.; Thomas, Varghese P.; Williamson, Valerie M.

    2007-01-01

    Many isolates of the plant-parasitic nematode Meloidogyne hapla reproduce by facultative meiotic parthenogenesis. Sexual crosses can occur, but, in the absence of males, the diploid state appears to be restored by reuniting sister chromosomes of a single meiosis. We have crossed inbred strains of M. hapla that differ in DNA markers and produced hybrids and F2 lines. Here we show that heterozygous M. hapla females, upon parthenogenetic reproduction, produce progeny that segregate 1:1 for the presence or absence of dominant DNA markers, as would be expected if sister chromosomes are rejoined, rather than the 3:1 ratio typical of a Mendelian cross. Codominant markers also segregate 1:1 and heterozygotes are present at low frequency (<3%). Segregation patterns and recombinant analysis indicate that a homozygous condition is prevalent for markers flanking recombination events, suggesting that recombination occurs preferentially as four-strand exchanges at similar locations between both pairs of non-sister chromatids. With this mechanism, meiotic parthenogenesis would be expected to result in rapid genomic homozygosity. This type of high negative crossover interference coupled with positive chromatid interference has not been observed in fungal or other animal systems in which it is possible to examine the sister products of a single meiosis and may indicate that meiotic recombination in this nematode has novel features. PMID:17483427

  6. The Mouse INO80 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Is an Essential Meiotic Factor for Spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Serber, Daniel W; Runge, John S; Menon, Debashish U; Magnuson, Terry

    2016-01-01

    The ability to faithfully transmit genetic information across generations via the germ cells is a critical aspect of mammalian reproduction. The process of germ cell development requires a number of large-scale modulations of chromatin within the nucleus. One such occasion arises during meiotic recombination, when hundreds of DNA double-strand breaks are induced and subsequently repaired, enabling the transfer of genetic information between homologous chromosomes. The inability to properly repair DNA damage is known to lead to an arrest in the developing germ cells and sterility within the animal. Chromatin-remodeling activity, and in particular the BRG1 subunit of the SWI/SNF complex, has been shown to be required for successful completion of meiosis. In contrast, remodeling complexes of the ISWI and CHD families are required for postmeiotic processes. Little is known regarding the contribution of the INO80 family of chromatin-remodeling complexes, which is a particularly interesting candidate due to its well described functions during DNA double-strand break repair. Here we show that INO80 is expressed in developing spermatocytes during the early stages of meiotic prophase I. Based on this information, we used a conditional allele to delete the INO80 core ATPase subunit, thereby eliminating INO80 chromatin-remodeling activity in this lineage. The loss of INO80 resulted in an arrest during meiosis associated with a failure to repair DNA damage during meiotic recombination. PMID:26607718

  7. From genes to games: cooperation and cyclic dominance in meiotic drive.

    PubMed

    Traulsen, Arne; Reed, Floyd A

    2012-04-21

    Evolutionary change can be described on a genotypic level or a phenotypic level. Evolutionary game theory is typically thought of as a phenotypic approach, although it is frequently argued that it can also be used to describe population genetic evolution. Interpreting the interaction between alleles in a diploid genome as a two player game leads to interesting alternative perspectives on genetic evolution. Here we focus on the case of meiotic drive and illustrate how meiotic drive can be directly and precisely interpreted as a social dilemma, such as the prisoners dilemma or the snowdrift game, in which the drive allele takes more than its fair share. Resistance to meiotic drive can lead to the well understood cyclic dominance found in the rock-paper-scissors game. This perspective is well established for the replicator dynamics, but there is still considerable ground for mutual inspiration between the two fields. For example, evolutionary game theorists can benefit from considering the stochastic evolutionary dynamics arising from finite population size. Population geneticists can benefit from game theoretic tools and perspectives on genetic evolution. PMID:21600218

  8. Cep55 regulates spindle organization and cell cycle progression in meiotic oocyte

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhao-Yang; Ma, Xue-Shan; Qi, Shu-Tao; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Guo, Lei; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2015-01-01

    Cep55 is a relatively novel member of the centrosomal protein family. Here, we show that Cep55 is expressed in mouse oocytes from the germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII) stages. Immuostaining and confocal microscopy as well as time lapse live imaging after injection of mRNA encoding fusion protein of Cep55 and GFP identified that Cep55 was localized to the meiotic spindle, especially to the spindle poles at metaphase, while it was concentrated at the midbody in telophase in meiotic oocytes. Knockdown of Cep55 by specific siRNA injection caused the dissociation of γ-tubulin from the spindle poles, resulting in severely defective spindles and misaligned chromosomes, leading to metaphase I arrest and failure of first polar body (PB1) extrusion. Correspondingly, cyclin B accumulation and spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) activation were observed in Cep55 knockdown oocytes. Our results suggest that Cep55 may act as an MTOC-associated protein regulating spindle organization, and thus cell cycle progression during mouse oocyte meiotic maturation. PMID:26582107

  9. Population dynamics of a meiotic/mitotic expansion model for the fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, A.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1995-12-01

    A model to explain the mutational process and population dynamics of the fragile X syndrome is presented. The mutational mechanism was assumed to be a multi-pathway, multistep process. Expansion of CGG repeats was based on an underlying biological process and was assumed to occur at two time points: meiosis and early embryonic development (mitosis). Meiotic expansion was assumed to occur equally in oogenesis and spermatogenesis, while mitotic expansion was restricted to somatic, or constitutional, alleles of maternal origin. Testable hypotheses were predicted by this meiotic/mitotic model. First, parental origin of mutation is predicted to be associated with the risk of a woman to have a full-mutation child. Second, {open_quotes}contractions{close_quotes} seen in premutation male transmissions are predicted not to be true contractions in repeat size, but a consequence of the lack of mitotic expansion in paternally derived alleles. Third, a portion of full-mutation males should have full-mutation alleles in their sperm, due to the lack of complete selection against the full-mutation female. Fourth, a specific premutation-allele frequency distribution is predicted and differs from that based on models assuming only meiotic expansion. Last, it is predicted that {approximately}65 generations are required to achieve equilibrium, but this depends greatly on the expansion probabilities. 42 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Meiotic recombination at the Lmp2 hotspot tolerates minor sequence divergence between homologous chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshino, Masayasu; Sagai, Tomoko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    1996-06-01

    Recombination is widely considered to linearly depend on the length of the homologous sequences. An 11% mismatch decreases the rate of phage-plasmid recombination 240-fold. Two single nucleotide mismatches, which reduce the longest uninterrupted stretch of similarity from 232 base pairs (bp) to 134 bp, reduce gene conversion in mouse L cells 20-fold. The efficiency of gene targeting through homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells can be increased by using an isogenic, rather than a non-isogenic, DNA construct. In this study we asked whether a high degree of sequence identity between homologous mouse chromosomes enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot. Sites of meiotic recombination in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II region are not randomly distributed but are almost all clustered within short segments known as recombinational hotspots. The wm7 MHC haplotype, derived from Japanese wild mice Mus musculus molossinus, enhances meiotic recombination at a hotspot near the Lmp2 gene. Heterozygotes between the wm7 haplotype and the b or k haplotypes have yielded a high frequency of recombination (2.1%) in 1.3 kilobase kb segment of this hotspot. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  11. The genomic landscape of meiotic crossovers and gene conversions in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wijnker, Erik; Velikkakam James, Geo; Ding, Jia; Becker, Frank; Klasen, Jonas R; Rawat, Vimal; Rowan, Beth A; de Jong, Daniël F; de Snoo, C Bastiaan; Zapata, Luis; Huettel, Bruno; de Jong, Hans; Ossowski, Stephan; Weigel, Detlef; Koornneef, Maarten; Keurentjes, Joost JB; Schneeberger, Korbinian

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the exact distribution of meiotic crossovers (COs) and gene conversions (GCs) is essential for understanding many aspects of population genetics and evolution, from haplotype structure and long-distance genetic linkage to the generation of new allelic variants of genes. To this end, we resequenced the four products of 13 meiotic tetrads along with 10 doubled haploids derived from Arabidopsis thaliana hybrids. GC detection through short reads has previously been confounded by genomic rearrangements. Rigid filtering for misaligned reads allowed GC identification at high accuracy and revealed an ∼80-kb transposition, which undergoes copy-number changes mediated by meiotic recombination. Non-crossover associated GCs were extremely rare most likely due to their short average length of ∼25–50 bp, which is significantly shorter than the length of CO-associated GCs. Overall, recombination preferentially targeted non-methylated nucleosome-free regions at gene promoters, which showed significant enrichment of two sequence motifs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01426.001 PMID:24347547

  12. Transcript profiling of the meiotic drive phenotype in testis of Aedes aegypti using suppressive subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongyoung; Jin, Lizhong; Lobo, Neil F; Severson, David W

    2011-09-01

    The meiotic drive gene in Aedes aegypti is tightly linked with the sex determination locus on chromosome 1, and causes highly male-biased sex ratios. We prepared cDNA libraries from testes from the Ae. aegypti T37 strain (driving) and RED strain (non-driving), and used suppressive subtraction hybridization techniques to enrich for T37 testes-specific transcripts. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from a total of 2784 randomly selected clones from the subtracted T37 (subT37) library as well as the primary libraries for each strain (pT37 and pRED). Sequence analysis identified a total of 171 unique genes in the subT37 library and 299 unique genes among the three libraries. The majority of genes enriched in the subT37 library were associated with signal transduction, development, reproduction, metabolic process and cell cycle functions. Further, as observed with meiotic drive systems in Drosophila and mouse, a number of these genes were associated with signaling cascades that involve the Ras superfamily of regulatory small GTPases. Differential expression of several of these genes was verified in Ae. aegypti pupal testes using qRT-PCR. This study increases our understanding of testes gene expression enriched in adult males from the meiotic drive strain as well as insights into the basic testes transcriptome in Ae. aegypti. PMID:21708167

  13. akirin is required for diakinesis bivalent structure and synaptonemal complex disassembly at meiotic prophase I

    PubMed Central

    Clemons, Amy M.; Brockway, Heather M.; Yin, Yizhi; Kasinathan, Bhavatharini; Butterfield, Yaron S.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Smolikove, Sarit

    2013-01-01

    During meiosis, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate chromosome remodeling, leading to the formation of a tight bivalent structure. This bivalent, a linked pair of homologous chromosomes, is essential for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. The formation of a tight bivalent involves chromosome condensation and restructuring around the crossover. The synaptonemal complex (SC), which mediates homologous chromosome association before crossover formation, disassembles concurrently with increased condensation during bivalent remodeling. Both chromosome condensation and SC disassembly are likely critical steps in acquiring functional bivalent structure. The mechanisms controlling SC disassembly, however, remain unclear. Here we identify akir-1 as a gene involved in key events of meiotic prophase I in Caenorhabditis elegans. AKIR-1 is a protein conserved among metazoans that lacks any previously known function in meiosis. We show that akir-1 mutants exhibit severe meiotic defects in late prophase I, including improper disassembly of the SC and aberrant chromosome condensation, independently of the condensin complexes. These late-prophase defects then lead to aberrant reconfiguring of the bivalent. The meiotic divisions are delayed in akir-1 mutants and are accompanied by lagging chromosomes. Our analysis therefore provides evidence for an important role of proper SC disassembly in configuring a functional bivalent structure. PMID:23363597

  14. akirin is required for diakinesis bivalent structure and synaptonemal complex disassembly at meiotic prophase I.

    PubMed

    Clemons, Amy M; Brockway, Heather M; Yin, Yizhi; Kasinathan, Bhavatharini; Butterfield, Yaron S; Jones, Steven J M; Colaiácovo, Monica P; Smolikove, Sarit

    2013-04-01

    During meiosis, evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate chromosome remodeling, leading to the formation of a tight bivalent structure. This bivalent, a linked pair of homologous chromosomes, is essential for proper chromosome segregation in meiosis. The formation of a tight bivalent involves chromosome condensation and restructuring around the crossover. The synaptonemal complex (SC), which mediates homologous chromosome association before crossover formation, disassembles concurrently with increased condensation during bivalent remodeling. Both chromosome condensation and SC disassembly are likely critical steps in acquiring functional bivalent structure. The mechanisms controlling SC disassembly, however, remain unclear. Here we identify akir-1 as a gene involved in key events of meiotic prophase I in Caenorhabditis elegans. AKIR-1 is a protein conserved among metazoans that lacks any previously known function in meiosis. We show that akir-1 mutants exhibit severe meiotic defects in late prophase I, including improper disassembly of the SC and aberrant chromosome condensation, independently of the condensin complexes. These late-prophase defects then lead to aberrant reconfiguring of the bivalent. The meiotic divisions are delayed in akir-1 mutants and are accompanied by lagging chromosomes. Our analysis therefore provides evidence for an important role of proper SC disassembly in configuring a functional bivalent structure. PMID:23363597

  15. A Maternal Screen for Genes Regulating Drosophila Oocyte Polarity Uncovers New Steps in Meiotic Progression

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Vitor; Kimm, Naomi; Lehmann, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Meiotic checkpoints monitor chromosome status to ensure correct homologous recombination, genomic integrity, and chromosome segregation. In Drosophila, the persistent presence of double-strand DNA breaks (DSB) activates the ATR/Mei-41 checkpoint, delays progression through meiosis, and causes defects in DNA condensation of the oocyte nucleus, the karyosome. Checkpoint activation has also been linked to decreased levels of the TGFα-like molecule Gurken, which controls normal eggshell patterning. We used this easy-to-score eggshell phenotype in a germ-line mosaic screen in Drosophila to identify new genes affecting meiotic progression, DNA condensation, and Gurken signaling. One hundred eighteen new ventralizing mutants on the second chromosome fell into 17 complementation groups. Here we describe the analysis of 8 complementation groups, including Kinesin heavy chain, the SR protein kinase cuaba, the cohesin-related gene dPds5/cohiba, and the Tudor-domain gene montecristo. Our findings challenge the hypothesis that checkpoint activation upon persistent DSBs is exclusively mediated by ATR/Mei-41 kinase and instead reveal a more complex network of interactions that link DSB formation, checkpoint activation, meiotic delay, DNA condensation, and Gurken protein synthesis. PMID:17507684

  16. Role for endocytosis of a constitutively active GPCR (GPR185) in releasing vertebrate oocyte meiotic arrest.

    PubMed

    Nader, Nancy; Dib, Maya; Daalis, Arwa; Kulkarni, Rashmi P; Machaca, Khaled

    2014-11-15

    Vertebrate oocytes are naturally arrested at prophase of meiosis I for sustained periods of time before resuming meiosis in a process called oocyte maturation that prepares the egg for fertilization. Members of the constitutively active GPR3/6/12 family of G-protein coupled receptors represent important mediators of meiotic arrest. In the frog oocyte the GPR3/12 homolog GPRx (renamed GPR185) has been shown to sustain meiotic arrest by increasing intracellular cAMP levels through GαSβγ. Here we show that GPRx is enriched at the cell membrane (~80%), recycles through an endosomal compartment at steady state, and loses its ability to signal once trapped intracellularly. Progesterone-mediated oocyte maturation is associated with significant internalization of both endogenous and overexpressed GPRx. Furthermore, a GPRx mutant that does not internalize in response to progesterone is significantly more efficient than wild-type GPRx at blocking oocyte maturation. Collectively our results argue that internalization of the constitutively active GPRx is important to release oocyte meiotic arrest. PMID:25220151

  17. Chromosome Synapsis Alleviates Mek1-Dependent Suppression of Meiotic DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi V.; MacQueen, Amy J.; Vader, Gerben; Shinohara, Miki; Sanchez, Aurore; Borde, Valérie; Shinohara, Akira; Hochwagen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Faithful meiotic chromosome segregation and fertility require meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes rather than the equally available sister chromatid, a bias that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the meiotic kinase, Mek1. Mek1 is thought to mediate repair template bias by specifically suppressing sister-directed repair. Instead, we found that when Mek1 persists on closely paired (synapsed) homologues, DNA repair is severely delayed, suggesting that Mek1 suppresses any proximal repair template. Accordingly, Mek1 is excluded from synapsed homologues in wild-type cells. Exclusion requires the AAA+-ATPase Pch2 and is directly coupled to synaptonemal complex assembly. Stage-specific depletion experiments further demonstrate that DNA repair in the context of synapsed homologues requires Rad54, a repair factor inhibited by Mek1. These data indicate that the sister template is distinguished from the homologue primarily by its closer proximity to inhibitory Mek1 activity. We propose that once pairing or synapsis juxtaposes homologues, exclusion of Mek1 is necessary to avoid suppression of all templates and accelerate repair progression. PMID:26870961

  18. Genetic control of recombination partner preference in yeast meiosis. Isolation and characterization of mutants elevated for meiotic unequal sister-chromatid recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, D A; Stahl, F W

    1999-01-01

    Meiotic exchange occurs preferentially between homologous chromatids, in contrast to mitotic recombination, which occurs primarily between sister chromatids. To identify functions that direct meiotic recombination events to homologues, we screened for mutants exhibiting an increase in meiotic unequal sister-chromatid recombination (SCR). The msc (meiotic sister-chromatid recombination) mutants were quantified in spo13 meiosis with respect to meiotic unequal SCR frequency, disome segregation pattern, sporulation frequency, and spore viability. Analysis of the msc mutants according to these criteria defines three classes. Mutants with a class I phenotype identified new alleles of the meiosis-specific genes RED1 and MEK1, the DNA damage checkpoint genes RAD24 and MEC3, and a previously unknown gene, MSC6. The genes RED1, MEK1, RAD24, RAD17, and MEC1 are required for meiotic prophase arrest induced by a dmc1 mutation, which defines a meiotic recombination checkpoint. Meiotic unequal SCR was also elevated in a rad17 mutant. Our observation that meiotic unequal SCR is elevated in meiotic recombination checkpoint mutants suggests that, in addition to their proposed monitoring function, these checkpoint genes function to direct meiotic recombination events to homologues. The mutants in class II, including a dmc1 mutant, confer a dominant meiotic lethal phenotype in diploid SPO13 meiosis in our strain background, and they identify alleles of UBR1, INP52, BUD3, PET122, ELA1, and MSC1-MSC3. These results suggest that DMC1 functions to bias the repair of meiosis-specific double-strand breaks to homologues. We hypothesize that the genes identified by the class II mutants function in or are regulators of the DMC1-promoted interhomologue recombination pathway. Class III mutants may be elevated for rates of both SCR and homologue exchange. PMID:10511544

  19. Arabidopsis SPO11-2 functions with SPO11-1 in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Nicola J; Kuromori, Takashi; Azumi, Yoshitaka; Roberts, Gethin; Breuer, Christian; Wada, Takuji; Maxwell, Anthony; Roberts, Keith; Sugimoto-Shirasu, Keiko

    2006-10-01

    The Spo11 protein is a eukaryotic homologue of the archaeal DNA topoisomerase VIA subunit (topo VIA). In archaea it is involved, together with its B subunit (topo VIB), in DNA replication. However, most eukaryotes, including yeasts, insects and vertebrates, instead have a single gene for Spo11/topo VIA and no homologues for topo VIB. In these organisms, Spo11 mediates DNA double-strand breaks that initiate meiotic recombination. Many plant species, in contrast to other eukaryotes, have three homologues for Spo11/topo VIA and one for topo VIB. The homologues in Arabidopsis, AtSPO11-1, AtSPO11-2 and AtSPO11-3, all share 20-30% sequence similarity with other Spo11/topo VIA proteins, but their functional relationship during meiosis or other processes is not well understood. Previous genetic evidence suggests that AtSPO11-1 is a true orthologue of Spo11 in other eukaryotes and is required for meiotic recombination, whereas AtSPO11-3 is involved in DNA endo-reduplication as a part of the topo VI complex. In this study, we show that plants homozygous for atspo11-2 exhibit a severe sterility phenotype. Both male and female meiosis are severely disrupted in the atspo11-2 mutant, and this is associated with severe defects in synapsis during the first meiotic division and reduced meiotic recombination. Further genetic analysis revealed that AtSPO11-1 and AtSPO11-2 genetically interact, i.e. plants heterozygous for both atspo11-1 and atspo11-2 are also sterile, suggesting that AtSPO11-1 and AtSPO11-2 have largely overlapping functions. Thus, the three Arabidopsis Spo11 homologues appear to function in two discrete processes, i.e. AtSPO11-1 and AtSPO11-2 in meiotic recombination and AtSPO11-3 in DNA replication. PMID:17018031

  20. Rejuvenation of Meiotic Cohesion in Oocytes during Prophase I Is Required for Chiasma Maintenance and Accurate Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Katherine A.; Jeffreys, Charlotte A.; Bickel, Sharon E.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosome segregation errors in human oocytes are the leading cause of birth defects, and the risk of aneuploid pregnancy increases dramatically as women age. Accurate segregation demands that sister chromatid cohesion remain intact for decades in human oocytes, and gradual loss of the original cohesive linkages established in fetal oocytes is proposed to be a major cause of age-dependent segregation errors. Here we demonstrate that maintenance of meiotic cohesion in Drosophila oocytes during prophase I requires an active rejuvenation program, and provide mechanistic insight into the molecular events that underlie rejuvenation. Gal4/UAS inducible knockdown of the cohesion establishment factor Eco after meiotic S phase, but before oocyte maturation, causes premature loss of meiotic cohesion, resulting in destabilization of chiasmata and subsequent missegregation of recombinant homologs. Reduction of individual cohesin subunits or the cohesin loader Nipped B during prophase I leads to similar defects. These data indicate that loading of newly synthesized replacement cohesin rings by Nipped B and establishment of new cohesive linkages by the acetyltransferase Eco must occur during prophase I to maintain cohesion in oocytes. Moreover, we show that rejuvenation of meiotic cohesion does not depend on the programmed induction of meiotic double strand breaks that occurs during early prophase I, and is therefore mechanistically distinct from the DNA damage cohesion re-establishment pathway identified in G2 vegetative yeast cells. Our work provides the first evidence that new cohesive linkages are established in Drosophila oocytes after meiotic S phase, and that these are required for accurate chromosome segregation. If such a pathway also operates in human oocytes, meiotic cohesion defects may become pronounced in a woman's thirties, not because the original cohesive linkages finally give out, but because the rejuvenation program can no longer supply new cohesive linkages

  1. Perturbing microtubule integrity blocks AMP-activated protein kinase-induced meiotic resumption in cultured mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ya, Ru; Downs, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    The oocyte meiotic spindle is comprised of microtubules (MT) that bind chromatin and regulate both metaphase plate formation and karyokinesis during meiotic maturation; however, little information is known about their role in meiosis reinitiation. This study was conducted to determine if microtubule integrity is required for meiotic induction and to ascertain how it affects activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an important participant in the meiotic induction process. Treatment with microtubule-disrupting agents nocodazole and vinblastine suppressed meiotic resumption in a dose-dependent manner in both arrested cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) stimulated with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and arrested denuded oocytes (DO) stimulated with the AMPK activator, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-4-ribofuranoside (AICAR). This effect coincided with suppression of AMPK activation as determined by western blotting and germinal vesicle immunostaining. Treatment with the MT stabilizer paclitaxel also suppressed meiotic induction. Targeting actin filament polymerization had only a marginal effect on meiotic induction. Immunolocalization experiments revealed that active AMPK colocalized with γ-tubulin during metaphase I and II stages, while it localized at the spindle midzone during anaphase. This discrete localization pattern was dependent on MT integrity. Treatment with nocodazole led to disruption of proper spindle pole localization of active AMPK, while paclitaxel induced excessive polymerization of spindle MT and formation of ectopic asters with accentuated AMPK colocalization. Although stimulation of AMPK increased the rate of germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB), spindle formation and polar body (PB) extrusion, the kinase had no effect on peripheral movement of the spindle. These data suggest that the meiosis-inducing action and localization of AMPK are regulated by MT spindle integrity during mouse oocyte maturation. PMID:23199370

  2. The behavior of the X- and Y-chromosomes in the oocyte during meiotic prophase in the B6.Y(TIR)sex-reversed mouse ovary.

    PubMed

    Alton, Michelle; Lau, Mau Pan; Villemure, Michele; Taketo, Teruko

    2008-02-01

    Sexual differentiation of the germ cells follows gonadal differentiation, which is determined by the presence or the absence of the Y-chromosome. Consequently, oogenesis and spermatogenesis take place in the germ cells with XX and XY sex chromosomal compositions respectively. It is unclear how sexual dimorphic regulation of meiosis is associated with the sex-chromosomal composition. In the present study, we examined the behavior of the sex chromosomes in the oocytes of the B6.Y(TIR) sex-reversed female mouse, in comparison with XO and XX females. As the sex chromosomes fail to pair in both XY and XO oocytes during meiotic prophase, we anticipated that the pairing failure may lead to excessive oocyte loss. However, the total number of germ cells, identified by immunolabeling of germ cell nuclear antigen 1 (GCNA1), did not differ between XY and XX ovaries or XO and XX ovaries up to the day of delivery. The progression of meiotic prophase, assessed by immunolabeling of synaptonemal complex components, was also similar between the two genotypes of ovaries. These observations suggest that the failure in sex-chromosome pairing is not sufficient to cause oocyte loss. On the other hand, labeling of phosphorylated histone gammaH2AX, known to be associated with asynapsis and transcriptional repression, was seen over the X-chromosome but not over the Y-chromosome in the majority of XY oocytes at the pachytene stage. For comparison, gammaH2AX labeling was seen only in the minority of XX oocytes at the same stage. We speculate that the transcriptional activity of sex chromosomes in the XY oocyte may be incompatible with ooplasmic maturation. PMID:18239052

  3. Sexual antagonism and meiotic drive cause stable linkage disequilibrium and favour reduced recombination on the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Rydzewski, W T; Carioscia, S A; Liévano, G; Lynch, V D; Patten, M M

    2016-06-01

    Sexual antagonism and meiotic drive are sex-specific evolutionary forces with the potential to shape genomic architecture. Previous theory has found that pairing two sexually antagonistic loci or combining sexual antagonism with meiotic drive at linked autosomal loci augments genetic variation, produces stable linkage disequilibrium (LD) and favours reduced recombination. However, the influence of these two forces has not been examined on the X chromosome, which is thought to be enriched for sexual antagonism and meiotic drive. We investigate the evolution of the X chromosome under both sexual antagonism and meiotic drive with two models: in one, both loci experience sexual antagonism; in the other, we pair a meiotic drive locus with a sexually antagonistic locus. We find that LD arises between the two loci in both models, even when the two loci freely recombine in females and that driving haplotypes will be enriched for male-beneficial alleles, further skewing sex ratios in these populations. We introduce a new measure of LD, Dz', which accounts for population allele frequencies and is appropriate for instances where these are sex specific. Both models demonstrate that natural selection favours modifiers that reduce the recombination rate. These results inform observed patterns of congealment found on driving X chromosomes and have implications for patterns of natural variation and the evolution of recombination rates on the X chromosome. PMID:26999777

  4. Effects of granulosa coculture on in-vitro oocyte meiotic maturation within a putatively less competent murine model.

    PubMed

    Heng, Boon Chin; Tong, Guo Qing; Ng, Soon Chye

    2004-09-15

    A less competent murine in vitro maturation (IVM) model was achieved by shortening the standard duration of in vivo PMSG stimulation from 48 to 24 h and selecting only naked/partially naked GV oocytes from a mixture of large and small follicles. Porcine granulosa coculture enhanced meiotic maturation within such a less competent model (37.3% versus 23.1%, P<0.05), while no significant enhancement was observed with macaque and murine granulosa coculture. Culture of porcine granulosa on extracellular matrix (ECM) gel resulted in a more differentiated morphology, but did not significantly further enhance the beneficial effects it already had on meiotic maturation. Increased concentrations of serum as well as the supplementation of gonadotrophins and follicular fluid within the culture milieu did not enhance IVM under both cell-free and coculture conditions. Porcine granulosa-conditioned medium also enhanced meiotic maturation (36.5% versus 26.7%, P<0.05), which was not diminished upon freeze-thawing (35.8% versus 22.6%, P<0.05). Enhancement of meiotic maturation by porcine granulosa coculture did not however translate to significant improvements in developmental competence, as assessed by in vitro fertilization (IVF) and embryo culture to the blastocyst stage, followed by total cell counts. ECM gel had a detrimental effect on fertilization and developmental competence, even though it had no detrimental effect on meiotic maturation itself. PMID:15289048

  5. MS5 Mediates Early Meiotic Progression and Its Natural Variants May Have Applications for Hybrid Production in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qiang; Shen, Yi; Li, Xi; Lu, Wei; Wang, Xiang; Han, Xue; Dong, Faming; Wan, Lili; Yang, Guangsheng; Hong, Dengfeng; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-06-01

    During meiotic prophase I, chromatin undergoes dynamic changes to establish a structural basis for essential meiotic events. However, the mechanism that coordinates chromosome structure and meiotic progression remains poorly understood in plants. Here, we characterized a spontaneous sterile mutant MS5(b)MS5(b) in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) and found its meiotic chromosomes were arrested at leptotene. MS5 is preferentially expressed in reproductive organs and encodes a Brassica-specific protein carrying conserved coiled-coil and DUF626 domains with unknown function. MS5 is essential for pairing of homologs in meiosis, but not necessary for the initiation of DNA double-strand breaks. The distribution of the axis element-associated protein ASY1 occurs independently of MS5, but localization of the meiotic cohesion subunit SYN1 requires functional MS5. Furthermore, both the central element of the synaptonemal complex and the recombination element do not properly form in MS5(b)MS5(b) mutants. Our results demonstrate that MS5 participates in progression of meiosis during early prophase I and its allelic variants lead to differences in fertility, which may provide a promising strategy for pollination control for heterosis breeding. PMID:27194707

  6. Episodic tectonic plate reorganizations driven by mantle convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Scott D.; Lowman, Julian P.; Gable, Carl W.

    2002-10-01

    Periods of relatively uniform plate motion were interrupted several times throughout the Cenozoic and Mesozoic by rapid plate reorganization events [R. Hey, Geol. Soc. Am. Bull. 88 (1977) 1404-1420; P.A. Rona, E.S. Richardson, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 40 (1978) 1-11; D.C. Engebretson, A. Cox, R.G. Gordon, Geol. Soc. Am. Spec. Pap. 206 (1985); R.G. Gordon, D.M. Jurdy, J. Geophys. Res. 91 (1986) 12389-12406; D.A. Clague, G.B. Dalrymple, US Geol. Surv. Prof. Pap. 1350 (1987) 5-54; J.M. Stock, P. Molnar, Nature 325 (1987) 495-499; C. Lithgow-Bertelloni, M.A. Richards, Geophys. Res. Lett. 22 (1995) 1317-1320; M.A. Richards, C. Lithgow-Bertelloni, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 137 (1996) 19-27; C. Lithgow-Bertelloni, M.A. Richards, Rev. Geophys. 36 (1998) 27-78]. It has been proposed that changes in plate boundary forces are responsible for these events [M.A. Richards, C. Lithgow-Bertelloni, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 137 (1996) 19-27; C. Lithgow-Bertelloni, M.A. Richards, Rev. Geophys. 36 (1998) 27-78]. We present an alternative hypothesis: convection-driven plate motions are intrinsically unstable due to a buoyant instability that develops as a result of the influence of plates on an internally heated mantle. This instability, which has not been described before, is responsible for episodic reorganizations of plate motion. Numerical mantle convection experiments demonstrate that high-Rayleigh number convection with internal heating and surface plates is sufficient to induce plate reorganization events, changes in plate boundary forces, or plate geometry, are not required.

  7. Global Dynamic Numerical Simulations of Plate Tectonic Reorganizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, G.; Quevedo, L.; Butterworth, N.; Matthews, K. J.; Müller, D.

    2010-12-01

    We use a new numerical approach for global geodynamics to investigate the origin of present global plate motion and to identify the causes of the last two global tectonic reorganizations occurred about 50 and 100 million years ago (Ma) [1]. While the 50 Ma event is the most well-known global plate-mantle event, expressed by the bend in the Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic chain, a prominent plate reorganization at about 100 Ma, although presently little studied, is clearly indicated by a major bend in the fracture zones in the Indian Ocean and by a change in Pacific plate motion [2]. Our workflow involves turning plate reconstructions into surface meshes that are subsequently employed as initial conditions for global Boundary Element numerical models. The tectonic setting that anticipates the reorganizations is processed with the software GPlates, combining the 3D mesh of the paleo-plate morphology and the reconstruction of paleo-subducted slabs, elaborated from tectonic history [3]. All our models involve the entire planetary system, are fully dynamic, have free surface, are characterized by a spectacular computational speed due to the simultaneous use of the multi-pole algorithm and the Boundary Element formulation and are limited only by the use of sharp material property variations [4]. We employ this new tool to unravel the causes of plate tectonic reorganizations, producing and comparing global plate motion with the reconstructed ones. References: [1] Torsvik, T., Müller, R.D., Van der Voo, R., Steinberger, B., and Gaina, C., 2008, Global Plate Motion Frames: Toward a unified model: Reviews in Geophysics, VOL. 46, RG3004, 44 PP., 2008 [2] Wessel, P. and Kroenke, L.W. Pacific absolute plate motion since 145 Ma: An assessment of the fixed hot spot hypothesis. Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol 113, B06101, 2008 [3] L. Quevedo, G. Morra, R. D. Mueller. Parallel Fast Multipole Boundary Element Method for Crustal Dynamics, Proceeding 9th World Congress and 4th Asian

  8. Organization of supercoil domains and their reorganization by transcription

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shuang; Stein, Richard A.; Higgins, N. Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Summary During a normal cell cycle, chromosomes are exposed to many biochemical reactions that require specific types of DNA movement. Separation forces move replicated chromosomes into separate sister cell compartments during cell division, and the contemporaneous acts of DNA replication, RNA transcription and cotranscriptional translation of membrane proteins cause specific regions of DNA to twist, writhe and expand or contract. Recent experiments indicate that a dynamic and stochastic mechanism creates supercoil DNA domains soon after DNA replication. Domain structure is subsequently reorganized by RNA transcription. Examples of transcription-dependent chromosome remodelling are also emerging from eukaryotic cell systems. PMID:16135220

  9. Hybrid origin of gynogenetic clones and the introgression of their mitochondrial genome into sexual diploids through meiotic hybridogenesis in the loach, Misgurnus anguillicuadatus.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Aya; Kodo, Yukihiro; Murakami, Masaru; Kuroda, Masamichi; Aoki, Takao; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2015-11-01

    In a few Japanese populations of the loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei: Cobitidae), clonal diploid lineages produce unreduced diploid eggs that normally undergo gynogenetic reproduction; however the origin of these clones remains elusive. Here, we show the presence of two diverse clades, A and B, within this loach species from sequence analyses of two nuclear genes RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1) and IRBP2 (interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, 2) and then demonstrate heterozygous genotypes fixed at the two loci as the evidence of the hybrid nature of clonal lineages. All the clonal individuals were identified by clone-specific mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, microsatellite genotypes, and random amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprints; they commonly showed two alleles, one from clade A and another from clade B, whereas other wild-type diploids possessed alleles from either clade A or B. However, we also found wild-type diploids with clone-specific mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes from clade B. One possible explanation is an introgression of a clone-specific mitochondrial genome from clonal to these wild-type loaches. These individuals likely arose by a cross between haploid sperm from bisexual B clade males and haploid eggs with clone-specific mtDNA and clade B nuclear genome, produced by meiotic hybridogenesis (elimination of unmatched A genome followed by meiosis after preferential pairing between two matched B genomes) in clone-origin triploid individual (ABB). PMID:26173834

  10. Gamete formation via meiotic nuclear restitution generates fertile amphiploid F1 (oat x maize) plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oat x maize crosses generated hybrid zygotes that by undergoing complete and incomplete uniparental genome loss of the maize genome during embryogenesis resulted in both euhaploid plants that have complete oat chromosome complements and no maize chromosome and aneuhaploid plants that have complete o...

  11. Meiotic Recombination in Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Bulls and Their Offspring

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In mammals, homologous chromosome pairing and recombination are essential events for meiosis. The generation of reciprocal exchanges of genetic material ensure both genetic diversity and the proper segregation of homologous chromosomes. With the advent of reproductive biotechnologies such as somat...

  12. Retinoic acid homeostasis through aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 mediates meiotic entry in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ruijuan; Fang, Lingling; Cheng, Yunying; He, Xue; Jiang, Wentao; Dong, Ranran; Shi, Hongjuan; Jiang, Dongneng; Sun, Lina; Wang, Deshou

    2015-01-01

    Meiosis is a process unique to the differentiation of germ cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is the key factor controlling the sex-specific timing of meiotic initiation in tetrapods; however, the role of RA in meiotic initiation in teleosts has remained unclear. In this study, the genes encoding RA synthase aldh1a2, and catabolic enzyme cyp26a1 were isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), a species without stra8. The expression of aldh1a2 was up-regulated and expression of cyp26a1 was down-regulated before the meiotic initiation in ovaries and in testes. Treatment with RA synthase inhibitor or disruption of Aldh1a2 by CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in delayed meiotic initiation, with simultaneous down-regulation of cyp26a1 and up-regulation of sycp3. By contrast, treatment with an inhibitor of RA catabolic enzyme and disruption of cyp26a1 resulted in earlier meiotic initiation, with increased expression of aldh1a2 and sycp3. Additionally, treatment of XY fish with estrogen (E2) and XX fish with fadrozole led to sex reversal and reversion of meiotic initiation. These results indicate that RA is indispensable for meiotic initiation in teleosts via a stra8 independent signaling pathway where both aldh1a2 and cyp26a1 are critical. In contrast to mammals, E2 is a major regulator of sex determination and meiotic initiation in teleosts. PMID:25976364

  13. Chromosomal meiotic segregation, embryonic developmental kinetics and DNA (hydroxy)methylation analysis consolidate the safety of human oocyte vitrification.

    PubMed

    De Munck, N; Petrussa, L; Verheyen, G; Staessen, C; Vandeskelde, Y; Sterckx, J; Bocken, G; Jacobs, K; Stoop, D; De Rycke, M; Van de Velde, H

    2015-06-01

    Oocyte vitrification has been introduced into clinical settings without extensive pre-clinical safety testing. In this study, we analysed major safety aspects of human oocyte vitrification in a high security closed system: (i) chromosomal meiotic segregation, (ii) embryonic developmental kinetics and (iii) DNA (hydroxy)methylation status. Fresh and vitrified sibling oocytes from young donors after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) were compared in three different assays. Firstly, the chromosomal constitution of the fertilized zygotes was deduced from array comparative genomic hybridization results obtained from both polar bodies biopsied at Day 1. Secondly, embryo development up to Day 3 was analysed by time-lapse imaging. Ten specific time points, six morphokinetic time intervals and the average cell number on Day 3 were recorded. Thirdly, global DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation patterns were analysed by immunostaining on Day 3 embryos. The nuclear fluorescence intensity was measured by Volocity imaging software. Comprehensive chromosomal screening of the polar bodies demonstrated that at least half of the zygotes obtained after ICSI of fresh and vitrified oocytes were euploid. Time-lapse analysis showed that there was no significant difference in cleavage timings, the predictive morphokinetic time intervals nor the average cell number between embryos developed from fresh and vitrified oocytes. Finally, global DNA (hydroxy)methylation patterns were not significantly different between Day 3 embryos obtained from fresh and from vitrified oocytes. Our data further consolidate the safety of the oocyte vitrification technique. Nevertheless, additional testing in young and older sub-fertile/infertile patients and sound follow-up studies of children born after oocyte cryopreservation remain mandatory. PMID:25833840

  14. Chromosomes carrying meiotic avoidance loci in three apomictic eudicot Hieracium subgenus Pilosella species share structural features with two monocot apomicts.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takashi; Ito, Kanae; Johnson, Susan D; Oelkers, Karsten; Suzuki, Go; Houben, Andreas; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Koltunow, Anna M

    2011-11-01

    The LOSS OF APOMEIOSIS (LOA) locus is one of two dominant loci known to control apomixis in the eudicot Hieracium praealtum. LOA stimulates the differentiation of somatic aposporous initial cells after the initiation of meiosis in ovules. Aposporous initial cells undergo nuclear proliferation close to sexual megaspores, forming unreduced aposporous embryo sacs, and the sexual program ceases. LOA-linked genetic markers were used to isolate 1.2 Mb of LOA-associated DNAs from H. praealtum. Physical mapping defined the genomic region essential for LOA function between two markers, flanking 400 kb of identified sequence and central unknown sequences. Cytogenetic and sequence analyses revealed that the LOA locus is located on a single chromosome near the tip of the long arm and surrounded by extensive, abundant complex repeat and transposon sequences. Chromosomal features and LOA-linked markers are conserved in aposporous Hieracium caespitosum and Hieracium piloselloides but absent in sexual Hieracium pilosella. Their absence in apomictic Hieracium aurantiacum suggests that meiotic avoidance may have evolved independently in aposporous subgenus Pilosella species. The structure of the hemizygous chromosomal region containing the LOA locus in the three Hieracium subgenus Pilosella species resembles that of the hemizygous apospory-specific genomic regions in monocot Pennisetum squamulatum and Cenchrus ciliaris. Analyses of partial DNA sequences at these loci show no obvious conservation, indicating that they are unlikely to share a common ancestral origin. This suggests convergent evolution of repeat-rich hemizygous chromosomal regions containing apospory loci in these monocot and eudicot species, which may be required for the function and maintenance of the trait. PMID:21896890

  15. Plasticity in the Meiotic Epigenetic Landscape of Sex Chromosomes in Caenorhabditis Species.

    PubMed

    Larson, Braden J; Van, Mike V; Nakayama, Taylor; Engebrecht, JoAnne

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis in the heterogametic sex in some species, sex chromosomes undergo meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), which results in acquisition of repressive chromatin and transcriptional silencing. In Caenorhabditis elegans, MSCI is mediated by MET-2 methyltransferase deposition of histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation. Here we examined the meiotic chromatin landscape in germ lines of four Caenorhabditis species; C. remanei and C. brenneri represent ancestral gonochorism, while C. briggsae and C. elegans are two lineages that independently evolved hermaphroditism. While MSCI is conserved across all four species, repressive chromatin modifications are distinct and do not correlate with reproductive mode. In contrast to C. elegans and C. remanei germ cells where X chromosomes are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation, X chromosomes in C. briggsae and C. brenneri germ cells are enriched for histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation. Inactivation of C. briggsae MET-2 resulted in germ-line X chromosome transcription and checkpoint activation. Further, both histone H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation were reduced in Cbr-met-2 mutant germ lines, suggesting that in contrast to C. elegans, H3 lysine 9 di- and trimethylation are interdependent. C. briggsae H3 lysine 9 trimethylation was redistributed in the presence of asynapsed chromosomes in a sex-specific manner in the related process of meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin. However, these repressive marks did not influence X chromosome replication timing. Examination of additional Caenorhabditis species revealed diverse H3 lysine 9 methylation patterns on the X, suggesting that the sex chromosome epigenome evolves rapidly. PMID:27280692

  16. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Does Not Impact Murine Meiotic Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Cortesao, Catarina S.; Freitas, Raquel F.; Barreto, Vasco M.

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) was first described as the triggering enzyme of the B-cell−specific reactions that edit the immunoglobulin genes, namely somatic hypermutation, gene conversion, and class switch recombination. Over the years, AID was also detected in cells other than lymphocytes, and it has been assigned additional roles in the innate defense against transforming retroviruses, in retrotransposition restriction and in DNA demethylation. Notably, AID expression was found in germline tissues, and in heterologous systems it can induce the double-strand breaks required for the initiation of meiotic recombination and proper gamete formation. However, because AID-deficient mice are fully fertile, the molecule is not essential for meiosis. Thus, the remaining question that we addressed here is whether AID influences the frequency of meiotic recombination in mice. We measured the recombination events in the meiosis of male and female mice F1 hybrids of C57BL/6J and BALB/c, in Aicda+/+ and Aicda−/− background by using a panel of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that distinguishes C57BL/6J from BALB/c genome across the 19 autosomes. In agreement with the literature, we found that the frequency of recombination in the female germline was greater than in male germline, both in the Aicda+/+ and Aicda−/− backgrounds. No statistical difference was found in the average recombination events between Aicda+/+ and Aidca−/− animals, either in females or males. In addition, the recombination frequencies between single-nucleotide polymorphisms flanking the immunoglobulin heavy and immunoglobulin kappa loci was also not different. We conclude that AID has a minor impact, if any, on the overall frequency of meiotic recombination. PMID:23550130

  17. A requirement for fatty acid oxidation in the hormone-induced meiotic maturation of mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Valsangkar, Deepa; Downs, Stephen M

    2013-08-01

    We have previously shown that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is required for AMP-activated protein kinase (PRKA)-induced maturation in vitro. In the present study, we have further investigated the role of this metabolic pathway in hormone-induced meiotic maturation. Incorporating an assay with (3)H-palmitic acid as the substrate, we first examined the effect of PRKA activators on FAO levels. There was a significant stimulation of FAO in cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO) treated with 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) and RSVA405. In denuded oocytes (DO), AICAR stimulated FAO only in the presence of carnitine, the molecule that facilitates fatty acyl CoA entry into the mitochondria. The carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 activator C75 successfully stimulated FAO in CEO. All three of these activators trigger germinal vesicle breakdown. Meiotic resumption induced by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) or amphiregulin was completely inhibited by the FAO inhibitors etomoxir, mercaptoacetate, and malonyl CoA. Importantly, FAO was increased in CEO stimulated by FSH and epidermal growth factor, and this increase was blocked by FAO inhibitors. Moreover, compound C, a PRKA inhibitor, prevented the FSH-induced increase in FAO. Both carnitine and palmitic acid augmented hormonal induction of maturation. In a more physiological setting, etomoxir eliminated human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-induced maturation in follicle-enclosed oocytes. In addition, CEO and DO from hCG-treated mice displayed an etomoxir-sensitive increase in FAO, indicating that this pathway was stimulated during in vivo meiotic resumption. Taken together, our data indicate that hormone-induced maturation in mice requires a PRKA-dependent increase in FAO. PMID:23863407

  18. Implications of mitotic and meiotic irregularities in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Lima, D C; Braz, G T; Dos Reis, G B; Techio, V H; Davide, L C; de F B Abreu, A

    2016-01-01

    The common bean has great social and economic importance in Brazil and is the subject of a high number of publications, especially in the fields of genetics and breeding. Breeding programs aim to increase grain yield; however, mitosis and meiosis represent under explored research areas that have a direct impact on grain yield. Therefore, the study of cell division could be another tool available to bean geneticists and breeders. The aim of this study was to investigate irregularities occurring during the cell cycle and meiosis in common bean. The common bean cultivar used was BRSMG Talismã, which owing to its high yield and grain quality is recommended for cultivation in Brazil. We classified the interphase nuclei, estimated the mitotic and meiotic index, grain pollen viability, and percentage of abnormalities in both processes. The mitotic index was 4.1%, the interphase nucleus was non-reticulated, and 19% of dividing somatic cells showed abnormal behavior. Meiosis also presented irregularities resulting in a meiotic index of 44.6%. Viability of pollen grains was 94.3%. These results indicate that the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã possesses repair mechanisms that compensate for changes by producing a large number of pollen grains. Another important strategy adopted by bean plants to ensure stability is the elimination of abnormal cells by apoptosis. As the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã is recommended for cultivation because of its good agronomic performance, it can be concluded that mitotic and meiotic irregularities have no negative influence on its grain quality and yield. PMID:27323072

  19. Cytomixis and meiotic abnormalities during microsporogenesis are responsible for male sterility and chromosome variations in Houttuynia cordata.

    PubMed

    Guan, J-Z; Wang, J-J; Cheng, Z-H; Liu, Y; Li, Z-Y

    2012-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (Saururaceae) is a leaf vegetable and a medicinal herb througout much of Asia. Cytomixis and meiotic abnormalities during microsporogenesis were found in two populations of H. cordata with different ploidy levels (2n = 38, 96). Cytomixis occurred in pollen mother cells during meiosis at high frequencies and with variable degrees of chromatin/chromosome transfer. Meiotic abnormalities, such as chromosome laggards, asymmetric segregation and polyads, also prevailed in pollen mother cells at metaphase of the first division and later stages. They were caused by cytomixis and resulted in very low pollen viability and male sterility. Pollen mother cells from the population with 2n = 38 showed only simultaneous cytokinesis, but most pollen mother cells from the population with 2n = 96 showed successive cytokinesis; a minority underwent simultaneous cytokinesis. Cytomixis and irregular meiotic divisions appear to be the origin of the intraspecific polyploidy in this species, which has large variations in chromosome numbers. PMID:22290472

  20. From network structure to network reorganization: implications for adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider-Mizell, Casey M.; Parent, Jack M.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Zochowski, Michal R.; Sander, Leonard M.

    2010-12-01

    Networks can be dynamical systems that undergo functional and structural reorganization. One example of such a process is adult hippocampal neurogenesis, in which new cells are continuously born and incorporate into the existing network of the dentate gyrus region of the hippocampus. Many of these introduced cells mature and become indistinguishable from established neurons, joining the existing network. Activity in the network environment is known to promote birth, survival and incorporation of new cells. However, after epileptogenic injury, changes to the connectivity structure around the neurogenic niche are known to correlate with aberrant neurogenesis. The possible role of network-level changes in the development of epilepsy is not well understood. In this paper, we use a computational model to investigate how the structural and functional outcomes of network reorganization, driven by addition of new cells during neurogenesis, depend on the original network structure. We find that there is a stable network topology that allows the network to incorporate new neurons in a manner that enhances activity of the persistently active region, but maintains global network properties. In networks having other connectivity structures, new cells can greatly alter the distribution of firing activity and destroy the initial activity patterns. We thus find that new cells are able to provide focused enhancement of network only for small-world networks with sufficient inhibition. Network-level deviations from this topology, such as those caused by epileptogenic injury, can set the network down a path that develops toward pathological dynamics and aberrant structural integration of new cells.

  1. Congruency of body-related information induces somatosensory reorganization.

    PubMed

    Cardini, Flavia; Longo, Matthew R

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain and impaired tactile sensitivity are frequently associated with "blurred" representations in the somatosensory cortex. The factors that produce such somatosensory blurring, however, remain poorly understood. We manipulated visuo-tactile congruence to investigate its role in promoting somatosensory reorganization. To this aim we used the mirror box illusion that produced in participants the subjective feeling of looking directly at their left hand, though they were seeing the reflection of their right hand. Simultaneous touches were applied to the middle or ring finger of each hand. In one session, the same fingers were touched (for example both middle fingers), producing a congruent percept; in the other session different fingers were touched, producing an incongruent percept. In the somatosensory system, suppressive interactions between adjacent stimuli are an index of intracortical inhibitory function. After each congruent and incongruent session, we recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEPs) elicited by electrocutaneous stimulation of the left ring and middle fingers, either individually or simultaneously. A somatosensory suppression index (SSI) was calculated as the difference in amplitude between the sum of potentials evoked by the two individually stimulated fingers and the potentials evoked by simultaneous stimulation of both fingers. This SSI can be taken as an index of the strength of inhibitory interactions and consequently can provide a measure of how distinct the representations of the two fingers are. Results showed stronger SSI in the P100 component after congruent than incongruent stimulation, suggesting the key role of congruent sensory information about the body in inducing somatosensory reorganization. PMID:26902158

  2. Parallel evolution of transcriptome architecture during genome reorganization.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sung Ho; Reiss, David J; Bare, J Christopher; Tenenbaum, Dan; Pan, Min; Slagel, Joseph; Moritz, Robert L; Lim, Sujung; Hackett, Murray; Menon, Angeli Lal; Adams, Michael W W; Barnebey, Adam; Yannone, Steven M; Leigh, John A; Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-11-01

    Assembly of genes into operons is generally viewed as an important process during the continual adaptation of microbes to changing environmental challenges. However, the genome reorganization events that drive this process are also the roots of instability for existing operons. We have determined that there exists a statistically significant trend that correlates the proportion of genes encoded in operons in archaea to their phylogenetic lineage. We have further characterized how microbes deal with operon instability by mapping and comparing transcriptome architectures of four phylogenetically diverse extremophiles that span the range of operon stabilities observed across archaeal lineages: a photoheterotrophic halophile (Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1), a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (Methanococcus maripaludis S2), an acidophilic and aerobic thermophile (Sulfolobus solfataricus P2), and an anaerobic hyperthermophile (Pyrococcus furiosus DSM 3638). We demonstrate how the evolution of transcriptional elements (promoters and terminators) generates new operons, restores the coordinated regulation of translocated, inverted, and newly acquired genes, and introduces completely novel regulation for even some of the most conserved operonic genes such as those encoding subunits of the ribosome. The inverse correlation (r=-0.92) between the proportion of operons with such internally located transcriptional elements and the fraction of conserved operons in each of the four archaea reveals an unprecedented view into varying stages of operon evolution. Importantly, our integrated analysis has revealed that organisms adapted to higher growth temperatures have lower tolerance for genome reorganization events that disrupt operon structures. PMID:21750103

  3. Self-repairing symmetry in jellyfish through mechanically driven reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Michael J.; Basinger, Ty; Yuan, William; Guo, Chin-Lin; Goentoro, Lea

    2015-01-01

    What happens when an animal is injured and loses important structures? Some animals simply heal the wound, whereas others are able to regenerate lost parts. In this study, we report a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair, where moon jellyfish respond to injuries by reorganizing existing parts, and rebuilding essential body symmetry, without regenerating what is lost. Specifically, in response to arm amputation, the young jellyfish of Aurelia aurita rearrange their remaining arms, recenter their manubria, and rebuild their muscular networks, all completed within 12 hours to 4 days. We call this process symmetrization. We find that symmetrization is not driven by external cues, cell proliferation, cell death, and proceeded even when foreign arms were grafted on. Instead, we find that forces generated by the muscular network are essential. Inhibiting pulsation using muscle relaxants completely, and reversibly, blocked symmetrization. Furthermore, we observed that decreasing pulse frequency using muscle relaxants slowed symmetrization, whereas increasing pulse frequency by lowering the magnesium concentration in seawater accelerated symmetrization. A mathematical model that describes the compressive forces from the muscle contraction, within the context of the elastic response from the mesoglea and the ephyra geometry, can recapitulate the recovery of global symmetry. Thus, self-repair in Aurelia proceeds through the reorganization of existing parts, and is driven by forces generated by its own propulsion machinery. We find evidence for symmetrization across species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). PMID:26080418

  4. Self-repairing symmetry in jellyfish through mechanically driven reorganization.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Michael J; Basinger, Ty; Yuan, William; Guo, Chin-Lin; Goentoro, Lea

    2015-06-30

    What happens when an animal is injured and loses important structures? Some animals simply heal the wound, whereas others are able to regenerate lost parts. In this study, we report a previously unidentified strategy of self-repair, where moon jellyfish respond to injuries by reorganizing existing parts, and rebuilding essential body symmetry, without regenerating what is lost. Specifically, in response to arm amputation, the young jellyfish of Aurelia aurita rearrange their remaining arms, recenter their manubria, and rebuild their muscular networks, all completed within 12 hours to 4 days. We call this process symmetrization. We find that symmetrization is not driven by external cues, cell proliferation, cell death, and proceeded even when foreign arms were grafted on. Instead, we find that forces generated by the muscular network are essential. Inhibiting pulsation using muscle relaxants completely, and reversibly, blocked symmetrization. Furthermore, we observed that decreasing pulse frequency using muscle relaxants slowed symmetrization, whereas increasing pulse frequency by lowering the magnesium concentration in seawater accelerated symmetrization. A mathematical model that describes the compressive forces from the muscle contraction, within the context of the elastic response from the mesoglea and the ephyra geometry, can recapitulate the recovery of global symmetry. Thus, self-repair in Aurelia proceeds through the reorganization of existing parts, and is driven by forces generated by its own propulsion machinery. We find evidence for symmetrization across species of jellyfish (Chrysaora pacifica, Mastigias sp., and Cotylorhiza tuberculata). PMID:26080418

  5. What Is the Nature of Poststroke Language Recovery and Reorganization?

    PubMed Central

    Kiran, Swathi

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on three main topics related to the nature of poststroke language recovery and reorganization. The first topic pertains to the nature of anatomical and physiological substrates in the infarcted hemisphere in poststroke aphasia, including the nature of the hemodynamic response in patients with poststroke aphasia, the nature of the peri-infarct tissue, and the neuronal plasticity potential in the infarcted hemisphere. The second section of the paper reviews the current neuroimaging evidence for language recovery in the acute, subacute, and chronic stages of recovery. The third and final section examines changes in connectivity as a function of recovery in poststroke aphasia, specifically in terms of changes in white matter connectivity, changes in functional effective connectivity, and changes in resting state connectivity after stroke. While much progress has been made in our understanding of language recovery, more work needs to be done. Future studies will need to examine whether reorganization of language in poststroke aphasia corresponds to a tighter, more coherent, and efficient network of residual and new regions in the brain. Answering these questions will go a long way towards being able to predict which patients are likely to recover and may benefit from future rehabilitation. PMID:23320190

  6. Ex-vivo assessment of chronic toxicity of low levels of cadmium on testicular meiotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffroy-Siraudin, Cendrine; Perrard, Marie-Hélène; Ghalamoun-Slaimi, Rahma; Ali, Sazan; Chaspoul, Florence; Lanteaume, André; Achard, Vincent; Gallice, Philippe; Durand, Philippe; and others

    2012-08-01

    Using a validated model of culture of rat seminiferous tubules, we assessed the effects of 0.1, 1 and 10 μg/L cadmium (Cd) on spermatogenic cells over a 2‐week culture period. With concentrations of 1 and 10 μg/L in the culture medium, the Cd concentration in the cells, determined by ICP-MS, increased with concentration in the medium and the day of culture. Flow cytometric analysis enabled us to evaluate changes in the number of Sertoli cells and germ cells during the culture period. The number of Sertoli cells did not appear to be affected by Cd. By contrast, spermatogonia and meiotic cells were decreased by 1 and 10 μg/L Cd in a time and dose dependent manner. Stage distribution of the meiotic prophase I and qualitative study of the synaptonemal complexes (SC) at the pachytene stage were performed by immunocytochemistry with an anti SCP3 antibody. Cd caused a time-and-dose-dependent increase of total abnormalities, of fragmented SC and of asynapsis from concentration of 0.1 μg/L. Additionally, we observed a new SC abnormality, the “motheaten” SC. This abnormality is frequently associated with asynapsis and SC widening which increased with both the Cd concentration and the duration of exposure. This abnormality suggests that Cd disrupts the structure and function of proteins involved in pairing and/or meiotic recombination. These results show that Cd induces dose-and-time-dependent alterations of the meiotic process of spermatogenesis ex-vivo, and that the lowest metal concentration, which induces an adverse effect, may vary with the cell parameter studied. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium induces ex-vivo severe time- and dose-dependent germ cell abnormalities. ► Cadmium at very low concentration (0.1 µg/l) induces synaptonemal complex abnormalities. ► The lowest concentration inducing adverse effect varied with the cell parameter studied. ► Cadmium alters proteins involved in pairing and recombination. ► Cadmium leads to achiasmate univalents and

  7. MOUSE VERSUS RAT: PROFOUND DIFFERENCES IN MEIOTIC REGULATION AT THE LEVEL OF THE ISOLATED OOCYTE

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    Cumulus cell-enclosed oocytes (CEO), denuded oocytes (DO) or dissected follicles were obtained 44–48 h after priming immature mice (20–23-days-old) with 5 IU or immature rats (25–27-days-old) with 12.5 IU of equine chorionic gonadotropin, and exposed to a variety of culture conditions. Mouse oocytes were more effectively maintained in meiotic arrest by hypoxanthine, dbcAMP, IBMX, milrinone, and 8-Br-cGMP. The guanylate cyclase activator, atrial natriuretic peptide, suppressed maturation in CEO from both species, but mycophenolic acid reversed IBMX-maintained meiotic arrest in mouse CEO with little activity in rat CEO. IBMX-arrested mouse, but not rat, CEO were induced to undergo germinal vesicle breakdown (GVB) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and amphiregulin, while human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was ineffective in both species. Nevertheless, FSH and amphiregulin stimulated cumulus expansion in both species. FSH and hCG were both effective inducers of GVB in cultured mouse and rat follicles while amphiregulin was stimulatory only in mouse follicles. Changing the culture medium or altering macromolecular supplementation had no effect on FSH-induced maturation in rat CEO. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, AICAR, was a potent stimulator of maturation in mouse CEO and DO, but only marginally stimulatory in rat CEO and ineffective in rat DO. The AMPK inhibitor, compound C, blocked meiotic induction more effectively in hCG-treated mouse follicles and heat-treated mouse CEO. Both agents produced contrasting results on polar body formation in cultured CEO in the two species. Active AMPK was detected in germinal vesicles of immature mouse, but not rat, oocytes prior to hCG-induced maturation in vivo; it colocalized with chromatin after GVB in rat and mouse oocytes, but did not appear at the spindle poles in rat oocytes as it did in mouse oocytes. Finally, cultured mouse and rat CEO displayed disparate maturation responses to energy substrate

  8. How does Xenopus oocyte acquire its competence to undergo meiotic maturation?

    PubMed

    Jessus, Catherine; Ozon, René

    2004-04-01

    During Xenopus oogenesis, the follicle-enclosed oocyte, arrested at the diplotene stage of meiotic prophase, accumulates pre-MPF. Pre-MPF is an heterodimer formed of cyclin B2 and Cdc2 protein kinase, which is maintained inactive by inhibitory phosphorylations on Thr14 and Tyr15. When the oocyte reaches its full size, it becomes competent to respond to progesterone and to activate MPF through a positive feedback loop. In this paper, we present experimental data indicating that the molecular network involved in the autoamplification loop of MPF is progressively established during late oogenesis. PMID:15182701

  9. Morphology, Conjugation, and Postconjugational Reorganization of Dileptus tirjakovae n. sp. (Ciliophora, Haptoria)

    PubMed Central

    VĎAČNÝ, PETER; FOISSNER, WILHELM

    2010-01-01

    We studied the morphology, conjugation, and postconjugational reorganization of a new haptorid ciliate, Dileptus tirjakovae n. sp., using conventional methods. Dileptus tirjakovae is characterized by two abutting, globular macronuclear nodules and scattered brush kinetids. Conjugation is similar to that in congeners, that is, it is temporary, heteropolar, and the partners unite bulge-to-bulge with the proboscis. Some peculiarities occur in the nuclear processes: there are two synkaryon divisions producing four synkaryon derivatives, of which two become macronuclear anlagen, one becomes the micronucleus, and one degenerates. Unlike spathidiids, D. tirjakovae shows massive changes in body shape and ciliary pattern before, during, and after conjugation: early and late conjugants as well as early exconjugants resemble Spathidium, while mid-conjugants resemble Enchelyodon. These data give support to the hypothesis that spathidiids evolved from a Dileptus-like ancestor by reduction of the proboscis. Dileptus tirjakovae exconjugants differ from vegetative cells by their smaller size, stouter body, shorter proboscis, and by the lower number of ciliary rows, suggesting one or several postconjugation divisions. Although 83% of the exconjugants have the vegetative nuclear pattern, some strongly deviating specimens occur and might be mistaken for distinct species, especially because exconjugants are less than half as long as vegetative cells. PMID:19017064

  10. Involvement of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fan, Heng-Yu; Huo, Li-Jun; Meng, Xiao-Qian; Zhong, Zhi-Sheng; Hou, Yi; Chen, Da-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2003-11-01

    Calcium signal is important for the regulation of meiotic cell cycle in oocytes, but its downstream mechanism is not well known. The functional roles of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in meiotic maturation and activation of pig oocytes were studied by drug treatment, Western blot analysis, kinase activity assay, indirect immunostaining, and confocal microscopy. The results indicated that meiotic resumption of both cumulus-enclosed and denuded oocytes was prevented by CaMKII inhibitor KN-93, Ant-AIP-II, or CaM antagonist W7 in a dose-dependent manner, but only germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) of denuded oocytes was inhibited by membrane permeable Ca2+ chelator BAPTA-AM. When the oocytes were treated with KN-93, W7, or BAPTA-AM after GVBD, the first polar body emission was inhibited. A quick elevation of CaMKII activity was detected after electrical activation of mature pig oocytes, which could be prevented by the pretreatment of CaMKII inhibitors. Treatment of oocytes with KN-93 or W7 resulted in the inhibition of pronuclear formation. The possible regulation of CaMKII on maturation promoting factor (MPF), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and ribosome S6 protein kinase (p90rsk) during meiotic cell cycles of pig oocytes was also studied. KN-93 and W7 prevented the accumulation of cyclin B and the full phosphorylation of MAPK and p90rsk during meiotic maturation. When CaMKII activity was inhibited during parthenogenetic activation, cyclin B, the regulatory subunit of MPF, failed to be degraded, but MAPK and p90rsk were quickly dephosphorylated and degraded. Confocal microscopy revealed that CaM and CaMKII were localized to the nucleus and the periphery of the GV stage oocytes. Both proteins were concentrated to the condensed chromosomes after GVBD. In oocytes at the meiotic metaphase MI or MII stage, CaM distributed on the whole spindle, but CaMKII was localized only on the spindle poles. After transition into anaphase, both proteins

  11. Mouse Sycp1 functions in synaptonemal complex assembly, meiotic recombination, and XY body formation

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Femke A.T.; de Boer, Esther; van den Bosch, Mike; Baarends, Willy M.; Ooms, Marja; Yuan, Li; Liu, Jian-Guo; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Heyting, Christa; Pastink, Albert

    2005-01-01

    In meiotic prophase, synaptonemal complexes (SCs) closely appose homologous chromosomes (homologs) along their length. SCs are assembled from two axial elements (AEs), one along each homolog, which are connected by numerous transverse filaments (TFs). We disrupted the mouse gene encoding TF protein Sycp1 to analyze the role of TFs in meiotic chromosome behavior and recombination. Sycp1-/- mice are infertile, but otherwise healthy. Sycp1-/- spermatocytes form normal AEs, which align homologously, but do not synapse. Most Sycp1-/- spermatocytes arrest in pachynema, whereas a small proportion reaches diplonema, or, exceptionally, metaphase I. In leptotene Sycp1-/- spermatocytes, γH2AX (indicative of DNA damage, including double-strand breaks) appears normal. In pachynema, Sycp1-/- spermatocytes display a number of discrete γH2AX domains along each chromosome, whereas γH2AX disappears from autosomes in wild-type spermatocytes. RAD51/DMC1, RPA, and MSH4 foci (which mark early and intermediate steps in pairing/recombination) appear in similar numbers as in wild type, but do not all disappear, and MLH1 and MLH3 foci (which mark late steps in crossing over) are not formed. Crossovers were rare in metaphase I of Sycp1-/- mice. We propose that SYCP1 has a coordinating role, and ensures formation of crossovers. Unexpectedly, Sycp1-/- spermatocytes did not form XY bodies. PMID:15937223

  12. Molecular Basis for Enhancement of the Meiotic DMCI Recombinase by RAD51AP1

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Kauppi, Liisa; San Filippo, Joseph San; Wiese, Claudia; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Begovic, Sead; Schild, David; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Sung, Patrick

    2010-11-05

    Homologous recombination is needed for meiotic chromosome segregation, genome maintenance, and tumor suppression. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) has been shown to interact with and enhance the recombinase activity of RAD51. Accordingly, genetic ablation of RAD51AP1 leads to enhanced sensitivity to and also chromosome aberrations upon DNA damage, demonstrating a role for RAD51AP1 in mitotic homologous recombination. Here we show physical association of RAD51AP1 with the meiosis-specific recombinase DMC1 and a stimulatory effect of RAD51AP1 on the DMC1-mediated D-loop reaction. Mechanistic studies have revealed that RAD51AP1 enhances the ability of the DMC1 presynaptic filament to capture the duplex DNA partner and to assemble the synaptic complex, in which the recombining DNA strands are homologously aligned. We also provide evidence that functional co-operation is dependent on complex formation between DMC1 and RAD51AP1, and that distinct epitopes in RAD51AP1 mediate interactions with RAD51 and DMC1. Finally, we show that RAD51AP1 is expressed in mouse testes, and that RAD51AP1 foci co-localize with a subset of DMC1 foci in spermatocytes. These results suggest that RAD51AP1 also serves an important role in meiotic homologous recombination.

  13. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In particular, our knowledge of MT kinetics during the sperm-producing male meiotic divisions remains in its infancy. In this study, I use an easy-to-implement photobleaching-based assay for measuring spindle MT dynamics in primary cultures of meiotic spermatocytes isolated from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By use of standard scanning confocal microscopy features, fiducial marks were photobleached on fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged MTs. These were followed by time-lapse imaging during different division stages, and their displacement rates were calculated using public domain software. I find that k-fibers continually shorten at their poles during metaphase and anaphase A through the process of MT flux. Anaphase chromosome movement is complemented by Pac-Man, the shortening of the k-fiber at its chromosomal interface. Thus, Drosophila spermatocytes share the sites of spindle dynamism and mechanisms of chromosome movement with mitotic cells. The data reveal the applicability of the photobleaching assay for measuring MT dynamics in primary cultures. This approach can be readily applied to other systems. PMID:25802491

  14. Sirt3 prevents maternal obesity-associated oxidative stress and meiotic defects in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Han, Longsen; Ma, Rujun; Hou, Xiaojing; Yu, Yang; Sun, Shaochen; Xu, Yinxue; Schedl, Tim; Moley, Kelle H; Wang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Maternal obese environment has been reported to induce oxidative stress and meiotic defects in oocytes, however the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, using mice fed a high fat diet (HFD) as an obesity model, we first detected enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) content and reduced Sirt3 expression in HFD oocytes. We further observed that specific depletion of Sirt3 in control oocytes elevates ROS levels while Sirt3 overexpression attenuates ROS production in HFD oocytes, with significant suppression of spindle disorganization and chromosome misalignment phenotypes that have been reported in the obesity model. Candidate screening revealed that the acetylation status of lysine 68 on superoxide dismutase (SOD2K68) is dependent on Sirt3 deacetylase activity in oocytes, and acetylation-mimetic mutant SOD2K68Q results in almost threefold increase in intracellular ROS. Moreover, we found that acetylation levels of SOD2K68 are increased by ∼80% in HFD oocytes and importantly, that the non-acetylatable-mimetic mutant SOD2K68R is capable of partially rescuing their deficient phenotypes. Together, our data identify Sirt3 as an important player in modulating ROS homeostasis during oocyte development, and indicate that Sirt3-dependent deacetylation of SOD2 plays a protective role against oxidative stress and meiotic defects in oocytes under maternal obese conditions. PMID:25790176

  15. Differentiating the roles of microtubule-associated proteins at meiotic kinetochores during chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Kakui, Yasutaka; Sato, Masamitsu

    2016-06-01

    Meiosis is a specialised cell division process for generating gametes. In contrast to mitosis, meiosis involves recombination followed by two consecutive rounds of cell division, meiosis I and II. A vast field of research has been devoted to understanding the differences between mitotic and meiotic cell divisions from the viewpoint of chromosome behaviour. For faithful inheritance of paternal and maternal genetic information to offspring, two events are indispensable: meiotic recombination, which generates a physical link between homologous chromosomes, and reductional segregation, in which homologous chromosomes move towards opposite poles, thereby halving the ploidy. The cytoskeleton and its regulators play specialised roles in meiosis to accomplish these divisions. Recent studies have shown that microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), including tumour overexpressed gene (TOG), play unique roles during meiosis. Furthermore, the conserved mitotic protein kinase Polo modulates MAP localisation in meiosis I. As Polo is a well-known regulator of reductional segregation in meiosis, the evidence suggests that Polo constitutes a plausible link between meiosis-specific MAP functions and reductional segregation. Here, we review the latest findings on how the localisation and regulation of MAPs in meiosis differ from those in mitosis, and we discuss conservation of the system between yeast and higher eukaryotes. PMID:26383111

  16. DNA methylation epigenetically silences crossover hot spots and controls chromosomal domains of meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Yelina, Nataliya E.; Lambing, Christophe; Hardcastle, Thomas J.; Zhao, Xiaohui; Santos, Bruno; Henderson, Ian R.

    2015-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which is typically concentrated in narrow hot spots that are controlled by genetic and epigenetic information. Arabidopsis chromosomes are highly DNA methylated in the repetitive centromeres, which are also crossover-suppressed. Here we demonstrate that RNA-directed DNA methylation is sufficient to locally silence Arabidopsis euchromatic crossover hot spots and is associated with increased nucleosome density and H3K9me2. However, loss of CG DNA methylation maintenance in met1 triggers epigenetic crossover remodeling at the chromosome scale, with pericentromeric decreases and euchromatic increases in recombination. We used recombination mutants that alter interfering and noninterfering crossover repair pathways (fancm and zip4) to demonstrate that remodeling primarily involves redistribution of interfering crossovers. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing, we show that crossover remodeling is driven by loss of CG methylation within the centromeric regions. Using cytogenetics, we profiled meiotic DNA double-strand break (DSB) foci in met1 and found them unchanged relative to wild type. We propose that met1 chromosome structure is altered, causing centromere-proximal DSBs to be inhibited from maturation into interfering crossovers. These data demonstrate that DNA methylation is sufficient to silence crossover hot spots and plays a key role in establishing domains of meiotic recombination along chromosomes. PMID:26494791

  17. Mutant Rec-1 Eliminates the Meiotic Pattern of Crossing over in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zetka, M. C.; Rose, A. M.

    1995-01-01

    Meiotic crossovers are not randomly distributed along the chromosome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the central portions of the autosomes have relatively few crossovers compared to the flanking regions. We have measured the frequency of crossing over for several intervals across chromosome I in strains mutant for rec-1. The chromosome is ~50 map units in both wild-type and rec-1 homozygotes, however, the distribution of exchanges is very different in rec-1. Map distances expand across the gene cluster and contract near the right end of the chromosome, resulting in a genetic map more consistent with the physical map. Mutations in two other genes, him-6 and him-14, also disrupted the distribution of exchanges. Unlike rec-1, individuals homozygous for him-6 and him-14 had an overall reduction in the amount of crossing over accompanied by a high frequency of nondisjunction and reduced egg hatching. In rec-1; him-6 and rec-1; him-14 homozygotes the frequency of crossing over was characteristic of the Him mutant phenotype, whereas the distribution of the reduced number of exchanges was characteristic of the Rec-1 pattern. It appears that these gene products play a role in establishing the meiotic pattern of exchange events. PMID:8601478

  18. A light- and electron microscopic analysis of meiotic prophase in female mice.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, A J; Mulder, R J

    1983-01-01

    In the paper we describe meiotic prophase of female mice on successive days of embryonic and early postnatal development. For this purpose we used three different techniques on ovarian material, i.e., Giemsa staining for the light microscopic study of chromatin, silver staining for the light microscopic study of the synaptonemal complex (SC), and agar filtration followed by uranyl acetate staining for the electron microscopic study of the SC. In all types of preparation it was impossible to distinguish leptotene stages, and we conclude that if leptotene really exists, it is of very short duration.--Two types of zygotene stages were found: the "normal" one, resembling zygotene stages in male mice, and a second type that has never been described in males and is characterized by, probably stable, unpaired regions together with totally unpaired axial elements of the SC.--The duration of pachytene was found to be 3-4 days, which is considerably shorter than in males. During early diplotene despiralization of the chromatin and disintegration of the axes of the SC were usually found together with desynapsis.--A considerable variation in distribution of meiotic stages was found between different litters in the same day of gestation. Fetuses in the same litter showed no significant variation. However, the oocytes in an ovary did not pass through meiosis synchronously, with differences up several days. The appearance of chromosomes in a highly contracted state could not be interpreted as a preleptotene condensation stage but probably is a mitotic phenomenon. PMID:6197255

  19. APCFZR1 prevents nondisjunction in mouse oocytes by controlling meiotic spindle assembly timing

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Janet E.; Lane, Simon I. R.; Jennings, Phoebe; García-Higuera, Irene; Moreno, Sergio; Jones, Keith T.

    2012-01-01

    FZR1 is an anaphase-promoting complex (APC) activator best known for its role in the mitotic cell cycle at M-phase exit, in G1, and in maintaining genome integrity. Previous studies also established that it prevents meiotic resumption, equivalent to the G2/M transition. Here we report that mouse oocytes lacking FZR1 undergo passage through meiosis I that is accelerated by ∼1 h, and this is due to an earlier onset of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) satisfaction and APCCDC20 activity. However, loss of FZR1 did not compromise SAC functionality; instead, earlier SAC satisfaction was achieved because the bipolar meiotic spindle was assembled more quickly in the absence of FZR1. This novel regulation of spindle assembly by FZR1 led to premature bivalent attachment to microtubules and loss of kinetochore-bound MAD2. Bivalents, however, were observed to congress poorly, leading to nondisjunction rates of 25%. We conclude that in mouse oocytes FZR1 controls the timing of assembly of the bipolar spindle and in so doing the timing of SAC satisfaction and APCCDC20 activity. This study implicates FZR1 as a major regulator of prometaphase whose activity helps to prevent chromosome nondisjunction. PMID:22918942

  20. Lack of evidence for association of meiotic nondisjunction with particular DNA haplotypes on chromosome 21.

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, N; Gusella, J F; Perroni, L; Bricarelli, F D; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    The hypothesis of a predisposition to meiotic nondisjunction for chromosome 21 carrying a specific molecular haplotype has been tested. The haplotype in question is defined by the restriction fragment length polymorphisms for the D21S1/D21S11 loci. Our results obtained on a sample of Northern Italian families with the occurrence of trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) failed to support this hypothesis, contradicting a previous study [Antonarakis, S. E., Kittur, S. D., Metaxotou, C., Watkins, P. C. & Patel, A. S. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 3360-3364]. These findings rule out an association between any specific D21S1/D21S11 haplotype (as well as other haplotypes for the D21S13, ETS2, and D21S23 loci) and a putative cis-acting genetic element favoring the meiotic missegregation of chromosome 21. For this reason, no preventive screening for couples at risk for trisomy 21 may be based on any of the haplotypes tested. Images PMID:2898783

  1. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity. PMID:27494704

  2. Kdm5/Lid Regulates Chromosome Architecture in Meiotic Prophase I Independently of Its Histone Demethylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhaunova, Liudmila; Ohkura, Hiroyuki; Breuer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    During prophase of the first meiotic division (prophase I), chromatin dynamically reorganises to recombine and prepare for chromosome segregation. Histone modifying enzymes are major regulators of chromatin structure, but our knowledge of their roles in prophase I is still limited. Here we report on crucial roles of Kdm5/Lid, one of two histone demethylases in Drosophila that remove one of the trimethyl groups at Lys4 of Histone 3 (H3K4me3). In the absence of Kdm5/Lid, the synaptonemal complex was only partially formed and failed to be maintained along chromosome arms, while localisation of its components at centromeres was unaffected. Kdm5/Lid was also required for karyosome formation and homologous centromere pairing in prophase I. Although loss of Kdm5/Lid dramatically increased the level of H3K4me3 in oocytes, catalytically inactive Kdm5/Lid can rescue the above cytological defects. Therefore Kdm5/Lid controls chromatin architecture in meiotic prophase I oocytes independently of its demethylase activity. PMID:27494704

  3. High Resolution Analysis of Meiotic Chromosome Structure and Behaviour in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Dylan; Nibau, Candida; Wnetrzak, Joanna; Jenkins, Glyn

    2012-01-01

    Reciprocal crossing over and independent assortment of chromosomes during meiosis generate most of the genetic variation in sexually reproducing organisms. In barley, crossovers are confined primarily to distal regions of the chromosomes, which means that a substantial proportion of the genes of this crop rarely, if ever, engage in recombination events. There is potentially much to be gained by redistributing crossovers to more proximal regions, but our ability to achieve this is dependent upon a far better understanding of meiosis in this species. This study explores the meiotic process by describing with unprecedented resolution the early behaviour of chromosomal domains, the progression of synapsis and the structure of the synaptonemal complex (SC). Using a combination of molecular cytogenetics and advanced fluorescence imaging, we show for the first time in this species that non-homologous centromeres are coupled prior to synapsis. We demonstrate that at early meiotic prophase the loading of the SC-associated structural protein ASY1, the cluster of telomeres, and distal synaptic initiation sites occupy the same polarised region of the nucleus. Through the use of advanced 3D image analysis, we show that synapsis is driven predominantly from the telomeres, and that new synaptic initiation sites arise during zygotene. In addition, we identified two different SC configurations through the use of super-resolution 3D structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM). PMID:22761818

  4. A critical component of meiotic drive in Neurospora is located near a chromosome rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Austin M; Rehard, David G; Groskreutz, Katie M; Kuntz, Danielle R; Sharp, Kevin J; Shiu, Patrick K T; Hammond, Thomas M

    2014-08-01

    Neurospora fungi harbor a group of meiotic drive elements known as Spore killers (Sk). Spore killer-2 (Sk-2) and Spore killer-3 (Sk-3) are two Sk elements that map to a region of suppressed recombination. Although this recombination block is limited to crosses between Sk and Sk-sensitive (Sk(S)) strains, its existence has hindered Sk characterization. Here we report the circumvention of this obstacle by combining a classical genetic screen with next-generation sequencing technology and three-point crossing assays. This approach has allowed us to identify a novel locus called rfk-1, mutation of which disrupts spore killing by Sk-2. We have mapped rfk-1 to a 45-kb region near the right border of the Sk-2 element, a location that also harbors an 11-kb insertion (Sk-2(INS1)) and part of a >220-kb inversion (Sk-2(INV1)). These are the first two chromosome rearrangements to be formally identified in a Neurospora Sk element, providing evidence that they are at least partially responsible for Sk-based recombination suppression. Additionally, the proximity of these chromosome rearrangements to rfk-1 (a critical component of the spore-killing mechanism) suggests that they have played a key role in the evolution of meiotic drive in Neurospora. PMID:24931406

  5. High-resolution mapping of meiotic crossovers and noncrossovers in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Mancera, Eugenio; Bourgon, Richard; Brozzi, Alessandro; Huber, Wolfgang; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2009-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a central role in the evolution of sexually reproducing organisms. The two recombination outcomes, crossover (CO) and noncrossover (NCO), increase genetic diversity, but have the potential to homogenize alleles by gene conversion. While CO rates are known to vary considerably across the genome, NCOs and gene conversions have only been identified in a handful of loci. To examine recombination genome-wide and at high spatial resolution, we generated maps of COs, CO-associated gene conversion and NCO gene conversion using dense genetic marker data collected from all four products of 56 yeast meioses. Our maps reveal differences in the distributions of COs and NCOs, showing more regions where either COs or NCOs are favoured than expected by chance. Furthermore, we detect evidence for interference between COs and NCOs, a phenomenon previously only known to occur between COs. Up to 1% of the genome of each meiotic product is subject to gene conversion in a single meiosis, with detectable bias towards GC nucleotides. The maps represent the first high-resolution, genome-wide characterization of the multiple outcomes of recombination in any organism. In addition, because NCO hot spots create holes of reduced linkage within haplotype blocks, our results stress the need to incorporate NCOs into genetic linkage analysis. PMID:18615017

  6. Mouse BRWD1 is critical for spermatid postmeiotic transcription and female meiotic chromosome stability

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Shrivatsav; Baumann, Claudia; Guisado, Daniela; Eppig, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Postmeiotic gene expression is essential for development and maturation of sperm and eggs. We report that the dual bromodomain-containing protein BRWD1, which is essential for both male and female fertility, promotes haploid spermatid–specific transcription but has distinct roles in oocyte meiotic progression. Brwd1 deficiency caused down-regulation of ∼300 mostly spermatid-specific transcripts in testis, including nearly complete elimination of those encoding the protamines and transition proteins, but was not associated with global epigenetic changes in chromatin, which suggests that BRWD1 acts selectively. In females, Brwd1 ablation caused severe chromosome condensation and structural defects associated with abnormal telomere structure but only minor changes in gene expression at the germinal vesicle stage, including more than twofold overexpression of the histone methyltransferase MLL5 and LINE-1 elements transposons. Thus, loss of BRWD1 function interferes with the completion of oogenesis and spermatogenesis through sexually dimorphic mechanisms: it is essential in females for epigenetic control of meiotic chromosome stability and in males for haploid gene transcription during postmeiotic sperm differentiation. PMID:25547156

  7. Detection of mitotic and meiotic aneuploidy in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Parry, J M; Sharp, D; Parry, E M

    1979-01-01

    A number of genetic systems are described which involve the use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The systems may be used to detect the production of aneuploid cells produced during both mitotic and meiotic cell division in the presence of genetically active chemicals. During mitotic cell division, monosomic colonies (2n - 1) may be detected by plating upon selective medium. Increases in such monosomic colonies are produced by exposure of cells to a number of chemical mutagens such as ethyl methane-sulfonate and mitomycin C. More importantly, monosomic colonies are also induced by nonmutagens such as sulfacetamide and saccharin, which suggests that such chemicals are capable of inducing aneuploidy (aneugenic) in the absence of mutagenic activity. Genetic analysis of aneuploid colonies produced on nonselective medium indicate that at least a proportion of the monosomic colonies were the result of mitotic nondisjunction. During meiotic cell division, disomic cells (n + 1) produced by chromosome nondisjunction may be detected by plating on selective media. The frequency of disomic cells has been shown to increase after exposure to p-fluorophenylalanine. PMID:387403

  8. B microchromosomes in the family Curimatidae (Characiformes): mitotic and meiotic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, Tatiane Ramos; Gravena, Waleska; Gouveia, Juceli Gonzalez; Giuliano-Caetano, Lucia; Dias, Ana Lúcia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In the present work, six curimatid species were analyzed: Cyphocharax voga (Hensel, 1870), Cyphocharax spilotus (Vari, 1987), Cyphocharax saladensis (Meinken, 1933), Cyphocharax modestus (Fernández-Yépez, 1948), Steindachnerina biornata (Braga & Azpelicueta, 1987) and Steindachnerina insculpta (Fernández-Yépez, 1948) collected from two hydrographic basins. All samples presented 2n=54 meta-submetacentric (m-sm) chromosomes and FN equal to 108, and 1 or 2 B microchromosomes in the mitotic and meiotic cells of the six sampled populations showing inter-and intraindividual variation. The analysis of the meiotic cells in Cyphocharax saladensis, Cyphocharax spilotus, and Cyphocharax voga showed a modal number of 54 chromosomes in the spermatogonial metaphases and 27 bivalents in the pachytene, diplotene, diakinesis and in metaphase I stages, and 27 chromosomes in metaphase II; in Cyphocharax modestus, Steindachnerina biornata, and Steindachnerina insculpta, spermatogonial metaphases with 54 chromosomes and pachytene and metaphase I with 27 bivalents were observed. The B microchromosome was observed as univalent in the spermatogonial metaphase of Cyphocharax spilotus, in the pachytene stage in the other species, with the exception of Cyphocharax saladensis, and Steindachnerina biornata in metaphase I. New occurrences of the B microchromosome in Cyphocharax voga, Cyphocharax saladensis and Steindachnerina biornata were observed, confirming that the presence of this type of chromosome is a striking characteristic of this group of fish. PMID:24260637

  9. Meiotic wave adds extra asymmetry to the development of female chicken gonads.

    PubMed

    de Melo Bernardo, Ana; Heeren, A Marijne; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Fernandes, Maria Gomes; He, Nannan; Anjie, Stafford; Noce, Toshiaki; Ramos, Ester Silveira; de Sousa Lopes, Susana M Chuva

    2015-10-01

    Development of female gonads in the chicken is asymmetric. This asymmetry affects gene expression, morphology, and germ cell development; consequently only the left ovary develops into a functional organ, whereas the right ovary remains vestigial. In males, on the other hand, both gonads develop into functional testes. Here, we revisited the development of asymmetric traits in female (and male) chicken gonads between Hamburger Hamilton stage 16 (HH16) and hatching. At HH16, primordial germ cells migrated preferentially to the left gonad, accumulating in the left coelomic hinge between the gut mesentery and developing gonad in both males and females. Using the meiotic markers SYCP3 and phosphorylated H2AFX, we identified a previously undescribed, pronounced asymmetryc meiotic progression in the germ cells located in the central, lateral, and extreme cortical regions of the left female gonad from HH38 until hatching. Moreover, we observed that--in contrast to the current view--medullary germ cells are not apoptotic, but remain arrested in pre-leptotene until hatching. In addition to the systematic analysis of the asymmetric distribution of germ cells in female chicken gonads, we propose an updated model suggesting that the localization of germ cells--in the left or right gonad; in the cortex or medulla of the left gonad; and in the central part or the extremities of the left cortex--has direct consequences for their development and participation in adult reproduction. PMID:26096940

  10. Genetic linkage between a sexually selected trait and X chromosome meiotic drive

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Philip M; Wolfenbarger, L. LaReesa; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies on the stalk-eyed fly, Cyrtodiopsis dalmanni, have shown that males with long eye-stalks win contests and are preferred by females, and artificial selection on male relative eye span alters brood sex-ratios. Subsequent theory proposes that X-linked meiotic drive can catalyse the evolution of mate preferences when drive is linked to ornament genes. Here we test this prediction by mapping meiotic drive and quantitative trait loci (QTL) for eye span. To map QTL we genotyped 24 microsatellite loci using 1228 F2 flies from two crosses between lines selected for long or short eye span. The crosses differed by presence or absence of a drive X chromosome, XD, in the parental male. Linkage analysis reveals that XD dramatically reduces recombination between X and XD chromosomes. In the XD cross, half of the F2 males carried the drive haplotype, produced partially elongated spermatids and female-biased broods, and had shorter eye span. The largest QTL mapped 1.3 cM from drive on the X chromosome and explained 36% of the variation in male eye span while another QTL mapped to an autosomal region that suppresses drive. These results indicate that selfish genetic elements that distort the sex-ratio can influence the evolution of exaggerated traits. PMID:16191622

  11. Drosophila ATM and ATR have distinct activities in the regulation of meiotic DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Eric F; Pedersen, Michael; Tiong, Stanley; White-Brown, Sanese K; Paul, Anshu; Campbell, Shelagh D; McKim, Kim S

    2011-10-31

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia-related (ATR) kinases are conserved regulators of cellular responses to double strand breaks (DSBs). During meiosis, however, the functions of these kinases in DSB repair and the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage checkpoint are unclear. In this paper, we show that ATM and ATR have unique roles in the repair of meiotic DSBs in Drosophila melanogaster. ATR mutant analysis indicated that it is required for checkpoint activity, whereas ATM may not be. Both kinases phosphorylate H2AV (γ-H2AV), and, using this as a reporter for ATM/ATR activity, we found that the DSB repair response is surprisingly dynamic at the site of DNA damage. γ-H2AV is continuously exchanged, requiring new phosphorylation at the break site until repair is completed. However, most surprising is that the number of γ-H2AV foci is dramatically increased in the absence of ATM, but not ATR, suggesting that the number of DSBs is increased. Thus, we conclude that ATM is primarily required for the meiotic DSB repair response, which includes functions in DNA damage repair and negative feedback control over the level of programmed DSBs during meiosis. PMID:22024169

  12. Zearalenone exposure affects mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Xu, Yin-Xue; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a metabolite of Fusarium and is a common contaminant of grains and foodstuffs. ZEN acts as a xenoestrogen and is considered to be cytotoxic, tissue toxic, and genotoxic, which causes abortions and stillbirths in humans and animals. Since estrogens affect oocyte maturation during meiosis, in this study we investigated the effects of ZEN on mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation. Our results showed that ZEN-treated oocyte maturation rates were decreased, which might be due to the disrupted cytoskeletons: (1) ZEN treatment resulted in significantly more oocytes with abnormal spindle morphologies; (2) actin filament expression and distribution were also disrupted after ZEN treatment, which was confirmed by the aberrant distribution of actin regulatory proteins. In addition, cortical granule-free domains (CGFDs) were disrupted after ZEN treatment, which indicated that ZEN may affect mouse oocyte fertilization capability. ZEN reduced mouse granulosa cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by MTT assay and TUNEL apoptosis analysis, which may be another cause for the decreased oocyte maturation. Thus, our results demonstrated that exposure to zearalenone affected oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation in mouse. PMID:24733567

  13. Dis1: A Yeast Gene Required for Proper Meiotic Chromosome Disjunction

    PubMed Central

    Rockmill, B.; Fogel, S.

    1988-01-01

    Mutants at a newly identified locus, DIS1 (disjunction), were detected by screening for mutants that generate aneuploid spores (chromosome VIII disomes) at an increased frequency. Strains carrying the partially dominant alleles, DIS1-1 or DIS1-2, generate disomes at rates up to 100 times the background level. Mitotic nondisjunction is also increased 10- to 50-fold over background. Half-tetrad analysis of disomes for a marked interval on chromosome VIII yields wild-type map distances, indicating that a general recombination deficiency is not the cause of nondisjuction. Meiotic nondisjunction in DIS1 mutants is not chromosome specific; 5% of the spores disomic for chromosome VIII are also disomic for chromosome III. Although only one disomic spore is found per exceptional ascus most of the disomes appear to be generated in the first meiotic division because recovered chromosome VIII disomes contain mostly nonsister chromosomes. We propose that disome generation in the DIS1 mutants results from precocious separation of sister centromeres. PMID:3294101

  14. Meiotically Induced Rec7 and Rec8 Genes of Schizosaccharomyces Pombe

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y.; Larson, K. L.; Dorer, R.; Smith, G. R.

    1992-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe rec7 and rec8 genes, which are required for meiotic intragenic recombination but not for mitotic recombination, have been cloned and their DNA sequences determined. Genetic and physical analyses demonstrated that the cloned fragments contained the rec genes rather than rec mutation suppressors. A 1.6-kb DNA fragment contained a functional rec7 gene, and a 2.1-kb fragment contained a functional rec8 gene. The nucleotide sequences of these fragments revealed open reading frames predicting 249 amino acids for the rec7 gene product and 393 amino acids for the rec8 gene product. Northern hybridization analysis showed that both rec gene mRNAs were detectable only at 2-3 hr after induction of meiosis. The absence of these mRNAs in mitosis and their disappearance at 4 hr and later in meiosis suggest that the rec7 and rec8 gene products may be involved primarily in the early steps of meiotic recombination in S. pombe. PMID:1339382

  15. Competition between meiotic and apomictic pathways during ovule and seed development results in clonality.

    PubMed

    Hojsgaard, Diego H; Martínez, Eric J; Quarin, Camilo L

    2013-01-01

    Meiotic and apomictic reproductive pathways develop simultaneously in facultative aposporous species, and compete to form a seed as a final goal. This developmental competition was evaluated in tetraploid genotypes of Paspalum malacophyllum in order to understand the low level of sexuality in facultative apomictic populations. Cyto-embryology on ovules, flow cytometry on seeds and progeny tests by DNA fingerprinting were used to measure the relative incidence of each meiotic or apomictic pathway along four different stages of the plant's life cycle, namely the beginning and end of gametogenesis, seed formation and adult offspring. A high variation in the frequencies of sexual and apomictic pathways occurred at the first two stages. A trend of radical decline in realized sexuality was then observed. Sexual and apomictic seeds were produced, but the efficiency of the sexual pathway dropped drastically, and exclusively clonal offspring remained. Both reproductive pathways are unstable at the beginning of development, and only the apomictic one remains functional. Key factors reducing sexuality are the faster growth and parthenogenetic development in the aposporous pathway, and an (epi)genetically negative background related to the extensive gene de-regulation pattern responsible for apomixis. The effects of inbreeding depression during post-fertilization development may further decrease the frequency of effective sexuality. PMID:23127139

  16. The mismatch repair system reduces meiotic homeologous recombination and stimulates recombination-dependent chromosome loss.

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, S R; Hunter, N; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    1996-01-01

    Efficient genetic recombination requires near-perfect homology between participating molecules. Sequence divergence reduces the frequency of recombination, a process that is dependent on the activity of the mismatch repair system. The effects of chromosomal divergence in diploids of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which one copy of chromosome III is derived from a closely related species, Saccharomyces paradoxus, have been examined. Meiotic recombination between the diverged chromosomes is decreased by 25-fold. Spore viability is reduced with an observable increase in the number of tetrads with only two or three viable spores. Asci with only two viable spores are disomic for chromosome III, consistent with meiosis I nondisjunction of the homeologs. Asci with three viable spores are highly enriched for recombinants relative to tetrads with four viable spores. In 96% of the class with three viable spores, only one spore possesses a recombinant chromosome III, suggesting that the recombination process itself contributes to meiotic death. This phenomenon is dependent on the activities of the mismatch repair genes PMS1 and MSH2. A model of mismatch-stimulated chromosome loss is proposed to account for this observation. As expected, crossing over is increased in pms1 and msh2 mutants. Furthermore, genetic exchange in pms1 msh2 double mutants is affected to a greater extent than in either mutant alone, suggesting that the two proteins act independently to inhibit homeologous recombination. All mismatch repair-deficient strains exhibited reductions in the rate of chromosome III nondisjunction. PMID:8887641

  17. Using Photobleaching to Measure Spindle Microtubule Dynamics in Primary Cultures of Dividing Drosophila Meiotic Spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Savoian, Matthew S

    2015-07-01

    In dividing animal cells, a microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle governs chromosome movement. Current models propose that the spindle facilitates and/or generates translocating forces by regionally depolymerizing the kinetochore fibers (k-fibers) that bind each chromosome. It is unclear how conserved these sites and the resultant chromosome-moving mechanisms are between different dividing cell types because of the technical challenges of quantitatively studying MTs in many specimens. In particular, our knowledge of MT kinetics during the sperm-producing male meiotic divisions remains in its infancy. In this study, I use an easy-to-implement photobleaching-based assay for measuring spindle MT dynamics in primary cultures of meiotic spermatocytes isolated from the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. By use of standard scanning confocal microscopy features, fiducial marks were photobleached on fluorescent protein (FP)-tagged MTs. These were followed by time-lapse imaging during different division stages, and their displacement rates were calculated using public domain software. I find that k-fibers continually shorten at their poles during metaphase and anaphase A through the process of MT flux. Anaphase chromosome movement is complemented by Pac-Man, the shortening of the k-fiber at its chromosomal interface. Thus, Drosophila spermatocytes share the sites of spindle dynamism and mechanisms of chromosome movement with mitotic cells. The data reveal the applicability of the photobleaching assay for measuring MT dynamics in primary cultures. This approach can be readily applied to other systems. PMID:25802491

  18. A novel mammalian HORMA domain-containing protein, HORMAD1, preferentially associates with unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Tomoyuki; Daniel, Katrin; Wojtasz, Lukasz; Toth, Attila; Höög, Christer

    2010-01-15

    HORMA domain-containing proteins regulate interactions between homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis in a wide range of eukaryotes. We have identified a mouse HORMA domain-containing protein, HORMAD1, and biochemically and cytologically shown it to be associated with the meiotic chromosome axis. HORMAD1 first accumulates on the chromosomes during the leptotene to zygotene stages of meiotic prophase I. As germ cells progress into the pachytene stage, HORMAD1 disappears from the synapsed chromosomal regions. However, once the chromosomes desynapse during the diplotene stage, HORMAD1 again accumulates on the chromosome axis of the desynapsed homologs. HORMAD1 thus preferentially localizes to unsynapsed or desynapsed chromosomal regions during the prophase I stage of meiosis. Analysis of mutant strains lacking different components of the synaptonemal complex (SC) revealed that establishment of the SC is required for the displacement of HORMAD1 from the chromosome axis. Our results therefore strongly suggest that also mammalian cells use a HORMA domain-containing protein as part of a surveillance system that monitors synapsis or other interactions between homologs. PMID:19686734

  19. 29 CFR 1926.12 - Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950. 1926.12 Section 1926.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION General Interpretations § 1926.12 Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950....

  20. 29 CFR 1926.12 - Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950. 1926.12 Section 1926.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION General Interpretations § 1926.12 Reorganization Plan No. 14 of 1950....

  1. 75 FR 7490 - Office of the Commissioner Reorganization; Statement of Organizations, Functions, and Delegations...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Office of the Commissioner Reorganization; Statement of Organizations, Functions, and Delegations of Authority AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the reorganization of the Office of...

  2. School District Reorganization: A Case Study of the Community Participation Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvin, Patrick

    This case study considers why community members of two rural New York School districts reacted so strongly against a referendum for school district reorganization in February 1983. State and local school officials introduced into this reorganization effort a unique plan designed to achieve community support for the merger. Rather than have the…

  3. 75 FR 42377 - Foreign-Trade Zone 244-Riverside County, CA; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... reorganize the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170, 1/12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09). The ASF is an option for grantees for the establishment or reorganization of... on August 21, 2000 (Board Order 1104, 65 FR 54196, 09/07/2000). The current zone project includes...

  4. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 24 - Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act A Appendix A to Part 24 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES FOR THE HANDLING OF RETALIATION... ENERGY REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1974, AS AMENDED Pt. 24, App. A Appendix A to Part 24—Your Rights Under...

  5. 26 CFR 54.4980B-9 - Business reorganizations and employer withdrawals from multiemployer plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... multiemployer plans: Q-1: For purposes of this section, what are a business reorganization, a stock sale, and an asset sale? A-1: For purposes of this section: (a) A business reorganization is a stock sale or an asset sale. (b) A stock sale is a transfer of stock in a corporation that causes the corporation to become...

  6. 75 FR 26198 - Foreign-Trade Zone 152 - Burns Harbor, Indiana, Application for Reorganization under Alternative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... reorganize the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170, 1/ 12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09). The ASF is an option for grantees for the establishment or reorganization of... December 9, 1988 (Board Order 393, 53 FR 52454, 12/28/88) and expanded on March 9, 1992 (Board Order...

  7. Limitations to Plasticity of Language Network Reorganization in Localization Related Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbwana, J.; Berl, M. M.; Ritzl, E. K.; Rosenberger, L.; Mayo, J.; Weinstein, S.; Conry, J. A.; Pearl, P. L.; Shamim, S.; Moore, E. N.; Sato, S.; Vezina, L. G.; Theodore, W. H.; Gaillard, W. D.

    2009-01-01

    Neural networks for processing language often are reorganized in patients with epilepsy. However, the extent and location of within and between hemisphere re-organization are not established. We studied 45 patients, all with a left hemisphere seizure focus (mean age 22.8, seizure onset 13.3), and 19 normal controls (mean age 24.8) with an fMRI…

  8. 78 FR 1197 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 32 Under Alternative Site Framework; Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... (77 FR 43048-43049, 7/23/2012) and the application, as amended, has been processed pursuant to the FTZ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 32 Under Alternative Site Framework; Miami... reorganization of zones; Whereas, the Greater Miami Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone...

  9. 26 CFR 1.368-1 - Purpose and scope of exception of reorganization exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Purpose and scope of exception of reorganization exchanges. 1.368-1 Section 1.368-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Rule; Definitions § 1.368-1 Purpose and scope of exception of reorganization...

  10. 26 CFR 1.368-1 - Purpose and scope of exception of reorganization exchanges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Purpose and scope of exception of reorganization exchanges. 1.368-1 Section 1.368-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Special Rule; Definitions § 1.368-1 Purpose and scope of exception of reorganization...

  11. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  12. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  13. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  14. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  15. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-3 - Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., reorganizations, etc. 1.167(l)-3 Section 1.167(l)-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... and Corporations § 1.167(l)-3 Multiple regulation, asset acquisitions, reorganizations, etc. (a... uses a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method of depreciation is required by...

  16. 29 CFR Appendix A to Part 24 - Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Your Rights Under the Energy Reorganization Act A Appendix A to Part 24 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor PROCEDURES FOR THE HANDLING OF RETALIATION... the Energy Reorganization Act ER10AU07.000...

  17. 75 FR 11514 - Foreign-Trade Zone 170 - Jeffersonville, Indiana, Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-11

    ... reorganize the zone under the alternative site framework (ASF) adopted by the Board (74 FR 1170, 1/ 12/09; correction 74 FR 3987, 1/22/09). The ASF is an option for grantees for the establishment or reorganization of... on December 27, 1990 (Board Order 495, 56 FR 673, 1/8/91) and expanded on July 23, 1997 (Board...

  18. A theoretical description of charge reorganization energies in molecular organic P-type semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Charlotte; Engels, Bernd

    2016-06-01

    Charge transport properties of materials composed of small organic molecules are important for numerous optoelectronic applications. A material's ability to transport charges is considerably influenced by the charge reorganization energies of the composing molecules. Hence, predictions about charge-transport properties of organic materials deserve reliable statements about these charge reorganization energies. However, using density functional theory which is mostly used for the predictions, the computed reorganization energies depend strongly on the chosen functional. To gain insight, a benchmark of various density functionals for the accurate calculation of charge reorganization energies is presented. A correlation between the charge reorganization energies and the ionization potentials is found which suggests applying IP-tuning to obtain reliable values for charge reorganization energies. According to benchmark investigations with IP-EOM-CCSD single-point calculations, the tuned functionals provide indeed more reliable charge reorganization energies. Among the standard functionals, ωB97X-D and SOGGA11X yield accurate charge reorganization energies in comparison with IP-EOM-CCSD values. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27059122

  19. 5 CFR 890.504 - Disposition of contingency reserves upon reorganization or merger of plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disposition of contingency reserves upon reorganization or merger of plans. 890.504 Section 890.504 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL... Contributions and Withholdings § 890.504 Disposition of contingency reserves upon reorganization or merger...

  20. Reorganization of a granular medium around a localized transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merceron, Aymeric; Sauret, Alban; Jop, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Physical and chemical transformation processes in reactive granular media involve the reorganization of the structure. In this paper, we study experimentally the rearrangements of a two-dimensional (2D) granular packing undergoing a localized transformation. We track the position and evolution of all the disks that constitute the granular packing when either a large intruder shrinks in size or is pulled out of the granular structure. In the two situations the displacements at long time are similar to 2D quasistatic silo flows whereas the short-time dynamic is heterogeneous in both space and time. We observe an avalanchelike behavior with power-law distributed events uncorrelated in time. In addition, the instantaneous evolutions of the local solid fraction exhibit self-similar distributions. The averages and the standard deviations of the solid fraction variations can be rescaled, suggesting a single mechanism of rearrangement.

  1. Exposure therapy triggers lasting reorganization of neural fear processing.

    PubMed

    Hauner, Katherina K; Mineka, Susan; Voss, Joel L; Paller, Ken A

    2012-06-01

    A single session of exposure therapy can eliminate recalcitrant and disabling fear of phobogenic objects or situations. We studied neural mechanisms of this remarkable outcome by monitoring changes in brain activity as a result of successful 2-h treatment. Before treatment, phobogenic images excited activity in a network of regions, including amygdala, insula, and cingulate cortex, relative to neutral images. Successful therapy dampened responsiveness in this fear-sensitive network while concomitantly heightening prefrontal involvement. Six months later, dampened fear-network activity persisted but without prefrontal engagement. Additionally, individual differences in the magnitude of visual cortex activations recorded shortly after therapy predicted therapeutic outcomes 6 mo later, which involved persistently diminished visual responsiveness to phobogenic images. Successful therapy thus entailed stable reorganization of neural responses to initially feared stimuli. These effects were linked to fear-extinction mechanisms identified in animal models, thus opening new opportunities for the treatment and prevention of debilitating anxiety disorders. PMID:22623532

  2. Reorganization of a granular medium around a localized transformation.

    PubMed

    Merceron, Aymeric; Sauret, Alban; Jop, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    Physical and chemical transformation processes in reactive granular media involve the reorganization of the structure. In this paper, we study experimentally the rearrangements of a two-dimensional (2D) granular packing undergoing a localized transformation. We track the position and evolution of all the disks that constitute the granular packing when either a large intruder shrinks in size or is pulled out of the granular structure. In the two situations the displacements at long time are similar to 2D quasistatic silo flows whereas the short-time dynamic is heterogeneous in both space and time. We observe an avalanchelike behavior with power-law distributed events uncorrelated in time. In addition, the instantaneous evolutions of the local solid fraction exhibit self-similar distributions. The averages and the standard deviations of the solid fraction variations can be rescaled, suggesting a single mechanism of rearrangement. PMID:27415344

  3. Correlation between cerebral reorganization and motor recovery after subcortical infarcts.

    PubMed

    Loubinoux, Isabelle; Carel, Christophe; Pariente, Jérémie; Dechaumont, Sophie; Albucher, Jean-François; Marque, Philippe; Manelfe, Claude; Chollet, François

    2003-12-01

    Our objective was to investigate correlations between clinical motor scores and cerebral sensorimotor activation to demonstrate that this reorganization is the neural substratum of motor recovery. Correlation analyses identified reorganization processes shared by all patients. Nine patients with first-time corticospinal tract lacuna were clinically evaluated using the NIH stroke scale, the motricity index, and the Barthel index. Patients were strictly selected for pure motor deficits. They underwent a first fMRI session (E1) 11 days after stroke, and then a second (E2) 4 weeks later. The task used was a calibrated repetitive passive flexion/extension of the paretic wrist. The control task was rest. Six healthy subjects followed the same protocol. Patients were also clinically evaluated 4 and 12 months after stroke. All patients improved significantly between E1 and E2. For E1 and E2, the ipsilesional primary sensorimotor and premotor cortex, supplementary motor area (SMA), and bilateral Broadmann area (BA) 40 were activated. Activation intensity was greater at the second examination except in the ipsilesional superior BA 40. Magnitude of activation was lower than that of controls except for well-recovered patients. E1 clinical hand motor score and E1 cerebral activation correlated in the SMA proper and inferior ipsilesional BA 40. Thus, we demonstrated early functionality of the sensorimotor system. The whole sensorimotor network activation correlated with motor status at E2, indicating a recovery of its function when activated. Moreover, the activation pattern in the acute phase (E1) had a predictive value: early recruitment and high activation of the SMA and inferior BA 40 were correlated with a faster or better motor recovery. On the contrary, activation of the contralesional hemisphere (prefrontal cortex and BA 39-40) and of the posterior cingulate/precuneus (BA 7-31) predicted a slower recovery. PMID:14683720

  4. Metalloproteinase inhibition prevents inhibitory synapse reorganization and seizure genesis.

    PubMed

    Pollock, Emily; Everest, Michelle; Brown, Arthur; Poulter, Michael O

    2014-10-01

    The integrity and stability of interneurons in a cortical network are essential for proper network function. Loss of interneuron synaptic stability and precise organization can lead to disruptions in the excitation/inhibition balance, a characteristic of epilepsy. This study aimed to identify alterations to the GABAergic interneuron network in the piriform cortex (PC: a cortical area believed to be involved in the development of seizures) after kindling-induced seizures. Immunohistochemistry was used to mark perineuronal nets (PNNs: structures in the extracellular matrix that provide synaptic stability and restrict reorganization of inhibitory interneurons) and interneuron nerve terminals in control and kindled tissues. We found that PNNs were significantly decreased around parvalbumin-positive interneurons after the induction of experimental epilepsy. Additionally, we found layer-specific increases in GABA release sites originating from calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin interneurons, implying that there is a re-wiring of the interneuronal network. This increase in release sites was matched by an increase in GABAergic post-synaptic densities. We hypothesized that the breakdown of the PNN could be due to the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and that the prevention of PNN breakdown may reduce the rewiring of interneuronal circuits and suppress seizures. To test this hypothesis we employed doxycycline, a broad spectrum MMP inhibitor, to stabilize PNNs in kindled rats. We found that doxycycline prevented PNN breakdown, re-organization of the inhibitory innervation, and seizure genesis. Our observations indicate that PNN degradation may be necessary for the development of seizures by facilitating interneuron plasticity and increased GABAergic activity. PMID:24946277

  5. Large-Scale Functional Brain Network Reorganization During Taoist Meditation.

    PubMed

    Jao, Tun; Li, Chia-Wei; Vértes, Petra E; Wu, Changwei Wesley; Achard, Sophie; Hsieh, Chao-Hsien; Liou, Chien-Hui; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Bullmore, Edward T

    2016-02-01

    Meditation induces a distinct and reversible mental state that provides insights into brain correlates of consciousness. We explored brain network changes related to meditation by graph theoretical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data. Eighteen Taoist meditators with varying levels of expertise were scanned using a within-subjects counterbalanced design during resting and meditation states. State-related differences in network topology were measured globally and at the level of individual nodes and edges. Although measures of global network topology, such as small-worldness, were unchanged, meditation was characterized by an extensive and expertise-dependent reorganization of the hubs (highly connected nodes) and edges (functional connections). Areas of sensory cortex, especially the bilateral primary visual and auditory cortices, and the bilateral temporopolar areas, which had the highest degree (or connectivity) during the resting state, showed the biggest decrease during meditation. Conversely, bilateral thalamus and components of the default mode network, mainly the bilateral precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex, had low degree in the resting state but increased degree during meditation. Additionally, these changes in nodal degree were accompanied by reorganization of anatomical orientation of the edges. During meditation, long-distance longitudinal (antero-posterior) edges increased proportionally, whereas orthogonal long-distance transverse (right-left) edges connecting bilaterally homologous cortices decreased. Our findings suggest that transient changes in consciousness associated with meditation introduce convergent changes in the topological and spatial properties of brain functional networks, and the anatomical pattern of integration might be as important as the global level of integration when considering the network basis for human consciousness. PMID:26165867

  6. Thalamic Reorganization in Chronic Patients With Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Kim, Seong Ho; Jung, Young Jin; Hong, Ji Heon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate changes of synaptic area of the spinothalamic tract and its thalamocortical pathway (STT) in the thalamus in chronic patients with putaminal hemorrhage. Twenty four patients with a lesion in the ventral posterior lateral nucleus (VPL) of the thalamus following putaminal hemorrhage were recruited for this study. The subscale for tactile sensation of the Nottingham Sensory Assessment (NSA) was used for the determination of somatosensory function. Diffusion tensor tractography of the STT was reconstructed using the Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain Software Library. We classified patients according to 2 groups: the VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in the VPL; and the non-VPL group, patients whose STTs were synapsed in other thalamic areas, except for the VPL. Thirteen patients belonged to the VPL group, and 8 patients belonged to the non-VPL group. Three patients were excluded from grouping due to interrupted integrity of the STTs. The tactile sensation score of the NSA in the non-VPL group (10.50 ± 0.93) was significantly decreased compared with that of the VPL group (19.45 ± 1.33) (P < 0.05). We found that 2 types of patient had recovered via the VPL area or other areas of the STT. It appears that patients who showed shifting of the thalamic synaptic area of the STT might have recovered by the process of thalamic reorganization following thalamic injury. In addition, thalamic reorganization appears to be related to poorer somatosensory outcome. PMID:26313781

  7. Multibeam investigation of the active North Atlantic plate boundary reorganization tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, Richard; Martinez, Fernando; Höskuldsson, Ármann; Eason, Deborah E.; Sleeper, Jonathan; Thordarson, Sigvaldi; Benediktsdóttir, Ásdís; Merkuryev, Sergey

    2016-02-01

    The previous orthogonal ridge/transform staircase geometry south of Iceland is being progressively changed to the present continuous oblique Reykjanes Ridge spreading geometry as North America-Eurasia transform faults are successively eliminated from north to south. This reorganization is commonly interpreted as a thermal phenomenon, caused by warmer Iceland plume mantle progressively interacting with the ridge, although other diachronous seafloor spreading reorganizations are thought to result from tectonic rift propagation. New marine geophysical data covering our reinterpretation of the reorganization tip near 57°N show successive transform eliminations at a propagation velocity of ∼110 km/Myr, ten times the spreading half rate, followed by abrupt reorganization slowing at the Modred transform as it was converted to a migrating non-transform offset. Neither the simple thermal model nor the simple propagating rift model appears adequate to explain the complicated plate boundary reorganization process.

  8. A meiotic drive element is located within a 130-kb region of chromosome V of the maize pathogen Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungus Fusarium verticillioides is a pathogen of maize worldwide and produces carcinogenic mycotoxins known as fumonisins. Natural populations of the fungus harbor a meiotic drive element called Spore killer, abbreviated as FvSkK. Only FvSkK progeny survive in a cross between an FvSkK strain and...

  9. Cohesin-interacting protein WAPL-1 regulates meiotic chromosome structure and cohesion by antagonizing specific cohesin complexes

    PubMed Central

    Crawley, Oliver; Barroso, Consuelo; Testori, Sarah; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Silva, Nicola; Castellano-Pozo, Maikel; Jaso-Tamame, Angel Luis; Martinez-Perez, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Wapl induces cohesin dissociation from DNA throughout the mitotic cell cycle, modulating sister chromatid cohesion and higher-order chromatin structure. Cohesin complexes containing meiosis-specific kleisin subunits govern most aspects of meiotic chromosome function, but whether Wapl regulates these complexes remains unknown. We show that during C. elegans oogenesis WAPL-1 antagonizes binding of cohesin containing COH-3/4 kleisins, but not REC-8, demonstrating that sensitivity to WAPL-1 is dictated by kleisin identity. By restricting the amount of chromosome-associated COH-3/4 cohesin, WAPL-1 controls chromosome structure throughout meiotic prophase. In the absence of REC-8, WAPL-1 inhibits COH-3/4-mediated cohesion, which requires crossover-fated events formed during meiotic recombination. Thus, WAPL-1 promotes functional specialization of meiotic cohesin: WAPL-1-sensitive COH-3/4 complexes modulate higher-order chromosome structure, while WAPL-1-refractory REC-8 complexes provide stable cohesion. Surprisingly, a WAPL-1-independent mechanism removes cohesin before metaphase I. Our studies provide insight into how meiosis-specific cohesin complexes are regulated to ensure formation of euploid gametes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10851.001 PMID:26841696

  10. Katanin maintains meiotic metaphase chromosome alignment and spindle structure in vivo and has multiple effects on microtubules in vitro.

    PubMed

    McNally, Karen; Berg, Evan; Cortes, Daniel B; Hernandez, Veronica; Mains, Paul E; McNally, Francis J

    2014-04-01

    Assembly of Caenorhabditis elegans female meiotic spindles requires both MEI-1 and MEI-2 subunits of the microtubule-severing ATPase katanin. Strong loss-of-function mutants assemble apolar intersecting microtubule arrays, whereas weaker mutants assemble bipolar meiotic spindles that are longer than wild type. To determine whether katanin is also required for spindle maintenance, we monitored metaphase I spindles after a fast-acting mei-1(ts) mutant was shifted to a nonpermissive temperature. Within 4 min of temperature shift, bivalents moved off the metaphase plate, and microtubule bundles within the spindle lengthened and developed a high degree of curvature. Spindles eventually lost bipolar structure. Immunofluorescence of embryos fixed at increasing temperature indicated that MEI-1 was lost from spindle microtubules before loss of ASPM-1, indicating that MEI-1 and ASPM-1 act independently at spindle poles. We quantified the microtubule-severing activity of purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes corresponding to six different point mutations and found a linear relationship between microtubule disassembly rate and meiotic spindle length. Previous work showed that katanin is required for severing at points where two microtubules intersect in vivo. We show that purified MEI-1/MEI-2 complexes preferentially sever at intersections between two microtubules and directly bundle microtubules in vitro. These activities could promote parallel/antiparallel microtubule organization in meiotic spindles. PMID:24501424

  11. JNK does not regulate meiotic progression in Xenopus oocytes: The strange case of pJNK and pERK.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jicheng; López, José M

    2016-08-01

    Xenopus ERK2, also known as Xp42 MAPK, is activated by progesterone and regulates meiotic progression in the oocytes through activation of the phosphatase Cdc25C and inhibition of the protein kinase Myt1, thus promoting dephosphorylation and activation of cyclinB/Cdc2 (MPF). Indeed, it has been reported that stress protein kinases p38 and JNK are activated during meiotic progression and, more specifically, that p38γ regulates meiosis through activation of Cdc25C. However, the role of JNK in meiotic progression is not so clear, and despite a 42kDa protein is detected with pJNK antibodies (XpJNK-p42), the specific isoform activated by progesterone has not been characterized in detail. The serine/threonine kinase MEKK1, an upstream activator of JNK and p38, is activated during stress conditions and regulates apoptosis in different cell types. Here we show that ectopic expression of a constitutively active MEKK1 in Xenopus oocytes induces phosphorylation of p38, JNK and ERK and accelerates meiotic progression induced by progesterone. Inhibition of each individual pathway reduces the acceleration of meiosis induced by MEKK1. However, constitutively active MEKK1 induces phosphorylation of two JNK isoforms (p40 and p49, corresponding to JNK1-1 and JNK1-2 respectively) distinct to the p42 protein detected with pJNK antibodies during meiotic progression (XpJNK-p42). Moreover, a constitutively active MKK7, which specifically activates the JNK signaling pathway and induces phosphorylation of the p40 and p49 isoforms, does not accelerate meiotic progression. Immunoprecipitation of the p42 protein with pJNK antibodies and subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry shows that XpJNK-p42 is, in fact, pERK2. Ectopic expression of ERK2 in oocytes treated with progesterone or hyperosmotic shock indicates that ERK2 is phosphorylated in both conditions but is only detected with pJNK antibodies in progesterone-treated oocytes. In addition, mature oocytes only present a moderate increase

  12. Oocyte heterogeneity with respect to the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed X chromosomes in the XY female mouse.

    PubMed

    Taketo, Teruko; Naumova, Anna K

    2013-10-01

    In the XY pachytene spermatocyte, the sex chromosomes do not synapse except for the pseudoautosomal region and become transcriptionally silenced. It has been suggested that the meiotic silencing of unsynapsed chromatin (MSUC) also occurs in oocytes. In the XY sex-reversed female mouse, the sex chromosomes fail to pair in the majority of oocytes and a greater number of oocytes are eliminated during the meiotic prophase compared to the XX female. Yet, many XY oocytes survive to reach the second meiotic metaphase. The goal of our current study was to determine whether the single X chromosome shows the characteristics of asynapsis and meiotic silencing in a proportion of XY oocytes, which can explain the survival of the remaining oocytes. We first examined the accumulation of markers associated with asynapsis or transcriptional silencing, i.e., BRCA1, γH2AX, H3K9me3, and H3K27me3, at the single X chromosome in the XY oocyte. We found that γH2AX and BRCA1 were enriched on the single X chromosome whereas H3K9me3 was not, and H3K27me3 was enriched at all chromosomes in the majority of XY oocytes. We next examined the meiotic silencing of the single X chromosome using enrichment of the X-encoded ATRX protein. On average, ATRX enrichment was lower in XY oocytes than in XX oocytes as expected from its half gene dosage. However, the intensity of ATRX staining in XY oocytes harboring γH2AX domains showed a remarkable heterogeneity. We conclude that MSUC occurs with varying consequences, resulting in a heterogeneous population of oocytes with respect to protein enrichment in the XY female mouse. PMID:23760560

  13. Dynamics of DOT1L localization and H3K79 methylation during meiotic prophase I in mouse spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ontoso, David; Kauppi, Liisa; Keeney, Scott; San-Segundo, Pedro A.

    2013-01-01

    During meiotic prophase I, interactions between maternal and paternal chromosomes, under checkpoint surveillance, establish connections between homologs that promote their accurate distribution to meiotic progeny. In human, faulty meiosis causes aneuploidy resulting in miscarriages and genetic diseases. Meiotic processes occur in the context of chromatin, therefore histone post-translational modifications are expected to play important roles. Here, we report the cytological distribution of the evolutionarily conserved DOT1L methyltransferase and the different H3K79 methylation states resulting from its activity (mono-, di- and tri-methylation; H3K79me1, me2 and me3, respectively) during meiotic prophase I in mouse spermatocytes. In the wild type, whereas low amounts of H3K79me1 are rather uniformly present throughout prophase I, levels of DOT1L, H3K79me2 and H3K79me3 exhibit a notable increase from pachynema onwards, but with differential subnuclear distribution patterns. The heterochromatic centromeric regions and the sex body are enriched for H3K79me3. In contrast, H3K79me2 is present all over the chromatin, but is largely excluded from the sex body despite the accumulation of DOT1L. In meiosis-defective mouse mutants, the increase of DOT1L and H3K79me is blocked at the same stage where meiosis is arrested. H3K79me patterns, combined with the cytological analysis of the H3.3, γH2AX, macroH2A and H2A.Z histone variants, are consistent with a differential role for these epigenetic marks in male mouse meiotic prophase I. We propose that H3K79me2 is related to transcriptional reactivation on autosomes during pachynema, whereas H3K79me3 may contribute to the maintenance of repressive chromatin at centromeric regions and the sex body. PMID:24105599

  14. Exposure to bisphenol A disrupts meiotic progression during spermatogenesis in adult rats through estrogen-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C; Duan, W; Li, R; Xu, S; Zhang, L; Chen, C; He, M; Lu, Y; Wu, H; Pi, H; Luo, X; Zhang, Y; Zhong, M; Yu, Z; Zhou, Z

    2013-01-01

    The effect of bisphenol A (BPA) on the reproductive system is highly debated but has been associated with meiotic abnormalities. However, evidence is lacking with regard to the mechanisms involved. In order to explore the underlying mechanisms of BPA-induced meiotic abnormalities in adult male rats, we exposed 9-week-old male Wistar rats to BPA by gavage at 0, 2, 20 or 200 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day for 60 consecutive days. 17β-Estradiol (E2) was administered at 10 μg/kg bw/day as the estrogenic positive control. Treatments with 200 μg/kg bw/day of BPA and E2 significantly decreased sperm counts and inhibited spermiation, characterized by an increase in stage VII and decrease in stage VIII in the seminiferous epithelium. This was concomitant with a disruption in the progression of meiosis I and the persistence of meiotic DNA strand breaks in pachytene spermatocytes,and the ataxia–telangiectasia-mutated and checkpoint kinase 2 signal pathway was also activated; Eventually, germ cell apoptosis was triggered as evaluated by terminal dUTP nick-end labeling assay and western blot for caspase 3. Using the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182780, we determined that ER signaling mediated BPA-induced meiotic disruption and reproductive impairment. Our results suggest that ER signaling-mediated meiotic disruption may be a major contributor to the molecular events leading to BPA-related male reproductive disorders. These rodent data support the growing association between BPA exposure and the rapid increase in the incidence of male reproductive disorders. PMID:23788033

  15. Evidence for cerebellar motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients: An fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Kurabe, Satoshi; Itoh, Kosuke; Nakada, Tsutomu; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2016-05-27

    Functional reorganization of the motor system following brain damage has been studied extensively in stroke patients, in which not only the cerebrum but also the cerebellum (Cbll) undergoes substantial reorganization. However, the role of Cbll in motor functional reorganization in brain tumor patients remains poorly investigated. Because brain damages in brain tumor patients occur much more slowly than in stroke patients, the neural mechanisms for motor functional reorganization might differ between these two disease conditions. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated whether Cbll constitutes the neural substrates for motor functional reorganization in eighteen supratentorial brain tumor patients who exhibited no clinical signs of paresis. The patients and normal volunteers underwent a unilateral hand movement task. In the patients, the locus of primary sensory motor (SM1) activation during contralesional hand movement was significantly displaced by the tumor, suggesting functional compromise and/or reorganization in the central sulcus region. In addition, their contralesional Cbll activation during contralesional hand movement was substantially increased as compared to normal controls. The finding represents the first conclusive evidence that Cbll is involved in the motor-related functional reorganization in patients with brain tumor. PMID:27102144

  16. Pre-meiotic transformation of germplasm-related structures during male gamete differentiation in Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Reunov, Arkadiy A; Reunova, Yulia A

    2016-02-01

    To highlight the ultrastructural features of transformation occurring with germplasm-related structures (GPRS), the spermatogenic cells of Xenopus laevis were studied by transmission electron microscopy and quantitative analysis. It was determined that in spermatogonia and spermatocytes, the compact germinal granules underwent fragmentation into particles comparable with inter-mitochondrial cement (IMC). Fragments of IMC agglutinated some cell mitochondria and resulted in the creation of mitochondrial clusters. Clustered mitochondria responded with loss of their membranes that occurred by the twisting of membranous protrusions around themselves until multi-layered membranes were formed. The mitochondrial affinity of multi-layered membranes was proven by an immunopositive test for mitochondrial dihydrolipoamide acetyltransferase. As a consequence of mitochondrial membrane twisting, the naked mitochondrial cores appeared and presumably underwent dispersion, which is the terminal stage of GPRS transformation. As no GPRS were observed in spermatids and sperm, it was assumed that these structures are functionally assigned to early stages of meiotic differentiation. PMID:25511532

  17. Fine-scale variation in meiotic recombination in Mimulus inferred from population shotgun sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, Uffe; Wright, Kevin M.; Jenkins, Jerry; Shu, Shengqiang; Yuan, Yao-Wu; Wessler, Susan R.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Willis, John H.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2013-11-13

    Meiotic recombination rates can vary widely across genomes, with hotspots of intense activity interspersed among cold regions. In yeast, hotspots tend to occur in promoter regions of genes, whereas in humans and mice hotspots are largely defined by binding sites of the PRDM9 protein. To investigate the detailed recombination pattern in a flowering plant we use shotgun resequencing of a wild population of the monkeyflower Mimulus guttatus to precisely locate over 400,000 boundaries of historic crossovers or gene conversion tracts. Their distribution defines some 13,000 hotspots of varying strengths, interspersed with cold regions of undetectably low recombination. Average recombination rates peak near starts of genes and fall off sharply, exhibiting polarity. Within genes, recombination tracts are more likely to terminate in exons than in introns. The general pattern is similar to that observed in yeast, as well as in PRDM9-knockout mice, suggesting that recombination initiation described here in Mimulus may reflect ancient and conserved eukaryotic mechanisms

  18. Rab6a is a novel regulator of meiotic apparatus and maturational progression in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Jiaqi; Li, Ling; Ma, Rujun; Ge, Juan; Han, Longsen; Wang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Rab family GTPases have been well known to regulate intracellular vesicle transport, however their function in mammalian oocytes has not been addressed. In this study, we report that when Rab6a is specifically knockdown, mouse oocytes are unable to progress normally through meiosis, arresting at metaphase I. Moreover, in these oocytes, the defects of chromosome alignment and spindle organization are readily observed during maturation, and resultantly increasing the aneuploidy incidence. We further reveal that kinetochore-microtubule attachments are severely compromised in Rab6a-depleted oocytes, which may in part mediate the meiotic phenotypes described above. In addition, when Rab6a function is altered, BubR1 levels on the kinetochores are markedly increased in metaphase oocytes, indicating the activation of spindle assembly checkpoint. In sum, we identify Rab6a as an important player in modulating oocyte meiosis, specifically the chromosome/spindle organization and metaphase-anaphase transition. PMID:26915694

  19. Mos is not required for the initiation of meiotic maturation in Xenopus oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dupré, Aude; Jessus, Catherine; Ozon, René; Haccard, Olivier

    2002-01-01

    In Xenopus oocytes, the c-mos proto-oncogene product has been proposed to act downstream of progesterone to control the entry into meiosis I, the transition from meiosis I to meiosis II, which is characterized by the absence of S phase, and the metaphase II arrest seen prior to fertilization. Here, we report that inhibition of Mos synthesis by morpholino antisense oligonucleotides does not prevent the progesterone-induced initiation of Xenopus oocyte meiotic maturation, as previously thought. Mos-depleted oocytes complete meiosis I but fail to arrest at metaphase II, entering a series of embryonic-like cell cycles accompanied by oscillations of Cdc2 activity and DNA replication. We propose that the unique and conserved role of Mos is to prevent mitotic cell cycles of the female gamete until the fertilization in Xenopus, starfish and mouse oocytes. PMID:12145203

  20. Mos is not required for the initiation of meiotic maturation in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Aude; Jessus, Catherine; Ozon, René; Haccard, Olivier

    2002-08-01

    In Xenopus oocytes, the c-mos proto-oncogene product has been proposed to act downstream of progesterone to control the entry into meiosis I, the transition from meiosis I to meiosis II, which is characterized by the absence of S phase, and the metaphase II arrest seen prior to fertilization. Here, we report that inhibition of Mos synthesis by morpholino antisense oligonucleotides does not prevent the progesterone-induced initiation of Xenopus oocyte meiotic maturation, as previously thought. Mos-depleted oocytes complete meiosis I but fail to arrest at metaphase II, entering a series of embryonic-like cell cycles accompanied by oscillations of Cdc2 activity and DNA replication. We propose that the unique and conserved role of Mos is to prevent mitotic cell cycles of the female gamete until the fertilization in Xenopus, starfish and mouse oocytes. PMID:12145203

  1. Porous silicon reorganization: Influence on the structure, surface roughness and strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenkovic, N.; Drießen, M.; Weiss, C.; Janz, S.

    2015-12-01

    Porous silicon and epitaxial thickening is a lift-off approach for silicon foil fabrication to avoid kerf losses and produce foils with thicknesses less than 50 μm. The crystal quality of the epitaxial silicon film strongly depends on the porous silicon template, which can be adapted through a reorganization process prior to epitaxy. In this work, we investigated the influence of reorganization on the structure of etched porous silicon layers. The reorganization processes were carried out in a quasi-inline Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition reactor. Variations on the temperatures and process durations for the reorganization step were examined. The cross-sections showed that porous silicon requires temperatures of approximately 1150 °C to produce an excellent template for epitaxy. Atomic Force Microscopy measurements on the samples annealed at different temperatures showed the evolution of the pores from as-etched to a closed surface. These measurements confirm that the surface is not yet closed after 30 min of reorganization at 1000 °C. Different durations of the reorganization step at a fixed temperature of 1150 °C all lead to a closed surface with a comparable roughness of less than 0.5 nm. X-ray diffraction measurements show a change in the strain in the porous layer from tensile to compressive when the reorganization temperature is increased from 800 °C to 1150 °C. A longer reorganization at a fixed temperature of 1150 °C leads to a reduction in the strain without reducing the quality of the surface roughness. Defect density measurements on silicon layers deposited on those templates confirm an improvement of the template for longer reorganization times. This study shows that our porous silicon templates achieve lower surface roughness and strain values than those reported in other publications.

  2. Cortical reorganization after macroreplantation at the upper extremity: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    PubMed

    Blume, Kathrin R; Dietrich, Caroline; Huonker, Ralph; Götz, Theresa; Sens, Elisabeth; Friedel, Reinhard; Hofmann, Gunther O; Miltner, Wolfgang H R; Weiss, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    With the development of microsurgical techniques, replantation has become a feasible alternative to stump treatment after the amputation of an extremity. It is known that amputation often induces phantom limb pain and cortical reorganization within the corresponding somatosensory areas. However, whether replantation reduces the risk of comparable persisting pain phenomena as well as reorganization of the primary somatosensory cortex is still widely unknown. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the potential development of persistent pain and cortical reorganization of the hand and lip areas within the sensory cortex by means of magnetoencephalographic dipole analyses after replantation of a traumatically amputated upper limb proximal to the radiocarpal joint. Cortical reorganization was investigated in 13 patients with limb replantation using air puff stimulation of the phalanges of both thumbs and both corners of the lower lip. Displacement of the centre of gravity of lip and thumb representations and increased cortical activity were found in the limb and face areas of the primary somatosensory cortex contralateral to the replanted arm when compared to the ipsilateral hemisphere. Thus, cortical reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex also occurs after replantation of the upper extremity. Patients' reports of pain in the replanted body part were negatively correlated with the amount of cortical reorganization, i.e. the more pain the patients reported, the less reorganization of the subjects' hand representation within the primary somatosensory cortex was observed. Longitudinal studies in patients after macroreplantation are necessary to assess whether the observed reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex is a result of changes within the representation of the replanted arm and/or neighbouring representations and to assess the relationship between the development of persistent pain and reorganization. PMID:24480484

  3. Computer-aided meiotic maturation assay (CAMMA) of zebrafish (danio rerio) oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lessman, Charles A; Nathani, Ravikanth; Uddin, Rafique; Walker, Jamie; Liu, Jianxiong

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a new technique called Computer-Aided Meiotic Maturation Assay (CAMMA) for imaging large arrays of zebrafish oocytes and automatically collecting image files at regular intervals during meiotic maturation. This novel method uses a transparency scanner interfaced to a computer with macro programming that automatically scans and archives the image files. Images are stacked and analyzed with ImageJ to quantify changes in optical density characteristic of zebrafish oocyte maturation. Major advantages of CAMMA include (1) ability to image very large arrays of oocytes and follow individual cells over time, (2) simultaneously image many treatment groups, (3) digitized images may be stacked, animated, and analyzed in programs such as ImageJ, NIH-Image, or ScionImage, and (4) CAMMA system is inexpensive, costing less than most microscopes used in traditional assays. We have used CAMMA to determine the dose response and time course of oocyte maturation induced by 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (HP). Maximal decrease in optical density occurs around 5 hr after 0.1 micro g/ml HP (28.5 degrees C), approximately 3 hr after germinal vesicle migration (GVM) and dissolution (GVD). In addition to changes in optical density, GVD is accompanied by streaming of ooplasm to the animal pole to form a blastodisc. These dynamic changes are readily visualized by animating image stacks from CAMMA; thus, CAMMA provides a valuable source of time-lapse movies for those studying zebrafish oocyte maturation. The oocyte clearing documented by CAMMA is correlated to changes in size distribution of major yolk proteins upon SDS-PAGE, and, this in turn, is related to increased cyclin B(1) protein. PMID:16998847

  4. Meiotic Interactors of a Mitotic Gene TAO3 Revealed by Functional Analysis of its Rare Variant.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Nitin, Rachana; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Studying the molecular consequences of rare genetic variants has the potential to identify novel and hitherto uncharacterized pathways causally contributing to phenotypic variation. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of a rare coding variant of TAO3, previously reported to contribute significantly to sporulation efficiency variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae During mitosis, the common TAO3 allele interacts with CBK1-a conserved NDR kinase. Both TAO3 and CBK1 are components of the RAM signaling network that regulates cell separation and polarization during mitosis. We demonstrate that the role of the rare allele TAO3(4477C) in meiosis is distinct from its role in mitosis by being independent of ACE2-a RAM network target gene. By quantitatively measuring cell morphological dynamics, and expressing the TAO3(4477C) allele conditionally during sporulation, we show that TAO3 has an early role in meiosis. This early role of TAO3 coincides with entry of cells into meiotic division. Time-resolved transcriptome analyses during early sporulation identified regulators of carbon and lipid metabolic pathways as candidate mediators. We show experimentally that, during sporulation, the TAO3(4477C) allele interacts genetically with ERT1 and PIP2, regulators of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis metabolic pathways, respectively. We thus uncover a meiotic functional role for TAO3, and identify ERT1 and PIP2 as novel regulators of sporulation efficiency. Our results demonstrate that studying the causal effects of genetic variation on the underlying molecular network has the potential to provide a more extensive understanding of the pathways driving a complex trait. PMID:27317780

  5. Meiotic Drive Impacts Expression and Evolution of X-Linked Genes in Stalk-Eyed Flies

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Josephine A.; Brand, Cara L.; Paczolt, Kimberly A.; Johns, Philip M.; Baker, Richard H.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Although sex chromosome meiotic drive has been observed in a variety of species for over 50 years, the genes causing drive are only known in a few cases, and none of these cases cause distorted sex-ratios in nature. In stalk-eyed flies (Teleopsis dalmanni), driving X chromosomes are commonly found at frequencies approaching 30% in the wild, but the genetic basis of drive has remained elusive due to reduced recombination between driving and non-driving X chromosomes. Here, we used RNAseq to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between males carrying either a driving X (XSR) or a standard X chromosome (XST), and found hundreds of these, the majority of which are X-linked. Drive-associated transcripts show increased levels of sequence divergence (dN/dS) compared to a control set, and are predominantly expressed either in testes or in the gonads of both sexes. Finally, we confirmed that XSR and XST are highly divergent by estimating sequence differentiation between the RNAseq pools. We found that X-linked transcripts were often strongly differentiated (whereas most autosomal transcripts were not), supporting the presence of a relatively large region of recombination suppression on XSR presumably caused by one or more inversions. We have identified a group of genes that are good candidates for further study into the causes and consequences of sex-chromosome drive, and demonstrated that meiotic drive has had a profound effect on sequence evolution and gene expression of X-linked genes in this species. PMID:24832132

  6. Disrupting Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 in Spermatocytes Causes Late Meiotic Arrest and Infertility in Mice.

    PubMed

    Clement, Tracy M; Inselman, Amy L; Goulding, Eugenia H; Willis, William D; Eddy, Edward M

    2015-12-01

    While cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) has a critical role in controlling resumption of meiosis in oocytes, its role has not been investigated directly in spermatocytes. Unique aspects of male meiosis led us to hypothesize that its role is different in male meiosis than in female meiosis. We generated a conditional knockout (cKO) of the Cdk1 gene in mouse spermatocytes to test this hypothesis. We found that CDK1-null spermatocytes undergo synapsis, chiasmata formation, and desynapsis as is seen in oocytes. Additionally, CDK1-null spermatocytes relocalize SYCP3 to centromeric foci, express H3pSer10, and initiate chromosome condensation. However, CDK1-null spermatocytes fail to form condensed bivalent chromosomes in prophase of meiosis I and instead are arrested at prometaphase. Thus, CDK1 has an essential role in male meiosis that is consistent with what is known about the role of CDK1 in female meiosis, where it is required for formation of condensed bivalent metaphase chromosomes and progression to the first meiotic division. We found that cKO spermatocytes formed fully condensed bivalent chromosomes in the presence of okadaic acid, suggesting that cKO chromosomes are competent to condense, although they do not do so in vivo. Additionally, arrested cKO spermatocytes exhibited irregular cell shape, irregular large nuclei, and large distinctive nucleoli. These cells persist in the seminiferous epithelium through the next seminiferous epithelial cycle with a lack of stage XII checkpoint-associated cell death. This indicates that CDK1 is required upstream of a checkpoint-associated cell death as well as meiotic metaphase progression in mouse spermatocytes. PMID:26490841

  7. Meiotic Transmission of an In Vitro–Assembled Autonomous Maize Minichromosome

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Shawn R; Rudgers, Gary W; Zieler, Helge; Mach, Jennifer M; Luo, Song; Grunden, Eric; Krol, Cheryl; Copenhaver, Gregory P; Preuss, Daphne

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous chromosomes are generated in yeast (yeast artificial chromosomes) and human fibrosarcoma cells (human artificial chromosomes) by introducing purified DNA fragments that nucleate a kinetochore, replicate, and segregate to daughter cells. These autonomous minichromosomes are convenient for manipulating and delivering DNA segments containing multiple genes. In contrast, commercial production of transgenic crops relies on methods that integrate one or a few genes into host chromosomes; extensive screening to identify insertions with the desired expression level, copy number, structure, and genomic location; and long breeding programs to produce varieties that carry multiple transgenes. As a step toward improving transgenic crop production, we report the development of autonomous maize minichromosomes (MMCs). We constructed circular MMCs by combining DsRed and nptII marker genes with 7–190 kb of genomic maize DNA fragments containing satellites, retroelements, and/or other repeats commonly found in centromeres and using particle bombardment to deliver these constructs into embryogenic maize tissue. We selected transformed cells, regenerated plants, and propagated their progeny for multiple generations in the absence of selection. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and segregation analysis demonstrated that autonomous MMCs can be mitotically and meiotically maintained. The MMC described here showed meiotic segregation ratios approaching Mendelian inheritance: 93% transmission as a disome (100% expected), 39% transmission as a monosome crossed to wild type (50% expected), and 59% transmission in self crosses (75% expected). The fluorescent DsRed reporter gene on the MMC was expressed through four generations, and Southern blot analysis indicated the encoded genes were intact. This novel approach for plant transformation can facilitate crop biotechnology by (i) combining several trait genes on a single DNA fragment, (ii) arranging genes in a defined sequence

  8. Meiotic nondisjunction in the mouse: methodology for genetic testing and comparison with other methods

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Liane B.

    1979-01-01

    Since trisomies produce adverse effects relatively late in development or even postnatally, they are an important component of the array of genetic damages that might be caused by environmental agents. Whole-chromosome aneuploidy (as opposed to breakage-derived aneuploidy) might come about secondarily from crossover depression, or could follow damage to the meiotic spindle or to kinetochores. For simplicity, the event—by whichever of the mechanisms—is referred to as meiotic nondisjunction (ND). A genetic method has been devised which is based on the facts that ND involving the sex chromosomes produces mostly viable mice, and that such exceptional animals can be externally recognized by the use of appropriate markers. The method is compared with the following other ND indicators: univalent and/or chiasma frequencies at M I; number of dyads at M II; extra sex chromosomes in spermatids; karyotypes in cleavage, morula, or blastocyst metaphases; and chromosome constitution of mid-gestation embryos. Some of the cytological endpoints are found to be unreliable. Various biological variables (germ-cell stage, sex, age) are examined with a view toward maximizing the chances for detecting induced nondisjunction. While experimental evidence on this question is equivocal, a consideration of the probable ND mechanisms suggests that the early spermatocyte (in stages including the premeiotic S phase) may be a favorable test object. The numerical sex-chromosome anomaly (NSA) method is useful not only in the study of ND but also in detecting breakage-derived chromosome losses induced in females, where the dominant lethal test is not easily applicable. PMID:387392

  9. Meiotic Interactors of a Mitotic Gene TAO3 Revealed by Functional Analysis of its Rare Variant

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Nitin, Rachana; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Studying the molecular consequences of rare genetic variants has the potential to identify novel and hitherto uncharacterized pathways causally contributing to phenotypic variation. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of a rare coding variant of TAO3, previously reported to contribute significantly to sporulation efficiency variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During mitosis, the common TAO3 allele interacts with CBK1—a conserved NDR kinase. Both TAO3 and CBK1 are components of the RAM signaling network that regulates cell separation and polarization during mitosis. We demonstrate that the role of the rare allele TAO3(4477C) in meiosis is distinct from its role in mitosis by being independent of ACE2—a RAM network target gene. By quantitatively measuring cell morphological dynamics, and expressing the TAO3(4477C) allele conditionally during sporulation, we show that TAO3 has an early role in meiosis. This early role of TAO3 coincides with entry of cells into meiotic division. Time-resolved transcriptome analyses during early sporulation identified regulators of carbon and lipid metabolic pathways as candidate mediators. We show experimentally that, during sporulation, the TAO3(4477C) allele interacts genetically with ERT1 and PIP2, regulators of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis metabolic pathways, respectively. We thus uncover a meiotic functional role for TAO3, and identify ERT1 and PIP2 as novel regulators of sporulation efficiency. Our results demonstrate that studying the causal effects of genetic variation on the underlying molecular network has the potential to provide a more extensive understanding of the pathways driving a complex trait. PMID:27317780

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum reorganizations and Ca2+ signaling in maturing and fertilized oocytes of marine protostome worms: the roles of MAPKs and MPF.

    PubMed

    Stricker, Stephen A; Smythe, Toni L

    2003-07-01

    Before a proper Ca(2+) response is produced at fertilization, oocytes typically undergo a maturation process during which their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is restructured. In marine protostome worms belonging to the phylum Nemertea, the ER of maturing oocytes forms numerous distinct clusters that are about 5 micro m in diameter. After fertilization, mature oocytes with such aggregates generate a normal series of Ca(2+) oscillations and eventually disassemble their ER clusters at around the time that the oscillations cease. Immature oocytes, however, lack prominent ER clusters and fail to exhibit repetitive Ca(2+) oscillations upon insemination, collectively suggesting that cell cycle-related changes in ER structure may play a role in Ca(2+) signaling. To assess the effects of meiotic regulators on the morphology of the ER and the type of Ca(2+) response that is produced at fertilization, nemertean oocytes were treated with pharmacological modulators of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) or maturation-promoting factor (MPF) prior to confocal microscopic analyses. Based on such imaging studies and correlative assays of kinase activities, MAPKs of the ERK1/2 type (extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2) do not seem to be essential for either structural reorganizations of the ER or repetitive Ca(2+) signaling at fertilization. Conversely, MPF levels appear to modulate both ER structure and the capacity to produce normal Ca(2+) oscillations. The significance of these findings is discussed with respect to other reports on ER structure, MPF cycling and Ca(2+) signaling in oocytes of deuterostome animals. PMID:12756171

  11. Reorganization of Photospheric Magnetic Fields in Active Regions During Energetic Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, J. C.; Wrasse, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    The reorganization of the photospheric magnetic field may be important for flaring activity. In this work we use the time evolution of the magnetic power spectra to identify for which length scales the reorganization of the active region magnetic field is most closely related to energetic flares. Our results show that the reorganization occurs mainly for length scales larger than 12.6 Mm and may start much before the time of the flare, but the time evolution of magnetic power spectra does not show regular patterns. An analysis of the dissipation spectra suggests that the dissipation takes place at all spatial scales, including small wavenumbers in which more energy is available.

  12. Reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids: A molecular Debye-Hueckel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Tiejun; Song Xueyu

    2013-03-21

    The reorganization energy of electron transfer processes in ionic fluids is studied under the linear response approximation using a molecule Debye-Hueckel theory. Reorganization energies of some model reactants of electron transfer reactions in molten salts are obtained from molecular simulations and a molecule Debye-Hueckel approach. Good agreements between simulation results and the results from our theoretical calculations using the same model Hamiltonian are found. Applications of our theory to electron transfer reactions in room temperature ionic liquids further demonstrate that our theoretical approach presents a reliable and accurate methodology for the estimation of reorganization energies of electron transfer reactions in ionic fluids.

  13. Nuclear actin and myosins in adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fuchsova, Beata; Serebryannyy, Leonid A; de Lanerolle, Primal

    2015-11-01

    Adenovirus serotypes have been shown to cause drastic changes in nuclear organization, including the transcription machinery, during infection. This ability of adenovirus to subvert transcription in the host cell facilitates viral replication. Because nuclear actin and nuclear myosin I, myosin V and myosin VI have been implicated as direct regulators of transcription and important factors in the replication of other viruses, we sought to determine how nuclear actin and myosins are involved in adenovirus infection. We first confirmed reorganization of the host's transcription machinery to viral replication centers. We found that nuclear actin also reorganizes to sites of transcription through the intermediate but not the advanced late phase of viral infection. Furthermore, nuclear myosin I localized with nuclear actin and sites of transcription in viral replication centers. Intriguingly, nuclear myosins V and VI, which also reorganized to viral replication centers, exhibited different localization patterns, suggesting specialized roles for these nuclear myosins. Finally, we assessed the role of actin in adenovirus infection and found both cytoplasmic and nuclear actin likely play roles in adenovirus infection and replication. Together our data suggest the involvement of actin and multiple myosins in the nuclear replication and late viral gene expression of adenovirus. PMID:26226218

  14. Structural reorganization of cylindrical nanoparticles triggered by polylactide stereocomplexation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Kirby, Nigel; Schiller, Tara L; Sanchez, Ana M; Dyson, M Adam; Sloan, Jeremy; Wilson, Neil R; O'Reilly, Rachel K; Dove, Andrew P

    2014-01-01

    Co-crystallization of polymers with different configurations/tacticities provides access to materials with enhanced performance. The stereocomplexation of isotactic poly(L-lactide) and poly(D-lactide) has led to improved properties compared with each homochiral material. Herein, we report the preparation of stereocomplex micelles from a mixture of poly(L-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) and poly(D-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) diblock copolymers in water via crystallization-driven self-assembly. During the formation of these stereocomplex micelles, an unexpected morphological transition results in the formation of dense crystalline spherical micelles rather than cylinders. Furthermore, mixture of cylinders with opposite homochirality in either THF/H2O mixtures or in pure water at 65 °C leads to disassembly into stereocomplexed spherical micelles. Similarly, a transition is also observed in a related PEO-b-PLLA/PEO-b-PDLA system, demonstrating wider applicability. This new mechanism for morphological reorganization, through competitive crystallization and stereocomplexation and without the requirement for an external stimulus, allows for new opportunities in controlled release and delivery applications. PMID:25517544

  15. Reorganization of the North Atlantic Oscillation during early Holocene deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Dietrich, Stephan; Fietzke, Jan; Fohlmeister, Jens; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Scholz, Denis; Richter, Detlev K.; Sabaoui, Abdellah; Spötl, Christoph; Lohmann, Gerrit; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    The North Atlantic Oscillation is the dominant atmospheric pressure mode in the North Atlantic region and affects winter temperature and precipitation in the Mediterranean, northwest Europe, Greenland, and Asia. The index that describes the sea-level pressure difference between Iceland and the Azores is correlated with a dipole precipitation pattern over northwest Europe and northwest Africa. How the North Atlantic Oscillation will develop as the Greenland ice sheet melts is unclear. A potential past analogue is the early Holocene, during which melting ice sheets around the North Atlantic freshened surface waters, affecting the strength of the meridional overturning circulation. Here we present a Holocene rainfall record from northwest Africa based on speleothem δ18O and compare it against a speleothem-based rainfall record from Europe. The two records are positively correlated during the early Holocene, followed by a shift to an anti-correlation, similar to the modern record, during the mid-Holocene. On the basis of our simulations with an Earth system model, we suggest the shift to the anti-correlation reflects a large-scale atmospheric and oceanic reorganization in response to the demise of the Laurentide ice sheet and a strong reduction of meltwater flux to the North Atlantic, pointing to a potential sensitivity of the North Atlantic Oscillation to the melting of ice sheets.

  16. Membrane indentation triggers clathrin lattice reorganization and fluidization.

    PubMed

    Cordella, Nicholas; Lampo, Thomas J; Melosh, Nicholas; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2015-01-21

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis involves the coordinated assembly of clathrin cages around membrane indentations, necessitating fluid-like reorganization followed by solid-like stabilization. This apparent duality in clathrin's in vivo behavior provides some indication that the physical interactions between clathrin triskelia and the membrane effect a local response that triggers fluid-solid transformations within the clathrin lattice. We develop a computational model to study the response of clathrin protein lattices to spherical deformations of the underlying flexible membrane. These deformations are similar to the shapes assumed during intracellular trafficking of nanoparticles. Through Monte Carlo simulations of clathrin-on-membrane systems, we observe that these membrane indentations give rise to a greater than normal defect density within the overlaid clathrin lattice. In many cases, the bulk surrounding lattice remains in a crystalline phase, and the extra defects are localized to the regions of large curvature. This can be explained by the fact that the in-plane elastic stress in the clathrin lattice are reduced by coupling defects to highly curved regions. The presence of defects brought about by indentation can result in the fluidization of a lattice that would otherwise be crystalline, resulting in an indentation-driven, defect-mediated phase transition. Altering subunit elasticity or membrane properties is shown to drive a similar transition, and we present phase diagrams that map out the combined effects of these parameters on clathrin lattice properties. PMID:25412023

  17. Cold acclimation wholly reorganizes the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome and metabolome.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Heath A; Knee, Jose M; Dennis, Alice B; Udaka, Hiroko; Marshall, Katie E; Merritt, Thomas J S; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-01-01

    Cold tolerance is a key determinant of insect distribution and abundance, and thermal acclimation can strongly influence organismal stress tolerance phenotypes, particularly in small ectotherms like Drosophila. However, there is limited understanding of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that confer such impressive plasticity. Here, we use high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to compare the transcriptomes and metabolomes of D. melanogaster acclimated as adults to warm (rearing) (21.5 °C) or cold conditions (6 °C). Cold acclimation improved cold tolerance and led to extensive biological reorganization: almost one third of the transcriptome and nearly half of the metabolome were differentially regulated. There was overlap in the metabolic pathways identified via transcriptomics and metabolomics, with proline and glutathione metabolism being the most strongly-supported metabolic pathways associated with increased cold tolerance. We discuss several new targets in the study of insect cold tolerance (e.g. dopamine signaling and Na(+)-driven transport), but many previously identified candidate genes and pathways (e.g. heat shock proteins, Ca(2+) signaling, and ROS detoxification) were also identified in the present study, and our results are thus consistent with and extend the current understanding of the mechanisms of insect chilling tolerance. PMID:27357258

  18. Plate boundary re-organization in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wortel, M. J.; Govers, R. M.; Baes, M.

    2010-12-01

    The TOPO-EUROPE ESF Collaborative Research Project TOPOMED addresses an intriguing process of plate boundary re-organization, considered to be active in the western Mediterranean region. The opening of the Algero-Provencal Basin (between Spain, Corsica-Sardinia and NW Africa) by roll-back of the African lithosphere, led to collision of the migrating arc-trench system with the NW African (Maghrebian) continental margin, in the M. Miocene. TOPOMED investigates the hypothesis that this event prompted the subsequent and probably still ongoing evolution of the Calabrian Arc in the east, and possibly that of the Gibraltar Arc in the west. In this contribution we focus on the role of STEP faults (Subduction-Transform-Edge-Propagators [Govers and Wortel, EPSL 2005]) in the evolution of the arcs. Furthermore, seismic activity along the margins of NW Africa and northern Sicily indicates the possibility that a new subduction zone is being formed, accommodating the continuing ~ N-S motion between Africa and Eurasia (Europe) after arc-continent collision. The postulated processes involved are subduction polarity reversal and subduction initiation along a STEP fault. The Mediterranean setting offers unique opportunities to study the arcs’ evolution and the subduction initiation process in a natural setting. We explore the differences between the margins’ settings on the basis of observations and report on numerical modeling results pertaining to the inferred processes of subduction initiation.

  19. Mechanism of filopodia initiation by reorganization of a dendritic network

    PubMed Central

    Svitkina, Tatyana M.; Bulanova, Elena A.; Chaga, Oleg Y.; Vignjevic, Danijela M.; Kojima, Shin-ichiro; Vasiliev, Jury M.; Borisy, Gary G.

    2003-01-01

    Afilopodium protrudes by elongation of bundled actin filaments in its core. However, the mechanism of filopodia initiation remains unknown. Using live-cell imaging with GFP-tagged proteins and correlative electron microscopy, we performed a kinetic-structural analysis of filopodial initiation in B16F1 melanoma cells. Filopodial bundles arose not by a specific nucleation event, but by reorganization of the lamellipodial dendritic network analogous to fusion of established filopodia but occurring at the level of individual filaments. Subsets of independently nucleated lamellipodial filaments elongated and gradually associated with each other at their barbed ends, leading to formation of cone-shaped structures that we term Λ-precursors. An early marker of initiation was the gradual coalescence of GFP-vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (GFP-VASP) fluorescence at the leading edge into discrete foci. The GFP-VASP foci were associated with Λ-precursors, whereas Arp2/3 was not. Subsequent recruitment of fascin to the clustered barbed ends of Λ-precursors initiated filament bundling and completed formation of the nascent filopodium. We propose a convergent elongation model of filopodia initiation, stipulating that filaments within the lamellipodial dendritic network acquire privileged status by binding a set of molecules (including VASP) to their barbed ends, which protect them from capping and mediate association of barbed ends with each other. PMID:12566431

  20. Mechanism of filopodia initiation by reorganization of a dendritic network.

    PubMed

    Svitkina, Tatyana M; Bulanova, Elena A; Chaga, Oleg Y; Vignjevic, Danijela M; Kojima, Shin-ichiro; Vasiliev, Jury M; Borisy, Gary G

    2003-02-01

    Afilopodium protrudes by elongation of bundled actin filaments in its core. However, the mechanism of filopodia initiation remains unknown. Using live-cell imaging with GFP-tagged proteins and correlative electron microscopy, we performed a kinetic-structural analysis of filopodial initiation in B16F1 melanoma cells. Filopodial bundles arose not by a specific nucleation event, but by reorganization of the lamellipodial dendritic network analogous to fusion of established filopodia but occurring at the level of individual filaments. Subsets of independently nucleated lamellipodial filaments elongated and gradually associated with each other at their barbed ends, leading to formation of cone-shaped structures that we term Lambda-precursors. An early marker of initiation was the gradual coalescence of GFP-vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (GFP-VASP) fluorescence at the leading edge into discrete foci. The GFP-VASP foci were associated with Lambda-precursors, whereas Arp2/3 was not. Subsequent recruitment of fascin to the clustered barbed ends of Lambda-precursors initiated filament bundling and completed formation of the nascent filopodium. We propose a convergent elongation model of filopodia initiation, stipulating that filaments within the lamellipodial dendritic network acquire privileged status by binding a set of molecules (including VASP) to their barbed ends, which protect them from capping and mediate association of barbed ends with each other. PMID:12566431

  1. Behavioral Consequences and Cortical Reorganization in Homonymous Hemianopia

    PubMed Central

    Chokron, Sylvie; Perez, Céline; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The most common visual defect to follow a lesion of the retrochiasmal pathways is homonymous hemianopia (HH), whereby, in each eye, patients are blind to the contralesional visual field. From a behavioral perspective, in addition to exhibiting a severe deficit in their contralesional visual field, hemianopic patients can also present implicit residual capacities, now usually referred to collectively as blindsight. It was recently demonstrated that HH patients can also suffer from a subtle deficit in their ipsilesional visual field, called sightblindness (the reverse case of blindsight). Furthermore, the nature of the visual deficit in the contralesional and ipsilesional visual fields, as well as the pattern of functional reorganization in the occipital lobe of HH patients after stroke, all appear to depend on the lesion side. In addition to their contralesional and ipsilesional visual deficits, and to their residual capacities, HH patients can also experience visual hallucinations in their blind field, the physiopathological mechanisms of which remain poorly understood. Herein we review blindsight in terms of its better-known aspects as well as its less-studied clinical signs such as sightblindness, hemispheric specialization and visual hallucinations. We also discuss the implications of recent experimental findings for rehabilitation of visual field defects in hemianopic patients. PMID:27445717

  2. Dynamic reorganization of functional brain networks during picture naming.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Benquet, Pascal; Biraben, Arnaud; Berrou, Claude; Dufor, Olivier; Wendling, Fabrice

    2015-12-01

    For efficient information processing during cognitive activity, functional brain networks have to rapidly and dynamically reorganize on a sub-second time scale. Tracking the spatiotemporal dynamics of large scale networks over this short time duration is a very challenging issue. Here, we tackle this problem by using dense electroencephalography (EEG) recorded during a picture naming task. We found that (i) the picture naming task can be divided into six brain network states (BNSs) characterized by significantly high synchronization of gamma (30-45 Hz) oscillations, (ii) fast transitions occur between these BNSs that last from 30 msec to 160 msec, (iii) based on the state of the art of the picture naming task, we consider that the spatial location of their nodes and edges, as well as the timing of transitions, indicate that each network can be associated with one or several specific function (from visual processing to articulation) and (iv) the comparison with previously-used approach aimed at localizing the sources showed that the network-based approach reveals networks that are more specific to the performed task. We speculate that the persistence of several brain regions in successive BNSs participates to fast and efficient information processing in the brain. PMID:26478964

  3. The yeast genome undergoes significant topological reorganization in quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Mark T.; Russo, Mariano; Belton, Jon-Matthew; Dekker, Job; Broach, James R.

    2015-01-01

    We have examined the three-dimensional organization of the yeast genome during quiescence by a chromosome capture technique as a means of understanding how genome organization changes during development. For exponentially growing cells we observe high levels of inter-centromeric interaction but otherwise a predominance of intrachromosomal interactions over interchromosomal interactions, consistent with aggregation of centromeres at the spindle pole body and compartmentalization of individual chromosomes within the nucleoplasm. Three major changes occur in the organization of the quiescent cell genome. First, intrachromosomal associations increase at longer distances in quiescence as compared to growing cells. This suggests that chromosomes undergo condensation in quiescence, which we confirmed by microscopy by measurement of the intrachromosomal distances between two sites on one chromosome. This compaction in quiescence requires the condensin complex. Second, inter-centromeric interactions decrease, consistent with prior data indicating that centromeres disperse along an array of microtubules during quiescence. Third, inter-telomeric interactions significantly increase in quiescence, an observation also confirmed by direct measurement. Thus, survival during quiescence is associated with substantial topological reorganization of the genome. PMID:26202961

  4. The yeast genome undergoes significant topological reorganization in quiescence.

    PubMed

    Rutledge, Mark T; Russo, Mariano; Belton, Jon-Matthew; Dekker, Job; Broach, James R

    2015-09-30

    We have examined the three-dimensional organization of the yeast genome during quiescence by a chromosome capture technique as a means of understanding how genome organization changes during development. For exponentially growing cells we observe high levels of inter-centromeric interaction but otherwise a predominance of intrachromosomal interactions over interchromosomal interactions, consistent with aggregation of centromeres at the spindle pole body and compartmentalization of individual chromosomes within the nucleoplasm. Three major changes occur in the organization of the quiescent cell genome. First, intrachromosomal associations increase at longer distances in quiescence as compared to growing cells. This suggests that chromosomes undergo condensation in quiescence, which we confirmed by microscopy by measurement of the intrachromosomal distances between two sites on one chromosome. This compaction in quiescence requires the condensin complex. Second, inter-centromeric interactions decrease, consistent with prior data indicating that centromeres disperse along an array of microtubules during quiescence. Third, inter-telomeric interactions significantly increase in quiescence, an observation also confirmed by direct measurement. Thus, survival during quiescence is associated with substantial topological reorganization of the genome. PMID:26202961

  5. Behavioral Consequences and Cortical Reorganization in Homonymous Hemianopia.

    PubMed

    Chokron, Sylvie; Perez, Céline; Peyrin, Carole

    2016-01-01

    The most common visual defect to follow a lesion of the retrochiasmal pathways is homonymous hemianopia (HH), whereby, in each eye, patients are blind to the contralesional visual field. From a behavioral perspective, in addition to exhibiting a severe deficit in their contralesional visual field, hemianopic patients can also present implicit residual capacities, now usually referred to collectively as blindsight. It was recently demonstrated that HH patients can also suffer from a subtle deficit in their ipsilesional visual field, called sightblindness (the reverse case of blindsight). Furthermore, the nature of the visual deficit in the contralesional and ipsilesional visual fields, as well as the pattern of functional reorganization in the occipital lobe of HH patients after stroke, all appear to depend on the lesion side. In addition to their contralesional and ipsilesional visual deficits, and to their residual capacities, HH patients can also experience visual hallucinations in their blind field, the physiopathological mechanisms of which remain poorly understood. Herein we review blindsight in terms of its better-known aspects as well as its less-studied clinical signs such as sightblindness, hemispheric specialization and visual hallucinations. We also discuss the implications of recent experimental findings for rehabilitation of visual field defects in hemianopic patients. PMID:27445717

  6. Cold acclimation wholly reorganizes the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome and metabolome

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Heath A.; Knee, Jose M.; Dennis, Alice B.; Udaka, Hiroko; Marshall, Katie E.; Merritt, Thomas J. S.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold tolerance is a key determinant of insect distribution and abundance, and thermal acclimation can strongly influence organismal stress tolerance phenotypes, particularly in small ectotherms like Drosophila. However, there is limited understanding of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that confer such impressive plasticity. Here, we use high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to compare the transcriptomes and metabolomes of D. melanogaster acclimated as adults to warm (rearing) (21.5 °C) or cold conditions (6 °C). Cold acclimation improved cold tolerance and led to extensive biological reorganization: almost one third of the transcriptome and nearly half of the metabolome were differentially regulated. There was overlap in the metabolic pathways identified via transcriptomics and metabolomics, with proline and glutathione metabolism being the most strongly-supported metabolic pathways associated with increased cold tolerance. We discuss several new targets in the study of insect cold tolerance (e.g. dopamine signaling and Na+-driven transport), but many previously identified candidate genes and pathways (e.g. heat shock proteins, Ca2+ signaling, and ROS detoxification) were also identified in the present study, and our results are thus consistent with and extend the current understanding of the mechanisms of insect chilling tolerance. PMID:27357258

  7. Increased spatial variance accompanies reorganization of two continental shelf ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Litzow, Michael A; Urban, J Daniel; Laurel, Benjamin J

    2008-09-01

    Phase transitions between alternate stable states in marine ecosystems lead to disruptive changes in ecosystem services, especially fisheries productivity. We used trawl survey data spanning phase transitions in the North Pacific (Gulf of Alaska) and the North Atlantic (Scotian Shelf) to test for increases in ecosystem variability that might provide early warning of such transitions. In both time series, elevated spatial variability in a measure of community composition (ratio of cod [Gadus sp.] abundance to prey abundance) accompanied transitions between ecosystem states, and variability was negatively correlated with distance from the ecosystem transition point. In the Gulf of Alaska, where the phase transition was apparently the result of a sudden perturbation (climate regime shift), variance increased one year before the transition in mean state occurred. On the Scotian Shelf, where ecosystem reorganization was the result of persistent overfishing, a significant increase in variance occurred three years before the transition in mean state was detected. However, we could not reject the alternate explanation that increased variance may also have simply been inherent to the final stable state in that ecosystem. Increased variance has been previously observed around transition points in models, but rarely in real ecosystems, and our results demonstrate the possible management value in tracking the variance of key parameters in exploited ecosystems. PMID:18767612

  8. Structural reorganization of cylindrical nanoparticles triggered by polylactide stereocomplexation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang; Pitto-Barry, Anaïs; Kirby, Nigel; Schiller, Tara L.; Sanchez, Ana M.; Dyson, M. Adam; Sloan, Jeremy; Wilson, Neil R.; O’Reilly, Rachel K.; Dove, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Co-crystallization of polymers with different configurations/tacticities provides access to materials with enhanced performance. The stereocomplexation of isotactic poly(L-lactide) and poly(D-lactide) has led to improved properties compared with each homochiral material. Herein, we report the preparation of stereocomplex micelles from a mixture of poly(L-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) and poly(D-lactide)-b-poly(acrylic acid) diblock copolymers in water via crystallization-driven self-assembly. During the formation of these stereocomplex micelles, an unexpected morphological transition results in the formation of dense crystalline spherical micelles rather than cylinders. Furthermore, mixture of cylinders with opposite homochirality in either THF/H2O mixtures or in pure water at 65 °C leads to disassembly into stereocomplexed spherical micelles. Similarly, a transition is also observed in a related PEO-b-PLLA/PEO-b-PDLA system, demonstrating wider applicability. This new mechanism for morphological reorganization, through competitive crystallization and stereocomplexation and without the requirement for an external stimulus, allows for new opportunities in controlled release and delivery applications. PMID:25517544

  9. Supervillin Reorganizes the Actin Cytoskeleton and Increases Invadopodial Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, Jessica L.; Smith, Tara C.; Fang, Zhiyou; Takizawa, Norio

    2009-01-01

    Tumor cells use actin-rich protrusions called invadopodia to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM) and invade tissues; related structures, termed podosomes, are sites of dynamic ECM interaction. We show here that supervillin (SV), a peripheral membrane protein that binds F-actin and myosin II, reorganizes the actin cytoskeleton and potentiates invadopodial function. Overexpressed SV induces redistribution of lamellipodial cortactin and lamellipodin/RAPH1/PREL1 away from the cell periphery to internal sites and concomitantly increases the numbers of F-actin punctae. Most punctae are highly dynamic and colocalize with the podosome/invadopodial proteins, cortactin, Tks5, and cdc42. Cortactin binds SV sequences in vitro and contributes to the formation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-SV induced punctae. SV localizes to the cores of Src-generated podosomes in COS-7 cells and with invadopodia in MDA-MB-231 cells. EGFP-SV overexpression increases average numbers of ECM holes per cell; RNA interference-mediated knockdown of SV decreases these numbers. Although SV knockdown alone has no effect, simultaneous down-regulation of SV and the closely related protein gelsolin reduces invasion through ECM. Together, our results show that SV is a component of podosomes and invadopodia and that SV plays a role in invadopodial function, perhaps as a mediator of cortactin localization, activation state, and/or dynamics of metalloproteinases at the ventral cell surface. PMID:19109420

  10. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT

    PubMed Central

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-01-01

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT–histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3–H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid–H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3–H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A–H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  11. An improved algorithm of fiber tractography demonstrates postischemic cerebral reorganization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-dong; Lu, Jie; Yao, Li; Li, Kun-cheng; Zhao, Xiao-jie

    2008-03-01

    In vivo white matter tractography by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) accurately represents the organizational architecture of white matter in the vicinity of brain lesions and especially ischemic brain. In this study, we suggested an improved fiber tracking algorithm based on TEND, called TENDAS, for tensor deflection with adaptive stepping, which had been introduced a stepping framework for interpreting the algorithm behavior as a function of the tensor shape (linear-shaped or not) and tract history. The propagation direction at each step was given by the deflection vector. TENDAS tractography was used to examine a 17-year-old recovery patient with congenital right hemisphere artery stenosis combining with fMRI. Meaningless picture location was used as spatial working memory task in this study. We detected the shifted functional localization to the contralateral homotypic cortex and more prominent and extensive left-sided parietal and medial frontal cortical activations which were used directly as seed mask for tractography for the reconstruction of individual spatial parietal pathways. Comparing with the TEND algorithms, TENDAS shows smoother and less sharp bending characterization of white matter architecture of the parietal cortex. The results of this preliminary study were twofold. First, TENDAS may provide more adaptability and accuracy in reconstructing certain anatomical features, whereas it is very difficult to verify tractography maps of white matter connectivity in the living human brain. Second, our study indicates that combination of TENDAS and fMRI provide a unique image of functional cortical reorganization and structural modifications of postischemic spatial working memory.

  12. Reorganization of the brain and heart rhythm during autogenic meditation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae-Keun; Rhee, Jyoo-Hi; Kang, Seung Wan

    2014-01-01

    The underlying changes in heart coherence that are associated with reported EEG changes in response to meditation have been explored. We measured EEG and heart rate variability (HRV) before and during autogenic meditation. Fourteen subjects participated in the study. Heart coherence scores were significantly increased during meditation compared to the baseline. We found near significant decrease in high beta absolute power, increase in alpha relative power and significant increases in lower (alpha) and higher (above beta) band coherence during 3~min epochs of heart coherent meditation compared to 3~min epochs of heart non-coherence at baseline. The coherence and relative power increase in alpha band and absolute power decrease in high beta band could reflect relaxation state during the heart coherent meditation. The coherence increase in the higher (above beta) band could reflect cortico-cortical local integration and thereby affect cognitive reorganization, simultaneously with relaxation. Further research is still needed for a confirmation of heart coherence as a simple window for the meditative state. PMID:24454283

  13. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26237312

  14. Integrated molecular mechanism directing nucleosome reorganization by human FACT.

    PubMed

    Tsunaka, Yasuo; Fujiwara, Yoshie; Oyama, Takuji; Hirose, Susumu; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2016-03-15

    Facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) plays essential roles in chromatin remodeling during DNA transcription, replication, and repair. Our structural and biochemical studies of human FACT-histone interactions present precise views of nucleosome reorganization, conducted by the FACT-SPT16 (suppressor of Ty 16) Mid domain and its adjacent acidic AID segment. AID accesses the H2B N-terminal basic region exposed by partial unwrapping of the nucleosomal DNA, thereby triggering the invasion of FACT into the nucleosome. The crystal structure of the Mid domain complexed with an H3-H4 tetramer exhibits two separate contact sites; the Mid domain forms a novel intermolecular β structure with H4. At the other site, the Mid-H2A steric collision on the H2A-docking surface of the H3-H4 tetramer within the nucleosome induces H2A-H2B displacement. This integrated mechanism results in disrupting the H3 αN helix, which is essential for retaining the nucleosomal DNA ends, and hence facilitates DNA stripping from histone. PMID:26966247

  15. Enhancing physical activity and brain reorganization after stroke.

    PubMed

    Carr, Janet H; Shepherd, Roberta B

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that, if reorganization of brain function is to be optimal after stroke, there needs to be a reorganisation of the methods used in physical rehabilitation and the time spent in specific task practice, strength and endurance training, and aerobic exercise. Frequency and intensity of rehabilitation need to be increased so that patients can gain the energy levels and vigour necessary for participation in physical activity both during rehabilitation and after discharge. It is evident that many patients are discharged from inpatient rehabilitation severely deconditioned, meaning that their energy levels are too low for active participation in daily life. Physicians, therapists, and nursing staff responsible for rehabilitation practice should address this issue not only during inpatient rehabilitation but also after discharge by promoting and supporting community-based exercise opportunities. During inpatient rehabilitation, group sessions should be frequent and need to include specific aerobic training. Physiotherapy must take advantage of the training aids available, including exercise equipment such as treadmills, and of new developments in computerised feedback systems, robotics, and electromechanical trainers. For illustrative purposes, this paper focuses on the role of physiotherapists, but the necessary changes in practice and in attitude will require cooperation from many others. PMID:21766024

  16. Germinal Excisions of the Maize Transposon Activator Do Not Stimulate Meiotic Recombination or Homology-Dependent Repair at the Bz Locus

    PubMed Central

    Dooner, H. K.; Martinez-Ferez, I. M.

    1997-01-01

    Double-strand breaks have been implicated both in the initiation of meiotic recombination in yeast and as intermediates in the transposition process of nonreplicative transposons. Some transposons of this class, notably P of Drosophila and Tc1 of Caenorhabditis elegans, promote a form of homology-dependent premeiotic gene conversion upon excision. In this work, we have looked for evidence of an interaction between Ac transposition and meiotic recombination at the bz locus in maize. We find that the frequency of meiotic recombination between homologues is not enhanced by the presence of Ac in one of the bz heteroalleles and, conversely, that the presence of a homologous sequence in either trans (homologous chromosome) or cis (tandem duplication) does not promote conversion of the Ac insertion site. However, a tandem duplication of the bz locus may be destabilized by the insertion of Ac. We discuss possible reasons for the lack of interaction between Ac excision and homologous meiotic recombination in maize. PMID:9409847

  17. Functional reorganization of the brain in humans following spinal cord injury: evidence for underlying changes in cortical anatomy.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Luke A; Gustin, Sylvia M; Macey, Paul M; Wrigley, Paul J; Siddall, Philip J

    2011-02-16

    Loss of somatosensory drive results in functional reorganization of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). While the phenomenon of functional cortical reorganization is well established, it remains unknown whether in humans, functional reorganization results from changes in brain anatomy, or simply reflects an unmasking of already existing dormant synapses. In 20 subjects with complete thoracic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) and 23 controls, we used functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging to determine whether SI reorganization was associated with changes in SI anatomy. SCI resulted in a significant SI reorganization, with the little finger representation moving medially toward the lower body representation (i.e., area of sensory loss). Furthermore, although SCI was associated with gray matter volume loss in the lower body representation, this loss was minimized as reorganization increased. That is, the greater the medial shift in little finger representation, the greater the gray matter preservation in the lower body representation. In addition, in the region of greatest SI reorganization (little finger), fractional anisotropy was correlated with SI reorganization. That is, as SI reorganization increased, the extent of aligned structures decreased. Finally, although thalamocortical fibers remained unchanged, the ease and direction of water movement within the little finger representation was altered, being directed more toward the midline in SCI subjects. These data show that SI reorganization following SCI is associated with changes in SI anatomy and provide compelling evidence that SI reorganization in humans results from the growth of new lateral connections, and not simply from the unmasking of already existing lateral connections. PMID:21325531

  18. Cytoskeletal reorganization during process of apoptosis induced by cytostatic drugs in K-562 and HL-60 leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Grzanka, A; Grzanka, D; Orlikowska, M

    2003-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the reorganization of F-actin, vimentin and tubulin in K-562 and HL-60 cell lines during apoptosis induced by etoposide, doxorubicin and taxol. The distribution of cytoskeletal proteins was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. Actin was also studied by confocal microscopy and at the ultrastructural level. Changes in the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins were found to be dose-dependent and appeared to be more intense in HL-60 cells. Etoposide- and doxorubicin-treated cells showed similar changes in the distribution of F-actin, vimentin and tubulin. The reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins seemed to be consistent with features of apoptosis. An increase in bright staining of F-actin, vimentin and tubulin at the site of apoptotic bodies formation was observed. Immunogold labeling of actin in HL-60 cells was associated with features typical for apoptosis, i.e. compaction and margination of nuclear chromatin. K-562 cells showed cytoplasmic actin-positivity in the cytoplasm. Significant changes in morphology of HL-60 cells were found in the following concentrations: etoposide 20, 200 microM; doxorubicin 5, 10 microM and taxol 2-10 microM. The investigated proteins seemed to be involved in the above-reported apoptotic changes. Bright staining of F-actin, vimentin and tubulin, concentrated at the site of apoptotic bodies formation might suggested importance of these proteins for this process. Moreover, the increase in actin labeling in areas of chromatin compaction and margination of nuclear chromatin especially in HL-60 cells, which are more susceptible to apoptosis might implicate that actin might be involved in the chromatin remodeling during apoptosis. PMID:14555241

  19. 7 CFR 4290.470 - Prior approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of RBIC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... BUSINESS INVESTMENT COMPANY (âRBICâ) PROGRAM Changes in Ownership, Structure, or Control Change in Structure of Rbic § 4290.470 Prior approval of merger, consolidation, or reorganization of RBIC. You may...

  20. Neuropathic pain and primary somatosensory cortex reorganization following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wrigley, P J; Press, S R; Gustin, S M; Macefield, V G; Gandevia, S C; Cousins, M J; Middleton, J W; Henderson, L A; Siddall, P J

    2009-01-01

    The most obvious impairments associated with spinal cord injury (SCI) are loss of sensation and motor control. However, many subjects with SCI also develop persistent neuropathic pain below the injury which is often severe, debilitating and refractory to treatment. The underlying mechanisms of persistent neuropathic SCI pain remain poorly understood. Reports in amputees describing phantom limb pain demonstrate a positive correlation between pain intensity and the amount of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) reorganization. Of note, this S1 reorganization has also been shown to reverse with pain reduction. It is unknown whether a similar association between S1 reorganization and pain intensity exists in subjects with SCI. The aim of this investigation was to determine whether the degree of S1 reorganization following SCI correlated with on-going neuropathic pain intensity. In 20 complete SCI subjects (10 with neuropathic pain, 10 without neuropathic pain) and 21 control subjects without SCI, the somatosensory cortex was mapped using functional magnetic resonance imaging during light brushing of the right little finger, thumb and lip. S1 reorganization was demonstrated in SCI subjects with the little finger activation point moving medially towards the S1 region that would normally innervate the legs. The amount of S1 reorganization in subjects with SCI significantly correlated with on-going pain intensity levels. This study provides evidence of a link between the degree of cortical reorganization and the intensity of persistent neuropathic pain following SCI. Strategies aimed at reversing somatosensory cortical reorganization may have therapeutic potential in central neuropathic pain. PMID:19027233