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Sample records for melah lagoon ne

  1. Spring and Summer Proliferation of Floating Macroalgae in a Mediterranean Coastal Lagoon (Tancada Lagoon, Ebro Delta, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, M.; Comín, F. A.

    2000-08-01

    During the last 10 years, a drastic change in the structure of the community of primary producers has been observed in Tancada Lagoon (Ebro Delta, NE Spain). This consisted of a decrease in the abundance of submerged rooted macrophyte cover and a spring and summer increase in floating macroalgae. Two spatial patterns have been observed. In the west part of the lagoon, Chaetomorpha linum Kützing, dominated during winter and decreased progressively in spring when Cladophora sp. reached its maximum development. In the east part of the lagoon, higher macroalgal diversity was observed, together with lower cover in winter and early spring. Cladophora sp., Gracilaria verrucosa Papenfuss and Chondria tenuissima Agardh, increased cover and biomass in summer. Maximum photosynthetic production was observed in spring for G. verrucosa (10·9 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) and C. tenuissima (19·0 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) in contrast with Cladophora sp. (15·9 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) and Chaetomorpha linum (7·2 mg O 2 g -1 DW h -1) which reached maximum production in summer. Increased conductivity from reduced freshwater inflow, and higher water temperatures during periods of lagoon isolation, mainly in summer, were the main physical factors associated with an increase in floating macroalgal biomass across the lagoon. Reduced nitrogen availability and temperature-related changes in carbon availability during summer were related to a decrease in abundance of C. linum and increases in G. verrucosa and Cladophora sp.

  2. Coastal Evolution in a Mediterranean Microtidal Zone: Mid to Late Holocene Natural Dynamics and Human Management of the Castelló Lagoon, NE Spain.

    PubMed

    Ejarque, Ana; Julià, Ramon; Reed, Jane M; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc; Marco-Barba, Javier; Riera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We present a palaeoenvironmental study of the Castelló lagoon (NE Spain), an important archive for understanding long-term interactions between dynamic littoral ecosystems and human management. Combining geochemistry, mineralogy, ostracods, diatoms, pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, charcoal and archaeo-historical datasets we reconstruct: 1) the transition of the lagoon from a marine to a marginal environment between ~3150 cal BC to the 17th century AD; 2) fluctuations in salinity; and 3) natural and anthropogenic forces contributing to these changes. From the Late Neolithic to the Medieval period the lagoon ecosystem was driven by changing marine influence and the land was mainly exploited for grazing, with little evidence for impact on the natural woodland. Land-use exploitation adapted to natural coastal dynamics, with maximum marine flooding hampering agropastoral activities between ~1550 and ~150 cal BC. In contrast, societies actively controlled the lagoon dynamics and become a major agent of landscape transformation after the Medieval period. The removal of littoral woodlands after the 8th century was followed by the expansion of agrarian and industrial activities. Regional mining and smelting activities polluted the lagoon with heavy metals from the ~11th century onwards. The expansion of the milling industry and of agricultural lands led to the channelization of the river Muga into the lagoon after ~1250 cal AD. This caused its transformation into a freshwater lake, increased nutrient load, and the infilling and drainage of a great part of the lagoon. By tracking the shift towards an anthropogenically-controlled system around ~750 yr ago, this study points out Mediterranean lagoons as ancient and heavily-modified systems, with anthropogenic impacts and controls covering multi-centennial and even millennial timescales. Finally, we contributed to the future construction of reliable seashell-based chronologies in NE Spain by calibrating the Banyuls-sur-Mer

  3. Coastal Evolution in a Mediterranean Microtidal Zone: Mid to Late Holocene Natural Dynamics and Human Management of the Castelló Lagoon, NE Spain

    PubMed Central

    Ejarque, Ana; Julià, Ramon; Reed, Jane M.; Mesquita-Joanes, Francesc; Marco-Barba, Javier; Riera, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    We present a palaeoenvironmental study of the Castelló lagoon (NE Spain), an important archive for understanding long-term interactions between dynamic littoral ecosystems and human management. Combining geochemistry, mineralogy, ostracods, diatoms, pollen, non-pollen palynomorphs, charcoal and archaeo-historical datasets we reconstruct: 1) the transition of the lagoon from a marine to a marginal environment between ~3150 cal BC to the 17th century AD; 2) fluctuations in salinity; and 3) natural and anthropogenic forces contributing to these changes. From the Late Neolithic to the Medieval period the lagoon ecosystem was driven by changing marine influence and the land was mainly exploited for grazing, with little evidence for impact on the natural woodland. Land-use exploitation adapted to natural coastal dynamics, with maximum marine flooding hampering agropastoral activities between ~1550 and ~150 cal BC. In contrast, societies actively controlled the lagoon dynamics and become a major agent of landscape transformation after the Medieval period. The removal of littoral woodlands after the 8th century was followed by the expansion of agrarian and industrial activities. Regional mining and smelting activities polluted the lagoon with heavy metals from the ~11th century onwards. The expansion of the milling industry and of agricultural lands led to the channelization of the river Muga into the lagoon after ~1250 cal AD. This caused its transformation into a freshwater lake, increased nutrient load, and the infilling and drainage of a great part of the lagoon. By tracking the shift towards an anthropogenically-controlled system around ~750 yr ago, this study points out Mediterranean lagoons as ancient and heavily-modified systems, with anthropogenic impacts and controls covering multi-centennial and even millennial timescales. Finally, we contributed to the future construction of reliable seashell-based chronologies in NE Spain by calibrating the Banyuls-sur-Mer

  4. Exceptionally preserved insect fossils in the Late Jurassic lagoon of Orbagnoux (Rhône Valley, France)

    PubMed Central

    Nel, Patricia; Krieg-Jacquier, Régis; Pouillon, Jean-Marc

    2014-01-01

    The Late Kimmeridgian marine limestones of the area around Orbagnoux (Rhône, France) are well known for their fish fauna and terrestrial flora. Here we record the first insects and their activities (mines on leaves and trails in sediments) from these layers, including the oldest record of the gerromorphan bugs, as a new genus and species Gallomesovelia grioti, attributed to the most basal family Mesoveliidae and subfamily Madeoveliinae. These new fossils suggest the presence of a complex terrestrial palaeoecosystem on emerged lands near the lagoon where the limestones were deposited. The exquisite state of preservation of these fossils also suggests that these outcrops can potentially become an important Konservat-Lagerstätte for the Late Jurassic of Western Europe. PMID:25210652

  5. Pyrite as a proxy for the identification of former coastal lagoons in semiarid NE Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Tiago O.; Nóbrega, Gabriel N.; Albuquerque, Antonia G. B. M.; Sartor, Lucas R.; Gomes, Irlene S.; Artur, Adriana G.; Otero, Xosé L.

    2015-10-01

    This work aimed to test the suitability of pyrite (FeS2) as a proxy for reconstructing past marine environmental conditions along the semiarid coast of Brazil. Morphological description combined with physicochemical analyses including Fe partitioning were conducted for soil depth profiles (30 and 60 cm depths) at three sites in two contrasting lagoons of the state of Ceará: a suspected former lagoon that would have been transformed into a freshwater "lake" at a site vegetated by Juncus effusus (site P1), and another lagoon with connection to the sea at sites vegetated by J. effusus (site P2) or Portulaca oleracea (site P3). Soil samples were collected in September 2010. Site P3 had more reducing conditions, reaching Eh values of -132 mV in the surface layer (0-10 cm), whereas minimum values for the P1 and P2 sites were +219 and +85 mV, respectively. Lower pyritic Fe values were found at site P1, with a degree of pyritization (DOP) ranging from 10 to 13%. At sites P2 and P3, DOP ranged from 9 to 67% and from 55 to 72%, respectively. These results are consistent with an interruption of tidal channels by eolian dune migration inducing strong changes in the hydrodynamics and physicochemical characteristics (lower salinity, oxidizing conditions) of these sites, causing the dieback of suspected former mangroves and a succession to freshwater marshes with an intermediate salt marsh stage. Together with other physicochemical signatures, pyrite can evidently serve as a useful proxy in tracking environmental changes in such ecotones, with implications for coastal management.

  6. Zooplankton taxonomic and size diversity in Mediterranean coastal lagoons (NE Iberian Peninsula): Influence of hydrology, nutrient composition, food resource availability and predation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badosa, Anna; Boix, Dani; Brucet, Sandra; López-Flores, Rocío; Gascón, Stéphanie; Quintana, Xavier D.

    2007-01-01

    The influence of hydrology, nutrient composition, food resource availability and predation on zooplankton taxonomic and size diversity was analyzed in several shallow lagoons of a Mediterranean salt marsh (Baix Ter Wetlands, NE Iberian Peninsula). Taxonomic diversity correlated better with variables related to the trophic state, such as nutrient concentrations, whereas size diversity was more sensitive to fish predation. However, the fish predation influence on the size diversity was only significant when fishes reached high densities. Under low fish densities no predation effects were observed and the food resource availability (FR a) appeared to be more important in structuring the zooplankton community. Nevertheless, the two diversity indexes showed opposite responses to this factor. With increasing FR a the taxonomic diversity increased and the size diversity decreased. Neither taxonomic nor size diversity of the zooplankton community correlated with other physical or biotic factors such as hydrological variability or macroinvertebrate predation. The relationships found suggest that the size diversity is mainly related to biotic interactions, such as fish predation or inter/intraspecific competition, while the taxonomic diversity appears to be more sensitive to abiotic factors such as the nutrient composition.

  7. Upper Cretaceous and lower Paleogene benthic foraminiferal paleoecology from north-eastern Tunisia: El Melah section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallala, N.; Zaghbib-Turki, D.; Turki, M. M.; Arenillas, I.; Arz, J. A.; Molina, E.

    2009-04-01

    As an impact of the bolide and ejecta falls at the K/Pg boundary the planktonic Foraminifera have suffered sever mass extinction. However, no small Benthic Foraminifera species mass extinction at the K/Pg boundary has documented. Nevertheless many species have showed disturbance. The Maastrichtian assemblages may be different from those of the lower Paleogene by their species content, diversity and frequencies. At the El Melah section, the small benthic foraminifera indicate upper bathyal environment, and manifest significant faunal turnover. Until the uppermost Maastrichtian, their assemblages are highly diversified, with 109 species. They are dominated by endobenthic morphotypes (72 %). At the K/Pg boundary, although 34% of them seem to disappear, but only few species have really extinct such us Arenobulimina obesa. Nevertheless, the majority of species persist elsewhere at the Danian (e.g. Gaudryina aissana, Gaudryina inflata, Tritaxia midwayensis, Coryphostoma incrassata). At the lower Danian, the survivor Maastrichtian species are of 66%. Some of them disappeared temporary. Three survivor species were eclipsed during the Guembelitria cretacea zone (Globobulimina ovata, Praebulimina carseyae and Anomalinoides welleri) and 27 other species were diminished during the Parvularugoglobigerina eugubina subzone. They are composed of both calcareous fauna (e.g. Bulimina rugifera, Bolivina deccurens, Anomalinoides midwayensis, Dentalina colei, Marginulina cf. glabra) and agglutinated fauna (e.g. Spiroplectamina knebeli and Saccamina placenta). Throughout the Parasubbotina pseudobulloides subzone, 15 others species were progressively disappeared. They are oligotrophic and low oxygen tolerant. About the Masstrichtian species Gaudryina inflata, G. pyramidata and Tritaxia midwayensis. These species seem to be more trophic exigent.Besides, at the lower Danian, 27 species seems to be appeared. Few of them appeared really (e.g. Spiroplectamina dentata, Dentalina vertebralis

  8. Diversity and Enzymatic Profiling of Halotolerant Micromycetes from Sebkha El Melah, a Saharan Salt Flat in Southern Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    Jaouani, Atef; Neifar, Mohamed; Prigione, Valeria; Ayari, Amani; Sbissi, Imed; Ben Amor, Sonia; Ben Tekaya, Seifeddine; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Cherif, Ameur; Gtari, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-one moderately halotolerant fungi have been isolated from sample ashes collected from Sebkha El Melah, a Saharan salt flat located in southern Tunisia. Based on morphology and sequence inference from the internal transcribed spacer regions, 28S rRNA gene and other specific genes such as β-tubulin, actin, calmodulin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the isolates were found to be distributed over 15 taxa belonging to 6 genera of Ascomycetes: Cladosporium (n = 3), Alternaria (n = 4), Aspergillus (n = 3), Penicillium (n = 5), Ulocladium (n = 2), and Engyodontium (n = 2). Their tolerance to different concentrations of salt in solid and liquid media was examined. Excepting Cladosporium cladosporioides JA18, all isolates were considered as alkali-halotolerant since they were able to grow in media containing 10% of salt with an initial pH 10. All isolates were resistant to oxidative stresses and low temperature whereas 5 strains belonging to Alternaria, Ulocladium, and Aspergillus genera were able to grow at 45°C. The screening of fungal strains for sets of enzyme production, namely, cellulase (CMCase), amylase, protease, lipase, and laccase, in presence of 10% NaCl, showed a variety of extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative profiles. Protease was the most abundant enzyme produced whereas laccase producers were members of the genus Cladosporium. PMID:25136587

  9. Diversity and enzymatic profiling of halotolerant micromycetes from Sebkha El Melah, a Saharan salt flat in southern Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Jaouani, Atef; Neifar, Mohamed; Prigione, Valeria; Ayari, Amani; Sbissi, Imed; Ben Amor, Sonia; Ben Tekaya, Seifeddine; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Cherif, Ameur; Gtari, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-one moderately halotolerant fungi have been isolated from sample ashes collected from Sebkha El Melah, a Saharan salt flat located in southern Tunisia. Based on morphology and sequence inference from the internal transcribed spacer regions, 28S rRNA gene and other specific genes such as β-tubulin, actin, calmodulin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, the isolates were found to be distributed over 15 taxa belonging to 6 genera of Ascomycetes: Cladosporium (n = 3), Alternaria (n = 4), Aspergillus (n = 3), Penicillium (n = 5), Ulocladium (n = 2), and Engyodontium (n = 2). Their tolerance to different concentrations of salt in solid and liquid media was examined. Excepting Cladosporium cladosporioides JA18, all isolates were considered as alkali-halotolerant since they were able to grow in media containing 10% of salt with an initial pH 10. All isolates were resistant to oxidative stresses and low temperature whereas 5 strains belonging to Alternaria, Ulocladium, and Aspergillus genera were able to grow at 45°C. The screening of fungal strains for sets of enzyme production, namely, cellulase (CMCase), amylase, protease, lipase, and laccase, in presence of 10% NaCl, showed a variety of extracellular hydrolytic and oxidative profiles. Protease was the most abundant enzyme produced whereas laccase producers were members of the genus Cladosporium. PMID:25136587

  10. Acid-labile sulfides in shallow marine bottom sediments: A review of the impact on ecosystems in the Azov Sea, the NE Black Sea shelf and NW Adriatic lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Zakuskina, O. Yu

    2012-02-01

    Acid-labile sulfides (LS) increase in bottom sediments at sites in the Azov Sea, at the NE Black Sea shelf and in the coastal lagoons of NW Adriatic Sea experiencing direct impacts of anthropogenic pollution. Fresh anthropogenic organic matter stimulates the bacterial sulfate reduction and here the rate of the LS production overcomes their loss during the oxidation and pyritization. This results in the expansion of reduced sediment layer up to the bottom surface. The LS concentration in the reduced sediments varies between 300 and 2000 mg S l -1 of wet silt depending on the size of pollution loading and on the rate of sedimentation. In the oxidized sediments away from the direct pollution impact, the LS concentration did not exceed 100-150 mg S l -1. Being a strong cytochrome toxin, the LS adversely affect the coastal ecosystems. The concentrations over 600 mg S l -1 result in quasi total benthic mortality whereas >300-400 mg S l -1 depletes the benthic faunal abundance and taxonomic diversity. Accumulation of the LS in sediments also induces nocturnal hypoxia and stimulates domination of toxic cyanobacteria in the pelagic phytocenoses.

  11. Lagoons and Oxidation Ponds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents the 1978 literature review of wastewater treatment. This review covers lagoons and oxidation ponds, and it includes some areas such as improving the effluents from ponds, stabilization ponds, aerated lagoons, and oxidation ditches. A list of 36 references is also presented. (HM)

  12. Brazil: Duck Lagoon

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    ... contents of the lagoon waters. High rainfall and increased freshwater discharge during El Niño events correspond with elevated dissolved ... years are dry and the associated low rainfall reduces the freshwater recharge to the lagoon, causing an increase in salinity. Occasional ...

  13. Brazil The Duck Lagoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image of Brazil covers an area of about 298 kilometers x 358 kilometers, and was captured by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on December 27, 2001. The 'Lagoa dos Patos', in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, translates to 'the Duck Lagoon'. It was named by 16th century Jesuit settlers, who asked the King of Spain to grant them title to the lagoon so that they could breed ducks. The King consented, but revoked his edict when he discovered that the 'duck-pond' (measuring about 14,000 square kilometers) was one of the largest lagoonal systems in the world. Note the sediment plume emanating from the southern end of the lagoon. Sailors in the 16th century imagined this outlet to be the mouth of a large river. Early Portuguese explorers mistook the entrance to the lagoon for the mouth of a great river and called it the Rio Grande. A series of wave-like points and curls form 'cusps' on the inner shores of the lagoon. The lagoon's characteristics change with short-term tide-induced cyclic perturbations, and with longer term large scale meteorological conditions. The distinctive wavelike 'cusps' along the inner shores result from the circulation, erosion and accumulation of sediments driven by wind and tidal action. The El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) circulation affects precipitation amount and continental runoff, thereby changing the contents of the lagoon waters. High rainfall and increased freshwater discharge during El Nino events correspond with elevated dissolved nutrient concentrations and increased phytoplankton growth. La Nina years are dry and the associated low rainfall reduces the freshwater recharge to the lagoon, causing an increase in salinity. Occasional blooms of toxic cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa), have been registered in the lagoon when nutrient concentrations are elevated. A number of reeds and grasses are important to the lagoon estuary, including widgeon grass

  14. Antibiotic resistant bacterial profiles of anaerobic swine lagoon effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. To better understand this, more data is ne...

  15. Lockport Sewage Lagoon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, John

    1995-01-01

    Describes a student initiated stewardship project that resulted in the transformation of a sewage lagoon near the school into a place to study nature. Contains a list of 20 things that discourage a successful stewardship project. (LZ)

  16. Comparative oceanography of coastal lagoons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kjerfve, Bjorn

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis that physical lagoon characteristics and variability depend on the channel connecting the lagoon to the adjacent coastal ocean is evaluated. The geographical, hydrological, and oceanographic characteristics of 10 lagoon systems are described and analyzed; these oceanographic features are utilized to classify the lagoon systems. Choked lagoons (Laguna Joyuda, Coorong, Lake St.Lucia, Gippsland Lakes, Lake Songkla/Thale Luang/Thale Noi, and Lagoa dos Patos) are prevalent on coasts with high wave energy and low tidal range; restricted lagoons (Lake Pontchartrain and Laguna de Terminos) are located on low/medium wave energy coasts with a low tidal range; and leaky lagoons (Mississippi Sound and Belize Lagoon/Chetumal Bay) are connected to the ocean by wide tidal passes that transmit oceanic effects into the lagoon with a minimum of resistance. The data support the hypothesis that the nature of the connecting channel controls system functions.

  17. Lagoon Restoration Project: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This project is a multiyear effort focusing on energy flow in the Palace of Fine Arts lagoon just outside the Exploratorium in San Francisco. Phase 1 was a pilot study to determine the feasibility of improving biological energy flow through the small freshwater lagoon, using the expertise and resources of an environmental artist in collaboration with museum biologists and arts department staff. The primary outcome of Phase 1 is an experimental fountain exhibit inside the museum designed by public artist Laurie Lundquist with Exploratorium staff. This fountain, with signage, functions both as a model for natural aeration and filtration systems and as a focal point for museum visitors to learn about how biological processes cycle energy through aquatic systems. As part of the study of the lagoon`s health, volunteers continued biweekly bird consus from March through September, 1994. The goal was to find out whether the poor water quality of the lagoon is affecting the birds. Limited dredging was undertaken by the city Parks and Recreation Department. However, a more peermanent solution to the lagoon`s ecological problems would require an ambitious redesign of the lagoon.

  18. The tale of four lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are a common management practice in the Carolinas for the treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very sophisticated. To get a better understanding of the microb...

  19. Circulation in Enewetak Atoll lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, M.; Smith, S.V.; Stroup, E.D.

    1981-11-01

    Currents at Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, were measured on the reef margins, in the channels, and in the lagoon. Lagoon circulation is dominated by wind-driven downwind surface flow and an upwind middepth return flow. This wind-driven flow has the characteristics of an Ekman spiral in an enclosed sea. Lagoon flushing is accomplished primarily by surf-driven water input over the windward (eastern) reefs and southerly drift out the South Channel. Mean water residence time is 1 month, while water entering the northern portion of the atoll takes about 4 months to exit.

  20. Mosquito Lagoon environmental resources inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Provancha, Jane A.; Hall, Carlton R.; Oddy, Donna M.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a synopsis of biotic and abiotic data collected in the Mosquito Lagoon area in relation to water quality. A holistic ecological approach was used in this review to allow for summaries of climate, land use, vegetation, geohydrology, water quality, fishes, sea turtles, wading birds, marine mammals, invertebrates, shellfish, and mosquito control. The document includes a bibliographic database list of 157 citations that have references to the Mosquito Lagoon, many of which were utilized in development of the text.

  1. 33 CFR 117.600 - Lagoon Pond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lagoon Pond. 117.600 Section 117.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.600 Lagoon Pond. The draw of the Lagoon...

  2. 33 CFR 117.600 - Lagoon Pond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lagoon Pond. 117.600 Section 117.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.600 Lagoon Pond. The draw of the Lagoon...

  3. 33 CFR 117.600 - Lagoon Pond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lagoon Pond. 117.600 Section 117.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.600 Lagoon Pond. The draw of the Lagoon...

  4. 33 CFR 117.600 - Lagoon Pond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lagoon Pond. 117.600 Section 117.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.600 Lagoon Pond. The draw of the Lagoon...

  5. 33 CFR 117.600 - Lagoon Pond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lagoon Pond. 117.600 Section 117.600 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.600 Lagoon Pond. The draw of the Lagoon...

  6. PERFORMANCE OF AERATED LAGOONS IN NORTHERN CLIMATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies of cold climate aerated lagoons conducted by the Arctic Environmental Research Station, Fairbanks, Alaska are reported. Conclusions are based on these studies, observations of full scale aerated lagoons operating in Alaska and reports on lagoons in the northern tier of th...

  7. Metagenomes of Mediterranean Coastal Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Rohit; Hernandez, Claudia Mella; Picazo, Antonio; Mizuno, Carolina Megumi; Ininbergs, Karolina; Díez, Beatriz; Valas, Ruben; DuPont, Christopher L.; McMahon, Katherine D.; Camacho, Antonio; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Coastal lagoons, both hypersaline and freshwater, are common, but still understudied ecosystems. We describe, for the first time, using high throughput sequencing, the extant microbiota of two large and representative Mediterranean coastal lagoons, the hypersaline Mar Menor, and the freshwater Albufera de Valencia, both located on the south eastern coast of Spain. We show there are considerable differences in the microbiota of both lagoons, in comparison to other marine and freshwater habitats. Importantly, a novel uncultured sulfur oxidizing Alphaproteobacteria was found to dominate bacterioplankton in the hypersaline Mar Menor. Also, in the latter prokaryotic cyanobacteria were almost exclusively comprised by Synechococcus and no Prochlorococcus was found. Remarkably, the microbial community in the freshwaters of the hypertrophic Albufera was completely in contrast to known freshwater systems, in that there was a near absence of well known and cosmopolitan groups of ultramicrobacteria namely Low GC Actinobacteria and the LD12 lineage of Alphaproteobacteria. PMID:22778901

  8. Metals in some lagoons of Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, F G; Sharma, V K; Alexander, V H; Frausto, C A

    1995-01-01

    The concentrations of metals, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn were determined in some lagoons to establish the level of metal pollution. The lagoons studied were Alvarado lagoon, Veracruz; San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas; and Terminos lagoon, Campeche. The concentrations were determined in water, oyster (Crassostrea virginica), and sediments. Metals were accumulated in either oysters or sediments. Cu and Zn were higher in oysters and Fe and Mn were higher in sediments. The results in water samples were compared with the limit established by the Secretaria de Ecologia and Desarrollo Urbano Report and briefly discussed. PMID:7621796

  9. INDIAN RIVER LAGOON IR, 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    Since the Indian River Lagoon Program's last implementation review, the NEP through the local sponsorship of the St. Johns River Water Management District, has seen a three-fold increase in implementation funding from $6.7 million in 1999, to $21.3 million in FY 2003. This fundin...

  10. Heavy metals distribution in sediments of Nador lagoon (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloundi, K.; Duplay, J.

    2003-04-01

    The Nador lagoon is a paralic system, located North-East of Morocco. At the present time this ecosystem undergoes an anthropic stress induced by urban, industrial and agricultural releases, and also by fishery activity which enriches this ecosystem in organic and inorganic wastes. A geochemical study has been undertaken, first to define the areas contaminated by heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Co, Cr and V), and second to caracterize the different mineral phases, which trap these elements. Sediment samples were collected on twenty-eight stations scattered all over the lagoon, and each core (30 cm) was subdivided in two horizons (surface and depth). Mineralogical analyses as well as major and trace elements analyses were performed on surface and deep sediments. The results on major element analyses (Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Na, P) show an enrichment in halite and phosphates in the surface sediments. This highlights on one hand, low water exchange rates between the lagoon and the Mediterranean sea, and on the other hand, an increase in organic releases related to the urban, agricultural and fishery activities. The highest concentrations in inorganic micro-pollutant were recorded N-E of the lagoon and close to Nador city. With reference to the geochemical background, it can be concluded that there is a slight contamination in heavy metals. Moreover, enrichment factor calculations (EF) for heavy metals point out an increase in metal elements as following: Zn>Co>Cr>V>Cu. Sequential extractions were performed to determine the behaviour of these micro-pollutants. Thus, it was shown that carbonates, oxides and phosphates are the preferential mineral phases for trapping these heavy metals.

  11. Bellechester, Minnesota, USA, lagoon collapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, E. C.; Broberg, J. S.; Kehren, A. R.; Graziani, M. M.; Turri, W. L.

    1993-12-01

    Bellechester, Minnesota, is a small community of approximately 155 residents located on the county line between Goodhue and Wabasha counties in southeast Minnesota's karst region. Bellechester is served by a 21-year-old wastewater treatment facility (WWTF) consisting of three waste-stabilization ponds. On 28 April 1992 six sinkholes were discovered to have drained cell 2 of the WWTF resulting in the loss of approximately 8.7×106 1 of partially treated effluent and about 600 m3 of soil into previously undetected subsurface voids of unknown dimensions. In the week following the collapse, approximately 200 water wells located within a 5-km radius of the WWTF were sampled in an after-the-fact, emergency sampling program. Twelve samples with elevated fecal coliform levels, 18 samples with nitrate-nitrogen greater than the 10 mg/1 standard, and no samples with elevated chlorides were found. However, the elevated levels could not be unambiguously attributed to the WWTF collapse. This is the third WWTF to fail by sinkhole collapse in southeast Minnesota since 1974. All three collapsed lagoons have been located in similar geomorphic and stratigraphic settings. However, at least two lagoons have collapsed in the adjacent area in northeast Iowa, and these lagoons are located at different stratigraphic positions. Twenty-two WWTFs constructed in southeast Minnesota's karst region in the last 25 years have been identified as subject to potential sinkhole collapse. An unknown but significant number of manure storage lagoons, flood control structures, etc., have also been constructed in the karst region and are at risk. Public agencies are beginning to develop plans to deal with the risk associated with existing and future waste lagoons in this environment. The critical hydrogeologic parameters that can be used to prioritize the risk of collapse at existing facilities include: (1) the lithology of the first bedrock beneath each lagoon, (2) the thickness of surficial materials

  12. Assessing the Impact of Animal Waste Lagoon Seepage on the Geochemistry of an Underlying Shallow Aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    McNab, W W; Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K

    2006-03-07

    Dairy facilities and similar confined animal operation settings pose a significant nitrate contamination threat via oxidation of animal wastes and subsequent transport to shallow groundwater. While nitrate contamination resulting from application of animal manure as fertilizer to fields is well recognized, the impact of manure lagoon leakage on groundwater quality is less well characterized. In this study, a dairy facility located in the southern San Joaquin Valley of California has been instrumented with monitoring wells as part of a two-year multidisciplinary study to evaluate nitrate loading and denitrification associated with facility operations. Among multiple types of data collected from the site, groundwater and surface water samples have been analyzed for major cations, anions, pH, oxidation-reduction potential, dissolved organic carbon, and selected dissolved gases (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}, Ar, Ne). Modeling of putative geochemical processes occurring within the dairy site manure lagoons shows substantial off-gassing of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} in response to mineralization of organic matter. The gas ebullition appears to strip dissolved gases, including Ar and Ne, from the lagoon water leaving concentrations that are undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. The resulting fractionated dissolved gas signature serves as an effective tracer for the lagoon water in the underlying shallow groundwater and can be used to constrain inverse geochemical models that assess mixing fractions of lagoon water and local groundwater water. Together with ion exchange and mineral equilibria reactions, identification of lagoon seepage helps explain key attributes of the local groundwater chemistry, including input and cycling of nitrogen, across the site.

  13. Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, D.; Norville, C. )

    1991-07-01

    The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

  14. Analysis of denitrification in swine anaerobic lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are a common management practice for the treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very sophisticated. To get a better understanding of the processes which occur i...

  15. INDIAN RIVER LAGOON CCMP PUBLIC PARTICIPATION INITIATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of public involvement within the Indian River Lagoon National Estuary Program (IRLNEP) was to develop the public consensus necessary to ensure long-term support for, and implementation of, the Indian River Lagoon Comprehensive Conservation Management Plan (CCMP). Consens...

  16. Denitrification enzyme activity in swine wastewater lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are typically used for treatment of swine wastewater. Although these anaerobic lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple in their physical, chemical, and biological processes, they are actually very sophisticated. Recent reports of high levels of di-nitrogen emissions and h...

  17. The present environmental scenario of the Nador Lagoon (Morocco).

    PubMed

    Ruiz, F; Abad, M; Olías, M; Galán, E; González, I; Aguilá, E; Hamoumi, N; Pulido, I; Cantano, M

    2006-10-01

    In this paper, we present a multivariate approach (waters, sediments, microfauna) concerning the environmental state of the Nador Lagoon (NE Morocco). The normal water quality parameters (salinity, pH, nutrients) of the dominant marine flows are altered by local fecal water effluents, urban discharges, sewages derived from a water treatment station, and residues originated in a slaughterhouse. The geochemical analyses carried out in surficial sediment samples show very high concentrations of all metals studied near an old iron mine and moderate contents between Nador and its treatment station. Ostracods are good bioindicators of these environmental impacts, with the presence of a highly brackish assemblage in the quieter, more confined areas or the appearance of opportunistic species under hypoxic conditions. In addition, these microcrustaceans are absent in polluted bottom sediments or areas with high hydrodynamic gradients, whereas they decrease in both density and diversity if the subaerial exposure increases. PMID:16624276

  18. Aerated Lagoons. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This student manual contains the textual material for a unit which focuses on the structural and operationally unique features of aerated lagoons. Topic areas discussed include: (1) characteristics of completely mixed aerated lagoons; (2) facultative aerated lagoons; (3) aerated oxidation ponds; (4) effects of temperature on aerated lagoons; (5)…

  19. High performance aerated lagoon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, L.

    1999-08-01

    At a time when less money is available for wastewater treatment facilities and there is increased competition for the local tax dollar, regulatory agencies are enforcing stricter effluent limits on treatment discharges. A solution for both municipalities and industry is to use aerated lagoon systems designed to meet these limits. This monograph, prepared by a recognized expert in the field, provides methods for the rational design of a wide variety of high-performance aerated lagoon systems. Such systems range from those that can be depended upon to meet secondary treatment standards alone to those that, with the inclusion of intermittent sand filters or elements of sequenced biological reactor (SBR) technology, can also provide for nitrification and nutrient removal. Considerable emphasis is placed on the use of appropriate performance parameters, and an entire chapter is devoted to diagnosing performance failures. Contents include: principles of microbiological processes, control of algae, benthal stabilization, design for CBOD removal, design for nitrification and denitrification in suspended-growth systems, design for nitrification in attached-growth systems, phosphorus removal, diagnosing performance.

  20. Using hydrochemistry, tracers and isotopes to analyze hydrogeological dynamics and eutrophication processes in coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menció, Anna; Mas-Pla, Josep; Quintana, Xavier D.

    2016-04-01

    Wetlands and coastal lagoons in Mediterranean areas have recently been the focus of an increasing interest due to the degradation of their ecological status in terms of declining biodiversity, alteration of ecological functioning and limitation of the ecosystem services they provide. Accordingly, the Horizon 2020 Programme of the European Union has set, as one of its priorities, to prevent a further degradation of these ecosystems and to recover their ecological functioning. The aim of this project is to analyze the hydrogeological dynamics in the Pletera coastal lagoons (NE, Spain) as a basis to propose guidelines for their sustainable management. Thus, monthly hydrochemical (with major ions, nutrients and tracers) and isotopic (δ18OH2O and δD) campaigns have been conducted, from November 2014 to October 2015, to determine the hydrogeological dynamics of the Pletera lagoons. In addition, in some of the sampling campaigns δ34SSO4, δ18OSO4, δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 have also been analyzed to determine the origin of eutrophication problems observed in these lagoons, mainly caused by nitrogen compounds. Project founded by MEC CGL-2014-57215-C4-2R and LIFE 13 NAT/ES/001001

  1. Sedimentation in lagoon waters (Case study on Segara Anakan Lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sari, Lilik Kartika; Adrianto, Luky; Soewardi, Kadarwan; Atmadipoera, Agus S.; Hilmi, Endang

    2016-05-01

    This study aims to demonstrate the effect of sedimentation on waters area that serves as an advocate for life. It is included in the category to be wary considering these conditions will reduce the quality of life and threaten the life and survival of endemic biota. Observations rate of sedimentation since April 2014 until March 2015 performed at 6 stations that are considered to represent the condition of the lagoon. The observations for rate of sedimentation was conducted twice in a month for one year. Oceanographic parameters was taken by CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth) sensor in two seasons, at the height of the rainy season, March 2014 and August 2014. Results showed that the aquatic area more narrow characterized by changes in the outside line of the island visible on the image observation for two decades.

  2. Spatial Distribution and Ecophysiological Characteristics of Macrophytes in a Mediterranean Coastal Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, M.; Hernandez, O.; Comin, F. A.

    2002-09-01

    The distribution biomass and photosynthesis of three species of rooted macrophytes, Ruppia cirrhosa (Petagna) Grande, Potamogeton pectinatus L. and Zostera noltii Hornem and a floating macroalgaChaetomorpha linum Kütz, were studied in Buda lagoon (River Ebro delta, NE Spain) during spring (May), summer (July) and autumn (October) 1995. Buda lagoon was characterized by a marked gradient of conductivity due to freshwater discharges from rice fields from June to October and by seawater input due to the regression of the delta of the River Ebro during the last 10 years. A typical spatial distribution was observed: monospecific stands of P. pectinatus developed near freshwater inputs in the inner part of the lagoon and mixed stands of R. cirrhosa and P. pectinatus developed in transitional zones between freshwater and seawater influence. The part of the lagoon where the influence of seawater was highest was covered by dense mixed stands of Z. noltii, R. cirrhosa and C. linum. Maximum biomass and production of P. pectinatus were reached in July (biomass of 501 gDW m-2, and maximum photosynthetic rates, Pm, of 14 mgO2 g-1 DW h-1). Maximum biomass of R. cirrhosa and Z. noltii (456·5 and 250 gDW m-2 respectively) and photosynthetic rate of R. cirrhosa (23·9 mgO2 g-1DW h-1) occurred in May, whereas no significant differences in production were detected between May and July in Z. noltii. Maximum C. linum production was reached in October (5·4 mgO2 g-1DW h-1). In OctoberP. pectinatus coverage and production decreased, which was related to high turbidity and density of benthivorous fish due to freshwater inflows. Implications of lower freshwater inflow and higher seawater intrusion in the spatial distribution of aquatic macrophytes in this coastal lagoon are discussed.

  3. Report to Congress: Municipal Wastewater Lagoon Study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-11-01

    This report presents the results of the Municipal Wastewater Lagoon Study performed by the USEPA in response to Section 3018 of RCRA and Sec. 246 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste amendments of 1984. The objectives are to determine: number and size of municipal lagoons; types and quantities of waste contained in such lagoons; the extent to which such waste has been or may be released from such lagoons and contaminates ground water; and available alternatives for preventing or controlling such releases.

  4. Nutrient-Chlorophyll Relationships in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indian River Lagoon is a highly diverse estuary located along Florida’s Atlantic coast. The system is made up of the main stem and two side-lagoons: the Banana River and Mosquito Lagoon. We segmented the main stem into three sections based on spatial trends in water quality ...

  5. Facultative Lagoons. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    The textual material for a unit on facultative lagoons is presented in this student manual. Topic areas discussed include: (1) loading; (2) microbial theory; (3) structure and design; (4) process control; (5) lagoon start-up; (6) data handling and analysis; (7) lagoon maintenance (considering visual observations, pond structure, safety, odor,…

  6. Inverse-dispersion technique for assessing lagoon gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques because of non-ideal wind conditions, such as those induced by trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and lagoons with dimensions too small to establish equilib...

  7. Accuracy of lagoon gas emissions using an inverse dispersion method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques because of non-ideal wind conditions. These include those induced by trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and lagoons with dimensions too small to establish ...

  8. PERSISTENCE OF PATHOGENS IN LAGOON-STORED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project objective was to investigate pathogen inactivation in lagoon-stored municipal sludges. The in-field lagoons were located in Louisiana (New Orleans) and in Texas (Port Aransas), both semitropical areas of the United States. ach lagoon was filled with 7.56 m3 of anaerob...

  9. Nitrifier activity and diversity in swine lagoon covers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia emissions from swine waste lagoons pose an environmental challenge to current pork production practices. Semi-permeable lagoon covers limit ammonia emissions by minimizing the effect of wind on the lagoon surface. Additionally, semi-permeable covers may also act as an attachment site for b...

  10. Denitrification in anaerobic lagoons used to treat swine wastewater.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are commonly used for treatment of swine wastewater. Although these lagoons were once thought to be relatively simple; their physical, chemical, and biological processes are actually very complex. This study of anaerobic lagoons had twofold objectives: 1] quantify denitrification e...

  11. Exploring new issues for coastal lagoons monitoring and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila; De Wit, Rutger

    2012-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are productive and highly vulnerable ecosystems, but their management is still problematic mostly because they constitute transitional interface between terrestrial and marine domains. The "4th European Conference on Coastal Lagoon Research - Research and Management for the conservation of coastal lagoon ecosystems, South North comparisons", was focused on the scientific research on coastal lagoons and the management for their conservation and sustainable use. Selected contributions were considered in this special issue of Estuarine Coastal and Shelf Science "Research and Management for the conservation of coastal lagoon ecosystems" as they deal with three important aspects for coastal lagoons management: (1) the design of monitoring programmes using biological compartments, (2) the ecosystem functioning and the impacts of perturbations and (3) ecosystem trajectories particularly after ecosystem restoration. Here we introduce the selected papers published in this issue, place these contributions in the perspective of the science-management interface and discuss new issues for coastal lagoon management.

  12. Sediment concentrations of trace metals in the Berre lagoon (France): an assessment of contamination.

    PubMed

    Accornero, Alessandra; Gnerre, Rossella; Manfra, Loredana

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports the concentrations of eight trace metals (Cr, Zn, Cu, Pb, Ni, As, Cd, and Hg) in the surficial sediments of the Berre lagoon. This is a typical Mediterranean lagoon, seriously affected by human activities since the 1930s, when it became one of the most important industrial sites in France. The overall range of concentrations is 38-428 mg kg(-1) for chromium, 50-151 mg kg(-1) for zinc, 11-48 mg kg(-1) for copper, 18-82 mg kg(-1) for lead, 18-56 mg kg(-1) for nickel, 4-10 mg kg(-1) for arsenic, 0.2-1.6 mg kg(-1) for cadmium, and 0.15-0.40 mg kg(-1) for mercury. The spatial distribution of concentrations largely mirrors the localization of major impact sources, with the most affected area restricted to a radius of a few kilometers from point sources, due to the environmental conditions of the outfall zone (fine sediments, low hydrodynamic regime, confinement), which favor the in situ accumulation of pollutants. The extent of contamination from trace metals in the lagoon sediments is evaluated through a three-pronged approach: (i) by comparison with other areas (see Table 3 for an up-to-date review of trace metal concentrations in lagoon systems and coastal regions of the world ocean); (ii) by evaluating the metal enrichment in the sediments through the calculation of concentration factors (CF) for each trace metal and by combining the CFs to estimate a Metal Pollution Index (MPI) taking into account the differences in toxicity of trace metals; and (iii) by defining a potential level of biological risk by the use of quality criteria such as the Threshold Effect Level (TEL) and Effects Range-Low (ER-L) benchmarks. On the basis of the calculated CFs, sediments appear as particularly enriched with Pb and Cd throughout the lagoon and with Cr and Zn at some sites. Although no site can be classified as "unpolluted" when looking at the calculated MPIs, two regions--the Vaïne pond and the southwestern area--have been identified as critical points of

  13. INDIAN RIVER LAGOON CCMP PROGRESS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In, 1996, Florida Governor Lawton Chiles And USEPA Administrator Carol Browner officially adopted the Indian River Lagoon CCMP. In it are dozens of actions, that if implemented would help maintain and improve the ecological integrity of the IRL. To evaluate the progress towards i...

  14. Denitrification enzyme activity in swine wastewater lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent publications of high levels of di-nitrogen emissions and high levels of potential surficial oxygen transfer indicated that large amounts of nitrogen may be removed via denitrification in anaerobic lagoons. If this denitrification is occurring via classical denitrification, the denitrification...

  15. Mercury Concentrations in Coastal Sediment from Younger Lagoon, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohn, R. A.; Ganguli, P. M.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Richardson, C. M.; Merckling, J.; Johnson, C.; Flegal, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Younger Lagoon Reserve, located in northern Monterey Bay, is one of the few relatively undisturbed wetlands that remain along the Central Coast of California. This lagoon system provides protected habitat for more than 100 bird species and for populations of fish, mammals, and invertebrates. Total mercury (HgT) concentrations in water within Younger Lagoon appear to vary with rainfall conditions and range from about 5-15 pM. These concentrations are similar to HgT in water from six nearby lagoon systems. However, Younger Lagoon contains elevated concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (~1 mM) and monomethylmercury (MMHg, ~1 pM) relative to our comparison lagoon sites (DOC < 0.5 mM and MMHg < 0.5 pM). We attribute Younger Lagoon's high DOC and MMHg to its restricted connection to the ocean and minor riverine contribution. Coastal lagoons in this region typically form at the mouth of streams. They behave as small estuaries during the wet season when surface water discharge keeps the mouth of the stream open to the ocean, and then transition into lagoons in the dry season when a sand berm develops and effectively cuts off surface water exchange. At Younger Lagoon, the sand berm remains intact throughout the year, breaching only during particularly high tides or intense rain events. Therefore, the lagoon's connection to nearshore seawater is primarily via surface water - groundwater interaction through the sand berm. Because Younger Lagoon is largely isolated from a surface water connection with the ocean, runoff from upgradient urban and agricultural land has an enhanced impact on water (and presumably sediment) quality. As a result, the lagoon is eutrophic and experiences annual algal blooms. Groundwater surveys suggest surface water, groundwater, and coastal seawater are hydraulically connected at Younger Lagoon, and mixing among these water masses appears to influence water geochemistry. To date, no chemical analyses have been conducted on sediment from Younger

  16. (U Th) / Ne chronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautheron, C. E.; Tassan-Got, L.; Farley, K. A.

    2006-03-01

    Production of 21Ne from the reaction 18O( α, n) 21Ne in U and Th rich minerals such as apatite, zircon, monazite and titanite can potentially be used for chronometry. Based on a review of the available cross section data we reevaluated the production of 21Ne from this reaction using a thin target approach and compared the results against thick target situations. The ( 21Ne / 4He) production ratio in these minerals is about 4 × 10 - 8 , but varies with oxygen content and Th / U ratio. 21Ne has a stopping range of about 1 μm compared to about 20 μm for α particles; thus the ( 21Ne / 4He) production ratio also depends on crystal size when the crystals are small enough that α ejection is important. Using a Monte Carlo model we computed the effects of ejection on the ( 21Ne / 4He) ratio for various geometries and grain sizes. We also present measurements of the ( 21Ne / 4He) ratio on few mg aliquots of well-dated volcanic apatites and zircons for which the duration of retention of 21Ne and 4He is the same. Values of (4.4 ± 1.1) × 10 - 8 and (3.5 ± 1.2) × 10 - 8 for apatite and zircon, respectively, are in agreement with the theoretical values of (4.16 ± 0.14) × 10 - 8 ; (3.54 ± 0.13) × 10 - 8 . Based on our production rate estimates the Durango apatite and Fish Canyon Tuff zircon give Ne ages of 34.2 ± 8.6 and 28 ± 12 Ma, respectively, which are in agreement with independently known ages. Our results demonstrate that the 21Ne production is well understood and can be used to measure the neon retention time for slowly cooled minerals. The 4He and 21Ne content of zircons from the deeply exhumed crustal section in Gold Butte, Nevada (crystallization age of 1.4 Ga) imply (U-Th) / Ne ages of 963 ± 164 and 777 ± 122 Ma, far older than their He ages of 16.7 ± 1.3 and 19.1 ± 1.5 Ma, respectively. To explain the age difference, a neon closure temperature for zircon between the values given by the thermochronometers U-Pb on apatite and Ar-Ar on muscovite is

  17. Lagoons and oxidation ponds. [Wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    George, D.B.

    1982-06-01

    A review of the literature on waste stabilization pond systems is presented. Factors such as wastewater temperature, and levels of heavy metals that affect the stability of the lagoons and oxidation ponds, and methods to upgrade stabilization pond effluent to meet state and federal effluent requirements are discussed. Model simulations utilized to predict the treatment efficiency of various waste stabilization pond geometries, and inlet and outlet configurations are reviewed. (KRM)

  18. Hydrography of a hypersaline coastal lagoon in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshal, Amin H.

    1987-02-01

    Temporal and spatial variations in salinity, temperature, oxygen and pH were studied in a coastal lagoon located on the eastern coast of the Red Sea during 11 cruises taken in the period from May 1983 through April 1984. The lagoon has an area of about 30 km 2 and a maximum depth of about 3 m. The study showed that the water in the lagoon had a very high salinity that varied between 51‰ in February to 113‰ in October and was believed to reach higher values in summer. Rapid fluctuations in salinity were observed in the lagoon especially in positions near its mouth due to the daily exchange of water with the Red Sea accompanying the tides. During high tide, a layer of relatively cold and low salinity water from the Red Sea entered the lagoon and spread over its warmer and more saline water. This led to the existence of a strong vertical stratification in this shallow lagoon. During low tide, the subsurface warm and high salinity water was exposed resulting in the existence of one layer of water in the lagoon. Temporal variation of salinity was correlated with the monthly changes of the mean sea level of the Red Sea and with evaporation. Spatial variations in this property at any position in the lagoon depended upon its location from the mouth of the lagoon. Temperature variation was controlled by meteorological conditions in the region and by the volume of the water in the lagoon. The marine environment of this lagoon is under natural stress due to its high temperature and to the extreme fluctuations of its high salinity. This can be reduced by increasing the rate of exchange of water between the lagoon and the Red Sea.

  19. Hydrological dynamics of water sources in a Mediterranean lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpp, C.; Ekdal, A.; Gönenc, I. E.; Maloszewski, P.

    2014-07-01

    Lagoons are important ecosystems occupying large coastal areas worldwide. Lagoons contain various mixtures of marine and freshwater sources which are highly dynamic in time. However, it often remains a challenge to identify and quantify dynamic changes of water sources, particularly in heterogeneous lagoon systems like the Köycegiz-Dalyan Lagoon (KDL), which is located at the southwest of Turkey on the Mediterranean Sea coast. The objective of this study was to quantify different contributions of potential water sources i.e. surface water, groundwater and seawater in the lagoon and how these water sources changed over time and space. In the wet and dry season stable isotopes of water, chloride concentration (Cl-) and salinity were measured in two depths in the lagoon and surrounding water bodies (sea, lake, groundwater). Different components of water sources were quantified with a three component endmember mixing analysis. Differences in Cl- and stable isotopes over time indicated the dynamic behaviour of the system. Generally, none of the groundwater samples was impacted by water of the Mediterranean Sea. During the wet season, most of the lagoon water (>95%) was influenced by freshwater and vertically well mixed. During the dry season, high Cl- in the deeper sampling locations indicated a high contribution of marine water throughout the entire lagoon system due to salt water intrusion. However, a distinct layering in the lagoon was obvious from low Cl- and depleted isotope contents close to the surface supporting freshwater inflow into the system even during the dry season. Besides temporal dynamics also spatial heterogeneities were identified. Changes in water sources were most evident in the main lagoon channel compared to more isolate lagoon lakes, which were influenced by marine water even in the wet season, and compared to side branches indicating slower turnover times. We found that environmental tracers helped to quantify contributions of different water

  20. Hydrological dynamics of water sources in a Mediterranean lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpp, C.; Ekdal, A.; Gönenc, I. E.; Maloszewski, P.

    2014-12-01

    Lagoons are important ecosystems occupying large coastal areas worldwide. Lagoons contain various mixtures of marine and freshwater sources which are highly dynamic in time. However, it often remains a challenge to identify and quantify dynamic changes of water sources, particularly in heterogeneous lagoon systems like the Köycegiz-Dalyan lagoon (KDL), which is located at the south-west of Turkey on the Mediterranean Sea coast. The objective of this study was to quantify different contributions of potential water sources i.e. surface water, groundwater and seawater in the lagoon and how these water sources changed over time and space. In the wet- and dry-season stable isotopes of water, chloride concentration (Cl-) and salinity were measured in two depths in the lagoon and surrounding water bodies (sea, lake, groundwater). Different components of water sources were quantified with a three component endmember mixing analysis. Differences in Cl- and stable isotopes over time indicated the dynamic behaviour of the system. Generally, none of the groundwater samples was impacted by water of the Mediterranean Sea. During the wet season, most of the lagoon water (> 95%) was influenced by freshwater and vertically well mixed. During the dry season, high Cl- in the deeper sampling locations indicated a high contribution of marine water throughout the entire lagoon system due to saltwater intrusion. However, a distinct layering in the lagoon was obvious from low Cl- and depleted isotope contents close to the surface supporting freshwater inflow into the system even during the dry season. Besides temporal dynamics also spatial heterogeneities were identified. Changes in water sources were most evident in the main lagoon channel compared to more isolate lagoon lakes, which were influenced by marine water even in the wet season, and compared to side branches indicating slower turnover times. We found that environmental tracers helped to quantify highly dynamic and

  1. How climate change threats water resource: the case of the Thau coastal lagoon (Mediterranean Sea, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Jeunesse, Isabelle; Sellami, Haykel; Cirelli, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    The latest reports of the intergovernmental panel on climate change explained that the Mediterranean regions are especially vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. These latest are expected to have strong impacts on the management of water resources and on regional economies. The aim of this paper is to discuss impacts of climate changes on the Thau case study in relation to the evolution of water balance, water uses and adaptation to climate change. The Thau coastal lagoon is located in the Mediterranean coast in south of France in the Languedoc-Roussillon Region. Economic activities are diverse from shellfish farming, fertilizers industries to agriculture and tourism. However, tourism and shellfish farming are of major importance for local economy. If tourism is mainly turned to the Sea coast, shellfishes grow within the lagoon and rely on water quality. Previous studies have demonstrated the link between the coastal lagoon water quality and inputs of freshwater from the catchment. Thus, changes in rainfalls, runoff and water balance would not only affect water uses but also water quality. Climate changes projections are presented following the implementation of 4 downscaled climatic models. Impacts on water balance are modelled with SWAT (Soil Water Assessment Tool) for 2041-2070 compared to the 1971-2000 reference period. The decrease of precipitations and water balance will impact discharges and thus decrease the freshwater inputs to the coastal lagoon. A study of water uses conducted in interactions with stakeholders within the Thau area has permitted to assess both current and evolution of water uses. It has revealed local water resources are depleting while water demand is increasing and is planned to continue to increase in the really near future. To prevent water scarcity events, mainly due to the climate change context, the Regional authorities have connected the catchment to the Rhône river to import water. The conclusion of this study is while

  2. Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, D.; Norville, C.

    1991-07-01

    The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

  3. Patterns of seasonal variation in lagoonal macrozoobenthic assemblages (Mellah lagoon, Algeria).

    PubMed

    Magni, Paolo; Draredja, Brahim; Melouah, Khalil; Como, Serena

    2015-08-01

    In coastal lagoons, many studies indicated that macrozoobenthic assemblages undergo marked temporal fluctuations as related to the strong environmental variability of these systems. However, most of these studies have not assessed the seasonal patterns of these fluctuations and none of them has investigated the consistency of this variation in different areas within the same lagoon system. In this study, we assessed patterns of variation at multiple temporal (date, season and year) scales in two different areas in the coastal lagoon of Mellah (northeast Algeria). These areas (hereafter Shore and Center) are representative of two different environments typically found in coastal lagoons. The Shore (water depth of about 1.5-2 m) is characterized by relatively higher hydrodynamics, sand to silty-sand sediments and the presence of vegetation (Ruppia maritima), the Center (water depth of about 3-3.5 m) is characterized by mud to sandy-mud, organic-enriched sediments due to fine particle accumulation. Results showed two distinct patterns of seasonal variation in Shore and Center assemblages for two consecutive years. In Shore, species richness (S), total abundance (N) and the abundance of several dominant taxa were highest in summer and/or autumn. This pattern can be related to the local environmental conditions maintaining relatively well oxidized conditions, while increasing food availability, and favoring the recruitment of species and individuals in summer/autumn. On the contrary in Center, S was lowest in summer and autumn, and N and the abundance of fewer dominant taxa were lowest in summer. In Center, the bivalve Loripes lucinalis showed a 10-fold increase from summer to autumn in both years, likely related to the lagoon's hydrodynamics favoring larval transport and settlement in the central sector of the lagoon. Overall, the seasonal variation found in Center followed a regression/recovery pattern typical of opportunistic assemblages occurring in confined

  4. Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Bridger Morrison

    2014-09-01

    J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

  5. NARSTO NE MODEL

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    ... Station Instrument:  Chemiluminescence UV Ozone Detector Location:  Northeastern United States ... Files:  NE Model Readme Hourly Surface Air Quality Ozone & Nitrogen Measurement Sites Related Data:  ...

  6. MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanski, Ray; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    To begin, we examine the relationship between MiniBooNE and the neutrino beam geometry at Fermilab. In Figure 1, a schematic representation is shown of the plan view of the location of MiniBooNE relative to SciBooNE and the NuMI target, where it can be seen that SciBooNE and MiniBooNE share the same beamline and neutrino flux, and therefore share some of the same systematic effects -- A combined analysis between the two experimental groups could yield a superior result compared to segregated individual analysis. MiniBooNE makes an angle of 6.3 degrees with the NuMI beamline, an off-axis measurement if you will, that provides a relatively high yield of electron neutrinos from kaon decay. Furthermore, the proton beam incident on the MiniBooNE target possesses a 53 MHz structure that will be important in timing studies related to the low energy excess. Let's review of the results of the MiniBooNE: As is well known, MiniBooNE, a test of the LSND effect [1], adds experimental inspiration to the possible existence of new phenomena; although two neutrino-family oscillations were shown to be an unlikely candidate to explain the LSND effect, a low energy excess of 3.0 sigma in the neutrino sector at energies between 200 to 475 MeV [2] - an effect that appears to have no counterpart in the antineutrino sector [3], combined with the 3.8 sigma LSND result - at roughly 50 MeV - strains phenomenology for insight. Miniboones continues to run and collect antineutrino data; will combine disappearance analysis with SciBooNE; take data from the NuMI target, an unusual source with a potentially new look at the low energy anomaly; and use beam timing techniques to further constrain phenomenological models. In this paper we will review current topics related to MiniBooNE and other associated experiments and phenomenology.

  7. MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Mahn, Kendall Brianna Mcconnel; /Columbia U.

    2007-03-01

    MiniBooNE is a short baseline neutrino experiment designed to confirm or refute the LSND observed excess of electron anti neutrinos in a muon anti neutrino beam. The experimental setup, data samples, and oscillation fit method are discussed. Although the result was not public at the time of the talk, MiniBooNE has since published results, which are discussed briefly as well.

  8. Are coastal lagoons physically or biologically controlled ecosystems? Revisiting r vs. K strategies in coastal lagoons and estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Marcos, Concepción; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel María; Pérez-Marcos, María

    2013-11-01

    Environmental stress influences biological assemblages, with species responding to stress by adopting particular life-history strategies (e.g., r vs. K). Coastal lagoons and estuaries are considered naturally stressed and physically controlled systems with frequent environmental disturbances and fluctuations. At the same time, their transitional nature (between terrestrial, freshwater and marine) makes them especially vulnerable to human impacts and land and freshwater inputs. As a result, it is hypothesised that residents of coastal lagoons would display characteristics of r-selected species. The r-strategy involves increased reproductive effort through early reproduction, small and numerous offspring with a large dispersive capability, short lifespan and small adult body size. Together, these traits provide a selective advantage in such unpredictable or short-lived environments. Alternatively, immigrants to coastal lagoons should mostly be K-strategists, with a competitive advantage over the r-strategists, at least on a temporary time scale. These hypotheses were explored using a dataset from 73 Atlanto-Mediterranean sites: 27 estuaries, 42 coastal lagoons and 4 from the sea, obtained from published sources. A detailed analysis of the distributions of the different resident fish species according to lagoon characteristics indicated that in lagoons with a higher marine influence the families Gobiidae, Blenniidae and Syngnathidae were common, while lagoons with freshwater influence are characterized by Cyprinidae and other freshwater species. In analyzing the biological strategies of lagoon species we found that fish assemblages inhabiting marine influenced lagoons were characterized by solitary, necto-benthonic sedentary species. These species are often hermaphroditic, with benthic broods and many exhibit brooding behaviour. This suggests that marine influenced lagoons are dominated by K-strategist species, while r-strategy species will be more common in

  9. In Situ Measurements of Malodors of a Swine Waste Lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining data on the concentrations of malodorous compounds contained in waste lagoons is essential if the factors affecting their emission are to be described. We monitored selected compounds in a 0.4 ha lagoon that received waste from approximately 2000 sows. Phenol, p-cresol, m-cresol, p-ethylph...

  10. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF AN EXISTING SEVEN CELL LAGOON SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The general objective of this study was to determine the yearly performance of a seven cell facultative wastewater lagoon system and to compare this performance with existing state and federal discharge standards and with the criteria used to design the lagoon system and to evalu...

  11. Environmental enhancement of swine lagoons through influent treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined swine production generates large volumes of wastewater typically stored and treated in anaerobic lagoons. Failure of these lagoons during tropical storms in North Carolina along with major public environmental concerns led to a permanent state moratorium of construction of new anaerobic lag...

  12. DESIGN INFORMATION REPORT: PROTECTION OF WASTEWATER LAGOON INTERIOR SLOPES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A problem common to many wastewater treatment and storage lagoons is erosion of the interior slopes. Erosion may be caused by surface runoff and wind-induced wave action. The soils that compose the steep interior slopes of lagoons are especially susceptible to erosion and slumpin...

  13. Characterization of Salmonella bacteriophages isolated from swine lagoon effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four Salmonella bacteriophages originally isolated from swine lagoon effluent were further characterized. Their differences and similarities to known phages and to each other and their potential for biocontrol of Salmonella were assessed. In host inoculation spot tests the lagoon phages produced s...

  14. In Situ Measurements of Malodors in a Swine Waste Lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obtaining data on the concentrations of malodorous compounds contained in waste lagoons is essential if the factors affecting their emission are to be described. We monitored selected compounds in a 0.4 ha lagoon that received waste from approximately 2000 sows. Phenol, p-cresol, m-cresol, p-ethyl...

  15. CONTROL OF ODORS FROM ANAEROBIC LAGOONS TREATING FOOD PROCESSING WASTEWATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic lagoons are used for the treatment of meat packing wastes in most areas of the country. They are a relatively low cost means of achieving BOD reduction. Although lagoon effluent is not suitable for stream discharge, it is amenable to further treatment or to land applica...

  16. Clipperton, a possible future for atoll lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpy, L.; Rodier, M.; Couté, A.; Perrette-Gallet, C.; Bley-Loëz, C.

    2010-09-01

    Closure of the Clipperton Island atoll (10°17' N 109°13' W), now a meromictic lake, is estimated to have occurred between 1839 and 1849. It was still closed in 2005. Brackish waters in the upper layer (0-10 m) were oxygenated, while saline waters in the deep layer (>20 m) were anoxic. Allowing for the methodological difficulties of earlier measurements, the physical characteristics of the lagoon did not seem to have changed significantly since the last expedition (1980). The intermediate layer between brackish and saline waters was characterized by a strong density gradient and a temperature inversion of up to 1.6°C. Microbial activity, water exchange between the deep layer and surrounding oceanic waters and the geothermal flux hypothesis are discussed. The low DIN and SRP concentrations observed in the upper layer, despite high nutrient input by seabird droppings, reflect the high nutrient uptake by primary producers as attested by the elevated overall gross primary production (6.6 g C m-2 day-1), and high suspended photosynthetic biomass (2.23 ± 0.23 μg Chl a l-1) and production (263 ± 27 μg C l-1 day-1). Phytoplankton composition changed in 67 years with the advent of new taxa and the disappearance of previously recorded species. The freshwater phytoplanktonic community comprised 43 taxa: 37 newly identified during the expedition and 6 previously noted; 16 species previously found were not seen in 2005. The closure of the lagoon, combined with the positive precipitation-evaporation budget characteristic of the region, has induced drastic changes in lagoon functioning compared with other closed atolls.

  17. Toward homogenization of Mediterranean lagoons and their loss of hydrodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrarin, Christian; Bajo, Marco; Bellafiore, Debora; Cucco, Andrea; De Pascalis, Francesca; Ghezzo, Michol; Umgiesser, Georg

    2014-08-01

    Lagoons are considered to be the most valuable systems of the Mediterranean coastal area, with crucial ecological, historical, economical, and social relevance. Climate change strongly affects coastal areas and can deeply change the status of transitional areas like lagoons. Herein we investigate the hydrological response of 10 Mediterranean lagoons to climate change by means of numerical models. Our results suggest that Mediterranean lagoons amplify the salinity and temperature changes expected for the open sea. Moreover, numerical simulations indicate that there will be a general loss of intralagoon and interlagoon variability of their physical properties. Therefore, as a result of climate change, we see on Mediterranean lagoons an example of a common process that in future may effect many coastal environments: that of homogenization of the physical characteristics with a tendency toward marinization.

  18. Macroalgae, nutrient cycles, and pollutants in the lagoon of Venice

    SciTech Connect

    Sfriso, A.; Pavoni, B.; Marcomini, A.; Orio, A.A. )

    1992-12-01

    The Lagoon of Venice is a wide, shallow coastal basin that extends for about 50 km along the northwest coast of the Adriatic Sea. The lagoon has been substantially modified through the actions of man over the last century through the artificial control of the hydraulic dynamics of the lagoon including the construction of channels to facilitate navigation. The lagoon is subjected to considerable pollutant loading through the drainage of land under cultivation, municipal sewage, and industrial effluents. In this paper are reported the results of observations designed to document recent changes in macroalgal species composition, seasonal cycles of primary producers and nutrient levels, and the effects of the macroalgal community on concentrations of organic and inorganic pollutants. The dominant macroalgae in the lagoon was Ulva rigida, and the levels of plant nutrients and pollutants were influenced by the seasonal cycles of the macroalgal community. 44 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Evaluating the human impact on groundwater quality discharging into a coastal reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Hernandez-Terrones, L.; Soto, M.; Lecossec, A.; Monroy-Rios, E.

    2008-12-01

    The Eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula has the fastest growth rate in Mexico and groundwater is the only source of drinking water in the region. The consequences of the lack of proper infrastructure to collect and treat wastewater and the impact of human activities on the quality of groundwater are addressed. The groundwater in the coastal aquifer of Quintana Roo (SE Mexico) discharges directly into the ocean. In addition, the coral reef of the Eastern Yucatan Peninsula is part of the Mesoamerican Coral Reef System, one of the largest in the world. The interaction of the reef-lagoon hydraulics with the coastal aquifer of Puerto Morelos (NE Yucatan Peninsula), and a major input of NH4, SO4, SiO2, as a consequence of the use of septic tanks and the lack of modern wastewater treatment plants are presented. No seasonal parameters differences were observed, suggesting that groundwater composition reaching the reef lagoon is not changing seasonally. A conceptual model of the coastal aquifer was developed, in order to explain how the human activities are impacting directly on the groundwater quality that, potentially, will have a direct impact on the coral reef. The protection and conservation of coral reefs must be directly related with a policy of sound management of coastal aquifers and wastewater treatment.

  20. Sludge Lagoons. Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166. Instructor's Guide [and] Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, Ronald M.

    This lesson describes three different types of sludge lagoons: (1) drying lagoons; (2) facultative lagoons; and (3) anaerobic lagoons. Normal operating sequence and equipment are also described. The lesson is designed to be used in sequence with the complete Sludge Treatment and Disposal Course #166 or as an independent lesson. The instructor's…

  1. Impact of cross-reef water fluxes on lagoon dynamics: a simple parameterization for coral lagoon circulation model, with application to the Ouano Lagoon, New Caledonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, Cristele; Sous, Damien; Devenon, Jean-Luc; Pagano, Marc; Rougier, Gilles; Blanchot, Jean

    2015-11-01

    This manuscript presents a combined experimental and numerical study of the impact of cross-reef fluxes on coral reef lagoon dynamics. The selected field site is the Ouano Lagoon (New Caledonia Island, France) in the South Western Pacific Ocean. Measurements of wave transformation above the reef and current profiles through passages and reef openings have been carried out during a 3-month survey. Data analysis reveals the preponderant roles played by both tides and waves on the lagoon dynamics. Based on field data, a simple parameterization of cross-reef fluxes is implemented in a coastal lagoon circulation model and a satisfactory agreement is found between parameterized model and field results. The model is thus used as a numerical experimental tool in order to analyse the cross-reef flows' possible influence on a narrow lagoon dynamics. The results highlight the importance of cross-reef fluxes induced by wave breaking over the reef barrier on the whole lagoon circulation and water properties.

  2. Comparison of the triple-point temperatures of 20Ne, 22Ne and normal Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Tamura, O.; Nagao, K.

    2013-09-01

    At the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), the triple points of 20Ne and 22Ne were realized using modular sealed cells, Ec3Ne20 and Ec8Ne22, made by the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM) in Italy. The difference of the triple-point temperatures of 20Ne and 22Ne was estimated by using the sub-range of standard platinum resistance thermometers (SPRTs) calibrated by NMIJ on the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). The melting curves obtained with the Ec3Ne20 and Ec8Ne22 cells show narrow widths (0.1 mK) over a wide range of the inverse of the melted fraction (1/F) from 1/F=1 to 1/F=10. The liquidus point Ttp estimated by the melting curves from F˜0.5 to F˜0.85 using the Ec8Ne22 is 0.146 29 (4) K higher than that using the Ec3Ne20 cell, which is in good agreement with that observed by INRiM using the same cells. After correction of the effect of impurities and other isotopes for Ec3Ne20 and Ec8Ne22 cells, the difference of Ttp between pure 20Ne and pure 22Ne is estimated to be 0.146 61 (4) K, which is consistent with the recent results reported elsewhere. The sub-ranges of SPRTs computed by using the triple point of 20Ne or 22Ne realized by the Ec3Ne20 cell or the Ec8Ne22 cell in place of the triple point of Ne for the defining fixed point of the ITS-90 are in good agreement with those realized on the basis of the ITS-90 at NMIJ within 0.03 mK, which is much smaller than the non-uniqueness and the sub-range inconsistency of SPRTs.

  3. Metals in sediments of San Andres lagoon, Tamaulipas, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Vazquez, F.G.; Aguilera, L.G. ); Sharma, V.K. )

    1994-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution in water is generally associated with industrial and municipal discharges into rivers, estuaries and lagoons. Once metals are in the water column, they may be taken up by organisms, deposited in the sediments or remain for some period in the water itself. The deposition rate in sediments depends on, among other factors, metal concentration in surface sediments. The concentrations of heavy metals in sediments of coastal, estuarine and lagoon environments have been determined by many workers. For the past several years, we have been interested in determining trace and heavy metal concentrations in the lagoons in Mexico to establish the levels of metal pollution. The work reported here is the completion of our ongoing study in San Andres lagoon. San Andres lagoon is located north of two industrial ports, Tampico and Altamira. In this industrial zone, the basins of the Panuco and Tamesi Rivers are localized and have industrial effluent throughout the year. All these activities and the input of the Tigre River, which runs through an agricultural and cattle-raising region, may affect the biogeochemistry of the San Andres lagoon. In the present work, we report concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Zn and Pb in sediments of San Andres lagoon. The measurements were made in different seasons; Rain-84 (August-September 1984); North (October-December 1984); Dry (April 1985); and Rain-85 (April-June 1985). 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. Multi-centennial scale precipitation and following lagoon ecosystem fluctuation in the Holocene reconstructed by East Korean Lagoon sediment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuki, K.; Yang, D. Y.; Lim, J.; Nahm, W. H.; Nakanishi, T.; Seto, K.; Otsuka, M.; Kashima, K.

    2014-12-01

    There are lagoons in the northern east coast of the South Korea, which were formed during the transgression period in the early Holocene. These lagoons shrank about 5-30 % during the first half of 20 century due to terrestrial sediment input from soil erosion in reclamation lands. However, buried lagoonal sediments record Holocene climate change. In this study, multi-centennial scale paleo-climate and paleo-ecosystem change were investigated by analysis of this buried and present lagoon deposits. Based on the diatom assemblage analysis of the sediment in the lagoon Maeho where it is the east coast lagoons in Korea, this lagoon was formed about 8,400 years ago, and halophilic diatoms showed high peaks at three times within the last 8,400 years. Timings of these peaks were well coincident with the high-sea level periods reported in the western Japan. It is considered that sea-level of the east coast in Korea also showed high at three times during the mid-late Holocene, and then, salinity of the lagoon increased in these periods. Except for such sea-level dependent change, salinity of the lagoon Maeho showed the multi-centennial (200 or 400 years) scale periodic variation. Magnetic susceptibility (MS) also showed the clear 400 years periodicity in the mid-late Holocene. When the MS showed high value, oligohalobous diatoms showed high value. However, halophilic diatoms and number of total diatom valves increased when the MS showed low value. This correspondence probably indicates that magnetic minerals flew into the lagoon with river fresh water, and then volume of fresh water inflow has changed with 400 years cycles. Such MS cycle was also confirmed in the sediments of other lagoons. Change of fresh water inflow should be not local event, was a part of regional environmental change. These results probably indicate that the precipitation on the northeastern South Korea has changed by the 400 years cycle. On the basis of lagoon bottom sediment, it made clear that the

  5. Temperature variability in a shallow, tidally isolated coral reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCabe, R. M.; Estrade, P.; Middleton, J. H.; Melville, W. K.; Roughan, M.; Lenain, L.

    2010-12-01

    Temperature data collected in the shallow, tidally isolated reef flat/lagoon of Lady Elliot Island off Queensland, Australia, show marked variability under solar and tidal forcing. Sea level drops below the height of the protective lagoon rim for a few hours during low tide, effectively isolating the remaining water. Because the lagoon is shallow, its temperature change (from diurnal solar forcing and cooling) is amplified. We develop a simple analytical model to predict the time evolution of mean lagoon temperature, beginning with a well-mixed control volume. This approach highlights the asymmetric flood/ebb physics of tidally isolated lagoons. After discussing the response of this model, we compare it with results from two idealized numerical simulations that illustrate differing aspects of lagoon temperature variability under "potential flow" and "prevailing current" situations. The conceptual model captures the essence of lagoon temperature variability and underscores the importance of solar-lunar phasing. However, because of the well-mixed assumption, it cannot reproduce sudden temperature transitions associated with new incoming water masses. Observations show that a slowly progressing thermal wave inundates the lagoon on rising tides. This wave is similar to our "potential flow" simulation in that it is approximately radially symmetric. On the other hand, it appears to advectively replace resident lagoon water, similar to our "prevailing current" simulations. We attempt to account for this behavior with a simple "frontal" modification to our conceptual model. Results show that this frontal model is able to capture the sudden temperature transitions present in the data and offers improved predictive capabilities over the well-mixed model.

  6. Context view from NE ridge of Daybreak Canyon running NE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Context view from NE ridge of Daybreak Canyon running NE from lookout tower shows fire line on right and NE side of lookout tower in the far distance. Tree in foreground is Pondaross Pine that survived fires of 1991 and 1994. Camera is pointed SW with wide-angle lens. - Chelan Butte Lookout, Summit of Chelan Butte, Chelan, Chelan County, WA

  7. A Century of changes for Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrieciu, Marian-Albert; Stanica, Adrian

    2014-05-01

    A Century of changes for Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System Marian-Albert Scrieciu (a), Adrian Stanica (a) (a) National Institute of Marine Geology and Geoecology e GeoEcoMar, Str. Dimitrie Onciul 23e25, Sector 2, 024053 Bucharest, Romania Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System, situated in the NW part of the Black Sea, in tight connection with the Danube Delta, has been subject to major changes due to human interventions in the past century. These changes have resulted into a complete change of the Lagoon specific ecosystems compared to its pristine state. In its natural state, as brackish - transitional environment, Antipa (1894) mentions Razelm Lagoon as one of the places with the greatest fisheries around the Black Sea coast (about 1879 - 1884, there were approximately 10,000 fishermen, all working on the Razelm Sinoe Lagoon System). Starting with the end of the XIXth Century, new canals were dug and existing channels were dredged in order to develop tighter connections with the Danube River. The natural inlet of Portita was blocked four decades ago and connections between the various parts of the lagoon system were controlled by the building of locks and sluices. The 2 inlets of Sinoe Lagoon were also controlled during early 1980s. Under these conditions, the lagoon ecosystem changed from brackish towards freshwater, with major effects on the existing flora and fauna. The period of brutal interventions ended in 1989 and the Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System became part of the Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve in 1991, with a strict policy of nature protection and restoration. Spatial planning has been the major management option for the entire reserve, lagoon system included. Plans for sustainable development of the Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System have been built in a participative manner, involving the local stakeholders, as part of FP7 ARCH project. Special attention has been given to impacts of climate change. The study presents the vision for the development Razelm-Sinoe Lagoon System over

  8. Is the Venice Lagoon Noisy? First Passive Listening Monitoring of the Venice Lagoon: Possible Effects on the Typical Fish Community.

    PubMed

    Bolgan, Marta; Picciulin, Marta; Codarin, Antonio; Fiorin, Riccardo; Zucchetta, Matteo; Malavasi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Three passive listening surveys have been carried out in two of the three Venice lagoon tide inlets and inside the Venice island. The spectral content and the intensity level of the underwater noise as well as the presence or absence of Sciaena umbra and the distribution of its different sound patterns have been investigated in all the recording sites. The passive listening proved to be successful in detecting S. umbra drumming sounds in both Venice lagoon tide inlets. Our results indicate that the spectral content and the level of underwater noise pollution in the Venice lagoon could affect fish acoustic communication. PMID:26610947

  9. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia’s Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves—specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  10. Self-generated morphology in lagoon reefs.

    PubMed

    Blakeway, David; Hamblin, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional form of a coral reef develops through interactions and feedbacks between its constituent organisms and their environment. Reef morphology therefore contains a potential wealth of ecological information, accessible if the relationships between morphology and ecology can be decoded. Traditionally, reef morphology has been attributed to external controls such as substrate topography or hydrodynamic influences. Little is known about inherent reef morphology in the absence of external control. Here we use reef growth simulations, based on observations in the cellular reefs of Western Australia's Houtman Abrolhos Islands, to show that reef morphology is fundamentally determined by the mechanical behaviour of the reef-building organisms themselves-specifically their tendency to either remain in place or to collapse. Reef-building organisms that tend to remain in place, such as massive and encrusting corals or coralline algae, produce nodular reefs, whereas those that tend to collapse, such as branching Acropora, produce cellular reefs. The purest reef growth forms arise in sheltered lagoons dominated by a single type of reef builder, as in the branching Acropora-dominated lagoons of the Abrolhos. In these situations reef morphology can be considered a phenotype of the predominant reef building organism. The capacity to infer coral type from reef morphology can potentially be used to identify and map specific coral habitat in remotely sensed images. More generally, identifying ecological mechanisms underlying other examples of self-generated reef morphology can potentially improve our understanding of present-day reef ecology, because any ecological process capable of shaping a reef will almost invariably be an important process in real time on the living reef. PMID:26175962

  11. Mercury methylation and demethylation in Hg-contaminated lagoon sediments (Marano and Grado Lagoon, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hines, Mark E.; Poitras, Erin N.; Covelli, Stefano; Faganeli, Jadran; Emili, Andrea; Žižek, Suzana; Horvat, Milena

    2012-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) transformation activities and sulfate (SO42-) reduction were studied in sediments of the Marano and Grado Lagoons in the Northern Adriatic Sea region as part of the "MIRACLE" project. The lagoons, which are sites of clam (Tapes philippinarum) farming, have been receiving excess Hg from the Isonzo River for centuries. Marano Lagoon is also contaminated from a chlor-alkali plant. Radiotracer methods were used to measure mercury methylation (230Hg, 197Hg), methylmercury (MeHg) demethylation (14C-MeHg) and SO42- reduction (35S) in sediment cores collected in autumn, winter and summer. Mercury methylation rate constants ranged from near zero to 0.054 day-1, generally decreased with depth, and were highest in summer. Demethylation rate constants were much higher than methylation reaching values of ˜0.6 day-1 in summer. Demethylation occurred via the oxidative pathway, except in winter when the reductive pathway increased in importance in surficial sediments. Sulfate reduction was also most active in summer (up to 1600 nmol mL-1 day-1) and depth profiles reflected seasonally changing redox conditions near the surface. Methylation and demethylation rate constants correlated positively with SO42- reduction and pore-water Hg concentrations, and inversely with Hg sediment-water partition coefficients indicating the importance of SO42- reduction and Hg dissolution on Hg cycling. Hg transformation rates were calculated using rate constants and concentrations of Hg species. In laboratory experiments, methylation was inhibited by amendments of the SO42--reduction inhibitor molybdate and by nitrate. Lagoon sediments displayed a dynamic seasonal cycle in which Hg dissolution in spring/summer stimulated Hg methylation, which was followed by a net loss of MeHg in autumn from demethylation. Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) tended to be responsible for methylation of Hg and the oxidative demethylation of MeHg. However, during winter in surficial sediments, iron

  12. Surface Water Quality Survey of Northern Indian River Lagoon from Sebastian Inlet to Mosquito Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, R. J.; Webb, B. M.

    2012-12-01

    Following news of an emerging brown tide algal bloom in the northern Indian River Lagoon (IRL), researchers sought to gain insight into the surface water quality in the IRL, as well as the extent of the algae coverage. A Portable SeaKeeper from YSI, mounted to a personal watercraft-based coastal profiling system, autonomously collected and analyzed the surface water. The system operates by recording sample data every 12 seconds while continuously underway at speeds up to and greater than 50 km/hr. The researchers covered a transect that started at Sebastian Inlet and followed a zig-zag path extending up through the Haulover Canal and into the Mosquito Lagoon. The survey path covered 166.7 km, and collected 2248 samples. Along the way stops were made at water quality stations used by the Saint John's River Water Management District, so that the data collected can be incorporated into ongoing monitoring efforts. The system analyzed the surface water for dissolved oxygen, pH, chlorophyll-a, salinity, temperature, turbidity, refined fuels, and CDOM. In the two days following the lagoon survey, the inlets at Port Canaveral and Sebastian were also surveyed for tidal currents and hydrography. The IRL transect survey data recorded evidence of the southern extent of the algae bloom in both chlorophyll-a and pH levels. Visual evidence of the bloom was striking as the water in the northern IRL turned a milk chocolaty brown color. Chlorophyll-a levels in the two inlets suggested bloom activity at these locations; however this bloom was different. This oceanic bloom was a result of a persistent upwelling event along the East Florida shelf, and the color was a paler green-yellow. The near-synoptic nature of the comprehensive lagoon survey, conducted in just over 7 hours, allows researchers to obtain a better understanding of water quality in coastal lagoons. Elevated levels of salinity, temperature, and refined fuels in the northern IRL indicate a low exchange rate and absence

  13. VISTA Stares Deeply into the Blue Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This new infrared image of the Lagoon Nebula was captured as part of a five-year study of the Milky Way using ESO's VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This is a small piece of a much larger image of the region surrounding the nebula, which is, in turn, only one part of a huge survey. Astronomers are currently using ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to scour the Milky Way's central regions for variable objects and map its structure in greater detail than ever before. This huge survey is called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) [1]. The new infrared image presented here was taken as part of this survey. It shows the stellar nursery called the Lagoon Nebula (also known as Messier 8, see eso0936), which lies about 4000-5000 light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). Infrared observations allow astronomers to peer behind the veil of dust that prevents them from seeing celestial objects in visible light. This is because visible light, which has a wavelength that is about the same size as the dust particles, is strongly scattered, but the longer wavelength infrared light can pass through the dust largely unscathed. VISTA, with its 4.1-metre diameter mirror - the largest survey telescope in the world - is dedicated to surveying large areas of the sky at near-infrared wavelengths deeply and quickly. It is therefore ideally suited to studying star birth. Stars typically form in large molecular clouds of gas and dust, which collapse under their own weight. The Lagoon Nebula, however, is also home to a number of much more compact regions of collapsing gas and dust, called Bok globules [2]. These dark clouds are so dense that, even in the infrared, they can block the starlight from background stars. But the most famous dark feature in the nebula, for which it is named, is the lagoon-shaped dust lane that winds its way through the glowing cloud of gas. Hot, young stars, which give off intense

  14. VISTA Stares Deeply into the Blue Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This new infrared image of the Lagoon Nebula was captured as part of a five-year study of the Milky Way using ESO's VISTA telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This is a small piece of a much larger image of the region surrounding the nebula, which is, in turn, only one part of a huge survey. Astronomers are currently using ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) to scour the Milky Way's central regions for variable objects and map its structure in greater detail than ever before. This huge survey is called VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) [1]. The new infrared image presented here was taken as part of this survey. It shows the stellar nursery called the Lagoon Nebula (also known as Messier 8, see eso0936), which lies about 4000-5000 light-years away in the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). Infrared observations allow astronomers to peer behind the veil of dust that prevents them from seeing celestial objects in visible light. This is because visible light, which has a wavelength that is about the same size as the dust particles, is strongly scattered, but the longer wavelength infrared light can pass through the dust largely unscathed. VISTA, with its 4.1-metre diameter mirror - the largest survey telescope in the world - is dedicated to surveying large areas of the sky at near-infrared wavelengths deeply and quickly. It is therefore ideally suited to studying star birth. Stars typically form in large molecular clouds of gas and dust, which collapse under their own weight. The Lagoon Nebula, however, is also home to a number of much more compact regions of collapsing gas and dust, called Bok globules [2]. These dark clouds are so dense that, even in the infrared, they can block the starlight from background stars. But the most famous dark feature in the nebula, for which it is named, is the lagoon-shaped dust lane that winds its way through the glowing cloud of gas. Hot, young stars, which give off intense

  15. Nitrification and denitrification gene abundances in swine wastewater anaerobic lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although anaerobic lagoons are used globally for livestock waste treatment, their detailed microbial cycling of nitrogen is only beginning to become understood. Within this cycling, nitrification can be performed by organisms which produce the enzyme ammonia monooxygenase (AMO). For denitrification,...

  16. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethinyl estradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl de...

  17. 13. Sewage treatment lagoon, drainage control at center left, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Sewage treatment lagoon, drainage control at center left, looking south - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Control Facility, County Road CS23A, North of Exit 127, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  18. 1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view: east side, from Condado Lagoon Beach on southeast (context) - Puente Guillermo Esteves, Spanning San Antonio Channel at PR-25 (Juan Ponce de Leon Avenue), San Juan, San Juan Municipio, PR

  19. Nutrient removal from swine lagoon effluent by duckweed

    SciTech Connect

    Bergmann, B.A.; Cheng, J.; Classen, J.; Stomp, A.M.

    2000-04-01

    Three duckweed geographic isolates were grown on varying concentrations of swine lagoon effluent in a greenhouse to determine their ability to remove nutrients from the effluent. Duckweed biomass was harvested every other day over a 12-day period. Duckweed biomass production, nutrient loss from the swine lagoon effluent, and nutrient content of duckweed biomass were used to identify effluent concentrations/geographic isolate combinations that are effective in terms of nutrient utilization from swine lagoon effluent and production of healthy duckweed biomass. When Lemna minor geographic isolate 8627 was grown on 50% swine lagoon effluent, respective losses of TKN, NH{sub 3}-N, TP, OPO{sub 4}-P, TOC, K, Cu, and Zn were 83, 100, 49, 31, 68, 21, 28 and 67%.

  20. ANALYSIS OF SWINE LAGOONS AND GROUND WATER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ESTROGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method was developed for analysis of low levels of natural (estradiol, estrone, estriol) and synthetic (ethynylestradiol) estrogens in ground water and swine waste lagoon effluent. The method includes solid phase extraction of the estrogens, preparation of pentafluorobenzyl der...

  1. Holocene lagoonal development in the isolated carbonate platforms off Belize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischler, Eberhard

    2003-06-01

    Thirty-one vibracores were taken in interior lagoons of Glovers Reef, Lighthouse Reef, and Turneffe Islands—three isolated carbonate platforms offshore Belize, Central America. Holocene facies successions overlying the Pleistocene limestone bedrock begin with soils, followed by mangrove peats, and marine carbonate sediments of lagoonal origin. The soils formed on top of subaerially exposed Pleistocene limestone before the Holocene transgression. Mangrove peats developed during initial flooding of the platforms (Glovers ca. 8.5 ky, Lighthouse ca. 7 ky, Turneffe ca. 6 ky BP). As water depths increased, reefs colonized platform margins, lagoonal circulation improved thereby promoting carbonate production. The basal lagoonal carbonate sediments are characterized by shell beds and/or Halimeda packstones-grainstones. Mollusk-dominated wackestones and packstones follow upsection in Glovers and Lighthouse Reefs. At present, open circulation prevails in Glovers and Lighthouse lagoons. In contrast, organic-rich Halimeda wackestones and packstones dominate the Turneffe Islands Holocene succession. The main lagoon area of Turneffe is enclosed by mangroves, and restricted circulation prevails. Factors that explain the differences in geomorphology, circulation, and facies are variations in depth of antecedent topography and degree of exposure to waves and currents. The thickness of Holocene lagoon sediments may exceed the maximum core length of 6 m in all atolls. Holocene sedimentation rates average 0.6 m/ky, with highest rates in Turneffe (0.82 m/ky), followed by Lighthouse (0.53 m/ky), and Glovers (0.46 m/ky). Like in many other isolated carbonate platforms and atolls, lagoon floor sedimentation did not keep pace with rising sea level, leading to unfilled accommodation space. At present, Glovers has an 18 m deep lagoon, while Lighthouse and the main Turneffe lagoon are 8 m deep. It is unlikely that the lagoons will be completely filled during the Holocene sea level highstand

  2. Tidal dynamics in a frictionally dominated tropical lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio-Fernandez, L.; Gomez-Valdes, J.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Enriquez, C.; Valle-Levinson, A.; Parra, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    This study examined the dynamics of tidal propagation inside a tropical lagoon. Sea surface elevation (inside) and current profiles (at the inlet) were examined over 60 days at the Chelem lagoon, which is a branched tropical lagoon located in the northern Yucatan Peninsula. Tides were predominantly diurnal with a wavelength at least 20 times longer than the total length of the basin. Spatial variations of sea surface elevation and the longitudinal transport were described in each branch by applying a linear analytical model and the results were compared to observations. Results showed that the coastal lagoon was highly frictional. The tidal signal was attenuated between 30% and 40% toward the lagoon heads, a result of the balance between pressure gradient and frictional forces. A causeway that chokes the western side of the lagoon allowed the propagation of the diurnal signal toward the west head of the basin but damped the semidiurnal signal. The causeway acted as a hydraulic low-pass filter, as in natural choked systems. The causeway's filter effect was included in the analytical model by optimizing the frictional parameters.

  3. Pathways of priority pesticides in sediments of coastal lagoons: The case study of Óbidos Lagoon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M I; Vale, C; Sontag, G; Noronha, J P

    2016-05-15

    This study reports the concentrations of the priority pesticides (PPs) in 14 surface sediments and 21 layers of a sediment core from Óbidos Lagoon, a shallow Portuguese coastal lagoon. Results show that the PPs are confined to the upper part of the lagoon that receives most of the inputs from surface runoff of the surrounding agricultural fields and from small tributaries. Past and recent applied PPs were registered in sediments, aluminum normalized concentrations varying between 0.05×10(-7) and 6.85×10(-7). The PP risk assessment based on sediment quality guidelines like the "Probable Effect Level" (PEL) shows no biological effects in either sediments or aquatic organisms of Óbidos Lagoon, except for dieldrin, lindane, DDT, heptachlor epoxide and its parent compound heptachlor. PMID:27021267

  4. Nutrient inputs to a Lagoon through submarine groundwater discharge: The case of Laoye Lagoon, Hainan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Tao; Du, Jinzhou; Moore, Willard S.; Zhang, Guosen; Su, Ni; Zhang, Jing

    2013-02-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) with inputs of nutrients in certain regions may play a significant role in controlling water quality in the coastal regions. In this paper, we have determined four naturally occurring radium isotope (223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra and 228Ra) activities and nutrient concentrations in surface water, coastal groundwater and river water in the mixing zone of Laoye Lagoon to estimate the fluxes of SGD by several models. The activities of the four radium isotopes of ground water were considerably greater than those in surface water samples. Using a 224Ra/228Ra activity ratio (AR) model, we estimated the average lagoon water age to be 3.2 days, which was comparable with the flushing time of 4.0 days. Based on the excess radium isotopes and the water age of the lagoon, the estimated fluxes of SGD (in 106 m3/d) ranged from 2.64 to 5.32 with an average of 4.11. Moreover, we used Si balance to evaluate the flux of SGD (4.8 × 106 m3/d) which was close to the result calculated by radium. The SGD-derived nutrient fluxes (in mol/d) were DIN = 1.7 × 105, PO43 - = 5.2 × 102, and SiO3 = 5.3 × 104. Furthermore, we applied the biogeochemical budget approach using SiO3 as a tracer to evaluate the impact of SGD. The differences between the results estimated by radium and SiO3 may indicate different pathways for the input of nutrients.

  5. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Mark R. Cole

    2013-12-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA), located in Butte County, Idaho, at the Idaho National Laboratory has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non-contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell #1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell #2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell #3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5-acre land application site that uses a center-pivot irrigation sprinkler system. As flows at CFA have decreased in recent years, the amount of wastewater discharged to the land application site has decreased from 13.64 million gallons in 2004 to no discharge in 2012 and 2013. In addition to the decreasing need for land application, approximately 7.7 MG of supplemental water was added to the system in 2013 to maintain a water level and prevent the clay soil liners in the cells from drying out and “cracking.” The Idaho National Laboratory is concerned that the sewage lagoons and land application site may be oversized for current and future flows. A further concern is the sustainability of the large volumes of supplemental water that are added to the system according to current operational practices. Therefore, this study was initiated to evaluate the system capacity, operational practices, and potential improvement alternatives, as warranted.

  6. The freshwater artisanal fishery of Patos Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Ceni, G; Fontoura, N F; Cabral, H N

    2016-07-01

    In this study data relative to the fishery in the freshwater area of the Patos Lagoon are analysed, and the dynamics, fishing gears used and catches evaluated. The results reveal the existence of two fishery strategies: forbidden mesh size gillnets (FMG; <35 mm; square measure) and allowed mesh size gillnets (AMG; ≥35 mm; square measure). In total, 31 species were caught (AMG = 27 and FMG = 24), but selectivity due to mesh size was significant (P < 0·001). The FMG may be very harmful since it captures individuals of most species below size at first maturity, including the target species, the armoured catfish Loricariichthys anus (61% of the total catch). In addition, this gear is used throughout the year, including the closed season (CS; November to January), when the target species is reproducing. Target species for the AMG are larger in size, comprising mainly the mullet Mugil liza, the marine catfish Genidens barbus and the whitemouth croaker Micropogonias furnieri. AMS gillnets were not used during the CS. The use of FMG reveals the need for effective fishery law enforcement and the need for additional studies to assess the status of populations of the exploited species. PMID:27250698

  7. Fine and coarse components in surface sediments from Bikini Lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V. E., LLNL

    1997-01-01

    In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations in the lagoon of Bikini Atoll, one of the two sites in the Marshall Islands used by the United States to test nuclear devices from 1946 through 1958. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long-lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show, by comparison, what modifications occurred in the composition since the sediments were first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material that is now found in the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. The 5 cratering events alone at Bikini Atoll redistributed sufficient material to account for the higher inventory of fine material found over the surface 4 cm of the sediment of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to greatly change the general geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

  8. Geochemical characterization of seaplane lagoon sediments, Alameda Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect

    Bono, A; Carroll, S; Esser, B; Luther, G W; O'Day, P; Randall, S

    1999-08-16

    Our objective in the characterization of sediments from Seaplane Lagoon at the Alameda Naval Air Station (NAS) was to determine the geochemical interactions that control the partitioning of cadmium, chromium, cobalt, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, and zinc between the sediments and the porewaters. Our approach was to collect several cores at the east outfall location of the Seaplane Lagoon. We determined the porewater chemistry by (1) making in situ micro-electrode measurements, (2) extracting porewaters, and (3) modeling geochemical reactions. We determined the sediment chemistry by measuring (1) elemental abundance, (2) mineralogy, and (3) trace-element speciation. This information should help the US Navy determine the long-term hazard of the sediments if they are left in place and the short-term hazard if they are dredged. We did not fully examine the geochemistry of sediments from the West Beach Landfill Wetlands site, because these sediments were distinct from the Seaplane Lagoon sediments. Our initial motivation for studying the Landfill Wetlands site was to determine the trace-element geochemistry in Seaplane Lagoon sediments that had been dredged and then disposed in the Landfill Wetlands. Unfortunately, the location of these dredged sediments is unknown. The cores we sampled were not from the Seaplane Lagoon.

  9. Nutrient-Chlorophyll Relationships in the Indian River Lagoon, Florida(SEERS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Indian River Lagoon is a highly diverse estuary located along Florida’s Atlantic coast. The system is made up of the main stem and two side-lagoons: the Banana River and Mosquito Lagoon. We segmented the main stem into three sections based on spatial trends in water quality ...

  10. A system for estimating bowen ratio And evaporation from waste lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A low cost system was deployed above a swine waste lagoon to obtain estimates of Bowen ratios and characterize lagoon temperatures. The system consisted of humidity and temperature sensors and anemometers deployed above the lagoon, water temperature sensors, and a meteorological station located by t...

  11. Evolution and vitality of seagrasses in a Mediterranean lagoon.

    PubMed

    Ferrat, Lila; Fernandez, C; Pasqualini, V; Pergent, G; Pergent-Martini, C

    2003-08-01

    Despite their registration on the list of the Ramsar convention sites, the Mediterranean lagoons rarely beneficiate of an effective protection, and are particularly sensitive to environmental quality. A control of these wetlands needs the creation of an inventory of knowledge for the concerned environment. In this perspective, the seagrass beds were followed up in the coastal lagoon of Urbino (Corse, France) since 1990. A cartographic study was carried out by remote sensing of aerial photography. Temporal evolution of the seagrass beds (Cymodocea nodosa principally) allows to determine the vitality of these structures. A comparison of the surface areas occupied by Cymodocea nodosa, between 1990 and 1999, did not allow seeing any significant evolution. However, some variations appear like biotopes all more fragile and coveted as the Mediterranean coastal fringe is straight and is the privileged site of appear in the localization of the beds, due to the modification of environmental conditions in the lagoon. PMID:12929800

  12. LANDSAT imagery of the Venetian Lagoon: A multitemporal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alberotanza, L.; Zandonella, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The use of LANDSAT multispectral scanner images from 1975 to 1979 to determine pollution dispersion in the central basin of the lagoon under varying tidal conditions is described. Images taken during the late spring and representing both short and long range tidal dynamics were processed for partial haze removal and removal of residual striping. Selected spectral bands were correlated to different types of turbid water. The multitemporal data was calibrated, classified considering sea truth data, and evaluated. The classification differentiated tide diffusion, algae belts, and industrial, agricultural, and urban turbidity distributions. Pollution concentration is derived during the short time interval between inflow and outflow and from the distance between the two lagoon inlets and the industrial zones. Increasing pollution of the lagoon is indicated.

  13. Evaluation of mobile metals in sediments of Burullus Lagoon, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mona; El-Gharabawy, Suzan

    2016-08-15

    The Burullus Lagoon north Nile Delta of Egypt is a UNESCO-protected area. Recently it has become a sediment sink which led to shrinking in its area and depth accompanying with increasing contaminant levels. In this study we attempt to explore the spatial distribution and their mobility of heavy metals (Zn, Cu, Ni, Cr and Pb) based on 21surface sediment samples recovered from Burullus lagoon basin and nine drains. The risk assessment code of the studied heavy metals can be arranged as Zn>Cu>Pb>Cr>Ni for all the samples collected from the lagoon basin and nine different drains. The heavy metals tend to accumulate in fine sediments and human activities promote the accumulation of contaminated sediments in water courses. PMID:27216045

  14. Registration of 'NE01643' Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NE01643 is a hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivar developed cooperatively by the Nebraska Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS and released in 2007 by the developing institutions and the South Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station. NE01643 will be marketed under the na...

  15. Eutrophication Process on Coastal Lagoons of North of Sinaloa, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo-Urias, D.; Martinez-Lopez, A.

    2007-05-01

    Coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of California support diverse and important fisheries and are reservoirs of great biological diversity. In northern Sinaloa, population growth and development, as well as increased use of these natural systems for recreation, has substantially increased the pressure placed upon marine resources. Discharge of untreated wastewaters generated by diverse human activities has been notably altered its health and integrity, principally along the lagoon's eastern shore In the late 60s, agriculture moved into a dominant role in coastal northern Sinaloa. The coastal plain encompasses more than 200,000 hectares under cultivation that now introduces large amounts of organic material, pesticides, heavy metals, and fertilizers into the lagoon systems of Topolobampo and San Ignacio-Navachiste-Macapule System at drainage discharge points and a minor grade in Colorado Lagoon. These lagoons are shallow and exhibit low water quality, lost of lagoon depth, presence of toxic substances (heavy metals) near the discharge points of wastewaters, and presence of harmful algal blooms. With the aim of evaluate the nutrients loadings (wastewaters, groundwaters) and their effects on the coastal lagoons of north of Sinaloa, the preliminary analysis of the physical, chemical and biologic variables data series are analyzed. From 1987-2007 eutrophication process is identified in Topolobampo Complex show increase tendency in annual average concentrations of DIN (Dissolved Inorganic Nitrogen= NO2+NO3) from 0.5 μ M in 1987 to 2.7 μ M in 2006. Trophic Index (TRIX) values, low nutrient ratios (N: P and N: Si) and the phytoplanktonic community structure support this result. Preliminary results of nutrients loadings show a mayor contribution of wastewaters into the coastal zone.

  16. State Waste Discharge Permit application, 100-N Sewage Lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations (Ecology et al. 1994), the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affect groundwater or have the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173--216 (or 173--218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. As a result of this decision, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office entered into Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177, (Ecology and DOE-RL 1991). This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Since the influent to the sewer lagoon is domestic waste water, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used. Although the 100-N Sewage Lagoon is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. The 100-N Sewage Lagoon serves the 100-N Area and other Hanford Site areas by receiving domestic waste from two sources. A network of sanitary sewer piping and lift stations transfers domestic waste water from the 100-N Area buildings directly to the 100-N Sewage Lagoon. Waste is also received by trucks that transport domestic waste pumped from on site septic tanks and holding tanks. Three ponds comprise the 100-N Sewage Lagoon treatment system. These include a lined aeration pond and stabilization pond, as well as an unlined infiltration pond. Both piped-in and trucked-in domestic waste is discharged directly into the aeration pond.

  17. KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M.

    2015-07-01

    KM3NeT is a large research infrastructure, that will consist of a network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. The main objective of KM3NeT is the discovery and subsequent observation of high-energy neutrino sources in the Universe. A further physics perspective is the measurement of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. A corresponding study, ORCA, is ongoing within KM3NeT. A cost effective technology for (very) large water Cherenkov detectors has been developed based on a new generation of low price 3-inch photo-multiplier tubes. Following the successful deployment and operation of two prototypes, the construction of the KM3NeT research infrastructure has started. The prospects of the different phases of the implementation of KM3NeT are summarised.

  18. KM3NeT

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, M. de; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2015-07-15

    KM3NeT is a large research infrastructure, that will consist of a network of deep-sea neutrino telescopes in the Mediterranean Sea. The main objective of KM3NeT is the discovery and subsequent observation of high-energy neutrino sources in the Universe. A further physics perspective is the measurement of the mass hierarchy of neutrinos. A corresponding study, ORCA, is ongoing within KM3NeT. A cost effective technology for (very) large water Cherenkov detectors has been developed based on a new generation of low price 3-inch photo-multiplier tubes. Following the successful deployment and operation of two prototypes, the construction of the KM3NeT research infrastructure has started. The prospects of the different phases of the implementation of KM3NeT are summarised.

  19. Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

  20. Optical researches for cyanobacteria bloom monitoring in Curonian Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Budylin, Gleb B.; Yakimov, Boris P.; Voloshina, Olga V.; Karabashev, Genrik S.; Evdoshenko, Marina A.; Fadeev, Victor V.

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria bloom is a great ecological problem of Curonian Lagoon and Baltic Sea. The development of novel methods for the on-line control of cyanobacteria concentration and, moreover, for prediction of bloom spreading is of interest for monitoring the state of ecosystem. Here, we report the results of the joint application of hyperspectral measurements and remote sensing of Curonian Lagoon in July 2015 aimed at the assessment of cyanobacteria communities. We show that hyperspectral data allow on-line detection and qualitative estimation of cyanobacteria concentration, while the remote sensing data indicate the possibility of cyanobacteria bloom detection using the spectral features of upwelling irradiation.

  1. Sediment budget in the Lagoon of Venice, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarretta, A.; Pillon, S.; Molinaroli, E.; Guerzoni, S.; Fontolan, G.

    2010-05-01

    A comparison of 1927, 1970 and 2002 bathymetric surveys in the Lagoon of Venice was used to reconstruct historical changes in sedimentation. A detailed GIS-based analysis of the charts revealed the timing and pattern of geomorphic changes and allowed calculation of sediment deposition and erosion for the entire lagoon and each of its four sub-basins: Treporti, Lido, Malamocco and Chioggia. Two main developments are discernible from comparative observation of the areal distribution of the main elevation ranges: the diminution in area of the saltmarshes, which decreased by more than 50%, from 68 km 2 in 1927 to 32 km 2 in 2002, and the progressive deepening of the lagoon, with a huge increase in the area of subtidal flats (between -0.75 and -2.00 m depth), from 88 to 206 km 2 during the same period. Generally, the lagoon showed a clear-cut change in the most frequent depths (modal depth) from a value of -0.62 m in 1927 to -0.88 m in 2002. The deepening of the lagoon affected mostly the lagoonal sub-basins south of the town of Venice, where modal depth increased from -0.65 to -1.12 m in Lido, from -0.64 to -1.75 m in Malamocco and from -0.39 to -0.88 m in Chioggia. Large changes in lagoonal morphology were caused by human-induced subsidence, the dredging of navigation channels between 1927 and 1970, and intense natural erosion enhanced by sediment re-suspension due to Manila clam fishing between 1970 and 2002. There was a net loss of about 110 Mm 3 of sediment from the lagoon, most of which (73 Mm 3, ca.70%) was in the earlier period. A significant amount was lost by dredging and direct disposal outside the system, either on land or at sea, and there was a net loss of 39 Mm 3 from the lagoon to the sea through the inlets, at an annual rate of 0.5 Mm 3. Comparison of erosion rates in the two periods revealed an alarming acceleration, from a net sediment loss of 0.3 Mm 3 yr -1 in the period 1927-1970 to 0.8 Mm 3 yr -1 in 1970-2002. Deterioration caused a shift from a

  2. HYDROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE COASTAL LAGOONS AT HUGH TAYLOR BIRCH STATE RECREATION AREA, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA: A HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The author presents initial results of an ongoing study of Southeast Florida coastal lagoon lakes. Objectives include presenting environmental conditions within and adjacent to the lagoons under a variety of hydrologic conditions and to determine water-quality changes in ground water and surface water and how these changes in water quality affect lagoonal biological communities within the lagoons.

  3. Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Giesbrecht

    2014-05-01

    The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

  4. Microplankton bloom in a brackish water lagoon of Terengganu.

    PubMed

    Shamsudin, L; Shazili, N A

    1991-10-01

    Increased primary plankton productivity was observed in a brackish water lagoon of Terengganu during the study period between January 1988 to December 1988. The lagoon is also the site for the fish cage culture activities of sea bass during the study period. An examination of water quality at the sampling stations during the study period indicated that both the organic and inorganic nutrients were high during the pre-monsoon period. The source of the nutrient in the lagoon was believed to be derived from the agro-based industrial effluents, fertilisers from paddy fields as well as untreated human and animal wastes. This coincided with the peak production of plankton in the surface waters of the brackish water lagoon. During this period both cultured and indigenous fish species were seen to suffer from oxygen asphyxiation (suffocation due to lack of oxygen). The primary productivity values ranged from 9 to 22 μg/L/h during the peak period while the microplankton species were composed of diatom, flagellates and dinoflagellates. Reduction in the primary productivity values were obtained with reduction in sallinity, specially during the peak monsoon months (November to March) corresponding to the Northeast monsoon period. PMID:24233946

  5. A Field Study Training Program on Wastewater Lagoon Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Water and Wastewater Technical School, Neosho, MO.

    This publication is a text and reference manual for operating personnel of both large and small wastewater lagoon systems with support from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). As a text, this inservice training manual is intended to be used in a correspondence course wherein the trainee or operator would read and study each chapter before…

  6. Aerated Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This unit (which consists of a single lesson) describes the structural and operationally unique features of aerated lagoons. In addition, special troubleshooting and maintenance problems are discussed. The instructor's guide for the unit includes: (1) an overview of the lesson; (2) lesson plan; (3) lecture outline (keyed to a set of slides used…

  7. Distribution and stability of eelgrass beds at Izembek Lagoon, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, D.H.; Markon, C.J.; Douglas, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Spatial change in eelgrass meadows, Zostera marina L., was assessed between 1978 and 1987 and between 1987 and 1995 at Izembek Lagoon, Alaska. Change in total extent was evaluated through a map to map comparison of data interpreted from a 1978 Landsat multi-spectral scanner image and 1987 black and white aerial photographs. A ground survey in 1995 was used to assess spatial change from 1987. Eelgrass beds were the predominant vegetation type in the lagoon, comprising 44-47% (15000-16000 ha) of the total area in 1978 and 1987. Izembek Lagoon contains the largest bed of seagrass along the Pacific Coast of North America and largest known single stand of eelgrass in the world. There was a high degree of overlap in the spatial distribution of eelgrass among years of change detection. The overall net change was a 6% gain between, 1978 and 1987 and a <1% gain between 1987 and 1995. The lack of significant change in eelgrass cover suggests that eelgrass meadows in Izembek Lagoon have been stable during the 17-year period of our study.

  8. Facultative Lagoons. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Lorri

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed to teach a two-lesson unit on the structure and components of facultative lagoons, the biological theory of their operation, and factors affecting their operation. Control testing recommendations, maintenance guidelines, and troubleshooting hints are also provided. These materials include: (1) an…

  9. Fate of estradiol and testosterone in anaerobic lagoon digestors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-scale lagoon digestors were constructed, and the fate of 14C-labelled 17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (Test) were monitored for 42 d anaerobically under biological and sterile conditions. Hormone levels decreased in the liquid layer and increased in the sludge with time. At 42 d, 16-2...

  10. WATER QUALITY RENOVATION OF ANIMAL WASTE LAGOONS UTILIZING AQUATIC PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Duckweeds Spirodela oligorhiza, S. polyrhiza, and Lemna gibba (clone G3) grown on dairy waste lagoons gave an estimated maximum annual yield of 22,023 kg dry wt./ha. S. oligorhiza and L. gibba had higher growth rates in the spring, fall, and winter, with L. gibba growing througho...

  11. ALTERNATIVE TREATMENT AND RECOVERY OF PHOSPHORUS FROM ANAEROBIC LAGOONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure nutrients in excess of the assimilative capacity of land available on farms are an environmental concern often associated with confined animal feeding operations (CAFO). The ability to extract phosphorus (P) from lagoon wastewater is critical to accomplish CAFO's comprehensive nutrient manage...

  12. Methane Dynamics in Sediments from Mangrove-dominated Costal Lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P. C.; Paytan, A.; Young, M. B.

    2014-12-01

    Porewater methane and sulfate concentrations from cored sediments have been measured in two coastal mangrove ecosystems (Celestún and Chelem Lagoons) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico. Methane exists in shallow sediments while sulfate is not depleted and stable carbon isotopes of methane (-87.27‰ ~ -62.08‰) imply high methane fluxes/production rates below and within the cored sediment depths. The preliminary results from a transport-reaction model show that methane emitted to the water column from these sediments could be 17.8 mg m-2 d-1 in Celestún Lagoon and much higher (565 mg m-2 d-1) in Chelem Lagoon. Since the water depths are shallow (mostly less than 100 cm), the high fluxes of methane could contribute to the atmosphere. The objectives of this study will aim to understand the biogeochemical cycles for methane and sulfate in sediments. A numerical transport-reaction model will be applied to the sedimentary geochemical data (methane, sulfate, chloride, particulate organic carbon (POC) and stable carbon isotopes of headspace methane) from the two lagoons to estimate sulfate reduction, methane oxidation and production rates and advective methane fluxes. The modeled results will be used to discuss the role of methane from mangrove areas and their potential contribution to the global methane cycle.

  13. Holocene carbonate sedimentation in Aitutaki Lagoon, Cook Islands, South Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Richmond, B.M.; Hein, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    Aitutaki, an almost-atoll in the Southern Cook Islands, is characterized by a shallow enclosed lagoon. Sediment distribution within the lagoon can be broadly placed into three sedimentary-bathymetric provinces. (1) A low-relief reef rim (< 2 m deep), including sand flats and washover fans, is comprised mostly of clean sand and gravel. (2) The majority of the lagoon floor, which lies between 3 and 6 m water depth, is dominated by sand and silt; coral-algal patch reefs are common with densities greater than 500 reefs/km/sup 2/. Sediment commonly is coarser grained near the patch reefs. (3) Enclosed and elongate-sinuous topographic lows (basins) up to 10 m deep are marked by coral-algal reef growth along their margins. These features are typically narrow, less than 100 m wide, and are U-shaped in cross section and infilled by carbonate and terrigenous muds. High-resolution continuous seismic profiling and limited drilling indicate that differences in thickness of Holocene sediment result from primary irregularities in the pre-Holocene basement surface. Aitutaki was formed by late Miocene volcanism, with a post-edifice building mid-Pleistocene (0.77 Ma) volcanic episode. Two islets within the lagoon are also of volcanic origin, and sinuous coral ridges which extend for several kilometers probably developed on Quaternary lava flows. The coral ridges and meandering enclosed basins appear to be unique to Aitutaki in the Cook Islands.

  14. Estimating greenhouse gas emissions from a waste lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cost-effective approach was used to investigate the relationship between emission of the greenhouse gases (GHG) CO2, CH4, and N2O and energy fluxes from a swine waste lagoon. Energy fluxes were calculated using the Penman method. The energy fluxes showed a diurnal pattern as expected of such flux...

  15. In Situ Monitoring of Malodors in a Swine Waste Lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An apparatus for the in situ quantification of malodorous compounds from animal wastewater was developed that employed a submersible magnetic stir plate and stir bar sorbtive extraction using polydimethylsiloxane-coated stir bars. Prior to deployment of the apparatus in a hog waste lagoon, experime...

  16. SPREADING LAGOONED SEWAGE SLUDGE ON FARMLAND: A CASE HISTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project demonstrated that land application is feasible and practical for a metropolitan treatment plant for disposal of a large volume (265,000 cu m) of stabilized, liquid sewage sludge stored in lagoons. The project involved transportation of sludge by semi-trailer tankers ...

  17. Antibiotic Resistant Bacterial Profiles of Anaerobic Swine Lagoon Effluent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although land application of swine manure lagoon effluent is a common and effective method of disposal, the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, both pathogenic and commensal can complicate already understood issues associated with its safe disposal. The aim of this study was to assess antibi...

  18. Flushing of Bowden Reef lagoon, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, Eric; King, Brian

    1990-12-01

    Field and numerical studies were undertaken in 1986 and 1987 of the water circulation around and over Bowden Reef, a 5-km long kidney-shaped coral reef lagoon system in the Great Barrier Reef. In windy conditions, the flushing of the lagoon was primarily due to the intrusion into the lagoon of topographically induced tidal eddies generated offshore. In calm weather, such eddies did not prevail and lagoon flushing was much slower. The observed currents at sites a few kilometres apart in inter-reefal waters, have a significant horizontal shear apparently due to the complex circulation in the reef matrix. Under such conditions, sensitivity tests demonstrate the importance of including this shear in the specification of open boundary conditions of numerical models of the hydrodynamics around reefs. Contrary to established practice, the water circulation around a coral reef should not be modelled by assuming reefs are hydrodynamically isolated from surrounding ones. Little improvement appears likely in the reliability of reef-scale numerical models until the inter-reefal shear can be reliably incorporated in such models.

  19. A new sampler for stratified lagoon chemical and microbiological assessments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A water column sampler was needed to study stratification of nutrients and bacteria in a swine manure lagoon. Conventional samplers yielded shallow samples near the bank or required a boat. These limitations prompted development of a new sampler to collect at multiple depths with minimal disturbanc...

  20. Benthic Primary Production Budget of a Caribbean Reef Lagoon (Puerto Morelos, Mexico)

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Malik S.; Jantzen, Carin; Haas, Andreas F.; Iglesias-Prieto, Roberto; Wild, Christian

    2013-01-01

    High photosynthetic benthic primary production (P) represents a key ecosystem service provided by tropical coral reef systems. However, benthic P budgets of specific ecosystem compartments such as macrophyte-dominated reef lagoons are still scarce. To address this, we quantified individual and lagoon-wide net (Pn) and gross (Pg) primary production by all dominant functional groups of benthic primary producers in a typical macrophyte-dominated Caribbean reef lagoon near Puerto Morelos (Mexico) via measurement of O2 fluxes in incubation experiments. The photosynthetically active 3D lagoon surface area was quantified using conversion factors to allow extrapolation to lagoon-wide P budgets. Findings revealed that lagoon 2D benthic cover was primarily composed of sand-associated microphytobenthos (40%), seagrasses (29%) and macroalgae (27%), while seagrasses dominated the lagoon 3D surface area (84%). Individual Pg was highest for macroalgae and scleractinian corals (87 and 86 mmol O2 m−2 specimen area d−1, respectively), however seagrasses contributed highest (59%) to the lagoon-wide Pg. Macroalgae exhibited highest individual Pn rates, but seagrasses generated the largest fraction (51%) of lagoon-wide Pn. Individual R was highest for scleractinian corals and macroalgae, whereas seagrasses again provided the major lagoon-wide share (68%). These findings characterise the investigated lagoon as a net autotrophic coral reef ecosystem compartment revealing similar P compared to other macrophyte-dominated coastal environments such as seagrass meadows and macroalgae beds. Further, high lagoon-wide P (Pg: 488 and Pn: 181 mmol O2 m−2 lagoon area d−1) and overall Pg:R (1.6) indicate substantial benthic excess production within the Puerto Morelos reef lagoon and suggest the export of newly synthesised organic matter to surrounding ecosystems. PMID:24367570

  1. POPs in the Lagoon of Venice: budgets and pathways.

    PubMed

    Guerzoni, Stefano; Rossini, Paolo; Sarretta, Alessandro; Raccanelli, Stefano; Ferrari, Giorgio; Molinaroli, Emanuela

    2007-04-01

    Dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in the ecosystem of the Lagoon of Venice were studied, in order to provide a general picture of conditions in the lagoon in terms of contamination by persistent organic pollutants (POPs). We present here novel data on atmospheric deposition, water, sediment and clam samples collected in the lagoon during the period January 2001-December 2004. Atmospheric deposition was sampled monthly at six sites located both close and far from large industrial and urban sources. Water samples were collected monthly from fifteen stations, and twenty-five samples of sediments and clams (Tapes philippinarum) were collected in four areas where clams are farmed and harvested inside the lagoon. All samples were analysed for PCDD/Fs, PCBs and HCB by HRGC/HRMS in the same laboratory. All samples examined (atmospheric deposition and water) substantially confirmed the spatial pattern reported in previously published data on sediments and atmospheric deposition: the zone surrounding the Porto Marghera petrochemical plant always had the highest levels of POPs (i.e., PCDD/Fs: atmosphere approximately 6 pg of 2,3,7,8-TCDD equivalents (I-TE) m(-2)d(-1); water 0.37 pg I-TEl(-1); sediment: 300 ng kg(-1); clam 2.8 pg I-TE g(-1)), and the minima were found at points on the margins of the lagoon (PCDD/Fs: atmosphere approximately 1 pg I-TEm(-2)d(-1); water 0.05 pg I-TEl(-1); sediment: approximately 5 ng kg(-1); clam approximately 0.2 pg I-TE g(-1)). Intermediate values were often encountered in the historical city centre of Venice and in the central part of the lagoon. To confirm this, new data on correlation between levels of PCDD/F in sediments and clams are reported, both for absolute values and for the PCDD/F "fingerprint". There is always a clear fingerprinting signature (PCDF/PCDD>1) for samples collected near Porto Marghera, and the opposite (PCDF/PCDD<1) in the rest of the lagoon. PMID:17215019

  2. Sand mining and morphometric dynamics along Ologe Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaddeus, D.; Odunuga, S.

    2015-04-01

    The study focuses on the sand mining activities and morphometric dynamics of Ologe Lagoon, in Lagos, Nigeria. It determines the sand mining activities and morphometric dynamics of Ologe Lagoon catchment area, the quantity of sand mined per unit time, and the extent of environmental degradation due to the continuous sand mining activities. Topographic maps of the 1985 and 2013 Ikonos satellite imagery were used to identify the morphometric dynamics of the area. Two hypotheses were generated to determine if there are significant differences between the means of the sampled population that lost properties due to flooding, and to determine if there was a correlation between building subsidence and loss of property; it was tested using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) with a correlation coefficient at 0.05 α significance level. The results of geometric measurement of the Ologe Lagoon between the two years interval show that perimeter width and circularity of the basin had reduced and shrunk, while the form factor remains the same at 0.15 km2. The basin elongation increased significantly by 0.01 km2, thus, increasing the rate at which water will be supplied to the lagoon. The ration of the form factor of 0.69/0.5 is close to the unity value R1, which shows a higher peak runoff; the values of the circularity ratio of 3.94/3.13 indicates circularity. This shows that the basin is circular time. The impact of the geometry indicates the development of mud flats and sandy bars, particularly at the lower portion of the lagoon; there is also modification of sediment deposition. The anthropogenic activity of sand mining causes destruction of the riparian forest around the lagoon. There is no significant difference in the means of sampled respondents regarding loss properties due to flooding, while there is a correlation between building subsidence and loss of life. It is recommended that a road map should be developed and implemented by the relevant agency of the government to guide

  3. Aspects of fish conservation in the upper Patos Lagoon basin.

    PubMed

    Fontoura, N F; Vieira, J P; Becker, F G; Rodrigues, L R; Malabarba, L R; Schulz, U H; Möller, O O; Garcia, A M; Vilella, F S

    2016-07-01

    The Patos Lagoon basin is a large (201 626 km(2) ) and complex drainage system in southern Brazil. The lagoon is 250 km long and 60 km wide, covering an area of 10 360 km(2) . The exchange of water with the Atlantic Ocean occurs through a 0·8 km wide and 15 m deep inlet, fixed by 4 km long jetties, at the southernmost part of the Patos Lagoon. The estuarine area is restricted to its southern portion (10%), although the upper limit of saline waters migrates seasonally and year to year, influenced by the wind regime and river discharge. The known number of recorded limnetic fish species is 200, but this number is expected to increase. A higher endemism is observed in fish species occurring in upper tributaries. The basin suffers from the direct impact of almost 7 million inhabitants, concentrated in small to large cities, most with untreated domestic effluents. There are at least 16 non-native species recorded in natural habitats of the Patos Lagoon basin, about half of these being from other South American river basins. Concerning the fishery, although sport and commercial fisheries are widespread throughout the Patos Lagoon basin, the lagoon itself and the estuarine area are the main fishing areas. Landing statistics are not available on a regular basis or for the whole basin. The fishery in the northern Patos Lagoon captures 31 different species, nine of which are responsible for most of the commercial catches, but only three species are actually sustaining the artisanal fishery: the viola Loricariichthys anus: 455 kg per 10 000 m(2) gillnet per day, the mullet Mugil liza: 123 kg per 10 000 m(2) gillnet per day and the marine catfish Genidens barbus: 50 kg per 10 000 m(2) gillnet per day. A decline of the fish stocks can be attributed to inadequate fishery surveillance, which leads to overfishing and mortality of juveniles, or to decreasing water quality because of urban and industrial activities and power production. Global climatic changes also represent a

  4. Pesticides in the Rhône river delta (France): basic data for a field-based exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Comoretto, Laetitia; Arfib, Bruno; Chiron, Serge

    2007-07-15

    The pesticide concentration levels flowing into paddy fields and surrounding lagoons of the Rhône river delta were investigated over a period of 6 months in 2004. Water samples were collected at the outlets of the major ditches and in the lagoons in order to study the seasonal variation in pesticide concentrations and the spatial contamination profile. Twenty four pesticides were monitored, mainly herbicides and insecticides. Rice pesticides accounted for 90% of the detection rates while the pesticides transported by the Rhône river water dissolved phase only accounted for 10%. Pretilachlor, oxadiazon, MCPA and bentazone herbicides were found at the highest frequencies into the effluent waters of ditches with maximum concentration levels of 1.2, 0.8, 2.5 and 1.6 microg/L, respectively. Only one insecticide, tebufenozide, was sporadically detected at a maximum concentration level of 0.12 microg/L. There were two main peaks of contamination. The first one in April corresponded to the use of pre-emergence herbicides (oxadiazon and pretilachlor) and the second one in June was related to the post-emergence herbicides (MCPA and bentazone). These concentration peaks were well correlated with the pesticide application period time and rapid pesticide transfer (1-2 weeks) from fields to lagoons were observed. Increased loads of the pre-emergence herbicides were induced by the specific management of paddy fields which includes water emptying of fields before and after rice seeding. Pesticide dissipation into the lagoons occurred very quickly and the duration of the exposure of non-target aquatic organisms to high pesticide concentrations (in total a few microg/L level) was no longer than 2 weeks. According to the physico-chemical properties of the chemicals, contrasting results were observed when studying the spatial variation in pesticide concentrations through the lagoons. The concentrations of bentazone and MCPA, two substances with high phototransformation abilities

  5. Water sources, mixing and evaporation in the Akyatan lagoon, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lécuyer, C.; Bodergat, A.-M.; Martineau, F.; Fourel, F.; Gürbüz, K.; Nazik, A.

    2012-12-01

    Akyatan lagoon, located southeast of Turkey along the Mediterranean coast, is a choked and hypersaline lagoon, and hosts a large and specific biodiversity including endangered sea turtles and migrating birds. Physicochemical properties of this lagoon were investigated by measuring temperature, salinity, and hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios of its waters at a seasonal scale during years 2006 and 2007. Winter and spring seasons were dominated by mixing processes between freshwaters and Mediterranean seawater. The majority of spring season waters are formed by evapoconcentration of brackish water at moderate temperatures of 22 ± 2 °C. During summer, hypersaline waters result from evaporation of seawater and brackish waters formed during spring. Evaporation over the Akyatan lagoon reaches up to 76 wt% based on salinity measurements and operated with a dry (relative humidity of 0.15-0.20) and hot (44 ± 6 °C) air. These residual waters were characterized by the maximal seasonal isotopic enrichment in both deuterium and 18O relative to VSMOW. During autumn, most lagoonal waters became hypersaline and were formed by evaporation of waters that had isotopic compositions and salinities close to that of seawater. These autumnal hypersaline waters result from an air humidity close to 0.45 and an atmospheric temperature of evaporation of 35 ± 5 °C, which are responsible for up to 71 wt% of evaporation, with restricted isotopic enrichments relative to VSMOW. During the warm seasons, the combination of air humidity, wind velocity and temperature were responsible for a large kinetic component in the total isotopic fractionation between water liquid and water vapour.

  6. (U-Th)/Ne Chronometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautheron, C. E.; Tassan-Got, L.; Farley, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear production of 21Ne, like 4He, in U and Th rich minerals such as apatite, zircon, monazite and titanite can potentially be used for chronometry. Due to the absence of 24Mg from the accessory minerals of interest, the production of 21Ne through neutron-induced reactions can be neglected and this production only occurs through the reaction 18O(α,n)21Ne. As the closure temperature is higher for neon than for helium, this gives a possible insight to the thermal history of minerals. To test the possibility of this new chronometer, a review of the available cross section data has been done, permitting a reevaluation of the 21Ne production from this reaction, using a thin target approach and testing the validity of the results against thick target situations. The important factors of the simulation are the cross section and the stopping distance values for a mineral characterized by its chemical composition and density. The (21Ne/4He) production ratio in these minerals is about 4× 10-8, but varies with oxygen content and Th/U ratio. Although the 21Ne has a stopping range of about 1 μm compared to about 20 μm for α particles, preferential α ejection compared to 21Ne lowers (21Ne/4He) at grain edges. For a bulk crystal the (21Ne/4He) production ratio depends on crystal size when the crystals are small. Using a Monte Carlo model we computed the effects of ejection on the (21Ne/4He) ratio for various geometries and grain sizes. The simulation can be run by any user through a graphical interface accessible from the Web at the address: http://h0.web.u-psud.fr/UThHeNe_MonteCarloSimulation/. We also present measurements of the (21Ne/4He) ratio on few mg aliquots of well-dated volcanic apatites and zircons. Values of (4.43± 1.1)× 10-8 and (3.46± 1.2)× 10-8 for apatite and zircon respectively are in agreement with the theoretical values of (4.16± 0.14)× 10-8; (3.54± 0.13)× 10-8. Based on our production rate estimates the Durango apatite and Fish Canyon Tuff

  7. Assessment of human activities impact on groundwater quality discharging into a reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.; Hernandez, L.; Paytan, A.; Merino-Ibarra, M.; Lecossec, A.; Soto, M.

    2010-03-01

    The Eastern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula has the fastest growth rate in Mexico and groundwater is the only source of drinking water in the region. The consequences of the lack of proper infrastructure to collect and treat wastewater and the impact of human activities on the quality of groundwater are addressed. The groundwater in the coastal aquifer of Quintana Roo (SE Mexico) discharges directly into the ocean (Submarine Groundwater Discharges). In addition, the coral reef of the Eastern Yucatan Peninsula is part of the Mesoamerican Coral Reef System, one of the largest in the world. The interaction of the reef-lagoon hydraulics with the coastal aquifer of Puerto Morelos (NE Yucatan Peninsula), and a major input of NH4, SO4, SiO2, as a consequence of the use of septic tanks and the lack of modern wastewater treatment plants are presented. A conceptual model of the coastal aquifer was developed, in order to explain how the human activities are impacting directly on the groundwater quality that, potentially, will have a direct impact on the coral reef. The protection and conservation of coral reefs must be directly related with a policy of sound management of coastal aquifers and wastewater treatment.

  8. Dissolved and particulate heavy metals distribution in coastal lagoons. A case study from Mar Chiquita Lagoon, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrame, María Ornela; De Marco, Silvia G.; Marcovecchio, Jorge E.

    2009-10-01

    Mar Chiquita Coastal Lagoon is located on the Atlantic coast of Argentina, and it has been declared a Biosphere Reserve under the UNESCO Man and Biosphere Programme (MAB). This coastal lagoon constitutes an estuarine environment with a very particular behaviour and it is ecologically important due to its biological diversity. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the distribution and geochemical behaviour of several heavy metals in this coastal system, focusing on their distribution in both the dissolved phase (<0.45 μm) and the suspended particulate matter. Therefore, the general hydrochemical parameters (salinity, temperature, turbidity, pH and dissolved oxygen) and concentration of total particulate and dissolved metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Zn, Fe, Pb, Cr and Mn) were measured along 2 years (2004-2006) at two different sites. As regards their distribution, hydrological parameters did not present any evidence of deviation with respect to historical values. Suspended particulate matter showed no seasonal variation or any relationship with the tide, thus indicating that in this shallow coastal lagoon neither tides nor freshwater sources regulate the particulate matter input. Heavy metals behaviour, both in dissolved and particulate phases did not reveal any relationship with tide or seasons. Mar Chiquita Coastal Lagoon showed a large input of dissolved and particulate metals, which is probably due to intensive agriculture within the drainage basin of this system.

  9. An integrated Pan-European perspective on coastal Lagoons management through a mosaic-DPSIR approach.

    PubMed

    Dolbeth, Marina; Stålnacke, Per; Alves, Fátima L; Sousa, Lisa P; Gooch, Geoffrey D; Khokhlov, Valeriy; Tuchkovenko, Yurii; Lloret, Javier; Bielecka, Małgorzata; Różyński, Grzegorz; Soares, João A; Baggett, Susan; Margonski, Piotr; Chubarenko, Boris V; Lillebø, Ana I

    2016-01-01

    A decision support framework for the management of lagoon ecosystems was tested using four European Lagoons: Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), Mar Menor (Spain), Tyligulskyi Liman (Ukraine) and Vistula Lagoon (Poland/Russia). Our aim was to formulate integrated management recommendations for European lagoons. To achieve this we followed a DPSIR (Drivers-Pressures-State Change-Impacts-Responses) approach, with focus on integrating aspects of human wellbeing, welfare and ecosystem sustainability. The most important drivers in each lagoon were identified, based on information gathered from the lagoons' stakeholders, complemented by scientific knowledge on each lagoon as seen from a land-sea perspective. The DPSIR cycles for each driver were combined into a mosaic-DPSIR conceptual model to examine the interdependency between the multiple and interacting uses of the lagoon. This framework emphasizes the common links, but also the specificities of responses to drivers and the ecosystem services provided. The information collected was used to formulate recommendations for the sustainable management of lagoons within a Pan-European context. Several common management recommendations were proposed, but specificities were also identified. The study synthesizes the present conditions for the management of lagoons, thus analysing and examining the activities that might be developed in different scenarios, scenarios which facilitate ecosystem protection without compromising future generations. PMID:26776151

  10. A mechanistic model of runoff-associated fecal coliform fate and transport through a coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Steets, B M; Holden, P A

    2003-02-01

    Fecal coliform (FC) contamination in coastal waters is an ongoing public health problem worldwide. Coastal wetlands and lagoons are typically expected to protect coastal waters by attenuating watershed pollutants including FC bacteria. However, new evidence suggests that coastal lagoons or marshes can also be a source of high indicator organism concentrations in coastal waters. We asked for a Mediterranean-type climate, what is the fate of runoff-associated FC through a coastal lagoon? To address this question, we developed a mass balance-based, mechanistic model of FC concentration through a coastal lagoon and simulated, for summer and winter conditions, FC within the lagoon water column, lagoon sediments, and in the ocean water just downstream of the lagoon mouth. Our model accounts for advective flow and dispersion, decay and sedimentation and resuspension of FC-laden sediments during high flow, erosional conditions. Under low flow conditions that occur in the summer, net FC decay and FC storage in lagoon sediments are predicted. Under high flow conditions that occur in the winter, FC-laden sediments are predicted to erode, resuspend and flow out of the lagoon where they elevate FC concentrations in the coastal ocean. For both seasonal conditions, the predicted water column FC concentrations were within an order of magnitude of field measurements for a reference site in southern California. Our results suggest that there are seasonally varying roles for coastal lagoons in mediating FC contamination to coastal waters. PMID:12688694

  11. Biogeochemical responses of shallow coastal lagoons to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, A.; Newton, A.; Tett, P.; Fernandes, T.

    2009-04-01

    The importance of climate change and global warming in the near future is becoming consensual within the scientific community (e.g. Kerr et al., 2008; Lloret et al., 2008). The surface temperature and sea level have increased during the last few years in the northern hemisphere (IPCC, 2007). Predictions for future changes include an increase of surface temperature and sea level for Europe. Moreover, the global warming phenomenon will also change the hydrological cycle and increase precipitation in northern and central Europe (IPCC, 2007). Sea level rise already threatens to overwhelm some lagoons, such as Venice and Moroccan lagoons (Snoussi et al., 2008). Shallow coastal lagoons are some of the most vulnerable systems that will be impacted by these changes (Eisenreich, 2005). Environmental impacts on coastal lagoons include an increase of water turbidity and therefore light attenuation. If these effects are strong enough, the lighted bottoms of shallow lagoons may loose a significant part of the benthic algal community. These communities are highly productive and are essential to control nutrient dynamics of the system by uptaking large amounts of nutrients both from the water column and from the sediments. A decrease in benthic algal communities and photosynthetic oxygen production will also contribute to increasing the vulnerability of the lagoons to hypoxia and anoxia. The flux of nutrients such as phosphate from the sediments may increase dramatically, further disrupting the nutrient balance and condition and promoting cyanobacterial blooms. Microbial activity is temperature dependent, therefore, the increase of temperature will increase the concentrations of ammonium within sediments. The release of phosphate and silicate will also increase with temperature. Coastal lagoons are valuable ecosystems and may be severely impacted, both ecologically and economically, by global change. Shallow coastal lagoons should be considered as sentinel systems and should be

  12. Toxicity of contaminants in lagoons and pannes of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, R.; Speelman, J.; Stewart, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    Contaminants in water and sediments of lagoons and pannes were 2--90 times greater at sites adjacent to slag and coal piles than those at reference sites. One site (Lagoon-US5) had sediments with very high concentrations of toxic organics (e.g. naphthalene, phenanthrene, dibenzofuran). Although analyses indicated a gradient of contaminant concentration with distance from their sources, toxicity assays were somewhat equivocal. With the exception of less reproduction in Ceriodaphnia at one lagoon site (US3 = 0.55 of reference), survival of fathead minnows and reproduction in Ceriodaphnia in lagoon and panne waters varied independently of the contaminant concentration. In fact, there was better Ceriodaphnia reproduction in water from two contaminated sites (Lagoon-US5, Panne-WP1) than in water from reference sites. Fathead minnow survival, Ceriodaphnia survival, Ceriodaphnia reproduction, amphipod survival, and amphipod growth varied among sites in toxicity assays with sediments, 100% mortality of fatheads at Lagoon-US5, 100% mortality of Ceriodaphnia at Lagoon-US3, and less survival of fathead minnows at Lagoon-US3 indicate possible toxicity from contaminants in sediments at these sites. Of all organisms and end-points tested, Ceriodaphnia survival seemed to be most closely associated with concentrations of contaminants in lagoon water and sediments. Amphipod survival also varied with contaminants in sediments, however, survival in sediments of contaminated sites ranged only from 0.90--0.93 of reference sites. Although the results are not consistent among organisms, toxicity assays indicate that sediments from the lagoon site with the highest contaminants (Lagoon-US5) and possibly those from another contaminated lagoon site (Lagoon-US3) could be toxic to aquatic organisms. Water and sediments from contaminated panne sites do not appear to be toxic to aquatic test organisms.

  13. Interannual and cyclone-driven variability in phytoplankton communities of a tropical coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Srichandan, Suchismita; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kumar, Abhishek; Mishra, Deepak R; Bhadury, Punyasloke; Muduli, Pradipta R; Pattnaik, Ajit K; Rastogi, Gurdeep

    2015-12-15

    One of the main challenges in phytoplankton ecology is to understand their variability at different spatiotemporal scales. We investigated the interannual and cyclone-derived variability in phytoplankton communities of Chilika, the largest tropical coastal lagoon in Asia and the underlying mechanisms in relation to environmental forcing. Between July 2012 and June 2013, Cyanophyta were most prolific in freshwater northern region of the lagoon. A category-5 very severe cyclonic storm (VSCS) Phailin struck the lagoon on 12th October 2013 and introduced additional variability into the hydrology and phytoplankton communities. Freshwater Cyanophyta further expanded their territory and occupied the northern as well as central region of the lagoon. Satellite remote sensing imagery revealed that the phytoplankton biomass did not change much due to high turbidity prevailing in the lagoon after Phailin. Modeling analysis of species-salinity relationship identified specific responses of phytoplankton taxa to the different salinity regime of lagoon. PMID:26611863

  14. The performance of biomass-based AMBI in lagoonal ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Mistri, Michele; Munari, Cristina

    2015-10-15

    We studied the performance of the AZTI Marine Biotic Index AMBI manipulating input data collected from lagoonal ecosystems. Our data set consisted of macrofaunal abundance and biomass counts gathered at a variety of sites at which the disturbance status was known. Input data were also manipulated using a set of transformations of increasing severity. Biotic indices were calculated using raw and transformed abundance, biomass and production. Among the three categories of AMBI-based indices, medium transformation of data gave the highest correlation with pressures. However, increasing the severity of transformation generally resulted in a decrease of the correlation with environmental factors. The relative importance of ecological groups changed when using abundance or biomass, sometimes leading to an improved ecological status classification. Being biomass and production more ecologically relevant than abundance, using them to derive AMBI-based new indices seems intriguing, at least in lagoonal waters, where the community is naturally disturbed and dominated by opportunists. PMID:26219686

  15. Spatial and temporal distribution of cyanobacteria in Batticaloa Lagoon.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jalaldeen Mohamed; Vinobaba, Periyathamby; Kularatne, Ranil Kavindra Asela; Ellawala Kankanamge, Champika

    2016-09-01

    The necessity to understand the relationship between cyanobacterial species abundance and water quality variations in coastal lagoons is crucial to develop strategies to prevent further cyanobacterial proliferation. This paper evaluates the relationship between water quality variations on the distribution of cyanobacteria during a 12-month period in Batticaloa Lagoon (Sri Lanka) using Redundancy analysis and Pearson correlations. Drastic variations in pH, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen (DO) and total phosphorus (TP) levels were reported, but not turbidity and NO3(-). This brackish waterbody is hypereutrophic (TP levels>0.1mg/L). The cyanobacterial community contained 13 genera and 22 species. NO3(-), TP and turbidity levels positively influenced cyanobacterial abundance during all seasons indicating that nutrient (largely phosphorus) and sediment entry control is highly crucial along with periodic monitoring of cyanobacterial growth. PMID:27593288

  16. Statistical characterization of spatiotemporal sediment dynamics in the Venice lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carniello, Luca; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Botter, Gianluca; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the dynamics of suspended sediment is crucial when investigating the long-term evolution of tidal landscapes. Here we apply a widely tested mathematical model which describes the dynamics of cohesive and noncohesive sediments, driven by the combined effect of tidal currents and wind waves, using 1 year long time series of observed water levels and wind data from the Venice lagoon. The spatiotemporal evolution of the computed suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is analyzed on the basis of the "peak over threshold" theory. Our analysis suggests that events characterized by high SSC can be modeled as a marked Poisson process over most of the lagoon. The interarrival time between two consecutive over threshold events, the intensity of peak excesses, and the duration are found to be exponentially distributed random variables over most of tidal flats. Our study suggests that intensity and duration of over threshold events are temporally correlated, while almost no correlation exists between interarrival times and both durations and intensities. The benthic vegetation colonizing the central southern part of the Venice lagoon is found to exert a crucial role on sediment dynamics: vegetation locally decreases the frequency of significant resuspension events by affecting spatiotemporal patterns of SSCs also in adjacent areas. Spatial patterns of the mean interarrival of over threshold SSC events are found to be less heterogeneous than the corresponding patterns of mean interarrivals of over threshold bottom shear stress events because of the role of advection/dispersion processes in mixing suspended sediments within the lagoon. Implications for long-term morphodynamic modeling of tidal environments are discussed.

  17. Validation of Numerical Shallow Water Models for Tidal Lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Eliason, D.; Bourgeois, A.

    1999-11-01

    An analytical solution is presented for the case of a stratified, tidally forced lagoon. This solution, especially its energetics, is useful for the validation of numerical shallow water models under stratified, tidally forced conditions. The utility of the analytical solution for validation is demonstrated for a simple finite difference numerical model. A comparison is presented of the energetics of the numerical and analytical solutions in terms of the convergence of model results to the analytical solution with increasing spatial and temporal resolution.

  18. A new sampler for stratified lagoon chemical and microbiological assessments.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, M R; Brooks, J P; Adeli, A

    2014-07-01

    A sampler was needed for a spatial and temporal study of microbial and chemical stratification in a large swine manure lagoon that was known to contain zoonotic bacteria. Conventional samplers were limited to collections of surface water samples near the bank or required a manned boat. A new sampler was developed to allow simultaneous collection of multiple samples at different depths, up to 2.3 m, without a manned boat. The sampler was tethered for stability, used remote control (RC) for sample collection, and accommodated rapid replacement of sterile tubing modules and sample containers. The sampler comprised a PVC pontoon with acrylic deck and watertight enclosures, for a 12 VDC gearmotor, to operate the collection module, and vacuum system, to draw samples into reusable autoclavable tubing and 250-mL bottles. Although designed primarily for water samples, the sampler was easily modified to collect sludge. The sampler held a stable position during deployment, created minimal disturbance in the water column, and was readily cleaned and sanitized for transport. The sampler was field tested initially in a shallow fresh water lake and subsequently in a swine manure treatment lagoon. Analyses of water samples from the lagoon tests showed that chemical and bacterial levels, pH, and EC did not differ between 0.04, 0.47, and 1.0 m depths, but some chemical and bacterial levels differed between winter and spring collections. These results demonstrated the utility of the sampler and suggested that future manure lagoon studies employ fewer or different depths and more sampling dates. PMID:24549945

  19. Taphonomy of coral reefs from Southern Lagoon of Belize

    SciTech Connect

    Westphall, M.J.; Ginsburg, R.N.

    1985-02-01

    The Southern Lagoon of the Belize barrier complex, an area of some 600 km/sup 2/, contains a tremendous number of lagoon reefs, which range in size from patches several meters across to rhomboidal-shaped structures several kilometers in their long dimension. These lagoon reefs are remarkable because they have Holocene sediment accumulations in excess of 13 m consisting almost entirely of coral debris and lime mud and sand, and rise up to 30 m above the surrounding lagoon floor with steeply sloping sides (50-80/sup 0/), yet are totally uncemented. The reef-building biota and their corresponding deposits were studied at a representative reef, the rhomboidal complex of Channel Cay. As with many of the reefs in this area, the steeply sloping flanks of Channel Cay are covered mainly by the branched staghorn coral Acropora cervicornis and ribbonlike and platy growth of Agaricia spp. The living corals are not cemented to the substrate, but are merely intergrown. Fragmented pieces of corals accumulate with an open framework below the living community; this open framework is subsequently infilled by lime muds and sands produced mainly from bioerosion. Results from probing and coring suggest that the bafflestone fabric of coral debris and sediment extends at least 13 m into the subsurface. Radiocarbon-age estimates indicate these impressive piles of coral rubble and sediment have accumulated in the past 9000 yr (giving a minimum accumulation rate of 1.4 m/1000 yr) and illustrate the potential for significant carbonate buildups without the need for early lithification.

  20. Industrial waste treatment: Lagoons (ponds). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and storage of wastewaters in lagoons. Lagoon design, operation, associated equipment, and pretreatment processes are discussed. Included in the references are treatment of wastewaters from breweries, tanneries, paper mills, agricultural operations, and other industrial operations. Descriptions and evaluations of specific facilities are provided. Municipal water and sewage treatment lagoons are referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 118 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Municipal sewage treatment: Lagoons (ponds). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and storage of municipal wastewater and sewage in lagoons. Lagoon design, operation, and associated equipment for pretreatment, treatment, and storage techniques are discussed. Many citations describe the water treatment facilities of specific cities, and provide evaluations of the operations at those sites. Industrial and other non-municipal wastewater treatment lagoons are referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  2. Municipal sewage treatment: Lagoons (ponds). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and storage of municipal wastewater and sewage in lagoons. Lagoon design, operation, and associated equipment for pretreatment, treatment, and storage techniques are discussed. Many citations describe the water treatment facilities of specific cities, and provide evaluations of the operations at those sites. Industrial and other non-municipal wastewater treatment lagoons are referenced in a related bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Geoelectrical signals of geologic and hydrologic processes in a fringing reef lagoon setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kevin M.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Tait, Douglas R.; Erler, Dirk V.

    2014-09-01

    Coastal groundwater may discharge into nearshore and offshore waters forced by terrestrial fluxes, controlled by local geology, and modulated by the hydrodynamics of littoral water. We investigated the electrical signature of these features with a dense, multiscale network of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys in the Muri Lagoon of Rarotonga, Cook Islands. The ERT surveys spanned from onshore to 400 m into the lagoon and used standard electrodes on land and across the foreshore, submerged electrodes in the shallow subtidal zone, and floating electrodes towed throughout the reef lagoon by a boat. ERT surveys on land mapped a typical freshwater lens underlain by a saltwater wedge, but with possible deviations from the classical model due to an adjacent tidal creek. Further inland, ERT surveys imaged a layer of lava flow deposits that is potentially a confining hydrogeologic unit; this unit was used to constrain the expected electrical resistivity of these deposits below the lagoon. ERT surveys across the intertidal zone and into the lagoon indicated fresh groundwater and porewater salinity patterns consistent with previous small-scale studies including the seaward extension of fresh groundwater pathways to the lagoon. Electrical resistivity (ER) variations in the lagoon subsurface highlighted heterogeneities in the lagoon structure that may focus submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) through previously unknown buried lava flow deposits in the lagoon. A transition to higher ER values near the reef crest is consistent with the ER signature of porosity reduction due to ongoing differential cementation of reef deposits across the lagoon. The imaged coastal hydrostratigraphic heterogeneity may thus control terrestrial and marine porewater mixing, support SGD, and provide the pathways for groundwater and the materials it transports into the lagoon. This hydrogeophysical investigation highlighted the spatial heterogeneity of submarine coastal geology and its

  4. On the circulation in the Puerto Morelos fringing reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronado, C.; Candela, J.; Iglesias-Prieto, R.; Sheinbaum, J.; López, M.; Ocampo-Torres, F. J.

    2007-03-01

    For a period of 22 months beginning in September 2003, an array of four current profilers were deployed on the Puerto Morelos fringing reef lagoon, a microtidal Caribbean environment characterised by the influence of the Yucatan Current (YC) and a Trade Wind regime. The dataset includes water currents, bottom pressure, and surface waves complemented with coastal meteorological data and surface currents from an acoustic Doppler current profiler moored 12 km offshore. Normal circulation conditions consisted of a surface wave-induced flow entering the lagoon over a shallow reef flat and strong flows exiting through northern and southern channels. This wave induced flow was modulated by a low-frequency sea level change related to a geostrophic response to the YC variability offshore, with tidal and direct wind forcing playing additional minor roles. Under extended summer low-wave height conditions, together with a decrease in sea level from the intensification of the offshore current, the exchange of the lagoon with the adjacent ocean was drastically reduced. Under normal wave conditions ( H S = 0.8 ± 0.4 m, mean ± SD), water residence time was on average 3 h, whereas during Hurricane Ivan’s extreme swell ( H S = 6 m) it decreased to 0.35 h.

  5. An integrated Pan-European perspective on coastal Lagoons management through a mosaic-DPSIR approach

    PubMed Central

    Dolbeth, Marina; Stålnacke, Per; Alves, Fátima L.; Sousa, Lisa P.; Gooch, Geoffrey D.; Khokhlov, Valeriy; Tuchkovenko, Yurii; Lloret, Javier; Bielecka, Małgorzata; Różyński, Grzegorz; Soares, João A.; Baggett, Susan; Margonski, Piotr; Chubarenko, Boris V.; Lillebø, Ana I.

    2016-01-01

    A decision support framework for the management of lagoon ecosystems was tested using four European Lagoons: Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), Mar Menor (Spain), Tyligulskyi Liman (Ukraine) and Vistula Lagoon (Poland/Russia). Our aim was to formulate integrated management recommendations for European lagoons. To achieve this we followed a DPSIR (Drivers-Pressures-State Change-Impacts-Responses) approach, with focus on integrating aspects of human wellbeing, welfare and ecosystem sustainability. The most important drivers in each lagoon were identified, based on information gathered from the lagoons’ stakeholders, complemented by scientific knowledge on each lagoon as seen from a land-sea perspective. The DPSIR cycles for each driver were combined into a mosaic-DPSIR conceptual model to examine the interdependency between the multiple and interacting uses of the lagoon. This framework emphasizes the common links, but also the specificities of responses to drivers and the ecosystem services provided. The information collected was used to formulate recommendations for the sustainable management of lagoons within a Pan-European context. Several common management recommendations were proposed, but specificities were also identified. The study synthesizes the present conditions for the management of lagoons, thus analysing and examining the activities that might be developed in different scenarios, scenarios which facilitate ecosystem protection without compromising future generations. PMID:26776151

  6. "Normal Planetary" Ne-Q in Chelyabinsk and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyquist, L. E.; Park, J.; Nagao, K.; Haba, M. K.; Mikouchi, T.; Kusakabe, M.; Shih, C.-Y.; Herzog, G. F.

    2015-07-01

    Chelyabinsk contains “Q”-noble gases. Martian shergottite Dhofar 378 contains trapped 20Ne/22Ne = 7.3±0.3, derivable from Q-Ne with 20Ne/22Ne = 10.67 via fractionation by solar wind induced sputtering. Martian juvenile Ne is suggested to be Q-Ne.

  7. The effect of floods on sediment contamination in a microtidal coastal lagoon: the lagoon of Lesina, Italy.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, Raffaele; Specchiulli, Antonietta; Cassin, Daniele; Botter, Margherita; Zonta, Roberto; Fabbrocini, Adele

    2014-10-01

    The effects on the microtidal lagoon of Lesina of runoff and the discharge of water and material from agricultural activities were investigated combining chemical analyses of pollutants [11 metals and 16 priority polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAHs)], determination of organic matter and grain size, and performance of innovative ecotoxicological tests. For metals, enrichment factors >3 for arsenic, nickel, and copper (Cu) were observed in the eastern zone of the lagoon, which is affected by nearby urban activities with discharge of water and domestic waste and by agricultural input with waters rich in fertilizers. Cu was correlated with no other metal, and its high concentrations (≤77 µg g(-1)) may result from the use of Cu-based fungicides in vineyards. Total PAHs (2,230 ± 3,150 ng g(-1)) displayed a wide range of concentrations with hot spots near freshwater inputs from the part of the catchment area exploited for wheat crops. Pyrolitic contamination also emerged, with higher-mass PAH congeners, such as asphalt, bitumen or coal, usually present in higher fractions as the dominant components. Ecotoxicological evaluations recorded moderate to high toxicity levels; the innovative MOT test bioassay showed good discriminatory ability because it identified a lagoon area whose inputs mainly depend on agricultural activities and which is impacted by metals rather than PAHs. Floods during periods of heavy rain and the discharge of water and material from agricultural activities may impact vulnerable systems, such as the lagoon of Lesina, where the presence of hot spots with remarkably high pollution values was observed. PMID:24862981

  8. Depositional history and fault-related studies, Bolinas Lagoon, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berquist, Joel R.

    1978-01-01

    Studies of core sediments and seismic reflection profiles elucidate the structure and depositional history of Bolinas Lagoon, Calif., which covers 4.4 km 2 and lies in the San Andreas fault zone at the southeast corner of the Point Reyes Peninsula 20 km northwest of San Francisco. The 1906 trace of the San Andreas fault crosses the west side of the lagoon and was determined from (1) tectonically caused salt-marsh destruction indicated by comparison of 1854 and 1929 U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey (U.S.C. & G.S.) topographic surveys, (2) formation of a tidal channel along the border of destroyed salt marshes, and (3) azimuths of the trend of the fault measured in 1907. Subsidence in the lagoon of 30 cm occurred east of the San Andreas fault in 1906. Near the east shore, seismic-reflection profiling indicates the existence of a graben fault that may connect to a graben fault on the Golden Gate Platform. Comparison of radiocarbon dates on shells and plant debris from boreholes drilled on Stinson Beach spit with a relative sea-level curve constructed for southern San Francisco Bay indicates 5.8 to more than 17.9 m of tectonic subsidence of sediments now located 33 m below mean sea level. Cored sediments indicate a marine transgression dated at 7770?65 yrs B.P. overlying freshwater organic-rich lake deposits. Fossil pollen including 2 to 8 percent Picea (spruce) indicate a late Pleistocene (?)-Early Holocene climate, cooler, wetter, and foggier than at present. Above the transgression are discontinuous and interfingering sequences of transgressive-regressive marine, estuarine, and barrier sediments that reflect rapid lateral and vertical shifts of successive depositional environments. Fossil megafauna indicate (1) accumulation in a protected, shallow-water estuary or bay, and (2) that the lagoon was probably continuously shallow and never a deep-water embayment. Analysis of grain-size parameters, pollen frequencies, and organic remains from a core near the north end of

  9. Hydrology and Salt Balance in a Large, Hypersaline Coastal Lagoon: Lagoa de Araruama, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kjerfve, Björn; Schettini, C. A. F.; Knoppers, Bastiaan; Lessa, Guilherme; Ferreira, H. O.

    1996-06-01

    Lagoa de Araruama in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, is a hypersaline coastal lagoon as a result of semi-arid climate conditions, a small drainage basin and a choked entrance channel. The lagoon has been continuously hypersaline for at least 4·5 centuries, but the mean salinity has varied substantially. It has recently decreased from 57 to 52 as indicated by density (salinity) measurements between 1965 and 1990. Analysis of more than 20 years of salinity time series data, in addition to monthly lagoon cruises to measure the spatial salinity distribution, indicate that the lagoon salinity largely fluctuates in response to the difference between evaporation and precipitation. The major factor explaining the long-term trend of decreasing salinity in the lagoon is the constant pumping of 1 m 3s -1of freshwater to the communities surrounding the lagoon from an adjacent watershed, and subsequent discharge of this water into Lagoa de Araruama. The net salt budget is primarily a balance between the advective import of salt from the coastal ocean and eddy diffusive export of salt to the ocean, although the extensive mining of salt from the lagoon during past decades is also a small but significant contribution to the salt budget. The flushing half-life is proposed as a useful time scale of water exchange, is calculated based on a combination of hydrological and tidal processes, and is excellent for comparison of lagoons and assessing water quality changes. The flushing half-life measures 83·5 days for Lagoa de Araruama, considerably longer than for most other coastal lagoons. The proposed dredging of a second ocean channel to Lagoa de Araruama is probably not a good idea. It is likely to accelerate the decrease of lagoon salinity and somewhat improve the lagoon water exchange. At the same time, this will eliminate the apparent buffering capacity provided by the hypersaline environment, and thus may potentially cause water quality problems.

  10. Chemistry of modern sediments in a hypersaline lagoon, north of Jeddah, Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Mahmoud Kh.

    1987-10-01

    Previous studies of modern peritidal sedimentary environments of the Red Sea, such as hypersaline lagoons and sea-marginal flats, have concentrated on its northern part, particularly in the Gulf of Aqaba. However, little is known about lagoon sediments in other localities along the Red Sea coastal stretches. This paper deals with the chemical characteristics of the sediments of a hypersaline (Ras Hatiba) lagoon, north of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The chemistry of hypersaline lagoon sediments is considerably changed following the modifications to the water chemistry by evaporation and precipitation. Ras Hatiba lagoon is a hypersaline elongated water body connected to the Red Sea by a narrow and shallow opening. The total area of the lagoon is c. 30 km 2. Coarse bioclastic sands are dominant in the lagoon and mostly surround lithified calcareous grounds. However, fine silt and clay sediments are present in separate patches. The sediments are rich in carbonates (average 78·5%) and organic carbon (average 7·3%), although they are negatively correlated. Calcium (average 25·1%) and magnesium (average 10·8‰) show a similar distribution pattern in the lagoon sediments. Strontium (average 5·2‰) is positively correlated with calcium. Sodium and potassium are relatively highly concentrated in the sediments (average 118 ppm and 173 ppm, respectively). Magnesium and strontium are of prime importance in the process of mineralization and diagenesis. The sabkha formation surrounding the lagoon is of low carbonate and organic carbon content, compared with the lagoon sediments, whilst it is characterized by high magnesium, sodium and potassium concentrations. Ras Hatiba lagoon sediments and sabkha resemble those of the northern Red Sea in the Gulfs of Aqaba and Suez and the Arabian Gulf in their major sedimentological and chemical characteristics.

  11. Measurement of seepage losses and chemical export from waste lagoons at animal feeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; DeSutter, T. M.

    2001-05-01

    Whole-lagoon seepage rates were measured from 20 lagoons in Kansas using water balance techniques. Study sites included cattle feedlots, swine facilities, and one dairy. Seepage rates ranged from 0.2 mm/day to 2.4 mm/day with and overall average of 1.2 mm/day. Analysis of lagoon effluent (58 samples from 38 sites) indicated large differences in lagoon chemistry between locations. Ammonium nitrogen (NH4-N), which accounted for over 99 percent of the soluble nitrogen, ranged from 10 ppm to 3500 ppm. On average, nitrogen concentrations in swine lagoons were about five times higher than those at cattle feedlots. The chemical flux density (flux boundary condition) was estimated from the seepage rate and the corresponding waste chemistry data from each lagoon. Results showed that ammonium-N export was between 0.02 and 1.06 kg NH4-N m-2 yr^{-1} with an overall average of about 0.3 kg NH4-N m^{-2} yr^{-1}$ . Similar data are available for other soluble compounds. Soil cores were collected beneath eight lagoons that had been operated from 12 to 25 years. Results showed that NH4-N was strongly adsorbed by the soil clay particles and that nitrogen concentrations often decreased to background levels at 3 m beneath the lagoon. Other ions, such as chloride, penetrated to much lower depths at all locations. The 'reservoir' of NH4-N that exists beneath older lagoons could convert to nitrate and move to lower depths after lagoon closure. Data suggest that the properties if the soil beneath lagoons, the concentration of the waste, the seepage rate, and the depth to groundwater are the crucial factors that affect the risk of groundwater contamination.

  12. Freshwater inflows and seasonal forcing strongly influence macrofaunal assemblages in Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Patricia; Caiola, Nuno; Ibáñez, Carles

    2014-06-01

    Coastal lagoons of the Ebro Delta (Catalonia, Spain) are part of the Ebro Delta Natural Park managed by regional government authorities. Coastal lagoons have persistently received freshwater inputs from the Ebro River from May to November that have altered their natural ecology and hydrological cycle. In this study, we evaluate the seasonal effect of contrasting salinity regimes (polyhaline in the Tancada lagoon, mesohaline in the Encanyissada and oligohaline in the Clot lagoon) on the composition, abundance, species richness, alpha diversity and biomass of benthic macrofauna communities, and we assess the relative contribution of local environmental variables to the observed patterns. Additional sampling was conducted in the largest lagoon (Encanyissada) in order to assess variability at lower spatial scale. At both spatial scales (i.e., among-lagoon and within-lagoon), species richness and diversity tended to increase at higher salinities, particularly in summer. At the assemblage level, significantly different groupings were also found among lagoons and among zones of the Encanyissada lagoon, with more distinctive differences also in summer. Environmental factors accounted for up to 56-60% of the variation in macrofaunal assemblages at both spatial scales, with salinity and temperature accounting for the largest contributions (approx. 14% and 10%, respectively), whereas biomass was mostly controlled by temperature and nutrients. Distinctive oxygen and organic matter levels across the lagoons were also associated with the freshwater influx and displayed significant contributions to observed patterns. Our study shows that the low salinity regime and/or other factors related to long-term inputs of freshwater shape the community of macrofauna within the lagoons, a central trophic resource for most of the local species of fish and aquatic birds. Restoration of these systems to their natural hydrological functioning without further inputs of freshwater and higher

  13. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: FINAL REPORT: DEVELOPMENT OF OPTIMUM TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR WASTEWATER LAGOONS PHASE II - SOLVENT EXTRACTION LABORATORY TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Army surveyed innovative treatment techniques for restoration of hazardous waste lagoons and selected solvent extraction as cost-effective restoration for further study. This treatability study focuses on treatment of organic (explosive) contaminated lagoon sediments w...

  14. FLOATING COVER SYSTEMS FOR WASTE LAGOONS: POTENTIAL APPLICATION AT OLD INGER SITE, LOUISIANA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hazardous liquids are impounded in pits, ponds, and lagoons at many uncontrolled hazardous waste sites across the country. As the ranking, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies proceed at these sites, many of the lagoons gradually fill with rainwater and threaten to ov...

  15. Influence of nutrient input on the trophic state of a tropical brackish water lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, D.; Patra, Sivaji; Muduli, Pradipta R.; Vardhan, K. Vishnu; R, Abhilash K.; Robin, R. S.; Subramanian, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    Ecosystem level changes in water quality and biotic communities in coastal lagoons have been associated with intensification of anthropogenic pressures. In light of incipient changes in Asia's largest brackish water lagoon (Chilika, India), an examination of different dissolved nutrients distribution and phytoplankton biomass, was conducted through seasonal water quality monitoring in the year 2011. The lagoon showed both spatial and temporal variation in nutrient concentration, mostly altered by freshwater input, regulated the chlorophyll distribution as well. Dissolved inorganic N:P ratio in the lagoon showed nitrogen limitation in May and December, 2011. Chlorophyll in the lagoon varied between 3.38 and 17.66 mg m -3. Spatially, northern part of the lagoon showed higher values of DIN and chlorophyll during most part of the year, except in May, when highest DIN was recorded in the southern part. Statistical analysis revealed that dissolved NH-N and urea could combinedly explain 43% of Chlorophyll- a (Chl- a) variability which was relatively higher than that explained by NO-N and NO-N (12.4%) in lagoon water. Trophic state index calculated for different sectors of the lagoon confirmed the inter-sectoral and inter-seasonal shift from mesotrophic to eutrophic conditions largely depending on nutrient rich freshwater input.

  16. Survival of Salmonella enterica in aerated and nonaerated wastewaters from dairy lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is the most commonly identified foodborne pathogen in produce, meat and poultry. Cattle are known reservoirs of Salmonella and the pathogen excreted in feces end up in manure flush lagoons. Salmonella enterica survival was monitored in wastewater from on-site holding lagoons equipped with...

  17. Improving estimates of N and P loads in irrigation water from swine manure lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The implementation of nutrient management plans (NMPs) for confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) requires recording N and P loads from land-applied manure, including nutrients applied in irrigation water from manure treatment lagoons. By regulation, lagoon irrigation water nutrient records in ...

  18. The Defense Committees of Sleepy Lagoon: A Convergent Struggle against Fascism, 1942-1944

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barajas, Frank P.

    2006-01-01

    The Sleepy Lagoon Defense Committee originated as an ad hoc committee and evolved to a broad-based movement for legal justice on behalf of seventeen youth convicted of murder and assault charges in connection with the Sleepy Lagoon case in Los Angeles in January 1943. This essay chronicles the multidimensional organizing to shift public opinion in…

  19. Decline of phosphorus, copper, and zinc in anaerobic lagoon columns receiving pretreated influent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined swine production generates large volumes of wastewater typically stored and treated in anaerobic lagoons. These lagoons usually require a sludge management plan for their maintenance consisting of regular sludge removal by mechanical agitation and pumping followed by land application at agr...

  20. 75 FR 53960 - Chignik Lagoon Power Utility; Notice of Declaration of Intention and Soliciting Comments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Chignik Lagoon Power Utility; Notice of Declaration of Intention and... Lagoon Power Utility. e. Name of Project: Packers Creek Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: The proposed Packers Creek Hydroelectric Project will be located on Packers Creek, near the community of Chignik...

  1. Improving N and P estimates for swine manure lagoon irrigation water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient management plans (NMPs) for confined animal feeding operations (CAFOs) require a record of N and P loads from manure land-applications, including irrigation with lagoon water. Mississippi regulations require nutrient records for lagoon irrigation water be based on at least one annual analy...

  2. Measuring gas emissions from animal waste lagoons with an inverse-dispersion technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring gas emissions from treatment lagoons and storage ponds poses challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques due to non-ideal conditions such as trees and crops surrounding the lagoons, and short fetch to establish equilibrated microclimate conditions within the water bo...

  3. Methane and ammonia emissions from New Mexico dairy lagoons in summer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gaseous emissions of concern from commercial dairy operations include methane and ammonia. Dairy wastewater lagoons are sources of emission for both these gases. We quantified emissions of methane and ammonia from a lagoon system at a commercial open lot dairy in eastern New Mexico using open path l...

  4. Sludge reduction and water quality improvement in anaerobic lagoons through influent pre-treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined swine production generates large volumes of wastewater typically stored and treated in anaerobic lagoons. These lagoons may require cleanup and closure measures in the future. In practice, liquid and sludge need to be removed by pumping, usually at great expense of energy, and land applied ...

  5. Using floating vegetation to remove nutrients from an anaerobic swine wastewater lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods are needed for utilizing nutrients contained within animal wastewater lagoons. One potential method for removing nutrients is to have vegetation growing in the lagoon. A study was conducted from 2005-2007 to determine the feasibility of growing vegetation on floating platforms on a single ...

  6. LONG TERM IMPACT OF SWINE LAGOON WASTEWATER ON SHALLOW GROUNDWATER NITROGEN LEVELS IN VEGETATED BUFFER SYSTEMS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An eight-year study was conducted to determine the impact of swine lagoon wastewater on shallow groundwater in vegetated buffer systems. Replicated 30 X 4 m plots were established at the interface of a pasture and riparian forest in 1993. Wastewater from the third lagoon of the University of Georg...

  7. Developing a model for the mercury cycle in the Marano-Grado Lagoon (Italy)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Marano-Grado Lagoon is a wetland system of about 160 km2 located in the Northern Adriatic Sea (Italy) between the Tagliamento and the Isonzo River mouths. The lagoon morphology and biogeochemistry are primarily controlled by the exchange with the Adriatic Sea and, to a lesser...

  8. Removal of Estrogenic Compounds in Dairy Waste Lagoons by Ferrate (VI): Oxidation/Coagulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ferrate(VI) was used to break down and/or remove steroidal estrogens (SE) from dairy waste lagoon effluent (DWLE). Dairy lagoon sites were sampled for estrogenic content (EC) and assayed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. Effects of varying...

  9. Assessment of the environmental quality of French continental Mediterranean lagoons with oyster embryo bioassay.

    PubMed

    Galgani, F; Senia, J; Guillou, J L; Laugier, T; Munaron, D; Andral, B; Guillaume, B; Coulet, E; Boissery, P; Brun, L; Bertrandy, M C

    2009-10-01

    In order to better understand environmental disturbances in the French coastal Mediterranean lagoons, we used an ecotoxicological approach based on the measurement of the toxicity of the sediments using oyster embryo bioassay that provides a basis for assessing the effects on the fauna of contaminants adsorbed on the sedimentary particles. The study covers all of the main lagoons of the French Mediterranean coasts of Languedoc Roussillon, Camargue, and Provence (Berre and Bolmon lagoons), where 188 stations were sampled. The toxicity tests provide evidence of variable levels of toxicity in sediments. Contaminated lagoons such as La peyrade, Le canet, and Ingrill and locally affected lagoons such as Bages-Sigean, Vaccares, Bolmon, and Berre have sampling stations with 100% of larval abnormalities during 24-h development. In all of the lagoons, the toxicity was mainly located close to local harbors and rivers. Salses Leucate (Languedoc roussillon) lagoon was found very clean, with no important toxicity. The results are discussed in terms of environmental disturbances of the coastal lagoons and with regard to the long-term monitoring of the impact of contaminants on the coastal environment. PMID:19288037

  10. Microbiological quality of effluents from anaerobic swine manure lagoons in Mississippi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Confined swine feeding operations in Mississippi and most of the southeastern USA routinely flush manure from pits beneath confinement barns into open anaerobic storage lagoons. Lagoon effluent is reused for pit flushing and eventually land applied as fertilizer for grass hay. The fertilizer quali...

  11. Nitrification and Denitrification Communities Associated with a Semi-Permeable Swine Waste Lagoon Biocover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia emission from swine waste lagoons presents a serious environmental challenge to pork producers. Semi-permeable swine waste lagoon biocovers have been developed to serve as a physical barrier and as an attachment site for biofilm development, but microbial analysis of the biocover technology...

  12. Induction of Purple Sulfur Bacterial Growth in Dairy Wastewater Lagoons by Circulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To determine if circulation of diary wastewater induces the growth of phototrophic purple sulfur bacteria (PSB). Methods and Results: Two dairy wastewater lagoons that were similar in size, geographic location, number and type of cattle loading the lagoons were chosen. The only obvious diffe...

  13. Plant growth and elemental uptake by floating vegetation on a single stage swine wastewater lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods are needed for utilizing nutrients contained within animal wastewater lagoons. One potential method for removing nutrients is to have vegetation growing on the lagoon. A study was conducted from 2005-2008 to determine the feasibility of growing vegetation on floating platforms on a single ...

  14. Evidence of North Africa’s Green Revolution Preserved in Sedimentary Organic Matter Deposited in Three Coastal Lagoons.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because of longer residence times and limited mixing in coastal lagoons, the impacts of anthropogenic nutrient loading to lagoon food webs are often more pronounced than in other coastal ecosystems. For these reasons, many lagoons also provide an excellent environment for the dep...

  15. Project summary. PERSISTENCE OF PATHOGENS IN LAGOON-STORED SLUDGE (EPA/600/S2-89/015)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project objective was to investigate pathogen inactlvation in lagoon-stored municipal sludges. The in-field lagoons were located in Louisiana (New Orleans) and in Texas (Port Aransas), both semitropical areas of the United States. Each lagoon was filled with 7.56 mL of ...

  16. Seasonal variation in heat fluxes, predicted emissions of malodorants, and wastewater quality of an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentrations of p-cresol above a wastewater lagoon were modeled from February through June based on equations developed in a previous study. Using this model, in which p-cresol concentrations were calculated based on lagoon evaporation and net available radiation at the lagoon surface, predic...

  17. Sedimentary lipid biogeochemistry of an hypereutrophic alkaline lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Grimalt, J.O.; Albaiges, J. ); Yruela, I.; Saizjimenez, C. ); Toja, J. ); Leeuw, J.W. De. )

    1991-09-01

    A detailed study of the lipid composition of sedimentary and water particulate samples of a dilute alkaline lake (Santa Olalla Lagoon, Guadalquivir Delta, southwestern Spain) has allowed the identification and quantitation of about 300 compounds reflecting predominant inputs of organic matter and very early diagenetic processes. These lipids, dominated by fatty acids (80-86%), account for up to 0.25% wt. of dry sediment which is consistent with the high eutrophic conditions of the lagoon and suggests a good preservation of the originally produced organic matter. However, the primary lipid compounds, mainly from cyanobacterial origin, are strongly modified. The C{sub 30}-C{sub 32}, 1,13- and 1,15-diols constitute the only major group that can be attributed directly to these organisms. The predominant lipids, including the fatty acids, are indicative of intense microbial reworking, namely contributions from gram-positive and gram-negative eubacteria and methanogens. Conversely, the higher plant lipids are better preserved and dominate the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction. Hydrogenation and dehydration are two major transformation processes in the sedimentary system being reflected in the transformation of sterols into 5{alpha}(H)- and 5{beta}(H)-stanols and sterenes, and 17{beta}(H), 21{beta}(H)-hopan-22-ol into diploptene. Oxidation in the water column seems to involve the partial transformation of sterols into steroid ketones, phytol into 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid and two isomeric 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-17-hexadecanolides, and, possibly, tetrahymanol into gammacer-3-one. Adiantone and bishomohopanoic acid probably result from the partial oxydation of extended polyhydroxyhopanes or the C{sub 30}-C{sub 33} hydroxyhopanes found in the lagoon waters.

  18. Sedimentary lipid biogeochemistry of an hypereutrophic alkaline lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimalt, J. O.; Yruela, I.; Saiz-Jimenez, C.; Toja, J.; de Leeuw, J. W.; Albaigés, J.

    1991-09-01

    A detailed study of the lipid composition of sedimentary and water particulate samples of a dilute alkaline lake (Santa Olalla Lagoon, Guadalquivir Delta, southwestern Spain) has allowed the identification and quantitation of about 300 compounds reflecting predominant inputs of organic matter and very early diagenetic processes. These lipids, dominated by fatty acids (80-86%), account for up to 0.25% wt. of dry sediment which is consistent with the high eutrophic conditions of the lagoon and suggests a good preservation of the originally produced organic matter. However, the primary lipid compounds, mainly from cyanobacterial origin, are strongly modified. The C30-C32, 1,13- and 1,15-diols constitute the only major group that can be attributed directly to these organisms. The predominant lipids, including the fatty acids, are indicative of intense microbial reworking, namely contributions from gram-positive and gram-negative eubacteria and methanogens. Conversely, the higher plant lipids are better preserved and dominate the aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction. Hydrogenation and dehydration are two major transformation processes in the sedimentary system being reflected in the transformation of sterols into 5α(H)- and 5β(H)-stanols and sterenes, and 17β(H),21β(H)-hopan-22-ol into diploptene. Oxidation in the water column seems to involve the partial transformation of sterols into steroid ketones, phytol into 5,9,13-trimethyltetradecanoic acid and two isomeric 3,7,11,15-tetramethyl-17-hexadecanolides, and, possibly, tetrahymanol into gammacer-3-one. Adiantone and bishomohopanoic acid probably result from the partial oxydation of extended polyhydroxyhopanes or the C30-C33 hydroxyhopanes found in the lagoon waters.

  19. Winter-summer nutrient composition linkage to algae-produced toxins in shellfish at a eutrophic coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Patrícia; Botelho, Maria João; Cabrita, Maria Teresa; Vale, Carlos; Moita, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Célia

    2012-10-01

    The current work examines the linkage of pronounced winter-summer fluctuations on the nutrient composition with phytoplankton assemblages and mussel toxicity produced by the presence of toxic dinoflagellates. The work was performed at the Óbidos lagoon, a coastal eutrophic ecosystem that is permanently connected to an area characterized by frequent upwelling episodes. The lagoon and adjoining coastal area exhibit recurrent incidents of diarrhetic and paralytic shellfish poisoning. The conclusions are based on: (1) inorganic and organic nutrients at five sites of the lower, middle and upper Óbidos lagoon, and inorganic nutrients at two sites of the adjacent coastal area; biannual campaigns were performed in winter and summer between 2006 and 2010; (2) phytoplankton assemblages at three sites of the lagoon (located at lower and upper areas) in winter and summer of 2009; (3) algae-derived toxicity of wild mussels from the lower lagoon and coastal area, on a 1-2 week time scale, over 2006 and 2009. Nutrient molar ratios in Óbidos lagoon contrast between winter and summer. The lower median ratios DIN:P (31 and 0.8) and Si:P (11 and 3.3) in summer reflect the excess of phosphate. Excess was mainly attributed to phosphorus regeneration in sediments of the upper lagoon with accentuated symptoms of eutrophication. Dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorus were also higher in summer, particularly in this area. No significant winter-summer differences were recorded for nutrient ratios in the adjacent coastal area. Phytoplankton assemblages pointed to a winter-summer contrast characterized by a shift of non-siliceous-based phytoplankton to diatoms. The toxic dinoflagellate species (Gymnodinium catenatum, Dinophysis cf. acuminata and Dinophysis acuta), presumably imported from the adjacent coast following upwelling episodes in summer, were observed in the lower lagoon. In summer of the two surveyed years, toxins produced by dinoflagellates occurred in

  20. A summary of preliminary studies of sedimentation and hydrology in Bolinas Lagoon, Marin County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ritter, John R.

    1970-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating sedimentary and hydrologic conditions in Bolinas Lagoon, a 1,100-acre lagoon 15 miles northwest of San Francisco. The program began in May 1967 and will continue into 1970. Only the study results analyzed before June 1968 are summarized in the report. Two series of measurements of suspended-sediment load and water discharge in the lagoon inlet showed that much of the suspended sediment is sand and that the average velocity was as much as 4.7 feet per second. Littoral drift near the inlet was generally toward the inlet, whereas farther from the inlet the pattern is irregular. Circulation velocities in the lagoon decrease rapidly away from the inlet, but probably remain high enough to erode bottom sediment along the channels. In most of the lagoon median size of bottom sediment was fine sand. Sediment was derived chiefly from Monterey Shale.

  1. Skeletal composition of modern lagoon sediments in New Caledonia: Coral, a minor constituent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevillon, C.

    1996-09-01

    The skeletal composition of 273 sediment samples, collected within 14615 km2 of lagoon habitat in New Caledonia (Ouvea and Chesterfield atolls and eastern and northern lagoons of the main island), was analyzed. Major constituents were molluscs (bivalves and gastropods), foraminifers, and Halimeda plates. The quantitative examination showed that, even in a pure coralline structure such as the two atolls studied, coral debris and calcareous algae, potentially produced within the barrier reef, never constituted a dominant element in the lagoonal sediments. Distribution of coral debris showed that coral is significant only close to the barrier reef (i.e. passes and back-reef slope). From the point of view of sedimentology, this suggests that the major role of the barrier reef is to provide a physical barrier that allows the development and preservation of lagoon sediments. Sedimentation within the lagoon of grains coarser than 63 µm is the result of in situ organic production combined with low hydrodynamic control.

  2. Redistribution of fallout radionuclides in Enewetak Atoll lagoon sediments by callianassid bioturbation.

    PubMed

    McMurtry, G M; Schneider, R C; Colin, P L; Buddemeier, R W; Suchanek, T H

    The lagoon sediments of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands contain a large selection of fallout radionuclides as a result of 43 nuclear weapon tests conducted there between 1948 and 1958. Studies of the burial of fallout radionuclides have been conducted on the islands and in several of the large craters, but studies of their vertical distribution have been limited to about the upper 20 cm of the lagoon sediments. We have found elevated fallout radionuclide concentrations buried more deeply in the lagoon sediments and evidence of burrowing into the sediment by several species of callianassid ghost shrimp (Crustacea: Thalassinidea) which has displaced highly radioactive sediment. The burrowing activities of callianassids, which are ubiquitous on the lagoon floor, facilitate radionuclide redistribution and complicate the fallout radionuclide inventory of the lagoon. PMID:3974699

  3. Survival of Salmonella enterica in Aerated and Nonaerated Wastewaters from Dairy Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Ravva, Subbarao V.; Sarreal, Chester Z.

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella is the most commonly identified foodborne pathogen in produce, meat and poultry. Cattle are known reservoirs of Salmonella and the pathogen excreted in feces ends up in manure flush lagoons. Salmonella enterica survival was monitored in wastewater from on-site holding lagoons equipped or not with circulating aerators at two dairies. All strains had poor survival rates and none proliferated in waters from aerated or settling lagoons. Populations of all three Salmonella serovars declined rapidly with decimal reduction times (D) of <2 days in aerated microcosms prepared from lagoon equipped with circulators. Populations of Salmonella decreased significantly in aerated microcosms (D = 4.2 d) compared to nonaerated waters (D = 7.4 d) and in summer (D = 3.4 d) compared to winter (D = 9.0 d). We propose holding the wastewater for sufficient decimal reduction cycles in lagoons to yield pathogen-free nutrient-rich water for crop irrigations and fertilization. PMID:25358096

  4. Comparison of the triple-point temperatures of {sup 20}Ne, {sup 22}Ne and normal Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, T.; Tamura, O.; Nagao, K.

    2013-09-11

    At the National Metrology Institute of Japan (NMIJ), the triple points of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne were realized using modular sealed cells, Ec3Ne20 and Ec8Ne22, made by the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM) in Italy. The difference of the triple-point temperatures of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 22}Ne was estimated by using the sub-range of standard platinum resistance thermometers (SPRTs) calibrated by NMIJ on the International Temperature Scale of 1990 (ITS-90). The melting curves obtained with the Ec3Ne20 and Ec8Ne22 cells show narrow widths (0.1 mK) over a wide range of the inverse of the melted fraction (1/F) from 1/F=1 to 1/F=10. The liquidus point T{sub tp} estimated by the melting curves from F∼0.5 to F∼0.85 using the Ec8Ne22 is 0.146 29 (4) K higher than that using the Ec3Ne20 cell, which is in good agreement with that observed by INRiM using the same cells. After correction of the effect of impurities and other isotopes for Ec3Ne20 and Ec8Ne22 cells, the difference of T{sub tp} between pure {sup 20}Ne and pure {sup 22}Ne is estimated to be 0.146 61 (4) K, which is consistent with the recent results reported elsewhere. The sub-ranges of SPRTs computed by using the triple point of {sup 20}Ne or {sup 22}Ne realized by the Ec3Ne20 cell or the Ec8Ne22 cell in place of the triple point of Ne for the defining fixed point of the ITS-90 are in good agreement with those realized on the basis of the ITS-90 at NMIJ within 0.03 mK, which is much smaller than the non-uniqueness and the sub-range inconsistency of SPRTs.

  5. Sedimentation rates and erosion processes in the lagoon of Venice.

    PubMed

    Sfriso, Adriano; Adriano, Sfriso; Facca, Chiara; Chiara, Facca; Marcomini, Antonio; Antonio, Marcomini

    2005-09-01

    Since the early 1990s in the lagoon of Venice, especially in the central basin, the surface sediment underwent high re-suspension and sedimentation changes and water turbidity increased both because of the disappearance of the macroalgal coverage and the harvesting of the Manila clam Tapes philippinarum Adams and Reeve, which had rapidly colonised the bottom free of macrophytes. Clams are harvested with hydraulic and mechanical dredges which remove and re-suspend surface sediments causing the transport and loss of the finest materials. Sediment transport and re-deposition in the lagoon have been monitored with sediment traps placed onto the bottoms near the Malamocco mouth (st. A), the Lido watershed (st. B) and the mainland (sts. C and D). From 1989-1993 to 1998-1999 sedimentation rates increased significantly at st. A (from 41 to 228 kg DW m(-2) year(-1)), st. B (from 65 to 760 kg DW m(-2) year(-1)) and st. C (from 140 to 721 kg DW m(-2) year(-1)), while at st. D sedimentation rates increased only by ca. 20%. In parallel sediment grain-size changed with a loss of the finest fraction especially near the mainland. The erosion or sedimentation status, acquired by utilizing sedimentation devices placed onto the bottoms, showed that sts. B, C, D were affected by sediment losses, while st. A, populated by seagrasses and characterised by seasonal variations which depend on the shoot development, did not show any significant bathymetric change on an annual basis. The highest sediment erosion was recorded at st. D (ca. 3.6 cm year(-1)) whereas a loss of ca. 1.5 and 0.5 cm year(-1) was found at sts. C and B, respectively, which accounted for a mean loss in the central lagoon of ca. 1.2 million tonnes year(-1). Those data agree with the previous indirect estimation of sediment loss which was based on the number of fishing boats operating in the lagoon on an annual basis. PMID:16083960

  6. Nitrogen availability of anaerobic swine lagoon sludge: sludge source effects.

    PubMed

    Moore, Amber D; Israel, Daniel W; Mikkelsen, Robert L

    2005-02-01

    Increased numbers of swine producers will be removing sludge from their anaerobic waste treatment lagoons in the next few years, due to sludge exceeding designed storage capacity. Information on availability of nitrogen (N) in the sludge is needed to improve application recommendations for crops. The objective of this study was to investigate possible effects of different companies and types of swine operations on the availability of N in sludge from their associated lagoons. A laboratory incubation study was conducted to quantify the availability of N (i.e. initial inorganic N plus the potentially mineralizable organic N) in the sludge. Nine sludge sources from lagoons of sow, nursery and finishing operations of three different swine companies were mixed with a loamy sand soil (200 mg total Kjeldahl N kg(-1) soil) and incubated at a water content of 0.19 g. water g(-1) dry soil and 25+/-2 degrees C for 12 weeks. Samples were taken at eight times over the 12-week period and analyzed for inorganic N (i.e. NH(4)-N and NO(3)-N) to determine mineralization of organic N in the sludge. Company and type of swine operation had no significant effects (P < 0.05) on the pattern of inorganic N accumulation over time. Thus, inorganic N accumulation from all sludge sources was fit to a first order equation [Nt = Ni + No (1-e(-kt)]. This relationship indicated that of the 200 mg of total sludge N added per kg soil, 23.5% was in the form of potentially mineralizable organic N (No) and 17.5% was in the form of inorganic N (Ni). The sum of these two pools (41%) represents an estimate of the proportion of total N in the applied sludge in plant available form after the 12 week incubation. While plant N availability coefficients were not measured in this study, the lack of significant company or type of swine operation effects on sludge N mineralization suggests that use of the same plant N availability coefficient for sludge from different types of lagoons is justifiable. The validity

  7. MicroBooNE Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleko, David

    2013-04-01

    MicroBooNE is a neutrino experiment under construction at Fermi National Lab. It employs a 10mx2.6mx(2.5m drift length) 86 ton liquid argon time projection chamber (TPC) active volume to record ionization signals from particles produced in neutrino interactions, and uses scintillation light detected by a PMT array to provide precise interaction timing information. The MicroBooNE readout electronics system includes both TPC and PMT readout electronics which digitize neutrino interaction signals at 2MHz and 64MHz, respectively. The TPC electronics readout system processes ionization signals from the three wire planes to two readout streams: one for triggered neutrino events, and a second one for continuous readout. The PMT readout system generates the trigger. This talk will describe the MicroBooNE readout system, its physics requirements, and specifications. Various tests which have been performed to exercise the data flow and integration with DAQ system, including data volume and integrity tests, will be described.

  8. Geochronometry and thermochronometry using nucleogenic 21Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farley, K. A.; Flowers, R. M.; Vasconcelos, P. M.

    2011-12-01

    Nucleogenic 21Ne is produced by the interaction of α particles with 18O. While the cross section for this reaction is small (about 1 α in 25 million participates), 21Ne excesses can be measured in a variety of minerals, forming the basis of (U-Th)/Ne chronometry. Previous work focused on thermochronometry of U, Th rich trace minerals. For example, Gautheron et al. (2005) studied nucleogenic Ne in zircon and inferred a closure temperature of ~400 C. Our preliminary Ne diffusion data on Durango apatite suggests Tc ~280 C. The method can also be applied to phases with much lower U and Th contents in which the 21Ne is measurable on old and/or large specimens. We have obtained (U-Th)/Ne ages on ~50 mg samples of iron oxides with ppm-level U and Th and Ne ages of 50-500 Ma. For example, hematites from the Neoproterozoic (?) Urucum BIF yield a 21Ne age of 470 ± 15 Ma and post-depositional hydrothermal hematite in the Redwall Limestone in the Grand Canyon yields an age of 251 ± 11 Ma. In both cases (U-Th)/He ages are more than 100 Myr younger. Outstanding issues with this method are 1) the diffusivity of Ne - are we measuring cooling ages or formation ages?, 2) how well known is the production rate?, and 3) in what minerals is the air component sufficiently small to permit precision measurements of 21Ne excesses?

  9. Lagooning of wastewaters favors dissemination of clinically relevant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Petit, Stéphanie M-C; Lavenir, Raphaël; Colinon-Dupuich, Céline; Boukerb, Amine M; Cholley, Pascal; Bertrand, Xavier; Freney, Jean; Doléans-Jordheim, Anne; Nazaret, Sylvie; Laurent, Frédéric; Cournoyer, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    The significance of wastewater treatment lagoons (WWTLs) as point sources of clinically relevant Pseudomonas aeruginosa that can disseminate through rural and peri-urban catchments was investigated. A panel of P. aeruginosa strains collected over three years from WWTLs and community-acquired infections was compared by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) DNA fingerprinting and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Forty-four distantly related PFGE profiles and four clonal complexes were found among the WWTL strains analyzed. Some genotypes were repeatedly detected from different parts of WWTLs, including the influent, suggesting an ability to migrate and persist over time. MLST showed all investigated lineages to match sequence types described in other countries and strains from major clinical clones such as PA14 of ST253 and "C" of ST17 were observed. Some of these genotypes matched isolates from community-acquired infections recorded in the WWTL geographic area. Most WWTL strains harbored the main P. aeruginosa virulence genes; 13% harbored exoU-encoded cytoxins, but on at least six different genomic islands, with some of these showing signs of genomic instability. P. aeruginosa appeared to be highly successful opportunistic colonizers of WWTLs. Lagooning of wastewaters was found to favor dissemination of clinically relevant P. aeruginosa among peri-urban watersheds. PMID:23792168

  10. Vibrio Trends in the Ecology of the Venice Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Mohammad Shamsur; Cardazzo, Barbara; Facco, Pierantonio; Bordin, Paola; Mioni, Renzo; Novelli, Enrico; Fasolato, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio is a very diverse genus that is responsible for different human and animal diseases. The accurate identification of Vibrio at the species level is important to assess the risks related to public health and diseases caused by aquatic organisms. The ecology of Vibrio spp., together with their genetic background, represents an important key for species discrimination and evolution. Thus, analyses of population structure and ecology association are necessary for reliable characterization of bacteria and to investigate whether bacterial species are going through adaptation processes. In this study, a population of Vibrionaceae was isolated from shellfish of the Venice lagoon and analyzed in depth to study its structure and distribution in the environment. A multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was developed on the basis of four housekeeping genes. Both molecular and biochemical approaches were used for species characterization, and the results were compared to assess the consistency of the two methods. In addition, strain ecology and the association between genetic information and environment were investigated through statistical models. The phylogenetic and population analyses achieved good species clustering, while biochemical identification was demonstrated to be imprecise. In addition, this study provided a fine-scale overview of the distribution of Vibrio spp. in the Venice lagoon, and the results highlighted a preferential association of the species toward specific ecological variables. These findings support the use of MLSA for taxonomic studies and demonstrate the need to consider environmental information to obtain broader and more accurate bacterial characterization. PMID:24487545

  11. Temporal changes of a macrobenthic assemblage in harsh lagoon sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Como, Serena; Magni, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    An opportunistic macrobenthic assemblage was studied from 2001 to 2003 in a central area of the Cabras lagoon (western Sardinia, Italy), known to be affected by environmental disturbances (i.e. organic over-enrichment of sediments, and episodic events of hypoxia/anoxia and sulphide development). We identified recurrent seasonal changes in this macrobenthic assemblage, with a general impoverishment in summer and a recovery in winter/spring. The nereids Neanthes succinea and Hediste diversicolor were found to replace the spionid Polydora ciliata as the most dominant species in the summer for 3 consecutive years. Occasional, unsynchronized appearances of small-sized deposit feeders, such as Tubificidae, Capitella cf. capitata, chironomid larvae and Hydrobia spp., were observed in winter/spring. We suggest that these changes are driven by the interplay of environmental conditions (worse in summer) with numerous biotic factors. This includes different tolerance levels of taxa to low oxygen concentrations and sulphides, variability in larval supply and post-larval transport, as well as competition for space and food between and within different functional groups, and facilitation through animal bioturbation and sediment reoxidation. A conceptual model is proposed to demonstrate how environmental conditions and biotic interactions may control the benthic assemblage in such a harsh lagoon environment.

  12. Enteric viruses in a mangrove lagoon, survival and shellfish incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez de Cardona, I.; Bermudez, M.; Billmire, E.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    Mangrove oysters (Crassostrea rhizophorae) were screened for enteric viruses. For 18 months oysters were collected from Cano Boqueron, a tropical mangrove lagoon on the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. This popular tourist resort has two primary sewage treatment plants which service 158 single family cabanas. In spite of the heavy seasonal input of sewage to Cano Boqueron and high densities of fecal coliform bacteria, enteric viruses were not detected in shellfish meat. Because no viruses were detected in the oysters, a virus survival study was performed. Poliovirus type 1 was placed in diffusion chambers in situ at two sites in Cano Boqueron. More than 95% of the poliovirus inactivation occurred within 24 h. Virus inactivation was significantly different by site, indicating different inactivation rates within the lagoon. Chamber studies done simultaneously with Escherichia coli did not reveal differences between sites. It is suggested that the sewage effluent had an antiviral effect in the absence of an antibacterial effect. This study demonstrates the importance for establishing microbial contamination standards for shellfish growing waters in the tropics based upon in situ studies with tropical species, e.g. mangrove oyster.

  13. Estuarine and lagoon biodiversity and their natural goods and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basset, A.; Elliott, M.; West, R. J.; Wilson, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    Assessing and monitoring ecosystem quality status and service provision of aquatic ecosystems is an increasingly important area of scientific, socio-economical and political interest. Contributions from two related meetings organized by the Estuarine & Coastal Sciences Association (ECSA) and the Euro-Mediterranean Lagoon Federation (EUROMEDLAG) address this area of interest in estuaries and lagoons, dominant types of transitional waters, by an integration of holistic and reductionistic approaches. In this context, we synthesise the key points raised by the contributions given at the two meetings to emphasise that transitional waters have emergent properties, which support their classification as an aquatic realm different from both freshwater and marine ones. They provide crucial ecosystem services, such as food provision and support for nutrient cycling, whose value and underlying mechanisms have been addressed with particular reference to estuarine ecosystems. The experimental studies show the mechanistic relationships and the responses of ecosystem functions and biodiversity to contrasting/changing environmental conditions with human activities as key drivers affecting both biodiversity conservation and ecosystem service provision.

  14. Isotopic Fractionation of 20Ne, 21Ne, and 22Ne in a Simulated Thermal Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jester, B.; Dominguez, G.

    2014-12-01

    Computer simulations allow for the analysis of the thermodynamic properties of systems which are difficult or impossible to do experimentally. Isotopic fractionation in thermal gradients is an example of a system which is not fully understood but could provide background for understanding variations in fractionations like those observed for noble gases in terrestrial and extraterrestrial material. Using a recently developed molecular dynamics simulation focused on the accuracy of the simulated physics, the isotopic fractionation of Neon in a thermal gradient was analyzed in order to provide a correlation between the fractionation and the experimental system's properties. Various ratios of isotopes 20Ne, 21Ne, and 22Ne were simulated in a thermal gradient ranging from 218 K to 233 K for a variety of time scales. Data was collected for various configurations including box sizes on the order of 1 nm to 100 μm. The simulated thermal conductivity was determined and compared with known values. The analysis indicates that the dimensions of the box heavily influence the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation in the thermal gradient.

  15. Sludge-Drying Lagoons: a Potential Significant Methane Source in Wastewater Treatment Plants.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuting; Ye, Liu; van den Akker, Ben; Ganigué Pagès, Ramon; Musenze, Ronald S; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-02-01

    "Sludge-drying lagoons" are a preferred sludge treatment and drying method in tropical and subtropical areas due to the low construction and operational costs. However, this method may be a potential significant source of methane (CH4) because some of the organic matter would be microbially metabolized under anaerobic conditions in the lagoon. The quantification of CH4 emissions from lagoons is difficult due to the expected temporal and spatial variations over a lagoon maturing cycle of several years. Sporadic ebullition of CH4, which cannot be easily quantified by conventional methods such as floating hoods, is also expected. In this study, a novel method based on mass balances was developed to estimate the CH4 emissions and was applied to a full-scale sludge-drying lagoon over a three year operational cycle. The results revealed that processes in a sludge-drying lagoon would emit 6.5 kg CO2-e per megaliter of treated sewage. This would represent a quarter to two-thirds of the overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from wastewater-treatment plants (WWTPs). This work highlights the fact that sludge-drying lagoons are a significant source of CH4 that adds substantially to the overall GHG footprint of WWTPs despite being recognized as a cheap and energy-efficient means of drying sludge. PMID:26642353

  16. Use of deep water lagoons for reducing sewage toxicity prior to wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.R.; Zuiderveen, J.A.; Belcher, B.; McGinley, P.; Birge, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    Investigations were conducted to determine the effectiveness of deep lagoons as a means of wastewater pretreatment. A lagoon system associated with a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was selected for study and parameters identified for monitoring included toxicity, metals, total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia. This system included two lagoons, with 7--15 day hydraulic retention times, fed sequentially with untreated water. Toxicity and other parameters were measured for raw influent water, the two lagoon outfalls, and the final WWTP effluent. In seven-day chronic tests with Ceriodaphnia dubia, the NOEC of influent water was as low as 20%, and 100% mortality occurred at 40%. Outfall from the first deep water lagoon showed reduced toxicity. The NOEC was > 50% but complete mortality occurred in undiluted effluent. Further reduction in toxicity occurred in the second lagoon. Its undiluted effluent had no effect on survival, but did markedly reduce fecundity. The final effluent discharged from the treatment plant affected neither survival nor fecundity. Results of this investigation support the use of deep water lagoons as an effective and economical means of pretreating wastewater. This approach offers promise for municipal waters, industrial effluents and stormwater runoff.

  17. Seasonal renewal time variability in the Curonian Lagoon caused by atmospheric and hydrographical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, Georg; Zemlys, Petras; Erturk, Ali; Razinkova-Baziukas, Arturas; Mėžinė, Jovita; Ferrarin, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the variability of the water exchanges in the Curonian Lagoon based on the hydraulic regime and the atmospheric forcings. A finite element hydrodynamic model has been applied to the Curonian Lagoon to simulate the circulation patterns for 10 years. With the help of a transport-diffusion model, the salinity distribution and the renewal times of the Curonian Lagoon have been investigated when forced by river runoff, wind, and Baltic Sea level fluctuations. The hydrodynamic model has been validated using in situ salinity measurements. Model results show that the variability depends mainly on seasonal changes in hydrographic forcing and on the dominant wind regimes that prevail over the Curonian Lagoon. Exchanges between the southern and the northern part of the lagoon mostly depend on the wind forcing and are much less influenced by the river discharge. However, when looking at the water renewal time, the most important factor is the river discharge into the lagoon. Other physical forcings only marginally determine the renewal time, and not even ice cover is able to influence it. Even if ice cover strongly inhibits the exchanges between the southern and northern lagoon, it is basically not able to change the absolute value of the renewal times.

  18. Seasonal renewal time variability in the Curonian Lagoon caused by atmospheric and hydrographical forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, G.; Zemlys, P.; Erturk, A.; Razinkova-Baziukas, A.; Mėžinė, J.; Ferrarin, C.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the variability of the water exchanges in the Curonian Lagoon based on the hydraulic regime and the atmospheric forcings. A finite element hydrodynamic model has been applied to the Curonian Lagoon to simulate the circulation patterns for ten years. With the help of a transport-diffusion model the salinity distribution and the renewal times of the Curonian Lagoon have been investigated when forced by river runoff, wind and Baltic Sea level fluctuations. The hydrodynamic model has been validated using in situ salinity measurements. Model results show that the variability depends mainly on seasonal changes in hydrographic forcing and on the dominant wind regimes that prevail over the Curonian Lagoon. Exchanges between the southern and the northern part of the lagoon are mostly depended on the wind forcing and are much less influenced by the river discharge. However, when looking at the water renewal time, the most important factor is the river discharge into the lagoon. Other physical forcings are only marginally determining the renewal time, and not even ice cover is able to influence it. Even if ice cover is strongly inhibiting the exchanges between southern and northern lagoon, it is basically not able to change the absolute value of the renewal times.

  19. The role of connectivity and hydrodynamic conditions in the configuration of ichthyoplankton assemblages in coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Quispe, Jhoni I.; Umgiesser, Georg; Ghezzo, Michol; De Pascalis, Francesca; Marcos, Concepción

    2014-05-01

    Fish assemblages in coastal lagoons are constituted by species with different gilds and life stories including estuarine residents but also a high percentage of marine stragglers and marine migrants. Previous studies showed that different ichthyoplancton assemblages can be identified inside a lagoon, depending on hydrological conditions, but at the same time a high spatial and temporal variability haven observed. The proposed models to explain lagoon assemblages configuration based on probabilities of colonization from the open sea involves an important stochastic component and introduces some randomness that could lead to that high spatial and temporal variability at short and long-term scales. In this work we analyze the relationship between ichthyoplankton assemblages in the Mar Menor lagoon and the adjacent open sea in the framework of the hydrodynamics of the lagoon and connectivity between sampling stations using hydrodynamic models. The results, show a complex interaction between the different factors that lead to a highly variable system with high accumulated richness and diversity of species, and a large proportion of occasional visitors and stragglers suggesting that the mechanisms of competitive lottery can play an important role in the maintenance of communities of coastal lagoons , where environmental variability occurs in a system with strong differences in colonization rates and connectivity, not only with the open sea, but also between locations within the lagoon.

  20. Metal concentrations in digestive gland and mantle of Sepia officinalis from two coastal lagoons of Portugal.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia; Raimundo, Joana; Vale, Carlos; Kadar, Eniko

    2009-01-15

    Concentrations of both essential (Fe, Cu, Zn) and non essential (Cd, Hg and Pb) metals were measured in the digestive gland and mantle of female cephalopods Sepia officinalis captured in two distinct lagoons in Portugal: Aveiro Lagoon, with a history of anthropogenic and industrial pollution, and Formosa Lagoon receiving urban effluents. We provide evidence for the following: (1) the digestive gland is the main target organ for both essential and non essential metals, frequently containing concentrations few orders of magnitude higher as compared to mantle; the sole exception from this was the Hg that is equally distributed in the two tissues; (2) unexpectedly, the higher levels of metals were found in animals captured in the less polluted lagoon, except for Cd whose bioavailability in Aveiro lagoon might be related to industrial sources, while the influence of Cd speciation in local pray composition should not be ruled out (3) size influenced metal concentration in different way: smaller individuals accumulated significantly more Cu, while Hg concentrations showed the opposite trend; (4) Cd is positively correlated to Zn and Cu in digestive gland of specimens collected in spring in Aveiro Lagoon, and no relationship was found in Formosa Lagoon; (5) the molar ratios Cd:Zn and Cd:Cu in digestive gland increased with body weight in specimens from Aveiro area, both ratios becoming particularly higher in older individuals. Metal-specific accumulation patterns in both mantle and digestive gland at the two sites are discussed in the light of their toxicological implications. PMID:19010515

  1. Phenology of cryptomonads and the CRY1 lineage in a coastal brackish lagoon (Vistula Lagoon, Baltic Sea).

    PubMed

    Piwosz, Kasia; Kownacka, Janina; Ameryk, Anetta; Zalewski, Mariusz; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2016-08-01

    Cryptomonadales have acquired their plastids by secondary endosymbiosis. A novel clade-CRY1-has been discovered at the base of the Cryptomonadales tree, but it remains unknown whether it contains plastids. Cryptomonadales are also an important component of phytoplankton assemblages. However, they cannot be readily identified in fixed samples, and knowledge on dynamics and distribution of specific taxa is scarce. We investigated the phenology of the CRY1 lineage, three cryptomonadales clades and a species Proteomonas sulcata in a brackish lagoon of the Baltic Sea (salinity 0.3-3.9) using fluorescence in situ hybridization. A newly design probe revealed that specimens of the CRY1 lineage were aplastidic. This adds evidence against the chromalveolate hypothesis, and suggests that the evolution of cryptomonadales' plastids might have been shorter than is currently assumed. The CRY1 lineage was the most abundant cryptomonad clade in the lagoon. All of the studied cryptomonads peaked in spring at the most freshwater station, except for P. sulcata that peaked in summer and autumn. Salinity and concentration of dissolved inorganic nitrogen most significantly affected their distribution and dynamics. Our findings contribute to the ecology and evolution of cryptomonads, and may advance understanding of evolutionary relationships within the eukaryotic tree of life. PMID:27136192

  2. Use of deep water lagoons for reducing sewage toxicity prior to wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, J.R.; Zuiderveen, J.A.; Belcher, B.; McGinley, P.; Birge, W.J.

    1995-12-31

    Investigations were conducted to determine the effectiveness of deep lagoons as a means of minimizing toxicity and reducing wastewater parameters. A lagoon system associated with a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was selected for study and parameters identified for monitoring included toxicity, metal concentrations, total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia. This system included two lagoons, with 7--15 day hydraulic retention times, which received municipal waste. Toxicity and other parameters were measured for raw influent water, the two lagoon outfalls, and the final WWTP effluent. In a definitive seven-day chronic test with Ceriodaphnia dubia, the NOEC of influent water was 20%, and the IC{sub 50} for reproduction was 22.3%. Outfall from the first deep water lagoon showed reduced toxicity. The NOEC and IC{sub 50} were 80 and 71.8%, respectively. Further reduction in toxicity occurred in the second lagoon. The NOEC was 80% and the IC{sub 50} was 75.9. The final effluent discharged from the treatment plant affected neither survival nor fecundity. A 7-day embryo larval test conducted with Pimephales promelas yielded similar results. NOEC values increased through the lagoon system and were 2.5, 40.0, 40.0 and 100%, respectively. Acute TIE procedures implicated both metals and ammonia as primary toxicants. In all tests a sequential reduction in toxicity was observed through the lagoons. Results of this investigation support the use of deep water lagoons as an effective and economical means of pretreating wastewater. This approach offers promise for municipal waters, industrial effluents and stormwater runoff.

  3. Genesis, distribution, and dynamics of lagoon marl extrusions along the Curonian Spit, southeast Baltic Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Alexander; Zhamoida, Vladimir; Ryabchuk, Daria; Buynevich, Ilya; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhov, Dmitry; Bitinas, Albertas; Pupienis, Donatas

    2016-04-01

    The unique geological process of extrusion of lagoon marl from beneath the massive migrating sand dunes is characteristic for large segments of the Curonian Spit - a ~100-km-long sandy barrier that separates the Curonian Lagoon from the Baltic Sea. The exposures of a composite set of Holocene organic sediments such as gyttja, clayey gyttja, and gyttja clay, commonly referred to as "lagoon marl", are common along the northern half of the lagoon coast of the spit. These outcrops of lagoon marl rise up to 3-4 m above the lagoon level and were formed by extrusion from their 7-8 m in situ depth beneath the present regional water table. New detailed investigations of the Baltic Sea bottom along the southern half of the Curonian Spit using side-scan sonar, multibeam echosounder, seismic imaging, sediment sampling, and video observations allowed identification and mapping of a unique underwater landscape formed by extensive outcrops of laminated and folded lagoon marl at water depths of 5-15 m. The combined onshore-offshore database indicates that the relict lagoon marl was deformed, compacted, and dehydrated by a massive dune-covered coastal barrier migrating landward (retrograding) over these sediments during the Litorina Sea transgression in a processes termed "dune tectonics". Spatial analysis of structures of the relict sediments traced in offshore geophysical data help constrain the rates of the southeastly migration of the dune massif. A conceptual dynamic model is presented to explain the present occurrence of marl exposures above the regional water table, as well as the occurrence of relict lagoon marl extrusions (diapirs) on the underwater marine slope of the Curonian Spit. This research was funded by a RFBR project 13-05-90711 and RSF project 14-37-00047 «Geoenvironmental conditions of marine management of natural recourses of the Russian sector of South-Eastern Baltic».

  4. Toxic metals in Venics lagoon sediments: Model, observation, an possible removal

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, A.; Molinaroli, E.

    1994-11-01

    We have modeled the distribution of nine toxic metals in the surface sediments from 163 stations in the Venice lagoon using published data. Three entrances from the Adriatic Sea control the circulation in the lagoon and divide it into three basins. We assume, for purposes of modeling, that Porto Marghera at the head of the Industrial Zone area is the single source of toxic metals in the Venice lagoon. In a standing body of lagoon water, concentration of pollutants at distance x from the source (C{sub 0}) may be given by C=C{sub 0}e{sup -kx} where k is the rate constant of dispersal. We calculated k empirically using concentrations at the source, and those farthest from it, that is the end points of the lagoon. Average k values (ppm/km) in the lagoon are: Zn 0.165, Cd 0.116, Hg 0.110, Cu 0.105, Co 0.072, Pb 0.058, Ni 0.008, Cr (0.011) and Fe (0.018 percent/km), and they have complex distributions. Given the k values, concentration at source (C{sub 0}), and the distance x of any point in the lagoon from the source, we have calculated the model concentrations of the nine metals at each sampling station. Tides, currents, floor morphology, additional sources, and continued dumping perturb model distributions causing anomalies (observed minus model concentrations). Positive anomalies are found near the source, where continued dumping perturbs initial boundary conditions, and in areas of sluggish circulation. Negative anomalies are found in areas with strong currents that may flush sediments out of the lagoon. We have thus identified areas in the lagoon where higher rate of sediment removal and exchange may lesson pollution. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Lagoon microbialites on Isla Angel de la Guarda and associated peninsular shores, Gulf of California (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Markes E.; Ledesma-Vázquez, Jorge; Backus, David H.; González, Maria R.

    2012-07-01

    Examples of two closed lagoons with extensive growth of Recent microbialites showing variable surface morphology and internal structure are found on Isla Angel de la Guarda in the Gulf of California. Comparable lagoonal microbialites also occur ashore from Ensenada El Quemado on the adjacent peninsular mainland of Baja California. The perimeters of all three lagoons feature crusted structures indicative of thrombolites with a knobby surface morphology 2 cm to 3 cm in relief and internal clotting without any sign of laminations. Outward from this zone, thrombolitic construction thins to merge with a white calcified crust below which a soft substratum of dark organic material 4 cm to 6 cm in thickness is concealed. The substratum is laminated and heavily mucilaginous, as observed along the edges of extensive shrinkage cracks in the overlying crust. The thrombolitic crust is anchored to the shore, while the thinner crust and associated stromatolitic mats float on the surface of the lagoons. Laboratory cultures of the dark organic material yielded the solitary cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis as the predominant taxon interspersed with filamentous forms. In decreasing order of abundance, other morphotypes present include Phormidium, Oscillatoria, Geitlerinema, Chroococus, and probably Spirulina. The larger of the two island lagoons follows an east-west azimuth and covers 0.225 km2, while the smaller lagoon has a roughly north-south axis and covers only 0.023 km2. The salinity of water in the smaller lagoon was measured as148 ppt. Pliocene strata along the edge of the smaller modern lagoon include siltstone bearing calcified platelets suggestive of a microbial origin. Dry lagoons abandoned during the later Quaternary occur inland at higher elevations on the island, but retain no fossils except for sporadic white crusts cemented on cobbles around distinct margins. Raised Quaternary lagoons parallel to the big lagoon on Isla Angel de la Guarda are partly obscured by flood

  6. Temporal shifts in reef lagoon sediment composition, Discovery Bay, Jamaica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Christopher T.; Taylor, Kevin G.; Machent, Philip G.

    2006-03-01

    Discovery Bay, north Jamaica, forms a large (1.5 km wide), deep (up to 56 m) embayment that acts as a sink for reef-derived and lagoonal carbonate sediments. Since the mid-1960s, the bay has also provided a sink for inputs of bauxite sediment that are spilled during loading at a boat terminal constructed within Discovery Bay. Bauxite has accumulated across much of the southern section of the bay with surficial sediments presently composed of up to 35 weight% non-carbonate. Cores recovered from sites on the western side of the bay provide a stratigraphic record of this history of bauxite contamination across water depths from 5 to 25 m. The bauxite-influenced upper sediment horizons are clearly visible in each core from the distinctive red-brown colouration of the sediment. These sediments are composed of approximately 10% non-carbonate (bauxite) and have Fe contents of around 2-3000 μg/g (up to 7000 μg/g). The thickness of this upper bauxite-contaminated sequence increases down transect (approximately 18 cm in the shallowest core, to around 47 cm in the deepest core), and in each core overlies a sequence of 'clean' lagoon carbonates. These typically are poorly sorted carbonate sands with variable amounts of coral rubble. Down-core data on CaCO 3 and Fe content provide a chemical record of decreasing sediment contamination with depth, with the lower 'clean' carbonates composed of only around 2% non-carbonate and <700 μg/g Fe. Down-core sediment-constituent data also indicate significant changes in sediment production at the shallowest sites. At depths of 5 and 10 m, sediment assemblages have shifted from diverse assemblages of coral, mollusc, Amphiroa and Halimeda in the clean lagoon sands, to assemblages dominated by Halimeda and Amphiroa within the surficial sediments. At the deeper sites, no major down-core shifts in sediment constituents occur. These sites thus record a rather complex history of changes in sediment composition and chemistry. Clear shifts in

  7. Ship traffic and shoreline erosion in the Lagoon of Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, Gian Marco; Zaggia, Luca; Lorenzetti, Giuliano; Manfè, Giorgia; Parnell, Kevin; Molinaroli, Emanuela; Rapaglia, John; Gionta, Sofia

    2016-04-01

    A study based on the analysis of a historical sequence of aerial photographs and satellite images combined with in situ measurements revealed an unprecedented shoreline regression on the side of a major waterway in the Venice Lagoon, Italy. The study considered long and short-term recession rates caused by ship-induced depression wakes in an area which was reclaimed at the end of the '60 for the expansion of the nearby Porto Marghera Industrial Zone and never used since then. The GIS analysis performed with the available imagery shows an average retreat of about 4 m yr-1 in the period between 1965 and 2015. Field measurements carried out between April 2014 and January 2015 also revealed that the shoreline's regression still proceed with a speed comparable to the long-term average regardless of the distance from the navigation channel and is not constant through time. Periods of high water levels determined by astronomical tide or storm surges, more common in the winter season, are characterized by faster regression rates. The retreat proceeds by collapse of slabs of the reclaimed muddy soil after erosion and removal of the underlying original salt marsh sediments and is a discontinuous process in time and space depending on morphology, intrinsic propertiesand vegetation cover of the artificial deposits. Digitalization of historical maps and new bathymetric surveys made in April 2015 allowed for the reconstruction of two digital terrain models for both past and present situations. The two models have been used to calculate the total volume of sediment lost during the period between 1970 and 2015. The results of this study shows as ship-channel interactions can dominate the morphodynamics of a waterway and its margins and permitted to better understand how this part of the Venice Lagoon reacted to the pressure of human activities in the post-industrial period. Evaluation of the temporal and spatial variation of shoreline position is also crucial to predict future

  8. Photoionization of the neon–rare gas dimers NeAr, NeKr, and NeXe

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Stephen T.; Dehmer, Patricia M.

    1982-01-01

    The relative photoionization cross sections for the heteronuclear neon--rare gas dimers NeAr, NeKr, and NeXe were measured at a wavelength resolution of 0.15 Â for NeAr and 0.28 Â for NeKr and NeXe in the energy region between the molecular ionization threshold and the atomic ²P⁰1/2 ionization limit of the heavier rare gas atom. The dimer ionization potentials are 15.685±0.004 eV for NeAr, 13.950±0.003 eV for NeKr, and 12.094±0.004 eV for NeXe. Combining these values with the known values of the atomic ionization potentials and the neutral ground state dissociation energies yields values of the A ²Σ⁺1/2 ionic ground state dissociation energies of 0.079±0.004 eV for NeAr, 0.055±0.003 eV for NeKr, and 0.041±0.004 eV for NeXe. Molecular Rydberg structure, which shows strong similarities to the atomic structure in the region of the autoionizing Beutler--Fano resonances, has been partially analyzed in terms of Rydberg series converging to the B ²Π1/2 state of the dimer ion. Vertical binding energies for the individual Rydberg states were determined based on the assumption that the Rydberg states dissociate to a neon atom in the ¹S0 ground state plus a rare gas atom in an ns'[1/2]⁰1 or nd'[3/2]⁰1 excited state. Values of the vertical binding energies of the B ²Π1/2 ionic state were determined from the series limits and are 0.022±0.002 eV for NeAr, 0.018±0.004 eV for NeKr, and 0.014±0.002 eV for NeXe.

  9. X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons pictorial overview, Piketon, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant uses large quantities of water for process cooling. The X-616 Liquid Effluent Control Facility was placed in operation in December 1976 to treat recirculation cooling water blowdown from the process cooling system. A chromium-based corrosion inhibitor was used in the cooling water system. A chromium sludge was produced in a clarifier to control chromium levels in the water. Chromium sludge produced by this process was stored in two surface impoundments called the X-616 Chromium Sludge Lagoons. The sludge was toxic due to its chromium concentration and therefore required treatment. The sludge was treated, turning it into a sanitary waste, and buried in an Ohio EPA approved landfill. The plant's process cooling water system has changed to a more environmentally acceptable phosphate-based inhibitor. Closure activities at X-616 began in August 1990, with all construction activities completed in June 1991, at a total cost of $8.0 million.

  10. Biological control of trace metal and organometal benthic fluxes in a eutrophic lagoon (Thau Lagoon, Mediterranean Sea, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Point, D.; Monperrus, M.; Tessier, E.; Amouroux, D.; Chauvaud, L.; Thouzeau, G.; Jean, F.; Amice, E.; Grall, J.; Leynaert, A.; Clavier, J.; Donard, O. F. X.

    2007-04-01

    In situ benthic chamber experiments were conducted in the Thau Lagoon that allowed the simultaneous determination of the benthic exchanges of trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Pb and U) and mercury species (iHg and MMHg). Fluxes of organotin compounds (MBT, DBT and TBT) were also investigated for the first time. The benthic incubations were performed during two campaigns at four stations that presented different macrobenthic and macrophytic species distribution and abundance (see [Thouzeau, G., Grall, J., Clavier, J., Chauvaud, L., Jean, F., Leynaert, A., Longpuirt, S., Amice, E., Amouroux, D., 2007. Spatial and temporal variability of benthic biogeochemical fluxes associated with macrophytic and macrofaunal distributions in the Thau lagoon (France). Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 72 (3), 432 446.]). The results indicate that most of the flux intensity as well as the temporal and spatial variability can be explained by the combined influence of microscale and macroscale processes. Microscale changes were identified using Mn flux as a good indicator of the redox conditions at the sediment water interface, and by extension, as an accurate proxy of benthic fluxes for most trace metals and mercury species. We also observed that the redox gradient at the interface is promoted by both microbial and macrobenthic species activity that governs O2 budgets. Macroscale processes have been investigated considering macrobenthic organisms activity (macrofauna and macroalgal cover). The density of such macroorganisms is able to explain most of the spatial and temporal variability of the benthic metal fluxes within a specific site. A tentative estimation of the flux of metals and organometals associated with deposit feeder and suspension feeder activity was found to be in the range of the flux determined within the chambers for most considered elements. Furthermore, a light/dark incubation investigating a dense macroalgal cover present at the sediment surface illustrates the role

  11. Molecular Characterization of Swine Manure Lagoon Microbial and Antibiotic Resistant Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: The differences in swine manure lagoon effluent based on differing management styles or approaches such as different stages of swine rearing determines the presence of variable antibiotic resistance determinants and functional microbial populations. These concerns determine the suitabil...

  12. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids)which ar...

  13. Problems and Alternatives of Settlement Lagoons for Mine Water Treatment System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Kil

    2015-04-01

    A field test and computational flow analysis were conducted to identify the structural problems with existing settlement lagoons and to propose effective alternatives. When it comes to existing settlement lagoons without any specifically designed internal structure, mine water flows along a specific route while other regions remained stagnant. Such a flow pattern along a specific region causes a significant reduction in retention time as well as the ineffective use of the space in a settlement lagoon. When applying the modified settlement lagoon design proposed in this study, the flow distribution of mine drainage became uniform and the time taken for mine drainage to reach the outlet was improved by as much as 360 times and the exchange efficiency was significantly enhanced from 14.5% to 82.7%.

  14. Stage-specific distribution models can predict eel (Anguilla anguilla) occurrence during settlement in coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, C.; Zucchetta, M.; Capoccioni, F.; Gravina, M. F.; Franzoi, P.; Ciccotti, E.

    2016-03-01

    Eel (Anguilla anguilla) is a catadromous fish species typical of Mediterranean coastal lagoons, that currently suffers from several anthropogenic and natural impacts. These are thought to be the cause of a stock-wide decline that this panmictic species is facing, in inland and coastal waters of Europe and North Africa. The decline affects both adult phases and recruitment, i.e. glass eel arrival to coastal waters and their ascent to inland waters. Quantitative features of eel recruitment reflect a transoceanic global scale, but also depend on local environmental conditions, the latter also affecting settlement dynamics in transitional waters. There is only little information on the dynamics of these two processes in coastal lagoons, notwithstanding the paramount importance of both in sustaining local stocks abundance and their demographic structure for this typical but also economically important inhabitant of Mediterranean lagoons, habitats that constitute an important share of the eel distribution area. The present study aims, therefore, to clarify space and time dynamics of local scale recruitment and of settlement in a coastal lagoon in the Mediterranean area, also by setting up a specific methodological approach. For this purpose, data from field surveys in combination with Species Distribution Models (SDMs) have been used in order to relate distribution of eel juvenile stages to the environmental conditions within the lagoon. Specifically, models were calibrated to quantify the relationship between presence of juvenile eel and the main environmental drivers, with the aim of identifying potential habitats for eel settlement within the lagoon. Results gained by modelling suggest certain spatial and temporal colonization patterns for the juvenile eel in the Fogliano lagoon, a typical Mediterranean coastal lake. The modelling approach has therefore proved to be a useful tool for predicting habitats for eel recruitment at the local scale and settlement, because

  15. Lagoon-sea exchanges, nutrient dynamics and water quality management of the Ria Formosa (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newton, Alice; Mudge, Stephen M.

    2005-02-01

    Historical data from the Ria Formosa lagoon are classified according to the EEA 2001 guidelines to provide a frame of reference to evaluate the effect of management during the implementation of the environmental legislative Directives. Water samples from the Ria Formosa lagoon were significantly enriched in nitrogen (NH 4+ NO 2- and NO 3-) with respect to the adjacent coastal waters indicating that inputs from sewage, agricultural runoff and benthic fluxes were not fully assimilated within the lagoon. Tidal flushing was insufficient in the inner areas of the lagoon to remove or effectively dilute these inputs. Enrichment was most severe close to the urban centres of Faro and Olhão, as well as in the Gilão Estuary and the shallow extremities. Dissolved oxygen undersaturation (mean 75% during daylight hours) was associated with the area close to the sewage outlets of Faro. In the shallow west end of the lagoon during summer, dissolved oxygen supersaturation reached 140% during the day but fell to 50% at night. Classification using the EEA (2001) guidelines suggests the system is "poor" or "bad" with respect to phosphate concentrations for the majority of the year and "poor" in nitrogen contamination during the autumn rainy period. Due to the high overall nitrogen load in the lagoon, there is a net export to the coastal waters, especially during November and December, and phosphate only becomes limiting briefly during the spring bloom (April). Therefore, substantial phytoplankton populations may be supported year-round in the lagoon. The consequences of water quality deterioration in the Ria Formosa would negatively affect the lagoon as a regional resource, important for its ecological, economic and recreational value. The industries most affected would be tourism, fisheries and aquaculture. Management options include Urban Waste Water Treatment, dredging, artificial inlets, limits on urban development and changes in agricultural practices.

  16. Heavy metals in water, sediment and tissues of Liza saliens from Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon, Portugal.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, A; Cabral, D; Salgado, M A

    2008-01-01

    Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon is an ecosystem of great ecological importance that is located on the northwest coast of Portugal and has been degraded as a result of industrial and anthropogenic activities. Concentrations of heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn) were measured in water, sediment and in tissues (liver and muscle) of Liza saliens, which is the dominant fish from the lagoon. Comparisons between metal concentrations in water and sediments were made with those in tissues of fish caught at the lagoon. Metals in water were quantified predominantly bound to particulate and equalled or exceeded the limit of chronic reference values. Metal concentrations in sediments varied among sampled sites. The relative order of concentrations was "Zn > Cu approximately Pb > Cr" the same pattern observed for metals in water. Metals in fish tissues showed higher concentrations in liver (262 mg CuxKg(-1) and 89 mg ZnxKg(-1)) than in muscle (<3 mg CuxKg(-1) and 26 mg ZnxKg(-1)), while Pb and Cr were not detected. These results suggest that Cu and Zn are the metals of major concern in the lagoon. Mullet detritivorous feeding habits, bioaccumulation pattern and the high sediment metals concentrations relative to the water suggest that sediments can be the most important source of contamination in this ecosystem. The positive relationship found between Cu in liver and fish length demonstrates that time of exposure is a crucial factor in bioaccumulation. Condition indices (K and HSI) in mullets from the lagoon were higher compared to mullets from sea, suggesting abnormal condition in the lagoon population. We conclude that metals chronic exposure in the lagoon can impose considerable fish stress. The results also show that the lagoon is an area of environmental concern. PMID:17447151

  17. Monitoring pollution in Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon, Portugal: liver histological and biochemical effects in Liza saliens.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C; Fontaínhas-Fernandes, A; Rocha, E; Salgado, M A

    2008-10-01

    The Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon is one important ecosystem located in the Northwest coast of Portugal. This study is concerned with the assessment of pollution of the lagoon contributed by urban, industrial and agricultural activities. The parameters selected for this aim were the occurrence of hepatic histological alterations and plasma blood biochemistry in Liza saliens, the dominant fish in this lagoon. Blood parameters were compared between mullets collected from the lagoon and from the sea and included plasma enzyme activities (aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP)), glucose (GLU) and total protein (TP). A positive relationship between hepatocyte vacuolization index and hepatosomatic index was found, suggesting that lipid accumulation could have contributed to the increase of liver weight. The hepatic alterations recorded included general diagnostic categories and additionally large areas of heterogeneous parenchyma, composed of hepatocytes with different spectrum of vacuolization. Liver histopathological evaluation revealed a sample prevalence of 34% for heterogeneous parenchyma, 31% for foci of necrosis and 9% for non-neoplastic lesions. No neoplastic lesions were found. Livers with heterogeneous parenchyma showed higher Cu and Zn content than livers without this category of lesion, suggesting that metals accumulated could trigger this hepatic alteration. AST was higher in mullets from the lagoon than in mullets from the sea, but no differences in ALP and ALT were found, suggesting a change in protein metabolism as an adaptive response to metals exposure. The higher glucose and protein contents observed in fish caught in the lagoon are consistent with a stress response and the measurement of plasma AST activity could be a sensitive indicator of lagoon fish stress. In conclusion, Esmoriz-Paramos lagoon biomonitorization, using indicator species will proceed to assess the impact of the restoration program under

  18. CISOCUR - Residence time modelling in the Curonian Lagoon and validation through stable isotope measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umgiesser, Georg; Razinkovas-Baziukas, Arturas; Zemlys, Petras; Ertürk, Ali; Mėžinė, Jovita

    2015-04-01

    The spatial pattern of the hydrodynamic circulation of the Curonian lagoon, the largest European coastal lagoon, is still little understood. In absence of automatic current registration data all the existing models relied mostly on such data as water levels leaving high level of uncertainty. Here we present CISOCUR, a new project financed by European Social Fund under the Global Grant measure. The project applies a new methodology that uses the carbon stable isotope (SI) ratio of C12 and C13 that characterize different water sources entering the lagoon and may be altered by internal kinetic processes. Through the tracing of these isotope ratios different water masses can be identified. This gives the possibility to validate several hypotheses of water circulation and validate hydrodynamic models. In particular it will be possible to 1) trace water masses entering the lagoon through the Nemunas and the Klaipeda strait; 2) test the hypothesis of sediment transport mechanisms inside the lagoon; 3) evaluate the importance of physical forcing on the lagoon circulation. The use of a hydrodynamic finite element model, coupled with the SI method, will allow for a realistic description of the transport processes inside the Curonian lagoon. So the main research goal is to apply the stable isotope tracers and a finite element model to determine the circulation patterns in the Curonian lagoon. Here we show how the SI analysis was used to validate the hydrodynamic model on the basis of residence time. The average residence time of the Nemunas waters is estimated through SI data and is then compared with the model data computed through standard algorithms. Seasonal changes of carbon content are taken care of through a preliminary application of a carbon kinetic model. The results are compared to literature data.

  19. The Dynamics of Mercury Speciation and Transport at a Central California Coastal Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, P. M.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Dimova, N. T.; Merckling, J.; Kehrlein, N. C.; Hohn, R. A.; Richardson, C. M.; Johnson, C. D.; Fisher, A. T.; Lamborg, C. H.; Flegal, A. R., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We evaluated spatial and temporal trends in total mercury and monomethylmercury (MMHg) in groundwater, lagoon water, and nearshore seawater to assess the drivers of MMHg production in a coastal lagoon system. Many West Coast streams transition from estuarine to lagoon conditions in the dry season when a sand berm develops at the stream mouth, restricting surface water exchange with the ocean. Because lagoons accumulate nutrients from their upstream watershed they are susceptible to eutrophication, which can promote the growth of anaerobic bacteria. In nearshore settings, these bacteria are primarily responsible for producing MMHg, a bioaccumulative neurotoxin. We found that MMHg concentrations in lagoon water (1 - 5 pM) were higher than in groundwater (0.2 - 1 pM) and coastal seawater (0.1 - 0.6 pM). Groundwater depth profiles combined with subsurface resistivity images suggest MMHg in lagoon water was transported through the sand berm to adjacent seawater. MMHg in seawater and groundwater followed similar trends, providing additional evidence of groundwater-surface water interaction. MMHg in groundwater directly below the lagoon was consistently higher where dissolved oxygen and NO3- decreased, implying MMHg production by anaerobic bacteria. Over a ~7-hour period we observed a 0.6 pM decrease in groundwater MMHg (1 to 0.4 pM) that coincided with a decrease in water temperature (16.5 to 13 °C). We hypothesize that microbial activity, and consequently MMHg production, were enhanced in warmer water. Because coastal lagoons support intricate food webs and serve as nurseries for a variety of organisms, processes that influence mercury speciation and transport in these ecosystems may have a disproportionate impact on nearshore mercury biogeochemical cycling.

  20. Seagrasses and sediment response to the changing physical forcing in a coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo da Silva, J.; Duck, R. W.; Pereira, M. J.; Catarino, J. B.

    2003-04-01

    The Ria de Aveiro is an estuary - coastal lagoon system connected to the Atlantic Ocean by a channel with a cross-sectional area that has steadily increased over more than one century. Local ocean tides, with amplitudes of 1-3 m, are today transmitted to the lagoon by the single, engineered inlet channel and propagate to the end of the lagoon channels as a damped progressive wave. The natural channel connecting the lagoon to the ocean evolved during historical times, moving southward and reducing its cross-section. The natural evolution was reverted in 1808 by opening the new inlet channel that has since been protected by breakwaters and deepened by dredging. This controlled evolution has caused an increase in the tidal prism associated with a larger tidal oscillation inside the lagoon. The change in tidal amplitude has important effects on the lagoon ecosystem, which are related to the increase in tidal currents, water level and salinity of the water. The pollution load reaching the lagoon from its catchment area is now, however, more readily flushed to the ocean. Most affected by the change are mudflat and intertidal areas, including the old salt-pans, some showing signs of erosion while others accumulate sediment that is transported in suspension by the strong tidal currents. Important indicators of ecosystem change are the seagrass beds. Until 1980 large areas of the lagoon bed were covered by seagrasses (Zostera, Ruppia, Potamogeton), which were collected in large quantities for use in agriculture. After 1980, the collection declined and the seagrass beds became sediment-covered. This resulted in a large decrease in the area of seagrasses in spite of the decline in the quantity collected. Our results show a pattern in the change of the seagrass populations that can be related to the changes in the physical forcing associated with tidal wave propagation. A parallel change in sediment texture was also observed.

  1. MiniBooNE Oscillation Results

    SciTech Connect

    Djurcic, Zelimir; /Columbia U.

    2009-07-01

    These proceedings summarize the MiniBooNE {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} results, describe the first {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e} result, and current analysis effort with the NuMI neutrinos detected in the miniBooNE detector.

  2. Rates of sediment supply and sea-level rise in a large coastal lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, R.A.; Ward, G.H.; White, W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Laguna Madre, Texas, is 3-7 km wide and more than 190 km long, making it one of the longest lagoons in the world. The lagoon encompasses diverse geologic and climatic regions and it is an efficient sediment trap that accumulates clastic sediments from upland, interior, and oceanic sources. The semi-arid climate and frequent tropical cyclones historically have been responsible for the greatest volume of sediment influx. On an average annual basis, eolian transport, tidal exchange, storm washover, mainland runoff, interior shore erosion, and authigenic mineral production introduce approximately one million m3 of sediments into the lagoon. Analyses of these sediment transport mechanisms and associated line sources and point sources of sediment provide a basis for: (1) estimating the long-term average annual sediment supply to a large lagoon; (2) calculating the average net sedimentation rate; (3) comparing introduced sediment volumes and associated aggradation rates with observed relative sea-level change; and (4) predicting future conditions of the lagoon. This comparison indicates that the historical average annual accumulation rate in Laguna Madre (<1 mm/yr) is substantially less than the historical rate of relative sea-level rise (~4 mm/yr). Lagoon submergence coupled with erosion of the western shore indicates that Laguna Madre is being submerged slowly and migrating westward rather than filling, as some have suggested.

  3. Phytoplankton community dynamics in an intermittently open hypereutrophic coastal lagoon in southern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Susana; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Gamito, Sofia

    2015-12-01

    Phytoplankton community' dynamics were studied in Salgados coastal lagoon in order to evaluate the effects of excessive organic loads and also physical stress caused by the irregular opening of the lagoon. Salgados is a hypereutrophic intermittently open coastal lagoon, which received freshwater inputs from small rivers and from a wastewater treatment plant. Cyanophyceae dominated the phytoplankton communities most of the time; Bacillariophyceae became the main taxonomic group in winter when the lagoon was closed; Chlorophyceae was the major class in early summer; pico-nano flagellate algae accounted for a high percentage of total phytoplankton during spring. Potentially harmful taxa were observed during most of the sampling periods, forming blooms and accounting for a considerable percentage of total phytoplankton abundance. A strong differentiation among dry and wet seasons could be noticed. The dry season was dominated by Microsystis aeruginosa, Rhodomonas sp., pico-nano flagellate algae, Cyclotella spp. and Planktothrix sp., while the wet season, although still with the presence of Microsystis aeruginosa, was dominated by Dolichospermum spiroides. The best environmental variables explaining stations patterns and based on phytoplankton taxa were days of isolation, pH, and salinity. Temperature, cumulative rain and total phosphorus were also related with species and stations patterns. The high nutrient load in Salgados lagoon promoted the development and persistence of harmful algae blooms. Proper management of coastal lagoons involves not only the control of direct discharges of nutrients, but also of other factors, including water level and communication with the sea.

  4. Strontium isotopic-paleontological method as a high-resolution paleosalinity tool for lagoonal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinhardt, Eduard G.; Stanley, Daniel Jean; Patterson, R. Timothy

    1998-11-01

    A combined strontium isotopic (87Sr/86Sr) and paleontological method is newly applied to a modern lagoon in Egypt's Nile River delta to test its applicability as a paleosalinity proxy. Analyses of 22 surficial samples collected throughout the lagoon include 81 Sr isotopic analyses of mollusks, foraminifera, ostracods, barnacles, bryozoans, serpulid worm tubes, pore water, and gypsum crystals. Two salinity groups are distinguished in each sample: a lower salinity group (˜1 ppt) mixed with a higher salinity group (˜3 10 ppt) that, respectively, are interpreted as the modern biocoenosis and an older relict fauna. The relict fauna denotes higher salinity conditions in the lagoon prior to closure of the Aswan High Dam (1964), and the modern fauna records freshening of the lagoon. Recent decreased salinity is a response to regulated Nile River flow and increased discharge into Manzala of fresh water via canals and drains. Quantification of this short-term salinity change holds promise for study of modern lagoons in other world settings, and may provide paleoclimatic information for older lagoon sequences in the Nile River delta and the geologic record.

  5. Living in a coastal lagoon environment: photosynthetic and biochemical mechanisms of key marine macroalgae.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Marta; Korbee, Nathalie; Pérez-Ruzafa, Isabel María; Marcos, Concepción; Figueroa, Félix L; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel

    2014-10-01

    The physiological status of Cystoseira compressa, Padina pavonica and Palisada tenerrima was studied by in vivo chlorophyll fluorescence, pigment content, stoichiometry (C:N), accumulation of UV photoprotectors and antioxidant activity; comparing their photosynthetic response in a coastal lagoon (Mar Menor) and in Mediterranean coastal waters. In general, the specimens reached their highest ETRmax in spring in the Lagoon, but in summer in the Mediterranean, coinciding with their maximum biomass peak. The species exhibited a dynamic photoinhibition. Except C. compressa, they showed a lower decrease in Fv/Fm and higher recovery rates in the Mediterranean populations when exposed to high irradiance. The higher salinity and temperature of the lagoon could impair the photoprotection mechanisms. The acclimation to lagoon environments is species-specific and involves complex regulatory mechanisms. The results underline the importance of N in repair, avoidance, quenching and scavenging mechanisms. In general, Lagoon specimens showed higher pigment concentration. Although xanthophylls play important photo-protective and antioxidant roles, the observed trend is more likely to be explained by the higher temperatures reached in the lagoon compared to Mediterranean. Therefore the studied photosynthetic and biochemical mechanisms can be effective not only for high irradiance, but also for higher temperatures in a climate change scenario, but are highly dependent on nutrient availability. PMID:25164017

  6. Dissipation of wave energy and turbulence in a shallow coral reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Lenain, Luc; Melville, W. Kendall; Middleton, Jason H.; Reineman, Benjamin; Statom, Nicholas; McCabe, Ryan M.

    2012-03-01

    Simultaneous in situ measurements of waves, currents and turbulence are presented to describe dissipation rates of wave energy and turbulent kinetic energy in the windward coral reef-lagoon system at Lady Elliot Island (LEI), Australia. The dissipation of wave energy in the lagoon is tidally modulated and strongly correlates with frictional dissipation due to the presence of the extremely rough bottom boundary. The observed turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation rate, ɛ, in this wave-dominated lagoon is much larger than recently reported values for unidirectional flows over natural fringing coral reefs. The correlation between the wave dissipation and ɛ is examined. The average rate of dissipation induced by the rough turbulent flow was estimated directly from the observed ɛ coupled with both a depth-integrated approach and with a bottom boundary layer scaling. Rates of TKE dissipation estimated using the two approaches approximate well, within a factor of 1.5 to 2.4, to the surface-wave energy dissipation rate. The wave dissipation and friction factor in the lagoon can be described by a spectral wave-frictional model with a bottom roughness length scale that is approximately constant across the lagoon. We also present estimates of dissipation induced by the canopy drag force of the coral heads. The dissipation in this case is enhanced and becomes more significant for the total energy dissipation when the water depth in the lagoon is comparable to the height of the coral heads.

  7. Self-powered wastewater treatment for the enhanced operation of a facultative lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Timothy; Babauta, Jerome T.; Atci, Erhan; Tang, Nghia; Orellana, Josue; Heo, Deukhyoun; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to harness the redox gradients in facultative lagoons using a lagoon microbial fuel cell (LMFC) to enhance autonomously the delivery of oxygen to the lagoon through aeration and mixing by operating an air pump. To enhance the usability of the low power generated by the LMFC, a power management system (PMS) was used to harvest power continually while only operating the air pump intermittently. Here we demonstrate the LMFC as an alternative energy source for self-powered wastewater treatment systems by treating both artificial wastewater and dairy wastewater in large laboratory-scale simulated lagoons. For comparison, we also used a lagoon treatment system without self-aeration. We show that the integrated LMFC and PMS system was able to improve chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal time by 21% for artificial wastewater and by 54% for dairy wastewater. The LMFC-PMS wastewater treatment system operated for over a year and proved to be robust and provide a measure of sustainability. The LMFC-PMS combination offers an innovative and low-tech approach to increasing the capacity of lagoons for rural communities. We believe that the technology developed in this research is the first step towards providing sustainable self-powered wastewater treatment systems.

  8. Production of Ne Auger electrons by Ne/+/ bombardment of Mg and Al surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Pepper, S. V.

    1976-01-01

    A description is given of experiments which provide evidence for the production of an inner shell vacancy in the Ne by the asymmetric Ne-Mg and Ne-Al collision. In addition, autoionization states of neutral Ne have been observed. These states are to be distinguished from the more usual case in Auger electron spectroscopy of de-excitation of an ion with a core vacancy. The experiments involved the bombardment of Mg and Al surfaces with Ne(+) ions. A LEED-Auger system equipped with an ion gun and a four-grid retarding potential analyzer operated in the usual dN(E)/dE mode was used.

  9. A GIS Approach for Reconstructing the Litorina Sea Lagoon in Tolkuse-Rannametsa Area, Eastern Gulf of Riga.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habicht, Hando-Laur; Rosentau, Alar; Jõeleht, Argo; Hang, Tiit; Kohv, Marko

    2015-04-01

    The eastern coast of the Gulf of Riga in the NE Baltic Sea is characterized by slow post-glacial isostatic uplift (about 1mm/yr) and slowly undulating low topography. Therefore even small increases in sea-level can easily lead to the flooding of considerable areas. The complex deglaciation history of the Baltic Sea area left, at times, south western Estonia submerged, while at other times, it emerged as terrestrial land. Different transgressive and regressive development stages of the Baltic Sea did not only shape the landscape, but also influenced the locations of the Stone Age settlements which were closely bound to the coastal areas which also include estuaries and lagoonal systems. The coastal region of the Gulf of Riga is abundant in Meso- and Neolithic settlement sites. The present study combines LiDAR, ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and geological data to reconstruct development of the Litorina Sea lagoon in Tolkuse-Rannametsa area and to create prognostic palaeogeographic maps in order to search for Meso- and Neolithic coastal settlement sites. Over 47 km of GPR profiling was done; sediments were described and dated in 37 cores two riverbank outcrops. Diatoms were analysed in the master core. A semi-automatic method for the removal of modern anthropogenic features from LiDAR derived digital elevation model (DEM) was developed, tested and used. In modelling process the impact of sedimentary processes subsequent to the time being modelled was taken into account by employing a backstripping methodology. The differential glacio-isostatic uplift within the study area was taken into account by using interpolated water-level surfaces. Palaeogeographic reconstructions shed new light into region's post-glacial coastal evolution and enabled us to suggest the possible locations of the Stone Age settlements with some of the proposed areas buried under up to 3 m thick peat layer. The results of the current study provide new chronological and shore displacement data

  10. Assessing hog lagoon waste contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed using Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Ann M; Song, Bongkeun; Mallin, Michael A

    2015-09-01

    Hog lagoons can be major sources of waste and nutrient contamination to watersheds adjacent to pig farms. Fecal source tracking methods targeting Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in pig fecal matter may underestimate or fail to detect hog lagoon contamination in riverine environments. In order to detect hog lagoon wastewater contamination in the Cape Fear Watershed, where a large number of hog farms are present, we conducted pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes in hog lagoon waste and identified new hog lagoon-specific marker sequences. Additional pyrosequencing analyses of Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA genes were conducted with surface water samples collected at 4 sites during 5 months in the Cape Fear Watershed. Using an operational taxonomic unit (OTU) identity cutoff value of 97 %, these newly identified hog lagoon markers were found in 3 of the river samples, while only 1 sample contained the pig fecal marker. In the sample containing the pig fecal marker, there was a relatively high percentage (14.1 %) of the hog lagoon markers and a low pig fecal marker relative abundance of 0.4 % in the Bacteroidetes 16S rRNA gene sequences. This suggests that hog lagoon contamination must be somewhat significant in order for pig fecal markers to be detected, and low levels of hog lagoon contamination cannot be detected targeting only pig-specific fecal markers. Thus, new hog lagoon markers have a better detection capacity for lagoon waste contamination, and in conjunction with a pig fecal marker, provide a more comprehensive and accurate detection of hog lagoon waste contamination in susceptible watersheds. PMID:26189016

  11. Do physicochemical sediment variables and their soft sediment macrofauna differ among microsize coastal lagoons with forested and urbanised catchments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikac, K. M.; Maher, W. A.; Jones, A. R.

    2007-03-01

    Microsize intermittently open and closed coastal lagoons are a common feature of the coast of southern New South Wales, in southeast Australia. Many of these lagoons are undergoing development and urbanisation of their catchments, leading to concern about their ecological health. Consequently, it was hypothesised that lagoons with urbanised catchments should hav e finer, more contaminated sediments and fewer macrofaunal taxa (represented by opportunistic taxa) than lagoons that have undeveloped, forested catchments. To test these hypotheses, five lagoons with catchments dominated by either native forest or urban development were compared with respect to their sediment composition (i.e. sediment grain size, trace metal concentrations, organic carbon and nutrients) and soft sediment macrofaunal assemblages in the Batemans Bay region of southeast Australia. Using a nested design without temporal replication, replicate core samples were taken from sampling stations nested within lagoons that were nested within catchment type. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to test for significant differences and dissimilarities between catchment types and among lagoons. Of all the abiotic and biotic variables measured, only total nitrogen showed a difference between the two catchment types. Thus providing support to refute the explanatory model that urbanisation had negatively affected the sedimentary environment and macrofaunal composition of these microsize coastal lagoons. In contrast, differences among lagoons were usually significant with differences between the two forested lagoons, North Head and Acheron lagoon, being particularly large for assemblage composition and the abundance of some taxa; this variation may, potentially, obscure any effects of urbanisation. In addition, the information collected in this study provides a basic understanding of the physicochemical and biological aspects of microsize coastal lagoons in southeast Australia. Such

  12. Temporal Variability of Carbon and Nutrient Budgets from a Tropical Lagoon in Chiku, Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, J.-J.; Kuo, F.

    2002-05-01

    Biogeochemical processes and budgets of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus from the semi-enclosed Chiku Lagoon were constructed through periodic observations and modelling. During the investigation, samples were mostly collected bimonthly, and hydrochemical properties, inorganic and organic nutrients (DIN, DON, DIP, DOP, Dsi (dissolved silica)) and organic carbon (DOC, POC) from waters associated with the lagoon were measured. The water exchange time of Chiku Lagoon ranges from 1·0 d (June 1997) to 8·5 d (January 1997) with an annual mean of 5·0 d. The residence time of nutrients varies with water exchange time, and is about 2-5 d longer than the water exchange time. Terrestrial inputs and lagoon distributions of nutrients varied in time and space based on the time scale of sampling. Thus, carbon and nutrient budgets were prepared for each sampling period and then combined to form annual budgets, which differed significantly from those modelled from annual means of various parameters. The annual removal of terrestrial nutrient inputs to the lagoon system is 69·4, 47·0, 27·7 and 42·0%, respectively, for DIN, DON, DIP and DOP. Consequently, the nonconservative flux of dissolved inorganic phosphorus (ΔDIP) from the lagoon is around -0·1 mole m-2 yr-1, that is equivalent to an internal organic carbon sink of 11 mol C m-2 yr-1. This organic carbon budget indicates that the lagoon is an autotrophic system where photosynthesis exceeds respiration (p-r> 0). This carbon sink is one of largest reported from world's lagoons, and its large size may result from the abundant nutrients in the lagoon. However, although the Chiku Lagoon is estimated to remove 4·7 mol C m-2 yr-1 carbonate through oyster calcification, it emits an equivalent amount of CO2 into the system. Despite net nitrogen fixation being observed during some periods, denitrification exceeds nitrogen fixation throughout the period of observation [(nfix-denit)=-1·4 mole N m-2 yr-1].

  13. Impacts of climate change on water resources in watersheds of four European lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanova, Anastassi; Hesse, Cornelia; Krysanova, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The hydrologic impacts of projected climate change were assessed for the drainage areas of four European lagoons: the Ria de Aveiro lagoon in Portugal, the Mar Menor lagoon in Spain, the Vistula lagoon in Poland and Kaliningrad region and the Tyligulski lagoon in Ukraine. The eco-hydrological model SWIM (Soil and Water Integrated Model) was applied to each of the four case study areas individually, considering basin-specific characteristics and management settings. All four watersheds were calibrated and validated towards river discharge at one or more gauges, reaching satisfactory to very good modelling results, depending on the quality and availability of input data (i.e. observed climate and discharge data). For the assessment of climate change impacts we forced the four model set-ups with scenario data from the ENSEMBLES project. Therefore a set of 15 climate scenarios, all running until the end of the 21st century, was applied to SWIM for one reference and three future periods of 30 years each. We evaluated the long-term changes of total freshwater inflow to the four lagoons and compared the results considering average trends and uncertainties induced by the different climate scenarios. The comparison not only shows differences in the magnitude of potential impacts among the four regions but also differences in the direction of change. In Spain and Portugal an average decrease in discharge of about -5% and -15% can be expected, while at the same time the total inflow to the Vistula and the Tyligulski lagoon is projected to increase by 18% and 20% on average by the end of the century. The agreement of climate projections among scenarios is varies between regions and in consequence the uncertainty in model outputs also differs between the four case studies. In the watershed of the Tyligulski lagoon the projected changes in river discharge vary between -70% and 120%, whereas the results for the Ria de Aveiro lagoon range between -1% and -27% for the last three

  14. Storm-water characterization and lagoon sediment analysis, Grand Forks Air Force Base, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, J.G.; Vaughn, R.W.; Scott, P.T.

    1990-08-01

    Sampling was conducted in the wastewater treatment lagoons and stormwater runoff at Grand Forks AFB. The base was concerned about whether the unlined lagoons were creating a potential groundwater contamination problem and whether their stormwater runoff met North Dakota state stream standards. Lagoon sediment did not contain Extraction Procedure hazardous chemicals. Stormwater runoff exceeded state standards for boron, phosphates, and phenols and contained trace levels of methylene chloride. Characterization of lagoon influent showed it to be generally representative of domestic sewage, but also contained trace levels of boron, phenols, toluene, cyanide, chloroform, methylene chloride and ethyl benzene.

  15. Parasite communities of the neotropical cormorant Phalacrocorax brasilianus (Gmelin) (Aves, Phalacrocoracidae) from two coastal lagoons in Guerrero state, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Violante-González, Juan; Monks, Scott; Gil-Guerrero, Salvador; Rojas-Herrera, Agustín; Flores-Garza, Rafael; Larumbe-Morán, Edvino

    2011-11-01

    The parasite community structure of the neotropical cormorant, Phalacrocorax brasilianus, from two lagoons (Coyuca and Tres Palos) from Guerrero state, México, was examined. Fourteen species of adult helminths (6,391 individuals) from 48 cormorants were identified: 9 digeneans, 1 acanthocephalan, 1 cestode, and 3 nematodes. A total of 11 species were collected in Coyuca Lagoon and 12 in Tres Palos Lagoon. Nine species co-occurred in cormorants of both lagoons but, with the exception of Contracaecum multipapillatum and Drepanocephalus olivaceus, species were not equally common in both lagoons. The prevalence values of six species of helminth and the mean abundance of four species varied significantly between lagoons, and C. multipapillatum was numerically dominant in both lagoons. The qualitative similarity between the two communities at the component level was 64%. All cormorants examined were infected, and parasite species richness was 3-5 in Coyuca and 4-9 in Tres Palos lagoon. The results indicate that both communities presented a similar structure at the component level, probably because the cormorants of both lagoons feed on the same species of fish and thus acquire almost the same species of parasites. Differences observed at the infracommunity level were attributed to variations in the degree of dominance of the particular species. PMID:21503640

  16. The distribution of salinity and main forcing effects in the Berre lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Bernard; Alekseenko, Elena; Chen, Paul Gang; Kharif, Christian; Kotarba, Richard; Fougere, Dominique

    2014-05-01

    The results from previous studies in lagoons and well mixed estuaries indicate that salt transport is primarily in response to advection associated with freshwater outflow, tidal diffusion, and to shear effects arising from spatial correlations of vertical and especially transverse deviations in salinity and current speed (Smith, 1994). Therefore, the inflow of fresh and salt water into coastal lagoons is an important factor influencing the structure and function of lagoonal ecosystems worldwide (Lirman et al., 2007). The predominance of marine or freshwater inflow leads to the different ecosystems. Among several lagoons located along the Mediterranean shore of France, the Berre lagoon has been under intense anthropogenic pressure for several decades (Delpy et al., 2012). Moreover, the salinity level of the Berre lagoon was varying dramatically from the 19th century up to now. In this work, a special attention is focused on the salinity variation in the Berre lagoon due to the three dominant abiotic forcing mechanisms, i.e., incoming sea tide, runoff from a hydropower and a strong wind. Four different model scenarios were considered in order to examine the impact of each forcing mechanism or combined effects, i.e. : (a) tide only, (b) runoff only, (c) combined tide and runoff, and (d) an N-NW wind, tide and runoff together. Numerical modeling and interpretation of numerical results are based on three-dimensional hydrodynamic model MARS3D. It is found that the strongest negative impact is related to the huge hydropower runoffs, inducing the desalinization of the surface and subsurface waters not only in the centre of the lagoon, but also in the entire water column in the coastal seagrass recolonization zones. In the absence of wind, the huge inputs of freshwater from the hydropower lead to a haline stratification and thus, to anoxic conditions, making most of the lagoon unproductive. On the contrary, strong winds play a positive role on the salinity level of the

  17. Coulomb Energies in ^18Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherr, R.; Fortune, H. T.

    1998-10-01

    Coulomb energies of the ^18Ne mirrors of the levels of ^18O vary considerably from state to state, an effect understood as arising from their different configurations. All the low-lying positive-parity states in these nuclei can be described in terms of two nucleons coupled to an ^16O core plus a collective component (most probably four-particle two-hole (4p-2h)). We have computed Coulomb energies using one such formulation(Lawson, Serduke and Fortune, Phys. Rev. C 14), 1245 (1976).. Two-particle energies arise from coupling a neutron to single-particle states of ^17O, and a proton to the mirror states of ^17F. For the 4p-2h component, we use the ^14O-^14C mass difference, plus a ph Coulomb term(Sherr and Bertsch, Phys. Rev. C 12), 1671 (1975).. Agreement is perhaps slightly better than another such attempt(Nero, Adelberger and Dietrich, Phys. Rev. C 24), 1864 (1981). using wave functions from Benson and Flowers.

  18. Hydrographic measurements in Jökulsárlón lagoon, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandon, M. A.; Hodgkins, R.; Björnsson, H.; Ólaffson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Jökulsárlón lagoon is an enclosed lake bordering the retreating Breidamerkurjökull glacier which flows down from the Vatnajökull ice cap. As the glacier calves most of the ice it releases decays within the lake and the addition of the stored fresh water modifies the water local properties. The lake itself is connected to the North Atlantic Ocean through a narrow channel only ~80 m wide, and all tidal and residual flows in and out of the lake are through this channel. In April 2012 (early spring) we conducted four hydrographic sections from a small boat to determine the early season hydrographic structure of the lake. We conducted two hydrographic sections from the entrance of the channel to sea across the lagoon to the Breidamerkurjökull glacier, one across the centre of the lagoon, and one along, and close to the glacier face. Four months of time series hydrographic data from the channel show that the oceanic tidal pulse into the lagoon is short in duration. The water that enters the lagoon is warm and saline enough to descend rapidly to the greatest depths within the lagoon. With our CTD measurements we have mapped the properties of water across the lake. These reveal the pathway of the Atlantic derived water towards the ice face. The warmest water measured within the lagoon was just below the surface and only adjacent to the glacier face. Whilst this warm water was created from solar input, its location and concentration reveal the complex density driven circulation patterns close to the ice face. Calculated oceanic driven melt rates from the ice face show enhanced oceanographic melting in this near surface layer which contributes to the more substantial deeper melting.

  19. Hydrologic characteristics of lagoons at San Juan, Puerto Rico, during an October 1974 tidal cycle

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gómez-Gómez, Fernando; Ellis, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Flow and water-quality changes were studied during a period of intense rainfall in the San Juan Lagoon system. The study covered a 25-hour period beginning 0900 hours 22 October, 1974. Precipitation during the study period averaged 70 millimeters. Sampling stations were located at Boca de Cangrejos, the main ocean outlet; Canal Pinones between Laguna de Pinones and Laguna La Torrecilla; Canal Suarez between Laguna San Jose, connects to Laguna La Torrecilla; and Cano de Martin Pena between Laguna San Jose and Bahia de San Juan. In addition water-elevation recording gages were installed at each lagoon. Water samples from the canal stations were analyzed for organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and suspended sediment. Specific-conductance measurements were used with the chemical data to estimate the runoff contributions of nutrients. Runoff into the lagoon, system during the study period was about 2.8 million cubic meters, or about 70 percent of the average precipitation. The runoff contributed chemical loadings to the lagoons of 95,000 kilograms total-organic carbon; 2,700 kilograms of total phosphorus; and 10,000 kilograms of total Khjeldhal nitrogen. A comparison with a prior study during which there was no significant rain, show that dry-period loadings are less than 10 percent of the wet-period loadings. At the end of the study period the system had not reached equilibrium, and the lagoons retained 80 percent of the water inflows from 50 to 90 percent of the chemical loads. Nearly 95 percent of the water outflows occurred at the Boca de Cangrejos sea outlet. The three lagoons and interconnecting canals form a very complex hydraulic system that is difficult to study using traditional techniques. A model of the system will facilitate management to improve the quality of water in the lagoons.

  20. Reconstruction of historic sea ice conditions in a sub-Arctic lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petrich, Chris; Tivy, Adrienne C.; Ward, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Historical sea ice conditions were reconstructed for Izembek Lagoon, Bering Sea, Alaska. This lagoon is a crucial staging area during migration for numerous species of avian migrants and a major eelgrass (Zostera marina) area important to a variety of marine and terrestrial organisms, especially Pacific Flyway black brant geese (Branta bernicla nigricans). Ice cover is a common feature of the lagoon in winter, but appears to be declining, which has implications for eelgrass distribution and abundance, and its use by wildlife. We evaluated ice conditions from a model based on degree days, calibrated to satellite observations, to estimate distribution and long-term trends in ice conditions in Izembek Lagoon. Model results compared favorably with ground observations and 26 years of satellite data, allowing ice conditions to be reconstructed back to 1943. Specifically, periods of significant (limited access to eelgrass areas) and severe (almost complete ice coverage of the lagoon) ice conditions could be identified. The number of days of severe ice within a single season ranged from 0 (e.g., 2001) to ≥ 67 (e.g., 2000). We detected a slight long-term negative trend in ice conditions, superimposed on high inter-annual variability in seasonal aggregate ice conditions. Based on reconstructed ice conditions, the seasonally cumulative number of significant or severe ice days correlated linearly with mean air temperature from January until March. Further, air temperature at Izembek Lagoon was correlated with wind direction, suggesting that ice conditions in Izembek Lagoon were associated with synoptic-scale weather patterns. Methods employed in this analysis may be transferable to other coastal locations in the Arctic.

  1. Chasing boundaries and cascade effects in a coupled barrier - marshes - lagoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo Trueba, J.; Mariotti, G.

    2015-12-01

    Low-lying coasts are often characterized by barriers islands, shore-parallel stretches of sand separated from the mainland by marshes and lagoons. We built an exploratory numerical model to examine the morphological feedbacks within an idealized barrier - marshes -lagoon system and predict its evolution under projected rates of sea level rise and sediment supply to the backbarrier environment. Our starting point is a recently developed morphodynamic model, which couples shoreface evolution and overwash processes in a dynamic framework. As such, the model is able to capture dynamics not reproduced by morphokinematic models, which advect geometries without specific concern to processes. These dynamics include periodic barrier retreat due to time lags in the shoreface response to barrier overwash, height drowning due to insufficient overwash fluxes as sea level rises, and width drowning, which occurs when the shoreface response rate is insufficient to maintain the barrier geometry during overwash-driven landward migration. We extended the model by coupling the barrier model with a model for the evolution of the marsh platform and the boundary between the marsh and the adjacent lagoon. The coupled model explicitly describes marsh edge processes and accounts for the modification of the wave regime associated with lagoon width (fetch). Model results demonstrate that changes in factors that are not typically associated with the dynamics of coastal barriers, such as the lagoon width and the rate of export/import of sediments from and to the lagoon, can lead to previously unidentified complex responses of the coupled system. In particular, a wider lagoon in the backbarrier, and/or a reduction in the supply of muddy sediments to the backbarrier, can increase barrier retreat rates and even trigger barrier drowning. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating backbarrier dynamics in models that aim at predicting the response of barrier systems.

  2. Resistance of polychaete species and trait patterns to simulated species loss in coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulwetter, Sarah; Papageorgiou, Nafsika; Koulouri, Panayota; Fanini, Lucia; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Markantonatou, Vasiliki; Pavloudi, Christina; Chatzigeorgiou, Georgios; Keklikoglou, Kleoniki; Vasileiadou, Katerina; Basset, Alberto; Pinna, Maurizio; Rosati, Ilaria; Reizopoulou, Sofia; Nicolaidou, Artemis; Arvanitidis, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The loss of species is known to have negative impacts on the integrity of ecosystems, but the details of this relationship are still far from being fully understood. This study investigates how the distribution patterns of polychaete species and their associated biological trait patterns in six Mediterranean coastal lagoons change under computationally simulated scenarios of random species loss. Species were progressively removed from the full polychaete assemblage and the similarity between the full assemblage and the reduced matrices of both species and trait patterns was calculated. The results indicate the magnitude of changes that might follow species loss in the real world, and allow consideration of the resistance of the system's functional capacity to loss of species, expressed through the species' biological traits as an approximation to functioning. Comparisons were made between the changes in the distribution of species and of traits, as well as between the six different lagoons. While the change of species and trait patterns was strongly correlated within most lagoons, different lagoons showed distinctly different patterns. In disturbed lagoons, the dominance of one or few species was the major driver for the observed patterns and the loss of these species caused extreme changes. Less disturbed lagoons were less susceptible to extreme changes and had a greater resistance towards species loss. Species richness appears to be less important for the ability of the lagoons to buffer changes, instead the initial composition of the assemblage and the identity of the lost species determine the response of the system and our ability to predict changes of the assemblage's functional potential.

  3. Occurrence of Purple Sulfur Bacteria in a Sewage Treatment Lagoon 1

    PubMed Central

    Holm, H. W.; Vennes, J. W.

    1970-01-01

    The ecology of purple sulfur bacteria in a sewage oxidation lagoon was investigated. Chemical changes in the lagoon were investigated by monitoring biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), sulfide, sulfate, phosphate, total carbohydrates, volatile acids, alkalinity, and pH. Lagoon water temperatures were observed daily. Microbial ecological relationships were deduced by enumerating coliforms, total bacteria other than anaerobes [Tryptone Glucose Extract (TGE) agar], methane formers such as Methanobacterium formicicum, sulfate reducers, purple sulfur bacteria, and algae. Finally, two strains of purple sulfur bacteria were characterized. Two populations, purple sulfur bacteria and total bacteria (TGE agar), reached maximal concentrations in the warmest part of the 1967 summer. Purple sulfur bacteria reached maximal numbers as concentrations of sulfide and volatile acids were depleted, whereas carbohydrates and alkalinity remained unchanged. Low sulfate levels, which were not limiting for sulfate reducers, may be attributable to storage of sulfur within purple sulfur bacteria. No biological, chemical, or physical agent was linked to the removal of coliforms. The increase of algae in the late summer of 1967 may have been related to the low organic content of the lagoon during this period. Although lagoon pH (7.7 to 8.2) was favorable for purple sulfur bacterial growth, temperatures and sulfides were not optimal in the lagoon for these organisms. Chromatium vinosum and Thiocapsa floridana (the predominant lagoon purple sulfur organism in 1967 and 1968) utilized certain carbohydrates, amino acids, volatile acids, and Krebs cycle intermediates. Also purple sulfur bacteria lowered BOD levels as demonstrated by the growth of T. floridana in sterilized sewage. PMID:4917194

  4. Marshall Islands Fringing Reef and Atoll Lagoon Observations of the Tohoku Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Murray; Becker, Janet M.; Merrifield, Mark A.; Song, Y. Tony

    2014-12-01

    The magnitude 9.0 Tohoku earthquake on 11 March 2011 generated a tsunami which caused significant impacts throughout the Pacific Ocean. A description of the tsunami within the lagoons and on the surrounding fringing reefs of two mid-ocean atoll islands is presented using bottom pressure observations from the Majuro and Kwajalein atolls in the Marshall Islands, supplemented by tide gauge data in the lagoons and by numerical model simulations in the deep ocean. Although the initial wave arrival was not captured by the pressure sensors, subsequent oscillations on the reef face resemble the deep ocean tsunami signal simulated by two numerical models, suggesting that the tsunami amplitudes over the atoll outer reefs are similar to that in deep water. In contrast, tsunami oscillations in the lagoon are more energetic and long lasting than observed on the reefs or modelled in the deep ocean. The tsunami energy in the Majuro lagoon exhibits persistent peaks in the 30 and 60 min period bands that suggest the excitation of closed and open basin normal modes, while energy in the Kwajalein lagoon spans a broader range of frequencies with weaker, multiple peaks than observed at Majuro, which may be associated with the tsunami behavior within the more irregular geometry of the Kwajalein lagoon. The propagation of the tsunami across the reef flats is shown to be tidally dependent, with amplitudes increasing/decreasing shoreward at high/low tide. The impact of the tsunami on the Marshall Islands was reduced due to the coincidence of peak wave amplitudes with low tide; however, the observed wave amplitudes, particularly in the atoll lagoon, would have led to inundation at different tidal phases.

  5. News from KM3NeT

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Ulrich F.; Collaboration: KM3NeT Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the Mediterranean Sea, hosting a multi-cubic-kilometre neutrino telescope and nodes for Earth and Sea sciences. In this report we shortly summarise the genesis of the KM3NeT project and present key elements of its technical design. The physics objectives of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope and some selected sensitivity estimates are discussed. Finally, some first results from prototype operations and the next steps towards implementation – in particular the first construction phase in 2014/15 – are described.

  6. Evolution of an intermittent lagoon-barrier system with rising sea level: observations and projections from the Muni-Pomadze lagoon, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies-Vollum, Sian

    2016-04-01

    Intermittently closed lagoon-barrier systems are a transitory environment between land and sea that are influenced by fluvial and marine processes as well as human activities. Fluvial processes dominate most of the time, when the barrier is closed. However, when the barrier is breached an ephemeral connection between the lagoon and the ocean develops and estuarine-like conditions ensue. As sea level rises, the evolution of these systems from intermittently closed to open is dependent on multiple processes including barrier breaching, fragmentation and overwashing. Human intervention, often to prevent flooding, also has an impact. The Muni-Pomadze lagoon in central Ghana is a small, intermittently closed lagoon-barrier system that supports a local fishing community. A beach-barrier separates the lagoon from the ocean, impounding river water and sediment behind it for most of the year. At the end of a rainy season the barrier may be breached, either naturally or by human intervention to prevent flooding of dwellings on the barrier. Field observation, digital mapping and GIS analysis of the shoreline has enabled an understanding of how the barrier is evolving with rising sea level. The shore face of the barrier has shifted landwards with an average retreat rate of 0.22 m/yr. Small washover fans, developed at low points along the lagoon side of the barrier have developed. However, aerial photos reveal that these fans have remained stable since 1972 (earliest available air photos). The small size and stability of these fans suggests that overwashing is not an important factor in the evolution of the barrier and that the barrier is being eroded rather not moving landward. Erosion is particularly prevalent at the breach end of the barrier with an average rate of loss of 3 metres per year and palm trees that were providing stability to the barrier have been washed away. Unconsolidated sands forming a transient, spit-like feature have replaced the stable barrier, which

  7. Photon beam quality correction factors for the NE2571A and NE2581A thimble ionization chambers using PENELOPE.

    PubMed

    Erazo, Fabián; Lallena, Antonio M

    2016-01-01

    The beam quality correction factor kQ,Q0 and the perturbation factor pQ for photon beams were calculated for the NE2571A and NE2581A ionization chambers, using the Monte Carlo simulation code PENELOPE. Results are compared to those quoted for the NE2571 and NE2581 chambers in previous works. Both kQ,Q0 and pQ obtained for NE2571A and NE2581A chambers agree with those of their predecessors NE2571 and NE2581 ones. PMID:26602965

  8. Fragrances as new contaminants in the Venice lagoon.

    PubMed

    Vecchiato, Marco; Cremonese, Simone; Gregoris, Elena; Barbaro, Elena; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo

    2016-10-01

    Fragrance Materials (FMs) are omnipresent components of household and Personal Care Products (PCPs). In spite of their widespread use, little is known about their environmental occurrence. We selected 17 among the longest-lasting and most stable fragrance ingredients that are commercially available, namely: Amberketal, Ambrofix, Amyl Salicylate, Benzyl Salicylate, Bourgeonal, Dupical, Hexyl Salicylate, Isobutavan, Lemonile, Mefranal, Myraldene, Okoumal, Oranger Crystals, Pelargene, Peonile, Tridecene-2-Nitrile, Ultravanil. A new analytical method was developed to quantify FMs in water samples and it was applied to perform the first study about the distribution of these compounds in the surface waters of the city of Venice and its lagoon. Total FMs concentrations range from about 30ngL(-1) to more than 10μgL(-1) in polluted canals during the low tide. Sewage discharges were supposed to be the main sources of the selected FMs in the environment. Salicylates, oestrogenic and allergenic compounds, were in general the most abundant and widespread components. This study reports for the first time the detection of most of the selected FMs in surface waters and represent the first step to understand their environmental fate. PMID:27267717

  9. Isolation and characterization of Magnetospirillum from saline lagoon.

    PubMed

    Revathy, T; Jacob, Jobin John; Jayasri, M A; Suthindhiran, K

    2016-07-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are aquatic prokaryotes that orient themselves to earth's magnetic field with the help of intracellular organelle magnetosomes. Although many species of MTB have been identified, the isolation of MTB is a challenging task due to the lack of systematic isolation procedure and/or commercial media. In this study, we are reporting the isolation of magnetotactic spirillum from the Pulicat lagoon, India using a systematic and selective procedure. Sampling site was chosen on the basis of physicochemical properties of the ecosystem and the catalysed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD-FISH) analysis of sediment samples. In the current study, a combination of techniques including 'capillary racetrack' Purification and gradient cultivation resulted in the isolation of magnetotactic spirilla from aquatic sediments. Based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the strain was identified as Magnetospirillum and was designated as Magnetospirillum sp. VITRJS1. The genes responsible for magnetosome formation (mamA, B, E, F, K, M, O, P, Q, T) were successfully detected using PCR amplification. The presence of cbbM gene confirmed that the isolate is chemolithoautotroph and utilises reduced sulphur as an electron source. Furthermore, magnetosomes extracted from VITRJS1 found to be cubo-octahedral in shape and 45 nm in size. Our results indicate that the systematic procedure using sediment analysis, CARD-FISH, and a combination of isolation methods enables the selective and rapid isolation of MTB from aquatic sediment sample. PMID:27263004

  10. The Maastrichtian flora of the Amaam Lagoon area (Northeastern Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseeva, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    The Maastrichtian Koryak flora from the Amaam Lagoon area is comprehensively studied with reference to available data on the stratigraphy of the study area and age assessment of the flora-bearing deposits. In the Koryak flora 32 species of plant fossils are identified and systematically described in the work. The established traits of the Koryak floristic assemblage are used to correlate it with the other assemblages close in age from different localities of Northeastern RNortheastern Russiaussia and Alaska. The results of correlation and taxonomic revision of plant fossils from the upper part of the Prince Creek Formation, Northern Alaska show that in the Anadyr-Koryak and Northern Alaska circum-Pacific regions the Koryak stage of flora development and the respective phytostratigraphic horizon (upper Maastrichtian-Selandian), of key significance for interregional correlation of continental deposits, are distinguishable. Floristic changes recorded in the northern circum-Pacific regions across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary suggest that the evolution of vegetation was gradual, controlled by climatic change, evolutionary factors and plant migration. These results are inconsistent with the postulated global significance of the ecological crisis at that time.

  11. The NeXus data format

    PubMed Central

    Könnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Björn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Männicke, David; Osborn, Raymond; Peterson, Peter F.; Richter, Tobias; Suzuki, Jiro; Watts, Benjamin; Wintersberger, Eugen; Wuttke, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitions for the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data. PMID:26089752

  12. UCB-NE-107 user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-03-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide users of UCB-NE-107 with the information necessary to use UCB-NE-107 effectively. UCB-NE-107 is a computer code for calculating the fractional rate of readily soluble radionuclides that are released from nuclear waste emplaced in water-saturated porous media. Waste placed in such environments will gradually dissolve. For many species such as actinides and rare earths, the process of dissolution is governed by the exterior flow field, and the chemical reaction rate or leaching rate. However, for readily soluble species such as /sup 135/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 129/I, it has been observed that their dissolution rates are rapid. UCB-NE-107 is a code for calculating the release rate at the waste/rock interface, to check compliance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC) subsystem performance objective. It is an implementation of the analytic solution given below. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  13. The NeXus data format

    SciTech Connect

    Könnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Björn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Männicke, David; Osborn, Raymond; Peterson, Peter F.; Richter, Tobias; Suzuki, Jiro; Watts, Benjamin; Wintersberger, Eugen; Wuttke, Joachim

    2015-01-30

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitions for the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data.

  14. The NeXus data format

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Könnecke, Mark; Akeroyd, Frederick A.; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Campbell, Stuart I.; Clausen, Björn; Cottrell, Stephen; Hoffmann, Jens Uwe; Jemian, Pete R.; Männicke, David; et al

    2015-01-30

    NeXus is an effort by an international group of scientists to define a common data exchange and archival format for neutron, X-ray and muon experiments. NeXus is built on top of the scientific data format HDF5 and adds domain-specific rules for organizing data within HDF5 files, in addition to a dictionary of well defined domain-specific field names. The NeXus data format has two purposes. First, it defines a format that can serve as a container for all relevant data associated with a beamline. This is a very important use case. Second, it defines standards in the form of application definitionsmore » for the exchange of data between applications. NeXus provides structures for raw experimental data as well as for processed data.« less

  15. [Species and size composition of fishes in Barra de Navidad lagoon, Mexican central Pacific].

    PubMed

    González-Sansón, Gaspar; Aguilar-Betancourt, Consuelo; Kosonoy-Aceves, Daniel; Lucano-Ramírez, Gabriela; Ruiz-Ramírez, Salvador; Flores-Ortega, Juan Ramón; Hinojosa-Larios, Angel; de Asís Silva-Bátiz, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    Coastal lagoons are considered important nursery areas for many coastal fishes. Barra de Navidad coastal lagoon (3.76km2) is important for local economy as it supports tourism development and artisanal fisheries. However, the role of this lagoon in the dynamics of coastal fish populations is scarcely known. Thus, the objectives of this research were: to characterize the water of the lagoon and related weather conditions, to develop a systematic list of the ichthyofauna, and to estimate the proportion of juveniles in the total number of individuals captured of most abundant species. Water and fish samples were collected between March 2011 and February 2012. Physical and chemical variables were measured in rainy and dry seasons. Several fishing gears were used including a cast net, beach purse seine and gillnets of four different mesh sizes. Our results showed that the lagoon is most of the time euhaline (salinity 30-40ups), although it can be mixopolyhaline (salinity 18-30ups) during short periods. Chlorophyll and nutrients concentrations suggested eutrophication in the lagoon. Mean water temperature changed seasonally from 24.9 degrees C (April, high tide) to 31.4 degrees C (October, low tide). Considering ichthyofauna species, a total of 36 448 individuals of 92 species were collected, 31 of them adding up to 95% of the total of individuals caught. Dominant species were Anchoa spp. (44.6%), Diapterus peruvianus (10.5%), Eucinostomus currani (8.1%), Cetengraulis mysticetus (7.8%), Mugil curema (5.2%) and Opisthonema libertate (4.5%). The lagoon is an important juvenile habitat for 22 of the 31 most abundant species. These included several species of commercial importance such as snappers (Lutjanus argentiventris, L. colorado and L. novemfasciatus), snook (Centropomus nigrescens) and white mullet (Mugil curema). Other four species seem to use the lagoon mainly as adults. This paper is the first contribution on the composition of estuarine ichthyofauna in Jalisco

  16. Biodiversity patterns of macrophyte and macroinvertebrate communities in two lagoons of Western Greece.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyttis, G.; Reizopoulou, S.; Papastergiadou, E.

    2012-04-01

    Aquatic macrophytes and benthic macroinvertebrates were studied seasonally (Spring, Autumn, Summer) between the years 2009 - 2011 in two coastal lagoons (Kotychi and Prokopos) located in Peloponnese, Greece, in order to investigate spatial and temporal biodiversity trends related to hydrological processes (degree of confinement, nitrates, phosphates, chl-a, total suspended materials, light irradiance, pH, salinity, temperature and dissolved oxygen). Kotychi lagoon presents a better communication with the sea, while Prokopos has a high degree of confinement. Both ecosystems seasonally receive freshwater input from streams. The submerged aquatic macrophytes constituted a major component of the ecosystems studied. In total, 22 taxa of aquatic macrophytes (angiosperms and macroalgae), 16 taxa for Kotychi (2 Rhodophyta, 8 Chlorophyta, 5 Magnoliophyta, 1 Streptophyta) and 14 taxa for Prokopos (1 Rhodophyta, 5 Chlorophyta, 5 Magnoliophyta, 3 Streptophyta) were found. Ruppia cirrhosa, and Potamogeton pectinatus were dominant in both lagoons. Kotychi lagoon was also dominated by Zostera noltii and Prokopos by Zannichellia pallustris ssp. pedicellata, while the biomass of aquatic species peaked during the summer periods, in both lagoons. The total number of macroinvertebrates found in the lagoons was 28 taxa for Kotychi and 19 for Prokopos. Chironomidae were dominant in both lagoons, while Kotychi was also dominated by Lekanesphaera monodi and Monocorophium insidiosum, and Prokopos by Ostracoda and Lekanesphaera monodi. Benthic diversity ranged from 1.33 to 2.57 in Kotychi and from 0.67 to 2.48 in Prokopos. Species richness, diversity, and abundance of benthic macroinvertebrates were strongly related to aquatic vegetation and to the degree of communication with the marine environment. Moreover, species richness and abundance of both macrophytes and macroinvertebrates were mainly dependent on depth, temperature, pH and concentration of total suspended materials (TSM). Results

  17. Review of solutions for 3D hydrodynamic modeling applied to aquaculture in South Pacific atoll lagoons.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, S; Ouillon, S; Brinkman, R; Falter, J; Douillet, P; Wolk, F; Smith, R; Garen, P; Martinez, E; Laurent, V; Lo, C; Remoissenet, G; Scourzic, B; Gilbert, A; Deleersnijder, E; Steinberg, C; Choukroun, S; Buestel, D

    2006-10-01

    A workshop organized in French Polynesia in November 2004 allowed reviewing the current methods to model the three-dimensional hydrodynamic circulation in semi-enclosed atoll lagoons for aquaculture applications. Mollusk (e.g. pearl oyster, clam) aquaculture is a major source of income for South Pacific countries such as French Polynesia or Cook Islands. This aquaculture now requires a better understanding of circulation patterns to improve the spatial use of the lagoons, especially to define the best area to set larvae collectors. The pelagic larval duration of the relevant species (<20 days) and the size of the semi-closed lagoons (few hundreds of km2) drive the specifications of the model in terms of the spatial and temporal scale. It is considered that, in contrast with fish, mollusk larvae movements are limited and that their cycle occurs completely in the lagoon, without an oceanic stage. Atolls where aquaculture is productive are generally well-bounded, or semi-closed, without significant large and deep openings to the ocean. Nevertheless part of the lagoon circulation is driven by oceanic water inputs through the rim, ocean swells, tides and winds. Therefore, boundary conditions of the lagoon system are defined by the spatial structure of a very shallow rim (exposition and number of hoas), the deep ocean swell climate, tides and wind regimes. To obtain a realistic 3D numerical model of lagoon circulation with adequate forcing, it is thus necessary to connect in an interdisciplinary way a variety of methods (models, remote sensing and in situ data collection) to accurately represent the different components of the lagoon system and its specific boundary conditions. We review here the current methods and tools used to address these different components for a hypothetical atoll of the Tuamotu Archipelago (French Polynesia), representative of the semi-closed lagoons of the South Pacific Ocean. We hope this paper will serve as a guide for similar studies

  18. Geomorphological evolution and environmental reclamation of Fusaro Lagoon (Campania Province, southern Italy).

    PubMed

    De Pippo, Tommaso; Donadio, Carlo; Grottola, Doriana; Pennetta, Micla

    2004-04-01

    Analysis of morphological, geological and environmental characteristics of the Fusaro Lagoon has shown the present degraded condition of the lagoon and the perilagoon area. The lagoon developed during the mid-Holocene within a wide marine bay confined between the coastal volcanic structures of Mt. Cuma to the north and Torregaveta to the south in the western part of the Phlegrean Fields. Subsequently, the bay was gradually filled with pyroclastic materials from phlegrean eruptive vents and sediments carried by the rivers Volturno and Clanis, thus, creating an open lagoon. It then evolved into a partially closed lagoon due to the formation of a continuous littoral spit during the late Holocene, probably wider than the present-day one and surrounded by marshlands. Finally, the total closure of the lagoon took place in the Graeco-Roman period, following the stabilization of the dune ridge, and it assumed a shape similar to present-day one only towards the end of the 18th century. Between the Roman period and 1941, three lagoon channels were opened in order to avoid the frequent environmental crises which continue to affect, although for different reasons, this salt-water basin. The basin has been exploited for more than 2000 years not only for mollusc culture and pisciculture, but also for the maceration of hemp and flax. In the 1980s, in order to reduce the effects of the environmental crises, dredging of the lagoon bottom has been carried out, altering the hydrogeological equilibrium and that of the ecosystem. Over the past 30 years, the supply of raw sewage of domestic, agricultural and industrial origin has ensured the presence of a high concentration of pollutants, including heavy metals. On the basis of the data obtained and in order to restore this sensitive transitional environment, eco-compatible interventions are proposed which aim at morphological and hydrologic resettlement, abatement of pollutants on the bottom of the basin, reintroduction of endemic

  19. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    SciTech Connect

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-06-25

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  20. MicroBooNE Detector Move

    ScienceCinema

    Flemming, Bonnie; Rameika, Gina

    2014-07-15

    On Monday, June 23, 2014 the MicroBooNE detector -- a 30-ton vessel that will be used to study ghostly particles called neutrinos -- was transported three miles across the Fermilab site and gently lowered into the laboratory's Liquid-Argon Test Facility. This video documents that move, some taken with time-lapse camerad, and shows the process of getting the MicroBooNE detector to its new home.

  1. Management strategies to optimise sustainable clam ( Tapes philippinarum) harvests in Barbamarco Lagoon, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spillman, C. M.; Hamilton, D. P.; Imberger, J.

    2009-01-01

    Barbamarco Lagoon is a small lagoon adjoining the Northern Adriatic Sea and is the site of a commercially valuable clam ( Tapes philippinarum) fishery. A three-dimensional (3D) coupled hydrodynamic-ecological model was applied to the lagoon with the objective of assessing impacts on clam food supply, commercial harvests and water quality of different clam rearing strategies, lagoon morphologies and flow regimes. Harvest and net growth to seeding ratios, total harvest value, clearance efficiencies and clam satiety were used to quantify the commercial success of different management strategies, while bottom dissolved oxygen concentrations were used as an indicator of ecosystem health. Increasing exchange with the Northern Adriatic Sea or increasing freshwater inputs into the lagoon improved clam food supply and increased both harvest production and ecosystem health in model simulations of the system. Results indicated that the high spatial and temporal variability of clam production and water quality responses must be considered for a holistic assessment of the outcomes of strategies in the context of ecological and production carrying capacity.

  2. Comprehensive assessment of hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity in an anaerobic swine waste lagoon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yost, Erin E.; Meyer, Michael T.; Dietze, Julie E.; Meissner, Benjamin M.; Williams, Mike; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally towards total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer.

  3. Measurement and modeling of hydrogen sulfide lagoon emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, Ian C; Aneja, Viney P

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) emissions were determined from an anaerobic lagoon at a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) in North Carolina. Measurements of H2S were made continuously from an anaerobic lagoon using a dynamic flow-through chamber for ∼ 1 week during each of the four seasonal periods from June 2007 through April 2008. H2S lagoon fluxes were highest in the summer with a flux of 3.81 ± 3.24 μg m(-2) min(-1) and lowest in the winter with a flux of 0.08 ± 0.09 μg m(-2) min(-1). An air-manure interface (A-MI) mass transfer model was developed to predict H2S manure emissions. The accuracy of the A-MI mass transfer model in predicting H2S manure emissions was comprehensively evaluated by comparing the model predicted emissions to the continuously measured lagoon emissions using data from all four seasonal periods. In comparison to this measurement data, the A-MI mass transfer model performed well in predicting H2S fluxes with a slope of 1.13 and an r(2) value of 0.60, and a mean bias value of 0.655 μg m(-2) min(-1). The A-MI mass transfer model also performed fairly well in predicting diurnal H2S lagoon flux trends. PMID:24387076

  4. A numerical study of circulation in a coastal reef-lagoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Ryan J.; Falter, James L.; Monismith, Stephen G.; Atkinson, Marlin J.

    2009-06-01

    A coupled wave-circulation numerical model was used to simulate the distribution of wave energy, as well as the circulation induced by wave breaking, wind, and tidal forcing, within a coral reef system in Kaneohe Bay, Oahu, Hawaii. Modeled wave, current, and wave setup fields were compared with field measurements collected on the forereef, reef flat, and reef channels and in the lagoon over a 4-week period. The predicted wave height transformation across the reef-lagoon system was in good agreement with field observations, using single-parameter (spatially uniform) values to describe both wave-breaking and frictional dissipation. The spatial distribution of the resulting wave setup field drove a persistent wave-driven flow across the reef flat that returned to the ocean through two deeper channels in the reef. Both the magnitude and direction of these currents were well described using a spatially uniform hydraulic roughness length scale. Notably, the model lends support to field observations that setup within the coastally bounded lagoon was a substantial fraction of the maximum setup on the reef (˜60-80%), which generated relatively weak cross-reef wave-driven flows (˜10-20 cm s-1) compared with reefs having mostly unbounded lagoons (e.g., many atolls and barrier reefs). Numerical experiments conducted using Lagrangian particle tracking revealed that residence times within Kaneohe Bay are extremely heterogeneous, typically ranging from <1 day on the reef to >1 month within its sheltered southern lagoon.

  5. Analysis of Lagoonal Ecosystems in the Po River Delta Associated with Intensive Aquaculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, Yu. I.; Sorokin, P. Yu.; Ravagnan, G.

    1999-03-01

    Observations on structure and functioning of coastal lagoon ecosystems experiencing a high level of eutrophication impact were accomplished in three lagoons of Ca'Pisani integrated within an experimental aquaculture enterprise variously fertilized by waste effluents discharged from and intensive fish culture plant. During August and early September an extremely dense bloom of dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarensewas recorded in these lagoons with the density of phytoplankton up to 190 g m -3of wet biomass, and primary production 2 to 6 mg Cl -1 day -1. The diel dissolved oxygen fluctuations in water column during the bloom reached 15-20 mg O 2 l -1. The wet biomass of bacterioplankton in the lagoons attained 5-9 g m -3. The microzooplankton was dominated by ciliates with biomass 1 to 19 g m -3. The daytime mesozooplankton was dominated by calanoid copepods with a biomass 0·05-0·25 g m -3, while the biomass of the demersal zooplankton at night attained 2 to 14 g m -3. In the lagoon of Ocaro, the phototrophic plankton was dominated by the symbiotic ciliate Mesodinium.The labile sulphides content in the upper layer of the bottom attained over 1 g S dm -3of wet silt. The rate of microbial sulphate reduction was 5-10 mg S dm -3day -1. The data are generalized within the energy balance in these specific anthropogenically transformed pelagic communities.

  6. Comprehensive Assessment of Hormones, Phytoestrogens, and Estrogenic Activity in an Anaerobic Swine Waste Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the distribution of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity was thoroughly characterized within the anaerobic waste lagoon of a typical commercial swine sow operation. Three independent rounds of sampling were conducted in June 2009, April 2010, and February 2011. Thirty-seven analytes in lagoon slurry and sludge were assessed using LC/MS-MS, and yeast estrogen screen was used to determine estrogenic activity. Of the hormone analytes, steroidal estrogens were more abundant than androgens or progesterone, with estrone being the predominant estrogen species. Conjugated hormones were detected only at low levels. The isoflavone metabolite equol was by far the predominant phytoestrogen species, with daidzein, genistein, formononetin, and coumestrol present at lower levels. Phytoestrogens were often more abundant than steroidal estrogens, but contributed minimally toward total estrogenic activity. Analytes were significantly elevated in the solid phases of the lagoon; although low observed log KOC values suggest enhanced solubility in the aqueous phase, perhaps due to dissolved or colloidal organic carbon. The association with the solid phase, as well as recalcitrance of analytes to anaerobic degradation, results in a markedly elevated load of analytes and estrogenic activity within lagoon sludge. Overall, findings emphasize the importance of adsorption and transformation processes in governing the fate of these compounds in lagoon waste, which is ultimately used for broadcast application as a fertilizer. PMID:24144340

  7. Benthic flux measurements of Hg species in a northern Adriatic lagoon environment (Marano and Grado Lagoon, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emili, Andrea; Acquavita, Alessandro; Koron, Neža; Covelli, Stefano; Faganeli, Jadran; Horvat, Milena; Žižek, Suzana; Fajon, Vesna

    2012-11-01

    As part of the "MIRACLE" project, the biogeochemical cycling of mercury (Hg) at the sediment-water interface was studied in the field in the Marano and Grado Lagoon (Northern Adriatic Sea). Seasonal investigations were conducted at selected experimental sites, where Manila Clams (Tapes philippinarum) were previously seeded. Measurements were performed seasonally during three campaigns, using two benthic chambers, one transparent and one dark, to evaluate the effect of light on Hg cycling. Total dissolved Hg (THg), methylmercury (MeHg), and dissolved gaseous Hg (DGM) species were considered. Diurnal benthic fluxes were found to significantly exceed the diffusive fluxes at all stations. The assessment of the annual recycling of Hg species from sediments to the water column showed that up to 99% of MeHg is recycled annually to the water column, while Hg recycling ranges from 30 to 60%. MeHg poses the higher risk for potential bioaccumulation in clams, but it is partially mitigated by Hg reduction, which seems to be an important process leading to evasion losses of Hg from these environments. Estimated benthic fluxes suggest that Hg recycling at the sediment-water interface is more active in the Grado sector. Hence, based on the estimated release of MeHg from sediments, it is suggested that the western sector seems to be more suitable for clam farming and the extension of rearing activities.

  8. Using an Integrated Approach to Assess the Sediment Quality of an Mediterranean Lagoon, the Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia).

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Badreddine; Elbarhoumi, Anis; Clérandeau, Christelle; Al-Rawabdeh, Abdulla M; Atyaoui, Atef; Touil, Soufiane; Driss, Mohamed Ridha; Cachot, Jérôme

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigates the quality of surface sediments from the Bizerte lagoon (North Tunisia) using an integrated approach including chemical contaminant analysis, bioassays and sediment quality guidelines (SQGs). Sediment samples were collected at 9 sites and analyzed for eight heavy metals (Hg, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Fe and Mn). PAHs, PCBs, OCPs were measured previously in the same sediment samples. Our results indicated that the highest concentrations of metals were found near urban areas due to the municipial and industrial wastewater discharges. Sediment pollution assessment was carried out using geoaccumulation index and enrichment factor, which indicate a widespread pollution by Cd, Pb, Ni and Zn in the studied sediments. For bioassays, aqueous and organic extracts were used to assess toxicity and genotoxicity in sediments by using Microtox(®) and SOS Chromotest, respectively. Toxicity levels were compared to metallic and organic pollutants contents. Our results highlight differences in the pattern of responses between the different assays and show no correlation with all the studied contaminants, emphasizing the influence of other contaminants not analyzed in the present study. Based on SQGs, the results of toxicity assessment indicated that adverse effects caused by Ni and Zn would be expected frequently. Nickel was found to have the highest predicted acute toxicity, followed by Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and Cr. There was no significant relationship between sediment toxicity calculated from heavy metal concentrations (SQG approach) and those measured with bioassays. These findings support the use of integrated approachs for evaluating the environmental risks of sediments. PMID:27146821

  9. International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons. (Bordeaux, France, September 8-14, 1981). Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    Lagoons and their characteristic coastal bay-mouth bars represent 15 percent of the world coastal zone. They are among the most productive ecosystems in the biosphere, this productivity resulting from the interplay of ocean and continent. An International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons (ISCOL) was held to: assess the state of knowledge in the…

  10. Improved process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons under varying wind speeds and gas bubbling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the lagoon water total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model using a...

  11. Fe(III) stimulates 3-methylindole and 4-methylphenol production in swine lagoon enrichments and Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: To determine the effects of anaerobic electron acceptors on 3-methylindole (3-MI) and 4-methylphenol (4-MP) production in swine waste lagoon enrichments and Clostridium scatologenes ATCC 25775. Methods and Results: Swine waste lagoon sediment was incubated anaerobically in tryptone-yeast ext...

  12. Analyses of nutrients and fecal bacteria from common contiguous soils inside and outside swine lagoon effluent spray fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effluent from swine manure treatment lagoons is a valuable byproduct of confined feeding operations. In the Mid-South US, effluent is used as fertilizer for grass hay in spray-irrigated fields. Recent work documented levels of nutrients and fecal bacteria, including human pathogens, in lagoons in ...

  13. Genetic structure and dynamics of a small introduced population: the pikeperch, Sander lucioperca, in the Rhône delta.

    PubMed

    Poulet, Nicolas; Balaresque, Patricia; Aho, Teija; Björklund, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Genetic data on introduced populations may help us to understand how these species succeed in colonising new territories. The pikeperch is a predatory fish widely introduced in Europe and has at times been considered as an invasive species. However, little is known about the genetics of both native and introduced populations. In the present study, we surveyed an introduced pikeperch population from the Rhône River delta, a habitat that has been highly modified for agricultural purposes. Using six microsatellites, we genotyped 93 individuals distributed among four hydraulically connected water bodies: the Rhône River, an irrigation canal, a drainage canal and a brackish lagoon. Population isolation were revealed by significant genetic distances and bottleneck highlighted by population monitoring. However, values of allelic richness and unbiased expected heterozygosity observed in these populations were similar, or even higher, compare to 18 native populations from the Baltic Sea drainage. It may be explained by multiple introductions in the Rhône drainage but also by demographic strategy that would have facilitated population persistence in this fragmented habitat. Similarly, heterozygote deficits (revealed by F(IS) values) have been detected, but were also found in native populations suggesting that mating among relatives could also result from a mating behavior of the species, maybe reinforce here by the reduced carrying capacity of the artificial canals and their respective isolation. Despite harsh environmental conditions and suspected inbreeding, the pikeperch has successfully maintained viable populations in the Rhône delta. Our study suggests that one of the factors in this invasive success, apart from its ecology, could be the maintenance of a good level of genetic diversity in introduced pikeperch populations. This genetic diversity probably stem from both its popularity as game fish and food resource which led to numerous stocking and an increasing

  14. Hydrogeochemistry Of A Modern Dolomite-Forming Lagoon System, Cabo Frio-RJ, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, N. F.; Walter, L. M.

    2004-12-01

    Two hypersaline, dolomite-forming lagoons near Cabo Frio, Brazil, and associated ground- and surface waters were sampled in a comparative sediment and fluid geochemical (solutes, stable isotopes) investigation. Although microbial mediation via sulfate reducers has been invoked to explain dolomite formation in these lagoons, we showed that dolomites are associated with sulfide oxidation (Moreira et al., 2004). Sulfide oxidation is thought to promote dolomite formation by causing undersaturation for competing carbonate phases such as Mg-calcite. Herein, we consider the larger hydrogeologic and temporal setting to further elucidate hydrogeochemical and geochemical constraints on rates and mechanisms of dolomite formation in the two lagoons. The lagoons, Brejo do Espinho (BE) and Lagoa Vermelha (LV), are shallow marginal marine systems flanked by quartz sand dunes separating them from Atlantic open seawater to the south and from Araruama lagoon, a large, hypersaline water body, to the north. In both lagoons, about 1 m of high Mg-calcite and dolomite mud has accumulated over the last 5,000 years on an underlying aquifer composed of highly permeable, quartz-rich coquinas. BE has a proximal relation to recharge from Araruama lagoon, while LV is more closely associated with meteoric recharge from lacustrine and riverine systems. BE is shallower, at 0.5 m water depth, than LV (2 m), permitting BE waters to remain oxic. Oxygen isotope values and chloride mass balances of pore waters and of fluids sampled from shallow ground water wells identify the different water and solute sources the lagoons. BE overlying brines and pore waters appear to be produced by evapoconcentration of Araruama source brines and meteoric precipitation. In contrast, LV derives from evapoconcentrated seawater mixed with regional lake and ground water sources. We envision a scenario in which dense, Mg-SO4-rich brines from Araruama migrate along a permeable flowpath in limited contact with the atmosphere

  15. [Distribution of hydrocarbon residues in the sediment from Bizerte lagoon (Northern Tunisia)].

    PubMed

    Soussi, N

    1983-01-01

    The study of hydrocarbon residue by infrared spectrophotometry in the deposits of the Bizerta Lagoon allows us to recognize a polluted zone sector of the Menzel Bourguiba Arsenal. The Eastern part of the lagoon, a zone of "oyster parks" is not affected by pollution. Its average contents of hydrocarbon residues are clearly below the maximum content determined by international regulations. The distribution of hydrocarbon residues in the superficial sediments following three well differentiated zones, reflects the weak hydrodynamism in the lagoon. The vertical variations of this pollution agent contents show the preferential accumulation of the terrigenous material, from lake Ichkeul , in the western part and the weak rate of sedimentation in the eastern zone. PMID:6677195

  16. Surface water-groundwater exchange in transitional coastal environments by airborne electromagnetics: The Venice Lagoon example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viezzoli, A.; Tosi, L.; Teatini, P.; Silvestri, S.

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the mixing between salt/fresh surficial water and groundwater in transitional environments is an issue of paramount importance considering the ecological, cultural, and socio-economic relevance of coastal zones. Acquiring information, which can improve the process understanding, is often logistically challenging, and generally expensive and slow in these areas. Here we investigate the capability of airborne electromagnetics (AEM) at the margin of the Venice Lagoon, Italy. The quasi-3D interpretation of the AEM outcome by the spatially constrained inversion (SCI) methodology allows us to accurately distinguish several hydrogeological features down to a depth of about 200 m. For example, the extent of the saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers and the transition between the upper salt saturated and the underlying fresher sediments below the lagoon bottom are detected. The research highlights the AEM capability to improve the hydrogeological characterization of subsurface processes in worldwide lagoons, wetlands, deltas.

  17. Metagenomic analysis of microbiota structure evolution in phytoremediation of a swine lagoon wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianfeng; Song, Zhaofeng; Wang, Liang; Zhu, Jun

    2016-11-01

    Pytoremediation was studied in this project to treat swine manure lagoon wastewater characteristic of high concentrations of organic carbon, ammonium (N) and phosphorus (P). The impacts of introducing exogenous microalgae Chlorella into the lagoon wastewater on the removal of major nutrients and the transformation of the native wastewater microbiota structure were explored under two phytoremediation modes (shake flask and CO2-air bubbling). The results showed that the inoculation of microalgae could significantly enhance N and P removal. Metagenomic analysis of the native microbiota composition in the wastewater affected by algae inoculation revealed that a substantial population of algicidal bacteria was developed in the shake flask system, while in the CO2-air bubbling system, a niche for more mutualistic bacteria was created, which benefited the maximal algal growth with the simultaneous optimal N and P removal. To our knowledge, this study presents, the first reported case of applying metagenomic approach to a phytoremediation system treating real swine lagoon wastewater. PMID:27518033

  18. Seasonal and temporal dynamics of macrophytic assemblages and abiotic parameters of coastal lagoons in Western Greece (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christia, Chrysoula; Papastergiadou, Eva

    2014-05-01

    Coastal lagoons are considered naturally stressed systems that experience frequent environmental disturbances and fluctuations and they are usually considered as physically controlled ecosystems. Coastal lagoons of Western Greece are representative of four different lagoon types covering a wide range of physiographical and hydrological characteristics. The seasonal differences in the physico-chemical parameters monitored from 2005 to 2007 were reduced in lagoon types (II and III) which characterized by better seawater communication when compared with the chocked lagoon types (Type I and IV). The latter types showed lower salinity values and high nutrient concentrations especially during the wet period. The macrophytic assemblages of coastal lagoons are typically dominated by few genera with great environmental plasticity and salinity competition, among other structuring abiotic variables. The implementation of DCA analysis revealed five distinct macrophytic assemblages in which dominant species were the angiosperms Zostera noltii, Ruppia cirrhosa, Cymodocea nodosa, Potamogeton pectinatus, the charophytes Lamprothamnium papulosum and Chara hispida f. corfuensis, as well as species preferring more marine conditions such as Acanthophora nayadiformis and Cystoseira barbata. The lagoon type IV differs from all other distinguished lagoon types due to the dominance of the species Potamogeton pectinatus and the charophyte Chara hispida f. corfuensis. Regarding the macrophytic assemblages and the univariate variables, important differences were recorded between lagoon types. Chocked lagoons showed low number of species and Shannon diversity index comparing with restricted lagoon types (Types II and III). The multiple linear regression analysis showed that transparency, pH, nitrates, alkalinity and Chl-a could affect the values of the above variables. A decline of angiosperms was referred on a worldwide scale and recorded also in coastal lagoons of Western Greece. A gradual

  19. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  20. Animal waste containment in anaerobic lagoons lined with compacted clays

    SciTech Connect

    Reddi, L.N.; Davalos, H.

    2000-03-01

    The practice of animal waste containment has recently drawn much interest from public and regulatory agencies in agriculture-oriented states such as Kansas and North Carolina. In this paper, the debate surrounding the practice is outlined, and results from a research investigation pertinent to the state of Kansas are presented. The research investigation involved two phases. In the first phase, compacted specimens of Kansas soils were tested with animal waste as the influent. The key objective of this phase of research was to assess the range of seepage quantities and the transport characteristics of nitrogen in the ammonium form (NH{sub 4}-N) through the compacted soils. Results from this phase indicated a steady increase of microbial counts in the liquid effluent. However, biological clogging did not appear to be prominent during the NH{sub 4}-N breakthrough time period. The results indicate significant differences in microbial uptake of NH{sub 4}-N among samples of the same soil type. In the second phase, analytical and numerical solutions were used to simulate ammonium transport in the field-scale liners and to estimated upper-bound travel times and final concentrations of NH{sub 4}-N in the underlying soils. Results form this phase showed drastic differences in travel times and end concentrations of NH{sub 4}-N among liners prepared from the same soil type. The potential for significant retardation, decay, and saturation levels of NH{sub 4}-N in clay liners suggests that liner thickness is an important parameter. It is concluded that mass transfer characteristics of liner material, cation exchange capacity and microbial uptake in particular, should be important considerations in the design of animal waste lagoon liners.

  1. Controls of Sediment Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Lagoons.

    PubMed

    Enrich-Prast, Alex; Figueiredo, Viviane; Esteves, Francisco de Assis; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sediment denitrification rates seem to be lower in tropical environments than in temperate environments. Using the isotope pairing technique, we measured actual denitrification rates in the sediment of tropical coastal lagoons. To explain the low denitrification rates observed at all study sites (<5 μmol N2 m-2 h-1), we also evaluated potential oxygen (O2) consumption, potential nitrification, potential denitrification, potential anammox, and estimated dissimilatory nitrate (NO3-) reduction to ammonium (NH4+; DNRA) in the sediment. 15NO3- and 15NH4+ conversion was measured in oxic and anoxic slurries from the sediment surface. Sediment potential O2 consumption was used as a proxy for overall mineralization activity. Actual denitrification rates and different potential nitrogen (N) oxidation and reduction processes were significantly correlated with potential O2 consumption. The contribution of potential nitrification to total O2 consumption decreased from contributing 9% at sites with the lowest sediment mineralization rates to less than 0.1% at sites with the highest rates. NO3- reduction switched completely from potential denitrification to estimated DNRA. Ammonium oxidation and nitrite (NO2-) reduction by potential anammox contributed up to 3% in sediments with the lowest sediment mineralization rates. The majority of these patterns could be explained by variations in the microbial environments from stable and largely oxic conditions at low sediment mineralization sites to more variable conditions and the prevalences of anaerobic microorganisms at high sediment mineralization sites. Furthermore, the presence of algal and microbial mats on the sediment had a significant effect on all studied processes. We propose a theoretical model based on low and high sediment mineralization rates to explain the growth, activity, and distribution of microorganisms carrying out denitrification and DNRA in sediments that can explain the dominance or coexistence of DNRA and

  2. Marine diatoms sustain growth of bivalves in a Mediterranean lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernet, Fabrice; Malet, Nathalie; Pastoureaud, Annie; Vaquer, André; Quéré, Claudie; Dubroca, Laurent

    2012-02-01

    Carbon stable isotopes and fatty acids were measured in the suspended particulate organic matter (POM) of the Thau lagoon to study its qualitative temporal changes in relation to environmental factors and to identify the food sources of bivalves over a one-yr-cycle in relation to their growth. Reciprocally, the impact of shellfish farming on POM was also studied. Oysters and mussels were sampled and measured for biometry, stable isotopes and fatty acid composition. Water samples were collected at two sites, both inside and outside of the shellfish farming area, to determine concentrations in POM, chlorophyll a (Chl a) and stable isotopes. Carbon isotopes and fatty acids in bivalves reflected seasonal changes in food sources, which varied consistently with the environment. Seasonal changes in δ13C and fatty acids in the bivalves suggested that dietary phytoplankton contribution varied according to season. Terrestrial organic matter and bacteria can contribute to the diet of bivalves during non-bloom periods. Mussels seemed to rely more on diatoms and less on terrestrial organic matter and bacteria than oysters did, particularly when phytoplankton biomass was low during the summer. Although one- and two-yr-old oysters showed similar δ13C, their fatty acid dynamics differed slightly. Periods of high growth rate in bivalves were mainly fuelled by diatoms, thus highlighting the importance of seasonal blooms of microphytoplankton during the critical period of bivalve growth and gamete production. Although there was no significant effect of shellfish farms on Chl a and POM δ13C, consistent differences indicate that stable isotopes could be used successfully to investigate the effects of bivalve aquaculture.

  3. Migration Rate Of Tidal Meanders: Inferences From The Venice Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finotello, A.; D'Alpaos, A.; Ghinassi, M.; Lanzoni, S.; Marani, M.; Rinaldo, A.

    2015-12-01

    Meandering channels are ubiquitous features of tidal landscapes. However, despite their fundamental role on the eco-morphodynamic evolution of these landscapes, tidal meanders have received less attention when compared to their fluvial counterparts. Improving current understanding of tidal meander migration, a largely-examined topic in fluvial landscapes, is a key step to highlight analogies and differences between tidal and fluvial cases. The migration of about 400 meander bends, belonging to 40 salt-marsh channels in the Northern Venice Lagoon (Italy), from 1968 to nowadays, has been investigated by means of both a classical method in fluvial frameworks and new procedure. Similarities with fluvial meanders occur, although important difference also emerge. Meanders cutting through the San Felice marsh follow the relationship between cartesian length and channel width, typical of meanders developed within different settings. However, meander migration rates proved to be smaller than those characterizing fluvial meanders. Indeed, the analysis of meander migration suggests a mean migration rate of about 0.10 m/year, consistent with the few data available in the literature. As for the fluvial case, the maximum-potential migration rate (i.e. the envelope curve of the relationship between migration rate and bend radius, both divided by channel width) reaches a maximum for radius-over-width ratio included between 2 and 3, regardless of the considered method. Nevertheless, the new-proposed method allows us to provide a more objective and continuous characterization. By using this new procedure, the channel curvature has finally been Fourier-analyzed, confirming the importance of even harmonics along the curvature spectrum. A correlation between migration rates and dominant harmonics seems to drive the evolution of tidal meanders and might represent a key-feature to distinguish them from their fluvial counterparts.

  4. Amount and type of derelict gear from the declining black pearl oyster aquaculture in Ahe atoll lagoon, French Polynesia.

    PubMed

    Andréfouët, Serge; Thomas, Yoann; Lo, Cedrik

    2014-06-15

    Pearl oyster aquaculture is a major activity in French Polynesia atoll lagoons. After the economic decline that characterized the last decade, concerns recently rose about discarded installations and materials that supported aquaculture practices and by facilities abandoned after they had to close their activities. In May 2013, a first inventory of the type and amount of pearl farms derelict gear (PFDG) was achieved on 47 sites in Ahe lagoon. Surveys were conducted within and outside the boundaries of aquaculture concessions. Twenty types of PFDG littered the lagoon floor and the water column. The most impacted areas were near abandoned grafting houses with up to nine types of PFDG. Forty-five percent of the sites were impacted, including outside concessions. While management authorities are fully aware of the problem, this first assessment is a wake-up call to stimulate the cleaning of lagoons, enhance awareness among farmers, and identify potential ecological consequences on lagoon ecosystems. PMID:24759510

  5. The effect of submarine groundwater discharge on nutrient and salinity regimes in a coastal lagoon off Perth, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, R. E.; Hearn, C. J.

    1985-12-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into a coastal lagoon off Perth, Western Australia, contains nitrate and silicate in concentrations two orders of magnitude higher than those of the receiving waters. This discharge delivers enough nitrate to replace that dissolved in the lagoon water mass about every eight days and enough silicate to replace the lagoon silicate in about 48 days. The delivery rate of nitrate nitrogen by SGD is equal to about 48% of that required for observed growth rates of lagoon macrophytes. Surface salinity is lower close to the shore as a result of SGD. During calm conditions a salinity front was observed in the lagoon, with a nearshore pool of nutrient-enriched water floating above the more saline ocean water.

  6. Sediment characteristics and water quality in the two hyper-saline lagoons along the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasul, Najeeb; Al-Farawati, Radwan; Al-Harbi, Omer; Naser Qutub, Abdul

    2013-04-01

    The two hyper-saline Shoaiba lagoons, Khawr ash Shaibah al Masdudah (northern lagoon) and Khawr ash Shaibah al Maftuhah (southern lagoon) have a unique environmental set-up because no rivers or wadis flow into the lagoons and therefore detrital material to the lagoons is lacking and most of the sediments are indigenous carbonates. The biogenic material is mostly derived from coral debris, coralline algae and molluscs abundant in gravel and sand size fractions. The evaporite deposits from the adjoining sabkhas are transported to the lagoon during tidal cycles. Carbonate is abundant in the form of aragonite and High Mg-calcite indicating carbonate to be recent and formed under shallow water conditions. In general, the sediments are the result of the mechanical breakdown of molluscs and coral reefs by either human activity or by coral boring marine organisms and physical processes such as tidal and wind generated currents. Strong currents dominate only the deeper part at the entrance of the lagoons that causes the winnowing of the finer sediments, and its transportation during flooding and ebbing. Shallow depths averaging 3 m, wind and tidal stirring are the main forces preventing the lagoons from developing stratification resulting in a well-mixed body of water. The shallow depth of the lagoons keep the turbidity levels higher, whereas salinity as high as 52 ‰ and water temperature as high as 38 °C helps in the formation of halite at the periphery. The cyclical inundation of sabkhas by a thin sheet of water during tidal cycles is important in understanding the ecological consequence. Mangrove stands in the lagoons act as a source of nutrients to the flora and fauna inhabiting the lagoons. The configurations of the mouth of the lagoons influence the tidal currents, including the sediment and water movement. The tidal current is enhanced as it enters the lagoons, in response to the funneling effect caused by the narrow channel. The current diffuses as the entrance

  7. Design of a covered lagoon methane recovery system for a flush dairy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.W.; Moser, M.; Smith, J.

    1996-12-31

    A lagoon-type methane recovery system was designed for the Cal Poly Dairy, which milks 130 cows with a total population of 296 animals. Most of the herd is housed in freestall barns where the manure is deposited on concrete and flushed with fresh or recycled water to an existing lagoon with a volume of 19,300 cubic meters. The design includes a new, primary covered lagoon of 17,000 cubic meters volume. The floating cover will be made of very low density polyethylene (VLDPE), with an area of 4,500 square meters. The predicted output of the lagoon is an average of over 310 cubic meters of biogas per day containing 60 percent methane. The methane production from the covered lagoon is adequate to produce 18 to 24 kW on a continuous basis from the present cow population. In order to account for future herd size increases, a 40 kW engine generator was specified to operate in parallel with the utility system at a varying level of output controlled by the biogas supply. The non-economic benefits of this covered lagoon include the demonstration of its operation to the students and visitors at Cal Poly which in turn will serve the California Dairy Community. Odor control is the most important non-economic benefit. Conversion of volatile solids to biogas and recovery and use of the biogas limits odor to surrounding areas. The economic benefits of the methane recovery system include the approximately 160,000 kWh of electricity produced annually, worth almost $13,000. Financial analyses for the project showed a payback of 13.7 years with a 4% internal rate of return.

  8. Tidal dynamics of the Terminos Lagoon, Mexico: observations and 3D numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras Ruiz Esparza, Adolfo; Douillet, Pascal; Zavala-Hidalgo, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    The tidal circulation patterns in the Terminos Lagoon were studied based on the analysis of 1 year of measurements and numerical simulations using a baroclinic 3D hydrodynamic model, the MARS3D. A gauging network was installed consisting of six self-recording pressure-temperature sensors, a tide gauge station and two current profilers, with pressure and temperature sensors moored in the main lagoon inlets. Model simulations were validated against current and sea level observations and were used to analyse the circulation patterns caused by the tidal forcing. The numerical model was forced with eight harmonic components, four diurnal ( K 1, O 1, P 1, Q 1) and four semi-diurnal ( M 2, S 2, N 2, K 2), extracted from the TPX0.7 database. The tidal patterns in the study area vary from mixed, mainly diurnal in the two main inlets of the lagoon, to diurnal in its interior. The tidal residual circulation inside the lagoon is dominated by a cyclonic gyre. The results indicate a net flux from the southwest Ciudad del Carmen inlet (CdC) towards the northeast Puerto Real inlet (PtR) along the southern side of the lagoon and the opposite in the northern side. The results indicate two areas of strong currents in the vicinity of the inlets and weak currents inside the lagoon. The area of strong currents in the vicinity of the CdC inlet is larger than that observed in the PtR inlet. Nevertheless, the current analysis indicates that the highest current speeds, which can reach a magnitude of 1.9 m s-1, occurred in PtR. A further analysis of the tide distortion in the inlets revealed that both passages are ebb dominated.

  9. Tidal dynamics in a changing lagoon: Flooding or not flooding the marginal regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Carina L.; Dias, João M.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are low-lying systems under permanent changes motivated by natural and anthropogenic factors. Ria de Aveiro is such an example with its margins currently threatened by the advance of the lagoonal waters recorded during the last decades. This work aims to study the tidal modifications found between 1987 and 2012 in this lagoon, motivated by the main channels deepening which induce higher inland tidal levels. Additionally it aims to study the impact that protective walls designed to protect the margins against flooding may have in those modifications under sea level rise predictions. The hydrodynamic model ELCIRC previously calibrated for Ria de Aveiro was used and tidal asymmetry, tidal ellipses and residual currents were analyzed for different scenarios, considering the mean sea level rise predicted for 2100 and the implementation of probable flood protection walls. Results evidenced that lagoon dominance remained unchanged between 1987 and 2012, but distortion decreased/increased in the deeper/shallower channels. The same trend was found under mean sea level rise conditions. Tidal currents increased over this period inducing an amplification of the water properties exchange within the lagoon, which will be stronger under mean sea level rise conditions. The deviations between scenarios with or without flood protection walls can achieve 60% for the tidal distortion and residual currents and 20% for the tidal currents, highlighting that tidal properties are extremely sensitive to the lagoon geometry. In summary, the development of numerical modelling applications dedicated to study the influence of mean sea level rise on coastal low-lying systems subjected to human influence should include structural measures designed for flood defence in order to accurately predict changes in the local tidal properties.

  10. [Temporal and spatial distribution of shorebirds (Charadriiformes) at San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja California Sur, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Luis Francisco; Carmona, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Baja California Peninsula has several wetlands that represent important ecosystems for shorebirds. San Ignacio Lagoon is one of these sites, and supports 10% of the total abundance of shorebirds reported in this Peninsula. Since there is few information about this group in this area, we studied spatial and temporal changes in abundance and distribution of shorebirds in San Ignacio Lagoon. For this, we conducted twelve monthly censuses (October 2007-September 2008) on the entire internal perimeter of the lagoon, which we divided into four areas: two at the North and two at the South. We observed a seasonal pattern, with the lowest abundance in May (1 585 birds) and the highest in October (47 410). The most abundant species were Marbled Godwits (Limosa fedoa; 55% of the total records), Western Sandpipers (Calidris mauri; 23%), and Willet (Tringa semipalmata; 10%). All three species were more abundant in autumn; for both, the Marbled Godwit and Willet, we observed their highest numbers in winter and spring, while the Western Sandpiper showed noticeable oscillations, reaching a maximum in early winter (December). In summer, Marbled Godwit and Willet were the only birds present but in lower numbers. Here present the first records of the Pacific Red Knot (Calidris canutus roselaari) in the area. Bird abundance and species richness were influenced seasonally by migration and spatially by sites in the lagoon. The greatest shorebird abundance was in the South area of the lagoon, probably because of better accessibility to food. Our results allowed the inclusion of San Ignacio Lagoon in the Western Hemisphere Shorebirds Reserve Network (WHSRN) as a site of international importance. PMID:23894976

  11. A Trophic Model of a Sandy Barrier Lagoon at Chiku in Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.-J.; Shao, K.-T.; Kuo, S.-R.; Hsieh, H.-L.; Wong, S.-L.; Chen, I.-M.; Lo, W.-T.; Hung, J.-J.

    1999-05-01

    Using the ECOPATH 3.0 software system, a balanced trophic model of a sandy barrier lagoon with intensive fishery activities at Chiku in tropical Taiwan was constructed. The lagoon model comprised 13 compartments. Trophic levels of the compartments varied from 1·0 for primary producers and detritus to 3·6 for piscivorous fish. Hanging-cultured oysters accounted for 39% of the harvestable fishery biomass and were the most important fishery species. The most prominent group in terms of biomass and energy flow in the lagoon was herbivorous zooplankton. Manipulations of the biomass of herbivorous zooplankton would have a marked impact on most compartments. Both total system throughput and fishery yield per unit area were high when compared to other reported marine ecosystems. This appears mainly due to high planktonic primary production, which is probably promoted by enriched river discharges draining mangroves and aquaculture ponds. Consequently, more than half of the total system throughput originates from primary producers in the lagoon. Although half of the primary production was not immediately used by upper trophic levels and flowed into the detrital pool, most of the detritus was directly consumed, passed up the food web and was exported to the fishery. Thus only a small proportion of energy was recycled through detritus pathways. This mechanism produces short pathways with high trophic efficiencies at higher trophic levels. The high fishery yield in the lagoon is due to high primary production and short pathways. This is the first model of a tropical sandy barrier lagoon with intensive fishery activities and thus may serve as a basis for future comparisons and ecosystem management.

  12. Biotic variation in coastal water bodies in Sussex, England: Implications for saline lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Chris B.; Vina-Herbon, Cristina; Metcalfe, Daniel J.

    2005-12-01

    Coastal water bodies are a heterogeneous resource typified by high spatial and temporal variability and threatened by anthropogenic impacts. This includes saline lagoons, which support a specialist biota and are a priority habitat for nature conservation. This paper describes the biotic variation in coastal water bodies in Sussex, England, in order to characterise the distinctiveness of the saline lagoon community and elucidate environmental factors that determine its distribution. Twenty-eight coastal water bodies were surveyed for their aquatic flora and invertebrate fauna and a suite of exploratory environmental variables compiled. Ordination and cluster analyses were used to examine patterns in community composition and relate these to environmental parameters. Biotic variation in the coastal water body resource was high. Salinity was the main environmental parameter explaining the regional distribution of taxa; freshwater and saline assemblages were evident and related to sea water ingress. Freshwater sites were indicated by the plant Myriophyllum spicatum and gastropod mollusc Lymnaea peregra, while more saline communities supported marine and brackish water taxa, notably a range of chlorophytic algae and the bivalve mollusc Cerastoderma glaucum. Site community differences were also related to bank slope and parameters describing habitat heterogeneity. A saline lagoon community was discerned within the matrix of biotic variation consisting of specialist lagoonal species with associated typically euryhaline taxa. For fauna, the latter were the molluscs Abra tenuis and Hydrobia ulvae, and the crustaceans Corophium volutator and Palaemonetes varians, and for flora they were the algae Ulva lactuca, Chaetomorpha mediterranea, Cladophora spp. and Enteromorpha intestinalis. One non-native polychaete species, Ficopomatus enigmaticus, also strongly influenced community structure within the lagoonal resource. The community was not well defined as specialist and

  13. Inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a swine waste lagoon and spray field.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Michael B; Liotta, Janice L; Bowman, Dwight D

    2013-04-01

    Because of outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis in humans, some Cryptosporidium spp. have become a public health concern. Commercial swine operations can be a source of this protozoan parasite. Although the species distribution of Cryptosporidium is likely dominated by Cryptosporidium suis , a fraction may be comprised of other Cryptosporidium species infectious to humans such as Cryptosporidium parvum . To better understand the survival dynamics of Cryptosporidium spp., oocysts associated with swine operations, 2 experiments were performed to determine die-off rates of C. parvum oocysts in a swine waste lagoon (2009 and 2010) and its spray field (2010 and 2011). Sentinel chambers containing a lagoon effluent suspension of C. parvum oocysts were submerged in the lagoon, and triplicate chambers were removed over time; oocysts were extracted and assayed for viability. For comparative purposes, inactivation rates of Ascaris suum eggs contained in sentinel chambers were also determined. For 2 spray field experiments, air-dried and sieved surface soil was placed in sentinel chambers, hydrated, and inoculated with a lagoon effluent suspension of C. parvum oocysts. Sentinel chambers and control oocysts in PBS contained in microcentrifuge tubes were buried 1.5 cm below the soil surface in 3 blocks. Triplicate chambers and controls were removed over time; oocysts were extracted and assayed for viability. Based on the first order decay equation, days to reach 99% die-off (T(99)) were determined. T(99)-values determined for the 2 lagoon experiments were 13.1 and 20.1 wk, respectively. A T(99)-value for C. parvum in the spray field was significantly longer at 38.0 wk than the control oocysts in PBS at 29.0 wk. The waste lagoon and spray field system of manure management at this large-scale farrowing operation appeared to reduce the load of C. parvum oocysts before they can be hydrologically transported off the operation and reduces their likelihood of contaminating surface waters

  14. Evaluation of the utility of water quality based indicators of estuarine lagoon condition in NSW, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanes, Peter; Coade, Geoff; Doherty, Maria; Hill, Ross

    2007-08-01

    Environmental indicators must have a predictable relationship with stressors to be of value in ecological assessments. We evaluated the information provided by commonly implemented monitoring indicators as a means of assessing of the level of ecological impact experienced by coastal lagoons in New South Wales, Australia. Existing data for environmental variables in coastal lagoons were correlated with independent estimates of catchment disturbance. There were few relationships between the monitoring variables (particularly water chemistry) and nutrient loads and catchment land use. Data from NSW catchments and lagoons were compared to analogous data from published northern hemisphere studies and it was clear that stressor variables were up to one to two orders of magnitude smaller in NSW, potentially explaining the lack of relationships with recognised indicators. Our study has highlighted the importance of using a range of indicators to assess trends in ecological condition of an estuarine ecosystem, particularly where stressor levels are not great. Using water quality as the sole means of determining lagoon condition was simply inadequate in NSW lagoons. We recommended that ecological outcome indicators such as algal abundance (macro and micro) and turbidity were most likely to show interpretable patterns at low to moderate nitrogen loadings (<40 kg Ha -1 yr -1) and that these should form the basis of estuarine trend monitoring in NSW lagoons. The demonstrated value of seagrass and macroalgal monitoring in estuaries with moderate to high nutrient loadings suggests that these indicators should not be overlooked when planning monitoring programs, recognising, however, they will not have strong discrimination at lower catchment loadings.

  15. Analysis of lagoon samples from different concentrated animal feeding operations for estrogens and estrogen conjugates.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Stephen R; White, Mark V; Hudson, Felisa M; Fine, Dennis D

    2007-02-01

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which are used for land application. Lagoons associated with swine, poultry, and cattle operations were sampled at three locations each for direct analysis for estrogens by GC/ MS/MS and estrogen conjugates by LC/MS/MS. Estrogen conjugates were also analyzed indirectly by first subjecting the same samples to enzyme hydrolysis. Solids from centrifuged samples were extracted for free estrogens to estimate total estrogen load. Total free estrogen levels (estrone, 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol, estriol) were generally higher in swine primary (1000-21000 ng/L), followed by poultry primary (1800-4000 ng/L), dairy secondary (370-550 ng/L), and beef secondary (22-24 ng/L) whole lagoon samples. Swine and poultry lagoons contained levels of 17(alpha-estradiol comparable to those of 17beta-estradiol. Confirmed estrogen conjugates included estrone-3-sulfate (2-91 ng/L), 17beta-estradiol-3-sulfate (8-44 ng/L), 17alpha-estradiol-3-sulfate (141-182 ng/L), and 17beta-estradiol-17-sulfate (72-84 ng/L) in some lagoons. Enzymatic hydrolysis indicated the presence of additional unidentified estrogen conjugates not detected bythe LC/MS/MS method. In most cases estrogen conjugates accounted for at least a third of the total estrogen equivalents. Collectively, these methods can be used to better determine estrogen loads from CAFO operations, and this research shows that estrogen conjugates contribute significantly to the overall estrogen load, even in different types of CAFO lagoons. PMID:17328177

  16. Temporal stability of otolith elemental fingerprints discriminates among lagoon nursery habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tournois, Jennifer; Ferraton, Franck; Velez, Laure; McKenzie, David J.; Aliaume, Catherine; Mercier, Lény; Darnaude, Audrey M.

    2013-10-01

    The chemical composition of fish otoliths reflects that of the water masses that they inhabit. Otolith elemental compositions can, therefore, be used as natural tags to discriminate among habitats. However, for retrospective habitat identification to be valid and reliable for any adult, irrespective of its age, significant differences in environmental conditions, and therefore otolith signatures, must be temporally stable within each habitat, otherwise connectivity studies have to be carried out by matching year-classes to the corresponding annual fingerprints. This study investigated how various different combinations of chemical elements in otoliths could distinguish, over three separate years, between four coastal lagoon habitats used annually as nurseries by gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata L.) in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean). A series of nine elements were measured in otoliths of 301 S. aurata juveniles collected in the four lagoons in 2008, 2010 and 2011. Percentages of correct re-assignment of juveniles to their lagoon of origin were calculated with the Random Forest classification method, considering every possible combination of elements. This revealed both spatial and temporal variations in accuracy of habitat identification, with correct re-assignment to each lagoon ranging from 44 to 99% depending on the year and the lagoon. There were also annual differences in the combination of elements that provided the best discrimination among the lagoons. Despite this, when the data from the three years were pooled, a combination of eight elements (B, Ba, Cu, Li, Mg, Rb, Sr and Y) provided greater than 70% correct re-assignment to each single lagoon, with a multi-annual global accuracy of 79%. When considering the years separately, discrimination accuracy with these elemental fingerprints was above 90% for 2008 and 2010. It decreased to 61% in 2011, when unusually heavy rainfall occurred, which presumably reduced chemical differences among several of the

  17. Project summary: Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

    1995-06-01

    The City of Indianapolis, Indiana, was required to construct advanced wastewater treatment facilities at the existing Belmont Wastewater Treatment Plant. The most cost effective site for these new treatment facilities was the 10 sludge lagoons containing 420,000 cubic meters (111 million gallons) of digested sewage sludge stored for up to 50 years. The project consisted of the following major tasks: (1) obtaining approval from regulatory agencies; (2) obtaining cooperation of landowners and farmers; (3) removing, transporting, and applying the lagooned sludge to soil; and (4) monitoring the impact on crops.

  18. Biodiversity of Saline and Brakish Marshes of the Indian River Lagoon: Historic and Current Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmalzer, Paul A.

    1995-01-01

    The Indian River Lagoon (IRL) crosses a zone of climatic transition. Historically, marshes dominated saline and brackish environments in the north of the lagoon, while mangroves became important to the south. Distribution of marsh communities was influenced by hydrology, salinity, soil characteristics, and fire, as well as periodic freezes. Marshes of the IRL have been greatly modified since the 1940s. Despite significant modifications, marsh plant species have not been lost from the region, but community and landscape patterns have been greatly modified and ecosystem processes altered.

  19. Eutrophication, water management, and the functioning of dutch estuaries and coastal lagoons

    SciTech Connect

    Nienhuis, P.H. )

    1992-12-01

    A number of European rivers (especially the Rhine) have a prevailing influence on the nutrient cycling of most Dutch estuaries. Owing to the increased loading of the estuaries with nitrogen and phosphorous compounds, effects of eutrophication on the biological communities are most evident in the tidal Western Wadden Sea and in a nontidal brackish lagoon, Veerse Meer. Whether the relation between changed nutrient loadings and changed biomass and production of primary and secondary producers in the turbid tidal Dutch ecosystems should be considered as a causal relation is questionable. The very widespread practice of lagoon modification confuses the effects of nutrient loading. 29 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Cross section analyses in MiniBooNE and SciBooNE experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    The MiniBooNE experiment (2002-2012) and the SciBooNE experiment (2007-2008) are modern high statistics neutrino experiments, and they developed many new ideas in neutrino cross section analyses. In this note, I discuss selected topics of these analyses.

  1. Far-Ultraviolet Emission Cross Sections of Ne 2 and Ne 3 Excited by Electron Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Geoffrey K.; Kanik, Isik; Ajello, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured the electron-impact-induced fluorescence spectrum of neon in the wavelength range 120-270 nm at a spectral resolution of 0.43 nm (FWHM). The strongest lines observed in the far-ultraviolet (FUV) spectrum of neon are assigned to terms of the doublet system of Ne 2 (2s(sup 2) 2p(sup 4)nl and the triplet system of Ne 3 (2s(sup 2)2p(sup 3)3l). Our FUV spectral data, obtained at 300 eV electron-impact energy, provide absolute emission cross sections of these Ne 2 and Ne 3 lines, and are compared to previous measurements where available. In addition, the excitation function of the strongest Ne II line observed at 191.6 nm was measured from threshold to 1000 eV electron-impact energy.

  2. Interatomic Coulombic decay following Ne 1s Auger decay in NeAr

    SciTech Connect

    Ouchi, T.; Sakai, K.; Fukuzawa, H.; Ueda, K.; Higuchi, I.; Tamenori, Y.; Demekhin, Ph. V.; Chiang, Y.-C.; Stoychev, S. D.; Kuleff, A. I.; Mazza, T.; Schoeffler, M.; Nagaya, K.; Yao, M.; Saito, N.

    2011-05-15

    Using momentum-resolved electron-ion multicoincidence spectroscopy, we have investigated interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) in the heteronuclear NeAr dimer following Ne 1s Auger decay. The measured intensity ratio for the three ICD transitions Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 1}P)Ar to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 1}S)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}), Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 1}P)Ar to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 1}D)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}), and Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 3}P)Ar to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 3}P)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}) reasonably agree with predictions. The kinetic energy release distribution for the fragmentation to Ne{sup 2+}(2p{sup -2} {sup 1}D)-Ar{sup +}(3p{sup -1}) after the ICD transition from singlet Ne{sup 2+}(2s{sup -1}2p{sup -1} {sup 1}P)Ar state, which is a mirror image of the kinetic energy distribution of the emitted ICD electrons, suggests that the corresponding ICD rate is roughly two times lower than predicted by ab initio calculations.

  3. The presence of cadmium in the intertidal environments of a moderately impacted coastal lagoon in western Portugal (Óbidos Lagoon)--spatial and seasonal evaluations.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Carmen A; Santos, Márcia S S; Ferreira, Susana M F; Gonçalves, Sílvia C

    2016-01-01

    A seasonal environmental monitoring program was carried out (winter 2009 to summer 2010) to evaluate the spatial and seasonal cadmium concentrations in the intertidal environments of the Óbidos Lagoon (Portugal). Also, some environmental parameters were monitored at each sampling station. Both the water and the sediment samples were contaminated, although to different degrees. In general, cadmium contamination appears to be mostly focused on the inner areas of the lagoon, namely, in Barrosa's arm, which receives a small tributary contaminated by agro-industrial activities. Only cadmium concentration in sediment showed to be significantly influenced by seasons. Some environmental parameters presented spatial and temporal heterogeneity which influenced, to some extent, cadmium bioavailability. The results of this study allow a better understanding of the environmental quality of this ecosystem regarding cadmium contamination and may assist in the definition of future coastal management measures specifically targeted to trace metal contamination and pollution monitoring. PMID:26611628

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of biochemical biomarkers in Gobius niger (Gobiidae) from a southern Mediterranean lagoon (Bizerta lagoon, Tunisia): Influence of biotic and abiotic factors.

    PubMed

    Louiz, Ibtissem; Ben Hassine, Oum Kalthoum; Palluel, Olivier; Ben-Attia, Mossadok; Aït-Aïssa, Sélim

    2016-06-15

    This study aims at evaluating both the influence of natural and some anthropogenic pressures on spatio-temporal variations on biomarker responses in sedentary benthic fish Gobius niger. For this purpose, variability of biotransformation enzymes and oxidative stress parameters response were studied in six stations from Bizerta lagoon as well as a reference station located in Ghar El Melh lagoon. Biomarker responses were shown to vary according to both physico-chemical parameters and anthropogenic pressures, but no influence of sex was reported. Based on multivariate analyses, the responses of biomarkers, obtained after covariate analysis in order to weigh the effect of physico-chemical parameters, allowed us to discriminate all stations, with a good classification rate for those that are highly contaminated. Altogether, this study shows the usefulness of G. niger as a sentinel species and stresses the necessity of integrating natural variables for data interpretation. PMID:27085596

  5. Fingerprints of lagoonal life: Migration of the marine flatfish Solea solea assessed by stable isotopes and otolith microchemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dierking, Jan; Morat, Fabien; Letourneur, Yves; Harmelin-Vivien, Mireille

    2012-06-01

    The commercially important marine flatfish common sole (Solea solea) facultatively uses NW Mediterranean lagoons as nurseries. To assess the imprint left by the lagoonal passage, muscle carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) isotope values of S. solea juveniles caught in Mauguio lagoon in spring (shortly after arrival from the sea) and in autumn (before the return to the sea) were compared with values of juveniles from adjacent coastal marine nurseries. In addition, in the lagoon, sole otolith stable isotope (C and oxygen (O)) and elemental (11 elements) composition in spring and autumn, and the stable isotope composition (C and N) of organic matter sources in autumn, were determined. Overall, our data indicate that a distinct lagoonal signature existed. Specifically, lagoon soles showed a strong enrichment in muscle tissue 15N (>6‰) compared to their coastal relatives, likely linked to sewage inputs (see below), and a depletion in 13C (1-2‰), indicative of higher importance of 13C depleted terrestrial POM in the lagoon compared to coastal nurseries. In addition, over the time spent in the lagoon, sole otolith δ13C and δ18O values and otolith elemental composition changed significantly. Analysis of the lagoon sole foodweb based on C and N isotopes placed sediment particulate organic matter (POM) at the base. Seagrasses, formerly common but in decline in Mauguio lagoon, played a minor role in the detritus cycle. The very strong 15N enrichment of the entire foodweb (+7 to +11‰) compared to little impacted lagoons and coastal areas testified of important human sewage inputs. Regarding the S. solea migration, the analysis of higher turnover and fast growth muscle tissue and metabolically inert and slower growth otoliths indicated that soles arrived at least several weeks prior to capture in spring, and that no migrations took place in summer. In the autumn, the high muscle δ15N value acquired in Mauguio lagoon would be a good marker of recent return to the sea, whereas

  6. Spatial and inter-annual variability of the macrobenthic communities within a coastal lagoon (Óbidos lagoon) and its relationship with environmental parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Susana; Moura, Ana; Gaspar, Miguel B.; Pereira, Paula; Cancela da Fonseca, Luís; Falcão, Manuela; Drago, Teresa; Leitão, Francisco; Regala, João

    2005-05-01

    The present work aims to analyse spatial and inter-annual variability in the benthic environment within the Óbidos lagoon, assessing the relationships between environmental characteristics and macrobenthic distribution patterns. Sediment samples were collected in February 2001 and 2002 for the study of macrofauna and biogeochemical parameters (sediment grain size, organic matter, organic carbon, chlorophyll a, and phaeopigments). Comparing 2001 to 2002, a general increase in the number of species, diversity and equitability indices was observed throughout the study area. Likewise, there was an increase of phytopigments and organic matter contents in the upper sediment layer. Based on the macrobenthic community patterns and environmental variables three main areas could be distinguished in both years: an outer area near the inlet mostly influenced by the sea, with very depressed number of species and abundance, and dominated by Saccocirrus papillocercus, Lekanesphaera levii, Microphthalmus similis and Nephtys cirrosa; an intermediate area located in the central part of the lagoon characterized by sandy sediment and low organic carbon, and colonized by a high diverse community with Hydrobia ulvae, Cerastoderma edule and Abra ovata as the most characteristic species; and the innermost area of the lagoon with muddy enriched sediments dominated by Heteromastus filiformis, oligochaetes, Scrobicularia plana, Cyathura carinata, Corophium acherusicum, phoronids, insect larvae and Corbula gibba. Deposit-feeders were dominant in the muddy sediments from the inner area, where suspension-feeders were also abundant. Carnivores were associated with clean sandy sediments from the inlet area and herbivores were more abundant within the central area.

  7. Dispersion of Outflow from Small Rivers and Coastal Lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Largier, J. L.; Basdurak, N. B.

    2013-05-01

    Along many tropical and subtropical coasts, waters enter the ocean via small streams or lagoons. These outflow plumes are known to be important to coastal productivity, but as pollutant loading increases they are also seen as an increasing source of coastal pollution. Physical processes in these small plumes interact in ways that are different to larger plumes, e.g., flow rate varies on short time scales, and the coriolis term is typically unimportant. After a brief review of dominant terms, attention will be given to observed plume patterns with a focus on the presence of low-salinity and outflow-related constituents nearshore. Data from studies off California and elsewhere will be used to suggest that there are common transport and mixing patterns at this scale. While the ultimate aim is to understand and model physical processes controlling dispersion of land-derived pollutants, at the very least one can recognize a spatial pattern of probability that can be characterized by primary physical parameters. Due to limited data on physical processes at the requisite resolution, numerical modeling is used to better understand processes and phenomena including inertial jets, buoyant plumes, alongshore flow, mixing and surface stresses. Ultimately, one can expect that a reasonable estimate of a probabilistic "zone of impact" can be obtained from knowledge of fundamental physical parameters that control transport and mixing. This link between physical forcing and response needs both a dynamical explanation and statistical support - yielding a general model that can be used for countless small inflows along many coasts. These features may be small but they are very common, and it is argued that their importance for coastal pollution and ecology is disproportionately big. The benefit of recognizing a transport-based zone of impact is that this pattern is the basis of distribution patterns for a variety of constituents, including dissolved and particulate contaminants

  8. Rhodobacter sediminis sp. nov., isolated from lagoon sediments.

    PubMed

    Subhash, Y; Lee, Sang-Seob

    2016-08-01

    Two Gram-stain-negative, rod-shaped phototrophic bacteria (designated strains N1T and C7) were isolated from lagoon sediments. Both strains were positive for catalase and oxidase activity. Casein, starch, urea and Tween 20 were hydrolysed by both strains while chitin, gelatin and Tween 80 were not. In both strains, C16 : 0, C18 : 0,C16 : 1ω6c/C16 : 1ω7c and C18 : 1ω6c/ C18 : 1ω7c were the predominant fatty acids, with minor amounts of C8 : 0 3-OH, anteiso-C14 : 0, C17 : 0, C14 : 1ω5c, C17 : 1 10-methyl and C18 : 1ω5c. Strains N1T and C7 contained phosphatidylglycerol and phosphatidylethanolamine as major polar lipids with minor amounts of phosphatidylcholine, unidentified lipids and an unidentified phospholipid. The mean genomic DNA G+C content was 70.6±1 mol% and the two strains were closely related (mean DNA-DNA hybridization >90 %). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the two strains clustered with species of the genus Rhodobacter belonging to the family Rhodobacteraceae of the class Alphaproteobacteria. Strain N1T has a 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 99.2 % with Rhodobacter capsulatus ATCC 11166T, 99.1 % with Rhodobacter viridis JA737T and <96.6 % with other members of the genus Rhodobacter. Strain N1T and C7 shared 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. DNA- DNA hybridization values between strain N1T and the type strains of the nearest species were clearly below the 70 % threshold. On the basis of phenotypic and genotypic data, it is proposed that strain N1T represents a novel species of the genus Rhodobacter, for which the name Rhodobacter sediminis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is N1T (=KEMB 563-471T=JCM 31175T), and strain C7 is an additional strain of the species. PMID:27150292

  9. Fate and persistence of glutaraldehyde and retention lagoon diversity of life at a natural gas storage facility

    SciTech Connect

    Derr, R.M.; Morris, E.A. III; Pope, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    In view of increasingly stringent environmental regulations concerning Produced water disposal, the natural gas industry needs to approximate the maximum amount of biocide which can be applied downhole and not adversely impact the local biology in retention lagoons receiving produced waters. Biocide treatment data from a microbially sour aquifer-storage natural gas facility, archived by the operations personnel, were incorporated into a study sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), Chicago, Illinois along with additional data from focused field sampling. The sandy assessed the persistence and fate of glutaraldehyde and its possible effects on diversity of life in the produced water system and outfall areas which receive the lagoon discharge under a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit. In this study, a mathematical model was constructed that incorporated experimentally-determined glutaraldehyde persistence, wellhead Outaraldehyde residuals, rates of water production, and lagoon specifications. The model was used to calculate the levels of glutaraldehyde in the lagoons as a function of time, based on the amount of glutaraldehyde applied downhole. The modeled results were used to assess the potential impacts of various levels of downhole treatment using glutaraldehyde and confirmed that the current treatment regime provided little potential for adverse environmental effects in the retention lagoons or the lagoon outfall areas. Chemical and biological sampling and diversity of life analyses were performed in the retention lagoon system and outfall areas to further test for environmental impacts relating to biocide use; no evidence of adverse effects was found.

  10. Ontogenetic patterns of concentration indicate lagoon nurseries are essential to common grunts stocks in a Puerto Rican bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, John Selden; Kenworthy, W. Judson; Wood, Lisa L.

    2009-03-01

    Estimates of abundance and size of three commercially exploited grunt species indicate ontogenetic changes in habitat utilization concentrate their juveniles within the lagoon of the Bay of La Parguera, Puerto Rico. Eleven biotopes, defined by four benthic structures (reef, mangrove, vegetation beds and unconsolidated sediments) and three geographic zones (inner lagoon, outer lagoon and bank shelf) were sampled randomly by visual surveys. French, bluestriped and white grunt ( Haemulon flavolineatum, Haemulon sciurus and Haemulon plumeri) were common in the bay and appeared to exhibit similar life history patterns of cross-shelf migration and habitat selection. Recently settled grunts were dispersed over vegetated and unconsolidated soft-bottom sediments of the bay. The juvenile stage occurred in highest densities in shallow lagoon biotopes among the submerged prop-roots of mangrove stands and on inshore reefs. Length data indicates that grunts migrate offshore to adult habitat via increasingly deep reefs. Indices of biotope nursery function based on standing stock estimates of juveniles identified three biotopes, all within the inner lagoon as essential habitat for juveniles of 5-10 cm length interval. This concentration of juveniles within biotopes of the lagoon could represent a bottleneck to recruitment for grunt stocks. Evidence that quantity and quality of lagoon nurseries may limit recruitment indicates that these areas represent a key component of a marine protected area designed to restore fisheries within the bay.

  11. Effects of regional climate changes on the planktonic ecosystem and water environment in the frozen Notoro Lagoon, northern Japan.

    PubMed

    Katsuki, Kota; Seto, Koji; Noguchi, Takuro; Sonoda, Takeshi; Kim, JuYong

    2012-10-01

    Diatom fossils from core sediments and living diatoms from water samples of Notoro Lagoon in northern Japan were examined to evaluate natural climate effects on lagoon environmental changes. In 1974, the artificial inlet was excavated. Immediately after, the anoxic bottom water in Notoro Lagoon began to disappear due to an increasing water exchange rate. However, chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the bottom water of Notoro Lagoon gradually increased, with fluctuations, during the last 30 years. In addition, the dominant diatom assemblages in Notoro Lagoon shifted to ice-related and spring bloom taxa after the excavation. The dominant taxa of each year in the sediment core were also strongly related to the timing of lagoon ice melting. This is because the COD in Notoro Lagoon was affected by the deposited volume of blooming diatoms, which was controlled by the duration of ice cover and the timing of ice discharge to the Okhotsk Sea likely due to an air pressure pattern change over the northern North Pacific like the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). PMID:22975383

  12. Migratory crustaceans as biomonitors of metal pollution in their nursery areas. The Lesina lagoon (SE Italy) as a case study.

    PubMed

    D'Adamo, R; Di Stasio, M; Fabbrocini, A; Petitto, F; Roselli, L; Volpe, M G

    2008-08-01

    The Lesina lagoon is located on the southern Adriatic coast of Italy; many marine species, such as the shrimp M. kerathurus, use the Lesina lagoon as a nursery, spending their initial growth phase there. In order to assess the usefulness of migratory species as biomonitors of the environmental quality of this nursery area, we evaluated the metal content of the M. kerathurus juveniles at the end of their growth phase in the lagoon (October), when they are assumed to have bioaccumulated the maximum level of metals from the lagoon environment. The concentrations of Cr, Cd, Pb, Zn, Mn and Cu were measured in the muscle and exoskeleton of the shrimp, and in the sediments and waters of three areas of the Lesina Lagoon. Both the water and sediment levels of the investigated metals tended to fall within the ranges recorded for other lagoon environments characterized by similar anthropic impact and texturally similar sediment; the juveniles of the shrimp M. kerathurus proved to be strong bioaccumulators of heavy metals such as Zn and Cu (biota-sediment accumulation factors - BSAFs - 6.01 and 25.0 respectively), which derive from agricultural activities; therefore, at the end of their growing phase in the lagoon they can be considered useful biomonitors of metal contamination of agricultural origin in their nursery area. PMID:17882520

  13. Tidal and wave modulation of submarine freshwater discharge to a fringing reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Levinson, A.; Parra, S.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Enriquez, C.

    2011-12-01

    Time series of hydrography, water velocity and hydrostatic pressure at a site of submarine freshwater discharge to a fringing reef lagoon and at an inlet that communicates the lagoon with the coastal ocean are used to deter mine the effects of tides and waves on modulating the freshwater delivery. Data were collected over a three-day period in July 2010 and a 9-day period in July 2011. The site of submarine freshwater discharge is characterized by an opening on the seafloor where the salinity of water entering the lagoon actually ranges between 27 and 28 at a rate of ~0.5 cubic meters per second. This discharge, which is connected to an aquifer, exhibits a clear tidal modulation with highest salinities at high tide. Interestingly, the lowest salinities occur when the tide begins to go down. By the time of low tide, the turbulent kinetic energy of the brackish discharge is maximum and promotes vigorous mixing with surrounding waters of salinity 36. Thus, salinity increases at low tides but does not reach as high values as at high tides. At high tides, turbulent kinetic energy is completely suppressed at the discharge. At the highest tides of the fortnight, water even reverses direction and intrudes into the aquifer. Moreover, periods of highest waves at the reef are associated with salinity pumping into the lagoon and higher salinity intrusion into the aquifer at high tides.

  14. Water quality and nitrogen mass loss from anaerobic lagoon columns receiving pretreated influent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control methods are needed to abate ammonia losses from swine anaerobic lagoons to reduce contribution of confined swine operations to air pollution. In a 15-month meso-scale column study, we evaluated the effect of manure pretreatment on water quality, reduction of N losses, and sludge accumulation...

  15. Environmental Quality Assessment of Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) Using Living Foraminifera Assemblages and a Multiproxy Approach.

    PubMed

    Alves Martins, Maria Virgínia; Zaaboub, Noureddine; Aleya, Lotfi; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Pereira, Egberto; Miranda, Paulo; Mane, Miguel; Rocha, Fernando; Laut, Lazaro; El Bour, Monia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the environmental quality of the Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) through an integrated approach that combined environmental, biogeochemical, and living benthic foraminiferal analyses. Specifically, we analyzed the physicochemical parameters of the water and sediment. The textural, mineralogical, and geochemical characteristics of the sediment, including total organic carbon, total nitrogen, simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), acid volatile sulfides (AVS), chlorophyll a, CaCO3, and changes in bacterial populations and carbon isotopes were measured. The SEM/AVS values indicated the presence of relatively high concentrations of toxic metals in only some areas. Foraminiferal assemblages were dominated by species such as A. parkinsoniana (20-91%), Bolivina striatula (<40%), Hopkinsina atlantica (<17%), and Bolivina ordinaria (<15%) that cannot be considered typical of impacted coastal lagoons both in Mediterranean and northeast Atlantic regions. The results of this work suggest that Bizerte Lagoon is a unique setting. This lagoon is populated by typical marine species that invaded this ecosystem, attracted not only by the prevailing favorable environmental conditions but also by the abundance and quality of food. The results indicate that the metal pollution found in some areas have a negative impact on the assemblages of foraminifera. At present, however, this negative impact is not highly alarming. PMID:26372655

  16. SEASONAL EMISSIONS OF AMMONIA AND METHANE FROM A HOG WASTE LAGOON WITH BIOACTIVE COVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the use of plane-integrated (PI) open-path Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (OP-FTIR) to measure the flux of ammonia and methane from a hog waste lagoon before and after the installation of a bioactive cover. A computed tomography algorithm using a smoo...

  17. Microbial community analysis of swine wastewater anaerobic lagoons by next-generation DNA sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are a standard practice for the treatment of swine wastewater. This practice relies heavily on microbiological processes to reduce concentrated organic material and nutrients. Despite this reliance on microbiological processes, research has only recently begun to identify and enume...

  18. Groundwater Discharge into Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes and/or Lagoons (ICOLLs) via Radon-222

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadat-Noori, M.; Santos, I. R.; Tait, D. R.; McMahon, A.; Kadel, S.; Maher, D. T.

    2015-12-01

    Intermittently Closed and Open Lakes and Lagoons (ICOLLs) are brackish coastal water bodies with an intermittent connection to the ocean that is closed periodically due to the accumulation of marine sediment forming an entrance berm. ICOLLs have dynamic coastal systems that may be vulnerable to minor changes in catchment hydrology. However, little is known regarding the impacts of groundwater on the hydrological cycles of ICOLLs. The relative contribution of rainfall versus groundwater discharge in two ICOLLs (Welsby, and Mermaid Lagoon) and a nearby wetland (South Welsby Lagoon) located on Bribie Island (Australia) were investigated using radon (222Rn) as natural geochemical groundwater tracer. Four seasonal surveys were undertaken to quantify the temporal and spatial groundwater dynamics of the ICOLLs. Radon contour maps revealed temporal and spatial changes over the study period. The estimated groundwater discharge rates from a radon-mass balance were 3.4±3.1, 7.3±9.8 and 2.6±3.8 cm d-1 in Weslby, South Weslby and Mermaid Lagoons, respectively. These values are at least 8-fold greater than rainfall (1420 mm per year, or 0.4 cm d-1). Assuming very minor surface water flows (not perceived during field surveys), this demonstrates that these systems are groundwater-dominated and their hydrology can be influenced by regional changes in groundwater level.

  19. Decline of phosphorus, copper, and zinc in anaerobic lagoon columns receiving pretreated influent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a 15-month meso-scale column study, we evaluated the effect of manure pretreatment on reduction of total suspended solids (TSS), total phosphorus (TP), soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP), copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) in swine lagoons using (i) enhanced solid–liquid separation with polymer (SS) and (i...

  20. History of dredging and filling of lagoons in the San Juan, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, S.R.

    1976-01-01

    Laguna La Torrecilla, Laguna de Pinones, Laguna San Jose, and Laguna del Condado, in the San Juan, Puerto Rico area, are located within a metropolitan area of more than 1 million people. Bathymetric maps made during the study, in 1973, showed that Lagunas La Torrecilla, San Jose, and del Condado have been modified by dredging and filling; whereas, Laguna de Pinones has remained in a near natural state. Laguna La Torrecilla has been dredged to a depth, in places, of about 18 meters, and Lagunas San Jose and del Condado, in places to about 11 meters. Dredging in the San Juan lagoons has been harmful, beneficial, and in a few instances has had little or no noticeable effect on the water quality. Usually, dredging in the connecting canals has been beneficial if the water entering the lagoons through the canals was of better quality than the water in the lagoon. Dredging in the mouths of lagoons has been beneficial; whereas, filling or blocking the mouths has been harmful. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. The Assessment of Mangrove Sediment Quality in Mengkabong Lagoon: An Index Analysis Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praveena, Sarva M.; Radojevic, Miroslav; Abdullah, Mohd H.

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to use different types of indexes to assess the current pollution status in Mengkabong lagoon and select the best index to describe the Mengkabong sediment quality. The indexes used in this study were Enrichment Factor (EF), Geo-accumulation Index (Igeo), Pollution Load Index (PLI) and Marine Sediment Pollution…

  2. Water hyacinths for upgrading sewage lagoons to meet advanced wastewater treatment standards, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Field tests using water hyacinths as biological filtration agents were conducted in the Mississippi gulf coast region. The plants were installed in one single cell and one multiple cell sewage lagoon systems. Water hyacinths demonstrated the ability to maintain BOD5 and total suspended solid (TSS) levels within the Environmental Protection Agency's prescribed limits of 30 mg/lBOD5 and 30 mg/l TSS. A multiple cell sewage lagoon system consisting of two aerated and one water hyacinth covered cell connected in series demonstrated the ability to maintain BOD5 and TSS levels below 30 mg/l year-round. A water hyacinth covered lagoon with a surface area of 0.28 hectare containing a total volume of 6.8 million liters demonstrated the capacity to treat 437,000 to 1,893,000 liters of sewage influent from 2.65 hectares of aerated lagoons daily and produce an effluent that met or exceeded standards year-round.

  3. Metal pollution loading, Manzalah lagoon, Nile delta, Egypt: Implications for aquaculture

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, F.R.; Slaboda, M.L.; Stanley, D.J.

    1994-03-01

    High cultural enrichment factors are found for Hg (13 x), Pb (22.1 x), and other potentially toxic metals (e.g., Sn, Zn, Cu, Ag) in the upper 20 cm of sediment cores from the southeastern Ginka subbasin of Manzalah lagoon, Nile delta, Egypt. Cores from other areas of the lagoon show little metal loading. Metal loading followed the closure of the Aswan High Dam, the availability of abundant cheap electricity, and the development of major power-based industries. Industrial wastes containing potentially toxic metals are dumped into the Nile delta drain system. The load carried by Bahr El-Baqar drain discharges into the Ginka subbasin, which acts as a sink and results in metal loading of the sediment deposited there. Further development of aquaculture in this subbasin, of food-stuff agriculture on recently reclaimed lagoon bottom, or where irrigation waters come from Bahr El-Baqar drain or its discharge should be halted or strictly limited until potentially toxic metals in the drain waters and sediment are removed and polluted input drastically reduced. This environmental assessment of heavy metals in aquaculture or agriculture development should extend to other waterbodies in the northern Nile delta, particularly Idku lagoon and Lake Mariut, where industrial metal-bearing wastes discharge into the waterbodies. 21 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Decline of phosphorus, copper, and zinc in anaerobic swine lagoon columns receiving pretreated influent

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Land application of both anaerobic lagoon liquid and sludge can increase nutrient accumulation beyond soil assimilative capacity and become a threat to water quality in regions with intensive confined swine production. In a 15-month meso-scale column study, we evaluated the effect of manure pretreat...

  5. Equilibrium Sampling Used to Monitor Malodors in a Swine Waste Lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    When conducting measurements of malodors from CAFOs, it is desirable to determine the levels of responsible compounds at the source of emission. We monitored malodorous compounds in a 0.4 ha anaerobic lagoon that received waste from approximately 2,000 sows. Compounds were measured by the use of e...

  6. Geochemical characterization of anthropogenic effects in coastal lagoons at the Northern Pacific coast of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Fernández, A. C.; Mellado-Vazquez, P. G.; Bojorquez-Sanchez, S.; Páez-Osuna, F.

    2007-05-01

    Sinaloa is a coastal state located in the Gulf of California that is characterized by an economy mostly based on agroindustry, fisheries, aquaculture and tourism. It has been recognized that the coastal lagoons neighboring the most developed economic areas of Sinaloa state are showing signs of infilling and eutrophication that have been related with the dumping of untreated effluents from agriculture croplands, aquaculture facilities and human settlements. The environmental impact to the lagoons of Navachiste, Santa María, Ohuira, Ensenada del Pabellón, Chiricahueto, Ceuta y Estero de Urías has been evaluated through the assessment of time dependent changes in the 210Pb-derived sedimentation rates and the sediment concentrations of geochemical constituents such as organic matter, carbonates and nutrients (N and P). 210Pb geochronology has shown that accretion rates and nutrient fluxes in some lagoons have considerably increased due to the development of the agriculture activities in the region. For instance, in Ohuira lagoon, at the area adjacent to the culture fields of El Fuerte Valley, sediment accumulation has increased ~5 times with respect to the pre-anthropogenic conditions in less than 20 years (0.06 to 0.32 cm yr-1), while C, N and P fluxes (mg cm-2 yr-1) increased almost 10, 10 and 13 fold, respectively (4.0-37 for OC, 0.6-6.0 for N and 0.1-7.0 for P).

  7. Hydrographic Study of a Highly Stratified River Mouth Estuary. Alvarado Coastal Lagoon, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perales-Valdivia, H.; Sanay, R.

    2014-12-01

    Two 24 hours surveys on high and low river discharge conditions were used to describe the hydrography and the currents at the entrance of Alvarado Coastal Lagoon, México, located at the southwestern coast of the Gulf of México. This study represent the first of this kind in this lagoon. The Alvardo Coastal Lagoon sustains several economical fisheres in the region, including the shrimp fishery. The inlet of the Alvarado Coastal Lagoon is a microtidal rivermouth estuary. In each survey, towed ADCP and hydrographic data were sampled during a diurnal tidal cycle for three across-inlet transects located near the mouth. 12 track repetitions were completed allowing to distinguish the subtidal and tidal signals. In both runoff conditions a salt wedge was present, and showed surface-bottom salinity difference up to 35 psu. During high river discharge condition the salt wedge was present only during flood tide. The thicknesses of the interface, and upper and bottom layers oscillated according the tide. The water surface layer was always toward the ocean. During low river discharge condition the salt wedge was present for the whole tidal cycle. The vertical position of the interface oscillated as the tide did but keeping a constant thickness.

  8. Profile of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Swine Lagoon: Implication on the Influence of Heat Fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons are effective and low-cost tools to treat swine manure but they are also responsible for emissions of numerous atmospheric pollutants such as ammonia, greenhouse gases, and odors. The emissions of these pollutants are controlled by the interactions between the atmosphere, biochemic...

  9. Long-term Simulation In Coastal Lagoons: Sacca Di Goro (1989-1998)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldivar, J. M.; Cattaneo, E.; Murray, C. N.; Giordani, G.; Viaroli, P.

    A biogeochemical model for the Sacca di Goro Lagoon has been developed and par- tially validated with field data from 1989 to 1998. The model considers the nutrient cycles in the water column as well as in the sediments. Furthermore, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and Ulva sp. dynamics, as well as shellfish farming, are taken into ac- count. Due to the recent anoxic crises in the lagoon, the dynamic of oxygen has been also simulated. The actual version of the model is a 0D with input fluxes from the watershed and exchange with the Northern Adriatic Sea. Nutrients from the water- shed, wet and dry deposition, temperature, light intensity, wind speed and shellfish production are considered as forcing functions. The results show that the model is able to capture the essential dynamics of the lagoon, with values in the same order of magnitude with the measurements from experimental campaigns. The model has been used to assess the effects of two possible measures aiming at reducing the lagoon's eutrophisation level: reduction of nutrients from the watershed and Ulva's mechanical removal. The coupling with a 3D hydrodynamical model of the Sacca di Goro, as well as with the watershed model is presently under development.

  10. Reducing phosphorus in swine effluent with aluminum chloride treatment during lagoon cleanout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phosphorus (P) runoff from agricultural lands fertilized with swine manure can be a significant environmental issue. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of aluminum chloride (AlCl3) applications to a swine lagoon during total clean out on P concentrations in manure and runoff wat...

  11. Biochar produced from anaerobically-digested fiber reduces phosphorus in dairy lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the use of biochar produced from anaerobic digester dairy fiber (ADF) to sequester phosphorus from dairy lagoons. The ADF was collected from a plugged flow digester, air dried to < 8% water content, and pelletized. Biochar was produced by slow pyrolysis in a barrel retort. The potential...

  12. Trophic ecology and food consumption of fishes in a hypersaline tropical lagoon.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, P H; Tubino, R A; Zambrano, L C; Hunder, D A; Garritano, S R; Monteiro-Neto, C

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the trophic ecology (diet composition, trophic strategy, similarities and overlap between species, feeding period and food consumption) of six benthivorous fish species in Araruama Lagoon, the largest hypersaline tropical lagoon on the east coast of South America, with an area of 210 km(2) and an average salinity of 52. The burrfish Chilomycterus spinosus fed on Anomalocardia flexuosa shell deposits, ingesting associated fauna. The caitipa mojarra Diapterus rhombeus differed from all other species, having not only the highest proportions of algae and Nematoda, but also feeding on polychaete tentacles. The two mojarras Eucinostomus spp. showed similar trophic strategies, feeding mostly on Polychaeta. The corocoro grunt Orthopristis ruber also fed mainly on Polychaeta, but differed from Eucinostomus spp. in secondary items. The whitemouth croacker Micropogonias furnieri fed mainly on small Crustacea at night, showing a high number of secondary prey items with low frequencies and high prey-specific abundance. The daily food consumption (g food g(-1) fish mass) for Eucinostomus argenteus was 0·012 and was 0·031 and 0·027 for M. furnieri in two different sampling events. The diet similarities between Araruama Lagoon and other brackish and marine environments indicate that hypersalinity is not a predominant factor shaping the trophic ecology of fishes in this lagoon. The stability of hypersaline conditions, without a pronounced gradient, may explain the presence of several euryhaline fishes and invertebrates well adapted to this condition, resulting in a complex food web. PMID:26033293

  13. Process model for ammonia volatilization from anaerobic swine lagoons incorporating varying wind speeds and biogas bubbling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ammonia volatilization from treatment lagoons varies widely with the total ammonia concentration, pH, temperature, suspended solids, atmospheric ammonia concentration above the water surface, and wind speed. Ammonia emissions were estimated with a process-based mechanistic model integrating ammonia ...

  14. ESTROGENIC ACTIVITY AND STEROID HORMONES IN SWINE WASTEWATER PROCESSED THROUGH A LAGOON CONSTRUCTED-WETLAND SYSTEM.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic lagoons and treatment wetlands are used world-wide to treat wastewater from dense livestock production facilities. However, there is very limited data on the hormonal activity of the wastewater effluent produced by these treatment systems. The objectives of this experiment were to measur...

  15. Abatement of ammonia emissions from swine lagoons using polymer enhanced solid-liquid separation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of solid-liquid separation of liquid swine manure on ammonia emissions from lagoons. This determination was done at full-scale in two contiguous swine production units that had similar animal production management. One of these units was maintained as a...

  16. Environmental Quality Assessment of Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) Using Living Foraminifera Assemblages and a Multiproxy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Alves Martins, Maria Virgínia; Zaaboub, Noureddine; Aleya, Lotfi; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Pereira, Egberto; Miranda, Paulo; Mane, Miguel; Rocha, Fernando; Laut, Lazaro; El Bour, Monia

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the environmental quality of the Bizerte Lagoon (Tunisia) through an integrated approach that combined environmental, biogeochemical, and living benthic foraminiferal analyses. Specifically, we analyzed the physicochemical parameters of the water and sediment. The textural, mineralogical, and geochemical characteristics of the sediment, including total organic carbon, total nitrogen, simultaneously extracted metals (SEM), acid volatile sulfides (AVS), chlorophyll a, CaCO3, and changes in bacterial populations and carbon isotopes were measured. The SEM/AVS values indicated the presence of relatively high concentrations of toxic metals in only some areas. Foraminiferal assemblages were dominated by species such as A. parkinsoniana (20–91%), Bolivina striatula (<40%), Hopkinsina atlantica (<17%), and Bolivina ordinaria (<15%) that cannot be considered typical of impacted coastal lagoons both in Mediterranean and northeast Atlantic regions. The results of this work suggest that Bizerte Lagoon is a unique setting. This lagoon is populated by typical marine species that invaded this ecosystem, attracted not only by the prevailing favorable environmental conditions but also by the abundance and quality of food. The results indicate that the metal pollution found in some areas have a negative impact on the assemblages of foraminifera. At present, however, this negative impact is not highly alarming. PMID:26372655

  17. Use of Shallow Lagoon Habitats by Nekton of the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared nekton use of prominent habitat types within a lagoonal system of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (GoM). These habitat types were defined by combinations of structure (cover type) and location (distance from shore) as: Spartina edge (<1m from shore), Spartina 3 m from...

  18. Occurrence and Diversity of Tetracycline Resistance Genes in Lagoons and Groundwater Underlying Two Swine Production Facilities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chee-Sanford, J. C.; Aminov, R.I.; Krapac, I.J.; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N.; Mackie, R.I.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we used PCR typing methods to assess the presence of tetracycline resistance determinants conferring ribosomal protection in waste lagoons and in groundwater underlying two swine farms. All eight classes of genes encoding this mechanism of resistance [tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tetB(P), tet(S), tet(T), and otrA] were found in total DNA extracted from water of two lagoons. These determinants were found to be seeping into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. The identities and origin of these genes in groundwater were confirmed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analyses. Tetracycline-resistant bacterial isolates from groundwater harbored the tet(M) gene, which was not predominant in the environmental samples and was identical to tet(M) from the lagoons. The presence of this gene in some typical soil inhabitants suggests that the vector of antibiotic resistance gene dissemination is not limited to strains of gastrointestinal origin carrying the gene but can be mobilized into the indigenous soil microbiota. This study demonstrated that tet genes occur in the environment as a direct result of agriculture and suggested that groundwater may be a potential source of antibiotic resistance in the food chain.

  19. Anthropogenic Enrichment and Nutrients in Some Tropical Lagoons of Ghana, West Africa

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger study of demographic change in coastal Ghana, we measured the concentrations of major plant nutrients and phytoplankton chlorophyll in eight coastal lagoons with different land use and human population density. The purpose of our study was to relate human acti...

  20. A new species of Jahnulales from Las Ilusiones Lagoon, Tabasco, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a study on biodiversity of freshwater ascomycetes from an urban tropical lagoon, an ascomycete with similar morphology to species of Jahnulales was obtained. Smooth surface test blocks of Pinus sp., Bucida sp., Cedrela sp. and Tabebuia sp. were submerged in pairs close to a private house whar...

  1. Validity of using backward Lagrangian Stochastic technique in measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluates the accuracy of measuring trace gas emission from treatment lagoons using backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLs) technique. The bLs technique was originally developed for relatively homogeneous terrains without any obstacles causing significant windflow disturbance. The errors ass...

  2. The contribution of roadside soil to phosphorus loading in the eutrophic Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Abayomi, Akeem; Nimmo, Malcolm; Williams, Claire; Olayinka, Kehinde O; Osuntogun, Bola; Alo, Babajide; Worsfold, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    Roadside soils were sampled from the Lagos Lagoon catchment during the wet and dry seasons over the period 2005-2009. Lagoon sediment samples were also collected within the same period. All samples were digested with aqua regia to determine total phosphorus and extracted with 0.5 M sodium bicarbonate to determine the bioavailable fraction (Olsen-P). A segmented flow analyser method was used for analysis and good accuracy was demonstrated for two reference soils (SO-2 from CCMET and SRM 2711 from NIST). The Lagos Lagoon is a hypereutrophic water body (1270 ± 1170 μg P L(-1)), with significant areas of anoxia and water hyacinth growth. The total phosphorus concentrations in roadside soils (16 sites; mean ± 2 S.D.) were 285 ± 279 mg kg(-1) in the wet season and 424 ± 629 mg kg(-1) in the dry season, indicating that rainwater leaching is a major source of phosphorus in the lagoon. The bioavailable fractions were 5.17 ± 3.47 mg kg(-1) (2.1 ± 1.5% of the total) in the wet season and 13.0 ± 8.7 mg kg(-1) (4.3 ± 4.5% of the total) in the dry season. PMID:21670835

  3. Transport of steroid hormones, phytoestrogens, and estrogenic activity across a swine lagoon/sprayfield system.

    PubMed

    Yost, Erin E; Meyer, Michael T; Dietze, Julie E; Williams, C Michael; Worley-Davis, Lynn; Lee, Boknam; Kullman, Seth W

    2014-10-01

    The inflow, transformation, and attenuation of natural steroid hormones and phytoestrogens and estrogenic activity were assessed across the lagoon/sprayfield system of a prototypical commercial swine sow operation. Free and conjugated steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progesterone) were detected in urine and feces of sows across reproductive stages, with progesterone being the most abundant steroid hormone. Excreta also contained phytoestrogens indicative of a soy-based diet, particularly, daidzein, genistein, and equol. During storage in barn pits and the anaerobic lagoon, conjugated hormones dissipated, and androgens and progesterone were attenuated. Estrone and equol persisted along the waste disposal route. Following application of lagoon slurry to agricultural soils, all analytes exhibited attenuation within 2 days. However, analytes including estrone, androstenedione, progesterone, and equol remained detectable in soil at 2 months postapplication. Estrogenic activity in the yeast estrogen screen and T47D-KBluc in vitro bioassays generally tracked well with analyte concentrations. Estrone was found to be the greatest contributor to estrogenic activity across all sample types. This investigation encompasses the most comprehensive suite of natural hormone and phytoestrogen analytes examined to date across a livestock lagoon/sprayfield and provides global insight into the fate of these analytes in this widely used waste management system. PMID:25148584

  4. Monitoring of Malodorous Compounds from a Swine Waste Lagoon by an Equilibrium Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The levels of malodorous compounds in the air above an anaerobic lagoon of a large swine farrowing operation were measured. Compounds were adsorbed onto silicone stir bars and retained compounds measured by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Equilibration times were previously determined by exper...

  5. Heat flux measurements and modeling of malodorous compounds above an anaerobic swine lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concentration of p-cresol and p-ethylphenol, two malodorants typical of swine waste, were measured at 0.5 m and 1.5 m above a waste treatment lagoon during two separate campaigns encompassing late winter through early spring and late spring through early summer. Concomitant collection of air te...

  6. Cellulase and xylanase activity during the decomposition of three aquatic macrophytes in a tropical oxbow lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Sciessere, L.; Cunha-Santino, M. B.; Bianchini, I.

    2011-01-01

    Due to the connection between enzymatic activity and degradation of different fractions of organic matter, enzyme assays can be used to estimate degradation rates of particulate and dissolved organic carbon in freshwater systems. The aim of this study was to quantify and model the enzymatic degradation involving the decomposition of macrophytes, describing temporal activity of cellulases (EC 3.2.1.4 and EC 3.2.1.91) and xylanase (EC 3.2.1.8) during in situ decomposition of three aquatic macrophytes (Salvinia sp., Eichhornia azurea and Cyperus giganteus) on the surface and water-sediment interface (w-s interface) of an oxbow lagoon (Óleo lagoon) within a natural Brazilian Savanna Reserve. Overall, the enzymatic degradation of aquatic macrophytes in Óleo lagoon occurred during the whole year and was initiated together with leaching. Xylanase production was ca. 5 times higher than cellulase values due to easy access to this compound by cellulolytic microorganisms. Enzymatic production and detritus mass decay were similar on the surface and w-s interface. Salvinia sp. was the most recalcitrant detritus, with low mass decay and enzymatic activity. E. azurea and C. giganteus decomposition rates and enzymatic production were high and similar. Due to the physicochemical homogeneity observed in the Óleo lagoon, the differences between the decay rates of each species are mostly related with detritus chemical quality. PMID:24031706

  7. Optimal sensor locations for the backward Lagrangian stochastic technique in measuring lagoon gas emission

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study evaluated the impact of gas concentration and wind sensor locations on the accuracy of the backward Lagrangian stochastic inverse-dispersion technique (bLS) for measuring gas emission rates from a typical lagoon environment. Path-integrated concentrations (PICs) and 3-dimensional (3D) wi...

  8. Transport and Fate of Nitrate and Pathogens at a Dairy Lagoon Water Application Site

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A field study has been initiated to quantify the vadose zone transport and fate of nutrients and indicator microbes at a dairy lagoon water application site. This site has been heavily instrumented with 48 thermometers, 48 tensiometers, 10 neutron access tubes, 8 electrical conductivity gauges, 2 w...

  9. Spatio-temporal impacts of dairy lagoon water reuse on soil: Heavy metals and salinity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diminishing freshwater resources have brought attention to the reuse of degraded water as a water resource rather than a disposal problem. Dairy lagoon water is degraded water that is often in large supply on concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), but the impact and sustainability of its r...

  10. Geotextile filtration performance for lagoon sludges and liquid animal manures dewatering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintenance and control of liquid levels in anaerobic lagoons and storage ponds require liquid-solid separation as a pretreatment and periodic removal of accumulated sludges. Until local options become available, sludges can be contained, dewatered, and stored using geotextile filtration. We used a ...

  11. Swine lagoon wastewater treatment in marsh-pond/floating wetland-marsh constructed wetland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Constructed wetlands have been used effectively to reduce the mass loads of organic and nutrient components from swine anaerobic lagoons. Continuous marsh wetlands with gentle slope and intermittent flows seem to be the best for promoting oxidation and minimizing ammonia volatilization. However, the...

  12. Influence of seasonal changes on the microbial community in an anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine slurry is stored in pits beneath confinement buildings or in adjacent lagoons. This slurry is a valuable resource for crop fertilization and soil conditioning, but may also be a source of unpleasant odors. Microorganisms are crucial to all of the important processes that occur in anaerobic sto...

  13. Stable isotopes in aquatic food web of an artificial lagoon in the Hangzhou Bay, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Weimin; Shi, Liyan; Chen, Yaqu

    2010-05-01

    Stable isotope values, δ13C and δ15N, were determined for four primary producers and 19 dominant consumers in a small artificial lagoon located in Hangzhou Bay. Based on these results the major pathways for energy flow and trophic structure of the artificial lagoon ecosystem were characterized. The mean δ13C values for the 19 consumers ranged from -22.99‰ to -14.24‰. Apart from so-iny mullet Liza haematocheila, the other 18 consumers had intermediate δ13C values between those of epibenthic microalgae and particulate organic matter (POM). The results of a multiple source linear mixing model (IsoSource model) indicated that 50% or more of the organic carbon in the tissues of most consumers was derived from epibenthic microalgae. This indicated that these primary producers were the main food source fueling the lagoon food web. The mean δ15N values for the 19 consumers varied between 4.93‰ and 12.97‰ and indicated four trophic levels in the lagoon. Four macroinvertebrates and zooplankton represented the primary consumers, whilst the other 14 consumers occupied the secondary and tertiary consumer levels. The 19 consumers were divided into three trophic guilds (detritivores/suspension feeders, omnivores and carnivores).

  14. Vadose Zone Monitoring of Dairy Green Water Lagoons using Soil Solution Samplers.

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, James R.; Coplen, Amy K

    2005-11-01

    Over the last decade, dairy farms in New Mexico have become an important component to the economy of many rural ranching and farming communities. Dairy operations are water intensive and use groundwater that otherwise would be used for irrigation purposes. Most dairies reuse their process/green water three times and utilize lined lagoons for temporary storage of green water. Leakage of water from lagoons can pose a risk to groundwater quality. Groundwater resource protection infrastructures at dairies are regulated by the New Mexico Environment Department which currently relies on monitoring wells installed in the saturated zone for detecting leakage of waste water lagoon liners. Here we present a proposal to monitor the unsaturated zone beneath the lagoons with soil water solution samplers to provide early detection of leaking liners. Early detection of leaking liners along with rapid repair can minimize contamination of aquifers and reduce dairy liability for aquifer remediation. Additionally, acceptance of vadose zone monitoring as a NMED requirement over saturated zone monitoring would very likely significantly reduce dairy startup and expansion costs. Acknowledgment Funding for this project was provided by the Sandia National Laboratories Small Business Assistance Program

  15. Spatial and Temporal Changes in the Microbial Community in an Anaerobic Swine Waste Treatment Lagoon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Swine slurry is stored in pits beneath confinement buildings or in adjacent lagoons. This slurry is a valuable resource for crop fertilization and soil conditioning, but may also be a source of unpleasant odors. Microorganisms are crucial to all of the important processes that occur in anaerobic sto...

  16. Tracing anthropogenically driven groundwater discharge into a coastal lagoon from southern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Isaac R.; Niencheski, Felipe; Burnett, William; Peterson, Richard; Chanton, Jeffrey; Andrade, Carlos F. F.; Milani, Idel B.; Schmidt, Axel; Knoeller, Kay

    2008-05-01

    SummaryWe investigated the distribution of naturally occurring geochemical tracers ( 222Rn, 223Ra, 224Ra, 226Ra, CH 4, δ18O, and δ2H) in the water column and adjacent groundwater of Mangueira Lagoon as proxies of groundwater discharge. Mangueira Lagoon is a large (90 km long), shallow (˜4-5 m deep), fresh, and non-tidal coastal lagoon in southern Brazil surrounded by extensively irrigated rice plantations and numerous irrigation canals. We hypothesized that the annual, intense irrigation for rice agriculture creates extreme conditions that seasonally change groundwater discharge patterns in the adjacent lagoon. We further supposed that dredging of irrigation canals alters groundwater fluxes. While the activities of 222Rn in shallow groundwater were 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than in surface water, CH 4 and radium isotopes were only ˜1 order of magnitude higher. Therefore, 222Rn appears to be the preferred groundwater tracer in this system. Radon concentrations and conductivities were dramatically higher near the pump house of rice irrigation canals, consistent with a groundwater source. Modeling of radon inventories accounting for total inputs (groundwater advection, diffusion from sediments, and decay of 226Ra) and losses (atmospheric evasion, horizontal mixing and decay) indicated that groundwater advection rates in the irrigation canals (˜25 cm/d) are over 2 orders of magnitude higher than along the shoreline (˜0.1 cm/d). Nearly 75% of the total area of the canals is found in the southern half of the lagoon, where groundwater inputs seem to be higher as also indicated by methane and stable isotope trends. In spite of the relatively small area of the canals, we estimate that they contribute nearly 70% of the total (˜57,000 m 3/d) groundwater input into the entire Mangueira Lagoon. We suggest that the dredging of these canals cut through aquitards which previously restricted upward advection from the underlying permeable strata. The irrigation channels

  17. Assessment of nitrogen and phosphorus loading by atmospheric dry deposition to the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olayinka, Kehinde O; Oladosu, Najeem O; Abayomi, Akeem A; Alo, Babajide I

    2016-07-01

    Surface water pollution has been found to be considerably driven by the contributions of airborne particles, open-air waste burning and fossil fuel combustion, ammonia volatilization from excreta, fertilizer and derivatives from explosive factories. Atmospheric deposition into the Lagos Lagoon is suspected to be a major contributor to the nutrient levels of the lagoon. Atmospheric dry nutrient deposition was monitored at six stations around the Lagos Lagoon from January to June 2012 in order to estimate the contribution of atmospheric deposits into the lagoon's nutrient cycles. Species of phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) in the lagoon water were analyzed by colorimetric methods. Mean [NO(-) 3 + NO(-) 2]-N was 3.08 ± 2.10 mg m(-2) day(-1) (0.55-8.73 mg m(-2) day(-1)). The (NO(-) 3 + NO(-) 2)-N was only about 2 % of total N but [NH(+) 4 + organic]-N was approximately 38 % of total N. Particulate N was about 60 % of total N. Average total N was 144 ± 94.9 mg m(-2) day(-1) (48.0-285 mg m(-2) day(-1)). Average soluble reactive P was significantly lower than [NO(-) 3 + NO(-) 2]-N averaging about 0.12 ± 0.12 mg m(-2) day(-1). Soluble reactive P (SRP) was less than 2 % of total P but soluble organic P was about 86 % of total P. Particulate P accounted for about 12 % of total P. Average total P was 4.56 ± 10.1 mg m(-2) day(-1) (0.48-31.6 mg m(-2) day(-1)). This study shows that atmospheric deposition of nutrients into the Lagos Lagoon is taking place and this may represent a considerable proportion of the total nutrient loading of the lagoon. PMID:27325250

  18. Determination of water quality variables, endotoxin concentration, and Enterobacteriaceae concentration and identification in southern High Plains dairy lagoons.

    PubMed

    Purdy, C W; Clark, R N; Straus, D C

    2010-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the concentration of endotoxin, determine 20 water quality variables, and identify and enumerate fungal and bacterial pathogens from United States southern High Plains dairy lagoons and control lakes during summer and winter. Water samples were collected in triplicate from the north, south, east, and west quadrants of each body of water. The mean (+/- SEM) winter dairy lagoon endotoxin concentration was significantly higher (9,678+/-1,834 ng/mL) than the summer concentration (3,220+/-810 ng/mL). The mean endotoxin concentration of the 2 control lakes (summer: 58.1+/-8.8 ng/mL; winter: 38.6+/-4.2 ng/mL) was significantly less than that of the dairy lagoons. Two hundred-one Salmonella enterica spp. isolates were identified, 7 serovars were recovered from the dairy lagoons, and 259 Salmonella ssp. were identified from 5 other dairy locations (milk barn, ditch effluent, settling basin, feed alley pad flush, and center pivots). Twenty-eight Salmonella spp. were identified from center pivot water. Escherichia coli O157:H7 pathogens were isolated from other dairy locations but not from lagoons. Neither Salmonella spp. nor E. coli O157:H7 were identified from control lakes. Enterobacteriaceae opportunistic pathogens were isolated from both dairies and control lakes. Important mesophilic and thermophilic catabolic (to manure biosolids) fungal isolates were identified from dairy effluent locations, but no thermophilic fungal isolates were cultured from the control lakes. Adequate curing of green forage following center pivot irrigation is important to kill lagoon water enteric pathogens, even though the lagoon water is mixed with fresh water. Recirculating lagoon water to flush the feed alley pad, where cows stand while eating, to remove manure and using lagoon water to abate dairy dust in loafing pens and unimproved dairy roads is inconsistent with good environmental practice management. PMID:20338428

  19. Hydrodynamics, temperature/salinity variability and residence time in the Chilika lagoon during dry and wet period: Measurement and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanty, M. M.; Mohanty, P. K.; Pattnaik, A. K.; Panda, U. S.; Pradhan, S.; Samal, R. N.

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigated the hydrodynamics, spatio-temporal variability of temperature/salinity and the residence time of tracer concentrations in a largest brackish water coastal lagoon in Asia, namely the Chilika lagoon, India. An integrated approach combined the measurement and 2D hydrodynamic-advection/dispersion model is used to simulate circulation and temperature/salinity, and estimated the water residence time in lagoon under different forcing mechanisms, such as tide, wind and freshwater discharge during the dry and wet periods. Water circulation inside the lagoon is simulated when wind is included with the tide only forcing during dry period, and freshwater influx is included with the tide and wind forcing during wet period. Under the realistic forcing conditions, the computed temporal variability of water temperature and salinity are well correlated with the measurements in both the periods. The spatial variations of water temperature within the lagoon is influenced by the meteorological conditions, tide and freshwater influx as well as the shallowness of the lagoon, whereas the salinity is spatially controlled by the freshwater influx from the riverine system and seawater intrusion through the tidal inlets. The numerical model results show that in the Chilika lagoon tidal and river influx affect significantly the residence time spatially, and is site specific. The residence time varies from values of 4-5 days in the outer channel (OC) and 132 days at the northern sector (NS) in the main body of lagoon. The current study represents a first attempt to use a combined model approach, which is therefore, a useful tool to support the ecological implication of the lagoon ecosystem.

  20. Structure and functioning of Mediterranean lagoon fish assemblages: A key for the identification of water body types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Anita; Franzoi, Piero; Torricelli, Patrizia

    2008-09-01

    Knowledge on the structure and functioning variability of transitional water fish assemblages may help in finding out the main descriptors for identifying different water body types for which specific biological reference conditions can be reliably derived. Fish assemblages from 19 Mediterranean lagoons were therefore investigated by evaluating the variability of their structure and functioning, and by relating it to the lagoons' environmental features. Fish assemblage structure was measured by its species richness. Functioning was measured by categorizing fish species into functional categories (or guilds) according to their use of lagoon habitat, feeding and reproduction, and by defining the functional structure of fish assemblages as the relative number of species per guild in each lagoon. Mediterranean lagoons' fish assemblages were found to be more similar to each other in their functional structure than in the taxonomical composition, thus confirming a shared functional role of these environments for biological communities. Lagoon local features, such as the lagoon area, its habitat heterogeneity and average salinity, significantly affected the total species richness and the different use that fish make of the lagoon environment, hence playing a primary role in the assessment of these water body types. Latitude also influenced the variability of fish assemblages in the Mediterranean lagoons investigated, with particular regard to their functioning as feeding and reproductive grounds for fish. These results are compared with previous studies and, although this limited the investigation to structural aspects only, were found to confirm in part the previous results and also added new insights about the key factors affecting the functioning of transitional water systems.

  1. Differences in ichthyofauna feeding habits among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir.

    PubMed

    Ferrareze, M; Nogueira, M G; Casatti, L

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we investigated differences in feeding habits of small-sized ichthyofauna among lateral lagoons and the river channel in a large reservoir. The study was performed in four lagoons and in one sampling site of the main channel in Rosana Reservoir, Paranapanema River, Brazil. The samples were taken in September and November of 2004 and in January, March, May, and August of 2005. Fish were sampled with a 7.5 m2 hand net. Five manual throws were made toward aquatic macrophytes stands. The sampling design favored the collection of small-sized fish fauna (juveniles/small-sized species). The stomach contents of 42 species were analyzed. A total of 183 different items were consumed by fish. These items were grouped in 11 food categories, which were used to classify fish into seven trophic guilds. Aquatic insects were consumed by 32 species and were the predominant feeding item. In the river, the most consumed items were aquatic insects, cladocerans, and phytoplankton, whereas in the lagoons aquatic insects, copepods, and cladocerans were the main items. By comparing each trophic guild, the number of insectivores, algivores, and zooplanktivores species was higher in the lagoons than in the river, and the opposite was found only for omnivore fish. Low niche width in all sites indicates high trophic specialization and low niche overlap between pairs of species. Fish assemblage in the lateral lagoons presents feeding habits distinct from those of the river species, indicating that the coexistence and high abundance of small-sized fish in the sampling sites are explained by their high feeding adaptability, which includes a tendency toward dietary specialization, low feeding overlap, and resource partitioning, along with different temporal resource uses. PMID:26132022

  2. Occurrence and removal of pharmaceutical and hormone contaminants in rural wastewater treatment lagoons.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolin; Zheng, Wei; Kelly, Walton R

    2013-02-15

    Rural communities in the United States usually use a series of aerated lagoons to treat domestic wastewater. Effluents from these systems are typically discharged to receiving watersheds, which leads to a potential transfer of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) and steroid hormones from sanitary sewage to the environment. The primary objectives of this study are to identify and quantify PPCPs and steroid hormones in rural sewage treatment lagoons, to investigate the removal efficiency of these emerging contaminants in the treatment processes, and to monitor their occurrence in the surrounding watershed. In this study, a method has been developed to analyze thirteen PPCPs and eight steroid hormones in various water samples. Among all of the PPCPs considered, ten chemicals were detected in sewage influents, lagoon waters of different treatment stages, or effluents at concentrations in the ng/L to low μg/L range. Three hormones were observed in the influents at total concentrations as high as 164 ng/L, but no hormone residues were detected in the effluents. This indicates that the aerated lagoons may effectively remove hormone contaminants. With the exception of carbamazepine, removal rates for the other detected PPCPs were relatively high in the range of 88 to 100% in September with average air temperature equal to 20 °C. However, the removal efficiency of nine PPCPs in the rural wastewater treatment plant exhibited large temporal variability. The concentrations of PPCPs in the lagoon waters and effluents collected in November, with average air temperature equal to 4.4 °C, were 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than those samples collected in September. Occurrence of these PPCP contaminants in the surrounding watershed was also monitored. The discharge of effluents significantly elevated the PPCP concentrations in the receiving creek and increased their occurrence in the adjacent river. PMID:23314119

  3. Holocene sedimentary evolution of a mid-ocean atoll lagoon, Maldives, Indian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klostermann, Lars; Gischler, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    Based on detailed analyses of cores covering the lagoon of Rasdhoo Atoll, Maldives, six carbonate facies, one soil, and one peat facies have been identified. The abundance of carbonate and rare opaque grains was quantified with a point counter. X-ray diffractometry was used to measure mineralogical composition of samples. The statistical delineation of facies using cluster analysis was based on point count, mineralogical, and textural analyses. In decreasing abundance, the six carbonate facies are classified as mollusk-coral-algal floatstone to rudstone (30 %), mollusk-coral-red algae rudstone (23 %), mollusk-coral-algal wackestone to floatstone (23 %), mollusk-coral wackestone (13 %), mollusk-coral mudstone to wackestone (9 %), and mollusk mudstone (2 %). The carbonate facies represent lagoonal background sedimentation, mostly consisting of fine sediments, and event sedimentation depositing transported coarse-grained reefal components. Fifty-seven carbonate samples and one peat sample were dated radiometrically, covering the Holocene transgression from 10 kyrs BP until today. Comparing the sediment accumulation data of the lagoon with two local sea-level curves, three systems tracts can be identified: (1) a lowstand systems tract characterized by karst and soil deposition >10 kyrs BP, (2) a transgressive systems tract with peat and carbonate separated by hiatus 10-6.5 kyrs BP, and (3) a highstand systems tract dominated by carbonate sedimentation 6.5-0 kyrs BP and further divided into three stages (6.5-3, 3-1, and 1-0 kyrs BP). During the Holocene transgression, sedimentation rates increased continuously to a maximum of 1.4 m/kyr during 3-1 kyrs BP. Modern (1-0 kyrs BP) mean sedimentation rates average 0.6 m/kyr. A simple calculation suggests that two processes (background sedimentation and sand apron progradation) will probably fill up the accommodation space of the lagoon during the Holocene highstand, but these processes will not suffice to fill the larger

  4. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Pantos, Olga; Morgan, Thomas C.; Rich, Virginia; Tonin, Hemerson; Bourne, David G.; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P.; Tyson, Gene W.

    2016-01-01

    Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L), and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems. PMID:26989611

  5. Liquid and atmospheric ammonia concentrations from a dairy lagoon during an aeration experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumburg, Brian; Neger, Manjit; Mount, George H.; Yonge, David; Filipy, Jenny; Swain, John; Kincaid, Ron; Johnson, Kristen

    Ammonia emissions from agriculture are an environmental and human health concern, and there is increasing pressure to reduce emissions. Animal agriculture is the largest global source of ammonia emissions and on a per cow basis dairy operations are the largest emitters. The storage and disposal of the dairy waste is one area where emissions can be reduced, aerobic biological treatment of wastewater being a common and effective way of reducing ammonia emissions. An aeration experiment in a dairy lagoon with two commercial aerators was performed for 1 month. Liquid concentrations of ammonia, total nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate were monitored before, during and after the experiment and atmospheric ammonia was measured downwind of the lagoon using a short-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument with 1 ppbv sensitivity. No changes in either liquid or atmospheric ammonia concentrations were detected throughout the experiment, and neither dissolved oxygen, nitrite nor nitrate could be detected in the lagoon at any time. The average ammonia concentration at 10 sampling sites in the lagoon at a depth of 0.15 m was 650 mg l -1 and at 0.90 m it was 700 mg l -1 NH 3-N. The average atmospheric ammonia concentration 50 m downwind was about 300 ppbv. The 0.90 m depth total nitrogen concentrations and total and volatile solids concentrations decreased during the experiment due to some mixing of the lagoon but the 0.15 m depth concentrations did not decrease indicating that the aerators were not strong enough to mix the sludge off the bottom into the whole water column.

  6. Evaluation of some heavy metal loading in the Kpeshi lagoon, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fianko, Joseph R.; Laar, Cynthia; Osei, Juilet; Anim, Alfred K.; Gibrilla, Abass; Adomako, Dickson

    2013-03-01

    A study was carried out on the Kpeshi lagoon to evaluate the relative contributions of some heavy metals (Na, k, Ca, K, Fe, Mn, Ni, Cr, Cd, Al, Pb) on the current state of the Kpeshi lagoon. The lagoon water was sampled along with some fish samples. Water pH, electrical conductivity and total dissolved salts were measured in situ whilst Na and K were measured using flame emission spectrometry. Heavy metals (iron, manganese, nickel, aluminium, chromium, lead and cadmium) in both water and fish samples were analyzed using atomic absorption spectrometry. Measured pH values ranged between 6.60 and 7.87, a mean conductivity and total dissolved salts of 87.31 ± 19.14 μS/cm and 38.4 ± 8.43 mg/L, respectively. Nutrient and organic matter were among the frequent source of pollution in the lagoon with mean sulphate, phosphate and nitrate concentrations of 190 ± 108.84, 1.62 ± 0.49 and 0.89 ± 0.26 mg/L, respectively. Iron and aluminium in the lagoon water measured the highest concentration of 13.2 ± 3.47 and 13.6 ± 4.29 mg/L, respectively. Fish samples however revealed very high concentrations of calcium and potassium measuring 15,709 ± 75.35 and 5,949.49 ± 87.30 mg/kg, respectively. Sodium and aluminium also revealed relatively high concentrations: 3,775.70 ± 24.80 and 708.47 ± 4.95 mg/kg, respectively. Notably, sites closer to settlement community (Teshie Township, e.g. S1, S2, S3 and S4) and the hospitality industries (i.e. dotted hotels, e.g. S7) appeared to be relatively more contaminated.

  7. Ecological implications of heavy metal concentrations in the sediments of Burullus Lagoon of Nile Delta, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongyuan; Salem, Alaa; Xu, Zhuang; Zhang, Weiguo

    2010-02-01

    This paper examines the spatial and temporal distribution of heavy metals (Fe, Al, Cu, Zn, Mn, Cd, Pb and Ni) from three short sediment cores collected from Burullus lagoon of the Nile delta, Egypt. 210Pb and 137Cs measurement is applied to understand sedimentation rate and related chronology. Remarkably low isotopic activities and intensive bioturbation in the lagoonal sediments rendered age determination difficult. Samples with detectable 137Cs in the upper core sediments together with sediment lithology could help infer a sedimentation rate of about 2.0 mm yr -1, thereby indicating post-dam (after 1964) sedimentation of the upper 10-cm core sediments. Our results demonstrate that most heavy metals in the surficial sediments after normalization to Al decrease seaward, showing a function of distance to the sewerage outlet on the inland lake coast. Also, there is an upwardly increasing trend of normalized heavy metals, especially in the upper 10-cm core sediments. Relevancy analysis has identified Mn, Pb and Cd as the diagnostic heavy metals in Burullus lagoon, most likely derived from Tanta and Kafrelsheihk, the major downtowns in the central Nile delta plain, from where wastewaters are directly discharging into the lake via canal networks. Although Burullus lagoon is presently least affected by pollution as compared to other major lagoons of the Nile delta, the increasing quantities of diagnostic metals, especially Mn, are extremely toxic, as they are potentially linked to the risks of digestive issues and pancreatic cancer reportedly. The situation calls for a rational planning for sewerage treatment in the protected Burullus coast.

  8. Nutrient dynamics in tropical rivers, estuarine-lagoons, and coastal ecosystems along the eastern Hainan Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. H.; Liu, S. M.; Li, Y. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Ren, J. L.; Zhang, J.

    2013-06-01

    Nutrient dynamics were studied along the eastern Hainan Island based on field observations during 2006-2009, to understand nutrient biogeochemical processes and to have an overview of human perturbations on coastal ecosystems in this tropical region. The concentrations of nutrients in the rivers had seasonal variations enriched with dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN). High riverine concentrations of nitrate were mainly originated from agricultural fertilizer input. The ratios of DIN : PO43- ranged from 37 to 1063, suggesting preferential PO43- relative to nitrogen in the rivers. The areal yields of dissolved silicate (DSi) varied from 76 to 448 × 103 mol km-2 yr-1 due to erosion over the drainage area, inducing high levels of DSi among worldwide tropical systems. Aquaculture ponds contained high concentrations of NH4+ (up to 157 μM) and DON (up to 130 μM). Particulate phosphorus concentrations (0.5 ∼1.4 μM) were in lower level comparied with estuaries around the world. Particulate silicate levels in rivers and lagoons were lower than global average level. Nutrient biogeochemistry in coastal areas were affected by human activities (e.g. aquaculture, agriculture), as well as natural events such as typhoon. Nutrient concentrations were low because open sea water dispersed land-derived nutrients. Nutrient budgets were built based on a steady-state box model, which showed that riverine fluxes would be magnified by estuarine processes (e.g. regeneration, desorption) in the Wenchanghe/Wenjiaohe Estuary, Wanquan River estuary, and the Laoyehai Lagoon except in the Xiaohai Lagoon. Riverine and groundwater input were the major sources of nutrients to the Xiaohai Lagoon and the Laiyehai Lagoon, respectively. Riverine input and aquaculture effluent were the major sources of nutrients to the eastern coastal of Hainan Island. Nutrient inputs to the coastal ecosystem can be increased by typhoon-induced runoff of rainwater, and phytoplankton bloom in the sea would be

  9. Diuron tolerance and potential degradation by pelagic microbiomes in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon.

    PubMed

    Angly, Florent E; Pantos, Olga; Morgan, Thomas C; Rich, Virginia; Tonin, Hemerson; Bourne, David G; Mercurio, Philip; Negri, Andrew P; Tyson, Gene W

    2016-01-01

    Diuron is a herbicide commonly used in agricultural areas where excess application causes it to leach into rivers, reach sensitive marine environments like the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon and pose risks to marine life. To investigate the impact of diuron on whole prokaryotic communities that underpin the marine food web and are integral to coral reef health, GBR lagoon water was incubated with diuron at environmentally-relevant concentration (8 µg/L), and sequenced at specific time points over the following year. 16S rRNA gene amplicon profiling revealed no significant short- or long-term effect of diuron on microbiome structure. The relative abundance of prokaryotic phototrophs was not significantly altered by diuron, which suggests that they were largely tolerant at this concentration. Assembly of a metagenome derived from waters sampled at a similar location in the GBR lagoon did not reveal the presence of mutations in the cyanobacterial photosystem that could explain diuron tolerance. However, resident phages displayed several variants of this gene and could potentially play a role in tolerance acquisition. Slow biodegradation of diuron was reported in the incubation flasks, but no correlation with the relative abundance of heterotrophs was evident. Analysis of metagenomic reads supports the hypothesis that previously uncharacterized hydrolases carried by low-abundance species may mediate herbicide degradation in the GBR lagoon. Overall, this study offers evidence that pelagic phototrophs of the GBR lagoon may be more tolerant of diuron than other tropical organisms, and that heterotrophs in the microbial seed bank may have the potential to degrade diuron and alleviate local anthropogenic stresses to inshore GBR ecosystems. PMID:26989611

  10. 78 FR 73581 - Nebraska Disaster #NE-00055

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION Nebraska Disaster NE-00055 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY.../26/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration... CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street...

  11. MiniBooNE oscillation searches

    SciTech Connect

    Brice, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    The range of oscillation analyses being pursued by the MiniBooNE collaboration is described. Focus is given to the various searches for electron neutrino appearance, but the disappearance of muon neutrinos and the appearance search for electron anti-neutrinos are covered as well.

  12. EC Detector at SciBooNE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Camillo

    2009-04-01

    SciBooNE is an experiment to measure neutrino and anti-neutrino cross-sections on the Booster Neutrino Beam at Fermilab. The EC is an extruded lead sheets and scintillating fibers "spaghetti calorimeter" to provide longitudinal containment and energy measurement for electrons and photons.

  13. Data ingestion into NeQuick 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nava, B.; Radicella, S. M.; Azpilicueta, F.

    2011-12-01

    NeQuick 2 is the latest version of the NeQuick ionosphere electron density model developed at the Aeronomy and Radiopropagation Laboratory of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) - Trieste, Italy with the collaboration of the Institute for Geophysics, Astrophysics and Meteorology of the University of Graz, Austria. It is a quick-run model particularly designed for trans-ionospheric propagation applications that has been conceived to reproduce the median behavior of the ionosphere. To provide 3-D specification of the ionosphere electron density for current conditions, different ionosphere electron density retrieval techniques based on the NeQuick adaptation to GPS-derived Total Electron Content (TEC) data and ionosonde measured peak parameters values have been developed. In the present paper the technique based on the ingestion of global vertical TEC map into NeQuick 2 will be validated and an assessment of the capability of the model to reproduce the ionosphere day-to-day variability will also be performed. For this purpose hourly GPS-derived global vertical TEC maps and hourly foF2 values from about 20 ionosondes corresponding to one month in high solar activity and one month in low solar activity period will be used. Furthermore, the first results concerning the ingestion of space-based GPS-derived TEC data will be presented.

  14. The (20)Ne interaction in extended matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Wong, M.; Schimmerling, W.

    1984-01-01

    Although heavy ion transport theory is developed to a relatively advanced stage, the present limitation in biomedical and electronic applications is the uncertainty in nuclear fragmentation parameters. The present status on Ne-20 beams is discussed and useful formulae are presented for future use in analysis of beam transport experiments.

  15. 76 FR 53018 - Nebraska Disaster #NE-00044

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Nebraska Disaster NE-00044 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... State of Nebraska (FEMA- 4014-DR), dated 08/12/2011. Incident: Severe Storms, Tornadoes,...

  16. 75 FR 67162 - Nebraska Disaster #NE-00040

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Nebraska Disaster NE-00040 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Straight-line Winds. Incident Period: 09/13/2010 through 09/14/2010. DATES: Effective Date:...

  17. Can PBDE natural formation and degradation processes interfere with the identification of anthropogenic trends and sources? Evidences from sediments of the Nador Lagoon (Morocco).

    PubMed

    Piazza, Rossano; Bellucci, Luca Giorgio; Giuliani, Silvia; Romano, Stefania; Frignani, Mauro; Pizzini, Sarah; Polo, Fabio Paolo; Vecchiato, Marco; Zambon, Stefano; El Moumni, Bouchta

    2016-07-15

    This paper presents the first results related to PBDE concentrations in sediments of the Nador Lagoon (N-E Morocco), an area endangered by different pollutant sources. Analyses were performed by HRGC-LRMS and confirmed by HRGC-HRMS on selected samples. Total surficial concentrations were 0.059-8.2ngg(-1). The maxima were found close to Nador City. Along the sedimentary records, the highest total concentrations (11 and 2.2ngg(-1)) were found at depths corresponding to times (1930s-1950s) when these chemicals were not yet produced. Dehydroxylation or demethoxylation of naturally occurring structural analogues of PBDEs under reducing conditions was suggested. BDE-47 dominated the congener compositions, while BDE-209, when present, could be detected only by HRGC-HRMS, proving that analytical degradation modified the original assemblage. Microbial anaerobic degradation could have changed congener compositions in sediments deposited from the 1970s to the 2000s. Current values are not harmful, but increasing trends call for constant monitoring. PMID:27216046

  18. Electron impact excitation of the Ne II and Ne III fine structure levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Loch, S. D.; Pindzola, M. S.; Cumbee, R.; Stancil, P. C.; Ballance, C. P.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of the low lying levels of the Ne II and Ne III ions are of great interest in cool molecular environments including young stellar objects, photodissociation regions, active galactic nuclei, and X-ray dominated regions. We have carried out details computations for cross sections and rate coefficients using the Dirac R-matrix codes (DARC), the Breit-Pauli R-matrix codes (BP) and the Intermediate Coupling Frame Transformation (ICFT) codes, for both Ne II and Ne III. We also compare our results with previous calculations. We are primarily interested in rate coefficients in the temperature range below 1000 K, and the focus is on obtaining the most accurate rate coefficients for those temperatures. We present both a recommended set of effective collision strengths and an indication of the uncertainties on these values. Work at Auburn University and UGA partly supported by NASA Grant NNX15AE47G.

  19. NeXO Web: the NeXO ontology database and visualization platform

    PubMed Central

    Dutkowski, Janusz; Ono, Keiichiro; Kramer, Michael; Yu, Michael; Pratt, Dexter; Demchak, Barry; Ideker, Trey

    2014-01-01

    The Network-extracted Ontology (NeXO) is a gene ontology inferred directly from large-scale molecular networks. While most ontologies are constructed through manual expert curation, NeXO uses a principled computational approach which integrates evidence from hundreds of thousands of individual gene and protein interactions to construct a global hierarchy of cellular components and processes. Here, we describe the development of the NeXO Web platform (http://www.nexontology.org)—an online database and graphical user interface for visualizing, browsing and performing term enrichment analysis using NeXO and the gene ontology. The platform applies state-of-the-art web technology and visualization techniques to provide an intuitive framework for investigating biological machinery captured by both data-driven and manually curated ontologies. PMID:24271398

  20. Discovery of a Circumstellar Disk in the Lagoon Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    Circumstellar disks of gas and dust play a crucial role in the formation of stars and planets. Until now, high-resolution images of such disks around young stars within the Orion Nebula obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) constituted the most direct proof of their existence. Now, another circumstellar disk has been detected around a star in the Lagoon Nebula - also known as Messier 8 (M8) , a giant complex of interstellar gas and dust with many young stars in the southern constellation of Sagittarius and four times more distant than the Orion Nebula. The observations were carried out by an international team of scientists led by Bringfried Stecklum (Thüringer Landessternwarte, Tautenburg, Germany) [1] who used telescopes located at the ESO La Silla observatory and also observations from the HST archive. These new results are paving the road towards exciting research programmes on star formation which will become possible with the ESO Very Large Telescope. The harsh environment of circumstellar disks The existence of circumstellar disks has been inferred from indirect measurements of young stellar objects, such as the spectral energy distribution, the analysis of the profiles of individual spectral lines and measurements of the polarisation of the emitted light [2]. Impressive images of such disks in the Orion Nebula, known as proplyds (PROto-PLanetarY DiskS), have been obtained by the HST during the recent years. They have confirmed the interpretation of previous ground-based emission-line observations and mapping by radio telescopes. Moreover, they demonstrated that those disks which are located close to hot and massive stars are subject to heating caused by the intense radiation from these stars. Subsequently, the disks evaporate releasing neutral gas which streams off. During this process, shock fronts (regions with increased density) with tails of ionised gas result at a certain distance between the disk and the hot star. These objects appear on

  1. A Continuation of Base-Line Studies for Environmentally Monitoring Space Transportation Systems at John F. Kennedy Space Center. Volume 3, Part 1: Ichthyological Survey of Lagoonal Waters. [Indian River lagoon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snelson, F. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Ichthyological species in the Indian River lagoonal system likely to be affected by NASA's aerospace activities at the Kennedy Space Center were surveyed. The importance of the fish found to inhabit the waters in the area is analyzed.

  2. Calculation of electron wave functions and refractive index of Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Min; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2008-10-01

    The radial wave functions of inner electron shell and outer electron shell of a Ne atom were obtained by the approximate analytical method and tested by calculating the ground state energy of the Ne atom. The equivalent volume of electron cloud and the refractive index of Ne were calculated. The calculated refractive index agrees well with the experimental result. Relationship between the refractive index and the wave function of Ne was discovered.

  3. Characterization and evolution of the sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon located next to a former mining area.

    PubMed

    García, Gregorio; Muñoz-Vera, Ana

    2015-11-15

    Coastal lagoons are ecosystems that are relatively enclosed water bodies under the influence of both the terrestrial and the marine environment, being vulnerable to human impacts. Human activities, such as mining extraction, are significant anthropogenic coastal stressors that can negatively affect ecosystems and communities. In light of the above, the objective of this research is to examine the influence of metal mining activities on the composition of sediments of a Mediterranean coastal lagoon, named Mar Menor. This paper presents a comprehensive characterization for grain size, mineralogy, geochemistry and organic matter of sediments of this coastal lagoon, investigating their variation along space and time. Sedimentation dynamics are ruling clearly the grain size predominant in each area of the Mar Menor coastal lagoon, determining the existence of entrainment, transport and sedimentation areas. For minerals, elements and organic matter, sedimentation dynamics are also determining their distribution. PMID:26371846

  4. Effect of climate change and mollusc invasion on eutrophication and algae blooms in the lagoon ecosystems of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, Sergei; Gorbunova, Julia; Rudinskaya, Lilia

    2015-04-01

    Coastal lagoons are most vulnerable to impacts of natural environmental and anthropogenic factors. The Curonian Lagoon and Vistula Lagoon are the largest coastal lagoons of the Baltic Sea, relating to the most highly productive water bodies of Europe. The Curonian Lagoon is choke mostly freshwater lagoon, while the Vistula Lagoon is restricted brackish water lagoon. In the last decades the nutrients loading changes, warming trend and biological invasions are observed. The researches (chlorophyll, primary production, nutrients, phytoplankton, benthos, etc) were carried out monthly since 1991 to 2014. The database includes 1600 stations in the Curonian Lagoon, 1650 stations in the Vistula Lagoon. Eutrophication and algae blooms are most important problems. Multiple reductions of nutrients loading from the watershed area in 1990s did not result in considerable improvement of the ecological situation in the lagoons. The Curonian Lagoon may be characterized as hypertrophic water body with "poor" water quality. Climate change in 1990s-2000s combined with other factors (freshwater, slow-flow exchange, high nutrients concentrations) creates conditions for Cyanobacteria "hyperblooms". Hyperbloom of Cyanophyta (average for the growing season Chl > 100 μg/l) were observed during 4 years in 1990s and 7 years in 2000s. The summer water temperature is the key environmental factor determining the seasonal and long-term variability of the primary production and algae blooms. Mean annual primary production in 2010-2014 (600 gC·m-2·year-1) is considerable higher, than in the middle of 1970s (300 gC·m-2·year-1). The local climate warming in the Baltic region caused ongoing eutrophication and harmful algae blooms in the Curonian Lagoon despite of significant reduction of nutrients loading in 1990s-2000s. Harmful algal blooms in July-October (chlorophyll to 700-3400 μg/l) result in deterioration of the water chemical parameters, death of fish in the coastal zone and pollution

  5. ANALYSIS OF LAGOON SAMPLES FROM DIFFERENT CONCENTRATED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS (CAFOS) FOR ESTROGENS AND ESTROGEN CONJUGATES (PRESENTATION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) have been identified as potentially important sources for the release of estrogens into the environment, information is lacking on the concentrations of estrogens in whole lagoon effluents (including suspended solids) which ...

  6. A 3D hydrodynamic fate and transport model for herbicides in Sacca di Goro coastal lagoon (Northern Adriatic).

    PubMed

    Carafa, R; Marinov, D; Dueri, S; Wollgast, J; Ligthart, J; Canuti, E; Viaroli, P; Zaldívar, J M

    2006-10-01

    Sacca di Goro is a shallow coastal microtidal lagoon with a surface area of 26 km2, and an average depth of about 1.5m. Fresh water pollutant loads from Po River branches and several drainage canals lead to anthropogenic eutrophication, frequent summer anoxia crises and chemical contamination. Such events not only affect the lagoon ecosystem but also cause serious economic losses, the lagoon being the second largest producer of clams in Italy. The present work aims at using a fate model coupled with COHERENS 3D hydrodynamic model to simulate and to explain the spatial distribution and temporal variations of s-triazines herbicides in the Sacca di Goro lagoon. The simulation results of spatial and temporal dynamic behaviour of atrazine, simazine and terbuthylazine have been compared with experimental data obtained during an annual monitoring programme. PMID:16643962

  7. A MECHANISTIC MODEL OF RUNOFF-ASSOCIATED FECAL COLIFORM FATE AND TRANSPORT THROUGH A COASTAL LAGOON. (R828676C003)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fecal coliform (FC) contamination in coastal waters is an ongoing public health problem worldwide. Coastal wetlands and lagoons are typically expected to protect coastal waters by attenuating watershed pollutants including FC bacteria. However, new evidence suggests that coast...

  8. Accuracy of inverse dispersion method with open-path remote sensing instrument for measuring gas emission from waste lagoons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trace gas emission from treatment lagoons and storage ponds pose challenging conditions for existing micrometeorological techniques due to surface inhomogeneity and short fetch to establish equilibrated microclimate conditions within the water boundary. This study evaluated the accuracy of an emergi...

  9. Before-after environmental impact assessment of an artificial channel opening on a south-western Atlantic choked lagoon system.

    PubMed

    Prestrelo, L; Monteiro-Neto, C

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the human induced impact of a channel opening in a choked lagoon and attempted to establish the cause-effect links for the observed changes. The same lagoon system was sampled before and after the channel opening event, and the differences in fish and crustacean assemblages and environmental variables between these periods analysed. The opening of the artificial channel resulted in salinity increases, leading to a shift in species composition, favouring marine species and reducing abundance and diversity of previously dominant freshwater species. Furthermore, saltwater entrance into the choked lagoon caused an unexpected decrease in species richness and biomass, plus deterioration of ecosystem processes, reducing fishing capacity. The effects of salinity on the ecosystem vary depending on the ecosystem's composition and capacity to overcome salinity changes, thus specific monitoring projects are important strategies for developing coastal lagoon conservation management. PMID:27250914

  10. Impacts of maintenance channel dredging in a northern Adriatic coastal lagoon. I: Effects on sediment properties, contamination and toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Roberta; Pasteris, Andrea; Ponti, Massimo

    2009-10-01

    Conservation and management of coastal lagoons envisage direct human intervention. To prevent siltation and to preserve the hydrodynamics features of the lagoon system, the inner channels undergo regular maintenance dredging. Sediment properties (RDP, organic matter, grain size), trace metals (Cd, Cu, Cr, Hg, Ni, and Pb), and toxicity vs. the amphipod Corophium insidiosum and the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, were analysed before and after dredging operations in a coastal lagoon (Pialassa Baiona, Italy). To detect the actual impacts, disturbed sites were contrasted with multiple controls in two distinct times, i.e. before and after disturbance, according to a sampling design based on Beyond BACI principles. The integrated methodology here adopted suggests that dredging operations carried out are not likely to pose dramatic effects on environmental quality of the lagoon.

  11. Seasonal dynamics and Trophic interactions of phytoplankton and zooplankton in the Vistula Lagoon of the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrieva, O. A.; Semenova, A. S.

    2012-11-01

    The trophic relationships of the phytoplankton and zooplankton in the Vistula Lagoon in 2008-2010 were investigated. In the current period, the lagoon is an eutrophic water body with summer blooms of blue-green algae. The trophic level of the Vistula Lagoon influences both the composition and quantitative characteristics of the communities of phytoplankton and zooplankton and the trophic relationships between them. In the analyzed period, the consumption of phytoplankton by the zooplankton on the average in the growing season was 28%, which is 1.5 times higher than in the late 1970s. The high grazing pressure of the zooplankton on the phytoplankton reduces its biomass, production, and the intensity of the blooming by the blue-green algae in the Vistula Lagoon.

  12. Identifying nutrient sources to three lagoons at Ofu and Olosega, American Samoa using δ15N of benthic macroalgae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Kroeger, Kevin D.; Fenner, Douglas; Craig, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Degradation of nearshore habitats is a serious problem in some areas of American Samoa, such as in Pago Pago Harbor on Tutuila Island, and is a smaller but chronic problem in other areas. Sedimentation, pollution, nutrient enrichment from surface runoff or groundwater, and trampling are the major factors causing the changes (Peshut and Brooks, 2005). On the outer islands of Ofu and Olosega (Manu’a Islands; Fig. 1), there is an interesting contrast between relatively pristine lagoon habitats not far from comparatively degraded lagoon habitats. To’aga lagoon on the southeast side of Ofu Island (Fig. 1) has clear waters, a high diversity of corals and fishes, no human habitations, and an undeveloped watershed with no streams. To’aga lagoon is within the boundaries of the National Park of American Samoa and is the site of long-term research on coral reef resilience and global climate change. Only 3 km to the east of To’aga is a degraded lagoon that fronts Olosega Village. The Olosega lagoon is similar in size but has significantly less live coral than To’aga, and blooms of filamentous algae have been reported to cover the Olosega lagoon/reef flat bottom (unpublished data, PC; Fig. 2). The islands are influenced by the same regional-scale and biogeochemical regimes, and both islands are remnants of a volcanic caldera (Craig, 2005). Thus, local factors operating on the scale of a kilometer or less are thought to be driving the differences observed between lagoons. Land disturbance is limited to a road linking the villages, the clearing of vegetation for buildings, and two village dump sites located on the narrow strip of land between the steep slopes of the islands and the shoreline; there is no industry or associated pollution on either island. Cesspools are used for sewage disposal. Nutrient enrichment (from cesspools) of groundwater and the lagoon, as well as trampling during gleaning of reef organisms, are possible factors affecting the spatial relief

  13. Spatial variations in dietary organic matter sources modulate the size and condition of fish juveniles in temperate lagoon nursery sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escalas, Arthur; Ferraton, Franck; Paillon, Christelle; Vidy, Guy; Carcaillet, Frédérique; Salen-Picard, Chantal; Le Loc'h, François; Richard, Pierre; Darnaude, Audrey Michèle

    2015-01-01

    Effective conservation of marine fish stocks involves understanding the impact, on population dynamics, of intra-specific variation in nursery habitats use at the juvenile stage. In some regions, an important part of the catching effort is concentrated on a small number of marine species that colonize coastal lagoons during their first year of life. To determine the intra-specific variation in lagoon use by these fish and their potential demographic consequences, we studied diet spatiotemporal variations in the group 0 juveniles of a highly exploited sparid, the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.), during their ∼6 months stay in a NW Mediterranean lagoon (N = 331, SL = 25-198 mm) and traced the origin of the organic matter in their food webs, at two lagoon sites with contrasted continental inputs. This showed that the origin (marine, lagoonal or continental) of the organic matter (OM) available in the water column and the sediment can vary substantially within the same lagoon, in line with local variations in the intensity of marine and continental inputs. The high trophic plasticity of S. aurata allows its juveniles to adapt to resulting differences in prey abundances at each site during their lagoon residency, thereby sustaining high growth irrespective of the area inhabited within the lagoon. However, continental POM incorporation by the juveniles through their diet (of 21-37% on average depending on the site) is proportional to its availability in the environment and could be responsible for the greater fish sizes (of 28 mm SL on average) and body weights (of 40.8 g on average) observed at the site under continental influence in the autumn, when the juveniles are ready to leave the lagoon. This suggests that continental inputs in particulate OM, when present, could significantly enhance fish growth within coastal lagoons, with important consequences on the local population dynamics of the fish species that use them as nurseries. As our results indicate that

  14. Water exchanges between a multi-inlet lagoon and the ocean: the role of forcing mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabião, João Pedro Farinha; Rodrigues, Marta Filipa Gomes; Fortunato, André Bustorff; Jacob, José Manuel Quintela de Brito; Cravo, Alexandra Maria Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the influence of the main drivers controlling the circulation and the transport in coastal lagoons is a necessary step towards the description of the dynamics of their ecosystems. Thus, the influence of the main physical drivers on the water exchanges in a multi-inlet barrier island (western sector of the Ria Formosa coastal lagoon, Portugal) was investigated. Several scenarios of tide, wind, bathymetry and point source discharges were simulated using a three-dimensional circulation model and a particle-tracking model. The circulation is adequately reproduced by the hydrodynamic model, with root mean square errors of about 5-8 cm for the water levels and 5-10 cm/s for the cross-sectional averaged velocities in the western inlets and main channels. Wind has a negligible effect on the modelled water levels and cross-sectional velocities, with differences smaller than 1 % between the simulations with and without wind. However, results show that wind influences significantly the transport by affecting the residual circulation, with distinct effects depending on the wind direction. Upwelling favourable winds (with west component) increase the landward transport through the Faro-Olhão inlet and promote a larger dispersion of the water-borne material inside the lagoon. The residual circulation between the three inlets of the western sector of the lagoon is also significantly affected by the bathymetry. Results show a decrease of about 50 % of the tidal prism of the Ancão inlet between 2002 and 2011, which reduces its capacity to export waterborne material to the adjacent coastal area and increases the residence times in some areas of the lagoon, with potentially adverse effects on the ecosystems' health. The dispersion of potential contaminants from point sources inside the lagoon to the coastal area depends on the combined effect of the tidal phase and amplitude and the location of the source. Mean residence times for the discharges from the wastewater

  15. Environmental occurrence and biota concentration of phthalate esters in Epe and Lagos Lagoons, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Adeogun, Aina O; Ibor, Oju R; Omogbemi, Emmanuel D; Chukwuka, Azubuike V; Adegbola, Rachel A; Adewuyi, Gregory A; Arukwe, Augustine

    2015-07-01

    The high global occurrence of phthalates in different environmental matrixes has resulted in the detection of their metabolites in human urine, blood, and breast milk, indicating a widespread human exposure. In addition, the notorious endocrine disrupting effects of phthalates have shown that they mimic or antagonize the action of endogenous hormones, consequently producing adverse effects on reproduction, growth and development. Herein, we have studied the occurrence of phthalate esters (PEs) in water, sediment and biota of two lagoons (Epe and Lagos) in Nigeria. Two fish species (Tilapia guineensis, and Chrysichthys nigrodigitatus) and a crustacean (the African river prawn--Macrobrachium vollenhovenii) were analyzed for PEs levels using a HPLC method and the derived values were used for calculating bioconcentration factor (BCF), biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) and phthalate pollution index (PPI) in the biota and environment. We observed that the growth and health condition of the fish species were normal with a k-factor of >1. Sediment PE levels were compared with water, at both lagoons showing concentration pattern that is characterized as DEHP = DEP > DBP. We observed that DBP was the predominant compound in T. guineensis, C. nigrodigitatus and African prawn, at both lagoons, showing organ-specific differences in bioconcentration (BCF and BSAF) patterns in the fish species. While there were no observed consistency in the pattern of PE concentration in fish organs, elevated DBP levels in different fish organs may be related to fish habitat and degradation level of phthalates. Low concentration of DEHP, compared with DBP and DEP, was measured in fish organs and whole prawn body. The BSAF values for DEHP were lowest, and highest for DBP for all species at both lagoons, and DEHP easily accumulated more in the sediment (sediment PPI = 0.28 and 0.16 for Epe and Lagos lagoon, respectively). Overall, our findings suggest a broader environmental and human

  16. Diazotroph community succession during the VAHINE mesocosm experiment (New Caledonia lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk-Kubo, K. A.; Frank, I. E.; Hogan, M. E.; Desnues, A.; Bonnet, S.; Zehr, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    The VAHINE mesocosm experiment, conducted in the low-nutrient low-chlorophyll waters of the Noumea lagoon (coastal New Caledonia) was designed to trace the incorporation of nitrogen (N) fixed by diazotrophs into the food web, using large volume (50 m3) mesocosms. This experiment provided a unique opportunity to study the succession of different N2-fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs) and calculate in situ net growth and mortality rates in response to fertilization with dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) over a 23-day period, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays targeting widely distributed marine diazotroph lineages. Inside the mesocosms, the most abundant diazotroph was the heterocyst-forming Richelia associated with Rhizosolenia (Het-1) in the first half of the experiment, while unicellular cyanobacterial Group C (UCYN-C) became abundant during the second half of the experiment. Decreasing DIP concentrations following the fertilization event and increasing temperatures were significantly correlated with increasing abundances of UCYN-C. Maximum net growth rates for UCYN-C were calculated to range between 1.23 ± 0.07 and 2.16 ± 0.07 d-1 in the mesocosms, which are among the highest growth rates reported for diazotrophs. Outside the mesocosms in the New Caledonia lagoon, UCYN-C abundances remained low, despite increasing temperatures, suggesting that the microbial community response to the DIP fertilization created conditions favorable for UCYN-C growth inside the mesocosms. Diazotroph community composition analysis using PCR targeting a component of the nitrogenase gene (nifH) verified that diazotrophs targeted in qPCR assays were collectively among the major lineages in the lagoon and mesocosm samples, with the exception of Crocosphaera-like phylotypes, where sequence types not typically seen in the oligotrophic ocean grew in the mesocosms. Maximum net growth and mortality rates for nine diazotroph phylotypes throughout the 23-day

  17. Potential changes in bacterial metabolism associated with increased water temperature and nutrient inputs in tropical humic lagoons.

    PubMed

    Scofield, Vinicius; Jacques, Saulo M S; Guimarães, Jean R D; Farjalla, Vinicius F

    2015-01-01

    Temperature and nutrient concentrations regulate aquatic bacterial metabolism. However, few studies have focused on the effect of the interaction between these factors on bacterial processes, and none have been performed in tropical aquatic ecosystems. We analyzed the main and interactive effects of changes in water temperature and N and P concentrations on bacterioplankton production (BP), bacterioplankton respiration (BR) and bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) in tropical coastal lagoons. We used a factorial design with three levels of water temperature (25, 30, and 35°C) and four levels of N and/or P additions (Control, N, P, and NP additions) in five tropical humic lagoons. When data for all lagoons were pooled together, a weak interaction was observed between the increase in water temperature and the addition of nutrients. Water temperature alone had the greatest impact on bacterial metabolism by increasing BR, decreasing BP, and decreasing BGE. An increase of 1°C lead to an increase of ~4% in BR, a decrease of ~0.9% in BP, and a decrease of ~4% in BGE. When data were analyzed separately, lagoons responded differently to nutrient additions depending on Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) concentration. Lagoons with lowest DOC concentrations showed the strongest responses to nutrient additions: BP increased in response to N, P, and their interaction, BR increased in response to N and the interaction between N and P, and BGE was negatively affected, mainly by the interaction between N and P additions. Lagoons with the highest DOC concentrations showed almost no significant relationship with nutrient additions. Taken together, these results show that different environmental drivers impact bacterial processes at different scales. Changes of bacterial metabolism related to the increase of water temperature are consistent between lagoons, therefore their consequences can be predicted at a regional scale, while the effect of nutrient inputs is specific to different

  18. Lagoonal reef accretion and holocene sea-level history from three atolls in the Cook Islands, Central South Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, S.C.; Hein, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    Radiocarbon ages of corals from cores collected at nine drill sites in the lagoons of three atolls (Pukapuka, Rakahanga, Aitutaki, Cook Islands) provide a history of lagoon sedimentation in response to Holocene sea-level rise and stabilization. Holocene lagoonal reefs were established between 8700 and 7800 years B.P. on 130,000-200,000 year-old reef platforms that are presently 7 to 22 m below the floor of the lagoons. Comparison of radiocarbon ages of the deepest corals to published sea-level curves indicate that Holocene reefs colonized these substrates rapidly (lagoon flooding, in water depths of less than 8 m. Subsequently, reef growth lagged behind sea-level rise until the outer reef rims reached sea level between 5000 and 4000 years B.P. Average vertical sediment accretion rates for the Holocene in the lagoons varied by location (83 ?? 2 to 278 ?? 8 cm/ka) and decreased through the Holocene in six of seven drill holes as the lagoons shallowed and became enclosed by the outer reef. A sample from an emergent (<0.5 m above present mean tide) reef on Rakahanga is 4610 ?? 100 years old, which may indicate a higher middle Holocene relative sea level on Rakahanga. Coral growth in Rakahanga lagoon ceased less than 2000 years ago, but was prolific in the early to middle Holocene. The timing and pattern of Holocene reef development exhibited in the Cook Islands is consistent with other oceanic islands. An assessment of the response of reef development to sea-level change during the Holocene provides a baseline to predict how future sea-level changes may affect the morphology of modern reefs.

  19. Wind effects on prey availability: How northward migrating waders use brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the sivash, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkuil, Yvonne; Koolhaas, Anita; Van Der Winden, Jan

    Large numbers of waders migrating northward in spring use the Sivash, a large system of shallow, brackish and hypersaline lagoons in the Black Sea and Azov Sea region (Ukraine). The bottoms of these lagoons are often uncovered by the wind. Hence, for waders the time and space available for feeding depend on wind conditions. In hypersaline lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was very poor, consisting mainly of chironomid larvae (0.19 g AFDM·m -2) and brine shrimps Artemia salina, respectively. Brine shrimp abundance was correlated with salinity, wind force, wind direction and water depth. Dunlin Calidris alpina and curlew sandpiper Calidris ferruginea were the only species feeding on brine shrimp. As brine shrimp densities are higher in deeper water, smaller waders such as broad-billed sandpipers Limicola falcinellus are too short-legged to reach exploitable densities of brine shrimp. In brackish lagoons the benthic and pelagic fauna was rich, consisting of polychaetes, bivalves, gastropods, chironomid larvae, isopods and amphipods (8.9 to 30.5 g AFDM·m -2), but there were no brine shrimps. Prey biomass increased with the distance from the coast, being highest on the site that was most frequently inundated. Dunlin, broad-billed sandpiper and grey plover Pluvialis squatarola were the most abundant birds in the brackish lagoon. Due to the effects of wind-tides only a small area was usually available as a feeding site. Gammarus insensibilis was the alternative prey resource in the water layer, and their density varied with wind direction in the same way as brine shrimp. Curlew sandpipers and dunlins in the hypersaline lagoons and broad-billed sandpipers in the brackish lagoons often changed feeding sites, probably following the variation in prey availability. Only because of the large size and variety of lagoons are waders in the Sivash always able to find good feeding sites.

  20. Potential changes in bacterial metabolism associated with increased water temperature and nutrient inputs in tropical humic lagoons

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Vinicius; Jacques, Saulo M. S.; Guimarães, Jean R. D.; Farjalla, Vinicius F.

    2015-01-01

    Temperature and nutrient concentrations regulate aquatic bacterial metabolism. However, few studies have focused on the effect of the interaction between these factors on bacterial processes, and none have been performed in tropical aquatic ecosystems. We analyzed the main and interactive effects of changes in water temperature and N and P concentrations on bacterioplankton production (BP), bacterioplankton respiration (BR) and bacterial growth efficiency (BGE) in tropical coastal lagoons. We used a factorial design with three levels of water temperature (25, 30, and 35°C) and four levels of N and/or P additions (Control, N, P, and NP additions) in five tropical humic lagoons. When data for all lagoons were pooled together, a weak interaction was observed between the increase in water temperature and the addition of nutrients. Water temperature alone had the greatest impact on bacterial metabolism by increasing BR, decreasing BP, and decreasing BGE. An increase of 1°C lead to an increase of ~4% in BR, a decrease of ~0.9% in BP, and a decrease of ~4% in BGE. When data were analyzed separately, lagoons responded differently to nutrient additions depending on Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) concentration. Lagoons with lowest DOC concentrations showed the strongest responses to nutrient additions: BP increased in response to N, P, and their interaction, BR increased in response to N and the interaction between N and P, and BGE was negatively affected, mainly by the interaction between N and P additions. Lagoons with the highest DOC concentrations showed almost no significant relationship with nutrient additions. Taken together, these results show that different environmental drivers impact bacterial processes at different scales. Changes of bacterial metabolism related to the increase of water temperature are consistent between lagoons, therefore their consequences can be predicted at a regional scale, while the effect of nutrient inputs is specific to different

  1. The DAΦNE-Light Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burattini, Emilio; Cinque, Gianfelice; Dabagov, Sultan; Grilli, Antonio; Marcelli, Augusto; Monti, Francesca; Pace, Elisabetta; Piccinini, Massimo; Raco, Agostino

    2004-05-01

    The new Synchrotron Radiation facility at Frascati exploits the intense photon emission from DAΦNE, the 0,51 GeV storage ring circulating over 1 A of electrons. Among the three beamlines commissioned, the Synchrotron INfrared Beamline At Daφne (SINBAD) is fully operational by a brilliant SR beam spanning the entire IR. Recently, the soft X-ray beamline has been characterized and, once implemented the double-crystal monocromator, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy is applied on material standards in the distinguishing energy region below 4 keV. An UltraViolet line, presently dedicated to photobiology dosimetry, has also given first results on cell irradiation in the UVB band.

  2. The DA{phi}NE-Light Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Burattini, Emilio; Cinque, Gianfelice; Dabagov, Sultan; Grilli, Antonio; Marcelli, Augusto; Pace, Elisabetta; Piccinini, Massimo; Raco, Agostino; Monti, Francesca

    2004-05-12

    The new Synchrotron Radiation facility at Frascati exploits the intense photon emission from DA{phi}NE, the 0,51 GeV storage ring circulating over 1 A of electrons. Among the three beamlines commissioned, the Synchrotron INfrared Beamline At Da{phi}ne (SINBAD) is fully operational by a brilliant SR beam spanning the entire IR. Recently, the soft X-ray beamline has been characterized and, once implemented the double-crystal monocromator, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy is applied on material standards in the distinguishing energy region below 4 keV. An UltraViolet line, presently dedicated to photobiology dosimetry, has also given first results on cell irradiation in the UVB band.

  3. Does coastal lagoon habitat quality affect fish growth rate and their recruitment? Insights from fishing and acoustic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brehmer, P.; Laugier, T.; Kantoussan, J.; Galgani, F.; Mouillot, D.

    2013-07-01

    Ensuring the sustainability of fish resources necessitates understanding their interaction with coastal habitats, which is becoming ever more challenging in the context of ever increasing anthropogenic pressures. The ability of coastal lagoons, exposed to major sources of disturbance, to provide resources and suitable habitats for growth and survival of juvenile fish is especially important. We analysed three lagoons with different ecological statuses and habitat quality on the basis of their eutrophication and ecotoxicity (Trix test) levels. Fish abundances were sampled using fishing and horizontal beaming acoustic surveys with the same protocols in the same year. The relative abundance of Anguilla anguilla, Dicentrarchus labrax or the Mugilidae group was not an indicator of habitat quality, whereas Atherina boyeri and Sparus aurata appeared to be more sensitive to habitat quality. Fish abundance was higher in the two lagoons with high eutrophication and ecotoxicity levels than in the less impacted lagoon, while fish sizes were significantly higher in the two most severely impacted lagoons. This leads us to suggest low habitat quality may increase fish growth rate (by the mean of a cascading effect), but may reduce lagoon juvenile abundance by increasing larval mortality. Such a hypothesis needs to be further validated using greater investigations which take into account more influences on fish growth and recruitment in such variable environments under complex multi-stressor conditions.

  4. Immunotoxic potential of aeration lagoon effluents for the treatment of domestic and hospital wastewaters in the freshwater mussel Elliptio complanata.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Francois; André, Chantale; Fortier, Marlène; Fournier, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Municipal wastewaters are major sources of pollution for the aquatic biota. The purpose of this study was to determine the levels of some pharmaceutical products and the immunotoxic potential of a municipal wastewater aeration lagoon for the treatment of the domestic wastewaters of a small town with wastewater inputs from a 400-bed hospital complex. Endemic mussels were collected, caged and placed in the final aeration lagoon and at sites 1 km upstream and 1 km downstream of the effluent outfall in the receiving river for a period of 14 days. The results showed that the final aeration lagoon contained high levels of total coliforms, conductivity and low dissolved oxygen (2.9 mg/L) as well as detectable amounts of trimethoprim, carbamazepine, gemfibrozil, and norfloxacin at concentrations exceeding 50 ng/L. The lagoon effluent was indeed toxic to the mussel specimens, as evidenced by the appearance of mortality after 14 days (10% mortality), decreased mussel weight-to-shell-length ratio and loss of hemocyte viability. The number of adhering hemocytes, phagocytic activity, total nitrite levels and arachidonic cyclooxygenase activity were significantly higher in mussels placed in the final aeration lagoon. A multivariate analysis also revealed that water pH, conductivity, total coliforms and dissolved oxygen were the endpoints most closely linked with phagocytic activity, the amount of adhering hemocytes and loss of hemocyte viability. In conclusion, exposure of mussels to treated aerated lagoon wastewater is deleterious to freshwater mussels where the immune system is compromised. PMID:22893952

  5. Status of KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccobene, G.

    2016-07-01

    The recent observation of cosmic neutrinos by IceCube has pushed the quest towards the identification of cosmic sources of high-energy particles. The KM3NeT Collaboration is now ready to launch the massive construction of detection units to be installed in deep sea to build a km-cubic size neutrino telescope. The main elements of the detector, the status of the project and the expected perfomances are briefly reported.

  6. CLIPS on the NeXT computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnock, Elizabeth; Eng, Norman

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the integration of CLIPS into a hybrid expert system neural network AI tool for the NeXT computer. The main discussion is devoted to the joining of these two AI paradigms in a mutually beneficial relationship. We conclude that expert systems and neural networks should not be considered as competing AI implementation methods, but rather as complimentary components of a whole.

  7. UCB-NE-101 user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.W.L.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide users of UCB-NE-101 with the information necessary to use UCB-NE-101 effectively. UCB-NE-101 calculates the concentration of solubility-limited species as a function of space and time and its mass flux rates from a waste sphere buried in a nuclear waste repository in water-saturated rock. The waste is surrounded by one type of rock, and some distance away, there is another type of rock. The inner layer of rock can be a backfill around a nuclear waste package and the outer layer the natural rock. The mass flux calculated is at the interface of the two layers. The species concentration calculated is in the inner layer. A constant concentration of the species, usually the solubility, is specified at the waste sphere/inner layer interface. Dissolution and transport is governed by the solubility of the species, and diffusion in the porous media. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  8. Diet selectivity and shift of wintering common pochards and tufted ducks in a eutrophic coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, Yoshio; Hiratsuka, Jun'ichi; Yamamuro, Masumi; Oka, Nariko; Abe, Manabu

    2000-10-01

    Diet selectivity and shift of common pochards ( Aythya ferina) and tufted ducks ( A. fuligula) were investigated in the eutrophic coastal lagoon, Lake Nakaumi, during three winters (1994-1997). These two diving ducks fed mainly on mussels Musculista senhousia, but used food resources differently. Common pochards foraged larger mussels that were depleted earlier than the smaller ones eaten by tufted ducks. After the mussel biomass decreased in late winter, tufted ducks shifted their diet to clams Ruditapes philippinarum and Crustacea, while common pochards shifted only to the clam. Thus, depletion of mussel biomass in the lagoon affected common pochards earlier and stronger than tufted ducks. We suggest that different use of food resources of each species influenced their wintering patterns. Tufted ducks used the wintering area for a long period, while common pochards moved to the other area when animal foods became less abundant.

  9. Carbon mass-balance modeling and carbon isotope exchange processes in the Curonian Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisevičiūtė, Rūta; Žilius, Mindaugas; Ertürk, Ali; Petkuvienė, Jolita

    2016-04-01

    The Curonian lagoon one of the largest coastal lagoons in Europe is located in the southeastern part of the Baltic Sea and lies along the Baltic coast of Lithuania and the Kaliningrad region of Russia. It is influenced by a discharge of the Nemunas and other smaller rivers and saline water of the Baltic Sea. The narrow (width 0.4 km, deep 8-14 m) Klaipėda Strait is the only way for fresh water run-off and brackish water intrusions. This research is focused on carbon isotope fractionations related with air - water exchange, primary production and organic carbon sedimentation, mineralization and uptake from both marine and terrestrial sources.

  10. Hydrodynamics of a shallow coastal lagoon with submarine groundwater discharge: a numerical modeling exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, R.; Marino-Tapia, I.

    2013-05-01

    Coastal lagoons are subjected to physical forces that make them vulnerable to climate change and human intervention. The karstic geology along the coastal zone of Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, forces groundwater to discharge in the sea and coastal lagoons through underground conduits that can form small but numerous and scattered underwater springs. These freshwater inputs, along with other physical forces like ocean tides and meteorological events, can have a significant effect on the circulation and residence times in coastal lagoons. Climate change consequences such as sea level rise and changing rain patterns, as well as the increasing human impact, can cause or aggravate certain environmental effects. Since coastal lagoons provide important environmental services there is a need to understand and have predictive capability to simulate the transport processes and the forces acting on them. The present study was carried out in the coastal lagoon of Celestun, located at NW Yucatan Peninsula, a region of karstic geology. The aim of this research is to understand the barotropic hydrodynamic functioning of this shallow system, taking into account the oceanographical, meteorological and hydrological forcing. Emphasis is made on the residence times in different parts of the lagoon, and the effects of freshwater inputs. For the detailed understanding of the processes the hydrodynamic numerical model DELFT3D was implemented. The model was validated with data gathered on the field during two intensive oceanographic campaigns, which included installation of CTDs and acoustic current meters at strategic sites distributed in the system, and detailed bathymetric measurements using an echosounder coupled with a differential GPS on board of a motorboat. In order to improve model performance a sensitivity analysis to the main variables involved in the model was carried out, among them: the size of the grid cells, grid depth, time step, friction coefficients, boundary conditions

  11. Transcriptomic resources for environmental risk assessment: a case study in the Venice lagoon.

    PubMed

    Milan, M; Pauletto, M; Boffo, L; Carrer, C; Sorrentino, F; Ferrari, G; Pavan, L; Patarnello, T; Bargelloni, L

    2015-02-01

    The development of new resources to evaluate the environmental status is becoming increasingly important representing a key challenge for ocean and coastal management. Recently, the employment of transcriptomics in aquatic toxicology has led to increasing initiatives proposing to integrate eco-toxicogenomics in the evaluation of marine ecosystem health. However, several technical issues need to be addressed before introducing genomics as a reliable tool in regulatory ecotoxicology. The Venice lagoon constitutes an excellent case, in which the assessment of environmental risks derived from the nearby industrial activities represents a crucial task. In this context, the potential role of genomics to assist environmental monitoring was investigated through the definition of reliable gene expression markers associated to chemical contamination in Manila clams, and their subsequent employment for the classification of Venice lagoon areas. Overall, the present study addresses key issues to evaluate the future outlooks of genomics in the environmental monitoring and risk assessment. PMID:25514060

  12. Determining the footprint of sewage discharges in a coastal lagoon in South-Western Europe.

    PubMed

    Cravo, Alexandra; Fernandes, Denise; Damião, Tânia; Pereira, Catarina; Reis, Margarida P

    2015-07-15

    Ria Formosa is a highly productive lagoon in South-Western Europe, supporting 90% of Portuguese clam production. Decreases in shellfish production have been ascribed to deterioration of water quality due to sewage discharges. Nevertheless, a thorough study considering their impact on the whole lagoon system has been missing. This work determined the sewage footprint from the major sewage treatment plants (STP) regarding eutrophication and microbial contamination within a two-year monitoring program. This focused on salinity, oxygen, nutrients, chlorophyll-a and faecal coliforms. Areas closer to sewage discharges showed an evident impact with maximum effects detected at the major STP. However, globally, the Ria Formosa did not show clear eutrophication problems due to high tidal flushing. Ammonium, oxygen, chlorophyll-a and faecal coliforms, unlike the other parameters, showed no seasonality. Microbiological contamination was of great concern and public health issues could be avoided by settling shellfish beds at least 500 m away from discharge points. PMID:26013590

  13. Sex-specific daily spawning seaward migration of striped mullet Mugil cephalus in a coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Katselis, G; Koukou, K; Ramfos, A; Moutopoulos, D K

    2015-08-01

    The sex-specific daily spawning seaward migration of striped mullet Mugil cephalus was analysed in Palaiopotamos Lagoon (western Greek coast, eastern Mediterranean Sea) in an 86 day time series. The data set included the daily number of M. cephalus catches in barrier traps, as well as a time series of some weather variables. The analysis revealed an important linkage of the daily migration rate as well as a sex-specific response of the species to the lunar cycle and the short-term fluctuation of weather variables. The daily migration pattern of females was more persistent than that of males, indicating a possible female leadership role during the spawning migration. Multiregression models described quite accurately the sex-specific daily migration rates of the species, thus providing a potentially powerful tool regarding the lagoon fishery management of M. cephalus, especially in the context of climate change. PMID:26108151

  14. Concentrations of radionuclides in reef and lagoon pelagic fish from the Marshall Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Brunk, J.L.; Marsh, K.V.

    1981-07-01

    A radiological survey was conducted from September through November of 1978 to assess the concentrations of persistent man-made radionuclides in the terrestrial and marine environments of 11 atolls and 2 islands of the Northern Marshall Islands. The atolls and islands include Rongelap, Utirik, Taka, Bikar, Rongerik, Ailinginae, Likiep, Jemo, Ailuk, Mejet, Wotho, Ujelang and Bikini. Over 4000 terrestrial and marine samples were collected for radionuclide analysis from 76 different islands. Soils, vegetation, indigenous animals, and cistern and groundwater were collected from the islands. Reef fish, pelagic species, clams, lagoon water, and sediments were obtained from the lagoons. A report is given of all available concentration data for /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 239+240/Pu, /sup 238/Pu, /sup 241/Am as well as naturally occurring /sup 40/K and other gamma emitting radionuclides in tissues and organs of different species of fish collected from the atolls.

  15. Harmful Algae Records in Venice Lagoon and in Po River Delta (Northern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    PubMed Central

    Bilaničovà, Dagmar; Marcomini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    A detailed review of harmful algal blooms (HAB) in northern Adriatic Sea lagoons (Po River Delta and Venice lagoon) is presented to provide “updated reference conditions” for future research and monitoring activities. In the study areas, the high mollusc production requires the necessity to identify better methods able to prevent risks for human health and socioeconomical interests. So, an integrated approach for the identification and quantification of algal toxins is presented by combining microscopy techniques with Liquid Chromatography coupled with High Resolution Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-HR-TOF-MS). The method efficiency was first tested on some samples from the mentioned coastal areas, where Dinophysis spp. occurred during summer in the sites directly affected by seawaters. Although cell abundance was always <200 cells/L, the presence of Pectenotoxin-2 (PTX2), detected by HPLC-HR-TOF-MS, indicated the potential release of detectable amounts of toxins even at low cell abundance. PMID:24683360

  16. Sterile Neutrino Searches in MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarra, Christina M.

    2014-09-01

    Tension among recent short baseline neutrino experiments has pointed toward the possible need for the addition of one or more sterile (non-interacting) neutrino states into the existing neutrino oscillation framework. This thesis first presents the motivation for sterile neutrino models by describing the short-baseline anomalies that can be addressed with them. This is followed by a discussion of the phenomenology of these models. The MiniBooNE experiment and results are then described in detail, particularly the most recent antineutrino analysis. This will be followed by a discussion of global fits to world data, including the anomalous data sets. Lastly, future experiments will be addressed, especially focusing on the MicroBooNE experiment and light collection studies. In particular, understanding the degradation source of TPB, designing the TPB-coated plates for MicroBooNE and developing lightguide collection systems will be discussed. We find an excess of events in the MiniBooNE antineutrino mode results consistent with the LSND anomaly, but one that has a different energy dependence than the low-energy excess reported in neutrino mode. This disagreement creates tension within global fits which include up to three sterile neutrinos. The low-energy excess will be addressed by the MicroBooNE experiment, which is expected to start taking data in early 2015. Tension among existing experiments calls for additional, more decisive future experiments.

  17. Modeling of the atomic Ne laser in He/Ne/Ar gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, W.; Kushner, S.; Kushner, M.J.

    1992-12-01

    The high pressure atomic Ne laser operates on 4 visible transitions between the 3p and 3s manifolds. There has been renewed interest in this laser due to demonstrated high efficiency lasing at 585 nm in e-beam and fission fragment excited plasmas. A comprehensive computer model for the Ne laser in He/Ne/Ar mixtures has been developed to examine excitation mechanisms. The authors found that direct excitation of the 3p manifold by dissociative recombination of Ne{sub 2}{sup +} is the likely pumping mechanism, while state-selective Penning reactions dominantly relax the lower levels. Comparisons to experiments performed on a short pulsed e-beam excited laser showed that the electron temperature in the afterglow is determined by a slow relaxation of excited states in Ar. Oscillation does not occur until these manifolds are depleted, and the electron temperature falls. Scaling laws for the Ne laser at low pump powers, as obtained using fission fragment excitation, will be discussed.

  18. Moisture Effects on Nitrogen Availability in Municipal Biosolids from End-of-Life Municipal Lagoons.

    PubMed

    Jeke, Nicholson N; Zvomuya, Francis; Ross, Lisette

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen (N) availability affects plant biomass yield and, hence, phytoextraction of contaminants during phytoremediation of end-of-life municipal lagoons. End-of-life lagoons are characterized by fluctuating moisture conditions, but the effects on biosolid N dynamics have not been adequately characterized. This 130-d laboratory incubation investigated effects of three moisture levels (30, 60, and 90% water-filled pore space [WFPS]) on N mineralization (N) in biosolids from a primary (PB) and a secondary (SB) municipal lagoon cell. Results showed a net increase in N with time at 60% WFPS and a net decrease at 90% WFPS in PB, while N at 30% WFPS did not change significantly. Moisture level and incubation time had no significant effect on N in SB. Nitrogen mineralization rate in PB followed three-half-order kinetics. Potentially mineralizable N (N) in PB was significantly greater at 60% WFPS (222 mg kg) than at 30% WFPS (30 mg kg), but rate constants did not differ significantly between the moisture levels. Nitrogen mineralization in SB followed first-order kinetics, with N significantly greater at 60% WFPS (68.4 mg kg) and 90% WFPS (94.1 mg kg) than at 30% WFPS (32 mg kg). Low N in SB suggests high-N-demanding plants may eventually have limited effectiveness to remediate biosolids in the secondary cell. While high N in PB would provide sufficient N to support high biomass yield, phytoextraction potential is reduced under dry and near-saturated conditions. These results have important implications on the management of moisture during phytoextraction of contaminants in end-of-life municipal lagoons. PMID:26641340

  19. Wastewater treatment lagoons (ponds). (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and storage of wastewaters in lagoons. The design, operation, and equipment for treatment and storage techniques, and associated pretreatment processes are discussed. Included in the references are treatment of wastewaters from industrial operations. Descriptions and evaluations of specific facilities are provided. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  20. Environmental Dynamics as a Structuring Factor for Microbial Carbon Utilization in a Subtropical Coastal Lagoon

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Cecilia; Piccini, Claudia; Unrein, Fernando; Bertoglio, Florencia; Conde, Daniel; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Laguna de Rocha belongs to a series of shallow coastal lagoons located along South America. It is periodically connected to the sea through a sand bar, exhibiting a hydrological cycle where physicochemical and biological gradients are rapidly established and destroyed. Its most frequent state is the separation of a Northern zone with low salinity, high turbidity and nutrient load, and extensive macrophyte growth, and a Southern zone with higher salinity and light penetration, and low nutrient content and macrophyte biomass. This zonation is reflected in microbial assemblages with contrasting abundance, activity, and community composition. The physicochemical conditions exerted a strong influence on community composition, and transplanted assemblages rapidly transformed to resembling the community of the recipient environment. Moreover, the major bacterial groups responded differently to their passage between the zones, being either stimulated or inhibited by the environmental changes, and exhibiting contrasting sensitivities to gradients. Addition of allochthonous carbon sources induced pronounced shifts in the bacterial communities, which in turn affected the microbial trophic web by stimulating heterotrophic flagellates and virus production. By contrast, addition of organic and inorganic nutrient sources (P or N) did not have significant effects. Altogether, our results suggest that (i) the planktonic microbial assemblage of this lagoon is predominantly carbon-limited, (ii) different bacterial groups cope differently with this constraint, and (iii) the hydrological cycle of the lagoon plays a key role for the alleviation or aggravation of bacterial carbon limitation. Based on these findings we propose a model of how hydrology affects the composition of bacterioplankton and of carbon processing in Laguna de Rocha. This might serve as a starting hypothesis for further studies about the microbial ecology of this lagoon, and of comparable transitional systems. PMID

  1. Assessment of the trophic status of four coastal lagoons and one estuarine delta, eastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cotovicz Junior, Luiz Carlos; Brandini, Nilva; Knoppers, Bastiaan Adriaan; Mizerkowski, Byanka Damian; Sterza, José Mauro; Ovalle, Alvaro Ramon Coelho; Medeiros, Paulo Ricardo Petter

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic eutrophication of aquatic ecosystems continues to be one of the major environmental issues worldwide and also of Brazil. Over the last five decades, several approaches have been proposed to discern the trophic state and the natural and cultural processes involved in eutrophication, including the multi-parameter Assessment of Estuarine Trophic Status (ASSETS) index model. This study applies ASSETS to four Brazilian lagoons (Mundaú, Manguaba, Guarapina, and Piratininga) and one estuarine delta (Paraíba do Sul River), set along the eastern Brazilian coast. The model combines three indices based on the pressure-state-response (PSR) approach to rank the trophic status and forecast the potential eutrophication of a system, to which a final ASSETS grade is established. The lagoons were classified as being eutrophic and highly susceptible to eutrophication, due primarily to their longer residence times but also their high nutrient input index. ASSETS classified the estuary of the Paraíba do Sul river with a low to moderate trophic state (e.g., largely mesotrophic) and low susceptibility to eutrophication. Its nutrient input index was high, but the natural high dilution and flushing potential driven by river flow mitigated the susceptibility to eutrophication. Eutrophication forecasting provided more favorable trends for the Mundaú and Manguaba lagoons and the Paraíba do Sul estuary, in view of the larger investments in wastewater treatment and remediation plans. The final ASSETS ranking system established the lagoons of Mundaú as "moderate," Manguaba as "bad," Guarapina as "poor," and Piratininga as "bad," whereas the Paraíba do Sul River Estuary was "good." PMID:22821328

  2. Quantifying Methane Fluxes in Sediments from Mangrove-dominated Costal Lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, P.; Young, M. B.; Paytan, A.

    2012-12-01

    Many studies have focused on methane emission from wetland sediments to the water column and atmosphere. However, there is growing evidence that organic rich, highly productive coastal areas such as mangrove-dominated lagoons and estuaries may have high rates of atmospheric methane flux, particularly in polluted areas. Dissolved methane concentrations in surface water and sediments have been measured in two coastal mangrove ecosystems (Celestún and Chelem Lagoons) on the Yucatán Peninsula, Mexico and the estimated diffusive methane fluxes to the atmosphere in both lagoons can reach to 2600 and 80 kg CH4/yr respectively with a much larger yet not quantified ebullition flux . The objectives of this study are to understand the sources and sinks for methane in sediments, how much methane is released from the sediment to water column and the relative contribution of diffusive and bubble fluxes. In addition rates/percentages of methane oxidized in the sediment and water column that lower methane flux to the atmosphere are quantified. Sedimentary geochemical data (methane, sulfate, chloride, particulate organic carbon (POC) and stable carbon isotopes of headspace methane) from the two lagoons were also measured to determine the impact of different salinities and degrees of pollution on POC mineralization and methane fluxes. Stable carbon isotopes of methane data indicate gas productions mainly by CO2 reduction with minor acetate fermentation signatures. A numerical transport-reaction model will be apply to the data to estimate sulfate reduction, methane oxidation and production rates and advective methane fluxes. The modeled results will be compared to methane bubble fluxes measured by flux chambers to obtain total methane emissions from sediment and discuss the role of methane from mangriove areas in impacting global climate change.

  3. Nutrient conversions by photosynthetic bacteria in a concentrated animal feeding operation lagoon system.

    PubMed

    Sund, J L; Evenson, C J; Strevett, K A; Nairn, R W; Athay, D; Trawinski, E

    2001-01-01

    A diurnal examination was conducted to determine the effect of photosynthetic bacteria on nutrient conversions in a two-stage concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) lagoon system in west-central Oklahoma. Changes in nutrients, microbial populations, and physical parameters were examined at three depths (0, 1.5, and 3.0 m) every 3 h over a 36-h period. The south lagoon (SL) was anaerobic (dissolved oxygen [DO] = 0.09 +/- 0.12 mg/L) while the north lagoon (NL) was facultative (DO ranged from 4.0-0.1 mg/L over 36-h period). Negative sulfide-sulfate (-0.85) and bacteriochlorophyll a (bchl a)-sulfate (-0.83) correlations, as well as positive bchl a-sulfide (0.87) and light intensity (I)-bchl a (0.89) correlations revealed that the SL was dominated by sulfur conversions driven by the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacteria (PSB). The correlation data was supported by diurnal trends for sulfate, sulfide, and bchl a. Both nitrogen and sulfur conversions played a role in the NL; however, nitrogen conversions appeared to dominate this system because of the activity of cyanobacteria. This was shown by positive chlorophyll a (chl a)-I (0.91) and chl a-nitrate (0.98) correlations and the negative correlation between ammonium and nitrite (-0.88). Correlation data was further supported by diurnal trends observed for chl a, DO, and ammonium. For both lagoons, the dominant photosynthetic microbial species determined which nutrient conversion processes were most important. PMID:11285928

  4. An assessment of contamination of the Fusaro Lagoon (Campania Province, southern Italy) by trace metals.

    PubMed

    Arienzo, M; Toscano, F; Di Fraia, M; Caputi, L; Sordino, P; Guida, M; Aliberti, F; Ferrara, L

    2014-09-01

    The Fusaro Lagoon is a shallow lagoon, located in SW Italy, largely influenced in the last decades by several anthropic impacts. The study examined the pollution status of the lagoon, during year 2011-2012 at nine sampling stations with the aim to find out proper measurements of water lagoon restoration. Concentrations of heavy metals (HMs) (aluminium [Al], barium [Ba], cadmium [Cd], copper [Cu], iron [Fe], manganese [Mn], vanadium [V] and zinc [Zn]) were examined in water, sediments and specimens of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis sp. A. Low levels of dissolved oxygen concentration were detected at many stations, with mean values of 5.2-6.4 mg L(-1). The redox potential of surface waters was also low, -2.7 to 50.7 mV. Sediments possessed high organic matter content, 17.7-29.4%. In sediments, the mean Zn level, 251.4 mg kg(-1), was about sixfold higher than that recorded in year 2000 (38.5 mg kg(-1)) and considerably higher than that recorded in 2007 (191 mg kg(-1)). The mean levels of Cd were outstandingly high, with a mean value of 70.5 mg kg(-1), about 30- and 50-fold higher than those determined in 2000 and 2007, respectively. Cadmium (Cd), Cu and nickel (Ni) appeared in excess with respect to most current guidelines, reaching significant pollution levels. C. intestinalis sp. A was detected only at few stations, with metals accumulated preferentially in the body in respect to the tunic, from 1.2 times for Zn (178 mg kg(-1)) to 4.0 times for V (304 mg kg(-1)). Data suggests the necessity of an immediate action of eco-compatible interventions for environmental restoration. PMID:24865384

  5. Limiting similarity, niche filtering and functional diversity in coastal lagoon fish communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouillot, David; Dumay, Olivier; Tomasini, Jean Antoine

    2007-02-01

    The fundamental idea behind the study of biodiversity patterns is the presumed connection between the shape of species assemblages and the functional ways in which they are organized, this functional organization referring to how species are related to one another, as competitors or members of a web of interactions and to how species are facing similar environmental constraints. Amongst the different facets of biodiversity, functional diversity is certainly a key for ecosystem processes in coastal areas. However, surprisingly, patterns of functional diversity have received little attention until now. After presenting a common framework linking functional diversity patterns to species coexistence theories, the aim of our study was twofold: (1) to seek assembly rules in brackish lagoon fish communities drove by functional traits. To this aim we used null models to examine the influence of two opposing forces acting on community structure: interspecific competition that might prevent the coexistence of the most similar species, and environmental filters that might result in the most similar species to coexist. (2) To seek relationships between fish functional diversity and environmental gradients, if any. Fish sampling was carried out in two coastal lagoons where stations differ considerably in terms of physicochemical parameters. Using morphological functional traits, functional diversity of fish communities was estimated using two recently published indices as well as a new proposed index. Firstly our study was not able to demonstrate a limitation of similarity in coexisting lagoon fishes due to interspecific competition. Conversely our results support the niche filtering hypothesis preventing species too dissimilar from one another to co-occur at the same station. Secondly, salinity was positively related to the functional diversity of fishes in both lagoons suggesting that within species assemblages near the channel species are less redundant than at stations far

  6. Reconstruction of historical atmospheric deposition of DDT in the Zempoala Lagoon, in the center of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van, Afferden M.; Hansen, A.M.; Fuller, C.C.

    2005-01-01

    Historical trend in deposition of DDT and its metabolites has been reconstructed by analyzing sediment cores of the Zempoala Lagoon, in the center of Mexico. The small watershed of this mountain lagoon is closed, and it is located between 2.800 and 3.700 masl. It ls neither affected by agriculture nor by permanent populations. The Zempoala Lagoon has an average depth of 3.9 mand a maximum depth of 8.8 m. Sediments were extracted with a eore sampler and analyzed by isotope methods (137CS and 2'OPb) for dating. Average sedimentation rate was determined in 0.129 9 cm" yr', corresponding to a maximum age of the 44 cm eore of approximately 60 years. The first presence of total-DDT oecurs in a depth between 28 and 32 cm of the sediment profile, corresponding to the 1960's, with a concentration of 5.3 I1g kg-'. The maximum eoncentration of total-DDT (13.0I1g kg-') occurs in sediment layers representing the late 1970's and beginning 1980's. More recently the concentration decreases towards the present concentration of 1.6 I1g kg-'. This concentration is below most DDT levels reported in recent sediment studies in the USA. The results indicate that the Zempoala Lagoon represents a natural reeipient for studies of the reconstruction of historical trends of atmospheric contaminant deposition in this region. The limitations of the methodology applied, due to the influenee of biodegradation on the definition of correct historical coneentrations of DDT depositions, are demonstrated.

  7. Airborne lidar measurements of wave energy dissipation in a coral reef lagoon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Reineman, Benjamin D.; Lenain, Luc; Melville, W. Kendall; Middleton, Jason H.

    2012-03-01

    Quantification of the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate in the water column, ɛ, is very important for assessing nutrient uptake rates of corals and therefore the health of coral reef lagoon systems. However, the availability of such data is limited. Recently, at Lady Elliot Island (LEI), Australia, we showed that there was a strong correlation between in situ measurements of surface-wave energy dissipation and ɛ. Previously, Reineman et al. (2009), we showed that a small airborne scanning lidar system could measure the surface wavefield remotely. Here we present measurements demonstrating the use of the same airborne lidar to remotely measure surface wave energy fluxes and dissipation and thereby estimate ɛ in the LEI reef-lagoon system. The wave energy flux and wave dissipation rate across the fore reef and into the lagoon are determined from the airborne measurements of the wavefield. Using these techniques, observed spatial profiles of energy flux and wave energy dissipation rates over the LEI reef-lagoon system are presented. The results show that the high lidar backscatter intensity and point density coming from the high reflectivity of the foam from depth-limited breaking waves coincides with the high wave-energy dissipation rates. Good correlations between the airborne measurements and in situ observations demonstrate that it is feasible to apply airborne lidar systems for large-scale, long-term studies in monitoring important physical processes in coral reef environments. When added to other airborne techniques, the opportunities for efficient monitoring of large reef systems may be expanded significantly.

  8. Application of Potential Non-Point Pollution Index For An Urban Watershed: Istanbul, Kucukcekmece Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musaoglu, N.; Dikerler, T.; Seker, D. Z.; Ustun, B.

    2011-12-01

    Istanbul is a major city with more than 15 million population and limited water resources. Besides, its urbanized area has been rapidly expanding for more than 30 years. Küçükçekmece Lagoon, as a potential RAMSAR site with its rich natural diversity and housing asset for birds, has been suffering from urbanization and industrial stress. With Sazlidere Dam constructed on the Lagoon's most important creek which supplies fresh water, Küçükçekmece Basin has almost 600 km2 wide area. Due to dam operation which cuts fresh water input down, water quality of the Küçükçekmece Lagoon has been deteriorating, as well as other antropogenic impacts. Potential non-point pollution index (or PNPI) is based on land use, soil and topographic data and aims to highlight the potentially polluting areas in a watershed. Denoting those areas, PNPI puts an assessment of the pressure exerted on the water bodies by different land uses. This index calculates different layers in order to represent run-off, land cover effect, and the distance of each polluting source (or pixels) in the study area. By the multiplication of those layers under GIS, a new data layer is produced showing the polluting potential of each pixel on the study area. For by Küçükçekmece Basin, Landsat ETM satellite images have been taken and its land use produced by unsupervised classification. Using this updated data, land use - land cover indicator has been calculated for the basin. Topography is another fact that is needed to produce both run-off indicator and distance indicator and it is generated by elevation data with 5m resolution. By integrating these indicator layers, PNPI analysis layer has been produced for Küçükçekmece Lagoon watershed.

  9. Bioaccumulation of mercury in reared and wild Ruditapes philippinarum of a Mediterranean lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giani, Michele; Rampazzo, Federico; Berto, Daniela; Maggi, Chiara; Mao, Andrea; Horvat, Milena; Emili, Andrea; Covelli, Stefano

    2012-11-01

    The Marano and Grado lagoon, one of the largest wetlands in the Mediterranean Sea, has been subject to mercury contamination by industrial and mining activities. This must be considered a severe threat for Manila clam harvesting, which is an important fishing and commercial activity in the area. Contamination levels and potential risk for human consumption both in reared and wild clams collected from the lagoon were assessed by analyzing total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) contents. In addition, relationships between THg and MeHg in sediments and in the bivalves were investigated. Increased bioaccumulation of THg but not of MeHg with increasing size of wild clam populations was observed at most sites. Higher concentrations both of THg (605 ± 210 ng g-1 ww) and MeHg (147 ± 37 ng g-1 ww) were detected in the eastern lagoon where the highest THg contents in sediments were observed as a consequence of the long-term supply of cinnabar rich suspended material from the Isonzo river. The variation of Hg content in seeded Manila clams during growth was monitored over a period of 18 months at two sites of the western sector of the lagoon. Results showed that the two areas were suitable for clam farming, with THg levels in reared bivalves always lower than the 0.5 mg kg-1 ww European Community limit. At the same time, as clams grew bigger in size, their THg and MeHg concentrations decreased, becoming lower than in the starting seeded pool. Reared clams presented lower THg (84 ± 55 ng g-1 ww) and MeHg (44.1 ± 24.6 ng g-1 ww) content than wild clams of the same commercial size (>30 mm). Based on a precautionary approach, intake of Hg and MeHg with the estimated clam consumption does not seem to constitute a risk for human health in the studied area.

  10. Nutrient dynamics in tropical rivers, lagoons, and coastal ecosystems of eastern Hainan Island, South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, R. H.; Liu, S. M.; Li, Y. W.; Zhang, G. L.; Ren, J. L.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-01

    Nutrient dynamics based on field observations made along the eastern Hainan Island during the period 2006-2009 were investigated to understand nutrient biogeochemical processes, and to provide an overview of human perturbations of coastal ecosystems in this tropical region. The rivers showed seasonal variations in nutrient concentrations, with enrichment of dissolved inorganic nitrogen and dissolved silicate, and depletion of PO43-. High riverine concentrations of nitrate mainly originated from agricultural fertilizer inputs. The DIN : PO43- ratios ranged from 37 to 1063, suggesting preferential depletion of PO43- relative to nitrogen in rivers. Chemical weathering in the drainage area might explain the high levels of dissolved silicate. Aquaculture ponds contained high concentrations of NH4+ and dissolved organic nitrogen. The particulate phosphorus concentrations in the study area were lower than those reported for estuaries worldwide. The particulate silicate levels in rivers and lagoons were lower than the global average level. Nutrient biogeochemistry in coastal areas was affected by human activities (e.g., aquaculture, agriculture), and by natural phenomena including typhoons. The nutrient concentrations in coastal waters were low because of dispersion of land-derived nutrients in the sea. Nutrient budgets were built based on a steady-state box model, which showed that riverine fluxes are magnified by estuarine processes (e.g., regeneration, desorption) in estuaries and Laoyehai Lagoon, but not in Xiaohai Lagoon. Riverine and groundwater inputs were the major sources of nutrients to Xiaohai and Laoyehai lagoons, respectively, and riverine inputs and aquaculture effluents were the major sources for the eastern coast of Hainan Island. Nutrient inputs to the coastal ecosystem increased with typhoon-induced runoff of rainwater, elucidating the important influence of typhoons on small tropical rivers.

  11. Modelling alongshore flow in a semi-enclosed lagoon strongly forced by tides and waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Barthel, Knut; Christensen, Kai H.; Furaca, Noca; Gammelsrød, Tor; Hoguane, António M.; Nharreluga, Bilardo

    2014-08-01

    Alongshore flows strongly driven by tides and waves is studied in the context of a one-dimensional numerical model. Observations from field surveys performed in a semi-enclosed lagoon (1.7 km×0.2 km) outside Xai-Xai, Mozambique, are used to validate the model results. The model is able to capture most of the observed temporal variability of the current, but sea surface height tends to be overestimated at high tide, especially during high wave events. Inside the lagoon we observed a mainly uni-directional alongshore current, with speeds up to 1 ms-1. The current varies primarily with the tide, being close to zero near low tide, generally increasing during flood and decreasing during ebb. The observations revealed a local minimum in the alongshore flow at high tide, which the model was successful in reproducing. Residence times in the lagoon were calculated to be less than one hour with wave forcing dominating the flushing. At this beach a high number of drowning casualties have occurred, but no connection was found between them and strong current events in a simulation covering the period 2011-2012.

  12. Do pharmaceuticals bioaccumulate in marine molluscs and fish from a coastal lagoon?

    PubMed

    Moreno-González, R; Rodríguez-Mozaz, S; Huerta, B; Barceló, D; León, V M

    2016-04-01

    The bioaccumulation of 20 pharmaceuticals in cockle (Cerastodema glaucum), noble pen shell (Pinna nobilis), sea snail (Murex trunculus), golden grey mullet (Liza aurata) and black goby (Gobius niger) was evaluated, considering their distribution throughout the Mar Menor lagoon and their variations in spring and autumn 2010. The analytical procedure was adapted for the different matrices as being sensitive and reproducible. Eighteen out of the 20 compounds analysed were found at low ngg(-1) in these species throughout the lagoon. Hydrochlorothiazide and carbamazepine were detected in all species considered. The bioaccumulation of pharmaceuticals was heterogeneous in the lagoon, with a higher number of pharmaceuticals being detected in fish (18) than in wild molluscs (8), particularly in golden grey mullet muscle (16). В-blockers and psychiatric drugs were preferentially bioccumulated in fish and hydrochlorothiazide was also confirmed in caged clams. The higher detection frequency and concentrations found in golden grey mullet suggested that mugilids could be used as an indicator of contamination by pharmaceuticals in coastal areas. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that shows data about hydrochlorothiazide, levamisole and codeine in wild marine biota. PMID:26775009

  13. Saltwater intrusion at a buoyant jet discharge in a fringing reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra, S. M.; Marino-Tapia, I.; Enriquez, C.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2013-05-01

    The influence of tides and waves on turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) from a buoyant jet discharge in a fringing reef lagoon was observed with measurements obtained throughout an 11-day period in July 2011. Tidal variations within the lagoon modulated TKE levels, temperature, and salinity at the buoyant jet. During neap and low tides, TKE values were predominantly >0.015 m2/s2. During neap tides, TKE at the jet was greater than during spring tides, meaning that larger tidal oscillations inhibited TKE production at the jet. When the water surface over the jet remained >0.02 m above the mean, TKE was suppressed to <0.005 m2/s2. During spring and high tides, the jet reversed flow directions, for the first time showing saltwater intrusion into the aquifer. This demonstrates the sensitivity of the jet discharge to fortnightly tides, despite the small tidal range (<0.3 m during spring tide) in the study area. Additionally, wind-waves from a passing storm (occurring towards the end of the measurement period) produced greater incident waves and created a wave set-up within the lagoon. The wave set-up further stressed the jet, reinforcing the salt intrusion into the aquifer caused by the spring tide oscillations. Therefore, increased sea levels, as illustrated here by the combination of incident waves, wave set-up and fortnightly tidal oscillations, is expected to threaten delicate aquifer conditions and vital water resources for coastal communities worldwide.

  14. Metal bioaccumulation pattern by Cotylorhiza tuberculata (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) in the Mar Menor coastal lagoon (SE Spain).

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Vera, Ana; García, Gregorio; García-Sánchez, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Coastal lagoons are ecosystems highly vulnerable to human impacts because of their situation between terrestrial and marine environment. Mar Menor coastal lagoon is one of the largest lagoons of the Mediterranean Sea, placed in SE Spain and subjected to major human impacts, in particular the mining of metal sulphides. As a consequence, metal concentration in water column and sediments of this ecosystem is usually higher than in other areas. For monitoring ecosystem health, the present study has assessed the ability of Cotylorhiza tuberculata for bioaccumulating metals from sea water. Up to 65 individuals were sampled at 8 different sampling stations during the summer of 2012. Although the concentration values for different elements considered were moderate (Pb: 0.04-29.50 ppm, Zn: 2.27-93.44 ppm, Cd: 0-0.67 ppm, As: 0.56-130.31 ppm) by dry weight of the jellyfish tissues (bell and oral arms combined), bioconcentration levels in relation to seawater metal concentration were extremely high. In any case, the use or disposal of these organisms should consider their metal content because of their potential environmental and health implications. PMID:26250818

  15. Health assessment for William Dick Lagoons, Honeybrook, Pennsylvania, Region 3. CERCLIS No. PAD980537773. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The William Dick Lagoon site consists of three unlined lagoons (approximately 2.5 acres total area) which previously contained over four million gallons of rinse water from cleaning chemical tank trailers. In 1970, two of the lagoons breached and released approximately 300,000 gallons of wastewater into the nearby area and a small tributary. Trichloroethylene, toluene, 4,4-DDE, and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons have been reported in the soil on the site. Trichloroethylene was detected in a nearby spring, previously used as a water source by a small number of residents. Potential human exposure pathways include ingestion of contaminated water, dermal exposure to contaminated water and soil, and inhalation of contaminated dust and organics in the contaminated groundwater. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances. However, it does not appear that a human population is currently exposed to site contaminants at levels of health concern.

  16. Ecosystem level assessment of the Grand Calumet Lagoons, Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, P.M.

    1995-12-31

    The Grand Calumet Lagoons make up the eastern section of the Grand Calumet River (GCR), Indiana Harbor and Ship Canal and nearshore Lake Michigan Area of Concern (AOC). The GCR AOC is the only one of the 42 Great Lakes Areas of Concern identified by the International Joint Commission with all 14 designated uses classified as impaired. Included within the boundaries of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (INDU), is the central section of the Grand Calumet Lagoons. A number of biotic and abiotic factors were tested to determine the effects of an industrial landfill that borders the lagoons to assess the potential impact on park resources. Analysis included water quality testing, assessments of macroinvertebrate, fish, algae and aquatic plant communities and contaminant concentrations in water, sediment and plant and fish tissue. Surface water testing found very few contaminants, but significantly higher nutrient levels were found in the water column closest to the landfill. Macroinvertebrate, aquatic plant and fish communities all showed significant impairment in relationship to their proximity to the landfill. Aquatic plant growth habit became limited next to the landfill with certain growth habits disappearing entirely. Aquatic plants collected close to the landfill had high concentrations of several heavy metals in their stems and shoots. Using the index of biotic integrity (IBI), fish community assessment indicated impairment in the areas adjacent to the landfill. Sediments tested at one site had over 12% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and carp (Cyprinus carpio) collected from this site had whole fish tissue concentrations over 1 mg/kg PAH.

  17. Water Hyacinths for Upgrading Sewage Lagoons to Meet Advanced Wastewater Treatment Standards, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Water hyacinths, Eichhornia crassipes Mart. Solms, have demonstrated the ability to function as an efficient and inexpensive final filtration system in a secondary domestic sewage lagoon during a three month test period. These plants reduced the suspended solids, biochemical oxygen demanding substances, and other chemical parameters to levels below the standards set by the state pollution control agency. The water hyacinth-covered secondary lagoon utilized in this experiment had a surface area of 0.28 hectare (0.70 acre) with a total capacity of 6.8 million liters (1.5 million gallons), receiving an inflow of 522,100 liters (115,000 gallons) per day from a 1.1 hectare (3.8 acre) aerated primary sewage lagoon. These conditions allowed a retention time of 14 to 21 days depending on the water hyacinth evapotranspiration rates. The desired purity of final sewage effluent can be controlled by the water hyacinth surface area, harvest rate, and the retention time.

  18. Seasonal change in a filter-feeding bivalve Musculista senhousia population of a eutrophic estuarine lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamuro, Masumi; Hiratsuka, Jun'ichi; Ishitobi, Yu

    2000-10-01

    Filter-feeding bivalves often predominate the benthic biomass of estuaries, although their population size may drastically fluctuate due to physical and biological disturbances. To examine the recovery of a mussel population after periods of severe predation and anoxia, and to estimate the amount of nutrients removed from the system through mussel production, we surveyed, over 2 years, the Musculista senhousia population in the estuarine lagoon, Lake Nakaumi, Japan. Predation by diving ducks ( Aythya fuligula, Aythya ferina and Aythya marila) during winter dramatically reduced the mussel biomass in both years, but recruitment of juvenile mussels sustained the population. Anoxia during the second summer severely reduced the mussel population, resulting in less biomass than in the autumn of the previous year. Potential annual removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from the lagoon water through burial of M. senhousia shells under oxic conditions was estimated to be 7.1 and 5.1 tons, respectively. These are equivalent to 0.7% and 4.9% of the nitrogen and phosphorous annual load entering the lagoon via the main river. Under anoxic conditions, removal would decrease to only 5.6% of the potential amount.

  19. The application of profile imaging for monitoring organic and metal pollution in the Venice lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Bona, F.; Maffiotti, A.

    1995-12-31

    Since 1993 the technique of Sediment Profile Imaging (SPI) has been applied in monitoring the Venice Lagoon. The purposes of the monitoring were several, ranging from an initial baseline survey of sediment quality, to the control of Ulva rigida proliferation, to sediment quality assessment for dredging and capping activities in restricted areas of the lagoon. Data resulting from each computer image analysis have been summarized in one index which takes into consideration the mutual interactions between the physical and chemical conditions and the benthic community. In this way a spatial and seasonal gradient in the quality Venice Lagoon sediments has been established and the key roles of the organic enrichment and of the ecosystem hydrodynamics have been confirmed. The underwater camera and image analysis have also been an effective screening tool to address further investigations in those areas of particular concern for sediment contamination. On the basis of the SPI indices a selection of stations has been made in order to sample and perform sediment toxicity tests and chemical analyses to assess contamination levels.

  20. Benthic macrofauna and sediment reworking quantification in contrasted environments in the Thau Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duport, E.; Gilbert, F.; Poggiale, J.-C.; Dedieu, K.; Rabouille, C.; Stora, G.

    2007-04-01

    As part of the Microbent-PNEC Program: "Biogeochemical processes at the water-sediment interface in eutrophicated environment", the aim of this work was to specifically investigate and quantify the relationships between macrobenthos and sediment reworking in the Thau Lagoon in order to provide information on the potential contaminant distribution and movements at the water-sediment interface. In order to achieve this, three cores were sampled at two stations (in the central part of the Thau Lagoon and near the shellfish farming zone) in the Thau Lagoon, in December 2001, April 2002, August 2002, January 2003 and May 2003. On the basis of quantification of macrobenthos and sediment reworking, evidence is provided of: (1) similar sediment mixing intensities for different species composition at the two stations; (2) the major role of functional bioturbation groups (e.g., biodiffusors and gallery-diffusors) modulated by seasonal variability on sediment mixing; (3) an increase of intensity in summer suggesting potentially different patterns of redistribution, bioaccumulation and chemical fate (e.g., speciation) of deposited contaminants.

  1. Copepod community succession during warm season in Lagoon Notoro-ko, northeastern Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshizumi; Ichikawa, Hideaki; Kitamura, Mitsuaki; Nishino, Yasuto; Taniguchi, Akira

    2015-06-01

    Lagoon Notoro-ko, located on the northeastern coast of Hokkaido, Japan, and connected to the Okhotsk Sea by a human-made channel, is strongly influenced by local hydrography, as water masses in the lagoon are seasonally influenced by the Soya Warm Current and the East Sakhalin Current. We here report on the succession of copepod communities during the warm season in relation to water mass exchange. Copepods were categorized into four seasonal communities (spring/early-summer, mid-summer, late-summer/fall, and early-winter) via a cluster analysis based on Bray-Curtis similarities. Spring/early-summer and early-winter communities were characterized by the temperate-boreal calanoid Pseudocalanus newmani, comprising 34.9%-77.6% of the total abundance of copepods during times of low temperature/salinity, as influenced by the prevailing East Sakhalin Current. Late-summer/fall communities were characterized by the neritic warm-water calanoid Paracalanus parvus s.l., comprising 63.9%-96.3% of the total abundance, as influenced by the Soya Warm Current. Mid-summer communities comprised approximately equal abundances of P. parvus, Eurytemora herdmani, Scolecithricella minor, and Centropages abdominalis (12.8%-28.2%); this community is transitional between those of the spring/early-summer and late-summer/fall. Copepod community succession in Lagoon Notoro-ko can be largely explained by seasonal changes in water masses.

  2. Taxonomic diversity and structure of benthic macroinvertebrates in Aby Lagoon (Ivory Coast, West Africa).

    PubMed

    Kouadio, K N; Diomandé, D; Ouattara, A; Koné, Y J M; Gourène, G

    2008-09-15

    The benthic macroinvertebrates of Aby lagoon (West Africa: Ivory coast) was studied during four seasons (high dry season, high rainy season, low dry season and low rainy season, respectively) from June 2006 to March 2007. The distribution of the benthic macroinvertebrates species was recorded at 13 stations on the whole of the lagoon. A total of 62 taxa of benthic macroinvertebrates belonging to 28 families and 10 orders were listed. The molluscs and crustaceans dominate qualitatively by adding up 51 and 24%, respectively of the total number of organisms. Five taxa (Corbula trigona (20%), Pachymelania aurita (12%), Clibernhardius cooki (7%), Oligochaeta (7%) and Crassostrea gasar (6%) accounted for 52% of total abundance. Classification analysis used to perform the characterisation of the lagoon on the basis of benthic macroinvertebrates showed the existence of four main clusters in which the seasonal pattern in benthic macroinvertebrates were very similar in the four seasons. In contrast the species richness and diversity indices were significantly different. Furthermore these indices where higher in the stations closer to the sea and surrounded by mangrove trees (southern area) compared to the inland ones. PMID:19137831

  3. Support mechanisms for oil spill accident response in costal lagoon areas (Ria de Aveiro, Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Eduardo R.; Silveira, Bruno; Alves, Fátima L.

    2014-10-01

    Oil spill accidents can be caused by several risk factors associated to maritime transport and port activities, which cannot always be predicted or controlled. Therefore, it is essential to support prevention and contingency plans, whose effectiveness is crucial to produce adequate responses and minimize resulting impacts. Ria de Aveiro (Portugal) is a wide coastal lagoon, within a densely populated area, representing a concentration of important biodiversity resources and several economic activities. This paper presents alternative methodologies to support the optimization of civil protection assets in the occurrence of oil spill events and the results of their application on a section area of the Aveiro Lagoon, using an established geographic information system database containing crucial data. The presented methodologies are based on the Environmental Sensitivity Index developed by the North American National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (USA) and the Global Vulnerability Index which were applied on the Bay of Biscay (Spain). However, during the development of this work, neither of these methodologies was considered to entirely assess the study area in its full extent, which led to the need to adapt and define a bespoke approach. The introduced changes include extra categories in shoreline classification, an adapted physical vulnerability index for coastal lagoons, differentiated aspects for highly protected status areas, qualitative assessment of socioeconomic features and an access and operability index created to support emergency operation response. The resulting maps are the subject of analysis, in which considerations regarding control and cleanup methods are introduced, together with guidelines for further integration in local risk management strategies.

  4. Hurricane impact on lagoonal reefs - implications for recognition of ancient storm deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Bonem, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    During August 1080, Hurricane Allen passed along the north coast of Jamaica. Although several previous investigations have documented the effects of this hurricane on the fore reef and reef crest, this study presents the first detailed description of the storm impact on lagoonal patch reefs in Discovery Bay. In contrast to the damage described on the fore reef and reef crest, the patch reefs received only minor temporary damage to reef framework due to breakage and increased sedimentation. These effects could be recognized only by examination of bathymetric and zonal maps constructed during the last 10 years. However, hurricane impact on the sedimentologic record was readily observed in cores taken along transects of lagoonal patch reefs. Although in general, shallow reef zones had abnormally great amounts of fine sediment and deeper zones showed increased coarse material, other patterns could be documented and made recognition of storm deposits and distinction of these deposits from artificial disturbance relatively easy. Because lagoonal patch reefs may serve as models for many ancient bioherms, this study provides new evidence that may be used to recognize ancient storm deposits associated with bioherms in carbonate mud environments.

  5. Assessment of fish assemblages in coastal lagoon habitats: Effect of sampling method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A.; Pérez-Ruzafa, A.; Drouineau, H.; Franzoi, P.; Koutrakis, E. T.; Lepage, M.; Verdiell-Cubedo, D.; Bouchoucha, M.; López-Capel, A.; Riccato, F.; Sapounidis, A.; Marcos, C.; Oliva-Paterna, F. J.; Torralva-Forero, M.; Torricelli, P.

    2012-10-01

    The structure of fish assemblages accounted for by different sampling methods (namely fyke net, seine nets, visual census) applied to vegetated and unvegetated lagoon habitats was investigated in terms of species composition, functional groups (ecological and trophic guilds), and fish size distribution. Significant differences were detected among methods, even among similar ones (seine nets). Visual census and fyke net detected more easily pelagic species, allowing the sampling of larger fish, whereas seine nets targeted more efficiently benthic-demersal species, with a dominance of 2-10 cm size classes in the fish catches. Differences were detected also among habitats, reflecting the different fish assemblages associated to vegetated and unvegetated habitats in coastal lagoons and transitional waters. However a different ability of discriminating between habitat-associated fish assemblages was recorded for the sampling methods. The different selectivity and functioning of the tested sampling methods confirm the importance of considering the targeted scale at which the research is being carried out, as well as the method that will be used to assess the ecological status of lagoon fish assemblages when choosing the most appropriate sampling method. A cross-validation of fish sampling methodologies in transitional waters is necessary to cope with the mandatory of the Water Framework Directive of standardization and comparability of monitoring methods.

  6. Modelling and observations of tidal wave propagation, circulation and residence times in Puttalam Lagoon, Sri Lanka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijeratne, E. M. S.; Rydberg, L.

    2007-09-01

    Tidal measurements and a depth-averaged 2D model are used to examine wave progression and circulation in a long, shallow, micro-tidal lagoon in Sri Lanka. Ranges and phase lags for different tidal constituents are used to calibrate the model. A single drag coefficient, Cd = 0.0032, gives almost perfect agreement with data. Current measurements are used for validation of the model. The lagoon tide consists of a combination of progressive and standing waves, where progressive waves dominate in the outer part and standing waves in the inner. A Lagrangian based particle-tracking method is developed to study tidally and wind induced residence times. If tides were the only factor affecting the residual circulation, the residence time inside the narrowest section would be approximately 100 days. Steady winds (of typical monsoon average) decrease the residence times to 60-90 days. Estuarine forcing due to net freshwater supply is not modelled (due to lack of reliable runoff data), but independent, long-term salinity observations and calculations based on volume and salt conservation during periods of negligible freshwater supply (the lagoon is seasonally hypersaline) indicate residence times ranging from 40 to 80 days. Model derived residence times based on tides alone represent a minimum exchange. Even weak forcing, through winds, excess evaporation or freshwater supply efficiently reduces residence times.

  7. Benthic foraminifera of Puerto Rican mangrove-lagoon systems: Potential for paleoenvironmental interpretations

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, S.J. )

    1990-02-01

    Recent foraminiferal assemblages from four traverses across mangrove-lagoonal environments off Puerto Rico exhibit patterns of distribution that should be useful in paleoenvironmental interpretations. Variations in sediment substrate type, abundance and distribution of marine vegetation, and degree of exposure to wave and current activity appear to be important factors related to foraminiferal distributions and abundances. Cluster analysis of foraminiferal abundance data distinguishes four major assemblages. Other generally recognizable trends in foraminiferal assemblages include: offshore increase in species diversity; offshore increase in percent miliolids while percent rotaliids remain more or less constant; small peaks in percent textulariids immediately adjacent to mangrove growth; almost 100% agglutinated assemblages in fully mangrove environments; offshore increase in foraminiferal number except in areas of abundant Halimeda plate production where numbers of foraminifera are diluted; restriction of high abundances of Fissurina, Nonionella, Fursenkoina and Helenina to lagoons behind mangrove islands; restrictions of high abundances of Rosalina, Cibicides, Discorbis, Spiroloculina, Cyclogyra, Quinqueloculina, Amphistegina, Peneroplis and Archaias to lagoons seaward of mangrove islands. These trends provide a micropaleontological link between a potential petroleum source, mangrove swamps, and the potential petroleum reservoir, reef rocks.

  8. Use of different intertidal habitats by faunal communities in a temperate coastal lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Cheila; Coelho, Rui; Silva, Marco; Bentes, Luís; Monteiro, Pedro; Ribeiro, Joaquim; Erzini, Karim; Gonçalves, Jorge M. S.

    2008-11-01

    The faunal communities of four intertidal habitats namely sand, mud, seagrass ( Zostera noltii) and seagrass patches (mixSM) of a temperate coastal lagoon, Ria Formosa (southern Portugal), were sampled. A total of 47 species were taken in 428 bottomless drop sampler samples, with the highest number of species and the more commonly occurring species belonging to the Mollusca phylum. The dominance of these gastropod species underlines the importance of the grazing food chain in these habitats. Bittium reticulatum was the most abundant species, being especially abundant in the seagrass habitat. The most frequent and highest biomass species in the community was Carcinus maenas, a predator that makes use of the available resources and that is adapted to the highly variable intertidal environment. Pomatoschistus microps was the most abundant fish species, with highest densities in the mud habitat, which demonstrates an ability to occupy a low depth area. The seagrass habitat had the highest diversity, abundance and biomass, followed by the mixSM habitat and was different from all the others. Assemblages were highly influenced by the presence of vegetation, providing forage and refuge from predation. A well defined summer group was identified in all habitats. These results highlight the importance of seagrass beds and the idea that their decrease implies the decrease of lagoon production through the impoverishment of the trophic structure of the lagoon.

  9. Microbial community composition of Tirez lagoon (Spain), a highly sulfated athalassohaline environment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim was to study the seasonal microbial diversity variations of an athalassohaline environment with a high concentration of sulfates in Tirez lagoon (La Mancha, Spain). Despite the interest in these types of environments there is scarce information about their microbial ecology, especially on their anoxic sediments. Results We report the seasonal microbial diversity of the water column and the sediments of a highly sulfated lagoon using both molecular and conventional microbiological methods. Algae and Cyanobacteria were the main photosynthetic primary producers detected in the ecosystem in the rainy season. Also dinoflagelates and filamentous fungi were identified in the brines. The highest phylotype abundance in water and sediments corresponded to members of the bacterial phylum Proteobacteria, mainly of the Gamma- and Alphaproteobacteria classes. Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were isolated and identified in Tirez brines and sediment samples. Halophilic sulfate reducing Deltaproteobacteria were also detected (Desulfohalobium). Conclusions Important differences have been found in the microbial diversity present in the Tirez water column and the sediments between the wet and dry seasons. Also the Tirez lagoon showed a high richness of the bacterial Alpha- and Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria and for the archaeal Euryarchaeota. PMID:24083554

  10. [Population ecology of Crocodylus acutus (Reptilia: Crocodylidae) in Palmasola lagoon, Oaxaca, Mexico].

    PubMed

    García-Grajales, Jesús; Silva, Alejandra Buenrostro

    2014-03-01

    Population ecology of Crocodylus acutus (Reptilia: Crocodylidae) in Palmasola lagoon, Oaxaca, Mexico. Abundance and population structure are important parameters to evaluate and compare the conservation status of a population over time in a given area. This study describes the population abundance and structure of Crocodylus acutus in Palmasola lagoon, Oaxaca. The field works consisted of night surveys during the new moon phase, between the 21:00 and 24:00h. These were conducted during the dry and wet seasons and counted the number of individuals to obtain population estimates. Recorded encounter rates ranged from 32 to 109.3ind./ km in 40 journeys deployed with an average time of 18 minutes browsing. The estimated population size using the Messel's model ranged from 32.7 to 93 individuals. For both seasons, there was a marked dominance of subadults, followed by juveniles and to a lesser extent adult individuals, as well as undetermined individuals (i.e. unknown body/size/length), in both seasons. There was also a significant association with mangrove areas (26.1%) by juveniles; the subadults's individual use of superficial water (22.7%) and mangrove areas (15.7%); meanwhile the adults were observed on superficial water (9.7%). This information contributes to our understanding of the population ecology of C. acutus in the Palmasola lagoon where the estimated population size seems to show higher values when compared to other reports in the country. PMID:24912351

  11. Hydromorphic to subaqueous soils transitions in the central Grado lagoon (Northern Adriatic Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vittori Antisari, Livia; De Nobili, Maria; Ferronato, Chiara; Natale, Marco; Pellegrini, Elisa; Vianello, Gilmo

    2016-05-01

    The Grado lagoon is among the largest in the Mediterranean sea and is characterized by salt marshes, where tides influenced the development of a complex micromorphology coupled to a micromosaic of vegetation covers. This study represents the first contribution to the understanding of the main processes governing formation, development and spatial transitions between hydromorphic and subaqueous soils in an Adriatic lagoon ecosystem. Physicochemical characteristics and development of soils were investigated in three salt marshes differing for their proximity to the open sea, textural composition and age of formation. Soils of back barrier salt marshes had A/C profiles and were mostly characterized by a sandy coarse texture that allows rapid drainage and subsurface oxygen exchanges. Soil sequences from the inner salt marsh to its submerged border slope or to a brackish waterhole do not simply represent a hydrosequence, but also reflect erosion/sorting/accumulation processes. The soils in the central part of the lagoon have finer texture and in displayed transition or cambic horizons. Silty clay loam textures and low positions allowed the development of more severe anoxic conditions and accumulation of sulphides. The tide oscillation strongly contributed to formation of redoximorphic features, intensity of anaerobic conditions but also colonization by different plant communities. Discriminant analysis was performed to identify physicochemical properties which discriminate the different soils according to geo-morphological position and prevailing plants. It confirmed that differentiation of plant communities occurred according to distinct morphological and physicochemical soil properties, but also acted as a primary affecting factor of pedogenesis.

  12. Vegetation dynamics in impounded marshes along the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Jorge R.; Crossman, Roy A.; Kain, Tim R.

    1990-05-01

    Data are presented on the vegetation dynamics of two impounded marshes along the Indian River Lagoon, in east-central Florida, USA. Vegetation in one of the marshes (IRC 12) was totally eliminated by overflooding and by hypersaline conditions (salinities over 100 ppt) that developed there in 1979 after the culvert connecting the marsh with the lagoon was closed. Over 20% recovery of the herbaceous halophytes Salicornia virginica, S. bigelovii, and Batis maritima was observed at that site after the culvert was reopened in 1982, but total cover in the marsh remains well below the original 75%. No recovery of mangroves was observed at this site. The second site (SLC 24), while remaining isolated from the lagoon during much of the study, did not suffer the complete elimination of vegetation experienced at the first site. At this location, mangroves increased in cover and frequency with a concomitant decrease in herbaceous halophytes. Considerable damage to the vegetation was evident at IRC 12 when the impoundment was closed and flooded for mosquito control in 1986. Although the damage was temporary, its occurrence emphasizes the need of planning and constant monitoring and adjustment of management details as conditions within particular marshes change. Storms and hurricanes may be important in promoting a replacement of black mangroves by red mangroves in closed impoundments because the former cannot tolerate pneumatophore submergence for long periods of time.

  13. Evaluation of Monensin Transport to Shallow Groundwater after Irrigation with Dairy Lagoon Water.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Sarah C; Harter, Thomas; Parikh, Sanjai J

    2016-03-01

    Animal waste products from concentrated animal feeding operations are a significant source of antibiotics to the environment. Monensin, an ionophore antibiotic commonly used to increase feed efficiency in livestock, is known to have varied toxicological effects on nontarget species. The current study builds on prior studies evaluating the impact of dairy management on groundwater quality by examining the transport of monensin in an agricultural field with coarse-textured soils during irrigation with lagoon wastewater. The dairy is located in California's San Joaquin Valley, where groundwater can be encountered <5 m below the surface. Groundwater samples were collected from a network of monitoring wells installed throughout the dairy and adjacent to irrigated fields before and after an irrigation event, which allowed for measurement of monensin potentially reaching the shallow groundwater as a direct result of irrigation with lagoon water. Monensin was extracted from water samples via hydrophilic-lipophilic balance solid-phase extraction and quantified with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Irrigation water was found to contain up to 1.6 μg L monensin, but monensin was only detected in monitoring wells surrounding the waste storage lagoon. Water chemistry changes in the wells bordering the irrigated field suggest that up to 7% of irrigation water reached groundwater within days of irrigation. The study suggests that contamination of groundwater with monensin can occur primarily by compromised waste storage systems and that rapid transport of monensin to groundwater is not likely to occur from a single irrigation event. PMID:27065394

  14. Multivariate analysis of potentially toxic metals in sediments of a tropical coastal lagoon.

    PubMed

    Oyeyiola, A O; Davidson, C M; Olayinka, K O; Oluseyi, T O; Alo, B I

    2013-03-01

    Surface sediments collected from the Lagos Lagoon, Nigeria, and three adjoining rivers were analysed for their physicochemical properties and pseudo-total concentration of the potentially toxic metals (PTM) Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn. The concentration of the PTM varied seasonally and spatially. Odo-Iyaalaro was observed to be the most polluted river, with highest concentrations of 42.1 mg kg(-1), 102 mg kg(-1), 185 mg kg(-1), 154 mg kg(-1) and 1040 mg kg(-1) of Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn, respectively, while Ibeshe River was the least contaminated, apart from a site affected by Cu from the textile industry. Some of the sediments were found to be above the consensus-based probable effect concentrations and Dutch sediment guideline for metals. Overall metal concentrations were similar to those reported for other tropical lagoon and estuarine systems affected by anthropogenic inputs as a result of rapid urbanisation. Due to the large number of samples, principal component analysis was used to examine relationships within the data set. Generally, sediments collected during the dry season were observed to have higher concentration of PTM than those collected during the rainy season. This means that PTM could accumulate over a prolonged period and then be released relatively rapidly, on an annual basis, into tropical lagoon systems. PMID:22628107

  15. Abundance of six tetracycline resistance genes in wastewater lagoons at cattle feedlots with different antibiotic use strategies.

    PubMed

    Peak, Nicholas; Knapp, Charles W; Yang, Richard K; Hanfelt, Margery M; Smith, Marilyn S; Aga, Diana S; Graham, David W

    2007-01-01

    The abundance of six tetracycline resistance genes tet(O), tet(Q), tet(W), tet(M), tet(B) and tet(L), were quantified over time in wastewater lagoons at concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFO) to assess how feedlot operation affects resistance genes in downstream surface waters. Eight lagoons at five cattle feedlots in the Midwestern United States were monitored for 6 months. Resistance and 16S-rRNA gene abundances were quantified using real-time PCR, and physicochemical lagoon conditions, tetracycline levels, and other factors (e.g. feedlot size and weather conditions) were monitored over time. Lagoons were sorted according to antibiotic use practice at each site, and designated as 'no-use', 'mixed-use' or 'high-use' for comparison. High-use lagoons had significantly higher detected resistance gene levels (tet(R); 2.8 x 10(6) copies ml(-1)) relative to no-use lagoons (5.1 x 10(3) copies ml(-1); P < 0.01) and mixed-use lagoons (7.3 x 10(5) copies ml(-1); P = 0.076). Bivariate correlation analysis on pooled data (n = 54) confirmed that tet(R) level strongly correlated with feedlot area (r = 0.67, P < 0.01) and 'total' bacterial 16S-rRNA gene level in each lagoon (r = 0.51, P < 0.01), which are both characteristic of large CAFOs. tet(M) was the most commonly detected gene, both in absolute number and normalized to 16S-rRNA gene level, although tet(O), tet(Q) and tet(W) levels were also high in the mixed and high-use lagoons. Finally, resistance gene levels were highly seasonal with abundances being 10-100 times greater in the autumn versus the summer. Results show that antibiotic use strategy strongly affects both the abundance and seasonal distribution of resistance genes in associated lagoons, which has implications on water quality and feedlot management practices. PMID:17227419

  16. The lagoon at Caroline/Millennium atoll, Republic of Kiribati: natural history of a nearly pristine ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Barott, Katie L; Caselle, Jennifer E; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Friedlander, Alan M; Maragos, James E; Obura, David; Rohwer, Forest L; Sandin, Stuart A; Smith, Jennifer E; Zgliczynski, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A series of surveys were carried out to characterize the physical and biological parameters of the Millennium Atoll lagoon during a research expedition in April of 2009. Millennium is a remote coral atoll in the Central Pacific belonging to the Republic of Kiribati, and a member of the Southern Line Islands chain. The atoll is among the few remaining coral reef ecosystems that are relatively pristine. The lagoon is highly enclosed, and was characterized by reticulate patch and line reefs throughout the center of the lagoon as well as perimeter reefs around the rim of the atoll. The depth reached a maximum of 33.3 m in the central region of the lagoon, and averaged between 8.8 and 13.7 m in most of the pools. The deepest areas were found to harbor large platforms of Favia matthaii, which presumably provided a base upon which the dominant corals (Acropora spp.) grew to form the reticulate reef structure. The benthic algal communities consisted mainly of crustose coralline algae (CCA), microfilamentous turf algae and isolated patches of Halimeda spp. and Caulerpa spp. Fish species richness in the lagoon was half of that observed on the adjacent fore reef. The lagoon is likely an important nursery habitat for a number of important fisheries species including the blacktip reef shark and Napoleon wrasse, which are heavily exploited elsewhere around the world but were common in the lagoon at Millennium. The lagoon also supports an abundance of giant clams (Tridacna maxima). Millennium lagoon provides an excellent reference of a relatively undisturbed coral atoll. As with most coral reefs around the world, the lagoon communities of Millennium may be threatened by climate change and associated warming, acidification and sea level rise, as well as sporadic local resource exploitation which is difficult to monitor and enforce because of the atoll's remote location. While the remote nature of Millennium has allowed it to remain one of the few nearly pristine coral reef

  17. The Lagoon at Caroline/Millennium Atoll, Republic of Kiribati: Natural History of a Nearly Pristine Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Barott, Katie L.; Caselle, Jennifer E.; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A.; Friedlander, Alan M.; Maragos, James E.; Obura, David; Rohwer, Forest L.; Sandin, Stuart A.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Zgliczynski, Brian

    2010-01-01

    A series of surveys were carried out to characterize the physical and biological parameters of the Millennium Atoll lagoon during a research expedition in April of 2009. Millennium is a remote coral atoll in the Central Pacific belonging to the Republic of Kiribati, and a member of the Southern Line Islands chain. The atoll is among the few remaining coral reef ecosystems that are relatively pristine. The lagoon is highly enclosed, and was characterized by reticulate patch and line reefs throughout the center of the lagoon as well as perimeter reefs around the rim of the atoll. The depth reached a maximum of 33.3 m in the central region of the lagoon, and averaged between 8.8 and 13.7 m in most of the pools. The deepest areas were found to harbor large platforms of Favia matthaii, which presumably provided a base upon which the dominant corals (Acropora spp.) grew to form the reticulate reef structure. The benthic algal communities consisted mainly of crustose coralline algae (CCA), microfilamentous turf algae and isolated patches of Halimeda spp. and Caulerpa spp. Fish species richness in the lagoon was half of that observed on the adjacent fore reef. The lagoon is likely an important nursery habitat for a number of important fisheries species including the blacktip reef shark and Napoleon wrasse, which are heavily exploited elsewhere around the world but were common in the lagoon at Millennium. The lagoon also supports an abundance of giant clams (Tridacna maxima). Millennium lagoon provides an excellent reference of a relatively undisturbed coral atoll. As with most coral reefs around the world, the lagoon communities of Millennium may be threatened by climate change and associated warming, acidification and sea level rise, as well as sporadic local resource exploitation which is difficult to monitor and enforce because of the atoll's remote location. While the remote nature of Millennium has allowed it to remain one of the few nearly pristine coral reef

  18. Population Dynamics, Reproductive Biology and Productivity of Streblospio shrubsolii (Polychaeta: Spionidae) in Different Sediments at Low Salinities in a Mediterranean Lagoon (Monolimni Lagoon, Northern Aegean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kevrekidis, Theodoros

    2005-02-01

    Monthly samples of Streblospio shrubsolii were collected from February 1998 to February 1999 at both parts of Monolimni Lagoon (0.3 psu < Sal. < 6 psu). Streblospio shrubsolii displayed a life cycle of about one year. Reproductive activity occurred from February to October. The worms showed a mean of 14 or 16 gametogenic segments. Reproductive activity, growth and density increased during spring despite the low salinities (0.3 psu). Streblospio shrubsolii showed faster growth, larger body size during autumn-winter, more reproductive peaks, a relatively higher mean annual density, mean anual biomass (B) and annual production (P) at the innermost part of the lagoon, in organically richer very fine sand, than those at the outer part in fine sand. Mean annual density was 1,320 individuals m-2 at the outer part and 1,745 individuals m-2 at the innermost. Production calculated by Hynes's method gave a B of 0.20 g DW m-2 y-1 and P of 0.45 g DW m-2 y-1 at the outer part; the respective values at the innermost part were 0.29 g DW m-2 y-1 and 0.61 g DW m-2 y-1.

  19. Masses and Charge Radii of {sup 17-22}Ne and the Two-Proton-Halo Candidate {sup 17}Ne

    SciTech Connect

    Geithner, W.; Kappertz, S.; Keim, M.; Neugart, R.; Wilbert, S.; Neff, T.; Feldmeier, H.; Herfurth, F.; Yazidjian, C.; Audi, G.; Guenaut, C.; Lunney, D.; Blaum, K.; George, S.; Delahaye, P.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kowalska, M.; Herlert, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Lievens, P.

    2008-12-19

    High-precision mass and charge radius measurements on {sup 17-22}Ne, including the proton-halo candidate {sup 17}Ne, have been performed with Penning trap mass spectrometry and collinear laser spectroscopy. The {sup 17}Ne mass uncertainty is improved by factor 50, and the charge radii of {sup 17-19}Ne are determined for the first time. The fermionic molecular dynamics model explains the pronounced changes in the ground-state structure. It attributes the large charge radius of {sup 17}Ne to an extended proton configuration with an s{sup 2} component of about 40%. In {sup 18}Ne the smaller radius is due to a significantly smaller s{sup 2} component. The radii increase again for {sup 19-22}Ne due to cluster admixtures.

  20. Environmental changes in the Moulay Bousselham lagoon (Morocco) during the last 7 000 years using a multiproxy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zourarah, Bendahhou; Maanan, Mohamed; Conceição Freitas, Maria; Leroy, Suzanne; Andrade, César; Cearreta, Alejandro; Cruces, Anabela

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this research is to reconstruct Holocene environmental changes in Moulay Bousselham lagoon using a multi-proxy approach to the study of sediments of two short cores: biological (e.g., pollen, foraminifera and diatoms), physicochemical (isotopes, chemical composition) and sedimentary (grain size, clay minerals). The research highlights the role of climatic variations and human interference in the evolution of this lagoon. The results show that at the beginning of the Holocene this area corresponded to a wide coastal bay, including the surface of Moulay Bousselham present-day lagoon and Merja Ras Ed-Dora. The dating's obtained in the base of the sediment cores range from 6790-6640 BP (end of the Atlantic and early Sub-boreal). Sand predominates in this section of the cores, with low content of organic matter and high content of bioclasts. Ammonia tepida is the predominant species but Haynesina germânica, Quinqueloculina semínula,Cibicides lobatulus,Criboelphidium oceanensis and Miliolinella sobrotunda are also presente. At the base, foraminifera assemblages show a relative abundance of Planorbulina mediterranensis, Rosalina anomala, Rosalina irregularis, Miliolinella subrotunda and Cibicides lobatulus. These are typical of a shallow environment with normal marine salinity. During the sub-boreal period (6640-4520 BP), a sandy barrier developed and the lagoon evolved to a brackish lagoon with low salinity. Sedimentation is homogeneous, the content of silt and clay is high (90%), calcium carbonate content is usually lower than 20% and the organic material exhibited the highest values (> 10%). Ammonia tepida is also the dominant species but C. oceanensis and H. germanica are secondary. The lagoon was closed in drier conditions and has gradually filled by sediments coming from the watershed, represented by an illite-chlorite association. The lagoon evolved to a sabkha. We must emphasize the role of deforestation caused by the Romans (2100 BP) in that period

  1. Succession within the prokaryotic communities during the VAHINE mesocosms experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, U.; Van Wambeke, F.; Bonnet, S.; Hess, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    N2 fixation fuels ~ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE experiment has been designed to track the fate of diazotroph derived nitrogen (DDN) and carbon within a coastal lagoon ecosystem in a comprehensive way. For this, large-volume (~ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed in the New Caledonia lagoon and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. This study examined the temporal dynamics of the prokaryotic community together with the evolution of biogeochemical parameters for 23 consecutive days in one of these mesocosms (M1) and in the Nouméa lagoon using MiSeq 16S rRNA gene sequencing. We observed clear successions within M1, some of which were not mirrored in the lagoon. The dominating classes in M1 were alpha- and gammaproteobacteria, cyanobacteria (mainly Synechococcus), eukaryotic microalgae, on days 10 and 14 Marine Group II euryarchaea, on days 12-23 also Flavobacteriia. Enclosure led to significant changes in the M1 microbial community, probably initiated by the early decay of Synechococcus and diatoms. However, we did not detect a pronounced bottle effect with a copiotroph-dominated community. The fertilization with ~ 0.8 μM DIP on day 4 did not have directly observable effects on the overall community within M1, as the data samples obtained from before and four days after fertilization clustered together, but likely influenced the development of individual populations later on, like Defluviicoccus-related bacteria and UCYN-C type diazotrophic cyanobacteria. Growth of UCYN-C led to among the highest N2 fixation rates ever measured in this region and enhanced growth of nearly all abundant heterotrophic groups in M1. We further show that different Rhodobacteraceae were the most efficient heterotrophs in the investigated system and we observed niche partitioning within the SAR86 clade. Whereas the location in- or outside the mesocosm had a significant effect on

  2. Evidence of North Africa's green revolution preserved in sedimentary organic matter deposited in three coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Oczkowski, Autumn J; Flower, Roger J; Thompson, Julian R; Ayache, Fethi; Ahmed, Mahmoud H; Ramdani, Mohamed; Turner, Simon

    2011-07-01

    Because of longer residence times and limited mixing in coastal lagoons, the impacts of anthropogenic nutrient loading to lagoon food webs are often more pronounced than in other coastal ecosystems. For these reasons, many lagoons also provide an excellent environment for the deposition and accumulation of organic matter (OM). Sediment cores were retrieved from three North African lagoons to provide records of recent environmental changes. We measured percentage nitrogen (%N), nitrogen stable isotope values (delta15N), and percentage organic matter (%OM), and we used radiometric dating techniques (210Pb, 137Cs) to examine the evidence for the intensification of upstream agricultural practices in sediment cores from Lake Manzala (Egypt), Ghar El Melh Lagoon (Tunisia), and Lagune de Nador (Morocco). With the exception of one core collected near a sewage outfall, sediments from Lake Manzala clearly reflected the impact of agricultural intensification following completion of the Aswan High Dam and delta barrages in the mid-1960s to early 1970s. Both %N and %OM more than doubled in three Manzala sediment cores, and delta15N values declined from 5 per thousand to < 1 per thousand. These changes reflect the increasing use of synthetic fertilizers (delta15N approximately 0 per thousand) from the 1960s to the present. Sediments from Ghar El Melh show a similar trend, with %N more than tripling, %OM increasing by 50%, and delta15N declining from 6 per thousand to 2 per thousand since 1965. These changes are consistent with the increasing use of water from a nearby river for crop irrigation and agricultural fertilizer use. Lagune de Nador receives relatively little agricultural drainage water, and core data did not show the same trends as Manzala and Ghar El Melh. Overall, the sediment core data from these systems reflect environmental shifts in the quantity, quality, and isotope signature of the deposited organic matter and confirm the concerns of local scientists and

  3. Long term changes in Zostera meadows in the Berre lagoon (Provence, Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, Guillaume; Boudouresque, Charles F.; Picon, Philippe

    2007-07-01

    The Berre lagoon (Provence, France), one of the largest Mediterranean brackish lagoons (155 km 2), was occupied, at the turn of the 20th century, by extensive Zostera meadows ( Zostera marina and probably Zostera noltii; perhaps over 6000 ha). Subsequently, the lagoon was disturbed by urban and industrial pollution and, from 1966, by the diversion of the Durance River. This resulted in a 10-49-fold and 8-31-fold increase of the freshwater and silt inputs, respectively. By means of digital analysis of aerial photographs for the years 1944, 1992, 1998 and 2004, coupled with ground truth for the last three dates, we mapped the Zostera meadows. The replacement of Z. marina by Z. noltii, the latter species being already dominant in the 1970s, was completed in 1990. In parallel to this substitution, the Zostera beds underwent a dramatic decline. Their depth limit, which was (6-9) m in the early 20th century, withdrew to 3.5, 3, 1 and less than 1 m by 1944, the 1970s, 1992 and 1998, respectively. Since 1998, Zostera must be considered as functionally extinct. The total surface area of Zostera meadows was of the order of 1.5 ha in 2004. In an attempt to alleviate disturbance, the input of freshwater and silt from the Durance River was significantly reduced from the early 1980s and 1990s respectively. Similarly, from the 1970s to the 1990s, urban and domestic pollution was drastically reduced. Despite these steps, Zostera meadows continued to shrink to near extinction. The lagoon has shifted from a system dominated by seagrass beds to a system with bare silt bottoms, which now occupy most of the lagoon. The reasons could be, in addition to continuing nutrient inputs, the resuspension of silt, no longer trapped under the seagrass canopy, during wind episodes, which are frequent in the area, and/or the release of nutrients from the bare silt habitat, which would constitute an indication of a possible hysteresis of the system. However, since 2000, the establishment of the

  4. Assessing Pathogen Levels in Dairy Lagoon Wastewater and Potential Evaporation Losses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, P.; Biswas, S.; Souza, A.; Silva-del-Rio, N.; Vaddella, V. K.; Castillo, A. R.

    2014-12-01

    The ongoing drought in California necessitates the conservation of existing water resources while protecting the water quality. There is a critical need to improve the understanding of evaporation losses from dairy lagoons in California, and their corresponding changes in pathogen levels in the lagoon wastewater. We have carried out preliminary studies involving extensive dairy lagoon water sampling, and batch-scale experiments. The dairy wastewater was collected from both primary and secondary lagoons in three counties of California (Merced, Tulare, and Glenn Counties) for enumerating the levels of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Subsequently, we conducted batch-scale experiments at mesophilic (31 and 37 ⁰C) and thermophilic temperatures (43 and 49 ⁰C) to understand the E. coli O157:H7 inactivation process and potential evaporative water losses. In addition, we compared the evaporation losses under the environment of biological activity and the environment of restricted biological activity (extreme environment with low pH). For E. coli O157:H7 enumeration, we used MacConkey agar, while for Salmonella spp., XLD agar was used. Listeria monocytogenes levels were measured using PALCAM agar (with selective supplement). In flushed dairy wastewater (fresh) samples, the average of E. coli O157:H7 levels were 2 × 104 CFU/mL. The average Listeria monocytogenes levels in flushed manure were 9 × 101. The levels of Salmonella spp. were non-detectable. In mesophilic condition (37 ⁰C) after 5 days of incubation, 8% of total water loss was observed, while at thermophilic temperature (49 ⁰C), 70% of total water loss was observed. After 5 days of incubation at 37 ⁰C, E. coli O157:H7 levels in flushed dairy manure were increased from 2.8 × 103 to 5.2 × 104 CFU/mL, while at 49 ⁰C, E. coli O157:H7 levels were reduced from 2.8 × 103 to 5 × 101 CFU/mL after 4 days of incubation. We anticipate that the results of this study would be useful

  5. Diazotroph community succession during the VAHINE mesocosms experiment (New Caledonia Lagoon)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk-Kubo, K. A.; Frank, I. E.; Hogan, M. E.; Desnues, A.; Bonnet, S.; Zehr, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The VAHINE mesocosm experiment, conducted in the low-nutrient low-chlorophyll waters of the Noumea Lagoon (coastal New Caledonia) was designed to trace the incorporation of nitrogen (N) fixed by diazotrophs into the food web, using large volume (50 m3) mesocosms. This experiment provided a unique opportunity to study the succession of different N2-fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs) and calculate in situ net growth and loss rates in response to fertilization with dissolved inorganic phosphate (DIP) over a 23 day period, using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. Inside the mesocosms, the diazotroph community assemblage was dominated by the heterocyst-forming Richelia associated with Rhizosolenia (Het-1) in the first half of the experiment, and unicellularcyanobacterial Group C (UCYN-C) became the dominant diazotroph in the second half of the experiment. Decreasing DIP concentrations following the fertilization event and increasing temperatures were significantly correlated with increasing abundances of UCYN-C. Maximum net growth rates for UCYN-C were calculated to be between 1.23 ± 0.07 and 2.16 ± 0.07 d-1 which are among the highest growth rates reported for diazotrophs. Outside the mesocosms in the Noumea Lagoon, UCYN-C abundances remained low, despite increasing temperatures, suggesting that the microbial community response to the DIP fertilization created conditions favorable for UCYN-C growth inside the mesocosms. Maximum net growth and loss rates for nine diazotroph phylotypes throughout the 23 day experiment were variable between mesocosms, and repeated fluctuations between periods of net growth and loss were commonly observed. The field population of diazotrophs in the Noumea Lagoon, was dominated by Het-1 over the course of the study period. However, eight additional diazotroph phylotypes were present in the lagoon at lower abundances, indicating a diverse field population of diazotrophs. Two ecotypes of the Braarudosphaera bigelowii

  6. Succession within the prokaryotic communities during the VAHINE mesocosms experiment in the New Caledonia lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfreundt, Ulrike; Van Wambeke, France; Caffin, Mathieu; Bonnet, Sophie; Hess, Wolfgang R.

    2016-04-01

    N2 fixation fuels ˜ 50 % of new primary production in the oligotrophic South Pacific Ocean. The VAHINE experiment has been designed to track the fate of diazotroph-derived nitrogen (DDN) and carbon within a coastal lagoon ecosystem in a comprehensive way. For this, large-volume ( ˜ 50 m3) mesocosms were deployed in the New Caledonian lagoon and were intentionally fertilized with dissolved inorganic phosphorus (DIP) to stimulate N2 fixation. This study examined the temporal dynamics of the prokaryotic community together with the evolution of biogeochemical parameters for 23 consecutive days in one of these mesocosms (M1) and in the Nouméa lagoon using MiSeq 16S rRNA gene sequencing and flow cytometry. Combining these methods allowed for inference of absolute cell numbers from 16S data. We observed clear successions within M1, some of which were not mirrored in the lagoon. The dominating classes in M1 were Alpha- and Gammaproteobacteria, Cyanobacteria, eukaryotic microalgae, Marine Group II Euryarchaeota, Flavobacteriia, and Acidimicrobia. Enclosure led to significant changes in the M1 microbial community, probably initiated by the early decay of Synechococcus and diatoms. However, we did not detect a pronounced bottle effect with a copiotroph-dominated community. The fertilization with ˜ 0.8 µM DIP on day 4 did not have directly observable effects on the overall community within M1, as the data samples obtained from before and 4 days after fertilization clustered together, but likely influenced the development of individual populations later on, like Defluviicoccus-related bacteria and UCYN-C-type diazotrophic cyanobacteria (Cyanothece). Growth of UCYN-C led to among the highest N2-fixation rates ever measured in this region and enhanced growth of nearly all abundant heterotrophic groups in M1. We further show that different Rhodobacteraceae were the most efficient heterotrophs in the investigated system and we observed niche partitioning within the SAR86 clade

  7. On the Lateral Retreat of Salt Marshes: Field Monitoring in the Venice Lagoon (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, L.; Bendoni, M.; Mel, R.; Oumeraci, H.; Francalanci, S.; Lanzoni, S.

    2014-12-01

    Salt marshes are geomorphic structures located in ecotone environments such as lagoon and estuaries, providing lot of ecosystem services to local population. In the last decades they are disappearing due to several factors such as sea level rise, subsidence and edge erosion due to surface waves. The latter is likely the chief mechanism modeling marsh boundaries and leading to the loss of wide marsh areas. In the case of the Venice Lagoon, from the beginning of the last century, the whole salt marsh surface has more than halved and trends indicate that the salt marshes might completely disappear over the next 50 years. Here, we present a field monitoring activity that we are currently carrying out on a retreating salt marsh located in the north part of the Lagoon of Venice (Italy). The marsh is subject to North-East (Bora) wind. Marsh area loss during the last decades has been documented through the comparison of georeferenced aerial photographs showing a retreat rate of the order of 1 m/year. Field measurements started by the end of November 2013 and consist of: salt marsh bank geometry at different cross-sections and wave climate in the lagoon about 30 m in front of the salt marsh. Erosion data are obtained by means of erosion pins located horizontally on the marsh scarp; at higher banks (about 0.9 m), two pins are located along the same vertical direction, for lower banks (about 0.4m), only one pin is employed. Significant wave height has been measured during three storm surges by means of pressure transducers (Pts). The measured wave climate in front of the bank was then put into relationship with the offshore wave climate estimated using wind data (intensity and direction) and bathymetric data. Wind intensity and direction is measured hourly by several measurement stations located in the Lagoon of Venice. In this way, it is possible to extrapolate wave climate hourly at the monitored marsh and calculate the wave power that acted on the bank in a given time

  8. On the Lateral Retreat of Salt Marshes: Field Monitoring in the Venice Lagoon (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, L.

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes are geomorphic structures located in ecotone environments such as lagoon and estuaries, providing lot of ecosystem services to local population. In the last decades they are disappearing due to several factors such as sea level rise, subsidence and edge erosion due to surface waves. The latter is likely the chief mechanism modeling marsh boundaries and leading to the loss of wide marsh areas. In the case of the Venice Lagoon, from the beginning of the last century, the whole salt marsh surface has more than halved and trends indicate that the salt marshes might completely disappear over the next 50 years. Here, we present a field monitoring activity on a retreating salt marsh located in the north part of the Lagoon of Venice (Italy). The marsh is subject to North-East (Bora) wind. Marsh area loss during the last decades has been documented through the comparison of georeferenced aerial photographs showing a retreat rate of the order of 1 m/year. Field measurements started by the end of November 2013 and consist of: salt marsh bank geometry at different cross-sections and wave climate in the lagoon about 30 m in front of the salt marsh. Erosion data are obtained by means of erosion pins located horizontally on the marsh scarp; at higher banks (about 0.9 m), two pins are located along the same vertical direction, for lower banks (about 0.4 m), only one pin is employed. Significant wave height has been measured during three storm surges by means of pressure transducers. The measured wave climate in front of the bank was then put into relationship with the offshore wave climate estimated using wind data (intensity and direction) and bathymetric data. Wind intensity and direction is measured hourly by several measurement stations located in the Lagoon of Venice. In this way, it is possible to extrapolate wave climate hourly at the monitored marsh and calculate the wave power that acted on the bank in a given time interval. Field survey revealed that the

  9. Tet and sul antibiotic resistance genes in livestock lagoons of various operation type, configuration, and antibiotic occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKinney, C.W.; Loftin, K.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Davis, J.G.; Pruden, A.

    2010-01-01

    Although livestock operations are known to harbor elevated levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria, few studies have examined the potential of livestock waste lagoons to reduce antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and examine the behavior of tetracycline [tet(O) and tet(W)] and sulfonamide [sul(I) and su/(II)] ARGsin a broad cross-section of livestock lagoons within the same semiarid western watershed. ARGs were monitored for one year in the water and the settled solids of eight lagoon systems by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, antibiotic residues and various bulk water quality constituents were analyzed. It was found that the lagoons of the chicken layer operation had the lowest concentrations of both tet and sul ARGs and low total antibiotic concentrations, whereas su ARGs were highest in the swine lagoons, which generally corresponded to the highest total antibiotic concentrations. A marginal benefit of organic and small dairy operations also was observed compared to conventional and large dairies, respectively. In all lagoons, su ARGs were observed to be generally more recalcitrant than tet ARGs. Also, positive correlations of various bulk water quality constituents were identified with tet ARGs but not sul ARGs. Significant positive correlations were identified between several metals and tet ARGs, but Pearson's correlation coefficients were mostly lower than those determined between antibiotic residues and ARGs. This study represents a quantitative characterization of ARGs in lagoons across a variety of livestock operations and provides insight into potential options for managing antibiotic resistance emanating from agricultural activities. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Characterization and source assessment of heavy metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments of the Fosu lagoon, Ghana

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.; Dodoo, D.K.; Okai-Sam, F.; Essuman, K.; Quagraine, E.K.

    2006-12-15

    The first results ever obtained on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) concentrations in the Fosu lagoon surface sediments are presented together with corresponding heavy metal (Fe, Mn, Cd, Zn and Ni) concentrations. Samples collected on a monthly basis from November 2003-April 2004 (heavy metals) and December 2003-January 2004 (PAHs) at 8 locations, representing different anthropogenic sources of contamination to the lagoon, were analyzed. Concentrations of Cd and Ni in the lagoon sediment suggest greater contamination to the lagoon from industrial activities in the vicinity of the lagoon; 50% of the sediment samples exceeded some established sediment Cd guidelines for the protection of aquatic lives. Then, 15 PAHs were detected among the sediments from the different locations and the compositional pattern in decreasing order was 3-ring {gt} 5-ring {gt} 4-ring {gt} 6-ring {gt} 2-ring PAH compounds. {Sigma} PAH concentrations in the sediment samples ranged from 254 to 558 mg/kg, with a mean of 359.4 mg/kg. Two distinct areas were identified to be a major source of anthropogenic load of both heavy metals and PAH; the mechanical shop in the northeastern sector of the lagoon is the main location for the input of Cd and it's associated PAH compounds (e.g., acenapthylene, acenaphthene, naphthalene and benzo(a)fluoranthene) and to a lesser extent Ni. Both combustion and petroleum sources may account for PAH loads from this area. The residential area in the northern sector is responsible for high loads of Mn and its associated PAH compounds (e.g., phenanthrene, benzo(a)pyrene and anthracene). These chemicals seem to enter the lagoon mainly by the combustion of especially wood or coal.

  11. tet and sul antibiotic resistance genes in livestock lagoons of various operation type, configuration, and antibiotic occurrence.

    PubMed

    McKinney, Chad W; Loftin, Keith A; Meyer, Michael T; Davis, Jessica G; Pruden, Amy

    2010-08-15

    Although livestock operations are known to harbor elevated levels of antibiotic resistant bacteria, few studies have examined the potential of livestock waste lagoons to reduce antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and examine the behavior of tetracycline [tet(O) and tet(W)] and sulfonamide [sul(I) and sul(II)] ARGs in a broad cross-section of livestock lagoons within the same semiarid western watershed. ARGs were monitored for one year in the water and the settled solids of eight lagoon systems by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In addition, antibiotic residues and various bulk water quality constituents were analyzed. It was found that the lagoons of the chicken layer operation had the lowest concentrations of both tet and sul ARGs and low total antibiotic concentrations, whereas sul ARGs were highest in the swine lagoons, which generally corresponded to the highest total antibiotic concentrations. A marginal benefit of organic and small dairy operations also was observed compared to conventional and large dairies, respectively. In all lagoons, sul ARGs were observed to be generally more recalcitrant than tet ARGs. Also, positive correlations of various bulk water quality constituents were identified with tet ARGs but not sul ARGs. Significant positive correlations were identified between several metals and tet ARGs, but Pearson's correlation coefficients were mostly lower than those determined between antibiotic residues and ARGs. This study represents a quantitative characterization of ARGs in lagoons across a variety of livestock operations and provides insight into potential options for managing antibiotic resistance emanating from agricultural activities. PMID:20704205

  12. Palaeogeographic evolution of Alykes lagoon, Pydna, Northern Greece during the Holocene, based on geomorphological and sedimentological data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsanakas, K.; Gaki-Papanastassiou, K.; Maroukian, H.; Cundy, A.; Papanastassiou, D.; Koskeridou, E.

    2012-04-01

    In this study an attempt is made in order to determine the palaeogeographic evolution of Alykes lagoon, located along the microtidal coast of Pieria Prefecture in northern Greece. For this purpose, sedimentological, micro and macropalaeontological and granulometric analyses have been carried out on sediments that have been collected from two drill cores. The total area of Alykes lagoon is 10.78 km2 while the length of the coastline is 11.4 km with a maximum width of 320 m, not exceeding an elevation of 1m. The lagoon in its present form does not seem to be filling up by terrestrial-fluvial action. The only human activity in the study area is the saltworks in the northern part of the lagoon. Two zones have been recognized according to their microfossil content corresponding to different palaeoenvironments of deposition.During the Holocene the sea invaded this lowland area and created a shallow open marine environment which at times was disturbed by multiple terrestrial inputs induced by fluvial discharge and longshore drift. The prevailing drift is from South to North and has contributed to the formation of a barrier spit which extended towards the NNE and finally confined the lagoon in the northwest. The spit has advanced to the east by forming three generations of ridge and swale topography having a slightly different orientation. Based on a radiocarbon date at -4.4 m below sea level obtained from the southern part of the lagoon, it is assumed that the coastline was already at that location by the end of the seventh millennium BP. Given that the drill core is only about twenty meters from the terrestrial outcrops (Neogene formations) we presume that this was the location of the oldest coastline during the Holocene. Therefore, the formation and evolution of the lagoon can be safely put around the sixth millennium BP.

  13. Influence of salinity regime on the food-web structure and feeding ecology of fish species from Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Patricia; Vergara, Carolina; Caiola, Nuno; Ibáñez, Carles

    2014-02-01

    Dual δ15N and δ13C analyses and estimates of biomass were used to characterize the food webs of valuable fish species in three coastal lagoons of the Ebro Delta subjected to contrasting salinity regimes (polyhaline in the Tancada lagoon, mesohaline in the Encanyissada and oligohaline in the Clot lagoon). The δ13C signatures of the entire food-web including primary producers, sediment organic matter and consumers showed the most enriched values in the Tancada lagoon (from approx. -4.8‰ in sediments to -19.7‰ in fish) and the most depleted ones in the Clot lagoon (from approx. -11.4‰ in sediments to -25.4‰ in fish), consistent with dominant contributions from marine and continental sources, respectively. For δ15N, particularly high values were detected in the submersed vegetation (11.3 ± 0.3‰) together with more enriched sediment values at lower salinities (by approx. 2.5‰), suggesting that historical loadings of agricultural fertilizers are still retained by the systems and transmitted across trophic levels. Negative relationships between δ15N and salinity were also observed for the amphipod Gammarus aequicauda and the isopod Sphaeroma hookeri, suggesting some consumption of accumulated and resuspended detrital material. In contrast, δ15N signatures of fish showed lower values and inconsistent patterns, possibly because most species have a seasonal use of the lagoons. The biomass of fish species did not show a clear effect of the salinity regime (except for the mosquitofish Gambusia holbrookii), but results for mixing models suggest a diet shift from higher contribution of zooplankton size fractions in the Encanyissada (from 57 to 73%) to macrofauna at the other lagoons (from 40 to 67%). We suggest that alterations in salinity might modify the trophic dynamics of the systems from benthic to planktonic pathways, without large-scale differences in δ15N of fish suggestive of similar trophic levels.

  14. Masterplan to safeguard Venice and to restore the lagoon and conterminous areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Gallo, Alba; Nadimi-Goki, Mandana; Wahsha, Mohammad

    2015-04-01

    Venice and its lagoon constitute a complex system, well known all over the world for the peculiarity of the town and for the fragility of the lagoon ecosystem with its delicate equilibrium. The whole system has been, and is currently, affected by human activities (industry, agriculture, settlements, tourism) that impact severely the ecosystem. Discharge from the agricultural drainage basin affects particularly the area North of the city of Venice; the central and southern areas, instead, receive important pollutant inputs from the industrial zone of Porto Marghera since the early'50s. Additional sources of pollution are domestic sewage and waste disposal from the urban area, that is visited by more than 10M people every year. As a consequence of the increasing land contamination, significant amounts of contaminants (both organic and inorganic) are accumulated in soils of the borderline, in water and in lagoon sediments, which constitute a potential source of secondary pollution. Results of surveys carried out in recent years in the whole area show that contaminants concentration increased from the beginning of the industrial activities until the '90s, when Porto Marghera declined. Most of contaminants have concentrations above the background levels. The highest metal levels were found in an area between Porto Marghera and the city of Venice, where both industrial and urban sewage are discharged, provoking environmental and human health hazard. In order to safeguard the city of Venice, and to restore its lagoon and conterminous areas, a Master Plan of intervention has been developed since the early 2000s. The land currently interested by environmental analysis and/or restoration covers approximately 1350ha; 78% of these (1100ha) proved variously contaminated, with 85% of sites overcoming the National Reference Values. Contamination, besides being diffused, is quite complex, involving the co-existence of several contaminant families (PAH, PCB, dioxin, heavy metals

  15. The changing of coastal landform at Chikou barrier island and lagoon coast, Tainan, Southwestern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C.-H.; Chyi, S.-J.; Hsiao, L.-L.; Wu, M.-S.; Lei, H.-F.

    2012-04-01

    The coast of southwestern Taiwan is mainly made of barriers and lagoons, which are prone to erosional and depositional processes. By using a serial maps, historical survey data, and RTK-GPS survey data, the changes of coast landforms are depicted. The maps being used in this study include (1) 1904 map(1:50000 scale), (2) 1920 map (1:50000 scale), (3) 1921 map (1:25000 scale), (4) 1924 map (1:25000 scale), (5) 1956 map (1:25000 scale), (6) 1975 map with ortho-rectified image (1:5000 scale), (7) 1983 map with ortho-rectified image (1:5000 scale), (8) 1989 map with ortho-rectified image (1:5000 scale), (9) 1992 map with ortho-rectified image (1:5000 scale), (10) 2001 map with ortho-rectified image (1:5000 scale). All maps are scanned and georeferenced to build a GIS archive for digitizing and further analysis. The results show that this coast was made of continuous sand barriers and lagoons. While lagoons were gradually shrinking, the sand barriers had remained stable from 1904 to 1924. After that, lagoons substantially deposited in the southern part and sand barriers became landward. In 1975 map, lagoons vanished and replaced with a tidal flat and tidal creeks. The following maps show that lagoons start to form again and sand barriers moving landward continuously. It is a significant sign of serious erosion in the coast. The RTK-GPS survey data in recent years show more detail of coast erosion and landform changes. The post-typhoon investigation results show that the seaward side of barrier island is eroded largely, especially for the two segments of the central part of the barrier island. Some depositions were found on the top of northern and central part of barrier dune, as well as washovers. In the southern barrier island, the depositions were carried to backshore and were obstructed in front of the bamboo piles and marine solid bags. The survey indicated the areas eroded by storm surge were gradually accumulating except for the beaches separate with plastic sheet

  16. The MiniBooNE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather L.

    2007-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have been observed in three sectors : solar ({nu}{sub e} disappearance) [1], atmospheric ({nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance) [2], and accelerator ({bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {bar {nu}}{sub e}) [3]. The probability for two-neutrino oscillation is a function of four variables : two are determined by the conditions of the experiment, and two are the quantities fit for when performing an oscillation search (sin{sup 2}(2{theta}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}). {Delta}m{sup 2} is the difference in squares of the mass states of the neutrinos ({Delta}m{sub 12}{sup 2} = m{sub 2}{sup 2}-m{sub 1}{sup 2}). If the observed oscillations only occur between neutrinos in the Standard Model a summation law of the {Delta}m{sup 2} is valid ({Delta}m{sub 13}{sup 2} = {Delta}m{sub 12}{sup 2} + {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}). The observed oscillations do not follow this summation law. This implies one of the results is incorrect or there exists physics beyond the Standard Model. While the solar and atmospheric results have been confirmed by several different experiments, the accelerator based result, from the Los Alamos LSND experiment [3], has yet to be fully vetted. The MiniBooNE experiment [4], located at Fermi National Laboratory, is designed to fully explore the LSND result. MiniBooNE is in the final stages of performing a blind oscillation search ({nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e}) using neutrino data collected through November, 2005. A blind analysis is one in which you may analyze some of the information in all of the data, all of the information in some of the data, but not all of the information in all of the data. As MiniBooNE hasn't yet opened the box, this discussion will focus on the different components of MiniBooNE relevant for the oscillation analysis.

  17. Stone Age settlement and Holocene water level changes of the Baltic Sea in the Torvajoe Basin area, Narva-Luga Klint Bay, NE Estonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raig, Hanna; Rosentau, Alar; Muru, Merle; Risberg, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The Tõrvajõe basin is located in NE Estonia in the southern part of the Narva-Luga Klint Bay, that is characterized by slow post-glacial isostatic uplift (about 0-1mm/yr) and slowly undulating low topography. Post-glacial changes of the water-level of the Baltic Sea have at times flooded the area, and at times, it has emerged as terrestrial land. In addition to a complex geological development, the surroundings of the Tõrvajõe basin are interesting from the archaeological point of view because of abundant archaeological findings in the area, of which the oldest (c 8.1 cal ka BP) from the Mesolithic period and the majority, indicating very intense habitation (c 7.1-5.5 cal ka BP), from the Neolithic period. Development of the Tőrvajőe basin area during the period of Stone Age settlement (c 8.1-5.5 cal. ka BP) is studied with multiple geological and archaeological proxies. Sediments are described by lithostratigraphical methods, loss-on-ignition. AMS radiocarbon dates are used to date events and create an age-depth model. Environment is described by pollen analyses and water environment by siliceous microfossil analyses. Palaeogeographical reconstructions for time slices of interest are created to illustrate Stone Age settlement pattern and changes of the coastline and landscape over time. The aim of this interdisciplinary study is to investigate and associate palaeoenvironmental conditions and water-level changes with Stone Age settlement pattern in the Tőrvajőe area. Results show four developmental stages in the post-glacial history of the basin: Ancylus Lake lagoon, mire, lagoon during the Litorina Sea and mire. During the Ancylus Lake transgression at about 10.8-10.2 cal. ka BP a spit started to form north of the basin and a lagoon evolved behind it. Following the Ancylus Lake regression river activity and formation of palaeosoil and fen peat took place. Due to the Litorina Sea transgression, that was initially slower but accelerated around 7.8-7.6 cal ka

  18. Alterations in macroinvertebrate spatial patterns in coastal lagoons: Óbidos (NW coast of Portugal) 1984 versus 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor; Pereira, Fábio; Freitas, Rosa

    2012-09-01

    The macroinvertebrate spatial distribution patterns in the Lagoon of Óbidos were studied in 1984 and revisited in 2002. The overall surficial sediments and benthic community patterns show consistent similarities in the two sampling periods, but also important differences. The lagoon is relatively shallow, with about 1/3 of the area covered with extensive intertidal sand banks. These are interrupted by a navigation channel bordering the northern margin (1984) and, following dredging operations, a new navigation channel was opened along the southern margin (2002). The sediments in the navigation channels were coarser and with less percentage of fines in 2002 than in 1984. Arthropods dominated the species richness and abundance in 1984, but were much less important in 2002, when the community was dominated by molluscs and annelids, both in species numbers as well as in abundance. In 1984, the structure of the macrofauna communities closely followed a general model proposed for Atlantic and Mediterranean lagoons, with the marine, the transition and the lagoon communities occupying very well defined areas. This gradient was in accordance with an increase in the fines and organic matter content directed inwards allowing for the coexistence of several characteristic lagoon species with others characteristic of organic enriched sediments. In 2002 this spatial pattern is still recognized but the marine and the transition communities are spatially mixed, occupying both the entrance region and the navigation channels, whereas the characteristic lagoon community identified in 1984 was only recognized in a group of sites located along the southern margin in 2002. Several species show very important changes in their distribution extent in the lagoon system. These changes essentially show a generalized inward expansion of the distribution range of the marine species, in agreement with a larger influence of marine conditions toward the inner areas of the lagoon. This study shows

  19. 18Ne Excited States Two-Proton Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Napoli, M.; Rapisarda, E.; Raciti, G.; Cardella, G.; Amorini, F.; Giacoppo, F.; Sfienti, C.

    2008-04-01

    Two-proton radioactivity studies have been performed on excited states of 18Ne produced by 20Ne fragmentation at the FRS of the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and excited via Coulomb excitation on a 209Pb target. The 18Ne levels decay has been studied by complete kinematical reconstruction. In spite of the low statistic, the energy and angular correlations of the emitted proton pairs indicate the presence of 2He emission toghether with the democratic decay.

  20. Corrective action plan for CAU No. 404: Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench, Tonopah Test Range

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 404. The site is located on the Tonopah Test Range. CAU 404 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CAS): the Roller Coaster Lagoons (CAS No TA-03-001-TA-RC) and the North Disposal Trench (CAS No TA-21-001-TA-RC). A site map of the lagoons and trench is provided. The Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons are comprised of two unlined lagoons that received liquid sanitary waste in 1963 from the Operation Roller Coaster Man Camp and debris from subsequent construction and range cleanup activities. The North Disposal Trench was excavated in approximately 1963 and received solid waste and debris from the man camp and subsequent construction and range cleanup activities. A small hydrocarbon spill occurred during the 1995 Voluntary Corrective Action (VCA) activities in an area associated with the North Disposal Trench CAS.