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Sample records for melanogaster dutpase isoforms

  1. Nuclear localization signal-dependent and -independent movements of Drosophila melanogaster dUTPase isoforms during nuclear cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Muha, Villo; Zagyva, Imre; Venkei, Zsolt; Szabad, Janos; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2009-04-03

    Two dUTPase isoforms (23 kDa and 21 kDa) are present in the fruitfly with the sole difference of an N-terminal extension. In Drosophila embryo, both isoforms are detected inside the nucleus. Here, we investigated the function of the N-terminal segment using eYFP-dUTPase constructs. In Schneider 2 cells, only the 23 kDa construct showed nuclear localization arguing that it may contain a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Sequence comparisons identified a lysine-rich nonapeptide with similarity to the human c-myc NLS. In Drosophila embryos during nuclear cleavages, the 23 kDa isoform showed the expected localization shifts. Contrariwise, although the 21 kDa isoform was excluded from the nuclei during interphase, it was shifted to the nucleus during prophase and forthcoming mitotic steps. The observed dynamic localization character showed strict timing to the nuclear cleavage phases and explained how both isoforms can be present within the nuclear microenvironment, although at different stages of cell cycle.

  2. Quantitative Profiling of Drosophila melanogaster Dscam1 Isoforms Reveals No Changes in Splicing after Bacterial Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Joachim; Schmucker, Dietmar; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The hypervariable Dscam1 (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule 1) gene can produce thousands of different ectodomain isoforms via mutually exclusive alternative splicing. Dscam1 appears to be involved in the immune response of some insects and crustaceans. It has been proposed that the diverse isoforms may be involved in the recognition of, or the defence against, diverse parasite epitopes, although evidence to support this is sparse. A prediction that can be generated from this hypothesis is that the gene expression of specific exons and/or isoforms is influenced by exposure to an immune elicitor. To test this hypothesis, we for the first time, use a long read RNA sequencing method to directly investigate the Dscam1 splicing pattern after exposing adult Drosophila melanogaster and a S2 cell line to live Escherichia coli. After bacterial exposure both models showed increased expression of immune-related genes, indicating that the immune system had been activated. However there were no changes in total Dscam1 mRNA expression. RNA sequencing further showed that there were no significant changes in individual exon expression and no changes in isoform splicing patterns in response to bacterial exposure. Therefore our studies do not support a change of D. melanogaster Dscam1 isoform diversity in response to live E. coli. Nevertheless, in future this approach could be used to identify potentially immune-related Dscam1 splicing regulation in other host species or in response to other pathogens. PMID:25310676

  3. Cryptocephal, the Drosophila melanogaster ATF4, Is a Specific Coactivator for Ecdysone Receptor Isoform B2

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Sebastien A.; VanHaaften, Eric; Cherbas, Lucy; Cherbas, Peter; Hewes, Randall S.

    2012-01-01

    The ecdysone receptor is a heterodimer of two nuclear receptors, the Ecdysone receptor (EcR) and Ultraspiracle (USP). In Drosophila melanogaster, three EcR isoforms share common DNA and ligand-binding domains, but these proteins differ in their most N-terminal regions and, consequently, in the activation domains (AF1s) contained therein. The transcriptional coactivators for these domains, which impart unique transcriptional regulatory properties to the EcR isoforms, are unknown. Activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) is a basic-leucine zipper transcription factor that plays a central role in the stress response of mammals. Here we show that Cryptocephal (CRC), the Drosophila homolog of ATF4, is an ecdysone receptor coactivator that is specific for isoform B2. CRC interacts with EcR-B2 to promote ecdysone-dependent expression of ecdysis-triggering hormone (ETH), an essential regulator of insect molting behavior. We propose that this interaction explains some of the differences in transcriptional properties that are displayed by the EcR isoforms, and similar interactions may underlie the differential activities of other nuclear receptors with distinct AF1-coactivators. PMID:22912598

  4. Transgenic expression and purification of myosin isoforms using the Drosophila melanogaster indirect flight muscle system

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, James T.; Melkani, Girish C.; Huxford, Tom; Bernstein, Sanford I.

    2011-01-01

    Biophysical and structural studies on muscle myosin rely upon milligram quantities of extremely pure material. However, many biologically interesting myosin isoforms are expressed at levels that are too low for direct purification from primary tissues. Efforts aimed at recombinant expression of functional striated muscle myosin isoforms in bacterial or insect cell culture have largely met with failure, although high level expression in muscle cell culture has recently been achieved at significant expense. We report a novel method for the use of strains of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster genetically engineered to produce histidine-tagged recombinant muscle myosin isoforms. This method takes advantage of the single muscle myosin heavy chain gene within the Drosophila genome, the high level of expression of accessible myosin in the thoracic indirect flight muscles, the ability to knock out endogenous expression of myosin in this tissue and the relatively low cost of fruit fly colony production and maintenance. We illustrate this method by expressing and purifying a recombinant histidine-tagged variant of embryonic body wall skeletal muscle myosin II from an engineered fly strain. The recombinant protein shows the expected ATPase activity and is of sufficient purity and homogeneity for crystallization. This system may prove useful for the expression and isolation of mutant myosins associated with skeletal muscle diseases and cardiomyopathies for their biochemical and structural characterization. PMID:22178692

  5. Abnormal muscle development in the heldup3 mutant of Drosophila melanogaster is caused by a splicing defect affecting selected troponin I isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Barbas, J A; Galceran, J; Torroja, L; Prado, A; Ferrús, A

    1993-01-01

    The troponin I (TnI) gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a family of 10 isoforms resulting from the differential splicing of 13 exons. Four of these exons (6a1, 6a2, 6b1, and 6b2) are mutually exclusive and very similar in sequence. TnI isoforms show qualitative specificity whereby each muscle expresses a selected repertoire of them. In addition, TnI isoforms show quantitative specificity whereby each muscle expresses characteristic amounts of each isoform. In the mutant heldup3, the development of the thoracic muscles DLM, DVM, and TDT is aborted. The mutation consists of a one-nucleotide displacement of the 3' AG splice site at the intron preceding exon 6b1, resulting in the failure to produce all exon 6b1-containing TnI isoforms. These molecular changes in a constituent of the thin filaments cause the selective failure to develop the DLM, DVM, and TDT muscles while having no visible effect on other muscles wherein exon 6b1 expression is minor. Images PMID:7680094

  6. Mod(mdg4)-58.8, isoform of mod(mdg4) loci, directly interacts with MTACP1A and MTACP1B proteins of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Golovnin, A K; Kostyuchenko, M V; Georgiev, P G; Melnikova, L S

    2016-01-01

    As a result of experiments in yeast two-hybrid system, coimmunoprecipitation of proteins from D. melanogaster embryo cell lysate, and immunostaining, it was shown for the first time that Mod(mdg4)-58.8 protein (isoform P), a product of mod(mdg4) locus, directly interacts with mtACP1A and mtACP1B proteins. These proteins are involved in de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids in mitochondria and are required for normal gametogenesis in males and females and, possibly, for the trachea development. This result expands the understanding of the role of mod(mdg4) locus products in the regulation of life activity of the eukaryotic cell. PMID:27025476

  7. Structure and enzymatic mechanism of a moonlighting dUTPase.

    PubMed

    Leveles, Ibolya; Németh, Veronika; Szabó, Judit E; Harmat, Veronika; Nyíri, Kinga; Bendes, Ábris Ádám; Papp-Kádár, Veronika; Zagyva, Imre; Róna, Gergely; Ozohanics, Olivér; Vékey, Károly; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2013-12-01

    Genome integrity requires well controlled cellular pools of nucleotides. dUTPases are responsible for regulating cellular dUTP levels and providing dUMP for dTTP biosynthesis. In Staphylococcus, phage dUTPases are also suggested to be involved in a moonlighting function regulating the expression of pathogenicity-island genes. Staphylococcal phage trimeric dUTPase sequences include a specific insertion that is not found in other organisms. Here, a 2.1 Å resolution three-dimensional structure of a ϕ11 phage dUTPase trimer with complete localization of the phage-specific insert, which folds into a small β-pleated mini-domain reaching out from the dUTPase core surface, is presented. The insert mini-domains jointly coordinate a single Mg2+ ion per trimer at the entrance to the threefold inner channel. Structural results provide an explanation for the role of Asp95, which is suggested to have functional significance in the moonlighting activity, as the metal-ion-coordinating moiety potentially involved in correct positioning of the insert. Enzyme-kinetics studies of wild-type and mutant constructs show that the insert has no major role in dUTP binding or cleavage and provide a description of the elementary steps (fast binding of substrate and release of products). In conclusion, the structural and kinetic data allow insights into both the phage-specific characteristics and the generally conserved traits of ϕ11 phage dUTPase. PMID:24311572

  8. Identification of the bacteriophage T5 dUTPase by protein sequence comparisons.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, A V

    1996-01-01

    It is shown by protein sequence comparisons that a 148 amino acid open reading frame (ORF 148) located at 67% of the bacteriophage T5 genome encodes a protein with strong similarity to known dUTPases. This protein contains five characteristic amino acid sequence motifs that are common to the dUTPase gene family. A similarity in size and high degree of sequence identity strongly suggest that the protein encoded by the ORF 148 of bacteriophage T5 is dUTPase. PMID:8988373

  9. Thermosensory and non-thermosensory isoforms of Drosophila melanogaster TRPA1 reveal heat sensor domains of a thermoTRP channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lixian; Bellemer, Andrew; Yan, Haidun; Honjo, Ken; Robertson, Jessica; Hwang, Richard Y; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Tracey, W. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Specialized somatosensory neurons detect temperatures ranging from pleasantly cool or warm to burning hot and painful (nociceptive). The precise temperature ranges sensed by thermally sensitive neurons is determined by tissue specific expression of ion channels of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) family. We show here, that in Drosophila, TRPA1 is required for sensing of nociceptive heat. We identify two new protein isoforms of dTRPA1named dTRPA1-C and dTRPA1-D that explain this requirement. A dTRPA1-C/D reporter was exclusively expressed in nociceptors and dTRPA1-C rescued thermal nociception phenotypes when restored to mutant nociceptors. However, surprisingly, we find that dTRPA1-C is not a direct heat sensor. Alternative splicing generates at least four isoforms of dTRPA1. Our analysis of these isoforms reveals a 37 amino acid intracellular region (encoded by a single exon) that is critical for dTRPA1 temperature responses. The identification of these amino acids opens the door to a biophysical understanding of a molecular thermosensor. PMID:22347718

  10. Protective effect of human endogenous retrovirus K dUTPase variants on psoriasis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Lai, Olivia Y; Chen, Haoyan; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; Hayashi, Genki; Kuebler, Peter J; Hultman, Gustaf K; Ariza, Maria-Eugenia; Williams, Marshall V; Batista, Mariana D; Nixon, Douglas F; Foerster, John; Bowcock, Anne M; Liao, Wilson

    2012-07-01

    Previous genetic and functional studies have implicated the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) dUTPase located within the PSORS1 locus in the major histocompatibility complex region as a candidate psoriasis gene. Here, we describe a variant discovery and case-control association study of HERV-K dUTPase variants in 708 psoriasis cases and 349 healthy controls. Five common HERV-K dUTPase variants were found to be highly associated with psoriasis, with the strongest association occurring at the missense single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs3134774 (K158R, P=3.28 × 10(-15), odds ratio =2.36 (95% confidence interval: 1.91-2.92)). After adjusting the association of the HERV-K dUTPase variants for the potential confounding effects of HLA alleles associated with psoriasis, the HERV-K SNPs rs9264082 and rs3134774 remained significantly associated. Haplotype analysis revealed that HERV-K haplotypes containing the non-risk alleles for rs3134774 and rs9264082 significantly reduced the risk of psoriasis. Functional testing showed higher antibody responses against recombinant HERV-K dUTPase in psoriasis patients compared with controls (P<0.05), as well as higher T-cell responses against a single HERV-K dUTPase peptide (P<0.05). Our data support an independent role for the HERV-K dUTPase on psoriasis susceptibility, and suggest the need for additional studies to clarify the role of this dUTPase in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:22437317

  11. Protective Effect of Human Endogenous Retrovirus K dUTPase Variants on Psoriasis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Olivia Y.; Chen, Haoyan; Michaud, Henri-Alexandre; Hayashi, Genki; Kuebler, Peter J.; Hultman, Gustaf K.; Ariza, Maria-Eugenia; Williams, Marshall V.; Batista, Mariana D.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Foerster, John; Bowcock, Anne M.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    Previous genetic and functional studies have implicated the human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) dUTPase located within the PSORS1 locus in the MHC region as a candidate psoriasis gene. Here, we describe a variant discovery and case-control association study of HERV-K dUTPase variants in 708 psoriasis cases and 349 healthy controls. Five common HERV-K dUTPase variants were found to be highly associated with psoriasis, with the strongest association occurring at the missense SNP rs3134774 (K158R, p=3.28 × 10-15, OR=2.36 [1.91-2.92]). After adjusting the association of the HERV-K dUTPase variants for the potential confounding effects of HLA alleles associated with psoriasis, the HERV-K SNPs rs9264082 and rs3134774 remained significantly associated. Haplotype analysis revealed that HERV-K haplotypes containing the non-risk alleles for rs3134774 and rs9264082 significantly reduced the risk of psoriasis. Functional testing showed higher antibody responses against recombinant HERV-K dUTPase in psoriasis patients compared to controls (p<0.05), as well as higher T-cell responses against a single HERV-K dUTPase peptide (p<0.05). Our data support an independent role for the HERV-K dUTPase on psoriasis susceptibility, and suggest the need for additional studies to clarify the role of this dUTPase in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. PMID:22437317

  12. Central Regulation of Locomotor Behavior of Drosophila melanogaster Depends on a CASK Isoform Containing CaMK-Like and L27 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Slawson, Justin B.; Kuklin, Elena A.; Ejima, Aki; Mukherjee, Konark; Ostrovsky, Lilly; Griffith, Leslie C.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic causes for disturbances of locomotor behavior can be due to muscle, peripheral neuron, or central nervous system pathologies. The Drosophila melanogaster homolog of human CASK (also known as caki or camguk) is a molecular scaffold that has been postulated to have roles in both locomotion and plasticity. These conclusions are based on studies using overlapping deficiencies that largely eliminate the entire CASK locus, but contain additional chromosomal aberrations as well. More importantly, analysis of the sequenced Drosophila genome suggests the existence of multiple protein variants from the CASK locus, further complicating the interpretation of experiments using deficiency strains. In this study, we generated small deletions within the CASK gene that eliminate gene products containing the CaMK-like and L27 domains (CASK-β), but do not affect transcripts encoding the smaller forms (CASK-α), which are structurally homologous to vertebrate MPP1. These mutants have normal olfactory habituation, but exhibit a striking array of locomotor problems that includes both initiation and motor maintenance defects. Previous studies had suggested that presynaptic release defects at the neuromuscular junction in the multigene deficiency strain were the likely basis of its locomotor phenotype. The locomotor phenotype of the CASK-β mutant, however, cannot be rescued by expression of a CASK-β transgene in motor neurons. Expression in a subset of central neurons that does not include the ellipsoid body, a well-known pre-motor neuropil, provides complete rescue. Full-length CASK-β, while widely expressed in the nervous system, appears to have a unique role within central circuits that control motor output. PMID:21059886

  13. Active site of mycobacterial dUTPase: Structural characteristics and a built-in sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Balazs; Barabas, Orsolya; Takacs, Eniko; Nagy, Nikolett; Nagy, Peter; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2008-08-15

    dUTPases are essential to eliminate dUTP for DNA integrity and provide dUMP for thymidylate biosynthesis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis apparently lacks any other thymidylate biosynthesis pathway, therefore dUTPase is a promising antituberculotic drug target. Crystal structure of the mycobacterial enzyme in complex with the isosteric substrate analog, {alpha},{beta}-imido-dUTP and Mg{sup 2+} at 1.5 A resolution was determined that visualizes the full-length C-terminus, previously not localized. Interactions of a conserved motif important in catalysis, the Mycobacterium-specific five-residue-loop insert and C-terminal tetrapeptide could now be described in detail. Stacking of C-terminal histidine upon the uracil moiety prompted replacement with tryptophan. The resulting sensitive fluorescent sensor enables fast screening for binding of potential inhibitors to the active site. K{sub d} for {alpha},{beta}-imido-dUTP binding to mycobacterial dUTPase is determined to be 10-fold less than for human dUTPase, which is to be considered in drug optimization. A robust continuous activity assay for kinetic screening is proposed.

  14. Flexible segments modulate co-folding of dUTPase and nucleocapsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Németh-Pongrácz, Veronika; Barabás, Orsolya; Fuxreiter, Mónika; Simon, István; Pichová, Iva; Rumlová, Michalea; Zábranská, Helena; Svergun, Dmitri; Petoukhov, Maxim; Harmat, Veronika; Klement, Eva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Eva; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Kónya, Emese; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2007-01-01

    The homotrimeric fusion protein nucleocapsid (NC)-dUTPase combines domains that participate in RNA/DNA folding, reverse transcription, and DNA repair in Mason-Pfizer monkey betaretrovirus infected cells. The structural organization of the fusion protein remained obscured by the N- and C-terminal flexible segments of dUTPase and the linker region connecting the two domains that are invisible in electron density maps. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals that upon oligonucleotide binding the NC domains adopt the trimeric symmetry of dUTPase. High-resolution X-ray structures together with molecular modeling indicate that fusion with NC domains dramatically alters the conformation of the flexible C-terminus by perturbing the orientation of a critical beta-strand. Consequently, the C-terminal segment is capable of double backing upon the active site of its own monomer and stabilized by non-covalent interactions formed with the N-terminal segment. This co-folding of the dUTPase terminal segments, not observable in other homologous enzymes, is due to the presence of the fused NC domain. Structural and genomic advantages of fusing the NC domain to a shortened dUTPase in betaretroviruses and the possible physiological consequences are envisaged. PMID:17169987

  15. Flexible segments modulate co-folding of dUTPase and nucleocapsid proteins

    PubMed Central

    Németh-Pongrácz, Veronika; Barabás, Orsolya; Fuxreiter, Mónika; Simon, István; Pichová, Iva; Rumlová, Michalea; Zábranská, Helena; Svergun, Dmitri; Petoukhov, Maxim; Harmat, Veronika; Klement, Éva; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Medzihradszky, Katalin F.; Kónya, Emese; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2007-01-01

    The homotrimeric fusion protein nucleocapsid (NC)-dUTPase combines domains that participate in RNA/DNA folding, reverse transcription, and DNA repair in Mason-Pfizer monkey betaretrovirus infected cells. The structural organization of the fusion protein remained obscured by the N- and C-terminal flexible segments of dUTPase and the linker region connecting the two domains that are invisible in electron density maps. Small-angle X-ray scattering reveals that upon oligonucleotide binding the NC domains adopt the trimeric symmetry of dUTPase. High-resolution X-ray structures together with molecular modeling indicate that fusion with NC domains dramatically alters the conformation of the flexible C-terminus by perturbing the orientation of a critical β-strand. Consequently, the C-terminal segment is capable of double backing upon the active site of its own monomer and stabilized by non-covalent interactions formed with the N-terminal segment. This co-folding of the dUTPase terminal segments, not observable in other homologous enzymes, is due to the presence of the fused NC domain. Structural and genomic advantages of fusing the NC domain to a shortened dUTPase in betaretroviruses and the possible physiological consequences are envisaged. PMID:17169987

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of dUTPase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus

    SciTech Connect

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2006-04-01

    Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. The nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48426 Da) was co-crystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Deoxyuridine 5′-triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase from Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus (M-PMV dUTPase) is a betaretroviral member of the dUTPase enzyme family. In the mature M-PMV virion, this enzyme is present as the C-terminal domain of the fusion protein nucleocapsid-dUTPase. The homotrimeric organization characteristic of dUTPases is retained in this bifunctional fusion protein. The fusion protein supposedly plays a role in adequate localization of dUTPase activity in the vicinity of nucleic acids during reverse transcription and integration. Here, the nucleocapsid-free dUTPase (48 426 Da) was cocrystallized with a dUTP substrate analogue using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The obtained crystals belong to the primitive hexagonal space group P6{sub 3}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.6, b = 60.6, c = 63.6 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°. Native and PtCl{sub 4}-derivative data sets were collected using synchrotron radiation to 1.75 and 2.3 Å, respectively. Phasing was successfully performed by isomorphous replacement combined with anomalous scattering.

  17. Molecular modeling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis dUTpase: docking and catalytic mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Teodorico C; Caetano, Melissa S; Josa, Daniela; Luz, Gustavo P; Freitas, Elisangela A; da Cunha, Elaine F F

    2011-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a leading cause of infectious disease in the world today. This outlook is aggravated by a growing number of M. tuberculosis infections in individuals who are immunocompromised as a result of HIV infections. Thus, new and more potent anti-TB agents are necessary. Therefore, dUTpase was selected as a target enzyme to combat M. tuberculosis. In this work, molecular modeling methods involving docking and QM/MM calculations were carried out to investigate the binding orientation and predict binding affinities of some potential dUTpase inhibitors. Our results suggest that the best potential inhibitor investigated, among the compounds studied in this work, is the compound dUPNPP. Regarding the reaction mechanism, we concluded that the decisive stage for the reaction is the stage 1. Furthermore, it was also observed that the compounds with a -1 electrostatic charge presented lower activation energy in relation to the compounds with a -2 charge. PMID:21469751

  18. The nucleotidohydrolases DCTPP1 and dUTPase are involved in the cellular response to decitabine.

    PubMed

    Requena, Cristina E; Pérez-Moreno, Guiomar; Horváth, András; Vértessy, Beáta G; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M; González-Pacanowska, Dolores; Vidal, Antonio E

    2016-09-01

    Decitabine (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, aza-dCyd) is an anti-cancer drug used clinically for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukaemia that can act as a DNA-demethylating or genotoxic agent in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, DCTPP1 (dCTP pyrophosphatase 1) and dUTPase are two 'house-cleaning' nucleotidohydrolases involved in the elimination of non-canonical nucleotides. In the present study, we show that exposure of HeLa cells to decitabine up-regulates the expression of several pyrimidine metabolic enzymes including DCTPP1, dUTPase, dCMP deaminase and thymidylate synthase, thus suggesting their contribution to the cellular response to this anti-cancer nucleoside. We present several lines of evidence supporting that, in addition to the formation of aza-dCTP (5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-5'-triphosphate), an alternative cytotoxic mechanism for decitabine may involve the formation of aza-dUMP, a potential thymidylate synthase inhibitor. Indeed, dUTPase or DCTPP1 down-regulation enhanced the cytotoxic effect of decitabine producing an accumulation of nucleoside triphosphates containing uracil as well as uracil misincorporation and double-strand breaks in genomic DNA. Moreover, DCTPP1 hydrolyses the triphosphate form of decitabine with similar kinetic efficiency to its natural substrate dCTP and prevents decitabine-induced global DNA demethylation. The data suggest that the nucleotidohydrolases DCTPP1 and dUTPase are factors involved in the mode of action of decitabine with potential value as enzymatic targets to improve decitabine-based chemotherapy. PMID:27325794

  19. Human herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases: a family of proteins that modulate dendritic cell function and innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Glaser, Ronald; Williams, Marshall V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded dUTPase can modulate innate immune responses through the activation of TLR2 and NF-κB signaling. However, whether this novel immune function of the dUTPase is specific for EBV or a common property of the Herpesviridae family is not known. In this study, we demonstrate that the purified viral dUTPases encoded by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2), human herpesvirus-6A (HHV-6A), human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) differentially activate NF-κB through ligation of TLR2/TLR1 heterodimers. Furthermore, activation of NF-κB by the viral dUTPases was inhibited by anti-TLR2 blocking antibodies (Abs) and the over-expression of dominant-negative constructs of TLR2, lacking the TIR domain, and MyD88 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TLR2/TLR1. In addition, treatment of human dendritic cells and PBMCs with the herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases from HSV-2, HHV-6A, HHV-8, and VZV resulted in the secretion of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12, TNF-α, IL-10, and IFN-γ. Interestingly, blocking experiments revealed that the anti-TLR2 Ab significantly reduced the secretion of cytokines by the various herpesviruses-encoded dUTPases (p < 0.05). To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating that a non-structural protein encoded by herpesviruses HHV-6A, HHV-8, VZV and to a lesser extent HSV-2 is a pathogen-associated molecular pattern. Our results reveal a novel function of the virus-encoded dUTPases, which may be important to the pathophysiology of diseases caused by these viruses. More importantly, this study demonstrates that the immunomodulatory functions of dUTPases are a common property of the Herpesviridae family and thus, the dUTPase could be a potential target for the development of novel therapeutic agents against infections caused by these herpesviruses. PMID:25309527

  20. Chronic Physical Stress Does Not Interact with Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-Encoded Dutpase to Alter the Sickness Response

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Abi Salloum, Bachir; Ariza, Maria Eugenia; Williams, Marshall; Reader, Brenda; Glaser, Ronald; Sheridan, John; Nelson, Randy J.

    2016-01-01

    Most adult humans have been infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which is thought to contribute to the development of chronic fatigue syndrome. Stress is known to influence the immune system and can exacerbate the sickness response. Although a role for psychological stress in the sickness response, particularly in combination with EBV-encoded deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) has been established, and the role of physical stressors in these interactions remains unspecified. In this study, we seek to determine the interaction of chronic physical (swim) stress and EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. We hypothesize that a chronic physical stressor will exacerbate the sickness response following EBV-encoded dUTPase injection. To test this hypothesis mice receive daily injections of EBV-encoded dUTPase or vehicle and are subjected to 15 min of swim stress each day for 14 days or left unmanipulated. On the final evening of injections mice undergo behavioral testing. EBV-encoded dUTPase injection alone produces some sickness behaviors. The physical swimming stress does not alter the sickness response. PMID:27175311

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of dUTPase from the ϕ11 helper phage of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Leveles, Ibolya; Róna, Gergely; Zagyva, Imre; Bendes, Ábris; Harmat, Veronika; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus superantigen-carrying pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) play a determinant role in spreading virulence genes among bacterial populations that constitute a major health hazard. Repressor (Stl) proteins are responsible for the transcriptional regulation of pathogenicity island genes. Recently, a derepressing interaction between the repressor Stl SaPIbov1 and dUTPase from the ϕ11 helper phage has been suggested [Tormo-Más et al. (2010 ▶), Nature (London), 465, 779–782]. Towards elucidation of the molecular mechanism of this interaction, this study reports the expression, purification and X-ray analysis of ϕ11 dUTPase, which contains a phage-specific polypeptide segment that is not present in other dUTPases. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. Data were collected to 2.98 Å resolution from one type of crystal. The crystal of ϕ11 dUTPase belonged to the cubic space group I23, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.16 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00°. PMID:22102244

  2. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of dUTPase from the φ11 helper phage of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Leveles, Ibolya; Róna, Gergely; Zagyva, Imre; Bendes, Ábris; Harmat, Veronika; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2011-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus superantigen-carrying pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) play a determinant role in spreading virulence genes among bacterial populations that constitute a major health hazard. Repressor (Stl) proteins are responsible for the transcriptional regulation of pathogenicity island genes. Recently, a derepressing interaction between the repressor Stl SaPIbov1 and dUTPase from the φ11 helper phage has been suggested [Tormo-Más et al. (2010), Nature (London), 465, 779-782]. Towards elucidation of the molecular mechanism of this interaction, this study reports the expression, purification and X-ray analysis of φ11 dUTPase, which contains a phage-specific polypeptide segment that is not present in other dUTPases. Crystals were obtained using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method at room temperature. Data were collected to 2.98 Å resolution from one type of crystal. The crystal of φ11 dUTPase belonged to the cubic space group I23, with unit-cell parameters a = 98.16 Å, α = β = γ = 90.00°. PMID:22102244

  3. The simian varicella virus uracil DNA glycosylase and dUTPase genes are expressed in vivo, but are non-essential for replication in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Toby M.; Williams, Marshall V.; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Gray, Wayne L.

    2012-01-01

    Neurotropic herpesviruses express viral deoxyuridine triphosphate nucleotidohydrolase (dUTPase) and uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) enzymes which may reduce uracil misincorporation into viral DNA, particularly in neurons of infected ganglia. The simian varicella virus (SVV) dUTPase (ORF 8) and UDG (ORF 59) share 37.7% and 53.9% amino acid identity, respectively, with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) homologs. Infectious SVV mutants defective in either dUTPase (SVV-dUTPase−) or UDG (SVV-UDG−) activity or both (SVV-dUTPase−/UDG−) were constructed using recA assisted endonuclease cleavage (RARE) and a cosmid recombination system. Loss of viral dUTPase and UDG enzymatic activity was confirmed in CV-1 cells infected with the SVV mutants. The SVV-dUTPase−, SVV-UDG−, and SVV-dUTPase−/UDG− mutants replicated as efficiently as wild-type SVV in cell culture. SVV dUTPase and UDG expression was detected in tissues derived from acutely infected animals, but not in tissues derived from latently infected animals. Further studies will evaluate the pathogenesis of SVV dUTPase and UDG mutants and their potential as varicella vaccines. PMID:19200445

  4. Aromatic stacking between nucleobase and enzyme promotes phosphate ester hydrolysis in dUTPase

    PubMed Central

    Pecsi, Ildiko; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Vertessy, Beata G.; Toth, Judit

    2010-01-01

    Aromatic interactions are well-known players in molecular recognition but their catalytic role in biological systems is less documented. Here, we report that a conserved aromatic stacking interaction between dUTPase and its nucleotide substrate largely contributes to the stabilization of the associative type transition state of the nucleotide hydrolysis reaction. The effect of the aromatic stacking on catalysis is peculiar in that uracil, the aromatic moiety influenced by the aromatic interaction is relatively distant from the site of hydrolysis at the alpha-phosphate group. Using crystallographic, kinetics, optical spectroscopy and thermodynamics calculation approaches we delineate a possible mechanism by which rate acceleration is achieved through the remote π–π interaction. The abundance of similarly positioned aromatic interactions in various nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g. most families of ATPases) raises the possibility of the reported phenomenon being a general component of the enzymatic catalysis of phosphate ester hydrolysis. PMID:20601405

  5. Aromatic stacking between nucleobase and enzyme promotes phosphate ester hydrolysis in dUTPase.

    PubMed

    Pecsi, Ildiko; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Vertessy, Beata G; Toth, Judit

    2010-11-01

    Aromatic interactions are well-known players in molecular recognition but their catalytic role in biological systems is less documented. Here, we report that a conserved aromatic stacking interaction between dUTPase and its nucleotide substrate largely contributes to the stabilization of the associative type transition state of the nucleotide hydrolysis reaction. The effect of the aromatic stacking on catalysis is peculiar in that uracil, the aromatic moiety influenced by the aromatic interaction is relatively distant from the site of hydrolysis at the alpha-phosphate group. Using crystallographic, kinetics, optical spectroscopy and thermodynamics calculation approaches we delineate a possible mechanism by which rate acceleration is achieved through the remote π-π interaction. The abundance of similarly positioned aromatic interactions in various nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g. most families of ATPases) raises the possibility of the reported phenomenon being a general component of the enzymatic catalysis of phosphate ester hydrolysis. PMID:20601405

  6. Direct contacts between conserved motifs of different subunits provide major contribution to active site organization in human and mycobacterial dUTPases

    PubMed Central

    Takács, Enikő; Nagy, Gergely; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Lopata, Anna; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2010-01-01

    dUTPases are essential for genome integrity. Recent results allowed characterization of the role of conserved residues. Here we analyzed the Asp/Asn mutation within conserved Motif I of human and mycobacterial dUTPases, wherein the Asp residue was previously implicated in Mg2+-coordination. Our results on transient/steady-state kinetics, ligand-binding and a 1.80 Å-resolution structure of the mutant mycobacterial enzyme, in comparison with wild type and C-terminally truncated structures, argue that this residue has a major role in providing intra- and intersubunit contacts, but is not essential for Mg2+ accommodation. We conclude that in addition to the role of conserved motifs in substrate accommodation, direct subunit interaction between protein atoms of active site residues from different conserved motifs are crucial for enzyme function. PMID:20493855

  7. Direct contacts between conserved motifs of different subunits provide major contribution to active site organization in human and mycobacterial dUTPases.

    PubMed

    Takács, Eniko; Nagy, Gergely; Leveles, Ibolya; Harmat, Veronika; Lopata, Anna; Tóth, Judit; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2010-07-16

    dUTP pyrophosphatases (dUTPases) are essential for genome integrity. Recent results allowed characterization of the role of conserved residues. Here we analyzed the Asp/Asn mutation within conserved Motif I of human and mycobacterial dUTPases, wherein the Asp residue was previously implicated in Mg(2+)-coordination. Our results on transient/steady-state kinetics, ligand binding and a 1.80 A resolution structure of the mutant mycobacterial enzyme, in comparison with wild type and C-terminally truncated structures, argue that this residue has a major role in providing intra- and intersubunit contacts, but is not essential for Mg(2+) accommodation. We conclude that in addition to the role of conserved motifs in substrate accommodation, direct subunit interaction between protein atoms of active site residues from different conserved motifs are crucial for enzyme function. PMID:20493855

  8. The Type 2 dUTPase of Bacteriophage ϕNM1 Initiates Mobilization of Staphylococcus aureus Bovine Pathogenicity Island 1.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosanne L L; Dokland, Terje

    2016-01-16

    Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity islands (SaPIs) are genetic elements that are mobilized by specific helper phages. The initial step in mobilization is the derepression of the SaPI by the interaction of a phage protein with the SaPI master repressor Stl. Stl proteins are highly divergent between different SaPIs and respond to different phage-encoded derepressors. One such SaPI, SaPIbov1, is derepressed by the dUTPase (Dut) of bacteriophage 80α (Dut80α) and its phage ϕ11 homolog, Dut11. We previously showed that SaPIbov1 could also be mobilized by phage ϕNM1, even though its dut gene is not homologous with that of 80α. Here, we show that ϕNM1 dut encodes a type 2 dUTPase (DutNM1), which has an α-helical structure that is distinct from the type 1 trimeric, β-sheet structure of Dut80α. Deletion of dutNM1 abolishes the ability of ϕNM1 to mobilize SaPIbov1. Like Dut80α, DutNM1 forms a direct interaction with SaPIbov1 Stl both in vivo and in vitro, leading to inhibition of the dUTPase activity and Stl release from its target DNA. This work provides novel insights into the diverse mechanisms of genetic mobilization in S. aureus. PMID:26585401

  9. The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    University of Connecticut; Graveley, Brenton R.; Brooks, Angela N.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Duff, Michael O.; Landolin, Jane M.; Yang, Li; Artieri, Carlo G.; van Baren, Marijke J.; Boley, Nathan; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brown, James B.; Cherbas, Lucy; Davis, Carrie A.; Dobin, Alex; Li, Renhua; Lin, Wei; Malone, John H.; Mattiuzzo, Nicolas R.; Miller, David; Sturgill, David; Tuch, Brian B.; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Dayu; Blanchette, Marco; Dudoit, Sandrine; Eads, Brian; Green, Richard E.; Hammonds, Ann; Jiang, Lichun; Kapranov, Phil; Langton, Laura; Perrimon, Norbert; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Willingham, Aarron; Zhang, Yu; Zou, Yi; Andrews, Justen; Bicke, Peter J.; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Peter; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Oliver, Brian; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-12-02

    Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most well studied genetic model organisms; nonetheless, its genome still contains unannotated coding and non-coding genes, transcripts, exons and RNA editing sites. Full discovery and annotation are pre-requisites for understanding how the regulation of transcription, splicing and RNA editing directs the development of this complex organism. Here we used RNA-Seq, tiling microarrays and cDNA sequencing to explore the transcriptome in 30 distinct developmental stages. We identified 111,195 new elements, including thousands of genes, coding and non-coding transcripts, exons, splicing and editing events, and inferred protein isoforms that previously eluded discovery using established experimental, prediction and conservation-based approaches. These data substantially expand the number of known transcribed elements in the Drosophila genome and provide a high-resolution view of transcriptome dynamics throughout development. Drosophila melanogaster is an important non-mammalian model system that has had a critical role in basic biological discoveries, such as identifying chromosomes as the carriers of genetic information and uncovering the role of genes in development. Because it shares a substantial genic content with humans, Drosophila is increasingly used as a translational model for human development, homeostasis and disease. High-quality maps are needed for all functional genomic elements. Previous studies demonstrated that a rich collection of genes is deployed during the life cycle of the fly. Although expression profiling using microarrays has revealed the expression of, 13,000 annotated genes, it is difficult to map splice junctions and individual base modifications generated by RNA editing using such approaches. Single-base resolution is essential to define precisely the elements that comprise the Drosophila transcriptome. Estimates of the number of transcript isoforms are less accurate than estimates of the number of genes

  10. Tropomyosin isoforms and reagents

    PubMed Central

    Schevzov, Galina; Whittaker, Shane P; Fath, Thomas; Lin, Jim JC

    2011-01-01

    Tropomyosins are rod-like dimers which form head-to-tail polymers along the length of actin filaments and regulate the access of actin binding proteins to the filaments.1 The diversity of tropomyosin isoforms, over 40 in mammals, and their role in an increasing number of biological processes presents a challenge both to experienced researchers and those new to this field. The increased appreciation that the role of these isoforms expands beyond that of simply stabilizing actin filaments has lead to a surge of reagents and techniques to study their function and mechanisms of action. This report is designed to provide a basic guide to the genes and proteins and the availability of reagents which allow effective study of this family of proteins. We highlight the value of combining multiple techniques to better evaluate the function of different tm isoforms and discuss the limitations of selected reagents. Brief background material is included to demystify some of the unfortunate complexity regarding this multi-gene family of proteins including the unconventional nomenclature of the isoforms and the evolutionary relationships of isoforms between species. Additionally, we present step-by-step detailed experimental protocols used in our laboratory to assist new comers to the field and experts alike. PMID:22069507

  11. DNA signals at isoform promoters

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  12. DNA signals at isoform promoters.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhiming; Xiong, Yuanyan; Dai, Xianhua

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional heterogeneity is extensive in the genome, and most genes express variable transcript isoforms. However, whether variable transcript isoforms of one gene are regulated by common promoter elements remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isoform promoters of one gene have separated DNA signals for transcription and translation initiation. We found that TATA box and nucleosome-disfavored DNA sequences are prevalent in distinct transcript isoform promoters of one gene. These DNA signals are conserved among species. Transcript isoform has a RNA-determined unstructured region around its start site. We found that these DNA/RNA features facilitate isoform transcription and translation. These results suggest a DNA-encoded mechanism by which transcript isoform is generated. PMID:27353836

  13. dcd (dCTP deaminase) gene of Escherichia coli: mapping, cloning, sequencing, and identification as a locus of suppressors of lethal dut (dUTPase) mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Weiss, B

    1992-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, most of the dUMP that is used as a substrate for thymidylate synthetase is generated from dCTP through the sequential action of dCTP deaminase and dUTPase. Some mutations of the dut (dUTPase) gene are lethal even when the cells are grown in the presence of thymidine, but their lethality can be suppressed by extragenic mutations that can be produced by transposon insertion. Six suppressor mutations were tested, and all were found to belong to the same complementation group. The affected gene was cloned, it was mapped by hybridization with a library of recombinant DNA, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. The gene is at 2,149 kb on the physical map. Its product, a 21.2-kDa polypeptide, was overproduced 1,000-fold via an expression vector and identified as dCTP deaminase, the enzyme affected in previously described dcd mutants. Null mutations in dcd probably suppress the lethality of dut mutations by reducing the accumulation of dUTP, which would otherwise lead to the excessive incorporation of uracil into DNA. Images PMID:1324907

  14. GAGA Factor Isoforms Have Distinct but Overlapping Functions In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Anthony J.; Schedl, Paul

    2001-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster GAGA factor (encoded by the Trithorax-like [Trl] gene) is required for correct chromatin architecture at diverse chromosomal sites. The Trl gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms of the GAGA factor (GAGA-519 and GAGA-581) that are identical except for the length and sequence of the C-terminal glutamine-rich (Q) domain. In vitro and tissue culture experiments failed to find any functional difference between the two isoforms. We made a set of transgenes that constitutively express cDNAs coding for either of the isoforms with the goal of elucidating their roles in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of the transgenes in Trl mutant background led us to the conclusion that GAGA-519 and GAGA-581 perform different, albeit largely overlapping, functions. We also expressed a fusion protein with LacZ disrupting the Q domain of GAGA-519. This LacZ fusion protein compensated for the loss of wild-type GAGA factor to a surprisingly large extent. This suggests that the Q domain either is not required for the essential functions performed by the GAGA protein or is exclusively used for tetramer formation. These results are inconsistent with a major role of the Q domain in chromatin remodeling or transcriptional activation. We also found that GAGA-LacZ was able to associate with sites not normally occupied by the GAGA factor, pointing to a role of the Q domain in binding site choice in vivo. PMID:11713290

  15. Catalytic mechanism of α-phosphate attack in dUTPase is revealed by X-ray crystallographic snapshots of distinct intermediates, 31P-NMR spectroscopy and reaction path modelling

    PubMed Central

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Bodor, Andrea; Perczel, András; Rosta, Edina; Kele, Zoltán; Zagyva, Imre; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince I.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Vértessy, Beáta G.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymatic synthesis and hydrolysis of nucleoside phosphate compounds play a key role in various biological pathways, like signal transduction, DNA synthesis and metabolism. Although these processes have been studied extensively, numerous key issues regarding the chemical pathway and atomic movements remain open for many enzymatic reactions. Here, using the Mason–Pfizer monkey retrovirus dUTPase, we study the dUTPase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dUTP, an incorrect DNA building block, to elaborate the mechanistic details at high resolution. Combining mass spectrometry analysis of the dUTPase-catalyzed reaction carried out in and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation, we show that the nucleophilic attack occurs at the α-phosphate site. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy (31P-NMR) analysis confirms the site of attack and shows the capability of dUTPase to cleave the dUTP analogue α,β-imido-dUTP, containing the imido linkage usually regarded to be non-hydrolyzable. We present numerous X-ray crystal structures of distinct dUTPase and nucleoside phosphate complexes, which report on the progress of the chemical reaction along the reaction coordinate. The presently used combination of diverse structural methods reveals details of the nucleophilic attack and identifies a novel enzyme–product complex structure. PMID:23982515

  16. Catalytic mechanism of α-phosphate attack in dUTPase is revealed by X-ray crystallographic snapshots of distinct intermediates, 31P-NMR spectroscopy and reaction path modelling.

    PubMed

    Barabás, Orsolya; Németh, Veronika; Bodor, Andrea; Perczel, András; Rosta, Edina; Kele, Zoltán; Zagyva, Imre; Szabadka, Zoltán; Grolmusz, Vince I; Wilmanns, Matthias; Vértessy, Beáta G

    2013-12-01

    Enzymatic synthesis and hydrolysis of nucleoside phosphate compounds play a key role in various biological pathways, like signal transduction, DNA synthesis and metabolism. Although these processes have been studied extensively, numerous key issues regarding the chemical pathway and atomic movements remain open for many enzymatic reactions. Here, using the Mason-Pfizer monkey retrovirus dUTPase, we study the dUTPase-catalyzed hydrolysis of dUTP, an incorrect DNA building block, to elaborate the mechanistic details at high resolution. Combining mass spectrometry analysis of the dUTPase-catalyzed reaction carried out in and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulation, we show that the nucleophilic attack occurs at the α-phosphate site. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy ((31)P-NMR) analysis confirms the site of attack and shows the capability of dUTPase to cleave the dUTP analogue α,β-imido-dUTP, containing the imido linkage usually regarded to be non-hydrolyzable. We present numerous X-ray crystal structures of distinct dUTPase and nucleoside phosphate complexes, which report on the progress of the chemical reaction along the reaction coordinate. The presently used combination of diverse structural methods reveals details of the nucleophilic attack and identifies a novel enzyme-product complex structure. PMID:23982515

  17. Differential Roles of PML Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Nisole, Sébastien; Maroui, Mohamed Ali; Mascle, Xavier H; Aubry, Muriel; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein is fused to the retinoic acid receptor alpha in patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Treatment of APL patients with arsenic trioxide (As2O3) reverses the disease phenotype by a process involving the degradation of the fusion protein via its PML moiety. Several PML isoforms are generated from a single PML gene by alternative splicing. They share the same N-terminal region containing the RBCC/tripartite motif but differ in their C-terminal sequences. Recent studies of all the PML isoforms reveal the specific functions of each. Here, we review the nomenclature and structural organization of the PML isoforms in order to clarify the various designations and classifications found in different databases. The functions of the PML isoforms and their differential roles in antiviral defense also are reviewed. Finally, the key players involved in the degradation of the PML isoforms in response to As2O3 or other inducers are discussed. PMID:23734343

  18. Leigh Syndrome in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Da-Rè, Caterina; von Stockum, Sophia; Biscontin, Alberto; Millino, Caterina; Cisotto, Paola; Zordan, Mauro A.; Zeviani, Massimo; Bernardi, Paolo; De Pittà, Cristiano; Costa, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Leigh Syndrome (LS) is the most common early-onset, progressive mitochondrial encephalopathy usually leading to early death. The single most prevalent cause of LS is occurrence of mutations in the SURF1 gene, and LSSurf1 patients show a ubiquitous and specific decrease in the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase, COX). SURF1 encodes an inner membrane mitochondrial protein involved in COX assembly. We established a Drosophila melanogaster model of LS based on the post-transcriptional silencing of CG9943, the Drosophila homolog of SURF1. Knockdown of Surf1 was induced ubiquitously in larvae and adults, which led to lethality; in the mesodermal derivatives, which led to pupal lethality; or in the central nervous system, which allowed survival. A biochemical characterization was carried out in knockdown individuals, which revealed that larvae unexpectedly displayed defects in all complexes of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and in the F-ATP synthase, while adults had a COX-selective impairment. Silencing of Surf1 expression in Drosophila S2R+ cells led to selective loss of COX activity associated with decreased oxygen consumption and respiratory reserve. We conclude that Surf1 is essential for COX activity and mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster, thus providing a new tool that may help clarify the pathogenic mechanisms of LS. PMID:25164807

  19. Short and long-term memory are modulated by multiple isoforms of the fragile X mental retardation protein

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Paromita; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Bell, Aaron J.; Choi, Catherine H.; Bradley, Michael P.; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Park, Jae H.; McBride, Sean M.J.; Dockendorff, Thomas C.

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of protein isoforms arising from alternative splicing is thought to modulate fine-tuning of synaptic plasticity. Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a neuronal RNA binding protein, exists in isoforms as a result of alternative splicing, but the contribution of these isoforms to neural plasticity are not well understood. We show that two isoforms of D. melanogaster FMRP (dFMR1) have differential roles in mediating neural development and behavior functions conferred by the dfmr1 gene. These isoforms differ in the presence of a protein interaction module that is related to prion domains and is functionally conserved between FMRPs. Expression of both isoforms is necessary for optimal performance in tests of short and long-term memory of courtship training. The presence or absence of the protein interaction domain may govern the types of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes dFMR1 assembles into, with different RNPs regulating gene expression in a manner necessary for establishing distinct phases of memory formation. PMID:20463240

  20. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  1. Investigating Spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, Rafael S.; Eikenes, Åsmund H.; Haglund, Kaisa; Jones, D. Leanne

    2014-01-01

    The process of spermatogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to probe a variety of developmental and cell biological questions, such as the characterization of mechanisms that regulate stem cell behavior, cytokinesis, meiosis, and mitochondrial dynamics. Classical genetic approaches, together with binary expression systems, FRT-mediated recombination, and novel imaging systems to capture single cell behavior, are rapidly expanding our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms regulating all aspects of spermatogenesis. This methods chapter provides a detailed description of the system, a review of key questions chapter that have been addressed or remain unanswered thus far, and an introduction to tools and techniques available to probe each stage of spermatogenesis. PMID:24798812

  2. Another look at the mechanism involving trimeric dUTPases in Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island induction involves novel players in the party

    PubMed Central

    Maiques, Elisa; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Donderis, Jorge; Ciges-Tomas, J. Rafael; Alite, Christian; Bowring, Janine Z.; Humphrey, Suzanne; Penadés, José R.; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have recently proposed that the trimeric staphylococcal phage encoded dUTPases (Duts) are signaling molecules that act analogously to eukaryotic G-proteins, using dUTP as a second messenger. To perform this regulatory role, the Duts require their characteristic extra motif VI, present in all the staphylococcal phage coded trimeric Duts, as well as the strongly conserved Dut motif V. Recently, however, an alternative model involving Duts in the transfer of the staphylococcal islands (SaPIs) has been suggested, questioning the implication of motifs V and VI. Here, using state-of the-art techniques, we have revisited the proposed models. Our results confirm that the mechanism by which the Duts derepress the SaPI cycle depends on dUTP and involves both motifs V and VI, as we have previously proposed. Surprisingly, the conserved Dut motif IV is also implicated in SaPI derepression. However, and in agreement with the proposed alternative model, the dUTP inhibits rather than inducing the process, as we had initially proposed. In summary, our results clarify, validate and establish the mechanism by which the Duts perform regulatory functions. PMID:27112567

  3. Identification and Characterization of the Nuclear Isoform of Drosophila melanogaster CTP:Phosphocholine Cytidylyltransferase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT) catalyzes the conversion of phosphocholine and cytidine 5'-triphosphate (CTP) to CDP-choline for the eventual synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). The enzyme is regulated by reversible association with cellular membranes, with the rate of catalysis in...

  4. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently the gold standard for cardiac pacing. However, it is invasive and nonspecific for cardiac tissues. We recently developed a noninvasive cardiac pacing technique using optogenetic tools, which are widely used in neuroscience. Optogenetic pacing of the heart provides high spatial and temporal precisions, is specific for cardiac tissues, avoids artifacts associated with electrical stimulation, and therefore promises to be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research. We demonstrated optogenetic control of heart rhythm in a well-established model organism, Drosophila melanogaster. We developed transgenic flies expressing a light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2), specifically in their hearts and demonstrated successful optogenetic pacing of ChR2-expressing Drosophila at different developmental stages, including the larva, pupa, and adult stages. A high-speed and ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence microscopy imaging system that is capable of providing images at a rate of 130 frames/s with axial and transverse resolutions of 1.5 and 3.9 μm, respectively, was used to noninvasively monitor Drosophila cardiac function and its response to pacing stimulation. The development of a noninvasive integrated optical pacing and imaging system provides a novel platform for performing research studies in developmental cardiology. PMID:26601299

  5. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  6. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  7. Inference of Isoforms from Short Sequence Reads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jianxing; Li, Wei; Jiang, Tao

    Due to alternative splicing events in eukaryotic species, the identification of mRNA isoforms (or splicing variants) is a difficult problem. Traditional experimental methods for this purpose are time consuming and cost ineffective. The emerging RNA-Seq technology provides a possible effective method to address this problem. Although the advantages of RNA-Seq over traditional methods in transcriptome analysis have been confirmed by many studies, the inference of isoforms from millions of short sequence reads (e.g., Illumina/Solexa reads) has remained computationally challenging. In this work, we propose a method to calculate the expression levels of isoforms and infer isoforms from short RNA-Seq reads using exon-intron boundary, transcription start site (TSS) and poly-A site (PAS) information. We first formulate the relationship among exons, isoforms, and single-end reads as a convex quadratic program, and then use an efficient algorithm (called IsoInfer) to search for isoforms. IsoInfer can calculate the expression levels of isoforms accurately if all the isoforms are known and infer novel isoforms from scratch. Our experimental tests on known mouse isoforms with both simulated expression levels and reads demonstrate that IsoInfer is able to calculate the expression levels of isoforms with an accuracy comparable to the state-of-the-art statistical method and a 60 times faster speed. Moreover, our tests on both simulated and real reads show that it achieves a good precision and sensitivity in inferring isoforms when given accurate exon-intron boundary, TSS and PAS information, especially for isoforms whose expression levels are significantly high.

  8. Splice variants of the SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factor Domino have distinct functions during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Börner, Kenneth; Becker, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    SWR1-type nucleosome remodeling factors replace histone H2A by variants to endow chromatin locally with specialized functionality. In Drosophila melanogaster a single H2A variant, H2A.V, combines functions of mammalian H2A.Z and H2A.X in transcription regulation and the DNA damage response. A major role in H2A.V incorporation for the only SWR1-like enzyme in flies, Domino, is assumed but not well documented in vivo. It is also unclear whether the two alternatively spliced isoforms, DOM-A and DOM-B, have redundant or specialized functions. Loss of both DOM isoforms compromises oogenesis, causing female sterility. We systematically explored roles of the two DOM isoforms during oogenesis using a cell type-specific knockdown approach. Despite their ubiquitous expression, DOM-A and DOM-B have non-redundant functions in germline and soma for egg formation. We show that chromatin incorporation of H2A.V in germline and somatic cells depends on DOM-B, whereas global incorporation in endoreplicating germline nurse cells appears to be independent of DOM. By contrast, DOM-A promotes the removal of H2A.V from stage 5 nurse cells. Remarkably, therefore, the two DOM isoforms have distinct functions in cell type-specific development and H2A.V exchange. PMID:27578180

  9. Neurotoxicology of bis(n)-tacrines on Blattella germanica and Drosophila melanogaster acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Mutunga, James M; Boina, Dhana Raj; Anderson, Troy D; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; Carlier, Paul R; Wong, Dawn M; Lam, Polo C-H; Totrov, Maxim M

    2013-08-01

    A series of bis(n)-tacrines were used as pharmacological probes of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) catalytic and peripheral sites of Blattella germanica and Drosophila melanogaster, which express AChE-1 and AChE-2 isoforms, respectively. In general, the potency of bis(n)-tacrines was greater in D. melanogaster AChE (DmAChE) than in B. germanica AChE (BgAChE). The change in potency with tether length was high in DmAChE and low in BgAChE, associated with 90-fold and 5.2-fold maximal potency gain, respectively, compared to the tacrine monomer. The optimal tether length for Blattella was 8 carbons and for Drosophila was 10 carbons. The two species differed by only about twofold in their sensitivity to tacrine monomer, indicating that differential potency occurred among dimeric bis(n)-tacrines due to structural differences in the peripheral site. Multiple sequence alignment and in silico homology modeling suggest that aromatic residues of DmAChE confer higher affinity binding, and the lack of same at the BgAChE peripheral site may account, at least in part, to the greater overall sensitivity of DmAChE to bis(n)-tacrines, as reflected by in vitro assay data. Topical and injection assays in cockroaches found minimal toxicity of bis(n)-tacrines. Electrophysiological studies on D. melanogaster central nervous system showed that dimeric tacrines do not readily cross the blood brain barrier, explaining the observed nonlethality to insects. Although the bis(n)-tacrines were not good insecticide candidates, the information obtained in this study should aid in the design of selective bivalent ligands targeting insect, pests, and disease vectors. PMID:23740645

  10. Ultra-deep profiling of alternatively spliced Drosophila Dscam isoforms by circularization-assisted multi-segment sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; You, Xintian; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; He, Haihuai; Kise, Yoshiaki; Sohn, Madlen; Chen, Tao; Klebes, Ansgar; Schmucker, Dietmar; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster gene Dscam (Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule) can generate thousands of different ectodomains via mutual exclusive splicing of three large exon clusters. The isoform diversity plays a profound role in both neuronal wiring and pathogen recognition. However, the isoform expression pattern at the global level remained unexplored. Here, we developed a novel method that allows for direct quantification of the alternatively spliced exon combinations from over hundreds of millions of Dscam transcripts in one sequencing run. With unprecedented sequencing depth, we detected a total of 18 496 isoforms, out of 19 008 theoretically possible combinations. Importantly, we demonstrated that alternative splicing between different clusters is independent. Moreover, the isoforms were expressed across a broad dynamic range, with significant bias in cell/tissue and developmental stage-specific patterns. Hitherto underappreciated, such bias can dramatically reduce the ability of neurons to display unique surface receptor codes. Therefore, the seemingly excessive diversity encoded in the Dscam locus might nevertheless be essential for a robust self and non-self discrimination in neurons. PMID:23792425

  11. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  12. PKC Isoform Expression in Modeled Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Risin, Diana; Sundaresan, Alamelu; Pellis, Neal R.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that modeled (MMG) and true (USA Space Shuttle Missions STS-54 and STS-56) microgravity (MG) inhibit human lymphocyte locomotion, Modeled MG also suppressed polyclonal and antigen-specific lymphocyte activation. Activation of PKC by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) restored the microgravity-inhibited lymphocyte locomotion as well as activation by phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), whereas calcium ionophore (ionomycin) was unable to restore these functions. Based on these results we hypothesized that MG-induced changes in lymphocyte functions are caused by a fundamental defect in signal transduction mechanism. This defect may be localized either at the PKC level or upstream of PKC, most likely, at the cell membrane level. In this study we examined the expression of PKC isoforms alpha, epsilon and delta in PBMC cultured in rotating wall vessel bioreactor, developed at NASA JSC, which models microgravity by sustaining cells in continuous free fall. The assessment of the isoforms was performed by FACS analysis following cell permeabilization. A decrease in the expression of isoforms epsilon and delta, but not isoform a, was observed in PBMC cultured in microgravity conditions. These data suggest that MMG might selectively affect the expression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC Molecular analysis confirm selective suppression of Ca2+ independent isoforms of PKC.

  13. High resolution structure of cleaved Serpin 42 Da from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila melanogaster Serpin 42 Da gene (previously Serpin 4) encodes a serine protease inhibitor that is capable of remarkable functional diversity through the alternative splicing of four different reactive centre loop exons. Eight protein isoforms of Serpin 42 Da have been identified to date, targeting the protease inhibitor to both different proteases and cellular locations. Biochemical and genetic studies suggest that Serpin 42 Da inhibits target proteases through the classical serpin ‘suicide’ inhibition mechanism, however the crystal structure of a representative Serpin 42 Da isoform remains to be determined. Results We report two high-resolution crystal structures of Serpin 42 Da representing the A/B isoforms in the cleaved conformation, belonging to two different space-groups and diffracting to 1.7 Å and 1.8 Å. Structural analysis reveals the archetypal serpin fold, with the major elements of secondary structure displaying significant homology to the vertebrate serpin, neuroserpin. Key residues known to have central roles in the serpin inhibitory mechanism are conserved in both the hinge and shutter regions of Serpin 42 Da. Furthermore, these structures identify important conserved interactions that appear to be of crucial importance in allowing the Serpin 42 Da fold to act as a versatile template for multiple reactive centre loops that have different sequences and protease specificities. Conclusions In combination with previous biochemical and genetic studies, these structures confirm for the first time that the Serpin 42 Da isoforms are typical inhibitory serpin family members with the conserved serpin fold and inhibitory mechanism. Additionally, these data reveal the remarkable structural plasticity of serpins, whereby the basic fold is harnessed as a template for inhibition of a large spectrum of proteases by reactive centre loop exon ‘switching’. This is the first structure of a Drosophila serpin reported to date

  14. [COMPARATIVE STUDY OF Hrs AND OTHER ENDOSOMAL MARKERS CELLULAR LOCALIZATION IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER SPERMATOGENESIS BY GFP-CHIMERICAL PROTEIN APPROACH].

    PubMed

    Marilovtseva, E V; Dubatolova, T D; Galimova, J A; Kopyl, S A; Omelyanchuk, L V

    2015-01-01

    Acrosome is a special organelle in spermatozoids necessary for fertilizing oocyte and originates, according to various theories, either from Golgi apparatus, or from endosomes and lysosomes. One of the proteins, found at mammalian acrosome, is Hgs, a homologue of Drosophila melanogaster Hrs (Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate), a known marker of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). However, although Drosophila acrosome was extensively studied, it is yet unknown whether Hrs localizes at acrosome similar to Hgs and, more generally, whether the spectrum of acrosomal proteins in Drosophila is the same as in mammals. Hrs (hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate) is the multidomain vesicular protein participating in the endosome-lysosome protein sorting. We demonstrated that two protein variants of the Drosophila Hrs are expressed in testes: a longer isoform B, and a shorter isoform A, which lacks VHS and FYVE domains that are necessary for anchoring Hrs in endosomes. We found that Hrs isoform B is concentrated at fusoma of spermatocytes in contrast to mammalian Hrs. This localization requires the C-terminus of the protein, starting from the aminoacid residue 383. In situ hybridization of hrs RNA probe showed that the gene is expressed early in spermatogenesis consistently with Hrs localization in early fusoma. Additionally, we demonstrated that Hrs is dispensable for cytokinesis. Finally, it was found that although Drosophila Hrs does not localize at acrosome, the other endosomal markers--Rab4, Rab7, and Rab11--are detected at the organelle. PMID:26591063

  15. Cellular immune defenses of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Brendon; Foley, Edan

    2016-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a widely used model for the characterization of blood cell development and function, with an array of protocols for the manipulation and visualization of fixed or live cells in vitro or in vivo. Researchers have deployed these techniques to reveal Drosophila hemocytes as a remarkably versatile cell type that engulfs apoptotic corpses; neutralizes invading parasites; seals epithelial wounds; and deposits extracellular matrix proteins. In this review, we will discuss the key features of Drosophila hemocyte development and function, and identify similarities with vertebrate counterparts. PMID:26748247

  16. Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase activates gemcitabine

    SciTech Connect

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, Nils Egil; Clausen, Anders Ranegaard; Willer, Mette; Gojkovic, Zoran

    2009-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) can additionally sensitize human cancer cell lines towards the anti-cancer drug gemcitabine. We show that this property is based on the Dm-dNK ability to efficiently phosphorylate gemcitabine. The 2.2 A resolution structure of Dm-dNK in complex with gemcitabine shows that the residues Tyr70 and Arg105 play a crucial role in the firm positioning of gemcitabine by extra interactions made by the fluoride atoms. This explains why gemcitabine is a good substrate for Dm-dNK.

  17. Antiangiogenic VEGF Isoform in Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Nila; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Lorenzoni, Paola; Di Lazzaro, Francesco; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Aglianò, Margherita; Giannini, Fabio; Grasso, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To investigate expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antiangiogenic isoform A-165b on human muscle in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM) and to compare distribution of angiogenic/antiangiogenic VEGFs, as isoforms shifts are described in other autoimmune disorders. Subjects and Methods. We analyzed VEGF-A165b and VEGF-A by western blot and immunohistochemistry on skeletal muscle biopsies from 21 patients affected with IIM (polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and inclusion body myositis) and 6 control muscle samples. TGF-β, a prominent VEGF inductor, was analogously evaluated. Intergroup differences of western blot bands density were statistically examined. Endomysial vascularization, inflammatory score, and muscle regeneration, as pathological parameters of IIM, were quantitatively determined and their levels were confronted with VEGF expression. Results. VEGF-A165b was significantly upregulated in IIM, as well as TGF-β. VEGF-A was diffusely expressed on unaffected myofibers, whereas regenerating/atrophic myofibres strongly reacted for both VEGF-A isoforms. Most inflammatory cells and endomysial vessels expressed both isoforms. VEGF-A165b levels were in positive correlation to inflammatory score, endomysial vascularization, and TGF-β. Conclusions. Our findings indicate skeletal muscle expression of antiangiogenic VEGF-A165b and preferential upregulation in IIM, suggesting that modulation of VEGF-A isoforms may occur in myositides. PMID:23840094

  18. A non-canonical start codon in the Drosophila fragile X gene yields two functional isoforms.

    PubMed

    Beerman, R W; Jongens, T A

    2011-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is caused by the loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). As a RNA binding protein, FMRP functions in translational regulation, localization, and stability of its neuronal target transcripts. The Drosophila homologue, dFMR1, is well conserved in sequence and function with respect to human FMRP. Although dFMR1 is known to express two main isoforms, the mechanism behind production of the second, more slowly migrating isoform has remained elusive. Furthermore, it remains unknown whether the two isoforms may also contribute differentially to dFMR1 function. We have found that this second dFMR1 isoform is generated through an alternative translational start site in the dfmr1 5'UTR. This 5'UTR coding sequence is well conserved in the melanogaster group. Translation of the predominant, smaller form of dFMR1 (dFMR1-S(N)) begins at a canonical start codon (ATG), whereas translation of the minor, larger form (dFMR1-L(N)) begins upstream at a non-canonical start codon (CTG). To assess the contribution of the N-terminal extension toward dFMR1 activity, we generated transgenic flies that exclusively express either dFMR1-S(N) or dFMR1-L(N). Expression analyses throughout development revealed that dFMR1-S(N) is required for normal dFMR1-L(N) expression levels in adult brains. In situ expression analyses showed that either dFMR1-S(N) or dFMR1-L(N) is individually sufficient for proper dFMR1 localization in the nervous system. Functional studies demonstrated that both dFMR1-S(N) and dFMR1-L(N) can function independently to rescue dfmr1 null defects in synaptogenesis and axon guidance. Thus, dfmr1 encodes two functional isoforms with respect to expression and activity throughout neuronal development. PMID:21333716

  19. Population transcriptomics of Drosophila melanogaster females

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Variation at the level of gene expression is abundant in natural populations and is thought to contribute to the adaptive divergence of populations and species. Gene expression also differs considerably between males and females. Here we report a microarray analysis of gene expression variation among females of 16 Drosophila melanogaster strains derived from natural populations, including eight strains from the putative ancestral range in sub-Saharan Africa and eight strains from Europe. Gene expression variation among males of the same strains was reported previously. Results We detected relatively low levels of expression polymorphism within populations, but much higher expression divergence between populations. A total of 569 genes showed a significant expression difference between the African and European populations at a false discovery rate of 5%. Genes with significant over-expression in Europe included the insecticide resistance gene Cyp6g1, as well as genes involved in proteolysis and olfaction. Genes with functions in carbohydrate metabolism and vision were significantly over-expressed in the African population. There was little overlap between genes expressed differently between populations in females and males. Conclusions Our results suggest that adaptive changes in gene expression have accompanied the out-of-Africa migration of D. melanogaster. Comparison of female and male expression data indicates that the vast majority of genes differing in expression between populations do so in only one sex and suggests that most regulatory adaptation has been sex-specific. PMID:21276238

  20. Mitochondrial glutamate carriers from Drosophila melanogaster: biochemical, evolutionary and modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Lunetti, Paola; Cappello, Anna Rita; Marsano, René Massimiliano; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Carrisi, Chiara; Martello, Emanuela; Caggese, Corrado; Dolce, Vincenza; Capobianco, Loredana

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial carriers are members of a family of transport proteins that mediate solute transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Two isoforms of the glutamate carriers, GC1 and GC2 (encoded by the SLC25A22 and SLC25A18 genes, respectively), have been identified in humans. Two independent mutations in SLC25A22 are associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. In the present study we show that two genes (CG18347 and CG12201) phylogenetically related to the human GC encoding genes are present in the D. melanogaster genome. We have functionally characterized the proteins encoded by CG18347 and CG12201, designated as DmGC1p and DmGC2p respectively, by overexpression in Escherichia coli and reconstitution into liposomes. Their transport properties demonstrate that DmGC1p and DmGC2p both catalyze the transport of glutamate across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Computational approaches have been used in order to highlight residues of DmGC1p and DmGC2p involved in substrate binding. Furthermore, gene expression analysis during development and in various adult tissues reveals that CG18347 is ubiquitously expressed in all examined D. melanogaster tissues, while the expression of CG12201 is strongly testis-biased. Finally, we identified mitochondrial glutamate carrier orthologs in 49 eukaryotic species in order to attempt the reconstruction of the evolutionary history of the glutamate carrier function. Comparison of the exon/intron structure and other key features of the analyzed orthologs suggests that eukaryotic glutamate carrier genes descend from an intron-rich ancestral gene already present in the common ancestor of lineages that diverged as early as bilateria and radiata. PMID:23850633

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase p38b interaction with delta class glutathione transferases from the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakul, Jeerang; Sukittikul, Suchada; Saisawang, Chonticha; Ketterman, Albert J

    2012-01-01

    Glutathione transferases (GSTs) are a family of multifunctional enzymes involved in xenobiotic biotransformation, drug metabolism, and protection against oxidative damage. The p38b mitogen-activated protein kinase is involved in cellular stress response. This study screened interactions between Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) Delta class glutathione transferases (DmGSTs) and the D. melanogaster p38b MAPK. Therefore, 12 DmGSTs and p38b kinase were obtained as recombinant proteins. The study showed that DmGSTD8 and DmGSTD11b significantly increased p38b activity toward ATF2 and jun, which are transcription factor substrates. DmGSTD3 and DmGSTD5 moderately increased p38b activity for jun. In addition, GST activity in the presence of p38b was also measured. It was found that p38b affected substrate specificity toward CDNB (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene) and DCNB (1,2-dichloro-4-nitrobenzene) of several GST isoforms, i.e., DmGSTD2, DmGSTD5, DmGSTD8, and DmGSTD11b. The interaction of a GST and p38b can affect the substrate specificity of either enzyme, which suggests induced conformational changes affecting catalysis. Similar interactions do not occur for all the Delta enzymes and p38b, which suggests that these interactions could be specific. PMID:23438069

  2. Apolipoprotein E isoform-dependent microglia migration

    PubMed Central

    Cudaback, Eiron; Li, Xianwu; Montine, Kathleen S.; Montine, Thomas J.; Keene, C. Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Complement component C5a and ATP are potent effectors of microglial movement and are increased in diverse neurodegenerative diseases and at sites of injury. Apolipoprotein E (apoE) influences microglial function, and different human apoE isoforms confer variable risk for development of neurodegenerative disorders, especially Alzheimer's disease. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that mouse apoE and human apoE isoforms influence microglial migration. Using primary wild-type and apoE-deficient microglia, we show that C5a- and ATP-stimulated chemotaxis are largely apoE-dependent processes with different molecular bases. Although the C5a-dependent chemotaxis of wild-type microglia was completely blocked by receptor-associated protein (RAP), suggesting apoE receptor involvement, ATP-stimulated migration was unaffected by RAP but was associated with differential ERK phosphorylation. Studies using primary microglia derived from targeted replacement mice “humanized” for the coding exons (protein isoform) of human ε2 (apoE2), ε3 (apoE3), or ε4 (apoE4) allele of APOE revealed that primary mouse microglia expressing apoE4 or apoE2 exhibited significantly reduced C5a- and ATP-stimulated migration compared with microglia expressing human apoE3. This study, for the first time, demonstrates apoE dependence and apoE isoform-specific modulation of microglial migration in response to distinct chemotactic stimuli commonly associated with neurodegenerative disease.—Cudaback, E., Li, X., Montine, K. S., Montine, T. J., Keene, C. D. Apolipoprotein E isoform-dependent microglia migration. PMID:21385991

  3. The genome sequence of Drosophila melanogaster.

    SciTech Connect

    2000-03-24

    The fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most intensively studied organisms in biology and serves as a model system for the investigation of many developmental and cellular processes common to higher eukaryotes, including humans. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of nearly all of the {approximately}120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map. Efforts are under way to close the remaining gaps; however, the sequence is of sufficient accuracy and contiguity to be declared substantially complete and to support an initial analysis of genome structure and preliminary gene annotation and interpretation. The genome encodes {approximately}13,600 genes, somewhat fewer than the smaller Caenorhabditis elegans genome, but with comparable functional diversity.

  4. The digestive tract of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lemaitre, Bruno; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The digestive tract plays a central role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. Far from being a passive tube, it provides the first line of defense against pathogens and maintains energy homeostasis by exchanging neuronal and endocrine signals with other organs. Historically neglected, the gut of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has recently come to the forefront of Drosophila research. Areas as diverse as stem cell biology, neurobiology, metabolism, and immunity are benefitting from the ability to study the genetics of development, growth regulation, and physiology in the same organ. In this review, we summarize our knowledge of the Drosophila digestive tract, with an emphasis on the adult midgut and its functional underpinnings. PMID:24016187

  5. Bisexual Hybrid Sterility in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, D. J.; Angus, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    A new type of hybrid sterility was investigated in D. melanogaster . Matings between strain 27 males from Para Wirra, South Australia, and Canton-S females produce 70–80% fully sterile male and female progeny. Strain 27 males produce sterile progeny when crossed to females of other geographic origins, but produce fertile progeny when crossed to a second sympatric strain. The sterility is avoided by lower rearing temperatures. Heat shock and tetracycline produce no improvement in the fertility of the hybrids. Normal flies produce sterile progeny when injected with, or fed, homogenates of sterile flies. A combination of maternal and paternal factors may interact to produce sterile hybrids by inhibiting gonad development. PMID:17248832

  6. A Protein Interaction Map of Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giot, L.; Bader, J. S.; Brouwer, C.; Chaudhuri, A.; Kuang, B.; Li, Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Ooi, C. E.; Godwin, B.; Vitols, E.; Vijayadamodar, G.; Pochart, P.; Machineni, H.; Welsh, M.; Kong, Y.; Zerhusen, B.; Malcolm, R.; Varrone, Z.; Collis, A.; Minto, M.; Burgess, S.; McDaniel, L.; Stimpson, E.; Spriggs, F.; Williams, J.; Neurath, K.; Ioime, N.; Agee, M.; Voss, E.; Furtak, K.; Renzulli, R.; Aanensen, N.; Carrolla, S.; Bickelhaupt, E.; Lazovatsky, Y.; DaSilva, A.; Zhong, J.; Stanyon, C. A.; Finley, R. L.; White, K. P.; Braverman, M.; Jarvie, T.; Gold, S.; Leach, M.; Knight, J.; Shimkets, R. A.; McKenna, M. P.; Chant, J.; Rothberg, J. M.

    2003-12-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a proven model system for many aspects of human biology. Here we present a two-hybrid-based protein-interaction map of the fly proteome. A total of 10,623 predicted transcripts were isolated and screened against standard and normalized complementary DNA libraries to produce a draft map of 7048 proteins and 20,405 interactions. A computational method of rating two-hybrid interaction confidence was developed to refine this draft map to a higher confidence map of 4679 proteins and 4780 interactions. Statistical modeling of the network showed two levels of organization: a short-range organization, presumably corresponding to multiprotein complexes, and a more global organization, presumably corresponding to intercomplex connections. The network recapitulated known pathways, extended pathways, and uncovered previously unknown pathway components. This map serves as a starting point for a systems biology modeling of multicellular organisms, including humans.

  7. Maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster Population Cage

    PubMed Central

    Caravaca, Juan Manuel; Lei, Elissa P.

    2016-01-01

    Large quantities of DNA, RNA, proteins and other cellular components are often required for biochemistry and molecular biology experiments. The short life cycle of Drosophila enables collection of large quantities of material from embryos, larvae, pupae and adult flies, in a synchronized way, at a low economic cost. A major strategy for propagating large numbers of flies is the use of a fly population cage. This useful and common tool in the Drososphila community is an efficient way to regularly produce milligrams to tens of grams of embryos, depending on uniformity of developmental stage desired. While a population cage can be time consuming to set up, maintaining a cage over months takes much less time and enables rapid collection of biological material in a short period. This paper describes a detailed and flexible protocol for the maintenance of a Drosophila melanogaster population cage, starting with 1.5 g of harvested material from the previous cycle. PMID:27023790

  8. Live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parton, Richard M; Vallés, Ana Maria; Dobbie, Ian M; Davis, Ilan

    2010-04-01

    Although many of the techniques of live cell imaging in Drosophila melanogaster are also used by the greater community of cell biologists working on other model systems, studying living fly tissues presents unique difficulties with regard to keeping the cells alive, introducing fluorescent probes, and imaging through thick, hazy cytoplasm. This article outlines the major tissue types amenable to study by time-lapse cinematography and different methods for keeping the cells alive. It describes various imaging and associated techniques best suited to following changes in the distribution of fluorescently labeled molecules in real time in these tissues. Imaging, in general, is a rapidly developing discipline, and recent advances in imaging technology are able to greatly extend what can be achieved with live cell imaging of Drosophila tissues. As far as possible, this article includes the latest technical developments and discusses likely future developments in imaging methods that could have an impact on research using Drosophila. PMID:20360379

  9. The Spn4 gene from Drosophila melanogaster is a multipurpose defence tool directed against proteases from three different peptidase families

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Mareke; Lummer, Martina; Bentele, Caterina; Smolenaars, Marcel M. W.; Rodenburg, Kees W.; Ragg, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    By alternative use of four RSL (reactive site loop) coding exon cassettes, the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) gene Spn4 from Drosophila melanogaster was proposed to enable the synthesis of multiple protease inhibitor isoforms, one of which has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of human furin. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory spectrum of all Spn4 RSL variants. The analyses indicate that the Spn4 gene encodes inhibitors that may inhibit serine proteases of the subtilase family (S8), the chymotrypsin family (S1), and the papain-like cysteine protease family (C1), most of them at high rates. Thus a cohort of different protease inhibitors is generated simply by grafting enzyme-adapted RSL sequences on to a single serpin scaffold, even though the target proteases contain different types and/or a varying order of catalytic residues and are descendents of different phylogenetic lineages. Since all of the Spn4 RSL isoforms are produced as intracellular residents and additionally as variants destined for export or associated with the secretory pathway, the Spn4 gene represents a versatile defence tool kit that may provide multiple antiproteolytic functions. PMID:16989645

  10. Structural Basis of Dscam Isoform Specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Meijers,R.; Puettmann-Holgado, R.; Skiniotis, G.; Liu, J.; Walz, T.; Wang, J.; Schmucker, D.

    2007-01-01

    The Dscam gene gives rise to thousands of diverse cell surface receptors1 thought to provide homophilic and heterophilic recognition specificity for neuronal wiring and immune responses. Mutually exclusive splicing allows for the generation of sequence variability in three immunoglobulin ecto-domains, D2, D3 and D7. We report X-ray structures of the amino-terminal four immunoglobulin domains (D1-D4) of two distinct Dscam isoforms. The structures reveal a horseshoe configuration, with variable residues of D2 and D3 constituting two independent surface epitopes on either side of the receptor. Both isoforms engage in homo-dimerization coupling variable domain D2 with D2, and D3 with D3. These interactions involve symmetric, antiparallel pairing of identical peptide segments from epitope I that are unique to each isoform. Structure-guided mutagenesis and swapping of peptide segments confirm that epitope I, but not epitope II, confers homophilic binding specificity of full-length Dscam receptors. Phylogenetic analysis shows strong selection of matching peptide sequences only for epitope I. We propose that peptide complementarity of variable residues in epitope I of Dscam is essential for homophilic binding specificity.

  11. A novel circadianly expressed Drosophila melanogaster gene dependent on the period gene for its rhythmic expression.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gelder, R N; Krasnow, M A

    1996-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster period (per) gene is required for expression of endogenous circadian rhythms of locomotion and eclosion. per mRNA is expressed with a circadian rhythm that is dependent on Per protein; this feedback loop has been proposed to be essential to the central circadian pacemaker. This model would suggest the Per protein also controls the circadian expression of other genetic loci to generate circadian behavior and physiology. In this paper we describe Dreg-5, a gene whose mRNA is expressed in fly heads with a circadian rhythm nearly identical to that of the per gene. Dreg-5 mRNA continues to cycle in phase with that of per mRNA in conditions of total darkness and also when the daily feeding time is altered. Like per mRNA, Dreg-5 mRNA is not expressed rhythmically in per null mutant flies. Dreg-5 encodes a novel 298 residue protein and Dreg-5 protein isoforms also oscillate in abundance with a circadian rhythm. The phase of Dreg-5 protein oscillation, however, is different from that of Per protein expression, suggesting that Dreg-5 and per have common translational but different post-translational control mechanisms. These results demonstrate that the per gene is capable of modulating the rhythmic expression of other genes; this activity may form the basis of the output of circadian rhythmicity in Drosophila. Images PMID:8612586

  12. Identification of a Novel C-Terminal Truncated WT1 Isoform with Antagonistic Effects against Major WT1 Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Naoya; Hojo, Nozomi; Sakamoto, Hiroyuki; Inaba, Rena; Moriguchi, Nahoko; Matsuno, Keiko; Fukuda, Mari; Matsumura, Akihide; Hayashi, Seiji; Morimoto, Soyoko; Nakata, Jun; Fujiki, Fumihiro; Nishida, Sumiyuki; Nakajima, Hiroko; Tsuboi, Akihiro; Oka, Yoshihiro; Hosen, Naoki; Sugiyama, Haruo; Oji, Yusuke

    2015-01-01

    The Wilms’ tumor gene WT1 consists of 10 exons and encodes a zinc finger transcription factor. There are four major WT1 isoforms resulting from alternative splicing at two sites, exon 5 (17AA) and exon 9 (KTS). All major WT1 isoforms are overexpressed in leukemia and solid tumors and play oncogenic roles such as inhibition of apoptosis, and promotion of cell proliferation, migration and invasion. In the present study, a novel alternatively spliced WT1 isoform that had an extended exon 4 (designated as exon 4a) with an additional 153 bp (designated as 4a sequence) at the 3’ end was identified and designated as an Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform. The insertion of exon 4a resulted in the introduction of premature translational stop codons in the reading frame in exon 4a and production of C-terminal truncated WT1 proteins lacking zinc finger DNA-binding domain. Overexpression of the truncated Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform inhibited the major WT1-mediated transcriptional activation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-xL gene promoter and induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. Conversely, suppression of the Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform by Ex4a-specific siRNA attenuated apoptosis. These results indicated that the Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform exerted dominant negative effects on anti-apoptotic function of major WT1 isoforms. Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform was endogenously expressed as a minor isoform in myeloid leukemia and solid tumor cells and increased regardless of decrease in major WT1 isoforms during apoptosis, suggesting the dominant negative effects on anti-apoptotic function of major WT1 isoforms. These results indicated that Ex4a(+)WT1 isoform had an important physiological function that regulated oncogenic function of major WT1 isoforms. PMID:26090994

  13. Conditions Affecting Social Space in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Alison R; Jolley, Sam N; Akinleye, Adesanya A; Nurilov, Marat; Rouzyi, Zulekha; Milunovich, Austin J; Chambers, Moria C; Simon, Anne F

    2015-01-01

    The social space assay described here can be used to quantify social interactions of Drosophila melanogaster - or other small insects - in a straightforward manner. As we previously demonstrated (1), in a two-dimensional chamber, we first force the flies to form a tight group, subsequently allowing them to take their preferred distance from each other. After the flies have settled, we measure the distance to the closest neighbor (or social space), processing a static picture with free online software (ImageJ). The analysis of the distance to the closest neighbor allows researchers to determine the effects of genetic and environmental factors on social interaction, while controlling for potential confounding factors. Diverse factors such as climbing ability, time of day, sex, and number of flies, can modify social spacing of flies. We thus propose a series of experimental controls to mitigate these confounding effects. This assay can be used for at least two purposes. First, researchers can determine how their favorite environmental shift (such as isolation, temperature, stress or toxins) will impact social spacing (1,2). Second, researchers can dissect the genetic and neural underpinnings of this basic form of social behavior (1,3). Specifically, we used it as a diagnostic tool to study the role of orthologous genes thought to be involved in social behavior in other organisms, such as candidate genes for autism in humans (4). PMID:26575105

  14. Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Vásquez-Procopio, Johana; Gambis, Alexis; Blowes, Liisa M; Steller, Hermann; Mollereau, Bertrand; Missirlis, Fanis

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH) and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH) are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. We concentrated on the intestine, where the ferritin induction process can be controlled experimentally by dietary iron manipulation. We showed that the expression pattern of Fer2LCH-Gal4 lines recapitulated iron-dependent endogenous expression of the ferritin subunits and used these lines to drive expression from UAS-mCherry-Fer2LCH transgenes. We found that the Gal4-mediated induction of mCherry-Fer2LCH subunits was too slow to effectively introduce them into newly formed ferritin complexes. Endogenous Fer2LCH and Fer1HCH assembled and stored excess dietary iron, instead. In contrast, when flies were genetically manipulated to co-express Fer2LCH and mCherry-Fer2LCH simultaneously, both subunits were incorporated with Fer1HCH in iron-loaded ferritin complexes. Our study provides fresh evidence that, in insects, ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo are tightly regulated. PMID:26861293

  15. Ferritin Assembly in Enterocytes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rosas-Arellano, Abraham; Vásquez-Procopio, Johana; Gambis, Alexis; Blowes, Liisa M.; Steller, Hermann; Mollereau, Bertrand; Missirlis, Fanis

    2016-01-01

    Ferritins are protein nanocages that accumulate inside their cavity thousands of oxidized iron atoms bound to oxygen and phosphates. Both characteristic types of eukaryotic ferritin subunits are present in secreted ferritins from insects, but here dimers between Ferritin 1 Heavy Chain Homolog (Fer1HCH) and Ferritin 2 Light Chain Homolog (Fer2LCH) are further stabilized by disulfide-bridge in the 24-subunit complex. We addressed ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo using novel transgenic strains of Drosophila melanogaster. We concentrated on the intestine, where the ferritin induction process can be controlled experimentally by dietary iron manipulation. We showed that the expression pattern of Fer2LCH-Gal4 lines recapitulated iron-dependent endogenous expression of the ferritin subunits and used these lines to drive expression from UAS-mCherry-Fer2LCH transgenes. We found that the Gal4-mediated induction of mCherry-Fer2LCH subunits was too slow to effectively introduce them into newly formed ferritin complexes. Endogenous Fer2LCH and Fer1HCH assembled and stored excess dietary iron, instead. In contrast, when flies were genetically manipulated to co-express Fer2LCH and mCherry-Fer2LCH simultaneously, both subunits were incorporated with Fer1HCH in iron-loaded ferritin complexes. Our study provides fresh evidence that, in insects, ferritin assembly and iron loading in vivo are tightly regulated. PMID:26861293

  16. Patterns of Hermes transposition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Guimond, N; Bideshi, D K; Pinkerton, A C; Atkinson, P W; O'Brochta, D A

    2003-03-01

    Transposable elements are being developed as tools for genomics and for the manipulation of insect genotypes for the purposes of biological control. An understanding of their transposition behavior will facilitate the use of these elements. The behavior of an autonomous Hermes transposable element from Musca domestica in the soma and germ-line of Drosophila melanogaster was investigated using the method of transposon display. In the germ-line, Hermes transposed at a rate of approximately 0.03 jumps per element per generation. Within the soma Hermes exhibited markedly non-random patterns of integration. Certain regions of the genome were distinctly preferred over others as integration targets, while other regions were underrepresented among the integration sites used. One particular site accounted for 4.4% of the transpositions recovered in this experiment, all of which were located within a 2.5-kb region of the actin5C promoter. This region was also present within the Hermes element itself, suggesting that this clustering is an example of transposable element "homing". Clusters of integration sites were also observed near the original donor sites; these represent examples of local hopping. The information content (sequence specificity) of the 8-bp target site was low, and the consensus target site resembles that determined from plasmid-based integration assays. PMID:12655404

  17. Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein genes: Selection for duplications

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, B.W.

    1989-01-01

    The metallothionein genes of Drosophila melanogaster, Mtn and Mto, may play an important role in heavy-metal detoxification. In order to investigate the possibility of increased selection for duplications of these genes in natural populations exposed to high levels of heavy metals, I compared the frequencies of such duplications among flies collected from metal-contaminated and non-contaminated orchards in Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Georgia. Contaminated of collection sites and of local flies was confirmed by atomic absorption spectrosphotometry. Six-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis was used to screen 1666 wild third chromosomes for Mtn duplications. A subset (327) of these lines was screened for Mto duplications: none were found. Cadmium tolerance test performed on F{sub 2} progeny of wild females failed to detect a difference in tolerance levels between flies from contaminated orchards and flies from control orchards. Estimates of sequence diversity among a subsample (92) of the chromosomes used in the duplication survey, including all 27 Mtn duplication chromosomes, were obtained using four-nucleotide-recognizing restriction enzyme analysis.

  18. Gut-associated microbes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Nichole; Lemaitre, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in using Drosophila melanogaster to elucidate mechanisms that underlie the complex relationships between a host and its microbiota. In addition to the many genetic resources and tools Drosophila provides, its associated microbiota is relatively simple (1–30 taxa), in contrast to the complex diversity associated with vertebrates (> 500 taxa). These attributes highlight the potential of this system to dissect the complex cellular and molecular interactions that occur between a host and its microbiota. In this review, we summarize what is known regarding the composition of gut-associated microbes of Drosophila and their impact on host physiology. We also discuss these interactions in the context of their natural history and ecology and describe some recent insights into mechanisms by which Drosophila and its gut microbiota interact. “Workers with Drosophila have been considered fortunate in that they deal with the first multicellular invertebrate to be cultured monoxenically (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910); the first to be handled axenically on a semisynthetic diet (Guyenot, 1917); and the first to be grown on a defined diet (Schultz et al., 1946). This list of advantages is somewhat embarrassing, since it implies an interest in nutrition that, in reality, was only secondary. The very first studies were concerned with the reduction of variability in genetic experiments (Delcourt and Guyenot, 1910) and standardization of the nutritional environment.” -James Sang, 1959 Ann NY Acad 1 PMID:22572876

  19. Parallel geographic variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Josie A; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Jones, Corbin D; Begun, David J; Kern, Andrew D

    2014-05-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, an ancestrally African species, has recently spread throughout the world, associated with human activity. The species has served as the focus of many studies investigating local adaptation relating to latitudinal variation in non-African populations, especially those from the United States and Australia. These studies have documented the existence of shared, genetically determined phenotypic clines for several life history and morphological traits. However, there are no studies designed to formally address the degree of shared latitudinal differentiation at the genomic level. Here we present our comparative analysis of such differentiation. Not surprisingly, we find evidence of substantial, shared selection responses on the two continents, probably resulting from selection on standing ancestral variation. The polymorphic inversion In(3R)P has an important effect on this pattern, but considerable parallelism is also observed across the genome in regions not associated with inversion polymorphism. Interestingly, parallel latitudinal differentiation is observed even for variants that are not particularly strongly differentiated, which suggests that very large numbers of polymorphisms are targets of spatially varying selection in this species. PMID:24610860

  20. Drosophila melanogaster locomotion in cold thin air.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Michael E; Frazier, Melanie R

    2006-01-01

    The alpine environment is likely to challenge insect locomotion because of low mean temperatures and reduced barometric pressure. In this study, we measured the direct and interactive effects of these factors on walking and flight performance of wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. We found that decreased temperature and decreased air pressure both reduced walking speed and flight performance. Flies walked more slowly at 18 degrees C and in the lowest air pressure treatment (34 kPa). This treatment, equivalent in air pressure to the top of Mount Everest, was the only air pressure that significantly reduced fly walking speed. Therefore, walking performance in the wild is likely limited by temperature, but not oxygen availability. In contrast to walking performance, low but ecologically realistic air pressures dramatically reduced overall flight performance. The effects of reduced air pressure on flight performance were more pronounced at colder temperatures. Reduced flight performance in high altitude conditions was primarily driven by an increased reluctance for flies to initiate flight rather than outright failure to fly. Such reluctance to fly in high altitude conditions may in part explain the prevalence of aptery and brachyptery in high altitude insects. The observed interactive effects of temperature and air pressure on flight performance confirm the importance of simultaneously manipulating both of these factors when studying the impact of altitudinal conditions on insect physiology and behavior. PMID:16391358

  1. Burkholderia thailandensis Is Virulent in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Pilátová, Martina; Dionne, Marc S.

    2012-01-01

    Melioidosis is a serious infectious disease endemic to Southeast Asia and Northern Australia. This disease is caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei; Burkholderia thailandensis is a closely-related organism known to be avirulent in humans. B. thailandensis has not previously been used to infect Drosophila melanogaster. We examined the effect of B. thailandensis infection on fly survival, on antimicrobial peptide expression, and on phagocytic cells. In the fruit fly, which possesses only an innate immune system, B. thailandensis is highly virulent, causing rapid death when injected or fed. One intriguing aspect of this infection is its temperature dependence: infected flies maintained at 25°C exhibit rapid bacterial proliferation and death in a few days, while infected animals maintained at 18°C exhibit very slow bacterial proliferation and take weeks to die; this effect is due in part to differences in immune activity of the host. Death in this infection is likely due at least in part to a secreted toxin, as injection of flies with sterile B. thailandensis-conditioned medium is able to kill. B. thailandensis infection strongly induces the expression of antimicrobial peptides, but this is insufficient to inhibit bacterial proliferation in infected flies. Finally, the function of fly phagocytes is not affected by B. thailandensis infection. The high virulence of B. thailandensis in the fly suggests the possibility that this organism is a natural pathogen of one or more invertebrates. PMID:23209596

  2. Macrophages and cellular immunity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gold, Katrina S; Brückner, Katja

    2015-12-01

    The invertebrate Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful model for understanding blood cell development and immunity. Drosophila is a holometabolous insect, which transitions through a series of life stages from embryo, larva and pupa to adulthood. In spite of this, remarkable parallels exist between Drosophila and vertebrate macrophages, both in terms of development and function. More than 90% of Drosophila blood cells (hemocytes) are macrophages (plasmatocytes), making this highly tractable genetic system attractive for studying a variety of questions in macrophage biology. In vertebrates, recent findings revealed that macrophages have two independent origins: self-renewing macrophages, which reside and proliferate in local microenvironments in a variety of tissues, and macrophages of the monocyte lineage, which derive from hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells. Like vertebrates, Drosophila possesses two macrophage lineages with a conserved dual ontogeny. These parallels allow us to take advantage of the Drosophila model when investigating macrophage lineage specification, maintenance and amplification, and the induction of macrophages and their progenitors by local microenvironments and systemic cues. Beyond macrophage development, Drosophila further serves as a paradigm for understanding the mechanisms underlying macrophage function and cellular immunity in infection, tissue homeostasis and cancer, throughout development and adult life. PMID:27117654

  3. Alzheimer's Disease, Drosophila melanogaster and Polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an insidious neurological disorder that affects memory, one of the human brain's main cognitive functions. Around 5.2 million Americans currently have AD, and the number threatens to climb to 7 million by 2020. Our native country, Colombia, is no exception with an estimated 260,000 individuals to be affected by AD in 2020. A large, genetically-isolated community in Antioquia, Colombia, with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease due to a presenilin-1 mutation is ideally suited for the study of molecular mechanisms of AD, and hence accelerate the discovery of new or alternative treatment approaches. In this regard, polyphenols--also known as polyhydroxyphenols--have shown antioxidant activity, gene regulation, metal chelator and anti-amyloidogenic aggregation effects. However, further in vitro and in vivo investigations are warranted to validate their use in clinical trials. Drosophila melanogaster is increasingly being used as a valid in vivo model of AD. Here, we summarise data published within the past 16 years (1998-2014) on the molecular biology of AD and the use of polyphenols in the fly to understand the molecular actions and feasibility of these compounds in the treatment of AD. PMID:26092625

  4. The 5S genes of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Artavanis-Tsakonas, S; Schedl, P; Tschudi, C; Pirrotta, V; Steward, R; Gehring, W J

    1977-12-01

    We have cloned embryonic Drosophila DNA using the poly (dA-DT) connector method (Lobban and Kaiser, 1973) and the ampicillin-resistant plasmid pSF2124 (So, Gill and Falkow, 1975) as a cloning vehicle. Two clones, containing hybrid plasmids with sequences complementary to a 5S RNA probe isolated from Drosophila tissue culture cells, were identified by the Grunstein and Hogness (1975) colony hybridization procedure. One hybrid plasmid has a Drosophila insert which is comprised solely of tandem repeats of the 5S gene plus spacer sequences. The other plasmid contains an insert which has about 20 tandem 5S repeat units plus an additional 4 kilobases of adjacent sequences. The size of the 5S repeat unit was determined by gel electrophoresis and was found to be approximately 375 base pairs. We present a restriction map of both plasmids, and a detailed map of of the5S repeat unit. The 5S repat unit shows slight length and sequence heterogeneity. We present evidence suggesting that the 5S genes in Drosophila melanogaster may be arranged in a single continuous cluster. PMID:413625

  5. The Sexually Antagonistic Genes of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Innocenti, Paolo; Morrow, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    When selective pressures differ between males and females, the genes experiencing these conflicting evolutionary forces are said to be sexually antagonistic. Although the phenotypic effect of these genes has been documented in both wild and laboratory populations, their identity, number, and location remains unknown. Here, by combining data on sex-specific fitness and genome-wide transcript abundance in a quantitative genetic framework, we identified a group of candidate genes experiencing sexually antagonistic selection in the adult, which correspond to 8% of Drosophila melanogaster genes. As predicted, the X chromosome is enriched for these genes, but surprisingly they represent only a small proportion of the total number of sex-biased transcripts, indicating that the latter is a poor predictor of sexual antagonism. Furthermore, the majority of genes whose expression profiles showed a significant relationship with either male or female adult fitness are also sexually antagonistic. These results provide a first insight into the genetic basis of intralocus sexual conflict and indicate that genetic variation for fitness is dominated and maintained by sexual antagonism, potentially neutralizing any indirect genetic benefits of sexual selection. PMID:20305719

  6. The Ran Pathway in Drosophila melanogaster Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jack W. C.; Barker, Amy R.; Wakefield, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, the small GTPase Ran has emerged as a central regulator of both mitosis and meiosis, particularly in the generation, maintenance, and regulation of the microtubule (MT)-based bipolar spindle. Ran-regulated pathways in mitosis bear many similarities to the well-characterized functions of Ran in nuclear transport and, as with transport, the majority of these mitotic effects are mediated through affecting the physical interaction between karyopherins and Spindle Assembly Factors (SAFs)—a loose term describing proteins or protein complexes involved in spindle assembly through promoting nucleation, stabilization, and/or depolymerization of MTs, through anchoring MTs to specific structures such as centrosomes, chromatin or kinetochores, or through sliding MTs along each other to generate the force required to achieve bipolarity. As such, the Ran-mediated pathway represents a crucial functional module within the wider spindle assembly landscape. Research into mitosis using the model organism Drosophila melanogaster has contributed substantially to our understanding of centrosome and spindle function. However, in comparison to mammalian systems, very little is known about the contribution of Ran-mediated pathways in Drosophila mitosis. This article sets out to summarize our understanding of the roles of the Ran pathway components in Drosophila mitosis, focusing on the syncytial blastoderm embryo, arguing that it can provide important insights into the conserved functions on Ran during spindle formation. PMID:26636083

  7. The Drosophila melanogaster multidrug-resistance protein 1 (MRP1) homolog has a novel gene structure containing two variable internal exons.

    PubMed

    Grailles, Marine; Brey, Paul T; Roth, Charles W

    2003-03-27

    Drosophila melanogaster has a gene very similar to human MRP1 that encodes a full ABC-transporter containing three membrane-spanning domains and two nucleotide-binding domains. This 19 exon insect gene, dMRP (FBgn0032456), spans slightly more than 22 kb. The cDNA SD07655 representing this gene was sequenced and found to contain sequences from 12 exons including single copies of two exons having multiple genomic copies. The gene contains two variant copies of exon 4 and seven of exon 8. While a cDNA contains only one version of each variable exon, all forms of these variable exons were detected in adult fly mRNA. These results predict that Drosophila could make 14 different MRP isoforms from a single gene by substituting different variable exons. This is the first report of any organism using differential splicing of alternative, internal exons, to produce such a large array of MRP isoforms having the same size, but with limited and defined internal variations. Defining the functional differences in the dMRP isoforms should provide clues to the structure/function relationships of the amino acids in these MRP domains, both for the insect enzyme and for those of other species. PMID:12706887

  8. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I.

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  9. Expression of Contractile Protein Isoforms in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Page A. W.

    1996-01-01

    The general objective of this experiment is to determine the effect of space flight parameters, including microgravity, on ontogenesis and embryogenesis of Japanese quail. Nine U.S. and two Russian investigators are cooperating in this study. Specific objectives of the participating scientists include assessing the gross and microscopic morphological and histological development of the embryo, as well as the temporal and spacial development of specific cells, tissues, and organs. Temporally regulated production of specific proteins is also being investigated. Our objective is to determine the effects of microgravity on developmentally programmed expression of Troponin T and I isoforms known to regulate cardiac and skeletal muscle contraction.

  10. Decoding RAS isoform and codon-specific signalling

    PubMed Central

    Newlaczyl, Anna U.; Hood, Fiona E.; Coulson, Judy M.; Prior, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    RAS proteins are key signalling hubs that are oncogenically mutated in 30% of all cancer cases. Three genes encode almost identical isoforms that are ubiquitously expressed, but are not functionally redundant. The network responses associated with each isoform and individual oncogenic mutations remain to be fully characterized. In the present article, we review recent data defining the differences between the RAS isoforms and their most commonly mutated codons and discuss the underlying mechanisms. PMID:25109951

  11. Separation of plasmid DNA isoforms using centrifugal ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Borujeni, Ehsan Espah; Zydney, Andrew L

    2012-07-01

    Centrifugal ultrafiltration is a well-established method for concentrating and purifying DNA. Here, we describe the use of centrifugal ultrafiltration for the separation of plasmid DNA isoforms based on differences in elongational flexibility of the supercoiled, open-circular, and linear plasmids. Transmission of each isoform is minimal below a critical value of the filtration velocity, which is directly related to the magnitude of the centrifugal speed and the system geometry. A discontinuous diafiltration process was used to enrich the desired isoform, as determined by agarose gel electrophoresis. The simplicity and efficacy of this membrane-based separation are attractive for multiple applications requiring the use of separated DNA isoforms. PMID:22780319

  12. How Drosophila melanogaster Forms its Mechanoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Furman, D.P; Bukharina, T.A

    2008-01-01

    A strictly determined number of external sensory organs, macrochaetes, acting as mechanoreceptors, are orderly located on drosophila head and body. Totally, they form the bristle pattern, which is a species-specific characteristic of drosophila. Each mechanoreceptor comprises four specialized cells derived from the single sensory organ precursor (SOP) cell. The conserved bristle pattern combined with a comparatively simple structure of each mechanosensory organ makes macrochaetes a convenient model for studying the formation spatial structures with a fixed number of elements at certain positions and the mechanism underlying cell differentiation. The macrochaete morphogenesis consists of three stages. At the first stage, the proneural clusters segregate from the massive of ectodermal cells of the wing imaginal disc. At the second stage, the SOP cell is determined and its position in the cluster is specified. At the third stage, the SOP cell undergoes two asymmetric divisions, and the daughter cells differentiate into the components of mechanoreceptor: shaft, socket, bipolar neuron, and sheath. The critical factor determining the neural pathway of cell development is the content of proneural proteins, products of the achaete-scute (AS-C) gene complex, reaching its maximum in the SOP cell. The experimental data on the main genes and their products involved in the control of bristle pattern formation are systematized. The roles of achaete-scute complex, EGFR and Notch signaling pathways, and selector genes in these processes are considered. An integral scheme describing the functioning of the system controlling macrochaete development in D. melanogaster is proposed based on analysis of literature data. PMID:19471605

  13. Selection on Wing Allometry in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. E.

    1990-01-01

    Five bivariate distributions of wing dimensions of Drosophila melanogaster were measured, in flies 1) subjected to four defined environmental regimes during development, 2) taken directly from nature in seven U.S. states, 3) selected in ten populations for change in wing form, and 4) sampled from 21 long inbred wild-type lines. Environmental stresses during development altered both wing size and the ratios of wing dimensions, but regardless of treatment all wing dimensions fell near a common allometric baseline in each bivariate distribution. The wings of wild-caught flies from seven widely separated localities, and of their laboratory-reared offspring, also fell along the same baselines. However, when flies were selected divergently for lateral offset from these developmental baselines, response to selection was rapid in every case. The mean divergence in offset between oppositely selected lines was 14.68 SD of the base population offset, after only 15 generations of selection at 20%. Measurements of 21 isofemale lines, founded from wild-caught flies and maintained in small populations for at least 22 years, showed large reductions in phenotypic variance of offsets within lines, but a large increase in the variance among lines. The variance of means of isofemale lines within collection localities was ten times the variance of means among localities of newly established wild lines. These observations show that much additive genetic variance exists for individual dimensions within the wing, such that bivariate developmental patterns can be changed in any direction by selection or by drift. The relative invariance of the allometric baselines of wing morphology in nature is most easily explained as the result of continuous natural selection around a local optimum of functional design. PMID:2127580

  14. Optogenetic pacing in Drosophila melanogaster (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Aneesh; Li, Airong; Men, Jing; Jerwick, Jason; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Zhou, Chao

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive, contact-less cardiac pacing technology can be a powerful tool in basic cardiac research and in clinics. Currently, electrical pacing is the gold standard for cardiac pacing. Although highly effective in controlling the cardiac function, the invasive nature, non-specificity to cardiac tissues and possible tissue damage limits its capabilities. Optical pacing of heart is a promising alternative, which is non-invasive and more specific, has high spatial and temporal precision, and avoids shortcomings in electrical stimulation. Optical coherence tomography has been proved to be an effective technique in non-invasive imaging in vivo with ultrahigh resolution and imaging speed. In the last several years, non-invasive specific optical pacing in animal hearts has been reported in quail, zebrafish, and rabbit models. However, Drosophila Melanogaster, which is a significant model with orthologs of 75% of human disease genes, has rarely been studied concerning their optical pacing in heart. Here, we combined optogenetic control of Drosophila heartbeat with optical coherence microscopy (OCM) technique for the first time. The light-gated cation channel, channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was specifically expressed by transgene as a pacemaker in drosophila heart. By stimulating the pacemaker with 472 nm pulsed laser light at different frequencies, we achieved non-invasive and more specific optical control of the Drosophila heart rhythm, which demonstrates the wide potential of optical pacing for studying cardiac dynamics and development. Imaging capability of our customized OCM system was also involved to observe the pacing effect visually. No tissue damage was found after long exposure to laser pulses, which proved the safety of optogenetic control of Drosophila heart.

  15. Basal activity of GIRK5 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Salvador, Carolina; Mora, Silvia I; Ordaz, Benito; Antaramian, Anaid; Vaca, Luis; Escobar, Laura I

    2003-02-14

    G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by Gbetagamma subunits. GIRK channels are critical for functions as diverse as heart rate modulation and neuronal post-synaptic inhibition. GIRK5 (Kir3.5) is the oocyte homologue of the mammalian GIRK subunits that conform the K(ACh) channel. It has been claimed that even when the oocytes express GIRK5 proteins they do not form functional channels. However, the GIRK5 gene shows three initiation sites that suggest the existence of three isoforms. In a previous work we demonstrated the functionality of homomultimers of the shortest isoform overexpressed in the own oocytes. Remarkably, the basal GIRK5-Delta25 inward currents were not coupled to the activation of a G-protein receptor in the oocytes. These results encouraged us to study this channel in another expression system. In this work we show that Sf21 insect cells can be successfully transfected with this channel. GIRK5-Delta25 homomultimers produce time-dependent inward currents only with GTPgammaS in the recording pipette. Therefore, alternative modes of stimulus input to heterotrimeric G-proteins should be present in the oocytes to account for these results. PMID:12535718

  16. Genetic Architecture of Abdominal Pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dembeck, Lauren M.; Huang, Wen; Magwire, Michael M.; Lawrence, Faye; Lyman, Richard F.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Pigmentation varies within and between species and is often adaptive. The amount of pigmentation on the abdomen of Drosophila melanogaster is a relatively simple morphological trait, which serves as a model for mapping the genetic basis of variation in complex phenotypes. Here, we assessed natural variation in female abdominal pigmentation in 175 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel, derived from the Raleigh, NC population. We quantified the proportion of melanization on the two most posterior abdominal segments, tergites 5 and 6 (T5, T6). We found significant genetic variation in the proportion of melanization and high broad-sense heritabilities for each tergite. Genome-wide association studies identified over 150 DNA variants associated with the proportion of melanization on T5 (84), T6 (34), and the difference between T5 and T6 (35). Several of the top variants associated with variation in pigmentation are in tan, ebony, and bric-a-brac1, genes known to affect D. melanogaster abdominal pigmentation. Mutational analyses and targeted RNAi-knockdown showed that 17 out of 28 (61%) novel candidate genes implicated by the genome-wide association study affected abdominal pigmentation. Several of these genes are involved in developmental and regulatory pathways, chitin production, cuticle structure, and vesicle formation and transport. These findings show that genetic variation may affect multiple steps in pathways involved in tergite development and melanization. Variation in these novel candidates may serve as targets for adaptive evolution and sexual selection in D. melanogaster. PMID:25933381

  17. P element excision in drosophila melanogaster and related drosophilids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The frequency of P element excision and the structure of the resulting excision products were determined in three drosophilid species, Drosophila melanogaster, D. virilis, and Chymomyza procnemis. A transient P element mobility assay was conducted in the cells of developing insect embryos, but unlik...

  18. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light.

    PubMed

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W; Wood, Matthew J A; Foster, Russell G; Peirson, Stuart N

    2015-09-21

    Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light including circadian entrainment, sleep induction, the pupillary light response (PLR), and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light). How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors. PMID:26320947

  19. Tunable protein synthesis by transcript isoforms in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Floor, Stephen N; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genes generate multiple RNA transcript isoforms though alternative transcription, splicing, and polyadenylation. However, the relationship between human transcript diversity and protein production is complex as each isoform can be translated differently. We fractionated a polysome profile and reconstructed transcript isoforms from each fraction, which we term Transcript Isoforms in Polysomes sequencing (TrIP-seq). Analysis of these data revealed regulatory features that control ribosome occupancy and translational output of each transcript isoform. We extracted a panel of 5′ and 3′ untranslated regions that control protein production from an unrelated gene in cells over a 100-fold range. Select 5′ untranslated regions exert robust translational control between cell lines, while 3′ untranslated regions can confer cell type-specific expression. These results expose the large dynamic range of transcript-isoform-specific translational control, identify isoform-specific sequences that control protein output in human cells, and demonstrate that transcript isoform diversity must be considered when relating RNA and protein levels. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10921.001 PMID:26735365

  20. Isoforms of Melanopsin Mediate Different Behavioral Responses to Light

    PubMed Central

    Jagannath, Aarti; Hughes, Steven; Abdelgany, Amr; Pothecary, Carina A.; Di Pretoro, Simona; Pires, Susana S.; Vachtsevanos, Athanasios; Pilorz, Violetta; Brown, Laurence A.; Hossbach, Markus; MacLaren, Robert E.; Halford, Stephanie; Gatti, Silvia; Hankins, Mark W.; Wood, Matthew J.A.; Foster, Russell G.; Peirson, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Melanopsin (OPN4) is a retinal photopigment that mediates a wide range of non-image-forming (NIF) responses to light [1, 2] including circadian entrainment [3], sleep induction [4], the pupillary light response (PLR) [5], and negative masking of locomotor behavior (the acute suppression of activity in response to light) [6]. How these diverse NIF responses can all be mediated by a single photopigment has remained a mystery. We reasoned that the alternative splicing of melanopsin could provide the basis for functionally distinct photopigments arising from a single gene. The murine melanopsin gene is indeed alternatively spliced, producing two distinct isoforms, a short (OPN4S) and a long (OPN4L) isoform, which differ only in their C terminus tails [7]. Significantly, both isoforms form fully functional photopigments [7]. Here, we show that different isoforms of OPN4 mediate different behavioral responses to light. By using RNAi-mediated silencing of each isoform in vivo, we demonstrated that the short isoform (OPN4S) mediates light-induced pupillary constriction, the long isoform (OPN4L) regulates negative masking, and both isoforms contribute to phase-shifting circadian rhythms of locomotor behavior and light-mediated sleep induction. These findings demonstrate that splice variants of a single receptor gene can regulate strikingly different behaviors. PMID:26320947

  1. Spinach pyruvate kinase isoforms: partial purification and regulatory properties

    SciTech Connect

    Baysdorfer, C.; Bassham, J.A.

    1984-02-01

    Pyruvate kinase from spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaves consists of two isoforms, separable by blue agarose chromatography. Both isoforms share similar pH profiles and substrate and alternate nucleotide K/sub m/ values. In addition, both isoforms are inhibited by oxalate and ATP and activated by AMP. The isoforms differ in their response to three key metabolites; citrate, aspartate, and glutamate. The first isoform is similar to previously reported plant pyruvate kinases in its sensitivity to citrate inhibition. The K/sub i/ for this inhibition is 1.2 millimolar citrate. The second isoform is not affected by citrate but is regulated by aspartate and glutamate. Aspartate is an activator with a K/sub a/ of 0.05 millimolar, and glutamate is an inhibitor with a K/sub i/ of 0.68 millimolar. A pyruvate kinase with these properties has not been previously reported. Based on these considerations, the authors suggest that the activity of the first isoform is regulated by respiratory metabolism. The second isoform, in contrast, may be regulated by the demand for carbon skeletons for use in ammonia assimilation.

  2. IL-33 isoforms: their future as vaccine adjuvants?

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Weiner, David B

    2015-01-01

    The identification and characterization of cytokine isoforms is likely to provide critical important new insight into immunobiology. Cytokine isoforms can provide additional diversity to their complex biological effects that participate in control and protection against different foreign pathogens. Recently, IL-33 has been identified as a proinflammatory cytokine having several different biologically active isoform products. Originally associated with Th2 immunity, new evidence now supports the role of two IL-33 isoforms to facilitate the generation of protective Th1 and CD8 T cell immunity against specific pathogens. Therefore, a better understanding of the IL-33 isoforms will inform us on how to utilize them to facilitate their development as tools as vaccine adjuvants for immune therapy. PMID:25656504

  3. Shaking B Mediates Synaptic Coupling between Auditory Sensory Neurons and the Giant Fiber of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Jonathan P.; Blagburn, Jonathan M.

    2016-01-01

    The Johnston’s Organ neurons (JONs) form chemical and electrical synapses onto the giant fiber neuron (GF), as part of the neuronal circuit that mediates the GF escape response in Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this study was to identify which of the 8 Drosophila innexins (invertebrate gap junction proteins) mediates the electrical connection at this synapse. The GF is known to express Shaking B (ShakB), specifically the ShakB(N+16) isoform only, at its output synapses in the thorax. The shakB2 mutation disrupts these GF outputs and also abolishes JON-GF synaptic transmission. However, the identity of the innexin that forms the presynaptic hemichannels in the JONs remains unknown. We used electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry and dye injection, along with presynaptically-driven RNA interference, to investigate this question. The amplitude of the compound action potential recorded in response to sound from the base of the antenna (sound-evoked potential, or SEP) was reduced by RNAi of the innexins Ogre, Inx3, Inx6 and, to a lesser extent Inx2, suggesting that they could be required in JONs for proper development, excitability, or synchronization of action potentials. The strength of the JON-GF connection itself was reduced to background levels only by RNAi of shakB, not of the other seven innexins. ShakB knockdown prevented Neurobiotin coupling between GF and JONs and removed the plaques of ShakB protein immunoreactivity that are present at the region of contact. Specific shakB RNAi lines that are predicted to target the ShakB(L) or ShakB(N) isoforms alone did not reduce the synaptic strength, implying that it is ShakB(N+16) that is required in the presynaptic neurons. Overexpression of ShakB(N+16) in JONs caused the formation of ectopic dye coupling, whereas ShakB(N) prevented it altogether, supporting this conclusion and also suggesting that gap junction proteins may have an instructive role in synaptic target choice. PMID:27043822

  4. Shaking B Mediates Synaptic Coupling between Auditory Sensory Neurons and the Giant Fiber of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pézier, Adeline P; Jezzini, Sami H; Bacon, Jonathan P; Blagburn, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    The Johnston's Organ neurons (JONs) form chemical and electrical synapses onto the giant fiber neuron (GF), as part of the neuronal circuit that mediates the GF escape response in Drosophila melanogaster. The purpose of this study was to identify which of the 8 Drosophila innexins (invertebrate gap junction proteins) mediates the electrical connection at this synapse. The GF is known to express Shaking B (ShakB), specifically the ShakB(N+16) isoform only, at its output synapses in the thorax. The shakB2 mutation disrupts these GF outputs and also abolishes JON-GF synaptic transmission. However, the identity of the innexin that forms the presynaptic hemichannels in the JONs remains unknown. We used electrophysiology, immunocytochemistry and dye injection, along with presynaptically-driven RNA interference, to investigate this question. The amplitude of the compound action potential recorded in response to sound from the base of the antenna (sound-evoked potential, or SEP) was reduced by RNAi of the innexins Ogre, Inx3, Inx6 and, to a lesser extent Inx2, suggesting that they could be required in JONs for proper development, excitability, or synchronization of action potentials. The strength of the JON-GF connection itself was reduced to background levels only by RNAi of shakB, not of the other seven innexins. ShakB knockdown prevented Neurobiotin coupling between GF and JONs and removed the plaques of ShakB protein immunoreactivity that are present at the region of contact. Specific shakB RNAi lines that are predicted to target the ShakB(L) or ShakB(N) isoforms alone did not reduce the synaptic strength, implying that it is ShakB(N+16) that is required in the presynaptic neurons. Overexpression of ShakB(N+16) in JONs caused the formation of ectopic dye coupling, whereas ShakB(N) prevented it altogether, supporting this conclusion and also suggesting that gap junction proteins may have an instructive role in synaptic target choice. PMID:27043822

  5. Sequencing and functional expression of the malonyl-CoA-sensitive carnitine palmitoyltransferase from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, V N; Cameron, J M; Zammit, V A; Price, N T

    1999-01-01

    Using expressed sequence tag data, we obtained a cDNA for a carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPT I)-like molecule from Drosophila melanogaster. The cDNA encodes a 782-residue protein that shows 49% and 48% sequence identity with the rat liver and skeletal-muscle isoforms of CPT I respectively. The sequence has two predicted membrane-spanning regions, suggesting that it adopts the same topology as its mammalian counterparts. The sequence contains all the residues that have been shown to be characteristic of carnitine acetyltransferases. Expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris confirmed that the cDNA does encode a CPT enzyme. The activity was found to be associated with a mitochondria-enriched fraction. Kinetic analysis revealed a K(m) for carnitine of 406 microM and a K(m) for palmitoyl-CoA of 105 microM. The CPT activity was very sensitive to inhibition by malonyl-CoA, with an IC(50) of 0.74 microM when the activity was assayed with 35 microM palmitoyl-CoA and 1% (w/v) albumin at pH 7.0. A histidine residue at position 140 in rat liver CPT I has been indicated to be important for inhibition by malonyl-CoA. The equivalent residue (position 136) in Drosophila CPT I is arginine, implying that any basic residue might be compatible with such sensitivity. Evidence is presented that, unlike in mammals, Drosophila has only a single CPT I gene. Sequences suggesting the existence of a splice variant in the 5' untranslated region were found; this was consistent with the existence of two promoters for the CPT I gene. PMID:10417309

  6. Targeted Proteomics Enables Simultaneous Quantification of Folate Receptor Isoforms and Potential Isoform-based Diagnosis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The distinct roles of protein isoforms in cancer are becoming increasingly evident. FRα and FRβ, two major isoforms of the folate receptor family, generally have different cellular distribution and tissue specificity. However, the presence of FRβ in breast tumors, where FRα is normally expressed, complicates this situation. Prior to applying any FR isoform-based diagnosis and therapeutics, it is essential to monitor the expression profile of FR isoforms in a more accurate manner. An LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated in this study because of the lack of suitable methodology for the simultaneous and specific measurement of highly homologous isoforms occurring at low concentrations. FRα and FRβ monitoring was achieved by measuring their surrogate isoform-specific peptides. Five human breast cell lines, isolated macrophages and 60 matched pairs of breast tissue samples were subjected to the analysis. The results indicated that FRβ was overexpressed in tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) but not epithelial cells, in addition to an enhanced level of FRα in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. Moreover, the levels of the FR isoforms were evaluated according to the histology, histopathological features and molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Several positive associations with PR/ER and HER2 status and metastasis were revealed. PMID:26573433

  7. Inositols affect the mating circadian rhythm of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Kazuki; Kawasaki, Haruhisa; Suzuki, Takahiro; Ito, Kumpei; Negishi, Osamu; Tsuno, Takuo; Tsuno, Hiromi; Yamazaki, Youta; Ishida, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the molecular circadian clock underlies the mating behavior of Drosophila melanogaster. However, information about which food components affect circadian mating behavior is scant. The ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum has recently become a popular functional food. Here, we showed that the close-proximity (CP) rhythm of D. melanogaster courtship behavior was damped under low-nutrient conditions, but significantly enhanced by feeding the flies with powdered ice plant. Among various components of ice plants, we found that myo-inositol increased the amplitude and slightly shortened the period of the CP rhythm. Real-time reporter assays showed that myo-inositol and D-pinitol shortened the period of the circadian reporter gene Per2-luc in NIH 3T3 cells. These data suggest that the ice plant is a useful functional food and that the ability of inositols to shorten rhythms is a general phenomenon in insects as well as mammals. PMID:26097456

  8. Insecticidal sesquiterpene from Alpinia oxyphylla against Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishikawa, Y

    2000-08-01

    In the course of screening for novel naturally occurring insecticides from Chinese crude drugs, an MeOH extract of Alpinia oxyphylla was found to possess insecticidal activity against larvae of Drosophila melanogaster Meigen. From the extract, an insecticidal compound was isolated by bioassay-guided fractionation and identified as nootkatone (1) by GC, GC-MS, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. In bioassays for insecticidal activity, 1 showed an LC(50) value of 11.5 micromol/mL of diet against larvae of D. melanogaster and an LD(50) value of 96 microg/adult against adults. Epinootkatol (1A), however, showed slight insecticidal activity in both assays, indicating that the carbonyl group at the 2-position in 1 was the important function for enhanced activity of 1. PMID:10956162

  9. Intra- and interspecies variation among Bari-1 elements of the melanogaster species group.

    PubMed Central

    Moschetti, R; Caggese, C; Barsanti, P; Caizzi, R

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the distribution of sequences homologous to Bari-1, a Tc1-like transposable element first identified in Drosophila melanogaster, in 87 species of the Drosophila genus. We have also isolated and sequenced Bari-1 homologues from D. simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia, the species constituting with D. melanogaster the melanogaster complex, and from D. diplacantha and D. erecta, two phylogenetically more distant species of the melanogaster group. Within the melanogaster complex the Bari-1 elements are extremely similar to each other, showing nucleotide identity values of at least 99.3%. In contrast, Bari-1-like elements from D. diplacantha and D. erecta are on average only 70% similar to D. melanogaster Bari-1 and are usually defective due to nucleotide deletions and/or insertions in the ORFs encoding their transposases. In D. erecta the defective copies are all located in the chromocenter and on chromosome 4. Surprisingly, while D. melanogaster Bari-1 elements possess 26-bp inverted terminal repeats, their D. diplacantha and D. erecta homologues possess long inverted terminal repeats similar to the terminal structures observed in the S elements of D. melanogaster and in several other Tc1-like elements of different organisms. This finding, together with the nucleotide and amino acid identity level between D. diplacantha and D. erecta elements and Bari-1 of D. melanogaster, suggests a common evolutionary origin and a rapid diversification of the termini of these Drosophila Tc1-like elements. PMID:9725843

  10. Complete mitochondrial genome of the Père David's Vole, Eothenomys melanogaster (Rodentia: Arvicolinae).

    PubMed

    Chen, Shunde; Chen, Guiying; Wei, Haixue; Wang, Qiong

    2016-07-01

    The Père David's Vole, Eothenomys melanogaster belongs to subfamily Arvicolinae. It is widespread in south China, and ranges into northern Southeast Asia. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Eothenomys melanogaster was determined. The mitogenome is 16,331 base pairs in length. The nucleotide sequence data of 12 heavy-strand protein-coding genes of E. melanogaster and other 17 rodents were used for phylogenetic analyses. Tree constructed using Bayesian phylogenetic methods demonstrated that E. melanogaster as a sister to E. chinensis, was clustered in subfamily Arvicolinae. The monophyly of the genus Eothenomys was supported as well with Eothenomys sister to the genus Myodes. PMID:26024146

  11. Neutralization of vascular endothelial growth factor antiangiogenic isoforms or administration of proangiogenic isoforms stimulates vascular development in the rat testis.

    PubMed

    Baltes-Breitwisch, Michelle M; Artac, Robin A; Bott, Rebecca C; McFee, Renee M; Kerl, Jill G; Clopton, Debra T; Cupp, Andrea S

    2010-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) plays a role in both angiogenesis and seminiferous cord formation, and alternative splicing of the Vegfa gene produces both proangiogenic isoforms and antiangiogenic isoforms (B-isoforms). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the expression of pro- and antiangiogenic isoforms during testis development and to determine the role of VEGFA isoforms in testis morphogenesis. Quantitative RT-PCR determined that Vegfa_165b mRNA was most abundant between embryonic days 13.5 and 16 (E13.5 and 16; P<0.05). Compared with ovarian mRNA levels, Vegfa_120 was more abundant at E13-14 (P<0.05), Vegfa_164 was less abundant at E13 (P<0.05), and Vegfa_165b tended to be less abundant at E13 (P<0.09) in testes. Immunohistochemical staining localized antiangiogenic isoforms to subsets of germ cells at E14-16, and western blot analysis revealed similar protein levels for VEGFA_165B, VEGFA_189B, and VEGFA_206B at this time point. Treatment of E13 organ culture testes with VEGFA_120, VEGFA_164, and an antibody to antiangiogenic isoforms (anti-VEGFAxxxB) resulted in less organized and defined seminiferous cords compared with paired controls. In addition, 50 ng/ml VEGFA_120 and VEGFA_164 treatments increased vascular density in cultured testes by 60 and 48% respectively, and treatment with VEGFAxxxB antibody increased vascular density by 76% in testes (0.5 ng/ml) and 81% in ovaries (5 ng/ml) compared with controls (P<0.05). In conclusion, both pro- and antiangiogenic VEGFA isoforms are involved in the development of vasculature and seminiferous cords in rat testes, and differential expression of these isoforms may be important for normal gonadal development. PMID:20457593

  12. EASI--enrichment of alternatively spliced isoforms.

    PubMed

    Venables, Julian P; Burn, John

    2006-01-01

    Alternative splicing produces more than one protein from the majority of genes and the rarer forms can have dominant functions. Instability of alternative transcripts can also hinder the study of regulation of gene expression by alternative splicing. To investigate the true extent of alternative splicing we have developed a simple method of enriching alternatively spliced isoforms (EASI) from PCRs using beads charged with Thermus aquaticus single-stranded DNA-binding protein (T.Aq ssb). This directly purifies the single-stranded regions of heteroduplexes between alternative splices formed in the PCR, enabling direct sequencing of all the rare alternative splice forms of any gene. As a proof of principle the alternative transcripts of three tumour suppressor genes, TP53, MLH1 and MSH2, were isolated from testis cDNA. These contain missing exons, cryptic splice sites or include completely novel exons. EASI beads are stable for months in the fridge and can be easily combined with standard protocols to speed the cloning of novel transcripts. PMID:16951290

  13. Mutagenicity of four hair dyes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Blijleven, W G

    1977-04-01

    The hair dye constituents p-phenylenediamine, 2,4-diaminoanisole sulfate, 2,4-diaminotoluene and 4-nitro-0-phenylenediamine were tested for mutagenicity in Drosophila melanogaster. The compounds were given orally to adult males. The induction of sex-linked recessive lethal mutation was used as a measure of mutagenicity. All four of the dyes tested were mutagenic with a peak mutagenic activity in metabolically active germ cells (spermatids and spermatocytes). PMID:406556

  14. Excess polymorphism at the Adh locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kreitman, M E; Aguadé, M

    1986-09-01

    The evolutionary history of a region of DNA encompassing the Adh locus is studied by comparing patterns of variation in Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species, D. simulans. An unexpectedly high level of silent polymorphism in the Adh coding region relative to the 5' and 3' flanking regions in D. melanogaster is revealed by a populational survey of restriction polymorphism using a four-cutter filter hybridization technique as well as by direct sequence comparisons. In both of these studies, a region of the Adh gene encompassing the three coding exons exhibits a frequency of polymorphism equal to that of a 4-kb 5' flanking region. In contrast, an interspecific sequence comparison shows a two-fold higher level of divergence in the 5' flanking sequence compared to the structural locus. Analysis of the patterns of variation suggest an excess of polymorphism within the D. melanogaster Adh locus, rather than lack of polymorphism in the 5' flanking region. An approach is outlined for testing neutral theory predictions about patterns of variation within and between species. This approach indicates that the observed patterns of variation are incompatible with an infinite site neutral model. PMID:3021568

  15. Metabolic Activity of Radish Sprouts Derived Isothiocyanates in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Baenas, Nieves; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Schloesser, Anke; Moreno, Diego A.; García-Viguera, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Wagner, Anika E.

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study the absorption, metabolism and potential health benefits of plant bioactives derived from radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus cv. Rambo), a Brassicaceae species rich in glucosinolates and other phytochemicals. Flies were subjected to a diet supplemented with lyophilized radish sprouts (10.6 g/L) for 10 days, containing high amounts of glucoraphenin and glucoraphasatin, which can be hydrolyzed by myrosinase to the isothiocyanates sulforaphene and raphasatin, respectively. We demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster takes up and metabolizes isothiocyanates from radish sprouts through the detection of the metabolite sulforaphane-cysteine in fly homogenates. Moreover, we report a decrease in the glucose content of flies, an upregulation of spargel expression, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PPARγ-coactivator 1 α, as well as the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. Overall, we show that the consumption of radish sprouts affects energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster which is reflected by lower glucose levels and an increased expression of spargel, a central player in mitochondrial biogenesis. These processes are often affected in chronic diseases associated with aging, including type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:26901196

  16. Metabolic Activity of Radish Sprouts Derived Isothiocyanates in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Baenas, Nieves; Piegholdt, Stefanie; Schloesser, Anke; Moreno, Diego A; García-Viguera, Cristina; Rimbach, Gerald; Wagner, Anika E

    2016-01-01

    We used Drosophila melanogaster as a model system to study the absorption, metabolism and potential health benefits of plant bioactives derived from radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus cv. Rambo), a Brassicaceae species rich in glucosinolates and other phytochemicals. Flies were subjected to a diet supplemented with lyophilized radish sprouts (10.6 g/L) for 10 days, containing high amounts of glucoraphenin and glucoraphasatin, which can be hydrolyzed by myrosinase to the isothiocyanates sulforaphene and raphasatin, respectively. We demonstrate that Drosophila melanogaster takes up and metabolizes isothiocyanates from radish sprouts through the detection of the metabolite sulforaphane-cysteine in fly homogenates. Moreover, we report a decrease in the glucose content of flies, an upregulation of spargel expression, the Drosophila homolog of the mammalian PPARγ-coactivator 1 α, as well as the inhibition of α-amylase and α-glucosidase in vitro. Overall, we show that the consumption of radish sprouts affects energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster which is reflected by lower glucose levels and an increased expression of spargel, a central player in mitochondrial biogenesis. These processes are often affected in chronic diseases associated with aging, including type II diabetes mellitus. PMID:26901196

  17. Principles of Genome Evolution in the Drosophila melanogaster Species Group

    PubMed Central

    Ranz, José M; Maurin, Damien; Chan, Yuk S; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Hillier, LaDeana W; Roote, John; Ashburner, Michael; Bergman, Casey M

    2007-01-01

    That closely related species often differ by chromosomal inversions was discovered by Sturtevant and Plunkett in 1926. Our knowledge of how these inversions originate is still very limited, although a prevailing view is that they are facilitated by ectopic recombination events between inverted repetitive sequences. The availability of genome sequences of related species now allows us to study in detail the mechanisms that generate interspecific inversions. We have analyzed the breakpoint regions of the 29 inversions that differentiate the chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster and two closely related species, D. simulans and D. yakuba, and reconstructed the molecular events that underlie their origin. Experimental and computational analysis revealed that the breakpoint regions of 59% of the inversions (17/29) are associated with inverted duplications of genes or other nonrepetitive sequences. In only two cases do we find evidence for inverted repetitive sequences in inversion breakpoints. We propose that the presence of inverted duplications associated with inversion breakpoint regions is the result of staggered breaks, either isochromatid or chromatid, and that this, rather than ectopic exchange between inverted repetitive sequences, is the prevalent mechanism for the generation of inversions in the melanogaster species group. Outgroup analysis also revealed evidence for widespread breakpoint recycling. Lastly, we have found that expression domains in D. melanogaster may be disrupted in D. yakuba, bringing into question their potential adaptive significance. PMID:17550304

  18. A portrait of copy-number polymorphism in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Dopman, Erik B; Hartl, Daniel L

    2007-12-11

    Thomas Hunt Morgan and colleagues identified variation in gene copy number in Drosophila in the 1920s and 1930s and linked such variation to phenotypic differences [Bridges CB (1936) Science 83:210]. Yet the extent of variation in the number of chromosomes, chromosomal regions, or gene copies, and the importance of this variation within species, remain poorly understood. Here, we focus on copy-number variation in Drosophila melanogaster. We characterize copy-number polymorphism (CNP) across genomic regions, and we contrast patterns to infer the evolutionary processes acting on this variation. Copy-number variation in D. melanogaster is nonrandomly distributed, presumably because of a mutational bias produced by tandem repeats or other mechanisms. Comparisons of coding and noncoding CNPs, however, reveal a strong effect of purifying selection in the removal of structural variation from functionally constrained regions. Most patterns of CNP in D. melanogaster suggest that negative selection and mutational biases are the primary agents responsible for shaping structural variation. PMID:18056801

  19. Identification of target genes regulated by homeotic proteins in Drosophila melanogaster through genetic selection of Ultrabithorax protein-binding sites in yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Mastick, G.S.; McKay, R.; Oligino, T.

    1995-01-01

    A method based on the transcriptional activation of a selectable reporter in yeast cells was used to identify genes regulated by the Utrabithorax homeoproteins in Drosophila melanogaster. Fifty-three DNA fragments that can mediate activation by UBX isoform Ia in this test were recovered after screening 15% of the Drosophila genome. Half of these fragments represent single-copy sequences in the genome. Six single-copy fragments were investigated in detail, and each was found to reside near a transcription unit whose expression in the embryo is segmentally modulated as expected for targets of homeotic genes. Four of these putative target genes are expressed in patterns that suggest roles in the development of regional specializations within mesoderm derivatives; in three cases these expression patterns depend on Ultrabithorax function. Extrapolation from this pilot study indicates that 85-170 candidate target genes can be identified by screening the entire Drosophila genome with UBX isoform Ia. With appropriate modifications, this approach should be applicable to other transcriptional regulators in diverse organisms. 69 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Diverse cap-binding properties of Drosophila eIF4E isoforms.

    PubMed

    Zuberek, Joanna; Kuchta, Krzysztof; Hernández, Greco; Sonenberg, Nahum; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    The majority of eukaryotic mRNAs are translated in a cap-dependent manner, which requires recognition of the mRNA 5' cap by eIF4E protein. Multiple eIF4E family members have been identified in most eukaryotic organisms. Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) has eight eIF4E related proteins; seven of them belong to Class I and one to Class II. Their biological roles with the exception of Dm eIF4E-1, Dm eIF4E-3 and Dm 4EHP, remain unknown. Here, we compare the molecular basis of Dm eIF4E's interactions with cap and eIF4G peptide by using homology modelling and fluorescence binding assays with various cap analogues. We found that despite the presence of conserved key residues responsible for cap recognition, the differences in binding different cap analogues among Class I Dm eIF4E isoforms are up to 14-fold. The highest affinity for cap analogues was observed for Dm eIF4E-3. We suggest that Dm eIF4E-3 and Dm eIF4E-5 bind the second nucleoside of the cap in an unusual manner via stacking interactions with a histidine or a phenylalanine residue, respectively. Moreover, the analysis of ternary complexes of eIF4G peptide-eIF4E-cap analogue showed cooperativity between eIF4G and cap binding only for Dm eIF4E-4, which exhibits the lowest affinity for cap analogues among all Dm eIF4Es. PMID:27374989

  1. p53 Isoforms: Key Regulators of the Cell Fate Decision.

    PubMed

    Joruiz, Sebastien M; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    It is poorly understood how a single protein, p53, can be responsive to so many stress signals and orchestrates very diverse cell responses to maintain/restore cell/tissue functions. The uncovering that TP53 gene physiologically expresses, in a tissue-dependent manner, several p53 splice variants (isoforms) provides an explanation to its pleiotropic biological activities. Here, we summarize a decade of research on p53 isoforms. The clinical studies and the diverse cellular and animal models of p53 isoforms (zebrafish, Drosophila, and mouse) lead us to realize that a p53-mediated cell response is, in fact, the sum of the intrinsic activities of the coexpressed p53 isoforms and that unbalancing expression of different p53 isoforms leads to cancer, premature aging, (neuro)degenerative diseases, inflammation, embryo malformations, or defects in tissue regeneration. Cracking the p53 isoforms' code is, thus, a necessary step to improve cancer treatment. It also opens new exciting perspectives in tissue regeneration. PMID:26801896

  2. Frac-seq reveals isoform-specific recruitment to polyribosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Martinez-Nunez, Rocio Teresa; Howard, Jonathan M.; Cvitovik, Ivan; Katzman, Sol; Tariq, Muhammad A.; Pourmand, Nader; Sanford, Jeremy R.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is required for the accurate expression of virtually all human protein coding genes. However, splicing also plays important roles in coordinating subsequent steps of pre-mRNA processing such as polyadenylation and mRNA export. Here, we test the hypothesis that nuclear pre-mRNA processing influences the polyribosome association of alternative mRNA isoforms. By comparing isoform ratios in cytoplasmic and polyribosomal extracts, we determined that the alternative products of ∼30% (597/1954) of mRNA processing events are differentially partitioned between these subcellular fractions. Many of the events exhibiting isoform-specific polyribosome association are highly conserved across mammalian genomes, underscoring their possible biological importance. We find that differences in polyribosome association may be explained, at least in part by the observation that alternative splicing alters the cis-regulatory landscape of mRNAs isoforms. For example, inclusion or exclusion of upstream open reading frames (uORFs) in the 5′UTR as well as Alu-elements and microRNA target sites in the 3′UTR have a strong influence on polyribosome association of alternative mRNA isoforms. Taken together, our data demonstrate for the first time the potential link between alternative splicing and translational control of the resultant mRNA isoforms. PMID:23783272

  3. A Network of Splice Isoforms for the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Guerler, Aysam; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the primary mammalian species used for studying alternative splicing events. Recent studies have generated computational models to predict functions for splice isoforms in the mouse. However, the functional relationship network, describing the probability of splice isoforms participating in the same biological process or pathway, has not yet been studied in the mouse. Here we describe a rich genome-wide resource of mouse networks at the isoform level, which was generated using a unique framework that was originally developed to infer isoform functions. This network was built through integrating heterogeneous genomic and protein data, including RNA-seq, exon array, protein docking and pseudo-amino acid composition. Through simulation and cross-validation studies, we demonstrated the accuracy of the algorithm in predicting isoform-level functional relationships. We showed that this network enables the users to reveal functional differences of the isoforms of the same gene, as illustrated by literature evidence with Anxa6 (annexin a6) as an example. We expect this work will become a useful resource for the mouse genetics community to understand gene functions. The network is publicly available at: http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isoformnetwork. PMID:27079421

  4. Isoform dependent regulation of human HCN channels by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Oliver; D’Avanzo, Nazzareno

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol has been shown to regulate numerous ion channels. HCN channels represent the molecular correlate of If or Ih in sinoatrial node (SAN) and neuronal cells. Previous studies have implicated a role for cholesterol in the regulation of rabbit HCN4 channels with effects on pacing in the rabbit SAN. Using electrophysiological and biochemical approaches, we examined the effect of cholesterol modulation on human HCN1, HCN2 and HCN4 isoforms. Patch-clamp experiments uncovered isoform specific differences in the effect of cholesterol on gating kinetics upon depletion by MβCD or mevastatin or enrichment using MβCD/cholesterol. Most dramatically cholesterol had isoform specific effects on mode-shifting, which has been suggested to play a key role in stabilizing firing rate and preventing arrhythmic firing in SAN cells and neurons. Mode-shifting in HCN1 channels was insensitive to cholesterol manipulation, while HCN2 and HCN4 were strongly affected. Trafficking of each isoform to the plasma membrane was also affected by cholesterol modulation differentially between isoforms, however, each isoform remained localized in lipid raft domains after cholesterol depletion. These effects may contribute to the side effects of cholesterol reducing therapies including disrupted heart rhythm and neuropathic pain, as well as the susceptibility of sinus dysfunction in patients with elevated cholesterol. PMID:26404789

  5. A Network of Splice Isoforms for the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Guerler, Aysam; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory mouse is the primary mammalian species used for studying alternative splicing events. Recent studies have generated computational models to predict functions for splice isoforms in the mouse. However, the functional relationship network, describing the probability of splice isoforms participating in the same biological process or pathway, has not yet been studied in the mouse. Here we describe a rich genome-wide resource of mouse networks at the isoform level, which was generated using a unique framework that was originally developed to infer isoform functions. This network was built through integrating heterogeneous genomic and protein data, including RNA-seq, exon array, protein docking and pseudo-amino acid composition. Through simulation and cross-validation studies, we demonstrated the accuracy of the algorithm in predicting isoform-level functional relationships. We showed that this network enables the users to reveal functional differences of the isoforms of the same gene, as illustrated by literature evidence with Anxa6 (annexin a6) as an example. We expect this work will become a useful resource for the mouse genetics community to understand gene functions. The network is publicly available at: http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isoformnetwork. PMID:27079421

  6. Multiple isoform recovery (MIR)-PCR: a simple method for the isolation of related mRNA isoforms.

    PubMed Central

    Fagotti, A; Gabbiani, G; Pascolini, R; Neuville, P

    1998-01-01

    We present a rapid and efficient method for the detection of related transcripts with different expression levels. This approach combines the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method with a cDNA subtractive technique. The strategy is based on successive subtractions of prevalent isoforms resulting in enrichment of less expressed transcripts. For each subtraction, a biotinylated primer specific for the prevalent isoform is hybridized on the total cDNA and the hybrid is retained on a streptavidin affinity column. The unbound cDNA serves as a template for subsequent isoform identification. To illustrate its application we describe the isolation of three new actin cDNA isoforms in the freshwater planarian Dugesia (S) polychroa. PMID:9518500

  7. Distinct Functional Interactions between Actin Isoforms and Nonsarcomeric Myosins

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Mirco; Diensthuber, Ralph P.; Chizhov, Igor; Claus, Peter; Heissler, Sarah M.; Preller, Matthias; Taft, Manuel H.; Manstein, Dietmar J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite their near sequence identity, actin isoforms cannot completely replace each other in vivo and show marked differences in their tissue-specific and subcellular localization. Little is known about isoform-specific differences in their interactions with myosin motors and other actin-binding proteins. Mammalian cytoplasmic β- and γ-actin interact with nonsarcomeric conventional myosins such as the members of the nonmuscle myosin-2 family and myosin-7A. These interactions support a wide range of cellular processes including cytokinesis, maintenance of cell polarity, cell adhesion, migration, and mechano-electrical transduction. To elucidate differences in the ability of isoactins to bind and stimulate the enzymatic activity of individual myosin isoforms, we characterized the interactions of human skeletal muscle α-actin, cytoplasmic β-actin, and cytoplasmic γ-actin with human myosin-7A and nonmuscle myosins-2A, -2B and -2C1. In the case of nonmuscle myosins-2A and -2B, the interaction with either cytoplasmic actin isoform results in 4-fold greater stimulation of myosin ATPase activity than was observed in the presence of α-skeletal muscle actin. Nonmuscle myosin-2C1 is most potently activated by β-actin and myosin-7A by γ-actin. Our results indicate that β- and γ-actin isoforms contribute to the modulation of nonmuscle myosin-2 and myosin-7A activity and thereby to the spatial and temporal regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. FRET-based analyses show efficient copolymerization abilities for the actin isoforms in vitro. Experiments with hybrid actin filaments show that the extent of actomyosin coupling efficiency can be regulated by the isoform composition of actin filaments. PMID:23923011

  8. Heterogeneity of presynaptic proteins: do not forget isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Bragina, Luca; Fattorini, Giorgia; Giovedì, Silvia; Bosco, Federica; Benfenati, Fabio; Conti, Fiorenzo

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of presynaptic protein expression in glutamatergic and GABAergic central synapses performed in several laboratories and with different techniques is unveiling a complex scenario, largely because each presynaptic protein exists in several isoforms. The interpretation of these findings is generally based on the notion that each synapse and each synaptic vesicle contains one of the isoforms of each family of presynaptic proteins. We verified whether this interpretation is tenable by performing triple labeling and immunoisolation studies with the aim of detecting two isoforms of a given presynaptic protein in glutamatergic or GABAergic axon terminals and/or synaptic vesicles (SVs). Here, we show that: (1) the possibility that not all families of presynaptic proteins are expressed in all terminals must be taken into serious account; (2) the expression of a given protein isoform in a terminal does not exclude the expression of other isoforms of the same protein in the same terminal and in the same vesicle. These conclusions open new and interesting problems; their experimental analysis might improve our understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology of central synapses. PMID:23382710

  9. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  10. p53 isoform profiling in glioblastoma and injured brain

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Rie; Giannini, Caterina; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Schroeder, Mark; Rogers, Joseph; Mastroeni, Diego; Scrable, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has been found to be the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers; however, the frequency of p53 mutations varies from 10–70% across different cancer types. This variability can partly be explained by inactivating mechanisms aside from direct genomic polymorphisms. The p53 gene encodes 12 isoforms, which have been shown to modulate full-length p53 activity in cancer. In this study, we characterized p53 isoform expression patterns in glioblastoma, gliosis, non-tumor brain, and neural progenitor cells by SDS-PAGE, immunoblot, mass spectrometry, and RT-PCR. At the protein level, we found that the most consistently expressed isoform in glioblastoma, Δ40p53, was uniquely expressed in regenerative processes, such as those involving neural progenitor cells and gliosis compared to tumor samples. Isoform profiling of glioblastoma tissues revealed the presence of both Δ40p53 and full-length p53, neither of which were detected in non-tumor cerebral cortex. Upon xenograft propagation of tumors, p53 levels increased. The variability of overall p53 expression and relative levels of isoforms suggest fluctuations in subpopulations of cells with greater or lesser capacity for proliferation, which can change as the tumor evolves under different growth conditions. PMID:22824800

  11. SURVIV for survival analysis of mRNA isoform variation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shihao; Wang, Yuanyuan; Wang, Chengyang; Wu, Ying Nian; Xing, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The rapid accumulation of clinical RNA-seq data sets has provided the opportunity to associate mRNA isoform variations to clinical outcomes. Here we report a statistical method SURVIV (Survival analysis of mRNA Isoform Variation), designed for identifying mRNA isoform variation associated with patient survival time. A unique feature and major strength of SURVIV is that it models the measurement uncertainty of mRNA isoform ratio in RNA-seq data. Simulation studies suggest that SURVIV outperforms the conventional Cox regression survival analysis, especially for data sets with modest sequencing depth. We applied SURVIV to TCGA RNA-seq data of invasive ductal carcinoma as well as five additional cancer types. Alternative splicing-based survival predictors consistently outperform gene expression-based survival predictors, and the integration of clinical, gene expression and alternative splicing profiles leads to the best survival prediction. We anticipate that SURVIV will have broad utilities for analysing diverse types of mRNA isoform variation in large-scale clinical RNA-seq projects. PMID:27279334

  12. Differential regulation of renal phospholipase C isoforms by catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Yu, P Y; Asico, L D; Eisner, G M; Jose, P A

    1995-01-01

    Dopamine and D1 agonists and NE all increase phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity, but whereas dopamine produces a natriuresis, NE has an antinatriuretic effect. To determine if catecholamines differentially regulate the expression of PLC isoforms, we infused fenoldopam, a D1 agonist, or pramipexole, a D1/D2 agonist, intravenously or infused fenoldopam or NE into the renal artery of anesthetized rats. After 3-4 h of infusion, when the expected natriuresis (fenoldopam or pramipexole) or antinatriuresis (NE) occurred, the kidneys were removed for analysis of PLC isoform protein expression activity. Western blot analysis revealed that in renal cortical membranes, fenoldopam and pramipexole increased expression of PLC beta 1 and decreased expression of PLC gamma 1; PLC delta was unchanged. In the cytosol, pramipexole and fenoldopam increased expression of both PLC beta 1 and PLC gamma 1. No effects were noted in the medulla. A preferential D1 antagonist, SKF 83742, which by itself had no effect, blocked the effects of pramipexole, thus confirming the involvement of the D1 receptor. In contrast, NE also increased PLC beta 1 but did not affect PLC gamma 1 protein expression in membranes. The changes in PLC isoform expression were accompanied by similar changes in PLC isoform activity. These studies demonstrate for the first time differential regulation of PLC isoforms by catecholamines. PMID:7814630

  13. Population Genomics of the Wolbachia Endosymbiont in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Mark F.; Weinert, Lucy A.; Welch, John J.; Linheiro, Raquel S.; Magwire, Michael M.; Jiggins, Francis M.; Bergman, Casey M.

    2012-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited symbiotic bacteria, commonly found in arthropods, which are able to manipulate the reproduction of their host in order to maximise their transmission. The evolutionary history of endosymbionts like Wolbachia can be revealed by integrating information on infection status in natural populations with patterns of sequence variation in Wolbachia and host mitochondrial genomes. Here we use whole-genome resequencing data from 290 lines of Drosophila melanogaster from North America, Europe, and Africa to predict Wolbachia infection status, estimate relative cytoplasmic genome copy number, and reconstruct Wolbachia and mitochondrial genome sequences. Overall, 63% of Drosophila strains were predicted to be infected with Wolbachia by our in silico analysis pipeline, which shows 99% concordance with infection status determined by diagnostic PCR. Complete Wolbachia and mitochondrial genomes show congruent phylogenies, consistent with strict vertical transmission through the maternal cytoplasm and imperfect transmission of Wolbachia. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis reveals that the most recent common ancestor of all Wolbachia and mitochondrial genomes in D. melanogaster dates to around 8,000 years ago. We find evidence for a recent global replacement of ancestral Wolbachia and mtDNA lineages, but our data suggest that the derived wMel lineage arose several thousand years ago, not in the 20th century as previously proposed. Our data also provide evidence that this global replacement event is incomplete and is likely to be one of several similar incomplete replacement events that have occurred since the out-of-Africa migration that allowed D. melanogaster to colonize worldwide habitats. This study provides a complete genomic analysis of the evolutionary mode and temporal dynamics of the D. melanogaster–Wolbachia symbiosis, as well as important resources for further analyses of the impact of Wolbachia on host biology. PMID:23284297

  14. Contribution of larval nutrition to adult reproduction in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Aguila, Jerell R; Hoshizaki, Deborah K; Gibbs, Allen G

    2013-02-01

    Within the complex life cycle of holometabolous insects, nutritional resources acquired during larval feeding are utilized by the pupa and the adult. The broad features of the transfer of larval resources to the pupae and the allocation of larval resources in the adult have been described by studies measuring and tracking macronutrients at different developmental stages. However, the mechanisms of resource transfer from the larva and the factors regulating the allocation of these resources in the adult between growth, reproduction and somatic maintenance are unknown. Drosophila melanogaster presents a tractable system in which to test cellular and tissue mechanisms of resource acquisition and allocation because of the detailed understanding of D. melanogaster development and the experimental tools to manipulate its tissues across developmental stages. In previous work, we demonstrated that the fat body of D. melanogaster larvae is important for survival of starvation stress in the young adult, and suggested that programmed cell death of the larval fat cells in the adult is important for allocation of resources for female reproduction. Here, we describe the temporal uptake of larval-derived carbon by the ovaries, and demonstrate the importance of larval fat-cell death in the maturation of the ovary and in fecundity. Larvae and adults were fed stable carbon isotopes to follow the acquisition of larval-derived carbon by the adult ovaries. We determined that over half of the nutrients acquired by the ovaries in 2-day-old adult females are dependent upon the death of the fat cells. Furthermore, when programmed cell death is inhibited in the larval fat cells, ovarian development was depressed and fecundity was reduced. PMID:23038728

  15. Acrolein genotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster. III. Effects of metabolism modification.

    PubMed

    Barros, A R; Sierra, L M; Comendador, M A

    1994-05-01

    In order to investigate the role of metabolism in acrolein genotoxicity in D. melanogaster, the action of several metabolism modifiers, namely phenobarbital, an inducer of xenobiotic metabolism, phenylimidazole and iproniazid, inhibitors of oxidative activities of cytochrome P450, and diethyl maleate, a glutathione-depleting agent, have been assayed using the sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test, with two different administration routes (feeding and injection). The results support the hypothesis that acrolein is not only a direct mutagen but is also transformed, by oxidative activities of cytochrome P450 after glutathione conjugation, into an active metabolite, possibly glycidaldehyde. Moreover, acrolein is deactivated by an enzymatic activity induced by phenobarbital. PMID:7513061

  16. Determination of the Spontaneous Locomotor Activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Jared K.; Kowalski, Suzanne; Rogina, Blanka

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been used as an excellent model organism to study environmental and genetic manipulations that affect behavior. One such behavior is spontaneous locomotor activity. Here we describe our protocol that utilizes Drosophila population monitors and a tracking system that allows continuous monitoring of the spontaneous locomotor activity of flies for several days at a time. This method is simple, reliable, and objective and can be used to examine the effects of aging, sex, changes in caloric content of food, addition of drugs, or genetic manipulations that mimic human diseases. PMID:24747955

  17. Structure of psoralen-crosslinked ribosomal RNA from Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Wollenzien, P L; Youvan, D C; Hearst, J E

    1978-01-01

    Ribosomal RNA from Drosophila melanogaster photoreacted with hydroxymethyltrioxsalen has been examined by electron microscopy. Reproducible patterns of hairpins were found in both the 26S and 18S RNA. The frequency of these hairpins and the amount of incorporated drug were dependent upon the conditions under which the crosslinking was performed. A prominent central hairpin occurs in the 26S RNA and the break that interrupts the continuity of the RNA chain is located within it. In addition to several small hairpins, the crosslinked 18S RNA contains a large open loop. Images PMID:417342

  18. Host-microbe interactions in the gut of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kuraishi, Takayuki; Hori, Aki; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2013-01-01

    Many insect species subsist on decaying and contaminated matter and are thus exposed to large quantities of microorganisms. To control beneficial commensals and combat infectious pathogens, insects must be armed with efficient systems for microbial recognition, signaling pathways, and effector molecules. The molecular mechanisms regulating these host-microbe interactions in insects have been largely clarified in Drosophila melanogaster with its powerful genetic and genomic tools. Here we review recent advances in this field, focusing mainly on the relationships between microbes and epithelial cells in the intestinal tract where the host exposure to the external environment is most frequent. PMID:24381562

  19. Modeling dietary influences on offspring metabolic programming in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Brookheart, Rita T; Duncan, Jennifer G

    2016-09-01

    The influence of nutrition on offspring metabolism has become a hot topic in recent years owing to the growing prevalence of maternal and childhood obesity. Studies in mammals have identified several factors correlating with parental and early offspring dietary influences on progeny health; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these factors remain undiscovered. Mammalian metabolic tissues and pathways are heavily conserved in Drosophila melanogaster, making the fly an invaluable genetic model organism for studying metabolism. In this review, we discuss the metabolic similarities between mammals and Drosophila and present evidence supporting its use as an emerging model of metabolic programming. PMID:27450801

  20. Fitness and density-dependent population growth in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, L.D.; Ayala, F.J.

    1981-03-01

    The density-dependent rates of population growth were determined for 26 populations of Drosophila melanogaster maintained in the serial transfer system. Twenty-five populations were homozygous for an entire chromosome 2 sampled from nature; the other was a random heterozygous population. Rates of population growth around the carrying capacity cannot explain the large fitness depression of these lines. However, the homozygous lines show large differences in rates of population growth at low densities relative to the random heterozygous standard. The average relative fitness of the homozygous lines, as determined from the growth rates at the lowest density, is 0.51.

  1. Determination of the spontaneous locomotor activity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jared K; Kowalski, Suzanne; Rogina, Blanka

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been used as an excellent model organism to study environmental and genetic manipulations that affect behavior. One such behavior is spontaneous locomotor activity. Here we describe our protocol that utilizes Drosophila population monitors and a tracking system that allows continuous monitoring of the spontaneous locomotor activity of flies for several days at a time. This method is simple, reliable, and objective and can be used to examine the effects of aging, sex, changes in caloric content of food, addition of drugs, or genetic manipulations that mimic human diseases. PMID:24747955

  2. Drosophila Melanogaster Show a Threshold Effect in Response to Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Antosh, Michael; Fox, David; Hasselbacher, Thomas; Lanou, Robert; Neretti, Nicola; Cooper, Leon N.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the biological effects of radiation using adult Drosophila melanogaster as a model organism, focusing on gene expression and lifespan analysis to determine the effect of different radiation doses. Our results support a threshold effect in response to radiation: no effect on lifespan and no permanent effect on gene expression is seen at incident radiation levels below 100 J/kg. We also find that it is more appropriate to compare radiation effects in flies using the absorbed energy rather than incident radiation levels. PMID:25552957

  3. Laminin isoforms in endothelial and perivascular basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yousif, Lema F.; Di Russo, Jacopo; Sorokin, Lydia

    2013-01-01

    Laminins, one of the major functional components of basement membranes, are found underlying endothelium, and encasing pericytes and smooth muscle cells in the vessel wall. Depending on the type of blood vessel (capillary, venule, postcapillary venule, vein or artery) and their maturation state, both the endothelial and mural cell phenotype vary, with associated changes in laminin isoform expression. Laminins containing the α4 and α5 chains are the major isoforms found in the vessel wall, with the added contribution of laminin α2 in larger vessels. We here summarize current data on the precise localization of these laminin isoforms and their receptors in the different layers of the vessel wall, and their potential contribution to vascular homeostasis. PMID:23263631

  4. A penalized likelihood approach for robust estimation of isoform expression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high-throughput sequencing of transcriptomes (RNA-Seq) has enabled the accurate estimation of gene expression at individual isoform level. However, systematic biases introduced during the sequencing and mapping processes as well as incompleteness of the transcript annotation databases may cause the estimates of isoform abundances to be unreliable, and in some cases, highly inaccurate. This paper introduces a penalized likelihood approach to detect and correct for such biases in a robust manner. Our model extends those previously proposed by introducing bias parameters for reads. An L1 penalty is used for the selection of non-zero bias parameters. We introduce an efficient algorithm for model fitting and analyze the statistical properties of the proposed model. Our experimental studies on both simulated and real datasets suggest that the model has the potential to improve isoform-specific gene expression estimates and identify incompletely annotated gene models.

  5. Identification and characterization of novel NuMA isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jin; Xu, Zhe; He, Dacheng; Lu, Guanting

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • Seven NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing were categorized into 3 groups: long, middle and short. • Both exons 15 and 16 in long NuMA were “hotspot” for alternative splicing. • Lower expression of short NuMA was observed in cancer cells compared with nonneoplastic controls. • Distinct localization pattern of short isoforms indicated different function from that of long and middle NuMA. - Abstract: The large nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) has been investigated for over 30 years with functions related to the formation and maintenance of mitotic spindle poles during mitosis. However, the existence and functions of NuMA isoforms generated by alternative splicing remains unclear. In the present work, we show that at least seven NuMA isoforms (categorized into long, middle and short groups) generated by alternative splicing from a common NuMA mRNA precursor were discovered in HeLa cells and these isoforms differ mainly at the carboxyl terminus and the coiled-coil domains. Two “hotspot” exons with molecular mass of 3366-nt and 42-nt tend to be spliced during alternative splicing in long and middle groups. Furthermore, full-length coding sequences of long and middle NuMA obtained by using fusion PCR were constructed into GFP-tagged vector to illustrate their cellular localization. Long NuMA mainly localized in the nucleus with absence from nucleoli during interphase and translocated to the spindle poles in mitosis. Middle NuMA displayed the similar cell cycle-dependent distribution pattern as long NuMA. However, expression of NuMA short isoforms revealed a distinct subcellular localization. Short NuMA were present in the cytosol during the whole cycle, without colocalization with mitotic apparatus. These results have allowed us tentatively to explore a new research direction for NuMA’s various functions.

  6. Identification and characterization of a novel retinal isoform of dystrophin

    SciTech Connect

    D`Souza, V.N.; Sigesmund, D.A.; Man, N.

    1994-09-01

    We have shown that dystrophin is required for normal function of the retina as measured by electroretinography (ERG). In these studies a genotype/phenotype correlation was found in which DMD/BMD patients with deletions in the central to distal region of the gene had abnormal ERGs, while patients with deletions in the 5{prime} end of the gene had a mild or normal retinal phenotype. A similar correlation was also observed in the mouse in which the mdx mouse having a mutation in exon 23 had a normal retinal phenotype, whereas the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse (mutation in intron 65) had an abnormal phenotype. Molecular analysis of both human and mouse retina indicated that at least two isoforms of dystrophin are expressed in the retina and localize to the outer plexiform layer, the synaptic junction between the photoreceptors, the bipolar cells, and the horizontal cells. Using a panel of monoclonal dystrophin antisera to analyze mdx mouse retina which does not contain full length dystrophin antisera, we showed that a shorter dystrophin isoform (approximately 260 kDa) was present and contained part of the rod, the cysteine-rich and C-terminal domains. The 5{prime} end of the transcript giving rise to this isoform was characterized and cloned using 5{prime}RACE. Sequence analysis indicated that this transcript contained a novel exon 1 consisting of 240 nucleotides and coded for a unique N-terminus of 13 amino acids. This isoform is distinct from the DP116 dystrophin isoform identified in peripheral nerve. From the functional analysis of DMD patients and dystrophic mice we conclude that this 260 kDa dystrophin isoform is required for normal retinal electrophysiology.

  7. Oxygenation properties and isoform diversity of snake hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Storz, Jay F; Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Moriyama, Hideaki; Hoffmann, Federico G; Wang, Tobias; Fago, Angela; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes; Weber, Roy E

    2015-11-01

    Available data suggest that snake hemoglobins (Hbs) are characterized by a combination of unusual structural and functional properties relative to the Hbs of other amniote vertebrates, including oxygenation-linked tetramer-dimer dissociation. However, standardized comparative data are lacking for snake Hbs, and the Hb isoform composition of snake red blood cells has not been systematically characterized. Here we present the results of an integrated analysis of snake Hbs and the underlying α- and β-type globin genes to characterize 1) Hb isoform composition of definitive erythrocytes, and 2) the oxygenation properties of isolated isoforms as well as composite hemolysates. We used species from three families as subjects for experimental studies of Hb function: South American rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus (Viperidae); Indian python, Python molurus (Pythonidae); and yellow-bellied sea snake, Pelamis platura (Elapidae). We analyzed allosteric properties of snake Hbs in terms of the Monod-Wyman-Changeux model and Adair four-step thermodynamic model. Hbs from each of the three species exhibited high intrinsic O2 affinities, low cooperativities, small Bohr factors in the absence of phosphates, and high sensitivities to ATP. Oxygenation properties of the snake Hbs could be explained entirely by allosteric transitions in the quaternary structure of intact tetramers, suggesting that ligation-dependent dissociation of Hb tetramers into αβ-dimers is not a universal feature of snake Hbs. Surprisingly, the major Hb isoform of the South American rattlesnake is homologous to the minor HbD of other amniotes and, contrary to the pattern of Hb isoform differentiation in birds and turtles, exhibits a lower O2 affinity than the HbA isoform. PMID:26354849

  8. Apolipoprotein E isoform-specific effects on lipoprotein receptor processing

    PubMed Central

    Bachmeier, Corbin; Shackleton, Ben; Ojo, Joseph; Paris, Daniel; Mullan, Michael; Crawford, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an isoform-specific role for apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the elimination of beta-amyloid (Aβ) from the brain. ApoE is closely associated with various lipoprotein receptors, which contribute to Aβ brain removal via metabolic clearance or transit across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). These receptors are subject to ectodomain shedding at the cell surface, which alters endocytic transport and mitigates Aβ elimination. To further understand the manner in which apoE influences Aβ brain clearance, these studies investigated the effect of apoE on lipoprotein receptor shedding. Consistent with prior reports, we observed an increased shedding of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and the LDLR-related protein 1 (LRP1) following Aβ exposure in human brain endothelial cells. When Aβ was co-treated with each apoE isoform, there was a reduction in Aβ-induced shedding with apoE2 and apoE3, while lipoprotein receptor shedding in the presence of apoE4 remained elevated. Likewise, intracranial administration of Aβ to apoE targeted replacement mice (expressing the human apoE isoforms) resulted in an isoform-dependent effect on lipoprotein receptor shedding in the brain (apoE4>apoE3>apoE2). Moreover, these results show a strong inverse correlation with our prior work in apoE transgenic mice in which apoE4 animals showed reduced Aβ clearance across the BBB compared to apoE3 animals. Based on these results, apoE4 appears less efficient than other apoE isoforms in regulating lipoprotein receptor shedding, which may explain the differential effects of these isoforms in removing Aβ from the brain. PMID:25015123

  9. Modulation of neuronal differentiation by CD40 isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Huayu; Obregon, Demian; Lou, Deyan; Ehrhart, Jared; Fernandez, Frank; Silver, Archie; Tan Jun

    2008-05-02

    Neuron differentiation is a complex process involving various cell-cell interactions, and multiple signaling pathways. We showed previously that CD40 is expressed and functional on mouse and human neurons. In neurons, ligation of CD40 protects against serum withdrawal-induced injury and plays a role in survival and differentiation. CD40 deficient mice display neuron dysfunction, aberrant neuron morphologic changes, and associated gross brain abnormalities. Previous studies by Tone and colleagues suggested that five isoforms of CD40 exist with two predominant isoforms expressed in humans: signal-transducible CD40 type I and a C-terminal truncated, non-signal-transducible CD40 type II. We hypothesized that differential expression of CD40 isoform type I and type II in neurons may modulate neuron differentiation. Results show that adult wild-type, and CD40{sup -/-} deficient mice predominantly express CD40 type I and II isoforms. Whereas adult wild-type mice express mostly CD40 type I in cerebral tissues at relatively high levels, in age and gender-matched CD40{sup -/-} mice CD40 type I expression was almost completely absent; suggesting a predominance of the non-signal-transducible CD40 type II isoform. Younger, 1 day old wild-type mice displayed less CD40 type I, and more CD40 type II, as well as, greater expression of soluble CD40 (CD40L/CD40 signal inhibitor), compared with 1 month old mice. Neuron-like N2a cells express CD40 type I and type II isoforms while in an undifferentiated state, however once induced to differentiate, CD40 type I predominates. Further, differentiated N2a cells treated with CD40 ligand express high levels of neuron specific nuclear protein (NeuN); an effect reduced by anti-CD40 type I siRNA, but not by control (non-targeting) siRNA. Altogether these data suggest that CD40 isoforms may act in a temporal fashion to modulate neuron differentiation during brain development. Thus, modulation of neuronal CD40 isoforms and CD40 signaling may

  10. Discovery of Supernumerary B Chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bauerly, Elisabeth; Hughes, Stacie E.; Vietti, Dana R.; Miller, Danny E.; McDowell, William; Hawley, R. Scott

    2014-01-01

    B chromosomes are small, heterochromatic chromosomes that are transmitted in a non-Mendelian manner. We have identified a stock of Drosophila melanogaster that recently (within the last decade) acquired an average of 10 B chromosomes per fly. These B chromosomes are transmitted by both males and females and can be maintained for multiple generations in a wild-type genetic background despite the fact that they cause high levels of 4th chromosome meiotic nondisjunction in females. Most curiously, these B chromosomes are mitotically unstable, suggesting either the absence of critical chromosomal sites or the inability of the meiotic or mitotic systems to cope with many additional chromosomes. These B chromosomes also contain centromeres and are primarily composed of the heterochromatic AATAT satellite sequence. Although the AATAT sequence comprises the majority of the 4th chromosome heterochromatin, the B chromosomes lack most, if not all, 4th chromosome euchromatin. Presumably as a consequence of their heterochromatic content, these B chromosomes significantly modify position-effect variegation in two separate reporter systems, acting as enhancers of variegation in one case and suppressors in the other. The identification of B chromosomes in a genetically tractable organism like D. melanogaster will facilitate studies of chromosome evolution and the analysis of the mechanisms by which meiotic and mitotic processes cope with additional chromosomes. PMID:24478336

  11. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos.

    PubMed

    Prata, Guilherme N; Hornos, José Eduardo M; Ramos, Alexandre F

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ∼1% of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes. PMID:26986358

  12. Aging modulates cuticular hydrocarbons and sexual attractiveness in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tsung-Han; Yew, Joanne Y; Fedina, Tatyana Y; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Dierick, Herman A; Pletcher, Scott D

    2012-03-01

    Attractiveness is a major component of sexual selection that is dependent on sexual characteristics, such as pheromone production, which often reflect an individual's fitness and reproductive potential. Aging is a process that results in a steady decline in survival and reproductive output, yet little is known about its effect on specific aspects of attractiveness. In this report we asked how aging impacts pheromone production and sexual attractiveness in Drosophila melanogaster. Evidence suggests that key pheromones in Drosophila are produced as cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC), whose functions in attracting mates and influencing behavior have been widely studied. We employed gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry to show that the composition of D. melanogaster CHC is significantly affected by aging in both sexes and that these changes are robust to different genetic backgrounds. Aging affected the relative levels of many individual CHC, and it shifted overall hydrocarbon profiles to favor compounds with longer chain lengths. We also show that the observed aging-related changes in CHC profiles are responsible for a significant reduction in sexual attractiveness. These studies illuminate causal links among pheromones, aging and attractiveness and suggest that CHC production may be an honest indicator of animal health and fertility. PMID:22323204

  13. Aging modulates cuticular hydrocarbons and sexual attractiveness in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tsung-Han; Yew, Joanne Y.; Fedina, Tatyana Y.; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Dierick, Herman A.; Pletcher, Scott D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Attractiveness is a major component of sexual selection that is dependent on sexual characteristics, such as pheromone production, which often reflect an individual’s fitness and reproductive potential. Aging is a process that results in a steady decline in survival and reproductive output, yet little is known about its effect on specific aspects of attractiveness. In this report we asked how aging impacts pheromone production and sexual attractiveness in Drosophila melanogaster. Evidence suggests that key pheromones in Drosophila are produced as cuticular hydrocarbons (CHC), whose functions in attracting mates and influencing behavior have been widely studied. We employed gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry to show that the composition of D. melanogaster CHC is significantly affected by aging in both sexes and that these changes are robust to different genetic backgrounds. Aging affected the relative levels of many individual CHC, and it shifted overall hydrocarbon profiles to favor compounds with longer chain lengths. We also show that the observed aging-related changes in CHC profiles are responsible for a significant reduction in sexual attractiveness. These studies illuminate causal links among pheromones, aging and attractiveness and suggest that CHC production may be an honest indicator of animal health and fertility. PMID:22323204

  14. Desiccation stress induces developmental heterochrony in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Thorat, Leena; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Banerjee, Kaushik; Nath, Bimalendu B

    2016-09-01

    Stressful environments are known to perturb developmental patterns in insects. In the purview of desiccation as a stressor, relatively little is known about the developmental consequences linked with desiccation tolerance. In this study, we have particularly focused on the exploration of the temporal profile of postembryonic development in response to desiccation exposure in Drosophila melanogaster and the associated trade-offs. We document a correlation between variations in 20-hydroxyecdysone levels and the altered timing of metamorphic events during the life cycle. Following desiccation, we observed an extension in the larval longevity whereas the duration of the pupal and adult stages was significantly shortened. Alternately, feeding of 20-hydroxyecdysone apparently led to the restoration of the normal temporal pattern of development in the desiccated group. In spite of the desiccation-responsive heterochronic shifts in development, the overall lifespan post recovery remained almost unaltered among the desiccated and undesiccated groups suggesting plasticity in developmental control. This observation reminisces 'canalization-like' phenomenon that buffers alterations in the overall lifespan. We thus identified a desiccationresponsive period in the lifespan of D. melanogaster during which variations in ecdysone levels are capable to alter the temporal course of development. PMID:27581925

  15. Genetic architecture of natural variation in Drosophila melanogaster aggressive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, John; Couch, Charlene; Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Peiffer, Jason; Anholt, Robert R. H.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Aggression is an evolutionarily conserved complex behavior essential for survival and the organization of social hierarchies. With the exception of genetic variants associated with bioamine signaling, which have been implicated in aggression in many species, the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression is largely unknown. Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model system for exploring the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression. Here, we performed genome-wide association analyses using the inbred, sequenced lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and replicate advanced intercross populations derived from the most and least aggressive DGRP lines. We identified genes that have been previously implicated in aggressive behavior as well as many novel loci, including gustatory receptor 63a (Gr63a), which encodes a subunit of the receptor for CO2, and genes associated with development and function of the nervous system. Although genes from the two association analyses were largely nonoverlapping, they mapped onto a genetic interaction network inferred from an analysis of pairwise epistasis in the DGRP. We used mutations and RNAi knock-down alleles to functionally validate 79% of the candidate genes and 75% of the candidate epistatic interactions tested. Epistasis for aggressive behavior causes cryptic genetic variation in the DGRP that is revealed by changing allele frequencies in the outbred populations derived from extreme DGRP lines. This phenomenon may pertain to other fitness traits and species, with implications for evolution, applied breeding, and human genetics. PMID:26100892

  16. Sexual Experience Enhances Drosophila melanogaster Male Mating Behavior and Success

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Sehresh; Ruggles, Patrick H.; Abbott, Wiley K.; Carney, Ginger E.

    2014-01-01

    Competition for mates is a wide-spread phenomenon affecting individual reproductive success. The ability of animals to adjust their behaviors in response to changing social environment is important and well documented. Drosophila melanogaster males compete with one another for matings with females and modify their reproductive behaviors based on prior social interactions. However, it remains to be determined how male social experience that culminates in mating with a female impacts subsequent male reproductive behaviors and mating success. Here we show that sexual experience enhances future mating success. Previously mated D. melanogaster males adjust their courtship behaviors and out-compete sexually inexperienced males for copulations. Interestingly, courtship experience alone is not sufficient in providing this competitive advantage, indicating that copulation plays a role in reinforcing this social learning. We also show that females use their sense of hearing to preferentially mate with experienced males when given a choice. Our results demonstrate the ability of previously mated males to learn from their positive sexual experiences and adjust their behaviors to gain a mating advantage. These experienced-based changes in behavior reveal strategies that animals likely use to increase their fecundity in natural competitive environments. PMID:24805129

  17. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  18. DFak56 is a novel Drosophila melanogaster focal adhesion kinase.

    PubMed

    Palmer, R H; Fessler, L I; Edeen, P T; Madigan, S J; McKeown, M; Hunter, T

    1999-12-10

    The mammalian focal adhesion kinase (FAK) family of nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinases have been implicated in controlling a multitude of cellular responses to the engagement of cell surface integrins and G protein-coupled receptors. We describe here a Drosophila melanogaster FAK homologue, DFak56, which maps to band 56D on the right arm of the second chromosome. Full-length DFak56 cDNA encodes a phosphoprotein of 140 kDa, which shares strong sequence similarity not only with mammalian p125(FAK) but also with the more recently described mammalian Pyk2 (also known as CAKbeta, RAFTK, FAK2, and CADTK) FAK family member. DFak56 has intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and is phosphorylated on tyrosine in vivo. As is the case for FAK, tyrosine phosphorylation of DFak56 is increased upon plating Drosophila embryo cells on extracellular matrix proteins. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence staining analysis showed that DFak56 is ubiquitously expressed with particularly high levels within the developing central nervous system. We utilized the UAS-GAL4 expression system to express DFak56 and analyze its function in vivo. Overexpression of DFak56 in the wing imaginal disc results in wing blistering in adults, a phenotype also observed with both position-specific integrin loss of function and position-specific integrin overexpression. Our results imply a role for DFak56 in adhesion-dependent signaling pathways in vivo during D. melanogaster development. PMID:10585440

  19. Hygienic grooming is induced by contact chemicals in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Aya; Guigue, Alexandra M. A.; Marion-Poll, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    In social insects, grooming is considered as a behavioral defense against pathogen and parasite infections since it contributes to remove microbes from their cuticle. However, stimuli which trigger this behavior are not well characterized yet. We examined if activating contact chemoreceptive sensilla could trigger grooming activities in Drosophila melanogaster. We monitored the grooming responses of decapitated flies to compounds known to activate the immune system, e.g., dead Escherichia coli (Ec) and lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and to tastants such as quinine, sucrose, and salt. LPS, quinine, and Ec were quite effective in triggering grooming movements when touching the distal border of the wings and the legs, while sucrose had no effect. Contact chemoreceptors are necessary and sufficient to elicit such responses, as grooming could not be elicited by LPS in poxn mutants deprived of external taste sensilla, and as grooming was elicited by light when a channel rhodopsin receptor was expressed in bitter-sensitive cells expressing Gr33a. Contact chemoreceptors distributed along the distal border of the wings respond to these tastants by an increased spiking activity, in response to quinine, Ec, LPS, sucrose, and KCl. These results demonstrate for the first time that bacterial compounds trigger grooming activities in D. melanogaster, and indicate that contact chemoreceptors located on the wings participate in the detection of such chemicals. PMID:25100963

  20. Systematically Differentiating Functions for Alternatively Spliced Isoforms through Integrating RNA-seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rajasree; Wen, Yuchen; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Kretzler, Matthias; Guan, Yuanfang

    2013-01-01

    Integrating large-scale functional genomic data has significantly accelerated our understanding of gene functions. However, no algorithm has been developed to differentiate functions for isoforms of the same gene using high-throughput genomic data. This is because standard supervised learning requires ‘ground-truth’ functional annotations, which are lacking at the isoform level. To address this challenge, we developed a generic framework that interrogates public RNA-seq data at the transcript level to differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms. For a specific function, our algorithm identifies the ‘responsible’ isoform(s) of a gene and generates classifying models at the isoform level instead of at the gene level. Through cross-validation, we demonstrated that our algorithm is effective in assigning functions to genes, especially the ones with multiple isoforms, and robust to gene expression levels and removal of homologous gene pairs. We identified genes in the mouse whose isoforms are predicted to have disparate functionalities and experimentally validated the ‘responsible’ isoforms using data from mammary tissue. With protein structure modeling and experimental evidence, we further validated the predicted isoform functional differences for the genes Cdkn2a and Anxa6. Our generic framework is the first to predict and differentiate functions for alternatively spliced isoforms, instead of genes, using genomic data. It is extendable to any base machine learner and other species with alternatively spliced isoforms, and shifts the current gene-centered function prediction to isoform-level predictions. PMID:24244129

  1. Role of p53 isoforms and aggregations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, SeJin; An, Seong Soo A

    2016-06-01

    p53 is a master regulatory protein that is involved in diverse cellular metabolic processes such as apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest. The protective function of p53 (in its homotetrameric form) as a tumor suppressor is lost in more than 50% of human cancers.Despite considerable experimental evidence suggesting the presence of multiple p53 states, it has been difficult to correlate the status of p53 with cancer response to treatments and clinical outcomes, which suggest the importance of complex but essential p53 regulatory pathways.Recent studies have indicated that the expression pattern of p53 isoforms may play a crucial role in regulating normal and cancer cell fates in response to diverse stresses. The human TP53 gene encodes at least 12 p53 isoforms, which are produced in normal tissue through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. Furthermore, some researchers have suggested that the formation of mutant p53 aggregates may be associated with cancer pathogenesis due to loss-of function (LoF), dominant-negative (DN), and gain-of function (GoF) effects.As different isoforms or the aggregation state of p53 may influence tumorigenesis, this review aims to examine the correlation of p53 isoforms and aggregation with cancer. PMID:27368003

  2. Antagonistic functions of LMNA isoforms in energy expenditure and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C; de Toledo, Marion; Chavey, Carine; Lapasset, Laure; Cavelier, Patricia; Lopez-Herrera, Celia; Chebli, Karim; Fort, Philippe; Beranger, Guillaume; Fajas, Lluis; Amri, Ez Z; Casas, Francois; Tazi, Jamal

    2014-05-01

    Alternative RNA processing of LMNA pre-mRNA produces three main protein isoforms, that is, lamin A, progerin, and lamin C. De novo mutations that favor the expression of progerin over lamin A lead to Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), providing support for the involvement of LMNA processing in pathological aging. Lamin C expression is mutually exclusive with the splicing of lamin A and progerin isoforms and occurs by alternative polyadenylation. Here, we investigate the function of lamin C in aging and metabolism using mice that express only this isoform. Intriguingly, these mice live longer, have decreased energy metabolism, increased weight gain, and reduced respiration. In contrast, progerin-expressing mice show increased energy metabolism and are lipodystrophic. Increased mitochondrial biogenesis is found in adipose tissue from HGPS-like mice, whereas lamin C-only mice have fewer mitochondria. Consistently, transcriptome analyses of adipose tissues from HGPS and lamin C-only mice reveal inversely correlated expression of key regulators of energy expenditure, including Pgc1a and Sfrp5. Our results demonstrate that LMNA encodes functionally distinct isoforms that have opposing effects on energy metabolism and lifespan in mammals. PMID:24639560

  3. Distinct Functions of Endophilin Isoforms in Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jifeng; Tan, Minghui; Yin, Yichen; Ren, Bingyu; Jiang, Nannan; Guo, Guoqing; Chen, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Endophilin isoforms perform distinct characteristics in their interactions with N-type Ca2+ channels and dynamin. However, precise functional differences for the endophilin isoforms on synaptic vesicle (SV) endocytosis remain unknown. By coupling RNA interference and electrophysiological recording techniques in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, we investigated the functional differences of three isoforms of endophilin in SV endocytosis. The results showed that the amplitude of normalized evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents in endophilin1 knockdown neurons decreased significantly for both single train and multiple train stimulations. Similar results were found using endophilin2 knockdown neurons, whereas endophilin3 siRNA exhibited no change compared with control neurons. Endophilin1 and endophilin2 affected SV endocytosis, but the effect of endophilin1 and endophilin2 double knockdown was not different from that of either knockdown alone. This result suggested that endophilin1 and endophilin2 functioned together but not independently during SV endocytosis. Taken together, our results indicate that SV endocytosis is sustained by endophilin1 and endophilin2 isoforms, but not by endophilin3, in primary cultured hippocampal neurons. PMID:26682072

  4. Characterization of multiple nestin isoforms in the goldfish brain.

    PubMed

    Venables, Maddie J; Navarro-Martín, Laia; Basak, Ajoy; Baum, Bernard R; Zhang, Dapeng; Trudeau, Vance L

    2016-09-01

    Nestin is an intermediate filament protein involved in neurogenesis in fish, mice, and humans. In this study we used rapid amplification of cDNA ends PCR to isolate goldfish nestin (nes). PCR analysis and sequencing revealed three different nes transcripts of 4003, 2446, and 2126 nucleotides, which are predicted to generate proteins of 860, 274, and 344 amino acids in length. Sequence analysis suggests that these nes transcripts are likely a result of alternative splicing. We next applied a multiple-antigenic peptide strategy to generate a goldfish-specific nestin antibody. Western blotting with this antibody together with mass spectrometry verified the presence of major nestin protein isoforms with differing molecular weights (~70, 40 and 30kDa). We further examined expression patterns of these nestin protein isoforms in different parts of the goldfish brain and pituitary and found the telencephalon to express all three isoforms at a distinct level and abundance. We report that multiple nestin isoforms are present indicating another level of complexity for the regulation of intermediate filaments in comparison to mammals. Studying the differential roles and regulation of these nestins could lead to a better understanding of cellular remodeling during neurogenesis and the unparalleled regenerative abilities after damage in the teleost CNS. PMID:27254106

  5. Alternative splicing results in RET isoforms with distinct trafficking properties

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Douglas S.; Rodrigues, David M.; Hyndman, Brandy D.; Crupi, Mathieu J. F.; Nicolescu, Adrian C.; Mulligan, Lois M.

    2012-01-01

    RET encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase that is essential for spermatogenesis, development of the sensory, sympathetic, parasympathetic, and enteric nervous systems and the kidneys, as well as for maintenance of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. RET is alternatively spliced to encode multiple isoforms that differ in their C-terminal amino acids. The RET9 and RET51 isoforms display unique levels of autophosphorylation and have differential interactions with adaptor proteins. They induce distinct gene expression patterns, promote different levels of cell differentiation and transformation, and play unique roles in development. Here we present a comprehensive study of the subcellular localization and trafficking of RET isoforms. We show that immature RET9 accumulates intracellularly in the Golgi, whereas RET51 is efficiently matured and present in relatively higher amounts on the plasma membrane. RET51 is internalized faster after ligand binding and undergoes recycling back to the plasma membrane. This differential trafficking of RET isoforms produces a more rapid and longer duration of signaling through the extracellular-signal regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway downstream of RET51 relative to RET9. Together these differences in trafficking properties contribute to some of the functional differences previously observed between RET9 and RET51 and establish the important role of intracellular trafficking in modulating and maintaining RET signaling. PMID:22875993

  6. Differential isoform expression and selective muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Huovinen, Sanna; Penttilä, Sini; Somervuo, Panu; Keto, Joni; Auvinen, Petri; Vihola, Anna; Huovinen, Sami; Pelin, Katarina; Raheem, Olayinka; Salenius, Juha; Suominen, Tiina; Hackman, Peter; Udd, Bjarne

    2015-10-01

    Despite the expression of the mutated gene in all muscles, selective muscles are involved in genetic muscular dystrophies. Different muscular dystrophies show characteristic patterns of fatty degenerative changes by muscle imaging, even to the extent that the patterns have been used for diagnostic purposes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms explaining the selective involvement of muscles are not known. To test the hypothesis that different muscles may express variable amounts of different isoforms of muscle genes, we applied a custom-designed exon microarray containing probes for 57 muscle-specific genes to assay the transcriptional profiles in sets of human adult lower limb skeletal muscles. Quantitative real-time PCR and whole transcriptome sequencing were used to further analyze the results. Our results demonstrate significant variations in isoform and gene expression levels in anatomically different muscles. Comparison of the known patterns of selective involvement of certain muscles in two autosomal dominant titinopathies and one autosomal dominant myosinopathy, with the isoform and gene expression results, shows a correlation between the specific muscles involved and significant differences in the level of expression of the affected gene and exons in these same muscles compared with some other selected muscles. Our results suggest that differential expression levels of muscle genes and isoforms are one determinant in the selectivity of muscle involvement in muscular dystrophies. PMID:26269091

  7. Role of p53 isoforms and aggregations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, SeJin; An, Seong Soo A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract p53 is a master regulatory protein that is involved in diverse cellular metabolic processes such as apoptosis, DNA repair, and cell cycle arrest. The protective function of p53 (in its homotetrameric form) as a tumor suppressor is lost in more than 50% of human cancers. Despite considerable experimental evidence suggesting the presence of multiple p53 states, it has been difficult to correlate the status of p53 with cancer response to treatments and clinical outcomes, which suggest the importance of complex but essential p53 regulatory pathways. Recent studies have indicated that the expression pattern of p53 isoforms may play a crucial role in regulating normal and cancer cell fates in response to diverse stresses. The human TP53 gene encodes at least 12 p53 isoforms, which are produced in normal tissue through alternative initiation of translation, usage of alternative promoters, and alternative splicing. Furthermore, some researchers have suggested that the formation of mutant p53 aggregates may be associated with cancer pathogenesis due to loss-of function (LoF), dominant-negative (DN), and gain-of function (GoF) effects. As different isoforms or the aggregation state of p53 may influence tumorigenesis, this review aims to examine the correlation of p53 isoforms and aggregation with cancer. PMID:27368003

  8. Tropomyosin-binding properties modulate competition between tropomodulin isoforms.

    PubMed

    Colpan, Mert; Moroz, Natalia A; Gray, Kevin T; Cooper, Dillon A; Diaz, Christian A; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-06-15

    The formation and fine-tuning of cytoskeleton in cells are governed by proteins that influence actin filament dynamics. Tropomodulin (Tmod) regulates the length of actin filaments by capping the pointed ends in a tropomyosin (TM)-dependent manner. Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 are associated with the cytoskeleton of non-muscle cells and their expression has distinct consequences on cell morphology. To understand the molecular basis of differences in the function and localization of Tmod isoforms in a cell, we compared the actin filament-binding abilities of Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 in the presence of Tpm3.1, a non-muscle TM isoform. Tmod3 displayed preferential binding to actin filaments when competing with other isoforms. Mutating the second or both TM-binding sites of Tmod3 destroyed its preferential binding. Our findings clarify how Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 compete for binding actin filaments. Different binding mechanisms and strengths of Tmod isoforms for Tpm3.1 contribute to their divergent functional capabilities. PMID:27091317

  9. Regulatory Divergence of Transcript Isoforms in a Mammalian Model System

    PubMed Central

    Thybert, David; Stefflova, Klara; Watt, Stephen; Flicek, Paul; Brazma, Alvis; Marioni, John C.; Odom, Duncan T.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic differences between species are driven by changes in gene expression and, by extension, by modifications in the regulation of the transcriptome. Investigation of mammalian transcriptome divergence has been restricted to analysis of bulk gene expression levels and gene-internal splicing. Using allele-specific expression analysis in inter-strain hybrids of Mus musculus, we determined the contribution of multiple cellular regulatory systems to transcriptome divergence, including: alternative promoter usage, transcription start site selection, cassette exon usage, alternative last exon usage, and alternative polyadenylation site choice. Between mouse strains, a fifth of genes have variations in isoform usage that contribute to transcriptomic changes, half of which alter encoded amino acid sequence. Virtually all divergence in isoform usage altered the post-transcriptional regulatory instructions in gene UTRs. Furthermore, most genes with isoform differences between strains contain changes originating from multiple regulatory systems. This result indicates widespread cross-talk and coordination exists among different regulatory systems. Overall, isoform usage diverges in parallel with and independently to gene expression evolution, and the cis and trans regulatory contribution to each differs significantly. PMID:26339903

  10. Arabidopsis UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase: evidence for two isoforms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arabidopsis UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase (AtUSP, EC 2.7.7.64) is a broad substrate pyrophosphorylase that exhibits activity with GlcA-1-P, Gal-1-P, and Glc-1-P. Immunoblots using polyclonal antibodies raised to recombinant AtUSP demonstrated the presence of two USP isoforms of approximately 70 kDa (U...

  11. APPRIS: annotation of principal and alternative splice isoforms.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jose Manuel; Maietta, Paolo; Ezkurdia, Iakes; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Lopez, Gonzalo; Valencia, Alfonso; Tress, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present APPRIS (http://appris.bioinfo.cnio.es), a database that houses annotations of human splice isoforms. APPRIS has been designed to provide value to manual annotations of the human genome by adding reliable protein structural and functional data and information from cross-species conservation. The visual representation of the annotations provided by APPRIS for each gene allows annotators and researchers alike to easily identify functional changes brought about by splicing events. In addition to collecting, integrating and analyzing reliable predictions of the effect of splicing events, APPRIS also selects a single reference sequence for each gene, here termed the principal isoform, based on the annotations of structure, function and conservation for each transcript. APPRIS identifies a principal isoform for 85% of the protein-coding genes in the GENCODE 7 release for ENSEMBL. Analysis of the APPRIS data shows that at least 70% of the alternative (non-principal) variants would lose important functional or structural information relative to the principal isoform. PMID:23161672

  12. Cell, Isoform, and Environment Factors Shape Gradients and Modulate Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S. Laura; Cavnar, Stephen P.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine gradient formation requires multiple processes that include ligand secretion and diffusion, receptor binding and internalization, and immobilization of ligand to surfaces. To understand how these events dynamically shape gradients and influence ensuing cell chemotaxis, we built a multi-scale hybrid agent-based model linking gradient formation, cell responses, and receptor-level information. The CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 signaling axis is highly implicated in metastasis of many cancers. We model CXCL12 gradient formation as it is impacted by CXCR4 and CXCR7, with particular focus on the three most highly expressed isoforms of CXCL12. We trained and validated our model using data from an in vitro microfluidic source-sink device. Our simulations demonstrate how isoform differences on the molecular level affect gradient formation and cell responses. We determine that ligand properties specific to CXCL12 isoforms (binding to the migration surface and to CXCR4) significantly impact migration and explain differences in in vitro chemotaxis data. We extend our model to analyze CXCL12 gradient formation in a tumor environment and find that short distance, steep gradients characteristic of the CXCL12-γ isoform are effective at driving chemotaxis. We highlight the importance of CXCL12-γ in cancer cell migration: its high effective affinity for both extracellular surface sites and CXCR4 strongly promote CXCR4+ cell migration. CXCL12-γ is also more difficult to inhibit, and we predict that co-inhibition of CXCR4 and CXCR7 is necessary to effectively hinder CXCL12-γ-induced migration. These findings support the growing importance of understanding differences in protein isoforms, and in particular their implications for cancer treatment. PMID:25909600

  13. Drosophila melanogaster larvae make nutritional choices that minimize developmental time.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Marisa A; Martins, Nelson E; Balancé, Lara F; Broom, Lara N; Dias, António J S; Fernandes, Ana Sofia D; Rodrigues, Fábio; Sucena, Élio; Mirth, Christen K

    2015-10-01

    Organisms from slime moulds to humans carefully regulate their macronutrient intake to optimize a wide range of life history characters including survival, stress resistance, and reproductive success. However, life history characters often differ in their response to nutrition, forcing organisms to make foraging decisions while balancing the trade-offs between these effects. To date, we have a limited understanding of how the nutritional environment shapes the relationship between life history characters and foraging decisions. To gain insight into the problem, we used a geometric framework for nutrition to assess how the protein and carbohydrate content of the larval diet affected key life history traits in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In no-choice assays, survival from egg to pupae, female and male body size, and ovariole number - a proxy for female fecundity - were maximized at the highest protein to carbohydrate (P:C) ratio (1.5:1). In contrast, development time was minimized at intermediate P:C ratios, around 1:2. Next, we subjected larvae to two-choice tests to determine how they regulated their protein and carbohydrate intake in relation to these life history traits. Our results show that larvae targeted their consumption to P:C ratios that minimized development time. Finally, we examined whether adult females also chose to lay their eggs in the P:C ratios that minimized developmental time. Using a three-choice assay, we found that adult females preferentially laid their eggs in food P:C ratios that were suboptimal for all larval life history traits. Our results demonstrate that D. melanogaster larvae make foraging decisions that trade-off developmental time with body size, ovariole number, and survival. In addition, adult females make oviposition decisions that do not appear to benefit the larvae. We propose that these decisions may reflect the living nature of the larval nutritional environment in rotting fruit. These studies illustrate the

  14. SUGARBEET ROOT SUCROSE SYNTHASE ISOFORMS DIFFER IN DEVELOPMENTAL EXPRESSION, SUBUNIT COMPOSITION AND RESPONSE TO PH.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two sucrose synthase isoforms have been identified by activity stained isoelectric focused polyacrylamide electrophoresis in developing sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) root. Sucrose synthase isoform I (SuSyI) was present from the early stages of development to maturity. Sucrose synthase isoform II (S...

  15. The Three Maize Sucrose synthase Isoforms Differ in Distribution, Localization, and Phosphorylation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although sucrose synthase (SUS) is widely appreciated for its role in plant metabolism and growth, very little is known about the contribution of each of the SUS isoforms to these processes. Using isoform-specific antibodies, we evaluated the three known isoforms individually at the protein level. ...

  16. Genetic variations of 14-3-3E1 isoform in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The highly conserved family of 14-3-3 proteins functions in the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. The presence of 14-3-3 isoforms and the diversity of cellular processes regulated by 14-3-3 isoforms suggest functional specificity of the isoforms. Several studies have observed diffe...

  17. N Termini of apPDE4 Isoforms Are Responsible for Targeting the Isoforms to Different Cellular Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Park, Soo-Won; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Changhoon; Chae, Yeon-Su; Park, Hyungju; Kim, Min-Jeong; Choi, Sun-Lim; Lee, Nuribalhae; Kim, Hyoung; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2010-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are known to play a key role in the compartmentalization of cAMP signaling; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying intracellular localization of different PDE isoforms are not understood. In this study, we have found that each of the supershort, short, and long forms of apPDE4 showed distinct localization in the…

  18. Can Drosophila melanogaster represent a model system for the detection of reproductive adverse drug reactions?

    PubMed

    Avanesian, Agnesa; Semnani, Sahar; Jafari, Mahtab

    2009-08-01

    Once a molecule is identified as a potential drug, the detection of adverse drug reactions is one of the key components of its development and the FDA approval process. We propose using Drosophila melanogaster to screen for reproductive adverse drug reactions in the early stages of drug development. Compared with other non-mammalian models, D. melanogaster has many similarities to the mammalian reproductive system, including putative sex hormones and conserved proteins involved in genitourinary development. Furthermore, the D. melanogaster model would present significant advantages in time efficiency and cost-effectiveness compared with mammalian models. We present data on methotrexate (MTX) reproductive adverse events in multiple animal models, including fruit flies, as proof-of-concept for the use of the D. melanogaster model. PMID:19482095

  19. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Stefanie L.; Seggio, Joseph A.; Hicks, Jasmin A.; Sharp, Katherine A.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.; Wang, Kevin C.

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  20. The Phenotypic Effects of Royal Jelly on Wild-Type D. melanogaster Are Strain-Specific.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Stefanie L; Seggio, Joseph A; Nascimento, Nara F; Huh, Dana D; Hicks, Jasmin A; Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D; Wang, Kevin C

    2016-01-01

    The role for royal jelly (RJ) in promoting caste differentiation of honeybee larvae into queens rather than workers is well characterized. A recent study demonstrated that this poorly understood complex nutrition drives strikingly similar phenotypic effects in Drosophila melanogaster, such as increased body size and reduced developmental time, making possible the use of D. melanogaster as a model system for the genetic analysis of the cellular mechanisms underlying RJ and caste differentiation. We demonstrate here that RJ increases the body size of some wild-type strains of D. melanogaster but not others, and report significant delays in developmental time in all flies reared on RJ. These findings suggest that cryptic genetic variation may be a factor in the D. melanogaster response to RJ, and should be considered when attempting to elucidate response mechanisms to environmental changes in non-honeybee species. PMID:27486863

  1. Drosophila melanogaster as a model for basal body research.

    PubMed

    Jana, Swadhin Chandra; Bettencourt-Dias, Mónica; Durand, Bénédicte; Megraw, Timothy L

    2016-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is one of the most extensively studied organisms in biological research and has centrioles/basal bodies and cilia that can be modelled to investigate their functions in animals generally. Centrioles are nine-fold symmetrical microtubule-based cylindrical structures required to form centrosomes and also to nucleate the formation of cilia and flagella. When they function to template cilia, centrioles transition into basal bodies. The fruit fly has various types of basal bodies and cilia, which are needed for sensory neuron and sperm function. Genetics, cell biology and behaviour studies in the fruit fly have unveiled new basal body components and revealed different modes of assembly and functions of basal bodies that are conserved in many other organisms, including human, green algae and plasmodium. Here we describe the various basal bodies of Drosophila, what is known about their composition, structure and function. PMID:27382461

  2. Recombinagenic and mutagenic activities of fluoroquinolones in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Thomé, Simone; Bizarro, Cassiane Rosa; Lehmann, Mauricio; de Abreu, Bianca Regina Ribas; de Andrade, Heloisa Helena Rodrigues; Cunha, Kênya Silva; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2012-02-18

    Fluoroquinolones are widely used in human and in veterinary medicine due to their broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. They act by inhibiting type II DNA topoisomerases (gyrase and topoisomerase IV). Because of the sequence homology between prokaryotic and eukaryotic topoisomerases II, fluoroquinolones can pose a hazard to eukaryotic cells. However, published information concerning the genotoxic profiles of these drugs in vivo is sparse and inconsistent. We have assessed the activities of three fluoroquinolones, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and norfloxacin, in the Drosophila melanogaster Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test (SMART) and measured their mutagenic and recombinagenic potentials. Norfloxacin was non-genotoxic. Ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin induced significant increases in spot frequencies in trans-heterozygous flies. To test the roles of somatic recombination and mutation in the observed genotoxicity, balancer-heterozygous flies were also analyzed. Ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin were preferential inducers of homologous recombination in proliferative cells, an event linked to loss of heterozygosity. PMID:22142834

  3. Frequency-dependent viability in mutant strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Curtsinger, J W; Sheen, F M

    1991-01-01

    We investigated the effects of genotypic frequencies on egg-to-adult viabilities in pairwise combinations of four strains of Drosophila melanogaster. The experiments involved mixture of a total of 42,000 eggs in varying proportions under controlled densities and observation of surviving adults. Viabilities were found to depend on frequencies in several genotypic combinations. In the most extreme case, the absolute viability of cn;bw females increased monotonically from 54% when common to 70% when rare. The results illustrate several statistical and methodological problems that might explain why some experiments have failed to detect frequency-dependent viabilities. These problems include heterogeneity between replications, sex differences in susceptibility to competition, and strong dependence of the experimental outcome on the choice of competitor genotypes. PMID:1901577

  4. Genetic variation for total fitness in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, K; Semple, C; Barton, N H; Partridge, L

    1997-01-01

    We measured the heterozygous effects on net fitness of a sample of 12 wild-type third chromosomes in D. melanogaster. Effects on fitness were assessed by competing the wild-type chromosomes against balancer chromosomes, to prevent the production of recombinants. The measurements were carried out in the population cage environment in which the life history had been evolving, in an undisturbed population with overlapping generations, and replicated measurements were made on each chromosome to control for confounding effects such as mutation accumulation. We found significant variation among the wild type chromosomes in their additive genetic effect on net fitness. The system provides an opportunity to obtain an accurate estimate of the distribution of heterozygous effects on net fitness, the contribution of different fitness components including male mating success, and the role of intra-chromosomal epistasis in fitness variation. PMID:9061969

  5. Drosophila melanogaster: a fly through its history and current use.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, R; Metcalfe, N H

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster, the common fruit fly, has been used as a model organism in both medical and scientific research for over a century. Work by Thomas Hunt Morgan (1866-1945) and his students at Columbia University at the beginning of the twentieth century led to great discoveries such as sex-linked inheritance and that ionising radiation causes mutations in genes. However, the use of Drosophila was not limited to genetic research. Experimentation with this model organism has also led to discoveries in neuroscience and neurodevelopment, including the basis of circadian rhythms. Its complex nervous system, conserved neurological function, and human disease-related loci allow Drosophila to be an ideal model organism for the study of neurodegenerative disease, for which it is used today, aiding research into diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, which are becoming more prevalent in today's ageing population. PMID:23516695

  6. Frequent Replenishment Sustains the Beneficial Microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Blum, Jessamina E.; Fischer, Caleb N.; Miles, Jessica; Handelsman, Jo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We report that establishment and maintenance of the Drosophila melanogaster microbiome depend on ingestion of bacteria. Frequent transfer of flies to sterile food prevented establishment of the microbiome in newly emerged flies and reduced the predominant members, Acetobacter and Lactobacillus spp., by 10- to 1,000-fold in older flies. Flies with a normal microbiome were less susceptible than germfree flies to infection by Serratia marcescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Augmentation of the normal microbiome with higher populations of Lactobacillus plantarum, a Drosophila commensal and probiotic used in humans, further protected the fly from infection. Replenishment represents an unexplored strategy by which animals can sustain a gut microbial community. Moreover, the population behavior and health benefits of L. plantarum resemble features of certain probiotic bacteria administered to humans. As such, L. plantarum in the fly gut may serve as a simple model for dissecting the population dynamics and mode of action of probiotics in animal hosts. PMID:24194543

  7. Systemic Bacterial Infection and Immune Defense Phenotypes in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Sarah; Jacobson, Eliana; Chambers, Moria C.; Lazzaro, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the premier model organisms for studying the function and evolution of immune defense. Many aspects of innate immunity are conserved between insects and mammals, and since Drosophila can readily be genetically and experimentally manipulated, they are powerful for studying immune system function and the physiological consequences of disease. The procedure demonstrated here allows infection of flies by introduction of bacteria directly into the body cavity, bypassing epithelial barriers and more passive forms of defense and allowing focus on systemic infection. The procedure includes protocols for the measuring rates of host mortality, systemic pathogen load, and degree of induction of the host immune system. This infection procedure is inexpensive, robust and quantitatively repeatable, and can be used in studies of functional genetics, evolutionary life history, and physiology. PMID:25992475

  8. Drosophila melanogaster as a Model Organism of Brain Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jeibmann, Astrid; Paulus, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been utilized to model human brain diseases. In most of these invertebrate transgenic models, some aspects of human disease are reproduced. Although investigation of rodent models has been of significant impact, invertebrate models offer a wide variety of experimental tools that can potentially address some of the outstanding questions underlying neurological disease. This review considers what has been gleaned from invertebrate models of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, metabolic diseases such as Leigh disease, Niemann-Pick disease and ceroid lipofuscinoses, tumor syndromes such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy as well as CNS injury. It is to be expected that genetic tools in Drosophila will reveal new pathways and interactions, which hopefully will result in molecular based therapy approaches. PMID:19333415

  9. A kinetic analysis of Drosophila melanogaster dopa decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Black, B C; Smarrelli, J

    1986-03-01

    The kinetic mechanism of dopa decarboxylase (3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.28) was investigated in Drosophila melanogaster. Based on initial velocity and product inhibition studies, an ordered reaction is proposed for dopa decarboxylase. This kinetic mechanism is interpreted in the context of measured enzyme activities and the catecholamine pools in Drosophila. The 1(2)amd gene is immediately adjacent to the gene coding for dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) and determines hypersensitivity to alpha-methyldopa in Drosophila. Dopa decarboxylase does not decarboxylate alpha-methyldopa and hence does not generate a toxic product capable of inhibiting 1(2)amd gene function. We propose that the 1(2)amd gene is involved with an unknown catecholamine pathway involving dopa but not dopamine. PMID:3081033

  10. Integrative neuromechanics of crawling in D. melanogaster larvae

    PubMed Central

    Pehlevan, Cengiz; Paoletti, Paolo; Mahadevan, L

    2016-01-01

    Locomotion in an organism is a consequence of the coupled interaction between brain, body and environment. Motivated by qualitative observations and quantitative perturbations of crawling in Drosophila melanogaster larvae, we construct a minimal integrative mathematical model for its locomotion. Our model couples the excitation-inhibition circuits in the nervous system to force production in the muscles and body movement in a frictional environment, thence linking neural dynamics to body mechanics via sensory feedback in a heterogeneous environment. Our results explain the basic observed phenomenology of crawling with and without proprioception, and elucidate the stabilizing role that proprioception plays in producing a robust crawling phenotype in the presence of biological perturbations. More generally, our approach allows us to make testable predictions on the effect of changing body-environment interactions on crawling, and serves as a step in the development of hierarchical models linking cellular processes to behavior. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11031.001

  11. Addition of molecular methods to mutation studies with Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.R. )

    1989-01-01

    For 80 years, Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a major tool in analyzing Mendelian genetics. By using chromosome inversions that suppress crossing over, geneticists have developed a large number of stocks for mutation analysis. These stocks permit numerous tests for specific locus mutations, lethals at multiple loci on any chromosome, chromosome exchanges, insertions, and deletions. The entire genome can be manipulated for a degree of genetic control not found in other germ-line systems. Recombinant DNA techniques now permit analysis of mutations to the nucleotide level. By combining classical genetic analysis with recombinant DNA techniques, it is possible to analyze mutations that range from chromosome aberrations and multilocus deficiencies to single nucleotide transitions.

  12. Genomic and structural organization of Drosophila melanogaster G elements.

    PubMed Central

    Di Nocera, P P; Graziani, F; Lavorgna, G

    1986-01-01

    The properties and the genomic organization of G elements, a moderately repeated DNA family of D. melanogaster, are reported. G elements lack terminal repeats, generate target site duplications at the point of insertion and exhibit at one end a stretch of A residues of variable length. In a large number of recombinant clones analyzed G elements occur in tandem arrays, interspersed with specific ribosomal DNA (rDNA) segments. This arrangement results from the insertion of members of the G family within the nontranscribed spacer (NTS) of rDNA units. Similarity of the site of integration of G elements to that of ribosomal DNA insertions suggests that distinct DNA sequences might have been inserted into rDNA through a partly common pathway. Images PMID:3003691

  13. A misexpression study examining dorsal thorax formation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Peña-Rangel, María Teresa; Rodriguez, Isabel; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan Rafael

    2002-01-01

    We studied thorax formation in Drosophila melanogaster using a misexpression screen with EP lines and thoracic Gal4 drivers that provide a genetically sensitized background. We identified 191 interacting lines showing alterations of thoracic bristles (number and/or location), thorax and scutellum malformations, lethality, or suppression of the thoracic phenotype used in the screen. We analyzed these lines and showed that known genes with different functional roles (selector, prepattern, proneural, cell cycle regulation, lineage restriction, signaling pathways, transcriptional control, and chromatin organization) are among the modifier lines. A few lines have previously been identified in thorax formation, but others, such as chromatin-remodeling complex genes, are novel. However, most of the interacting loci are uncharacterized, providing a wealth of new genetic data. We also describe one such novel line, poco pelo (ppo), where both misexpression and loss-of-function phenotypes are similar: loss of bristles and scutellum malformation. PMID:11901120

  14. Oligonucleotide-directed site-specific mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Banga, S S; Boyd, J B

    1992-01-01

    An efficient technique has been developed for performing in vivo site-directed mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. This procedure involves directed repair of P-element-induced DNA lesions after injection of a modified DNA sequence into early embryos. An oligonucleotide of 50 base pairs, whose sequence spans the P-element insertion site, mediates base replacement in the endogenous gene. Restriction mapping, DNA sequencing, and polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrate that base substitutions present in an injected oligonucleotide are incorporated into genomic sequences flanking a P insertion site in the white gene. This analysis suggests that progeny bearing directed mutations are recovered with a frequency of about 0.5 x 10(-3). Because Drosophila remains a premier organism for the analysis of eukaryotic gene regulation, this system should find strong application in that analysis as well as in the analysis of DNA recombination, conversion, repair, and mutagenesis. Images PMID:1311850

  15. In vivo super-resolution RESOLFT microscopy of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Schnorrenberg, Sebastian; Grotjohann, Tim; Vorbrüggen, Gerd; Herzig, Alf; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in diffraction unlimited super-resolution microscopy, in vivo nanoscopy of tissues and model organisms is still not satisfactorily established and rarely realized. RESOLFT nanoscopy is particularly suited for live cell imaging because it requires relatively low light levels to overcome the diffraction barrier. Previously, we introduced the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2, which facilitated fast RESOLFT nanoscopy (Grotjohann et al., 2012). In that study, as in most other nanoscopy studies, only cultivated single cells were analyzed. Here, we report on the use of rsEGFP2 for live-cell RESOLFT nanoscopy of sub-cellular structures of intact Drosophila melanogaster larvae and of resected tissues. We generated flies expressing fusion proteins of alpha-tubulin and rsEGFP2 highlighting the microtubule cytoskeleton in all cells. By focusing through the intact larval cuticle, we achieved lateral resolution of. PMID:27355614

  16. A pulsed magnetic stress applied to Drosophila melanogaster flies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Side, D.; Bozzetti, M. P.; Friscini, A.; Giuffreda, E.; Nassisi, V.; Specchia, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-04-01

    We report the development of a system to feed pulsed magnetic stress to biological samples. The device is based on a RLC circuit that transforms the energy stored in a high voltage capacitor into a magnetic field inside a coil. The field has been characterized and we found that charging the capacitor with 24 kV results in a peak field of 0.4 T. In order to test its effect, we applied such a stress to the Drosophila melanogaster model and we examined its bio-effects. We analysed, in the germ cells, the effects on the control of specific DNA repetitive sequences that are activated after different environmental stresses. The deregulation of these sequences causes genomic instability and chromosomes breaks leading to sterility. The magnetic field treatment did not produce effects on repetitive sequences in the germ cells of Drosophila. Hence, this field doesn't produce deleterious effects linked to repetitive sequences derepression.

  17. Genetic control of cadmium tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Maroni, G.; Ann-Shu Ho; Theodore, L.

    1995-12-01

    Flies from a transgenic line of Drosophila melanogaster with two copies of the metallothionein allele Mtn{sup 3} were more tolerant to cadmium than strains with only one copy of the gene. However, flies with the Mtn{sup 3} allele were as tolerant as flies with the Mtn{sup 1} allele, despite the level of expression of Mtn{sup {minus}3} allele were as tolerant as flies with the Mtn{sup 1} allele, despite the level of expression of Mtn{sup 1} being three times higher than that of Mtn{sup {minus}3}. We propose that the substitution of Lys-40 (in Mtn{sup 3}) for Glu-40 (in Mtn{sup 1}) accounts for a reduction in binding affinity of Mtn{sup 1}, which offsets the increased expression levels. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Ontogeny of Drosophila melanogaster in a system of dysgenic crosses

    SciTech Connect

    Grishaeva, T.M.; Ivashchenko, N.I.

    1995-09-01

    Three families of mobile elements that induce P-M, H-E, and I-R hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster were activated by crossing flies of different cytotypes. Manifestation of gonadal sterility in F{sub 1} hybrid progeny was dependent on the temperature of development. The systems differed significantly in lethality of F{sub 2} hybrids at various stages of ontogeny (embyros, larvae, pupae, and adult flies). The highest embryo lethality was found in the P-M system at the cleavage stage. In the I-R and H-E systems, the peak of embryonic death corresponded to the stages of blastoderm and organogenesis, respectively. Experimental results are discussed in view of molecular and cytological characteristics of interacting strains and existing hypotheses for regulation of transposition of P, hobo, and I mobile elements. 44 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Permutation Entropy Applied to Movement Behaviors of Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuedan; Chon, Tae-Soo; Baek, Hunki; Do, Younghae; Choi, Jin Hee; Chung, Yun Doo

    Movement of different strains in Drosophila melanogaster was continuously observed by using computer interfacing techniques and was analyzed by permutation entropy (PE) after exposure to toxic chemicals, toluene (0.1 mg/m3) and formaldehyde (0.01 mg/m3). The PE values based on one-dimensional time series position (vertical) data were variable according to internal constraint (i.e. strains) and accordingly increased in response to external constraint (i.e. chemicals) by reflecting diversity in movement patterns from both normal and intoxicated states. Cross-correlation function revealed temporal associations between the PE values and between the component movement patterns in different chemicals and strains through the period of intoxication. The entropy based on the order of position data could be a useful means for complexity measure in behavioral changes and for monitoring the impact of stressors in environment.

  20. Genotoxic effects of cisplatin in somatic tissue of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transdihybrid for mwh and flr were exposed to varying concentrations of cisplatin by feeding on dry media wetted with aqueous solutions of the test compound. Larval feeding continued until pupation, and surviving transdihybrid adults were collected seven days following commencement of feeding. Wings of adults were removed and scored under 400X magnification for the presence of twin spots and single spots comprised of clones of cells possessing malformed wing hairs. Cisplatin was found to induce both twin spots and single spots, and significant linear concentration-response relationships were obtained with respect to the induction of all endpoints. This capacity to induce mitotic exchange in the somatic tissue of Drosophila compares well with the compound's reported ability to induce chromosome breaks in Drosophila germ cells. However, not all compounds possess similar genotoxic profiles in the somatic an germ tissue of Drosophila.

  1. Thorax Injury Lowers Resistance to Infection in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Eliana; Khalil, Sarah; Lazzaro, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    The route of infection can profoundly affect both the progression and outcome of disease. We investigated differences in Drosophila melanogaster defense against infection after bacterial inoculation into two sites—the abdomen and the thorax. Thorax inoculation results in increased bacterial proliferation and causes high mortality within the first few days of infection. In contrast, abdomen inoculation results in minimal mortality and lower bacterial loads than thorax inoculation. Inoculation into either site causes systemic infection. Differences in mortality and bacterial load are due to injury of the thorax and can be recapitulated by abdominal inoculation coupled with aseptic wounding of the thorax. This altered resistance appears to be independent of classical immune pathways and opens new avenues of research on the role of injury during defense against infection. PMID:25092914

  2. DNA topoisomerase I is essential in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M P; Brown, S D; Chen, A; Hsieh, T S

    1993-01-01

    Both biochemical and genetic experiments suggest that the type I DNA topoisomerase may participate in DNA replication, recombination, transcription, and other aspects of DNA metabolism. Despite its apparent importance, genetic studies in unicellular organisms including eubacteria and yeasts indicate that topoisomerase I is not essential for viability. We have previously isolated the cDNA clone encoding DNA topoisomerase I from Drosophila melanogaster. We report here the cytogenetic mapping of top1 to the X chromosome at 13C1 and isolation of top1 genomic DNA. Using P-element mutagenesis, we have isolated a mutant deficient in Drosophila topoisomerase I functions. Genetic studies of this mutant show that topoisomerase I is essential for the growth and development of the fruit fly, a multicellular organism. The biological functions of topoisomerase I are inferred from our analysis of the regulation of topoisomerase I expression during Drosophila development. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8393572

  3. Genetic effects induced by neutrons in Drosophila melanogaster I. Determination of absorbed dose.

    PubMed

    Delfin, A; Paredes, L C; Zambrano, F; Guzmán-Rincón, J; Ureña-Nuñez, F

    2001-12-01

    A method to obtain the absorbed dose in Drosophila melanogaster irradiated in the thermal column facility of the Triga Mark III Reactor has been developed. The method is based on the measurements of neutron activation of gold foils produced by neutron capture to obtain the neutron fluxes. These fluxes, combined with the calculations of kinetic energy released per unit mass, enables one to obtain the absorbed doses in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:11761104

  4. Quantitative Genetics of Food Intake in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Garlapow, Megan E.; Huang, Wen; Yarboro, Michael T.; Peterson, Kara R.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Food intake is an essential animal activity, regulated by neural circuits that motivate food localization, evaluate nutritional content and acceptance or rejection responses through the gustatory system, and regulate neuroendocrine feedback loops that maintain energy homeostasis. Excess food consumption in people is associated with obesity and metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. However, little is known about the genetic basis of natural variation in food consumption. To gain insights in evolutionarily conserved genetic principles that regulate food intake, we took advantage of a model system, Drosophila melanogaster, in which food intake, environmental conditions and genetic background can be controlled precisely. We quantified variation in food intake among 182 inbred, sequenced lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). We found significant genetic variation in the mean and within-line environmental variance of food consumption and observed sexual dimorphism and genetic variation in sexual dimorphism for both food intake traits (mean and variance). We performed genome wide association (GWA) analyses for mean food intake and environmental variance of food intake (using the coefficient of environmental variation, CVE, as the metric for environmental variance) and identified molecular polymorphisms associated with both traits. Validation experiments using RNAi-knockdown confirmed 24 of 31 (77%) candidate genes affecting food intake and/or variance of food intake, and a test cross between selected DGRP lines confirmed a SNP affecting mean food intake identified in the GWA analysis. The majority of the validated candidate genes were novel with respect to feeding behavior, and many had mammalian orthologs implicated in metabolic diseases. PMID:26375667

  5. The ribosomal protein genes and Minute loci of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Marygold, Steven J; Roote, John; Reuter, Gunter; Lambertsson, Andrew; Ashburner, Michael; Millburn, Gillian H; Harrison, Paul M; Yu, Zhan; Kenmochi, Naoya; Kaufman, Thomas C; Leevers, Sally J; Cook, Kevin R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations in genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs) have been shown to cause an array of cellular and developmental defects in a variety of organisms. In Drosophila melanogaster, disruption of RP genes can result in the 'Minute' syndrome of dominant, haploinsufficient phenotypes, which include prolonged development, short and thin bristles, and poor fertility and viability. While more than 50 Minute loci have been defined genetically, only 15 have so far been characterized molecularly and shown to correspond to RP genes. Results We combined bioinformatic and genetic approaches to conduct a systematic analysis of the relationship between RP genes and Minute loci. First, we identified 88 genes encoding 79 different cytoplasmic RPs (CRPs) and 75 genes encoding distinct mitochondrial RPs (MRPs). Interestingly, nine CRP genes are present as duplicates and, while all appear to be functional, one member of each gene pair has relatively limited expression. Next, we defined 65 discrete Minute loci by genetic criteria. Of these, 64 correspond to, or very likely correspond to, CRP genes; the single non-CRP-encoding Minute gene encodes a translation initiation factor subunit. Significantly, MRP genes and more than 20 CRP genes do not correspond to Minute loci. Conclusion This work answers a longstanding question about the molecular nature of Minute loci and suggests that Minute phenotypes arise from suboptimal protein synthesis resulting from reduced levels of cytoribosomes. Furthermore, by identifying the majority of haplolethal and haplosterile loci at the molecular level, our data will directly benefit efforts to attain complete deletion coverage of the D. melanogaster genome. PMID:17927810

  6. Male killing Spiroplasma protects Drosophila melanogaster against two parasitoid wasps.

    PubMed

    Xie, J; Butler, S; Sanchez, G; Mateos, M

    2014-04-01

    Maternally transmitted associations between endosymbiotic bacteria and insects are diverse and widespread in nature. Owing to imperfect vertical transmission, many heritable microbes have evolved compensational mechanisms to enhance their persistence in host lineages, such as manipulating host reproduction and conferring fitness benefits to host. Symbiont-mediated defense against natural enemies of hosts is increasingly recognized as an important mechanism by which endosymbionts enhance host fitness. Members of the genus Spiroplasma associated with distantly related Drosophila hosts are known to engage in either reproductive parasitism (i.e., male killing) or defense against natural enemies (the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma and a nematode). A male-killing strain of Spiroplasma (strain Melanogaster Sex Ratio Organism (MSRO)) co-occurs with Wolbachia (strain wMel) in certain wild populations of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. We examined the effects of Spiroplasma MSRO and Wolbachia wMel on Drosophila survival against parasitism by two common wasps, Leptopilina heterotoma and Leptopilina boulardi, that differ in their host ranges and host evasion strategies. The results indicate that Spiroplasma MSRO prevents successful development of both wasps, and confers a small, albeit significant, increase in larva-to-adult survival of flies subjected to wasp attacks. We modeled the conditions under which defense can contribute to Spiroplasma persistence. Wolbachia also confers a weak, but significant, survival advantage to flies attacked by L. heterotoma. The host protective effects exhibited by Spiroplasma and Wolbachia are additive and may provide the conditions for such cotransmitted symbionts to become mutualists. Occurrence of Spiroplasma-mediated protection against distinct parasitoids in divergent Drosophila hosts suggests a general protection mechanism. PMID:24281548

  7. Male killing Spiroplasma protects Drosophila melanogaster against two parasitoid wasps

    PubMed Central

    Xie, J; Butler, S; Sanchez, G; Mateos, M

    2014-01-01

    Maternally transmitted associations between endosymbiotic bacteria and insects are diverse and widespread in nature. Owing to imperfect vertical transmission, many heritable microbes have evolved compensational mechanisms to enhance their persistence in host lineages, such as manipulating host reproduction and conferring fitness benefits to host. Symbiont-mediated defense against natural enemies of hosts is increasingly recognized as an important mechanism by which endosymbionts enhance host fitness. Members of the genus Spiroplasma associated with distantly related Drosophila hosts are known to engage in either reproductive parasitism (i.e., male killing) or defense against natural enemies (the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma and a nematode). A male-killing strain of Spiroplasma (strain Melanogaster Sex Ratio Organism (MSRO)) co-occurs with Wolbachia (strain wMel) in certain wild populations of the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. We examined the effects of Spiroplasma MSRO and Wolbachia wMel on Drosophila survival against parasitism by two common wasps, Leptopilina heterotoma and Leptopilina boulardi, that differ in their host ranges and host evasion strategies. The results indicate that Spiroplasma MSRO prevents successful development of both wasps, and confers a small, albeit significant, increase in larva-to-adult survival of flies subjected to wasp attacks. We modeled the conditions under which defense can contribute to Spiroplasma persistence. Wolbachia also confers a weak, but significant, survival advantage to flies attacked by L. heterotoma. The host protective effects exhibited by Spiroplasma and Wolbachia are additive and may provide the conditions for such cotransmitted symbionts to become mutualists. Occurrence of Spiroplasma-mediated protection against distinct parasitoids in divergent Drosophila hosts suggests a general protection mechanism. PMID:24281548

  8. Quantitative Genetics of Food Intake in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Garlapow, Megan E; Huang, Wen; Yarboro, Michael T; Peterson, Kara R; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-01-01

    Food intake is an essential animal activity, regulated by neural circuits that motivate food localization, evaluate nutritional content and acceptance or rejection responses through the gustatory system, and regulate neuroendocrine feedback loops that maintain energy homeostasis. Excess food consumption in people is associated with obesity and metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. However, little is known about the genetic basis of natural variation in food consumption. To gain insights in evolutionarily conserved genetic principles that regulate food intake, we took advantage of a model system, Drosophila melanogaster, in which food intake, environmental conditions and genetic background can be controlled precisely. We quantified variation in food intake among 182 inbred, sequenced lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). We found significant genetic variation in the mean and within-line environmental variance of food consumption and observed sexual dimorphism and genetic variation in sexual dimorphism for both food intake traits (mean and variance). We performed genome wide association (GWA) analyses for mean food intake and environmental variance of food intake (using the coefficient of environmental variation, CVE, as the metric for environmental variance) and identified molecular polymorphisms associated with both traits. Validation experiments using RNAi-knockdown confirmed 24 of 31 (77%) candidate genes affecting food intake and/or variance of food intake, and a test cross between selected DGRP lines confirmed a SNP affecting mean food intake identified in the GWA analysis. The majority of the validated candidate genes were novel with respect to feeding behavior, and many had mammalian orthologs implicated in metabolic diseases. PMID:26375667

  9. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A.

    2013-08-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility.

  10. EGFR soluble isoforms and their transcripts are expressed in meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Guillaudeau, Angélique; Durand, Karine; Bessette, Barbara; Chaunavel, Alain; Pommepuy, Isabelle; Projetti, Fabrice; Robert, Sandrine; Caire, François; Rabinovitch-Chable, Hélène; Labrousse, François

    2012-01-01

    The EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) is involved in the oncogenesis of many tumors. In addition to the full-length EGFR (isoform a), normal and tumor cells produce soluble EGFR isoforms (sEGFR) that lack the intracellular domain. sEGFR isoforms b, c and d are encoded by EGFR variants 2 (v2), 3 (v3) and 4 (v4) mRNA resulting from gene alternative splicing. Accordingly, the results of EGFR protein expression analysis depend on the domain targeted by the antibodies. In meningiomas, EGFR expression investigations mainly focused on EGFR isoform a. sEGFR and EGFRvIII mutant, that encodes a constitutively active truncated receptor, have not been studied. In a 69 meningiomas series, protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry using extracellular domain targeted antibody (ECD-Ab) and intracellular domain targeted antibody (ICD-Ab). EGFRv1 to v4 and EGFRvIII mRNAs were quantified by RT-PCR and EGFR amplification revealed by MLPA. Results were analyzed with respect to clinical data, tumor resection (Simpson grade), histological type, tumor grade, and patient outcome.Immunochemical staining was stronger with ECD-Ab than with ICD-Ab. Meningiomas expressed EGFRv1 to -v4 mRNAs but not EGFRvIII mutant. Intermediate or high ECD-Ab staining and high EGFRv1 to v4 mRNA levels were associated to a better progression free survival (PFS). PFS was also improved in women, when tumor resection was evaluated as Simpson 1 or 2, in grade I vs. grade II and III meningiomas and when Ki67 labeling index was lower than 10%. Our results suggest that, EGFR protein isoforms without ICD and their corresponding mRNA variants are expressed in meningiomas in addition to the whole isoform a. EGFRvIII was not expressed. High expression levels seem to be related to a better prognosis. These results indicate that the oncogenetic mechanisms involving the EGFR pathway in meningiomas could be different from other tumor types. PMID:22623992

  11. Haplotype and isoform specific expression estimation using multi-mapping RNA-seq reads

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel pipeline and methodology for simultaneously estimating isoform expression and allelic imbalance in diploid organisms using RNA-seq data. We achieve this by modeling the expression of haplotype-specific isoforms. If unknown, the two parental isoform sequences can be individually reconstructed. A new statistical method, MMSEQ, deconvolves the mapping of reads to multiple transcripts (isoforms or haplotype-specific isoforms). Our software can take into account non-uniform read generation and works with paired-end reads. PMID:21310039

  12. [PHF10 isoforms are phosphorylated in the PBAF mammalian chromatin remodeling complex].

    PubMed

    Brechalov, A V; Valieva, M E; Georgieva, S G; Soshnikova, N V

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex PBAF(SWI/SNF) alters the structure of chromatin and controls gene expression. PHF10 is a specific subunit of PBAF complex and is expressed as four isoforms in mammalian cells. We demonstrated that all isoforms are expressed in various human cell types of different histological origins. All four isoforms are extensively phosphorylated and their phosphorylation level is depended on the cell type. Phosphorylation of PHF10 isoforms occurs while they are incorporated as a subunit of the PBAF complex, and therefore phosphorylation of PHF10 isoforms may play an essential role in regulation of PBAF complex's function and mechanism of action. PMID:27239853

  13. PAX6 Isoforms, along with Reprogramming Factors, Differentially Regulate the Induction of Cornea-specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sasamoto, Yuzuru; Hayashi, Ryuhei; Park, Sung-Joon; Saito-Adachi, Mihoko; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Quantock, Andrew J.; Nakai, Kenta; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Nishida, Kohji

    2016-01-01

    PAX6 is the key transcription factor involved in eye development in humans, but the differential functions of the two PAX6 isoforms, isoform-a and isoform-b, are largely unknown. To reveal their function in the corneal epithelium, PAX6 isoforms, along with reprogramming factors, were transduced into human non-ocular epithelial cells. Herein, we show that the two PAX6 isoforms differentially and cooperatively regulate the expression of genes specific to the structure and functions of the corneal epithelium, particularly keratin 3 (KRT3) and keratin 12 (KRT12). PAX6 isoform-a induced KRT3 expression by targeting its upstream region. KLF4 enhanced this induction. A combination of PAX6 isoform-b, KLF4, and OCT4 induced KRT12 expression. These new findings will contribute to furthering the understanding of the molecular basis of the corneal epithelium specific phenotype. PMID:26899008

  14. Functional impact of splice isoform diversity in individual cells

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Karen; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing provides an effective means for expanding coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes. Recent studies suggest that co-expression of different splice isoforms may increase diversity of RNAs and proteins at a single-cell level. A pertinent question in the field is whether such co-expression is biologically meaningful or, rather, represents insufficiently stringent splicing regulation. Here we argue that isoform co-expression may produce functional outcomes that are difficult and sometimes impossible to achieve using other regulation strategies. Far from being a ‘splicing noise’, co-expression is often established through co-ordinated activity of specific cis-elements and trans-acting factors. Further work in this area may uncover new biological functions of alternative splicing (AS) and generate important insights into mechanisms allowing different cell types to attain their unique molecular identities. PMID:27528755

  15. Direct Activation of Epac by Sulfonylurea is Isoform Selective

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Katie J.; Coltharp, Carla; Amzel, L. Mario; Zhang, Jin

    2011-01-01

    Summary Commonly used as a treatment for Type II diabetes, sulfonylureas (SUs) stimulate insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells by binding to sulfonylurea receptors. Recently, SUs have been shown to also activate exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 2 (Epac2), however little is known about this molecular action. Using biosensor imaging and biochemical analysis, we show that SUs activate Epac2 and the downstream signaling via direct binding to Epac2. We further identify R447 of Epac2 to be critically involved in SU binding. This distinct binding site from cAMP points to a new mode of allosteric activation of Epac2. We also show that SUs selectively activate Epac2 isoform, but not the closely related Epac1, further establishing SUs as a new class of isoform-selective enzyme activators. PMID:21338921

  16. Heart wall velocimetry and exogenous contrast-based cardiac flow imaging in Drosophila melanogaster using Doppler optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choma, Michael A.; Suter, Melissa J.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Bouma, Brett E.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2010-09-01

    Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) is a central organism in biology and is becoming increasingly important in the cardiovascular sciences. Prior work in optical imaging of the D. melanogaster heart has focused on static and dynamic structural anatomy. In the study, it is demonstrated that Doppler optical coherence tomography can quantify dynamic heart wall velocity and hemolymph flow in adult D. melanogaster. Since hemolymph is optically transparent, a novel exogenous contrast technique is demonstrated to increase the backscatter-based intracardiac Doppler flow signal. The results presented here open up new possibilities for functional cardiovascular phenotyping of normal and mutant D. melanogaster.

  17. Comparison of liver oncogenic potential among human RAS isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook In; Moon, Hyuk; Ju, Hye-Lim; Kim, Dae Yeong; Cho, Kyung Joo; Ribback, Silvia; Dombrowski, Frank; Calvisi, Diego F.; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-01-01

    Mutation in one of three RAS genes (i.e., HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS) leading to constitutive activation of RAS signaling pathways is considered a key oncogenic event in human carcinogenesis. Whether activated RAS isoforms possess different oncogenic potentials remains an unresolved question. Here, we compared oncogenic properties among RAS isoforms using liver-specific transgenesis in mice. Hydrodynamic transfection was performed using transposons expressing short hairpin RNA downregulating p53 and an activated RAS isoform, and livers were harvested at 23 days after gene delivery. No differences were found in the hepatocarcinogenic potential among RAS isoforms, as determined by both gross examination of livers and liver weight per body weight ratio (LW/BW) of mice expressing HRASQ61L, KRAS4BG12V and NRASQ61K. However, the tumorigenic potential differed significantly between KRAS splicing variants. The LW/BW ratio in KRAS4AG12V mice was significantly lower than in KRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.001), and KRAS4AG12V mice lived significantly longer than KRRAS4BG12V mice (p < 0.0001). Notably, tumors from KRAS4AG12V mice displayed higher expression of the p16INK4A tumor suppressor when compared with KRAS4BG12V tumors. Forced overexpression of p16INK4A significantly reduced tumor growth in KRAS4BG12V mice, suggesting that upregulation of p16INK4A by KRAS4AG12V presumably delays tumor development driven by the latter oncogene. PMID:26799184

  18. Structural differences between C-terminal regions of tropomyosin isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Śliwińska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Tropomyosins are actin-binding regulatory proteins which overlap end-to-end along the filament. High resolution structures of the overlap regions were determined for muscle and non-muscle tropomyosins in the absence of actin. Conformations of the junction regions bound to actin are unknown. In this work, orientation of the overlap on actin alone and on actin–myosin complex was evaluated by measuring FRET distances between a donor (AEDANS) attached to tropomyosin and an acceptor (DABMI) bound to actin’s Cys374. Donor was attached to the Cys residue introduced by site-directed mutagenesis near the C-terminal half of the overlap. The recombinant alpha-tropomyosin isoforms used in this study – skeletal muscle skTM, non-muscle TM2 and TM5a, and chimeric TM1b9a had various amino acid sequences of the N- and C-termini involved in the end-to-end overlap. The donor-acceptor distances calculated for each isoform varied between 36.4 Å and 48.1 Å. Rigor binding of myosin S1 increased the apparent FRET distances of skTM and TM2, but decreased the distances separating TM5a and TM1b9a from actin. The results show that isoform-specific sequences of the end-to-end overlaps determine orientations and dynamics of tropomyosin isoforms on actin. This can be important for specificity of tropomyosin in the regulation of actin filament diverse functions. PMID:24167776

  19. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hector, Ralph D; Dando, Owen; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Kind, Peter C; Bailey, Mark E S; Cobb, Stuart R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5) cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3'-untranslated region (UTR), which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders. PMID:27315173

  20. Specific roles of GABAB(1) receptor isoforms in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Laura H.; Kelly, Peter H.; Bettler, Bernhard; Kaupmann, Klemens; Cryan, John F.

    2010-01-01

    The GABAB receptor is a heterodimer of GABAB(1) and GABAB(2) subunits. There are two isoforms of the GABAB(1) subunit: GABAB(1a) and GABAB(1b). Recent studies with mutant mice suggest a differential role for the two GABAB(1) isoforms in behavioural processes. As pharmacological and genetic studies have implicated GABAB receptors in cognition we investigated the behaviour of GABAB(1a) −/− and GABAB(1b) −/− mice in different types of cognitive paradigms. GABAB(1a) −/− and GABAB(1b) −/− mice were both impaired relative to wildtype controls in a continuous spontaneous alternation behaviour test of working spatial memory. In contrast to the reported phenotype of GABAB(1) −/− mice, however, neither GABAB(1a) −/− nor GABAB(1b) −/− mice were deficient in a passive avoidance task. On the other hand, GABAB(1a) −/− mice were impaired in familiar and novel object recognition. We conclude that GABAB(1) isoforms contribute differentially to GABAB receptor-mediated cognitive processes. PMID:17498817

  1. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  2. Cholesterol efflux is LXRα isoform-dependent in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The nuclear receptor liver X receptor (LXR) has two isoforms: LXRα and LXRβ. LXR activation promotes cholesterol efflux in macrophages, but the relative importance of each LXR isoform in mediating cholesterol efflux remains elusive. Methods We evaluated the ability of different doses of LXRs agonist T0901317 to affect cholesterol efflux in human macrophages and its relationship with mRNA and protein levels of several well-characterized proteins involved in cholesterol efflux, including ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, LXRβ and LXRα, using quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and siRNA techniques. Results Here we show that LXRα rather than LXRβ sustains baseline cholesterol efflux in human blood-derived macrophages. Treatment of human macrophages with a non-isoform-specific LXR agonist T0901317 substantially increased HDL- and apoA-I-mediated cholesterol efflux, which was associated with increased mRNA and protein expression levels of ABCA1, ABCG1, SR-BI, LXRα and LXRβ. The siRNA- mediated silencing of LXRα, but not LXRβ significantly reduced the protein levels of ABCA1,ABCG1, and SR-BI as wellas HDL- and ApoA1-mediated cholesterol in human macrophages. Conclusions These findings imply that LXRα- rather than LXRβ- specific agonists may promote reverse cholesterol transport in humans. PMID:24996838

  3. Characterisation of CDKL5 Transcript Isoforms in Human and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Owen; Landsberger, Nicoletta; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Kind, Peter C.; Bailey, Mark E. S.; Cobb, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the X-linked Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Like 5 gene (CDKL5) cause early onset infantile spasms and subsequent severe developmental delay in affected children. Deleterious mutations have been reported to occur throughout the CDKL5 coding region. Several studies point to a complex CDKL5 gene structure in terms of exon usage and transcript expression. Improvements in molecular diagnosis and more extensive research into the neurobiology of CDKL5 and pathophysiology of CDKL5 disorders necessitate an updated analysis of the gene. In this study, we have analysed human and mouse CDKL5 transcript patterns both bioinformatically and experimentally. We have characterised the predominant brain isoform of CDKL5, a 9.7 kb transcript comprised of 18 exons with a large 6.6 kb 3’-untranslated region (UTR), which we name hCDKL5_1. In addition we describe new exonic regions and a range of novel splice and UTR isoforms. This has enabled the description of an updated gene model in both species and a standardised nomenclature system for CDKL5 transcripts. Profiling revealed tissue- and brain development stage-specific differences in expression between transcript isoforms. These findings provide an essential backdrop for the diagnosis of CDKL5-related disorders, for investigations into the basic biology of this gene and its protein products, and for the rational design of gene-based and molecular therapies for these disorders. PMID:27315173

  4. Expression profile of parkin isoforms in human gliomas.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Grazia; D'Amico, Agata Grazia; Magro, Gaetano; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Saccone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo; Cavallaro, Sebastiano; D'Agata, Velia

    2015-10-01

    Mutations of parkin gene are not restricted to familial forms of Parkinsonism but they also occur in a wide variety of malignancies including gliomas. Parkin over-expression reduces glioma cells proliferation and analysis of its expression is predictive for the survival outcome of patients with glioma. To date have been identified 21 parkin alternative splice variants. However, most of the studies have focused their attention exclusively on full-length protein. In the present study, the expression profile of parkin isoforms in different grades of astrocytomas was analyzed for the first time, in order to evaluate their involvement in this malignancy. Furthermore, to investigate their role in cellular processes, their expression in three glioblastoma cell lines was analyzed following treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132, or induction of mitophagy with CCCP, or after serum deprivation. Results suggested that H20, H1 and H5 isoforms are always expressed in tumors both in vivo and in vitro models. Therefore, these isoforms might be used as specific biomarkers to develop a prognostic tool for brain tumors. PMID:26238155

  5. Signaling by the Engulfment Receptor Draper: A Screen in Drosophila melanogaster Implicates Cytoskeletal Regulators, Jun N-Terminal Kinase, and Yorkie

    PubMed Central

    Fullard, John F.; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2015-01-01

    Draper, the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the Ced-1 protein of Caenorhabditis elegans, is a cell-surface receptor required for the recognition and engulfment of apoptotic cells, glial clearance of axon fragments and dendritic pruning, and salivary gland autophagy. To further elucidate mechanisms of Draper signaling, we screened chromosomal deficiencies to identify loci that dominantly modify the phenotype of overexpression of Draper isoform II (suppressed differentiation of the posterior crossvein in the wing). We found evidence for 43 genetic modifiers of Draper II. Twenty-four of the 37 suppressor loci and 3 of the 6 enhancer loci were identified. An additional 5 suppressors and 2 enhancers were identified among mutations in functionally related genes. These studies reveal positive contributions to Drpr signaling for the Jun N-terminal Kinase pathway, supported by genetic interactions with hemipterous, basket, jun, and puckered, and for cytoskeleton regulation as indicated by genetic interactions with rac1, rac2, RhoA, myoblast city, Wiskcott–Aldrich syndrome protein, and the formin CG32138, and for yorkie and expanded. These findings indicate that Jun N-terminal Kinase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling collaborate in Draper signaling. Relationships between Draper signaling and Decapentaplegic signaling, insulin signaling, Salvador/Warts/Hippo signaling, apical-basal cell polarity, and cellular responses to mechanical forces are also discussed. PMID:25395664

  6. Selective glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms reveal glucocorticoid-induced apoptotic transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I; Shin, S C; Cao, Y; Bender, I K; Jafari, N; Feng, G; Lin, S; Cidlowski, J A; Schleimer, R P; Lu, N Z

    2013-01-01

    Induction of T-cell apoptosis contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic benefits of glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms have distinct proapoptotic activities in osteosarcoma cells. Here we determined whether GR isoforms selectively induce apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Jurkat cells stably expressing individual GR isoforms were generated and treated with vehicle or dexamethasone (DEX). DEX induced apoptosis in cells expressing the GR-A, -B, or -C, but not the GR-D, isoform. cDNA microarray analyses of cells sensitive (GR-C3) and insensitive (GR-D3) to DEX revealed glucocorticoid-induced proapoptotic transcriptomes. Genes that were regulated by the proapoptotic GR-C3, but not by the GR-D3, isoform likely contributed to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. The identified genes include those that are directly involved in apoptosis and those that facilitate cell killing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that distinct chromatin modification abilities may underlie the distinct functions of GR isoforms. Interestingly, all GR isoforms, including the GR-D3 isoform, suppressed mitogen-stimulated cytokines. Furthermore, the GR-C isoforms were selectively upregulated in mitogen-activated primary T cells and DEX treatment induced GR-C target genes in activated T cells. Cell-specific expressions and functions of GR isoforms may help to explain the tissue- and individual-selective actions of glucocorticoids and may provide a basis for developing improved glucocorticoids. PMID:23303127

  7. Selective glucocorticoid receptor translational isoforms reveal glucocorticoid-induced apoptotic transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Wu, I; Shin, S C; Cao, Y; Bender, I K; Jafari, N; Feng, G; Lin, S; Cidlowski, J A; Schleimer, R P; Lu, N Z

    2013-01-01

    Induction of T-cell apoptosis contributes to the anti-inflammatory and antineoplastic benefits of glucocorticoids. The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) translational isoforms have distinct proapoptotic activities in osteosarcoma cells. Here we determined whether GR isoforms selectively induce apoptosis in Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Jurkat cells stably expressing individual GR isoforms were generated and treated with vehicle or dexamethasone (DEX). DEX induced apoptosis in cells expressing the GR-A, -B, or -C, but not the GR-D, isoform. cDNA microarray analyses of cells sensitive (GR-C3) and insensitive (GR-D3) to DEX revealed glucocorticoid-induced proapoptotic transcriptomes. Genes that were regulated by the proapoptotic GR-C3, but not by the GR-D3, isoform likely contributed to glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis. The identified genes include those that are directly involved in apoptosis and those that facilitate cell killing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that distinct chromatin modification abilities may underlie the distinct functions of GR isoforms. Interestingly, all GR isoforms, including the GR-D3 isoform, suppressed mitogen-stimulated cytokines. Furthermore, the GR-C isoforms were selectively upregulated in mitogen-activated primary T cells and DEX treatment induced GR-C target genes in activated T cells. Cell-specific expressions and functions of GR isoforms may help to explain the tissue- and individual-selective actions of glucocorticoids and may provide a basis for developing improved glucocorticoids. PMID:23303127

  8. The Drosophila melanogaster hybrid male rescue gene causes inviability in male and female species hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Barbash, D A; Roote, J; Ashburner, M

    2000-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster mutation Hmr rescues inviable hybrid sons from the cross of D. melanogaster females to males of its sibling species D. mauritiana, D. simulans, and D. sechellia. We have extended previous observations that hybrid daughters from this cross are poorly viable at high temperatures and have shown that this female lethality is suppressed by Hmr and the rescue mutations In(1)AB and D. simulans Lhr. Deficiencies defined here as Hmr(-) also suppressed lethality, demonstrating that reducing Hmr(+) activity can rescue otherwise inviable hybrids. An Hmr(+) duplication had the opposite effect of reducing the viability of female and sibling X-male hybrid progeny. Similar dose-dependent viability effects of Hmr were observed in the reciprocal cross of D. simulans females to D. melanogaster males. Finally, Lhr and Hmr(+) were shown to have mutually antagonistic effects on hybrid viability. These data suggest a model where the interaction of sibling species Lhr(+) and D. melanogaster Hmr(+) causes lethality in both sexes of species hybrids and in both directions of crossing. Our results further suggest that a twofold difference in Hmr(+) dosage accounts in part for the differential viability of male and female hybrid progeny, but also that additional, unidentified genes must be invoked to account for the invariant lethality of hybrid sons of D. melanogaster mothers. Implications of our findings for understanding Haldane's rule-the observation that hybrid breakdown is often specific to the heterogametic sex-are also discussed. PMID:10747067

  9. Cyanide binding and heme cavity conformational transitions in Drosophila melanogaster hexacoordinate hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Ascenzi, Paolo; Bocedi, Alessio; Dewilde, Sylvia; Burmester, Thorsten; Hankeln, Thomas; Moens, Luc; Bolognesi, Martino

    2006-08-22

    The reason for the presence of hemoglobin-like molecules in insects, such as Drosophila melanogaster, that live in fully aerobic environments has yet to be determined. Heme endogenous hexacoordination (where HisE7 and HisF8 axial ligands to the heme Fe atom are both provided by the protein) is a recently discovered mechanism proposed to modulate O(2) affinity in hemoglobins from different species. Previous results have shown that D. melanogaster hemoglobin 1 (product of the glob1 gene) displays heme endogenous hexacoordination in both the ferrous and ferric states. Here we present kinetic data characterizing the exogenous cyanide ligand binding process, and the three-dimensional structure (at 1.4 A resolution) of the ensuing cyano-met D. melanogaster hemoglobin. Comparison with the crystal structure of the endogenously hexacoordinated D. melanogaster hemoglobin shows that the transition to the cyano-met form is supported by conformational readjustment in the CD-D-E region of the protein, which removes HisE7 from the heme. The structural and functional features of D. melanogaster hemoglobin are examined in light of previous results achieved for human and mouse neuroglobins and for human cytoglobin, which display heme endogenous hexacoordination. The study shows that, despite the rather constant value for cyanide association rate constants for the ferric hemoproteins, different distal site conformational readjustments and/or heme sliding mechanisms are displayed by the known hexacoordinate hemoglobins as a result of exogenous ligand binding. PMID:16906763

  10. In vivo imaging of the Drosophila Melanogaster heart using a novel optical coherence tomography microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izatt, Susan D.; Choma, Michael A.; Israel, Steven; Wessells, Robert J.; Bodmer, Rolf; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2005-03-01

    Real time in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging of the adult fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster heart using a newly designed OCT microscope allows accurate assessment of cardiac anatomy and function. D. melanogaster has been used extensively in genetic research for over a century, but in vivo evaluation of the heart has been limited by available imaging technology. The ability to assess phenotypic changes with micrometer-scale resolution noninvasively in genetic models such as D. melanogaster is needed in the advancing fields of developmental biology and genetics. We have developed a dedicated small animal OCT imaging system incorporating a state-of-the-art, real time OCT scanner integrated into a standard stereo zoom microscope which allows for simultaneous OCT and video imaging. System capabilities include A-scan, B-scan, and M-scan imaging as well as automated 3D volumetric acquisition and visualization. Transverse and sagittal B-mode scans of the four chambered D. melanogaster heart have been obtained with the OCT microscope and are consistent with detailed anatomical studies from the literature. Further analysis by M-mode scanning is currently under way to assess cardiac function as a function of age and sex by determination of shortening fraction and ejection fraction. These studies create control cardiac data on the wild type D. melanogaster, allowing subsequent evaluation of phenotypic cardiac changes in this model after regulated genetic mutation.

  11. Parallel Evolution of Copy-Number Variation across Continents in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Schrider, Daniel R; Hahn, Matthew W; Begun, David J

    2016-05-01

    Genetic differentiation across populations that is maintained in the presence of gene flow is a hallmark of spatially varying selection. In Drosophila melanogaster, the latitudinal clines across the eastern coasts of Australia and North America appear to be examples of this type of selection, with recent studies showing that a substantial portion of the D. melanogaster genome exhibits allele frequency differentiation with respect to latitude on both continents. As of yet there has been no genome-wide examination of differentiated copy-number variants (CNVs) in these geographic regions, despite their potential importance for phenotypic variation in Drosophila and other taxa. Here, we present an analysis of geographic variation in CNVs in D. melanogaster. We also present the first genomic analysis of geographic variation for copy-number variation in the sister species, D. simulans, in order to investigate patterns of parallel evolution in these close relatives. In D. melanogaster we find hundreds of CNVs, many of which show parallel patterns of geographic variation on both continents, lending support to the idea that they are influenced by spatially varying selection. These findings support the idea that polymorphic CNVs contribute to local adaptation in D. melanogaster In contrast, we find very few CNVs in D. simulans that are geographically differentiated in parallel on both continents, consistent with earlier work suggesting that clinal patterns are weaker in this species. PMID:26809315

  12. Comparative population genomics of latitudinal variation in Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Machado, Heather E; Bergland, Alan O; O'Brien, Katherine R; Behrman, Emily L; Schmidt, Paul S; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    Examples of clinal variation in phenotypes and genotypes across latitudinal transects have served as important models for understanding how spatially varying selection and demographic forces shape variation within species. Here, we examine the selective and demographic contributions to latitudinal variation through the largest comparative genomic study to date of Drosophila simulans and Drosophila melanogaster, with genomic sequence data from 382 individual fruit flies, collected across a spatial transect of 19 degrees latitude and at multiple time points over 2 years. Consistent with phenotypic studies, we find less clinal variation in D. simulans than D. melanogaster, particularly for the autosomes. Moreover, we find that clinally varying loci in D. simulans are less stable over multiple years than comparable clines in D. melanogaster. D. simulans shows a significantly weaker pattern of isolation by distance than D. melanogaster and we find evidence for a stronger contribution of migration to D. simulans population genetic structure. While population bottlenecks and migration can plausibly explain the differences in stability of clinal variation between the two species, we also observe a significant enrichment of shared clinal genes, suggesting that the selective forces associated with climate are acting on the same genes and phenotypes in D. simulans and D. melanogaster. PMID:26523848

  13. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kis, Viktor; Barti, Benjámin; Lippai, Mónika; Sass, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain’s LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp), as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain. PMID:26148013

  14. Specialized Cortex Glial Cells Accumulate Lipid Droplets in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kis, Viktor; Barti, Benjámin; Lippai, Mónika; Sass, Miklós

    2015-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are common organelles of the majority of eukaryotic cell types. Their biological significance has been extensively studied in mammalian liver cells and white adipose tissue. Although the central nervous system contains the highest relative amount and the largest number of different lipid species, neither the spatial nor the temporal distribution of LDs has been described. In this study, we used the brain of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate the neuroanatomy of LDs. We demonstrated that LDs are exclusively localised in glial cells but not in neurons in the larval nervous system. We showed that the brain's LD pool, rather than being constant, changes dynamically during development and reaches its highest value at the beginning of metamorphosis. LDs are particularly enriched in cortex glial cells located close to the brain surface. These specialized superficial cortex glial cells contain the highest amount of LDs among glial cell types and encapsulate neuroblasts and their daughter cells. Superficial cortex glial cells, combined with subperineurial glial cells, express the Drosophila fatty acid binding protein (Dfabp), as we have demonstrated through light- and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. To the best of our best knowledge this is the first study that describes LD neuroanatomy in the Drosophila larval brain. PMID:26148013

  15. Ferritin Is Required in Multiple Tissues during Drosophila melanogaster Development

    PubMed Central

    Blowes, Liisa M.; Missirlis, Fanis; Riesgo-Escovar, Juan R.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, iron is stored in the cellular endomembrane system inside a protein cage formed by 24 ferritin subunits of two types (Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH) in a 1:1 stoichiometry. In larvae, ferritin accumulates in the midgut, hemolymph, garland, pericardial cells and in the nervous system. Here we present analyses of embryonic phenotypes for mutations in Fer1HCH, Fer2LCH and in both genes simultaneously. Mutations in either gene or deletion of both genes results in a similar set of cuticular embryonic phenotypes, ranging from non-deposition of cuticle to defects associated with germ band retraction, dorsal closure and head involution. A fraction of ferritin mutants have embryonic nervous systems with ventral nerve cord disruptions, misguided axonal projections and brain malformations. Ferritin mutants die with ectopic apoptotic events. Furthermore, we show that ferritin maternal contribution, which varies reflecting the mother’s iron stores, is used in early development. We also evaluated phenotypes arising from the blockage of COPII transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus, feeding the secretory pathway, plus analysis of ectopically expressed and fluorescently marked Fer1HCH and Fer2LCH. Overall, our results are consistent with insect ferritin combining three functions: iron storage, intercellular iron transport, and protection from iron-induced oxidative stress. These functions are required in multiple tissues during Drosophila embryonic development. PMID:26192321

  16. Genetic basis of transcriptome diversity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Magwire, Michael M.; Peiffer, Jason A.; Lyman, Richard F.; Stone, Eric A.; Anholt, Robert R. H.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how DNA sequence variation is translated into variation for complex phenotypes has remained elusive but is essential for predicting adaptive evolution, for selecting agriculturally important animals and crops, and for personalized medicine. Gene expression may provide a link between variation in DNA sequence and organismal phenotypes, and its abundance can be measured efficiently and accurately. Here we quantified genome-wide variation in gene expression in the sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), increasing the annotated Drosophila transcriptome by 11%, including thousands of novel transcribed regions (NTRs). We found that 42% of the Drosophila transcriptome is genetically variable in males and females, including the NTRs, and is organized into modules of genetically correlated transcripts. We found that NTRs often were negatively correlated with the expression of protein-coding genes, which we exploited to annotate NTRs functionally. We identified regulatory variants for the mean and variance of gene expression, which have largely independent genetic control. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for the mean, but not for the variance, of gene expression were concentrated near genes. Notably, the variance eQTLs often interacted epistatically with local variants in these genes to regulate gene expression. This comprehensive characterization of population-scale diversity of transcriptomes and its genetic basis in the DGRP is critically important for a systems understanding of quantitative trait variation. PMID:26483487

  17. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Ria; Kolli, Santharam; Bauer, Johannes H

    2013-01-01

    The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans). Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health. PMID:23326371

  18. Cold acclimation wholly reorganizes the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome and metabolome.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Heath A; Knee, Jose M; Dennis, Alice B; Udaka, Hiroko; Marshall, Katie E; Merritt, Thomas J S; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-01-01

    Cold tolerance is a key determinant of insect distribution and abundance, and thermal acclimation can strongly influence organismal stress tolerance phenotypes, particularly in small ectotherms like Drosophila. However, there is limited understanding of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that confer such impressive plasticity. Here, we use high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to compare the transcriptomes and metabolomes of D. melanogaster acclimated as adults to warm (rearing) (21.5 °C) or cold conditions (6 °C). Cold acclimation improved cold tolerance and led to extensive biological reorganization: almost one third of the transcriptome and nearly half of the metabolome were differentially regulated. There was overlap in the metabolic pathways identified via transcriptomics and metabolomics, with proline and glutathione metabolism being the most strongly-supported metabolic pathways associated with increased cold tolerance. We discuss several new targets in the study of insect cold tolerance (e.g. dopamine signaling and Na(+)-driven transport), but many previously identified candidate genes and pathways (e.g. heat shock proteins, Ca(2+) signaling, and ROS detoxification) were also identified in the present study, and our results are thus consistent with and extend the current understanding of the mechanisms of insect chilling tolerance. PMID:27357258

  19. Porphyromonas gingivalis-host interactions in a Drosophila melanogaster model.

    PubMed

    Igboin, Christina O; Tordoff, Kevin P; Moeschberger, Melvin L; Griffen, Ann L; Leys, Eugene J

    2011-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative obligate anaerobe that has been implicated in the etiology of adult periodontitis. We recently introduced a Drosophila melanogaster killing model for examination of P. gingivalis-host interactions. In the current study, the Drosophila killing model was used to characterize the host response to P. gingivalis infection by identifying host components that play a role during infection. Drosophila immune response gene mutants were screened for altered susceptibility to killing by P. gingivalis. The Imd signaling pathway was shown to be important for the survival of Drosophila infected by nonencapsulated P. gingivalis strains but was dispensable for the survival of Drosophila infected by encapsulated P. gingivalis strains. The P. gingivalis capsule was shown to mediate resistance to killing by Drosophila antimicrobial peptides (Imd pathway-regulated cecropinA and drosocin) and human beta-defensin 3. Drosophila thiol-ester protein II (Tep II) and Tep IV and the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) homolog Eiger were also involved in the immune response against P. gingivalis infection, while the scavenger receptors Eater and Croquemort played no roles in the response to P. gingivalis infection. This study demonstrates that the Drosophila killing model is a useful high-throughput model for characterizing the host response to P. gingivalis infection and uncovering novel interactions between the bacterium and the host. PMID:21041486

  20. Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) locomotion during a sounding rocket flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark S.; Keller, Tony S.

    2008-05-01

    The locomotor activity of young Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) was studied during a Nike-Orion sounding rocket flight, which included a short-duration microgravity exposure. An infrared monitoring system was used to determine the activity level, instantaneous velocity, and continuous velocity of 240 (120 male, 120 female) fruit flies. Individual flies were placed in chambers that limit their motion to walking. Chambers were oriented both vertically and horizontally with respect to the rocket's longitudinal axis. Significant changes in Drosophila locomotion patterns were observed throughout the sounding rocket flight, including launch, microgravity exposure, payload re-entry, and after ocean impact. During the microgravity portion of the flight (3.8 min), large increases in all locomotion measurements for both sexes were observed, with some measurements doubling compared to pad (1 G) data. Initial effects of microgravity were probably delayed due to large accelerations from the payload despining immediately before entering microgravity. The results indicate that short-duration microgravity exposure has a large effect on locomotor activity for both males and females, at least for a short period of time. The locomotion increases may explain the increased male aging observed during long-duration exposure to microgravity. Studies focusing on long-duration microgravity exposure are needed to confirm these findings, and the relationship of increased aging and locomotion.

  1. A Cytogenetic Analysis of Chromosomal Region 31 of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, N. J.; Whitehead, I. P.; Brock, J. K.; Sinclair, D. A.; Mottus, R.; Stromotich, G.; Harrington, M. J.; Grigliatti, T. A.

    1993-01-01

    Cytogenetic region 31 of the second chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster was screened for recessive lethal mutations. One hundred and thirty nine new recessive lethal alleles were isolated that fail to complement Df(2L)J2 (31A-32A). These new alleles, combined with preexisting mutations in the region, define 52 complementation groups, 35 of which have not previously been described. Among the new mutations were alleles of the cdc2 and mfs(2)31 genes. Six new deficiencies were also isolated and characterized identifying 16 deficiency subintervals within region 31. The new deficiencies were used to further localize three loci believed to encode non-histone chromosomal proteins. Suvar(2)1/Su(var)214, a dominant suppressor of position-effect variegation (PEV), maps to 31A-B, while the recessive suppressors of PEV mfs(2)31 and wdl were localized to regions 31E and 31F-32A, respectively. In addition, the cytological position of several mutations that interact with heterochromatin were more precisely defined. PMID:8514131

  2. Peroxisomes in wild-type and rosy mutant Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Beard, M E; Holtzman, E

    1987-01-01

    This study shows that peroxisomes are abundant in the Malpighian tubule and gut of wild-type Oregon R Drosophila melanogaster and that the peroxisomal population of the rosy-506 eye-color mutant differs from that of the wild type. Catalase activity in wild-type flies is demonstrable in bodies of appearance and centrifugal behavior comparable to the peroxisomes of vertebrate tissues. Xanthine oxidase (xanthine:oxygen oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.3.22) activity of the Malpighian tubule of wild-type flies is demonstrable cytochemically in bodies like those containing catalase. The rosy-506 mutant flies, with a deletion in the structural gene for xanthine dehydrogenase (xanthine:NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.204), lack cytochemically demonstrable peroxisomal xanthine oxidase activity. In addition, peroxisomes in the rosy-506 mutants show less intense cytochemical staining for catalase than those in wild-type flies, and biochemical assays indicate that catalase in the rosy mutant is much more accessible to substrate in the absence of detergent than in the wild type. Thus, the rosy-506 mutation appears to affect peroxisomes and may mimic aspects of the defects of peroxisomes in some human metabolic disorders. Images PMID:3118368

  3. Evolution of the olfactory code in the Drosophila melanogaster subgroup.

    PubMed Central

    Stensmyr, Marcus C; Dekker, Teun; Hansson, Bill S

    2003-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster subgroup has been the focus of numerous studies about evolution. We address the question of how the olfactory code has evolved among the nine sister species. By using in vivo electrophysiological measurements, so called single-cell recordings, we have established the ligand affinity of a defined subset of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) across all nine species. We show that the olfactory code as relayed by the investigated subset of ORNs is conserved to a striking degree. Distinct shifts in the code have occurred only within the simulans clade. However, these shifts are restricted to an altered tuning profile of the same single ORN type in all three of the simulans siblings and a more drastic change unique to D. sechellia, involving a complete loss of one sensillum type in favour of another. The alterations observed in D. sechellia may represent a novel host-specific adaptation to its sole host, morinda fruit (Morinda citrifolia). The overall high degree of similarity of the code within the subgroup is intriguing when considering the great variety in distributions as well as in habitat and host choice of the siblings, factors that could greatly affect the olfactory system. PMID:14667348

  4. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, N; Gans, M; Masson, M; Terzian, C; Bucheton, A

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is stable and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovoD1 female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovoD1 reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. PMID:7713426

  5. Characterization of the Drosophila melanogaster Dis3 ribonuclease.

    PubMed

    Mamolen, Megan; Andrulis, Erik D

    2009-12-18

    The Dis3 ribonuclease is a member of the hydrolytic RNR protein family. Although much progress has been made in understanding the structure, function, and enzymatic activities of prokaryotic RNR family members RNase II and RNase R, there are no activity studies of the metazoan ortholog, Dis3. Here, we characterize the activity of the Drosophila melanogaster Dis3 (dDis3) protein. We find that dDis3 is active in the presence of various monovalent and divalent cations, and requires divalent cations for activity. dDis3 hydrolyzes compositionally distinct RNA substrates, yet releases different products depending upon the substrate. Additionally, dDis3 remains active when lacking N-terminal domains, suggesting that an independent active site resides in the C-terminus of the protein. Finally, a study of dDis3 interactions with dRrp6 and core exosome subunits in extracts revealed sensitivity to higher divalent cation concentrations and detergent, suggesting the presence of both ionic and hydrophobic interactions in dDis3-exosome complexes. Our study thus broadens our mechanistic understanding of the general ribonuclease activity of Dis3 and RNR family members. PMID:19800864

  6. Genomic imprinting and position-effect variegation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, V K; Sinclair, D A; Grigliatti, T A

    1999-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is a phenomenon in which the expression of a gene or chromosomal region depends on the sex of the individual transmitting it. The term imprinting was first coined to describe parent-specific chromosome behavior in the dipteran insect Sciara and has since been described in many organisms, including other insects, plants, fish, and mammals. In this article we describe a mini-X chromosome in Drosophila melanogaster that shows genomic imprinting of at least three closely linked genes. The imprinting of these genes is observed as mosaic silencing when the genes are transmitted by the male parent, in contrast to essentially wild-type expression when the same genes are maternally transmitted. We show that the imprint is due to the sex of the parent rather than to a conventional maternal effect, differential mitotic instability of the mini-X chromosome, or an allele-specific effect. Finally, we have examined the effects of classical modifiers of position-effect variegation on the maintenance and the establishment of the imprint. Factors that modify position-effect variegation alter the somatic expression but not the establishment of the imprint. This suggests that chromatin structure is important in maintenance of the imprint, but a separate mechanism may be responsible for its initiation. PMID:10101173

  7. Seminal Fluid Regulation of Female Sexual Attractiveness in Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tram, Uyen; Wolfner, Mariana F.

    1998-03-01

    Finding a willing and suitable mate is critical for sexual reproduction. Visual, auditory, and chemical cues aid in locating and/or attracting partners. After mating, females from many insect species become less attractive. This is caused by changes in the quantity and/or quality of pheromones synthesized by the female and to changes in the female's behavior. For example, female insects may stop releasing pheromones, assume a mate refusal posture, or move less in response to males. Many postmating changes in female insects are triggered by seminal fluid proteins from the male's accessory gland proteins (Acps) and by sperm. To determine the role of seminal fluid components in mediating changes in attractiveness, we measured the attractiveness of Drosophila melanogaster females that had been mated to genetically altered males that lack sperm and/or Acps. We found that the drop in female attractiveness occurs in two phases. A short-term drop in attractiveness is triggered independent of the receipt of sperm and Acps. Maintenance of lowered attractiveness is dependent upon sperm.

  8. Strong Purifying Selection at Synonymous Sites in D. melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lawrie, David S.; Messer, Philipp W.; Hershberg, Ruth; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2013-01-01

    Synonymous sites are generally assumed to be subject to weak selective constraint. For this reason, they are often neglected as a possible source of important functional variation. We use site frequency spectra from deep population sequencing data to show that, contrary to this expectation, 22% of four-fold synonymous (4D) sites in Drosophila melanogaster evolve under very strong selective constraint while few, if any, appear to be under weak constraint. Linking polymorphism with divergence data, we further find that the fraction of synonymous sites exposed to strong purifying selection is higher for those positions that show slower evolution on the Drosophila phylogeny. The function underlying the inferred strong constraint appears to be separate from splicing enhancers, nucleosome positioning, and the translational optimization generating canonical codon bias. The fraction of synonymous sites under strong constraint within a gene correlates well with gene expression, particularly in the mid-late embryo, pupae, and adult developmental stages. Genes enriched in strongly constrained synonymous sites tend to be particularly functionally important and are often involved in key developmental pathways. Given that the observed widespread constraint acting on synonymous sites is likely not limited to Drosophila, the role of synonymous sites in genetic disease and adaptation should be reevaluated. PMID:23737754

  9. Intestinal inflammation and stem cell homeostasis in aging Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ayyaz, Arshad; Jasper, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    As a barrier epithelium, the intestinal epithelium has to coordinate physiological functions like digestion and nutrient resorption with the control of commensal bacteria and the prevention of pathogenic infections. It can therefore mount powerful innate immune and inflammatory responses, while, at the same time, maintaining tissue homeostasis through regenerative processes. How these different functions are coordinated remains unclear, and further insight is required to understand the age-related loss of homeostasis in this system, as well as the etiology of inflammatory and proliferative diseases of the gut. Recent work in Drosophila melanogaster has provided important new insight into the regulation of regenerative activity, innate immune homeostasis, commensal control, as well as age-related dysfunction in the intestine. Interestingly, many of the identified processes and mechanisms mirror similar homeostatic processes in the vertebrate intestine. This review summarized the current understanding of how innate immune responses, changes in commensal bacteria, and other challenges influence regenerative activity in the aging intestinal epithelium of flies and draws parallels to similar processes in mammals. PMID:24380076

  10. Quantitative Trait Loci for Locomotor Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Katherine W.; Morgan, Theodore J.; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2006-01-01

    Locomotion is an integral component of most animal behaviors and many human diseases and disorders are associated with locomotor deficits, but little is known about the genetic basis of natural variation in locomotor behavior. Locomotion is a complex trait, with variation attributable to the joint segregation of multiple interacting quantitative trait loci (QTL), with effects that are sensitive to the environment. We assessed variation in a component of locomotor behavior (locomotor reactivity) in a population of 98 recombinant inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster and mapped four QTL affecting locomotor reactivity by linkage to polymorphic roo transposable element insertion sites. We used complementation tests of deficiencies to fine map these QTL to 12 chromosomal regions and complementation tests of mutations to identify 13 positional candidate genes affecting locomotor reactivity, including Dopa decarboxylase (Ddc), which catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of serotonin and dopamine. Linkage disequilibrium mapping in a population of 164 second chromosome substitution lines derived from a single natural population showed that polymorphisms at Ddc were associated with naturally occurring genetic variation in locomotor behavior. These data implicate variation in the synthesis of bioamines as a factor contributing to natural variation in locomotor reactivity. PMID:16783013

  11. Genotoxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Erico R; Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Obando, Veroska; Rubio, Laura; Marcos, Ricard

    2015-09-01

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) are used as semiconductors, catalysts, gas sensors, and antimicrobial agents. We have used the comet and wing-spot assays in Drosophila melanogaster to assess the genotoxicity of CuONPs and ionic copper (CuSO4). Lipid peroxidation analysis was also performed (Thiobarbituric Acid Assay, TBARS). In larval hemocytes, both CuONPs and CuSO4 caused significant dose-dependent increases in DNA damage (comet assay). In the wing-spot assay, an increase in the frequency of mutant spots was observed in the wings of the adults; CuONPs were more effective than was CuSO4. Both agents induced TBARS; again, CuONPs were more active than was CuSO4. The results indicate that CuONPs are genotoxic in Drosophila, and these effects may be mediated by oxidative stress. Most of the effects appear to be related to the presence of copper ions. PMID:26338537

  12. Extension of Drosophila melanogaster lifespan with a GPCR peptide inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Ja, William W.; West, Anthony P.; Delker, Silvia L.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.; Benzer, Seymour

    2009-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) mediate signaling from extracellular ligands to intracellular signal transduction proteins1. Methuselah (Mth) is a class B (secretin-like) GPCR, a family typified by their large, ligand-binding, N-terminal extracellular domains2. Down-regulation of mth increases the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster3— inhibitors of Mth signaling would thus be expected to enhance longevity. We used mRNA display selection4,5 to identify high affinity (KD = 15 to 30 nM) peptide ligands that bind to the N-terminal ectodomain of Mth. The selected peptides are potent antagonists of Mth signaling, and structural studies suggest that they perturb the interface between the Mth ecto- and transmembrane (TM) domains. Flies constitutively expressing a Mth antagonist peptide exhibit a robust lifespan extension, suggesting that the peptides inhibit Mth signaling in vivo. Our work thus provides novel lifespan-extending ligands for a metazoan and a general approach for the design of modulators of this important class of GPCRs. PMID:17546039

  13. A histochemical study of the muscles of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Deak, I I

    1977-08-01

    The thoracic muscles of Drosophila melanogaster can be classified into two classes, the fibrillar and the tubular muscles, on morphological grounds. Histochemical techniques were used to characterize these two classes of muscle according to their content of various enzymes (alpha-glycerophosphate, NAD-dependent isocitrate, malate and succinate dehydrogenases, fumarase, acid phosphatase, adenosine triphosphatase and acetylcholinesterase) and of glycogen. These investigations showed that the two muslces types are histochemically very different and, further, that the morphologically similar tubular muscles are heterogeneous with respect to their enzyme content. In particular, the tergal depressor of the trochanter of the second leg, the largest of the tubular muslces, has considerably less of all the enzymes studied, with the exception of acetylcholinesterase, than all the other tubular muscles examined. The histochemical techniqes were also used to follow the changes in enzyme levels that occur during development of the indirect flight muscle fibres. All the enzymes that are present in adult flight muslces showed an increase in staining intensity throughout muscle development. Some minor differences were observed in the time of appearance and rate of increase of intensity of the different enzymes. PMID:142843

  14. Resources for Functional Genomics Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Stephanie E.; Hu, Yanhui; Kim, Kevin; Housden, Benjamin E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has become a system of choice for functional genomic studies. Many resources, including online databases and software tools, are now available to support design or identification of relevant fly stocks and reagents or analysis and mining of existing functional genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, etc. datasets. These include large community collections of fly stocks and plasmid clones, “meta” information sites like FlyBase and FlyMine, and an increasing number of more specialized reagents, databases, and online tools. Here, we introduce key resources useful to plan large-scale functional genomics studies in Drosophila and to analyze, integrate, and mine the results of those studies in ways that facilitate identification of highest-confidence results and generation of new hypotheses. We also discuss ways in which existing resources can be used and might be improved and suggest a few areas of future development that would further support large- and small-scale studies in Drosophila and facilitate use of Drosophila information by the research community more generally. PMID:24653003

  15. Assaying Blood Cell Populations of the Drosophila melanogaster Larva

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Sophia; Alexander, Brandy; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, hematopoiesis is regulated by inductive microenvironments (niches). Likewise, in the invertebrate model organism Drosophila melanogaster, inductive microenvironments known as larval Hematopoietic Pockets (HPs) have been identified as anatomical sites for the development and regulation of blood cells (hemocytes), in particular of the self-renewing macrophage lineage. HPs are segmentally repeated pockets between the epidermis and muscle layers of the larva, which also comprise sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In the larva, resident (sessile) hemocytes are exposed to anti-apoptotic, adhesive and proliferative cues from these sensory neurons and potentially other components of the HPs, such as the lining muscle and epithelial layers. During normal development, gradual release of resident hemocytes from the HPs fuels the population of circulating hemocytes, which culminates in the release of most of the resident hemocytes at the beginning of metamorphosis. Immune assaults, physical injury or mechanical disturbance trigger the premature release of resident hemocytes into circulation. The switch of larval hemocytes between resident locations and circulation raises the need for a common standard/procedure to selectively isolate and quantify these two populations of blood cells from single Drosophila larvae. Accordingly, this protocol describes an automated method to release and quantify the resident and circulating hemocytes from single larvae. The method facilitates ex vivo approaches, and may be adapted to serve a variety of developmental stages of Drosophila and other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26650404

  16. Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Harbison, Susan T.; Sehgal, Amita

    2008-01-01

    Although intensively studied, the biological purpose of sleep is not known. To identify candidate genes affecting sleep, we assayed 136 isogenic P-element insertion lines of Drosophila melanogaster. Since sleep has been negatively correlated with energy reserves across taxa, we measured energy stores (whole-body protein, glycogen, and triglycerides) in these lines as well. Twenty-one insertions with known effects on physiology, development, and behavior affect 24-hr sleep time. Thirty-two candidate insertions significantly impact energy stores. Mutational genetic correlations among sleep parameters revealed that the genetic basis of the transition between sleep and waking states in males and females may be different. Furthermore, sleep bout number can be decoupled from waking activity in males, but not in females. Significant genetic correlations are present between sleep phenotypes and glycogen stores in males, while sleep phenotypes are correlated with triglycerides in females. Differences observed in male and female sleep behavior in flies may therefore be related to sex-specific differences in metabolic needs. Sleep thus emerges as a complex trait that exhibits extensive pleiotropy and sex specificity. The large mutational target that we observed implicates genes functioning in a variety of biological processes, suggesting that sleep may serve a number of different functions rather than a single purpose. PMID:18430954

  17. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  18. Drosophila melanogaster prefers compounds perceived sweet by humans.

    PubMed

    Gordesky-Gold, Beth; Rivers, Natasha; Ahmed, Osama M; Breslin, Paul A S

    2008-03-01

    To understand the functional similarities of fly and mammalian taste receptors, we used a top-down approach that first established the fly sweetener-response profile. We employed the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, an omnivorous human commensal, and determined its sensitivity to an extended set of stimuli that humans find sweet. Flies were tested with all sweeteners in 2 assays that measured their taste reactivity (proboscis extension assay) and their ingestive preferences (free roaming ingestion choice test). A total of 21 sweeteners, comprised of 11 high-potency sweeteners, 2 amino acids, 5 sugars, 2 sugar alcohols, and a sweet salt (PbCl2), were tested in both assays. We found that wild-type Drosophila responded appetitively to most high-potency sweeteners preferred by humans, even those not considered sweet by rodents or new world monkeys. The similarities in taste preferences for sweeteners suggest that frugivorous/omnivorous apes and flies have evolved promiscuous carbohydrate taste detectors with similar affinities for myriad high-potency sweeteners. Whether these perceptual parallels are the result of convergent evolution of saccharide receptor-binding mechanisms remains to be determined. PMID:18234713

  19. Morphogenesis of the somatic musculature in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, Victoria K.; Dobi, Krista C.; Baylies, Mary K.

    2015-01-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the somatic muscle system is first formed during embryogenesis, giving rise to the larval musculature. Later during metamorphosis, this system is destroyed and replaced by an entirely new set of muscles in the adult fly. Proper formation of the larval and adult muscles is critical for basic survival functions such as hatching and crawling (in the larva), walking and flying (in the adult), and feeding (at both larval and adult stages). Myogenesis, from mononucleated muscle precursor cells to multinucleated functional muscles, is driven by a number of cellular processes that have begun to be mechanistically defined. Once themesodermal cells destined for themyogenic lineage have been specified, individual myoblasts fuse together iteratively to form syncytial myofibers. Combining cytoplasmic contents demands a level of intracellular reorganization that, most notably, leads to redistribution of the myonuclei to maximize internuclear distance. Signaling from extending myofibers induces terminal tendon cell differentiation in the ectoderm, which results in secure muscle-tendon attachments that are critical formuscle contraction. Simultaneously, muscles become innervated and undergo sarcomerogenesis to establish the contractile apparatus that will facilitate movement. The cellular mechanisms governing these morphogenetic events share numerous parallels to mammalian development, and the basic unit of all muscle, the myofiber, is conserved from flies to mammals. Thus, studies of Drosophila myogenesis and comparisons to muscle development in other systems highlight conserved regulatory programs of biomedical relevance to general muscle biology and studies of muscle disease. PMID:25758712

  20. Genetic basis of transcriptome diversity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Magwire, Michael M; Peiffer, Jason A; Lyman, Richard F; Stone, Eric A; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how DNA sequence variation is translated into variation for complex phenotypes has remained elusive but is essential for predicting adaptive evolution, for selecting agriculturally important animals and crops, and for personalized medicine. Gene expression may provide a link between variation in DNA sequence and organismal phenotypes, and its abundance can be measured efficiently and accurately. Here we quantified genome-wide variation in gene expression in the sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), increasing the annotated Drosophila transcriptome by 11%, including thousands of novel transcribed regions (NTRs). We found that 42% of the Drosophila transcriptome is genetically variable in males and females, including the NTRs, and is organized into modules of genetically correlated transcripts. We found that NTRs often were negatively correlated with the expression of protein-coding genes, which we exploited to annotate NTRs functionally. We identified regulatory variants for the mean and variance of gene expression, which have largely independent genetic control. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for the mean, but not for the variance, of gene expression were concentrated near genes. Notably, the variance eQTLs often interacted epistatically with local variants in these genes to regulate gene expression. This comprehensive characterization of population-scale diversity of transcriptomes and its genetic basis in the DGRP is critically important for a systems understanding of quantitative trait variation. PMID:26483487

  1. Heritable variation in courtship patterns in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Bryn E; Ruedi, Elizabeth A; McCoy, Lenovia J; Moore, Jamie M; Wolfner, Mariana F; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the genetic basis of naturally occurring variation for sexually selected behavioral traits. Drosophila melanogaster, with its rich repertoire of courtship behavior and genomic and genetic resources, is an excellent model organism for addressing this question. We assayed a genetically diverse panel of lines with full genome sequences, the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, to assess the heritability of variation in courtship behavior and mating progression. We subsequently used these data to quantify natural variation in transition probabilities between courtship behaviors. We found heritable variation along the expected trajectory for courtship behaviors, including the tendency to initiate courtship and rate of progression through courtship, suggesting a genetic basis to male modulation of courtship behavior based on feedback from unrelated, outbred, and genetically identical females. We assessed the genetic basis of variation of the transition with the greatest heritability--from copulation to no engagement with the female--and identified variants in Serrate and Furin 1 as well as many other polymorphisms on the chromosome 3R associated with this transition. Our findings suggest that courtship is a highly dynamic behavior with both social and genetic inputs, and that males may play an important role in courtship initiation and duration. PMID:25650358

  2. Thermoregulatory strategy may shape immune investment in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kutch, Ian C; Sevgili, Hasan; Wittman, Tyler; Fedorka, Kenneth M

    2014-10-15

    As temperatures change, insects alter the amount of melanin in their cuticle to improve thermoregulation. However, melanin is also central to insect immunity, suggesting that thermoregulatory strategy may indirectly impact immune defense by altering the abundance of melanin pathway components (a hypothesis we refer to as thermoregulatory-dependent immune investment). This may be the case in the cricket Allonemobius socius, where warm environments (both seasonal and geographical) produced crickets with lighter cuticles and increased pathogen susceptibility. Unfortunately, the potential for thermoregulatory strategy to influence insect immunity has not been widely explored. Here we address the relationships between temperature, thermoregulatory strategy and immunity in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. To this end, flies from two separate Canadian populations were reared in either a summer- or autumn-like environment. Shortly after adult eclosion, flies were moved to a common environment where their cuticle color and susceptibility to a bacterial pathogen (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) were measured. As with A. socius, individuals from summer-like environments exhibited lighter cuticles and increased pathogen susceptibility, suggesting that the thermoregulatory-immunity relationship is evolutionarily conserved across the hemimetabolous and holometabolous clades. If global temperatures continue to rise as expected, then thermoregulation might play an important role in host infection and mortality rates in systems that provide critical ecosystem services (e.g. pollination), or influence the prevalence of insect-vectored disease (e.g. malaria). PMID:25147243

  3. Mapping polycomb response elements at the Drosophilla melanogaster giant locus.

    PubMed

    Abed, Jumana AlHaj; Cheng, Connie L; Crowell, Chase R; Madigan, Laura L; Onwuegbuchu, Erica; Desai, Siddhi; Benes, Judith; Jones, Richard S

    2013-12-01

    Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins are highly conserved epigenetic transcriptional regulators. They are capable of either maintaining the transcriptional silence of target genes through many cell cycles or enabling a dynamic regulation of gene expression in stem cells. In Drosophila melanogaster, recruitment of PcG proteins to targets requires the presence of at least one polycomb response element (PRE). Although the sequence requirements for PREs are not well-defined, the presence of Pho, a PRE-binding PcG protein, is a very good PRE indicator. In this study, we identify two PRE-containing regions at the PcG target gene, giant, one at the promoter, and another approximately 6 kb upstream. PRE-containing fragments, which coincide with localized presence of Pho in chromatin immunoprecipitations, were shown to maintain restricted expression of a lacZ reporter gene in embryos and to cause pairing-sensitive silencing of the mini-white gene in eyes. Our results also reinforce previous observations that although PRE maintenance and pairing-sensitive silencing activities are closely linked, the sequence requirements for these functions are not identical. PMID:24170735

  4. Cleavage patterns of Drosophila melanogaster satellite DNA by restriction enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, C J; Wiesehahn, G; Hearst, J E

    1976-01-01

    The five satellite DNAs of Drosophila melanogaster have been isolated by the combined use of different equilibrium density gradients and hydrolyzed by seven different restriction enzymes; Hae III, Hind II + Hind III, Hinf, Hpa II, EcoR I and EcoR II. The 1.705 satellite is not hydrolyzed by any of the enzymes tested. Hae III is the only restriction enzyme that cuts the 1.672 and 1.686 satellites. The cleavage products from either of these reactions has a heterogeneous size distribution. Part of the 1.688 satellite is cut by Hae III and by Hinf into three discrete fragments with M.W. that are multiples of 2.3 X 10(5) daltons (approximately 350 base pairs). In addition, two minor bands are detected in the 1.688-Hinf products. The mole ratios of the trimer, dimer and monomer are: 1:6.30 : 63.6 for 1.688-Hae III and 1 : 22.0 : 403 for 1.688-Hinf. Circular mitochondrial DNA (rho = 1.680) is cut into discrete fragments by all of the enzymes tested and molecular weights of these fragments have been determined. Images PMID:818625

  5. Cold acclimation wholly reorganizes the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome and metabolome

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Heath A.; Knee, Jose M.; Dennis, Alice B.; Udaka, Hiroko; Marshall, Katie E.; Merritt, Thomas J. S.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold tolerance is a key determinant of insect distribution and abundance, and thermal acclimation can strongly influence organismal stress tolerance phenotypes, particularly in small ectotherms like Drosophila. However, there is limited understanding of the molecular and biochemical mechanisms that confer such impressive plasticity. Here, we use high-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to compare the transcriptomes and metabolomes of D. melanogaster acclimated as adults to warm (rearing) (21.5 °C) or cold conditions (6 °C). Cold acclimation improved cold tolerance and led to extensive biological reorganization: almost one third of the transcriptome and nearly half of the metabolome were differentially regulated. There was overlap in the metabolic pathways identified via transcriptomics and metabolomics, with proline and glutathione metabolism being the most strongly-supported metabolic pathways associated with increased cold tolerance. We discuss several new targets in the study of insect cold tolerance (e.g. dopamine signaling and Na+-driven transport), but many previously identified candidate genes and pathways (e.g. heat shock proteins, Ca2+ signaling, and ROS detoxification) were also identified in the present study, and our results are thus consistent with and extend the current understanding of the mechanisms of insect chilling tolerance. PMID:27357258

  6. Flexible origin of hydrocarbon/pheromone precursors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wicker-Thomas, Claude; Garrido, Damien; Bontonou, Gwénaëlle; Napal, Laura; Mazuras, Nicolas; Denis, Béatrice; Rubin, Thomas; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Montagne, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    In terrestrial insects, cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) provide protection from desiccation. Specific CHCs can also act as pheromones, which are important for successful mating. Oenocytes are abdominal cells thought to act as specialized units for CHC biogenesis that consists of long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) synthesis, optional desaturation(s), elongation to very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), and removal of the carboxyl group. By investigating CHC biogenesis in Drosophila melanogaster, we showed that VLCFA synthesis takes place only within the oenocytes. Conversely, several pathways, which may compensate for one another, can feed the oenocyte pool of LCFAs, suggesting that this step is a critical node for regulating CHC synthesis. Importantly, flies deficient in LCFA synthesis sacrificed their triacylglycerol stores while maintaining some CHC production. Moreover, pheromone production was lower in adult flies that emerged from larvae that were fed excess dietary lipids, and their mating success was lower. Further, we showed that pheromone production in the oenocytes depends on lipid metabolism in the fat tissue and that fatty acid transport protein, a bipartite acyl-CoA synthase (ACS)/FA transporter, likely acts through its ACS domain in the oenocyte pathway of CHC biogenesis. Our study highlights the importance of environmental and physiological inputs in regulating LCFA synthesis to eventually control sexual communication in a polyphagous animal. PMID:26353752

  7. Evolutionary Consequences of Altered Atmospheric Oxygen in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Charette, Marc; Darveau, Charles-A.; Perry, Steve F.; Rundle, Howard D.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster, all derived from a common ancestor, were independently evolved for 34+ generations in one of three treatment environments of varying PO2: hypoxia (5.0–10.1 kPa), normoxia (21.3 kPa), and hyperoxia (40.5 kPa). Several traits related to whole animal performance and metabolism were assayed at various stages via “common garden” and reciprocal transplant assays to directly compare evolved and acclimatory differences among treatments. Results clearly demonstrate the evolution of a greater tolerance to acute hypoxia in the hypoxia-evolved populations, consistent with adaptation to this environment. Greater hypoxia tolerance was associated with an increase in citrate synthase activity in fly homogenate when compared to normoxic (control) populations, suggesting an increase in mitochondrial volume density in these populations. In contrast, no direct evidence of increased performance of the hyperoxia-evolved populations was detected, although a significant decrease in the tolerance of these populations to acute hypoxia suggests a cost to adaptation to hyperoxia. Hyperoxia-evolved populations had lower productivity overall (i.e., across treatment environments) and there was no evidence that hypoxia or hyperoxia-evolved populations had greatest productivity or longevity in their respective treatment environments, suggesting that these assays failed to capture the components of fitness relevant to adaptation. PMID:22046390

  8. Mechanisms of naturally evolved ethanol resistance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fry, James D

    2014-11-15

    The decaying fruit in which Drosophila melanogaster feed and breed can contain ethanol in concentrations as high as 6-7%. In this cosmopolitan species, populations from temperate regions are consistently more resistant to ethanol poisoning than populations from the tropics, but little is known about the physiological basis of this difference. I show that when exposed to low levels of ethanol vapor, flies from a tropical African population accumulated 2-3 times more internal ethanol than flies from a European population, giving evidence that faster ethanol catabolism by European flies contributes to the resistance difference. Using lines differing only in the origin of their third chromosome, however, I show that faster ethanol elimination cannot fully explain the resistance difference, because relative to African third chromosomes, European third chromosomes confer substantially higher ethanol resistance, while having little effect on internal ethanol concentrations. European third chromosomes also confer higher resistance to acetic acid, a metabolic product of ethanol, than African third chromosomes, suggesting that the higher ethanol resistance conferred by the former might be due to increased resistance to deleterious effects of ethanol-derived acetic acid. In support of this hypothesis, when ethanol catabolism was blocked with an Alcohol dehydrogenase mutant, there was no difference in ethanol resistance between flies with European and African third chromosomes. PMID:25392459

  9. Identification of chromosome inheritance modifiers in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Dobie, K W; Kennedy, C D; Velasco, V M; McGrath, T L; Weko, J; Patterson, R W; Karpen, G H

    2001-01-01

    Faithful chromosome inheritance is a fundamental biological activity and errors contribute to birth defects and cancer progression. We have performed a P-element screen in Drosophila melanogaster with the aim of identifying novel candidate genes involved in inheritance. We used a "sensitized" minichromosome substrate (J21A) to screen approximately 3,000 new P-element lines for dominant effects on chromosome inheritance and recovered 78 Sensitized chromosome inheritance modifiers (Scim). Of these, 69 decreased minichromosome inheritance while 9 increased minichromosome inheritance. Fourteen mutations are lethal or semilethal when homozygous and all exhibit dramatic mitotic defects. Inverse PCR combined with genomic analyses identified P insertions within or close to genes with previously described inheritance functions, including wings apart-like (wapl), centrosomin (cnn), and pavarotti (pav). Further, lethal insertions in replication factor complex 4 (rfc4) and GTPase-activating protein 1 (Gap1) exhibit specific mitotic chromosome defects, discovering previously unknown roles for these proteins in chromosome inheritance. The majority of the lines represent mutations in previously uncharacterized loci, many of which have human homologs, and we anticipate that this collection will provide a rich source of mutations in new genes required for chromosome inheritance in metazoans. PMID:11290718

  10. Sleep in Populations of Drosophila Melanogaster1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chang; Haynes, Paula R.; Donelson, Nathan C.; Aharon, Shani

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is a diurnal insect active during the day with consolidated sleep at night. Social interactions between pairs of flies have been shown to affect locomotor activity patterns, but effects on locomotion and sleep patterns have not been assessed for larger populations. Here, we use a commercially available locomotor activity monitor (LAM25H) system to record and analyze sleep behavior. Surprisingly, we find that same-sex populations of flies synchronize their sleep/wake activity, resulting in a population sleep pattern, which is similar but not identical to that of isolated individuals. Like individual flies, groups of flies show circadian and homeostatic regulation of sleep, as well as sexual dimorphism in sleep pattern and sensitivity to starvation and a known sleep-disrupting mutation (amnesiac). Populations of flies, however, exhibit distinct sleep characteristics from individuals. Differences in sleep appear to be due to olfaction-dependent social interactions and change with population size and sex ratio. These data support the idea that it is possible to investigate neural mechanisms underlying the effects of population behaviors on sleep by directly looking at a large number of animals in laboratory conditions. PMID:26465005

  11. Quantitative Genomics of Aggressive Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Alexis C; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Morgan, Theodore J; Mackay, Trudy F. C

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is important for animal survival and reproduction, and excessive aggression is an enormous social and economic burden for human society. Although the role of biogenic amines in modulating aggressive behavior is well characterized, other genetic mechanisms affecting this complex behavior remain elusive. Here, we developed an assay to rapidly quantify aggressive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, and generated replicate selection lines with divergent levels of aggression. The realized heritability of aggressive behavior was approximately 0.10, and the phenotypic response to selection specifically affected aggression. We used whole-genome expression analysis to identify 1,539 probe sets with different expression levels between the selection lines when pooled across replicates, at a false discovery rate of 0.001. We quantified the aggressive behavior of 19 mutations in candidate genes that were generated in a common co-isogenic background, and identified 15 novel genes affecting aggressive behavior. Expression profiling of genetically divergent lines is an effective strategy for identifying genes affecting complex traits. PMID:17044737

  12. Dscam2 affects visual perception in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Danny S.; van Swinderen, Bruno; Millard, S. Sean

    2015-01-01

    Dscam2, a cell surface protein that mediates cellular repulsion, plays a crucial role in the development of the Drosophila melanogaster visual system. Dscam2 generates boundaries between neighboring modules in the fly optic lobe; in Dscam2 mutants this visual system modularity is compromised. Although developmental wiring defects have been well described in the Dscam2 mutant, behavioral consequences have not been investigated. To address this, we examined the visual behavior of Dscam2 mutant flies. Using a phototaxis assay, we ascertained that these flies are not blind, but have a reduced phototaxic response. Through population-based and single fly optomotor assays, we found that Dscam2 mutant flies can track motion but that their response is opposite to control flies under defined experimental conditions. In a fixation paradigm, which allows tethered flies to control the angular position of a visual stimulus, mutant flies' responses were diametrically opposed to those seen in control flies. These data suggest that modest changes in the modularity of the fly visual system in the Dscam2 mutant can dramatically change the perception of specific visual cues and modify behavior. PMID:26106310

  13. Substrate-borne vibratory communication during courtship in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Caroline C G; Hedwig, Berthold; Conduit, Graham; Lawrence, Peter A; Goodwin, Stephen F; Casal, José

    2012-11-20

    Courtship in Drosophila melanogaster has become an iconic example of an innate and interactive series of behaviors. The female signals her acceptance of copulation by becoming immobile in response to a male's display of stereotyped actions. The male and female communicate via vision, air-borne sounds, and pheromones, but what triggers the female's immobility is undetermined. Here, we describe an overlooked and important component of Drosophila courtship. Video recordings and laser vibrometry show that the male abdomen shakes ("quivers"), generating substrate-borne vibrations at about six pulses per second. We present evidence that the female becomes receptive and stops walking because she senses these vibrations, rather than as a response to air-borne songs produced by the male fluttering the wings. We also present evidence that the neural circuits expressing the sex-determination genes fruitless and doublesex drive quivering behavior. These abdominal quivers and associated vibrations, as well as their effect on female receptivity, are conserved in other Drosophila species. Substrate-borne vibrations are an ancient form of communication that is widespread in animals. Our findings in Drosophila open a door to study the neuromuscular circuitry responsible for these signals and the sensory systems needed for their reception. PMID:23103187

  14. Dopamine Modulates Metabolic Rate and Temperature Sensitivity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Taro; Tomita, Jun; Kume, Shoen; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Homeothermal animals, such as mammals, maintain their body temperature by heat generation and heat dissipation, while poikilothermal animals, such as insects, accomplish it by relocating to an environment of their favored temperature. Catecholamines are known to regulate thermogenesis and metabolic rate in mammals, but their roles in other animals are poorly understood. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, has been used as a model system for the genetic studies of temperature preference behavior. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic rate and temperature sensitivity of some temperature sensitive behaviors are regulated by dopamine in Drosophila. Temperature-sensitive molecules like dTrpA1 and shits induce temperature-dependent behavioral changes, and the temperature at which the changes are induced were lowered in the dopamine transporter-defective mutant, fumin. The mutant also displays a preference for lower temperatures. This thermophobic phenotype was rescued by the genetic recovery of the dopamine transporter in dopamine neurons. Flies fed with a dopamine biosynthesis inhibitor (3-iodo-L-tyrosine), which diminishes dopamine signaling, exhibited preference for a higher temperature. Furthermore, we found that the metabolic rate is up-regulated in the fumin mutant. Taken together, dopamine has functions in the temperature sensitivity of behavioral changes and metabolic rate regulation in Drosophila, as well as its previously reported functions in arousal/sleep regulation. PMID:22347491

  15. Flamenco, a gene controlling the gypsy retrovirus of drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Prud`homme, N.; Gans, M.; Masson, M.; Terzian, C.; Bucheton, A.

    1995-02-01

    Gypsy is an endogenous retrovirus of Drosophila melanogaster. It is table and does not transpose with detectable frequencies in most Drosophila strains. However, we have characterized unstable strains, known as MG, in which it transposes at high frequency. These stocks contain more copies of gypsy than usual stocks. Transposition results in mutations in several genes such as ovo and cut. They are stable and are due to gypsy insertions. Integrations into the ovo{sup D1} female sterile-dominant mutation result in a null allele of the gene and occurrence of fertile females. This phenomenon, known as the ovo{sup D1} reversion assay, can be used to quantitate gypsy activity. We have shown that the properties of MG strains result from mutation of a host gene that we called flamenco (flam). It has a strict maternal effect on gypsy mobilization: transposition occurs at high frequency only in the germ line of the progeny of females homozygous for mutations of the gene. It is located at position 65.9 (20A1-3) on the X chromosome. The mutant allele present in MG strains is essentially recessive. Flamenco seems to control the infective properties of gypsy. 40 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers for genetic mapping in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Phan, Alexander C.; Naeemuddin, Mohammed; Mapa, Felipa A.; Ruddy, David A.; Ryan, Jessica J.; Young, Lynn M.; Wells, Trent; Kopczynski, Casey; Ellis, Michael C.

    2001-04-16

    For nearly a century, genetic analysis in Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerful tool for analyzing gene function, yet Drosophila lacks the molecular genetic mapping tools that have recently revolutionized human, mouse and plant genetics. Here, we describe the systematic characterization of a dense set of molecular markers in Drosophila using an STS-based physical map of the genome. We identify 474 biallelic markers in standard laboratory strains of Drosophila that the genome. The majority of these markers are single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and sequences for these variants are provided in an accessible format. The average density of the new markers is 1 marker per 225 kb on the autosomes and 1 marker per 1 Mb on the X chromosome. We include in this survey a set of P-element strains that provide additional utility for high-resolution mapping. We demonstrate one application of the new markers in a simple set of crosses to map a mutation in the hedgehog gene to an interval of <1 Mb. This new map resource significantly increases the efficiency and resolution of recombination mapping and will be of immediate value to the Drosophila research community.

  17. Locus Adh of Drosophila melanogaster under selection for delayed senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Khaustova, N.D.

    1995-05-01

    Dynamics of the Adh activity and frequencies of alleles Adh{sup F} and Adh{sup S} were analyzed under selection for delayed senescence. The experiments were performed on Drosophila melanogaster. Lines Adh{sup S}cn and Adh{sup F}vg and experimental populations cn` and vg`, selected for an increased duration of reproductive period (late oviposition) were used. Analysis of fertility, longevity, viability and resistance to starvation showed that selection for late oviposition resulted in delayed senescence of flies of the experimental populations. Genetic structure of population vg` changed considerably with regard to the Adh locus. This was confirmed by parameters of activity, thermostability, and electrophoretic mobility of the enzyme isolated from flies after 30 generations of selection. Analysis of frequencies of the Adh alleles showed that in both selected populations, which initially had different genetic composition, accumulated allele Adh{sup S}, which encodes the isozyme that is less active but more resistant to inactivation. Genetic mechanism of delayed senescence in Drosophila is assumed to involve selection at vitally important enzyme loci, including Adh. 18 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs.

  18. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  19. In vivo super-resolution RESOLFT microscopy of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schnorrenberg, Sebastian; Grotjohann, Tim; Vorbrüggen, Gerd; Herzig, Alf; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Despite remarkable developments in diffraction unlimited super-resolution microscopy, in vivo nanoscopy of tissues and model organisms is still not satisfactorily established and rarely realized. RESOLFT nanoscopy is particularly suited for live cell imaging because it requires relatively low light levels to overcome the diffraction barrier. Previously, we introduced the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2, which facilitated fast RESOLFT nanoscopy (Grotjohann et al., 2012). In that study, as in most other nanoscopy studies, only cultivated single cells were analyzed. Here, we report on the use of rsEGFP2 for live-cell RESOLFT nanoscopy of sub-cellular structures of intact Drosophila melanogaster larvae and of resected tissues. We generated flies expressing fusion proteins of alpha-tubulin and rsEGFP2 highlighting the microtubule cytoskeleton in all cells. By focusing through the intact larval cuticle, we achieved lateral resolution of <60 nm. RESOLFT nanoscopy enabled time-lapse recordings comprising 40 images and facilitated recordings 40 µm deep within fly tissues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15567.001 PMID:27355614

  20. No apparent cost of evolved immune response in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vanika; Venkatesan, Saudamini; Chatterjee, Martik; Syed, Zeeshan A; Nivsarkar, Vaishnavi; Prasad, Nagaraj G

    2016-04-01

    Maintenance and deployment of the immune system are costly and are hence predicted to trade-off with other resource-demanding traits, such as reproduction. We subjected this longstanding idea to test using laboratory experimental evolution approach. In the present study, replicate populations of Drosophila melanogaster were subjected to three selection regimes-I (Infection with Pseudomonas entomophila), S (Sham-infection with MgSO4 ), and U (Unhandled Control). After 30 generations of selection flies from the I regime had evolved better survivorship upon infection with P. entomophila compared to flies from U and S regimes. However, contrary to expectations and previous reports, we did not find any evidence of trade-offs between immunity and other life history related traits, such as longevity, fecundity, egg hatchability, or development time. After 45 generations of selection, the selection was relaxed for a set of populations. Even after 15 generations, the postinfection survivorship of populations under relaxed selection regime did not decline. We speculate that either there is a negligible cost to the evolved immune response or that trade-offs occur on traits such as reproductive behavior or other immune mechanisms that we have not investigated in this study. Our research suggests that at least under certain conditions, life-history trade-offs might play little role in maintaining variation in immunity. PMID:26932243

  1. Foraging Path-length Protocol for Drosophila melanogaster Larvae.

    PubMed

    Anreiter, Ina; Vasquez, Oscar E; Allen, Aaron M; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster larval path-length phenotype is an established measure used to study the genetic and environmental contributions to behavioral variation. The larval path-length assay was developed to measure individual differences in foraging behavior that were later linked to the foraging gene. Larval path-length is an easily scored trait that facilitates the collection of large sample sizes, at minimal cost, for genetic screens. Here we provide a detailed description of the current protocol for the larval path-length assay first used by Sokolowski. The protocol details how to reproducibly handle test animals, perform the behavioral assay and analyze the data. An example of how the assay can be used to measure behavioral plasticity in response to environmental change, by manipulating feeding environment prior to performing the assay, is also provided. Finally, appropriate test design as well as environmental factors that can modify larval path-length such as food quality, developmental age and day effects are discussed. PMID:27167330

  2. Physiological effects of L-theanine on Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Li, Wenzhe; Yu, Huiyi; Yuan, Ruiqi; Yang, Yang; Pung, Kingston; Li, Ping; Xue, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Green tea has been consumed as the most popular drink in East Asia for centuries, and is believed to have a wide range of health benefits. L-Theanine, the major component of the free amino acids in green tea, has been reported to display neuronal protection and tumor inhibition in vitro, but its physiological effects on animal development and behavior remain elusive. In this report, we used Drosophila melanogaster, the fruit fly, as a model organism to investigate the physiological effects of L-theanine. Flies were fed with three different concentrations of theanine as a dietary supplement after eclosion, and were examined for a variety of physiological parameters at different time points. We found theanine treatment results in significantly increased locomotion and courtship ability, and decreased resistance against wet and dry starvation in males, but not in females. Furthermore, theanine application diminished UV tolerance in females, but not in males. However, we did not perceive distinguishable effect of theanine on animal development, life span, weight, and tolerance of heat and anoxia. This work represents the first comprehensive physiological investigation of L-theanine at the whole animal level, and shall shed light on the mechanistic study of theanine in the future. PMID:24284483

  3. [Molecular and cellular aspects of radiation hormesis in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Vaĭserman, A M; Litoshenko, A Ia; Kvitnitskaia-Ryzhova, T Iu; Koshel', N M; Mozzhukhina, T G; Mikhal'skiĭ, S A; Voĭtenko, V P

    2003-01-01

    The long-term effects of the R-irradiation of D. melanogaster at the 1-hour egg stage with the dosages of 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 Gy were investigated. DNA samples were isolated from whole 5-6-days adult males. The aliquots of DNA were digested by S1-nuclease. Preimaginal stage lethality increased with irradiation dose increasing. At the same time, decrease in imaginal LS (life span) was observed after irradiation with the greatest dose (4 Gy) only. Moreover, hormesis by LS has revealed: in males irradiation with 0.25, 0.75 and 1 Gy increased the mean LS, and with 0.25 and 0.5 Gy caused the maximum LS; in females exposures with 0.25, 0.75 and 2 Gy increased the maximum LS. The densitometric assay of DNA electrophoregrams showed decrease by 39.2% of the part of high-molecular-weight DNA in control as a result of S1-nuclease action. Samples of DNA from the irradiated flies were more stable to enzyme action. The higher stability of DNA originated from the irradiated flies could be the result of reparation system activation. Ultrastructural changes induced at the egg stage by irradiation at the dose of 0.75 Gy testify the increased transcriptional activity of the brain cells. PMID:12945182

  4. Unique transposon landscapes are pervasive across Drosophila melanogaster genomes

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Reazur; Chirn, Gung-wei; Kanodia, Abhay; Sytnikova, Yuliya A.; Brembs, Björn; Bergman, Casey M.; Lau, Nelson C.

    2015-01-01

    To understand how transposon landscapes (TLs) vary across animal genomes, we describe a new method called the Transposon Insertion and Depletion AnaLyzer (TIDAL) and a database of >300 TLs in Drosophila melanogaster (TIDAL-Fly). Our analysis reveals pervasive TL diversity across cell lines and fly strains, even for identically named sub-strains from different laboratories such as the ISO1 strain used for the reference genome sequence. On average, >500 novel insertions exist in every lab strain, inbred strains of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), and fly isolates in the Drosophila Genome Nexus (DGN). A minority (<25%) of transposon families comprise the majority (>70%) of TL diversity across fly strains. A sharp contrast between insertion and depletion patterns indicates that many transposons are unique to the ISO1 reference genome sequence. Although TL diversity from fly strains reaches asymptotic limits with increasing sequencing depth, rampant TL diversity causes unsaturated detection of TLs in pools of flies. Finally, we show novel transposon insertions negatively correlate with Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA) levels for most transposon families, except for the highly-abundant roo retrotransposon. Our study provides a useful resource for Drosophila geneticists to understand how transposons create extensive genomic diversity in fly cell lines and strains. PMID:26578579

  5. Genome-wide analysis of promoter architecture in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Landolin, Jane M.; Brown, James B.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Takahashi, Hazuki; Lassmann, Timo; Yu, Charles; Booth, Benjamin W.; Zhang, Dayu; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Boley, Nathan; Andrews, Justen; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Bickel, Peter J.; Carninci, Piero; Carlson, Joseph W.; Celniker, Susan E.

    2010-10-20

    Core promoters are critical regions for gene regulation in higher eukaryotes. However, the boundaries of promoter regions, the relative rates of initiation at the transcription start sites (TSSs) distributed within them, and the functional significance of promoter architecture remain poorly understood. We produced a high-resolution map of promoters active in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo by integrating data from three independent and complementary methods: 21 million cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) tags, 1.2 million RNA ligase mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RLMRACE) reads, and 50,000 cap-trapped expressed sequence tags (ESTs). We defined 12,454 promoters of 8037 genes. Our analysis indicates that, due to non-promoter-associated RNA background signal, previous studies have likely overestimated the number of promoter-associated CAGE clusters by fivefold. We show that TSS distributions form a complex continuum of shapes, and that promoters active in the embryo and adult have highly similar shapes in 95% of cases. This suggests that these distributions are generally determined by static elements such as local DNA sequence and are not modulated by dynamic signals such as histone modifications. Transcription factor binding motifs are differentially enriched as a function of promoter shape, and peaked promoter shape is correlated with both temporal and spatial regulation of gene expression. Our results contribute to the emerging view that core promoters are functionally diverse and control patterning of gene expression in Drosophila and mammals.

  6. Dissection and Immunostaining of Imaginal Discs from Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Spratford, Carrie M.; Kumar, Justin P.

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of post-embryonic development in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, takes place within a set of sac-like structures called imaginal discs. These discs give rise to a high percentage of adult structures that are found within the adult fly. Here we describe a protocol that has been optimized to recover these discs and prepare them for analysis with antibodies, transcriptional reporters and protein traps. This procedure is best suited for thin tissues like imaginal discs, but can be easily modified for use with thicker tissues such as the larval brain and adult ovary. The written protocol and accompanying video will guide the reader/viewer through the dissection of third instar larvae, fixation of tissue, and treatment of imaginal discs with antibodies. The protocol can be used to dissect imaginal discs from younger first and second instar larvae as well. The advantage of this protocol is that it is relatively short and it has been optimized for the high quality preservation of the dissected tissue. Another advantage is that the fixation procedure that is employed works well with the overwhelming number of antibodies that recognize Drosophila proteins. In our experience, there is a very small number of sensitive antibodies that do not work well with this procedure. In these situations, the remedy appears to be to use an alternate fixation cocktail while continuing to follow the guidelines that we have set forth for the dissection steps and antibody incubations. PMID:25285379

  7. Evolutionary, environmental and tissue controls on the occurrence of multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein

    SciTech Connect

    Battey, J.F.; Ohlrogge, J.B. )

    1989-04-01

    Previous research has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP). We have examined the development of this trait in evolutionarily diverse species. Isoforms were resolved by Western blotting and native PAGE of {sup 3}H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed in primitive vascular plants including gymnosperms, ferns and Psilotum and the nonvascular liverworts and mosses. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, unicellular algae and bacteria such as Chlamydomonas, Dunaliella, Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single electrophoretic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants. We have also examined light and tissue control over the expression of ACP isoforms. The expression of multiple forms of ACP in leaf of Spinacia and Avena is altered very little by light. Rather, the different patterns of ACP isoforms are primarily dependant on tissue source.

  8. Myosin motor isoforms direct specification of actomyosin function by tropomyosins

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Joseph E.; Pollard, Luther W.; Murray, George G.; Lord, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Myosins and tropomyosins represent two cytoskeletal proteins that often work together with actin filaments in contractile and motile cellular processes. While the specialized role of tropomyosin in striated muscle myosin-II regulation is well characterized, its role in non-muscle myosin regulation is poorly understood. We previously showed that fission yeast tropomyosin (Cdc8p) positively regulates myosin-II (Myo2p) and myosin-V (Myo52p) motors. To understand the broader implications of this regulation we examined the role of two mammalian tropomyosins (Tpm3.1cy/Tm5NM1 and Tpm4.2cy/Tm4) recently implicated in cancer cell proliferation and metastasis. Like Cdc8p, the Tpm3.1cy and Tpm4.2cy isoforms significantly enhance Myo2p and Myo52p motor activity, converting non-processive Myo52p molecules into processive motors that can walk along actin tracks as single molecules. In contrast to the positive regulation of Myo2p and Myo52p, Cdc8p and the mammalian tropomyosins potently inhibited skeletal muscle myosin-II, while having negligible effects on the highly processive mammalian myosin-Va. In support of a conserved role for certain tropomyosins in regulating non-muscle actomyosin structures, Tpm3.1cy supported normal contractile ring function in fission yeast. Our work reveals that actomyosin regulation by tropomyosin is dependent on the myosin isoform, highlighting a general role for specific isoforms of tropomyosin in sorting myosin motor outputs. PMID:25712463

  9. PSA Isoforms' Velocities for Early Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Isabel; Klocker, Helmut; Pichler, Renate; Horninger, Wolfgang; Bektic, Jasmin

    2015-06-01

    Free prostate-specific antigen (fPSA) and its molecular isoforms are suggested for enhancement of PSA testing in prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study we evaluated whether PSA isoforms' velocities might serve as a tool to improve early PCa diagnosis. Our study population included 381 men who had undergone at least one ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy whose pathologic examination yielded PCa or showed no evidence of prostatic malignancy. Serial PSA, fPSA, and proPSA measurements were performed on serum samples covering 7 years prior to biopsy using Beckmann Coulter Access immunoassays. Afterwards, velocities of PSA (PSAV), fPSA% (fPSA%V), proPSA% (proPSA%V) and the ratio proPSA/PSA/V were calculated and their ability to discriminate cancer from benign disease was evaluated. Among 381 men included in the study, 202 (53%) were diagnosed with PCa and underwent radical prostatectomy at our Department. PSAV, fPSA%V, proPSA%V as well as proPSA/PSA/V were able to differentiate significantly between PCa and non-cancerous prostate. The highest discriminatory power between cancer and benign disease has been observed two and one year prior to diagnosis with all measured parameters. Among all measured parameters, fPSA%V showed the best cancer specificity of 45.3% with 90% of sensitivity. In summary, our results highlight the value of PSA isoforms' velocity for early detection of PCa. Especially fPSA%V should be used in the clinical setting to increase cancer detection specificity. PMID:26026127

  10. Different motifs regulate trafficking of SorCS1 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten S; Keat, Sady J; Hamati, Jida W; Madsen, Peder; Gutzmann, Jakob J; Engelsberg, Arne; Pedersen, Karen M; Gustafsen, Camilla; Nykjaer, Anders; Gliemann, Jørgen; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Kuhl, Dietmar; Petersen, Claus M; Hermey, Guido

    2008-06-01

    The type I transmembrane protein SorCS1 is a member of the Vps10p-domain receptor family comprised of Sortilin, SorLA and SorCS1, -2 and -3. Current information indicates that Sortilin and SorLA mediate intracellular protein trafficking and sorting, but little is known about the cellular functions of the SorCS subgroup. SorCS1 binds platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and is expressed in isoforms differing only in their cytoplasmic domains. Here, we identify two novel isoforms of mouse SorCS1 designated m-SorCS1c and -d. In situ hybridization revealed a combinatorial expression pattern of the variants in brain and embryonic tissues. We demonstrate that among the mouse variants, only SorCS1c mediates internalization and that the highly conserved SorCS1c is internalized through a canonical tyrosine-based motif. In contrast, human SorCS1a, whose cytoplasmic domain is completely different from mouse SorCS1a, is internalized through a DXXLL motif. We report that the human SorCS1a cytoplasmic domain interacts with the alphaC/sigma2 subunits of the adaptor protein (AP)-2 complex, and internalization of human SorCS1a and -c is mediated by AP-2. Our results suggest that the endocytic isoforms target internalized cargo to lysosomes but are not engaged in Golgi-endosomal transport to a significant degree. PMID:18315530

  11. Expression of Gls and Gls2 glutaminase isoforms in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carolina; Sánchez-Mejías, Elisabeth; Dávila, José C; Martín-Rufián, Mercedes; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Vitorica, Javier; Alonso, Francisco J; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Norenberg, Michael D; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V; Jayakumar, Arumugan R; Gutiérrez, Antonia; Márquez, Javier

    2015-03-01

    The expression of glutaminase in glial cells has been a controversial issue and matter of debate for many years. Actually, glutaminase is essentially considered as a neuronal marker in brain. Astrocytes are endowed with efficient and high capacity transport systems to recapture synaptic glutamate which seems to be consistent with the absence of glutaminase in these glial cells. In this work, a comprehensive study was devised to elucidate expression of glutaminase in neuroglia and, more concretely, in astrocytes. Immunocytochemistry in rat and human brain tissues employing isoform-specific antibodies revealed expression of both Gls and Gls2 glutaminase isozymes in glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal populations as well as in astrocytes. Nevertheless, there was a different subcellular distribution: Gls isoform was always present in mitochondria while Gls2 appeared in two different locations, mitochondria and nucleus. Confocal microscopy and double immunofluorescence labeling in cultured astrocytes confirmed the same pattern previously seen in brain tissue samples. Astrocytic glutaminase expression was also assessed at the mRNA level, real-time quantitative RT-PCR detected transcripts of four glutaminase isozymes but with marked differences on their absolute copy number: the predominance of Gls isoforms over Gls2 transcripts was remarkable (ratio of 144:1). Finally, we proved that astrocytic glutaminase proteins possess enzymatic activity by in situ activity staining: concrete populations of astrocytes were labeled in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus of rat brain demonstrating functional catalytic activity. These results are relevant for the stoichiometry of the Glu/Gln cycle at the tripartite synapse and suggest novel functions for these classical metabolic enzymes. PMID:25297978

  12. Identification of signals that facilitate isoform specific nucleolar localization of myosin IC

    SciTech Connect

    Schwab, Ryan S.; Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Yunus, Sharifah Z.S.A.; Domaradzki, Tera; Hofmann, Wilma A.

    2013-05-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily that localizes to the cytoplasm and the nucleus, where it is involved in transcription by RNA polymerases I and II, intranuclear transport, and nuclear export. In mammalian cells, three isoforms of myosin IC are expressed that differ only in the addition of short isoform-specific N-terminal peptides. Despite the high sequence homology, the isoforms show differences in cellular distribution, in localization to nuclear substructures, and in their interaction with nuclear proteins through yet unknown mechanisms. In this study, we used EGFP-fusion constructs that express truncated or mutated versions of myosin IC isoforms to detect regions that are involved in isoform-specific localization. We identified two nucleolar localization signals (NoLS). One NoLS is located in the myosin IC isoform B specific N-terminal peptide, the second NoLS is located upstream of the neck region within the head domain. We demonstrate that both NoLS are functional and necessary for nucleolar localization of specifically myosin IC isoform B. Our data provide a first mechanistic explanation for the observed functional differences between the myosin IC isoforms and are an important step toward our understanding of the underlying mechanisms that regulate the various and distinct functions of myosin IC isoforms. - Highlights: ► Two NoLS have been identified in the myosin IC isoform B sequence. ► Both NoLS are necessary for myosin IC isoform B specific nucleolar localization. ► First mechanistic explanation of functional differences between the isoforms.

  13. Genetic architecture of olfactory behavior in Drosophila melanogaster: differences and similarities across development

    PubMed Central

    Lavagnino, N.J.; Arya, G.H.; Korovaichuk, A.; Fanara, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the holometabolous insect Drosophila melanogaster, genetic, physiological and anatomical aspects of olfaction are well known in the adult stage, while larval stages olfactory behavior has received some attention it has been less studied than its adult counterpart. Most of these studies focus on olfactory receptors (Or) genes that produce peripheral odor recognition. In this paper, through a loss-of-function screen using P-element inserted lines and also by means of expression analyses of larval olfaction candidate genes, we extended the uncovering of the genetic underpinnings of D. melanogaster larval olfactory behavior by demonstrating that larval olfactory behavior is, in addition to Or genes, orchestrated by numerous genes with diverse functions. Also, our results points out that the genetic architecture of olfactory behavior in D. melanogaster presents a dynamic and changing organization across environments and ontogeny. PMID:23563598

  14. Evolution of the amylase isozymes in the Drosophila melanogaster species subgroup.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Y; Inomata, N; Yamazaki, T

    1999-10-01

    The relationship between the net charge of molecules and their mobility on electrophoresis was analyzed for Drosophila alpha-amylases. Most of the differences in electrophoretic mobility, 98.2%, can be explained by the charge state. Therefore five reference amino acid sites, which are informative residues for charge differences among amylase isozymes, were considered for the evolution of the isozymes in Drosophila melanogaster. The amylase isozymes in D. melanogaster can be classified into three groups, I (AMY1, AMY2, and AMY3-A), II (AMY3-B and AMY4), and III (AMY5, AMY6-A, and AMY6-B), based on the differences in the reference sites. The most primitive amylase in D. melanogaster was found to belong to Group I, most likely the AMY2 isozyme. Groups II and III could have been derived from Group I. These results were confirmed by the analysis of 38 amino acid sites with charge differences in Drosophila. PMID:10626037

  15. Is Esterase-P Encoded by a Cryptic Pseudogene in Drosophila Melanogaster?

    PubMed Central

    Balakirev, E. S.; Ayala, F. J.

    1996-01-01

    We have amplified and sequenced the gene encoding Esterase-P (Est-P) in 10 strains of Drosophila melanogaster. Three premature termination codons occur in the coding region of the gene in two strains. This observation, together with other indirect evidence, leads us to propose that Est-P may be a pseudogene in D. melanogaster. Est-P would be a ``cryptic'' pseudogene, in the sense that it retains intact the coding sequence (without stop codons and other alterations usually observed in pseudogenes) in most D. melanogaster strains. We conjecture that the β-esterase cluster may consist in other Drosophila species of functional and nonfunctional genes. We also conjecture that the rarity of detected pseudogenes in Drosophila may be due to the difficulty of discovering them, because most of them are cryptic. PMID:8978040

  16. FlyVar: a database for genetic variation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Jiang, Lichun; Chen, Yong; Haelterman, Nele A.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    FlyVar is a publicly and freely available platform that addresses the increasing need of next generation sequencing data analysis in the Drosophila research community. It is composed of three parts. First, a database that contains 5.94 million DNA polymorphisms found in Drosophila melanogaster derived from whole genome shotgun sequencing of 612 genomes of D. melanogaster. In addition, a list of 1094 dispensable genes has been identified. Second, a graphical user interface (GUI) has been implemented to allow easy and flexible queries of the database. Third, a set of interactive online tools enables filtering and annotation of genomic sequences obtained from individual D. melanogaster strains to identify candidate mutations. FlyVar permits the analysis of next generation sequencing data without the need of extensive computational training or resources. Database URL: www.iipl.fudan.edu.cn/FlyVar. PMID:26289428

  17. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced /sup 155/Eu:/sup 3 +/ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor.

  18. The multigene families of actinoporins (part I): Isoforms and genetic structure.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Alvarado-Mesén, J; Lanio, M E; Álvarez, C; Barbosa, J A R G; Pazos, I F

    2015-09-01

    Actinoporins are basic pore-forming proteins produced by sea anemones, with molecular weight around 20 kDa showing high affinity for sphingomyelin-containing membranes. Most sea anemones produce more than one actinoporin isoform differing in isoelectric point, molecular weigth and cytolytic activity. Examples of sea anemones with actinoporin isoforms are: Actinia equina with at least five isoform genes; Actinia tenebrosa, three isoforms; Actinia fragacea, five isoforms; Actineria villosa, Phyllodiscus semoni, Stichodactyla helianthus and Oulactis orientalis, with two isoforms each one, and Heteractis crispa with twenty-four isoforms. Additionally, thirty-four different amino acid sequences were deduced from fifty-two nucleotide sequences of Heteractis magnifica toxins suggesting the presence of a large number of isoforms or allelic variants. Many amino acidic changes in the isoforms are located in important regions for pore formation. The genetic structure of actinoporins comprises a pre-propeptide and a mature toxin region; therefore, actinoporins could be synthetized in the Golgi apparatus as precursor forms. The subsequent maturation of the toxins involves a proteolytic processing during secretion. Here we hypothesize that sea anemones could have suffered duplication, conversion and mutation of genes that produced multigene families as an efficient response to evolutionary pressure, leading to successful strategies of predatory and defensive function. PMID:26187849

  19. Male-Specific Fruitless Isoforms Target Neurodevelopmental Genes to Specify a Sexually Dimorphic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Neville, Megan C.; Nojima, Tetsuya; Ashley, Elizabeth; Parker, Darren J.; Walker, John; Southall, Tony; Van de Sande, Bram; Marques, Ana C.; Fischer, Bettina; Brand, Andrea H.; Russell, Steven; Ritchie, Michael G.; Aerts, Stein; Goodwin, Stephen F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background In Drosophila, male courtship behavior is regulated in large part by the gene fruitless (fru). fru encodes a set of putative transcription factors that promote male sexual behavior by controlling the development of sexually dimorphic neuronal circuitry. Little is known about how Fru proteins function at the level of transcriptional regulation or the role that isoform diversity plays in the formation of a male-specific nervous system. Results To characterize the roles of sex-specific Fru isoforms in specifying male behavior, we generated novel isoform-specific mutants and used a genomic approach to identify direct Fru isoform targets during development. We demonstrate that all Fru isoforms directly target genes involved in the development of the nervous system, with individual isoforms exhibiting unique binding specificities. We observe that fru behavioral phenotypes are specified by either a single isoform or a combination of isoforms. Finally, we illustrate the utility of these data for the identification of novel sexually dimorphic genomic enhancers and novel downstream regulators of male sexual behavior. Conclusions These findings suggest that Fru isoform diversity facilitates both redundancy and specificity in gene expression, and that the regulation of neuronal developmental genes may be the most ancient and conserved role of fru in the specification of a male-specific nervous system. PMID:24440396

  20. Insecticidal compounds against Drosophila melanogaster from Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Mitsuo; Anzai, Jun; Fujioka, Jun; Isikawa, Yukio

    2003-10-01

    Dimethyl malate (1) and 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (2) were isolated as insecticidal compounds by bioassay-guided fractionation from MeOH extract of the fruits of Cornus officinalis Sieb. et Zucc. Insecticidal activity against larvae of D. melanogaster was demonstrated: 1 and 2 gave the LC50 value of 6.15 and 11.8 micromol/mL of diet concentration, respectively. Acute toxicity against adults of D. melanogaster, 1 and 2 had the insecticidal activity, with the LD50 value of 21.5 and 34.0 microg/adult. PMID:14526912

  1. Solvent dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) does not induce aneuploidy in oocytes of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Traut, H.

    1983-01-01

    Both with a conventional method and with the ''aneuploidy pattern method'' the authors tested whether the solvent dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) is able to induce aneuploidy (numerical chromosome aberrations) in oocytes of Drosophila melanogaster. DMSO was fed as a 2% solution to Drosophila females. No evidence for a mutagenic activity was obtained. This finding and the negative results reported by other authors for other types of mutation in Drosophila show that DMSO can be used as a solvent for chemical agents in mutagencity screening in Drosophila melanogaster.

  2. Role of Rho kinase isoforms in murine allergic airway responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M; Liu, P-Y; Kasahara, D I; Williams, A S; Verbout, N G; Halayko, A J; Fedulov, A; Shoji, T; Williams, E S; Noma, K; Shore, S A; Liao, J K

    2011-10-01

    Inhibition of Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinases (ROCKs) reduces allergic airway responses in mice. The purpose of this study was to determine the roles of the two ROCK isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, in these responses. Wildtype (WT) mice and heterozygous ROCK1 and ROCK2 knockout mice (ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-), respectively) were sensitised and challenged with ovalbumin. ROCK expression and activation were assessed by western blotting. Airway responsiveness was measured by forced oscillation. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the lungs were fixed for histological assessment. Compared with WT mice, ROCK1 and ROCK2 expression were 50% lower in lungs of ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) mice, respectively, without changes in the other isoform. In WT lungs, ROCK activation increased after ovalbumin challenge and was sustained for several hours. This activation was reduced in ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) lungs. Airway responsiveness was comparable in WT, ROCK1(+/-), and ROCK2(+/-) mice challenged with PBS. Ovalbumin challenge caused airway hyperresponsiveness in WT, but not ROCK1(+/-) or ROCK2(+/-) mice. Lavage eosinophils and goblet cell hyperplasia were significantly reduced in ovalbumin-challenged ROCK1(+/-) and ROCK2(+/-) versus WT mice. Ovalbumin-induced changes in lavage interleukin-13, interleukin-5 and lymphocytes were also reduced in ROCK1(+/-) mice. In conclusion, both ROCK1 and ROCK2 are important in regulating allergic airway responses. PMID:21565918

  3. BDNF isoforms: a round trip ticket between neurogenesis and serotonin?

    PubMed

    Foltran, Rocío Beatriz; Diaz, Silvina Laura

    2016-07-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF, was discovered more than 30 years ago and, like other members of the neurotrophin family, this neuropeptide is synthetized as a proneurotrophin, the pro-BDNF, which is further cleaved to yield mature BDNF. The myriad of actions of these two BDNF isoforms in the central nervous system is constantly increasing and requires the development of sophisticated tools and animal models to refine our understanding. This review is focused on BDNF isoforms, their participation in the process of neurogenesis taking place in the hippocampus of adult mammals, and the modulation of their expression by serotonergic agents. Interestingly, around this triumvirate of BDNF, serotonin, and neurogenesis, a series of recent research has emerged with apparently counterintuitive results. This calls for an exhaustive analysis of the data published so far and encourages thorough work in the quest for new hypotheses in the field. BDNF is synthetized as a pre-proneurotrophin. After removal of the pre-region, proBDNF can be cleaved by intracellular or extracellular proteases. Mature BDNF can bind TrkB receptors, promoting their homodimerization and intracellular phosphorylation. Phosphorylated-TrkB can activate three different signaling pathways. Whereas G-protein-coupled receptors can transactivate TrkB receptors, truncated forms can inhibit mBDNF signaling. Pro-BDNF binds p75(NTR) by its mature domain, whereas the pro-region binds co-receptors. PMID:27167299

  4. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M; Bravo, Javier A; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2014-10-21

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)(-/-) mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  5. A New View of Ras Isoforms in Cancers.

    PubMed

    Nussinov, Ruth; Tsai, Chung-Jung; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Jang, Hyunbum

    2016-01-01

    Does small GTPase K-Ras4A have a single state or two states, one resembling K-Ras4B and the other N-Ras? A recent study of K-Ras4A made the remarkable observation that even in the absence of the palmitoyl, K-Ras4A can be active at the plasma membrane. Importantly, this suggests that K-Ras4A may exist in two distinct signaling states. In state 1, K-Ras4A is only farnesylated, like K-Ras4B; in state 2, farnesylated and palmitoylated, like N-Ras. The K-Ras4A hypervariable region sequence is positively charged, in between K-Ras4B and N-Ras. Taken together, this raises the possibility that the farnesylated but nonpalmitoylated state 1, like K-Ras4B, binds calmodulin and is associated with colorectal and other adenocarcinomas like lung cancer and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand, state 2 may be associated with melanoma and other cancers where N-Ras is a major contributor, such as acute myeloid leukemia. Importantly, H-Ras has two, singly and doubly, palmitoylated states that may also serve distinct functional roles. The multiple signaling states of palmitoylated Ras isoforms question the completeness of small GTPase Ras isoform statistics in different cancer types and call for reevaluation of concepts and protocols. They may also call for reconsideration of oncogenic Ras therapeutics. PMID:26659836

  6. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  7. Genomic Variation in Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Charles H.; Stevens, Kristian; Cardeno, Charis; Lee, Yuh Chwen G.; Schrider, Daniel R.; Pool, John E.; Langley, Sasha A.; Suarez, Charlyn; Corbett-Detig, Russell B.; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Fang, Shu; Nista, Phillip M.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Kern, Andrew D.; Dewey, Colin N.; Song, Yun S.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Begun, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This report of independent genome sequences of two natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster (37 from North America and 6 from Africa) provides unique insight into forces shaping genomic polymorphism and divergence. Evidence of interactions between natural selection and genetic linkage is abundant not only in centromere- and telomere-proximal regions, but also throughout the euchromatic arms. Linkage disequilibrium, which decays within 1 kbp, exhibits a strong bias toward coupling of the more frequent alleles and provides a high-resolution map of recombination rate. The juxtaposition of population genetics statistics in small genomic windows with gene structures and chromatin states yields a rich, high-resolution annotation, including the following: (1) 5′- and 3′-UTRs are enriched for regions of reduced polymorphism relative to lineage-specific divergence; (2) exons overlap with windows of excess relative polymorphism; (3) epigenetic marks associated with active transcription initiation sites overlap with regions of reduced relative polymorphism and relatively reduced estimates of the rate of recombination; (4) the rate of adaptive nonsynonymous fixation increases with the rate of crossing over per base pair; and (5) both duplications and deletions are enriched near origins of replication and their density correlates negatively with the rate of crossing over. Available demographic models of X and autosome descent cannot account for the increased divergence on the X and loss of diversity associated with the out-of-Africa migration. Comparison of the variation among these genomes to variation among genomes from D. simulans suggests that many targets of directional selection are shared between these species. PMID:22673804

  8. Genome-wide association study of sleep in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sleep is a highly conserved behavior, yet its duration and pattern vary extensively among species and between individuals within species. The genetic basis of natural variation in sleep remains unknown. Results We used the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) to perform a genome-wide association (GWA) study of sleep in D. melanogaster. We identified candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in the mean as well as the environmental sensitivity of sleep traits; these SNPs typically had sex-specific or sex-biased effects, and were generally located in non-coding regions. The majority of SNPs (80.3%) affecting sleep were at low frequency and had moderately large effects. Additive models incorporating multiple SNPs explained as much as 55% of the genetic variance for sleep in males and females. Many of these loci are known to interact physically and/or genetically, enabling us to place them in candidate genetic networks. We confirmed the role of seven novel loci on sleep using insertional mutagenesis and RNA interference. Conclusions We identified many SNPs in novel loci that are potentially associated with natural variation in sleep, as well as SNPs within genes previously known to affect Drosophila sleep. Several of the candidate genes have human homologues that were identified in studies of human sleep, suggesting that genes affecting variation in sleep are conserved across species. Our discovery of genetic variants that influence environmental sensitivity to sleep may have a wider application to all GWA studies, because individuals with highly plastic genotypes will not have consistent phenotypes. PMID:23617951

  9. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hoskins, Roger A.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; George, Reed A.; Svirskas, Robert; et al

    2015-01-14

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy andmore » middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. In conclusion, further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads.« less

  10. Environment dependence of mutational parameters for viability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, James D; Heinsohn, Stefanie L

    2002-01-01

    The genomic rate of mildly deleterious mutations (U) figures prominently in much evolutionary and ecological theory. In Drosophila melanogaster, estimates of U have varied widely, from <0.1 to nearly 1 per zygote. The source of this variation is unknown, but could include differences in the conditions used for assaying fitness traits. We examined how assay conditions affect estimates of the rates and effects of viability-depressing mutations in two sets of lines with accumulated spontaneous mutations on the second chromosome. In each set, the among-line variance in egg-to-adult viability was significantly greater when viability was assayed using a high parental density than when it was assayed using a low density. In contrast, the proportional decline in viability due to new mutations did not differ between densities. Two other manipulations, lowering the temperature and adding ethanol to the medium, had no significant effects on either the mean decline or among-line variance. Cross-environment genetic correlations in viability were generally close to one, implying that most mutations reduced viability in all environments. Using data from the low-density, lower-bound estimates of U approached the classic, high values of Mukai and Ohnishi; at the high density, U estimates were similar to recently reported low values. The difference in estimated mutation rates, taken at face value, would imply that many mutations affected fitness at low density but not at high density, but this is shown to be incompatible with the observed high cross-environment correlations. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Regardless of the interpretation, the results show that assay conditions can have a large effect on estimates of mutational parameters for fitness traits. PMID:12136018

  11. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Joseph W.; Wan, Kenneth H.; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E.; Booth, Benjamin W.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; George, Reed A.; Svirskas, Robert; Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Damia, Elisabetta; Messina, Giovanni; Méndez-Lago, María; de Pablos, Beatriz; Demakova, Olga V.; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N.; Boldyreva, Lidiya V.; Marra, Marco; Carvalho, A. Bernardo; Dimitri, Patrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Zhimulev, Igor F.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Karpen, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy and middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. Further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads. PMID:25589440

  12. Involvement of Redox State in the Aging of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Radyuk, Svetlana N.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The main objective of this review was to provide an exposition of investigations, conducted in Drosophila melanogaster, on the role of reactive oxygen species and redox state in the aging process. While early transgenic studies did not clearly support the validity of the oxidative stress hypothesis of aging, predicated on the accumulation of structural damage, they spawned a broader search for redox-related effects that might impact the aging process. Recent Advances: Initial evidence implicating the thiol redox state as a possible causative factor in aging has been obtained in Drosophila. Overexpression of genes, such as GCL, G6PD, Prx2, and Prx5, which are involved in the maintenance of thiol redox homeostasis, has strong positive effects on longevity. Further, the depletion of peroxiredoxin activity in the mitochondria through the double knockdown of Prx5 and Prx3 not only results in a redox crisis but also elicits a rapid aging phenotype. Critical Issues: Herein, we summarize the present status of knowledge about the main components of the machinery controlling thiol redox homeostasis and describe how age-related redox fluctuations might impact aging more acutely through disruption of the redox-sensitive signaling mechanisms rather than via the simple accumulation of structural damage. Future Directions: Based on these initial insights into the plausible impact of redox fluctuations on redox signaling, future studies should focus on the pathways that have been explicitly implicated in aging, such as insulin signaling, TOR, and JNK/FOXO, with particular attention to elements that are redox sensitive. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 788–803. PMID:23458359

  13. Strong Costs and Benefits of Winter Acclimatization in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Schou, Mads Fristrup; Loeschcke, Volker; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2015-01-01

    Studies on thermal acclimation in insects are often performed on animals acclimated in the laboratory under conditions that are not ecologically relevant. Costs and benefits of acclimation responses under such conditions may not reflect costs and benefits in natural populations subjected to daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations. Here we estimated costs and benefits in thermal tolerance limits in relation to winter acclimatization of Drosophila melanogaster. We sampled flies from a natural habitat during winter in Denmark (field flies) and compared heat and cold tolerance of these to that of flies collected from the same natural population, but acclimated to 25 °C or 13 °C in the laboratory (laboratory flies). We further obtained thermal performance curves for egg-to-adult viability of field and laboratory (25 °C) flies, to estimate possible cross-generational effects of acclimation. We found much higher cold tolerance and a lowered heat tolerance in field flies compared to laboratory flies reared at 25 °C. Flies reared in the laboratory at 13 °C exhibited the same thermal cost-benefit relations as the winter acclimatized flies. We also found a cost of winter acclimatization in terms of decreased egg-to-adult viability at high temperatures of eggs laid by winter acclimatized flies. Based on our findings we suggest that winter acclimatization in nature can induce strong benefits in terms of increased cold tolerance. These benefits can be reproduced in the laboratory under ecologically relevant rearing and testing conditions, and should be incorporated in species distribution modelling. Winter acclimatization also leads to decreased heat tolerance. This may create a mismatch between acclimation responses and the thermal environment, e.g. if temperatures suddenly increase during spring, under current and expected more variable future climatic conditions. PMID:26075607

  14. Cytochrome P450-Dependent Metabolism of Caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone—an inhibitor of CYP enzymes—showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects. PMID:25671424

  15. Histone Gene Multiplicity and Position Effect Variegation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gerald D.; Sinclair, Donald A.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.

    1983-01-01

    The histone genes of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster are reiterated 100–150 times per haploid genome and are located in the segment of chromosome 2 that corresponds to polytene bands 39D2-3 to E1-2. The influence of altered histone gene multiplicity on chromatin structure has been assayed by measuring modification of the gene inactivation associated with position effect variegation in genotypes bearing deletions of the 39D-E segment. The proportion of cells in which a variegating gene is active is increased in genotypes that are heterozygous for a deficiency that removes the histone gene complex. Deletions that remove segments adjacent to the histone gene complex have no effect on the expression of variegating genes. Suppression of position effect variegation associated with reduction of histone gene multiplicity applies to both X-linked and autosomal variegating genes. Position effects exerted by both autosomal and sex-chromosome heterochromatin were suppressible by deletions of the histone gene complex. The suppression was independent of the presence of the Y chromosome. A deficiency that deletes only the distal portion of the histone gene complex also has the ability to suppress position effect variegation. Duplication of the histone gene complex did not enhance position effect variegation. Deletion or duplication of the histone gene complex in the maternal genome had no effect on the extent of variegation in progeny whose histone gene multiplicity was normal. These results are discussed with respect to current knowledge of the organization of the histone gene complex and control of its expression. PMID:17246163

  16. The Many Landscapes of Recombination in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Ratnappan, Ramesh; Bailin, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    Recombination is a fundamental biological process with profound evolutionary implications. Theory predicts that recombination increases the effectiveness of selection in natural populations. Yet, direct tests of this prediction have been restricted to qualitative trends due to the lack of detailed characterization of recombination rate variation across genomes and within species. The use of imprecise recombination rates can also skew population genetic analyses designed to assess the presence and mode of selection across genomes. Here we report the first integrated high-resolution description of genomic and population variation in recombination, which also distinguishes between the two outcomes of meiotic recombination: crossing over (CO) and gene conversion (GC). We characterized the products of 5,860 female meioses in Drosophila melanogaster by genotyping a total of 139 million informative SNPs and mapped 106,964 recombination events at a resolution down to 2 kilobases. This approach allowed us to generate whole-genome CO and GC maps as well as a detailed description of variation in recombination among individuals of this species. We describe many levels of variation in recombination rates. At a large-scale (100 kb), CO rates exhibit extreme and highly punctuated variation along chromosomes, with hot and coldspots. We also show extensive intra-specific variation in CO landscapes that is associated with hotspots at low frequency in our sample. GC rates are more uniformly distributed across the genome than CO rates and detectable in regions with reduced or absent CO. At a local scale, recombination events are associated with numerous sequence motifs and tend to occur within transcript regions, thus suggesting that chromatin accessibility favors double-strand breaks. All these non-independent layers of variation in recombination across genomes and among individuals need to be taken into account in order to obtain relevant estimates of recombination rates, and should

  17. Genomic Evidence for Adaptive Inversion Clines in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Kapun, Martin; Fabian, Daniel K; Goudet, Jérôme; Flatt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Clines in chromosomal inversion polymorphisms-presumably driven by climatic gradients-are common but there is surprisingly little evidence for selection acting on them. Here we address this long-standing issue in Drosophila melanogaster by using diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to estimate inversion frequencies from 28 whole-genome Pool-seq samples collected from 10 populations along the North American east coast. Inversions In(3L)P, In(3R)Mo, and In(3R)Payne showed clear latitudinal clines, and for In(2L)t, In(2R)NS, and In(3R)Payne the steepness of the clinal slopes changed between summer and fall. Consistent with an effect of seasonality on inversion frequencies, we detected small but stable seasonal fluctuations of In(2R)NS and In(3R)Payne in a temperate Pennsylvanian population over 4 years. In support of spatially varying selection, we observed that the cline in In(3R)Payne has remained stable for >40 years and that the frequencies of In(2L)t and In(3R)Payne are strongly correlated with climatic factors that vary latitudinally, independent of population structure. To test whether these patterns are adaptive, we compared the amount of genetic differentiation of inversions versus neutral SNPs and found that the clines in In(2L)t and In(3R)Payne are maintained nonneutrally and independent of admixture. We also identified numerous clinal inversion-associated SNPs, many of which exhibit parallel differentiation along the Australian cline and reside in genes known to affect fitness-related traits. Together, our results provide strong evidence that inversion clines are maintained by spatially-and perhaps also temporally-varying selection. We interpret our data in light of current hypotheses about how inversions are established and maintained. PMID:26796550

  18. The Release 6 reference sequence of the Drosophila melanogaster genome.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Roger A; Carlson, Joseph W; Wan, Kenneth H; Park, Soo; Mendez, Ivonne; Galle, Samuel E; Booth, Benjamin W; Pfeiffer, Barret D; George, Reed A; Svirskas, Robert; Krzywinski, Martin; Schein, Jacqueline; Accardo, Maria Carmela; Damia, Elisabetta; Messina, Giovanni; Méndez-Lago, María; de Pablos, Beatriz; Demakova, Olga V; Andreyeva, Evgeniya N; Boldyreva, Lidiya V; Marra, Marco; Carvalho, A Bernardo; Dimitri, Patrizio; Villasante, Alfredo; Zhimulev, Igor F; Rubin, Gerald M; Karpen, Gary H; Celniker, Susan E

    2015-03-01

    Drosophila melanogaster plays an important role in molecular, genetic, and genomic studies of heredity, development, metabolism, behavior, and human disease. The initial reference genome sequence reported more than a decade ago had a profound impact on progress in Drosophila research, and improving the accuracy and completeness of this sequence continues to be important to further progress. We previously described improvement of the 117-Mb sequence in the euchromatic portion of the genome and 21 Mb in the heterochromatic portion, using a whole-genome shotgun assembly, BAC physical mapping, and clone-based finishing. Here, we report an improved reference sequence of the single-copy and middle-repetitive regions of the genome, produced using cytogenetic mapping to mitotic and polytene chromosomes, clone-based finishing and BAC fingerprint verification, ordering of scaffolds by alignment to cDNA sequences, incorporation of other map and sequence data, and validation by whole-genome optical restriction mapping. These data substantially improve the accuracy and completeness of the reference sequence and the order and orientation of sequence scaffolds into chromosome arm assemblies. Representation of the Y chromosome and other heterochromatic regions is particularly improved. The new 143.9-Mb reference sequence, designated Release 6, effectively exhausts clone-based technologies for mapping and sequencing. Highly repeat-rich regions, including large satellite blocks and functional elements such as the ribosomal RNA genes and the centromeres, are largely inaccessible to current sequencing and assembly methods and remain poorly represented. Further significant improvements will require sequencing technologies that do not depend on molecular cloning and that produce very long reads. PMID:25589440

  19. Developmental expression of the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fjose, A.; Polito, L. C.; Weber, U.; Gehring, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated several cDNA clones of the white locus which are derived from embryonic and pupal transcripts of Drosophila melanogaster. The cDNA sequences map within ˜7.5 kb (coordinates −3.0 to +4.6) of the genomic DNA and correspond mainly to sequences within the distal region of the gene (coordinates −0.2 to −3.0). A major RNA species of 2.6 kb was detected on Northerns of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from all developmental stages. The total accumulation of this transcript peaks in the mature third instar larva to a level of 0.003% which is about ten times higher than that observed in embryos. The spatial distribution of white locus transcripts was determined by in situ hybridization to tissue sections. In embryos, hybridization signals are restricted to the cells of the developing Malpighian tubules and the signal strength corresponds with ˜50 transcripts per cell. Before the termination of the third instar stage, hybridization signals are also detected at a comparable level in the eye antennal disks. At the same stage, a third site of labeling is observed over a small cluster of cells which seems to be associated with the larval photoreceptor organs. Thus, white locus expression is largely restricted to tissues which are known to be involved in the biosynthesis of eye pigments and these different cell types act in a temporally autonomous manner with respect to the induction of the white gene during development. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453550

  20. The Genomic Basis of Postponed Senescence in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, Megan Ulmer; Campbell, Terry; Huang, Wen; Butler, Daniel G.; Carbone, Mary Anna; Duncan, Laura H.; Harbajan, Sasha V.; King, Edward M.; Peterson, Kara R.; Weitzel, Alexander; Zhou, Shanshan; Mackay, Trudy F. C.

    2015-01-01

    Natural populations harbor considerable genetic variation for lifespan. While evolutionary theory provides general explanations for the existence of this variation, our knowledge of the genes harboring naturally occurring polymorphisms affecting lifespan is limited. Here, we assessed the genetic divergence between five Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for postponed senescence for over 170 generations (O lines) and five lines from the same base population maintained at a two week generation interval for over 850 generations (B lines). On average, O lines live 70% longer than B lines, are more productive at all ages, and have delayed senescence for other traits than reproduction. We performed population sequencing of pools of individuals from all B and O lines and identified 6,394 genetically divergent variants in or near 1,928 genes at a false discovery rate of 0.068. A 2.6 Mb region at the tip of the X chromosome contained many variants fixed for alternative alleles in the two populations, suggestive of a hard selective sweep. We also assessed genome wide gene expression of O and B lines at one and five weeks of age using RNA sequencing and identified genes with significant (false discovery rate < 0.05) effects on gene expression with age, population and the age by population interaction, separately for each sex. We identified transcripts that exhibited the transcriptional signature of postponed senescence and integrated the gene expression and genetic divergence data to identify 98 (175) top candidate genes in females (males) affecting postponed senescence and increased lifespan. While several of these genes have been previously associated with Drosophila lifespan, most are novel and constitute a rich resource for future functional validation. PMID:26378456

  1. Female mediation of competitive fertilization success in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Lüpold, Stefan; Pitnick, Scott; Berben, Kirstin S.; Blengini, Cecilia S.; Belote, John M.; Manier, Mollie K.

    2013-01-01

    How females store and use sperm after remating can generate postcopulatory sexual selection on male ejaculate traits. Variation in ejaculate performance traits generally is thought to be intrinsic to males but is likely to interact with the environment in which sperm compete (e.g., the female reproductive tract). Our understanding of female contributions to competitive fertilization success is limited, however, in part because of the challenges involved in observing events within the reproductive tract of internally fertilizing species while discriminating among sperm from competing males. Here, we used females from crosses among isogenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster, each mated to two genetically standardized males (the first with green- and the second with red-tagged sperm heads) to demonstrate heritable variation in female remating interval, progeny production rate, sperm-storage organ morphology, and a number of sperm performance, storage, and handling traits. We then used multivariate analyses to examine relationships between this female-mediated variation and competitive paternity. In particular, the timing of female ejection of excess second-male and displaced first-male sperm was genetically variable and, by terminating the process of sperm displacement, significantly influenced the relative numbers of sperm from each male competing for fertilization, and consequently biased paternity. Our results demonstrate that females do not simply provide a static arena for sperm competition but rather play an active and pivotal role in postcopulatory processes. Resolving the adaptive significance of genetic variation in female-mediated mechanisms of sperm handling is critical for understanding sexual selection, sexual conflict, and the coevolution of male and female reproductive traits. PMID:23757499

  2. Studies on a photoreactivating enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A photoreactivating enzyme was purified from Schneider's Line No. 2 Drosophila melanogaster cultured cells. DEAE cellulose chromatography with high potassium phosphate buffer conditions was used to separate nucleic acids from the protein component of the crude cell extract. The protein pass-through fraction from DEAE cellulose was chromatographed on phosphocellulose followed by hydroxylapatite, using linear potassium phosphate gradients to elute the enzyme. Gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 resulted in a 4500-fold purification of the enzyme with a final recovery of 4%. The enzyme has an apparent gel filtration molecular weight of 32,900 (+/- 1350 daltons) and an isoelectric pH of 4.9. Optimum ionic strength for activity is 0.17 at pH 6.5 in potassium phosphate buffer. The action spectrum for photoreactivation in Drosophila has an optimum at 365 nm with a response to wavelengths in the range of 313 to 465 nm. Drosophila photoreactivating enzyme contains an essential RNA that is necessary for activity in vitro. The ability of the enzyme to photoreactivate dimers in vitro is abolished by treatment of the enzyme with ribonucleases, or by disruption of the enzyme-RNA complex by electrophoresis or adsorption to DEAE cellulose. The essential RNA is heterogeneous in size but contains a 10-12 base region that may interact with the active site of the enzyme, and thus is protected from degradation by contaminating RNase activities during purification. The RNA is thought to stabilize the photoreactivating enzyme by maintaining the enzyme in the proper configuration for binding to dimer-containing DNA. It is not known whether this RNA is essential for in vivo photoreactivation.

  3. Calmodulin Affects Sensitization of Drosophila melanogaster Odorant Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mukunda, Latha; Miazzi, Fabio; Sargsyan, Vardanush; Hansson, Bill S.; Wicher, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Flying insects have developed a remarkably sensitive olfactory system to detect faint and turbulent odor traces. This ability is linked to the olfactory receptors class of odorant receptors (ORs), occurring exclusively in winged insects. ORs form heteromeric complexes of an odorant specific receptor protein (OrX) and a highly conserved co-receptor protein (Orco). The ORs form ligand gated ion channels that are tuned by intracellular signaling systems. Repetitive subthreshold odor stimulation of olfactory sensory neurons sensitizes insect ORs. This OR sensitization process requires Orco activity. In the present study we first asked whether OR sensitization can be monitored with heterologously expressed OR proteins. Using electrophysiological and calcium imaging methods we demonstrate that D. melanogaster OR proteins expressed in CHO cells show sensitization upon repeated weak stimulation. This was found for OR channels formed by Orco as well as by Or22a or Or56a and Orco. Moreover, we show that inhibition of calmodulin (CaM) action on OR proteins, expressed in CHO cells, abolishes any sensitization. Finally, we investigated the sensitization phenomenon using an ex vivo preparation of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing Or22a inside the fly's antenna. Using calcium imaging, we observed sensitization in the dendrites as well as in the soma. Inhibition of calmodulin with W7 disrupted the sensitization within the outer dendritic shaft, whereas the sensitization remained in the other OSN compartments. Taken together, our results suggest that CaM action is involved in sensitizing the OR complex and that this mechanisms accounts for the sensitization in the outer dendrites, whereas further mechanisms contribute to the sensitization observed in the other OSN compartments. The use of heterologously expressed OR proteins appears to be suitable for further investigations on the mechanistic basis of OR sensitization, while investigations on native neurons are required

  4. Characterization of Drosophila melanogaster JmjC+N histone demethylases

    PubMed Central

    Lloret-Llinares, Marta; Carré, Clément; Vaquero, Alejandro; de Olano, Natalia; Azorín, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we characterize histone demethylase activity of the entire family of JmjC+N proteins of Drosophila melanogaster. Our results show that Lid (little imaginal discs), which is structurally homologous to JARID1, demethylates H3K4me3. However, contrary to what would be inferred from its demethylase activity, lid contributes to the establishment of transcriptionally competent chromatin states as: (i) is required for histone H3 acetylation; (ii) contributes to expression of the homoeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx); and (iii) antagonizes heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing (PEV). These results, which are consistent with the identification of lid as a trithorax group (trxG) gene, are discussed in the context of current models for the contribution of H3K4me3 to the regulation of gene expression. Here, we also show that the two Drosophila JMJD2 homologues, dJMJD2(1)/CG15835 and dJMJD2(2)/CG33182, are capable of demethylating both H3K9me3 and H3K36me3. dJMJD2(1)/CG15835 regulates heterochromatin organization, as its over-expression induces spreading of HP1, out of heterochromatin, into euchromatin, without affecting the actual pattern of histone modifications of heterochromatin. dJMJD2(1)/CG15835 is excluded from heterochromatin and localizes to multiple euchromatic sites, where it regulates H3K36 methylation. These results indicate that dJMJD2(1)/CG15835 contributes to delimit hetero- and euchromatic territories through the regulation of H3K36 methylation in euchromatin. On the other hand, dJARID2/CG3654 shows no demethylase activity on H3K4me3, H3K9me3, H3K27me3, H3K36me3 and H4K20me3. PMID:18375980

  5. Functional Networks of Highest-Connected Splice Isoforms: From The Chromosome 17 Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Govindarajoo, Brandon; Panwar, Bharat; Zhang, Yang; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing allows a single gene to produce multiple transcript-level splice isoforms from which the translated proteins may show differences in their expression and function. Identifying the major functional or canonical isoform is important for understanding gene and protein functions. Identification and characterization of splice isoforms is a stated goal of the HUPO Human Proteome Project and of neXtProt. Multiple efforts have catalogued splice isoforms as "dominant", "principal", or "major" isoforms based on expression or evolutionary traits. In contrast, we recently proposed highest connected isoforms (HCIs) as a new class of canonical isoforms that have the strongest interactions in a functional network and revealed their significantly higher (differential) transcript-level expression compared to nonhighest connected isoforms (NCIs) regardless of tissues/cell lines in the mouse. HCIs and their expression behavior in the human remain unexplored. Here we identified HCIs for 6157 multi-isoform genes using a human isoform network that we constructed by integrating a large compendium of heterogeneous genomic data. We present examples for pairs of transcript isoforms of ABCC3, RBM34, ERBB2, and ANXA7. We found that functional networks of isoforms of the same gene can show large differences. Interestingly, differential expression between HCIs and NCIs was also observed in the human on an independent set of 940 RNA-seq samples across multiple tissues, including heart, kidney, and liver. Using proteomic data from normal human retina and placenta, we showed that HCIs are a promising indicator of expressed protein isoforms exemplified by NUDFB6 and M6PR. Furthermore, we found that a significant percentage (20%, p = 0.0003) of human and mouse HCIs are homologues, suggesting their conservation between species. Our identified HCIs expand the repertoire of canonical isoforms and are expected to facilitate studying main protein products, understanding gene

  6. Differential sensitivity of rat voltage-sensitive sodium channel isoforms to pyrazoline-type insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, Kristopher S.; Soderlund, David M. . E-mail: dms6@cornell.edu

    2006-07-15

    Pyrazoline-type insecticides are potent inhibitors of insect and mammalian voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In mammals, there are nine sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms that have unique distributions and pharmacological properties, but no published data exist that compare the relative sensitivity of these different mammalian sodium channel isoforms to inhibition by pyrazoline-type insecticides. This study employed the Xenopus oocyte expression system to examine the relative sensitivity of rat Na{sub v}1.2a, Na{sub v}1.4, Na{sub v}1.5, and Na{sub v}1.8 sodium channel {alpha} subunit isoforms to the pyrazoline-type insecticides indoxacarb, DCJW, and RH 3421. Additionally, we assessed the effect of coexpression with the rat {beta}1 auxiliary subunit on the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a and Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms to these compounds. The relative sensitivity of the four sodium channel {alpha} subunits differed for each of the three compounds we examined. With DCJW, the order of sensitivity was Na{sub v}1.4 > Na{sub v}1.2a > Na{sub v}1.5 > Na{sub v}1.8. In contrast, the relative sensitivity of these isoforms to indoxacarb differed from that to DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.8 isoform was most sensitive, the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was completely insensitive, and the sensitivities of the Na{sub v}1.5 and Na{sub v}1.2a isoforms were intermediate between these two extremes. Moreover, the pattern of sensitivity to RH 3421 among these four isoforms was different from that for either indoxacarb or DCJW: the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform was most sensitive to RH 3421, whereas the sensitivities of the remaining three isoforms were substantially less than that of the Na{sub v}1.4 isoform and were approximately equivalent. The only statistically significant effect of coexpression of either the Na{sub v}1.2a or Na{sub v}1.4 isoforms with the {beta}1 subunit was the modest reduction in the sensitivity of the Na{sub v}1.2a isoform to RH 3421. These results demonstrate that mammalian sodium

  7. Expression of Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C Isoforms in Native Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Béziau, Delphine M.; Toussaint, Fanny; Blanchette, Alexandre; Dayeh, Nour R.; Charbel, Chimène; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Dupuis, Jocelyn; Ledoux, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) comprises a superfamily of enzymes that play a key role in a wide array of intracellular signalling pathways, including protein kinase C and intracellular calcium. Thirteen different mammalian PLC isoforms have been identified and classified into 6 families (PLC-β, γ, δ, ε, ζ and η) based on their biochemical properties. Although the expression of PLC isoforms is tissue-specific, concomitant expression of different PLC has been reported, suggesting that PLC family is involved in multiple cellular functions. Despite their critical role, the PLC isoforms expressed in native endothelial cells (ECs) remains undetermined. A conventional PCR approach was initially used to elucidate the mRNA expression pattern of PLC isoforms in 3 distinct murine vascular beds: mesenteric (MA), pulmonary (PA) and middle cerebral arteries (MCA). mRNA encoding for most PLC isoforms was detected in MA, MCA and PA with the exception of η2 and β2 (only expressed in PA), δ4 (only expressed in MCA), η1 (expressed in all but MA) and ζ (not detected in any vascular beds tested). The endothelial-specific PLC expression was then sought in freshly isolated ECs. Interestingly, the PLC expression profile appears to differ across the investigated arterial beds. While mRNA for 8 of the 13 PLC isoforms was detected in ECs from MA, two additional PLC isoforms were detected in ECs from PA and MCA. Co-expression of multiple PLC isoforms in ECs suggests an elaborate network of signalling pathways: PLC isoforms may contribute to the complexity or diversity of signalling by their selective localization in cellular microdomains. However in situ immunofluorescence revealed a homogeneous distribution for all PLC isoforms probed (β3, γ2 and δ1) in intact endothelium. Although PLC isoforms play a crucial role in endothelial signal transduction, subcellular localization alone does not appear to be sufficient to determine the role of PLC in the signalling microdomains found in the

  8. Two temporally synthesized charge subunits interact to form the five isoforms of cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum) catalase.

    PubMed Central

    Ni, W; Trelease, R N; Eising, R

    1990-01-01

    Five charge isoforms of tetrameric catalase were isolated from cotyledons of germinated cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) seedlings. Denaturing isoelectric focusing of the individual isoforms in polyacrylamide gels indicated that isoforms A (most anodic) and E (most cathodic) consisted of one subunit of different charge, whereas isoforms B, C and D each consisted of a mixture of these two subunits. Thus the five isoforms apparently were formed through combinations of two subunits in different ratios. Labelling cotyledons in vivo with [35S]methionine at three daily intervals in the dark, and translation in vivo of polyadenylated RNA isolated from cotyledons at the same ages, revealed synthesis of two different subunits. One of the subunits was synthesized in cotyledons at all ages studied (days 1-3), whereas the other subunit was detected only at days 2 and 3. This differential expression of two catalase subunits helped explain previous results from this laboratory showing that the two anodic forms (A and B) found in maturing seeds were supplemented with three cathodic forms (C-E) after the seeds germinated. These subunit data also helped clarify our new findings that proteins of isoforms A, B and C (most active isoforms) accumulated in cotyledons of plants kept in the dark for 3 days, then gradually disappeared during the next several days, whereas isoforms D and E (least active isoforms) remained in the cells. This shift in isoform pattern occurred whether seedlings were kept in the dark or exposed to continuous light after day 3, although exposure to light enhanced this process. These sequential molecular events were responsible for the characteristic developmental changes (rise and fall) in total catalase activity. We believe that the isoform changeover is physiologically related to the changeover in glyoxysome to leaf-type-peroxisome metabolism. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1695843

  9. Expression of insect α6-like nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in Drosophila melanogaster highlights a high level of conservation of the receptor:spinosyn interaction.

    PubMed

    Perry, Trent; Somers, Jason; Yang, Ying Ting; Batterham, Philip

    2015-09-01

    Insecticide research has often relied on model species for elucidating the resistance mechanisms present in the targeted pests. The accuracy and applicability of extrapolations of these laboratory findings to field conditions varies but, for target site resistance, conserved mechanisms are generally the rule rather than the exception (Perry et al., 2011). The spinosyn class of insecticides appear to fit this paradigm and are a pest control option with many uses in both crop and animal protection. Resistance to spinosyns has been identified in both laboratory-selected and field-collected pest insects. Studies using the model insect, Drosophila melanogaster, have identified the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit, Dα6 as an important target of the insecticide spinosad (Perry et al., 2007; Watson et al., 2010). Field-isolated resistant strains of several agricultural pest insects provide evidence that resistance cases are often associated with mutations in orthologues to Dα6 (Baxter et al., 2010; Puinean et al., 2013). The expression of these receptors is difficult in heterologous systems. In order to examine the biology of the Dα6 receptor subunit further, we used Drosophila as a model and developed an in vivo rescue system. This allowed us to express four different isoforms of Dα6 and show that each is able to rescue the response to spinosad. Regulatory sequences upstream of the Dα6 gene able to rescue the resistance phenotype were identified. Expression of other D. melanogaster subunits revealed that the rescue phenotype appears to be Dα6 specific. We also demonstrate that expression of pest insect orthologues of Dα6 from a variety of species are capable of rescuing the spinosad response phenotype, verifying the relevance of this receptor to resistance monitoring in the field. In the absence of a robust heterologous expression system, this study presents an in vivo model that will be useful in analysing many other aspects of these receptors and

  10. [Functional analysis of Grp and Iris, the gag and env domesticated errantivirus genes, in the Drosophila melanogaster genome].

    PubMed

    Makhnovskii, P A; Kuzmin, I V; Nefedova, L N; Kima, A I

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is the only invertebrate that contains endogenous retroviruses, which are called errantiviruses. Two domesticated genes, Grp and Iris, which originate from errantivirus gag and env, respectively, have been found in the D. melanogaster genome. The functions performed by the genes in Drosophila are still unclear. To identify the functions of domesticated gag and env in the D. melanogaster genome, expression of Iris and Grp was studied in strains differing by the presence or absence of the functional gypsy errantivirus. In addition, the expression levels were measured after injection of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, which activate different immune response pathways, and exposure to various abiotic stress factors. The presence of functional D. melanogaster retrovirus gypsy was found to increase the Grp expression level in somatic tissues of the carcass, while exerting no effect on the Iris expression level. Activation of the immune response in D. melanogaster by bacteria Bacillus cereus increased the Grp expression level and did not affect Iris expression. As for the effects of abiotic stress factors (oxidative stress, starvation, and heat and cold stress), the Grp expression level increased in response to starvation in D. melanogaster females, and the Iris expression level was downregulated in heat shock and oxidative stress. Based on the findings, Grp was assumed to play a direct role in the immune response in D. melanogaster; Iris is not involved in immune responses, but and apparently performs a cell function that is inhibited in stress. PMID:27414781

  11. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pritchard, Rory A.; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated. PMID:26313408

  12. Different phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms mediate carrageenan nociception and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, Rory A; Falk, Lovissa; Larsson, Mathilda; Leinders, Mathias; Sorkin, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) participate in signal transduction cascades that can directly activate and sensitize nociceptors and enhance pain transmission. They also play essential roles in chemotaxis and immune cell infiltration leading to inflammation. We wished to determine which PI3K isoforms were involved in each of these processes. Lightly anesthetized rats (isoflurane) were injected subcutaneously with carrageenan in their hind paws. This was preceded by a local injection of 1% DMSO vehicle or an isoform-specific antagonist to PI3K-α (compound 15-e), -β (TGX221), -δ (Cal-101), or -γ (AS252424). We measured changes in the mechanical pain threshold and spinal c-Fos expression (4 hours after injection) as indices of nociception. Paw volume, plasma extravasation (Evans blue, 0.3 hours after injection), and neutrophil (myeloperoxidase; 1 hour after injection) and macrophage (CD11b+; 4 hour after injection) infiltration into paw tissue were the measured inflammation endpoints. Only PI3K-γ antagonist before treatment reduced the carrageenan-induced pain behavior and spinal expression of c-Fos (P ≤ 0.01). In contrast, pretreatment with PI3K-α, -δ, and-γ antagonists reduced early indices of inflammation. Plasma extravasation PI3K-α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.05), and -γ (P ≤ 0.01), early (0-2 hour) edema -α (P ≤ 0.05), -δ (P ≤ 0.001), and -γ (P ≤ 0.05), and neutrophil infiltration (all P ≤ 0.001) were all reduced compared to vehicle pretreatment. Later (2-4 hour), edema and macrophage infiltration (P ≤ 0.05) were reduced by only the PI3K-δ and -γ isoform antagonists, with the PI3K-δ antagonist having a greater effect on edema. PI3K-β antagonism was ineffective in all paradigms. These data indicate that pain and clinical inflammation are pharmacologically separable and may help to explain clinical conditions in which inflammation naturally wanes or goes into remission, but pain continues unabated. PMID:26313408

  13. Role of nuclear progesterone receptor isoforms in uterine pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Bansari; Elguero, Sonia; Thakore, Suruchi; Dahoud, Wissam; Bedaiwy, Mohamed; Mesiano, Sam

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Progesterone is a key hormonal regulator of the female reproductive system. It plays a major role to prepare the uterus for implantation and in the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Actions of progesterone on the uterine tissues (endometrium, myometrium and cervix) are mediated by the combined effects of two progesterone receptor (PR) isoforms, designated PR-A and PR-B. Both receptors function primarily as ligand-activated transcription factors. Progesterone action on the uterine tissues is qualitatively and quantitatively determined by the relative levels and transcriptional activities of PR-A and PR-B. The transcriptional activity of the PR isoforms is affected by specific transcriptional coregulators and by PR post-translational modifications that affect gene promoter targeting. In this context, appropriate temporal and cell-specific expression and function of PR-A and PR-B are critical for normal uterine function. METHODS Relevant studies describing the role of PRs in uterine physiology and pathology (endometriosis, uterine leiomyoma, endometrial cancer, cervical cancer and recurrent pregnancy loss) were comprehensively searched using PubMed, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Google Scholar and critically reviewed. RESULTS Progesterone, acting through PR-A and PR-B, regulates the development and function of the endometrium and induces changes in cells essential for implantation and the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. During pregnancy, progesterone via the PRs promotes myometrial relaxation and cervical closure. Withdrawal of PR-mediated progesterone signaling triggers menstruation and parturition. PR-mediated progesterone signaling is anti-mitogenic in endometrial epithelial cells, and as such, mitigates the tropic effects of estrogen on eutopic normal endometrium, and on ectopic implants in endometriosis. Similarly, ligand-activated PRs function as tumor suppressors in endometrial cancer cells through inhibition of key

  14. Explication of interactions between HMGCR isoform 2 and various statins through In silico modeling and docking.

    PubMed

    Karthik, M V K; Satya Deepak, M V K N; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2012-02-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) catalyzes the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonate, a four-electron oxidoreduction that is the rate-limiting step in the synthesis of cholesterol and other isoprenoids. This study was designed to understand the mode of interactions of HMGCR isoform 2 with other statins. Hence, ligands such as Atorvastatin (DB01076), Lovastatin (DB00227), Fluvastatin (DB01095), Simvastatin (DB00641), Pravastatin (DB00175), Rosuvastatin (DB01098) and Cerivastatin (DB00439) were docked with enzymes HMGCR isoform 1 (pdb: 1DQ8) and modeled HMGCR isoform 2 (gi|196049380). Our homology modeling results were further processed to model the structure of human HMGCR isoform 2 and its accuracy was confirmed through RMS Z-scores (1.249). These interactions revealed that binding residues such as Arg515, Asp516, Tyr517 and Asn518 are found to be conserved in HMGCR isoform 2 with various statins. Our studies further concluded that Atorvastatin is most efficient inhibitor against both the isoforms of HMGCR whereas HMGCR isoform 2 shows less effectiveness with statins when compared with HMGCR isoform 1. PMID:22177940

  15. Appearance of Novel Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Isoforms in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Growth on Nitrate.

    PubMed Central

    Huppe, H. C.; Turpin, D. H.

    1996-01-01

    Extractable glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity is higher from N-limited Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells than from N-sufficient cells. Native gels reveal that the isoform complexity varies depending on the form of N supplied. The isoforms associated with NO3- growth appear within 2 h of switching cells from NH4+ to NO3-. PMID:12226271

  16. AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    AN ENZYME LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY FOR THE HO-1 ISOFORM OF HEME OXYGENASE

    Heme oxygenase (HO) occurs in biological tissues as two major isoforms HO-1 and HO-2. HO-1 is inducible by many treatments, particularly oxidative stress-related conditions such as depletion of gl...

  17. Activation of AMPK alpha and gamma-isoform complexes in the intact ischemic rat heart

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a key role in modulating cellular metabolic processes. AMPK, a serine-threonine kinase, is a heterotrimeric complex of catalytic alpha-subunits and regulatory beta- and gamma-subunits with multiple isoforms. Mutations in the cardiac gamma(2)-isoform have bee...

  18. Revisiting the Identification of Canonical Splice Isoforms through Integration of Functional Genomics and Proteomics Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong-Dong; Menon, Rajasree; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Guan, Yuanfang

    2014-01-01

    Canonical isoforms in different databases have been defined as the most prevalent, most conserved, most expressed, longest, or the one with the clearest description of domains or post-translational modifications. In this article, we revisit these definitions of canonical isoforms based on functional genomics and proteomics evidence, focusing on mouse data. We report a novel functional relationship network-based approach for identifying the Highest Connected Isoforms (HCIs). We show that 46% of these HCIs are not the longest transcripts. In addition, this approach revealed many genes that have more than one highly connected isoforms. Averaged across 175 RNA-seq datasets covering diverse tissues and conditions, 65% of the HCIs show higher expression levels than non-highest connected isoforms (NCIs) at the transcript level. At the protein level, these HCIs highly overlap with the expressed splice variants, based on proteomic data from eight different normal tissues. These results suggest that a more confident definition of canonical isoforms can be made through integration of multiple lines of evidence, including highest connected isoforms defined by biological processes and pathways, expression prevalence at the transcript level, and relative or absolute abundance at the protein level. This integrative proteogenomics approach can successfully identify principal isoforms that are responsible for the canonical functions of genes. PMID:25265570

  19. Comprehensive analysis of tropomyosin isoforms in skeletal muscles by top-down proteomics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yutong; Peng, Ying; Lin, Ziqing; Chen, Yi-Chen; Wei, Liming; Hacker, Timothy A; Larsson, Lars; Ge, Ying

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are heterogeneous in nature and are capable of performing various functions. Tropomyosin (Tpm) is a major component of the thin filament in skeletal muscles and plays an important role in controlling muscle contraction and relaxation. Tpm is known to consist of multiple isoforms resulting from different encoding genes and alternative splicing, along with post-translational modifications. However, a systematic characterization of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles is still lacking. Therefore, we employed top-down mass spectrometry (MS) to identify and characterize Tpm isoforms present in different skeletal muscles from multiple species, including swine, rat, and human. Our study revealed that Tpm1.1 and Tpm2.2 are the two major Tpm isoforms in swine and rat skeletal muscles, whereas Tpm1.1, Tpm2.2, and Tpm3.12 are present in human skeletal muscles. Tandem MS was utilized to identify the sequences of the major Tpm isoforms. Furthermore, quantitative analysis revealed muscle-type specific differences in the abundance of un-modified and modified Tpm isoforms in rat and human skeletal muscles. This study represents the first systematic investigation of Tpm isoforms in skeletal muscles, which not only demonstrates the capabilities of top-down MS for the comprehensive characterization of skeletal myofilament proteins but also provides the basis for further studies on these Tpm isoforms in muscle-related diseases. PMID:27090236

  20. A global comparison between nuclear and cytosolic transcriptomes reveals differential compartmentalization of alternative transcript isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang

    2010-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses have typically disregarded nucleocytoplasmic differences. This approach has ignored some post-transcriptional regulations and their effect on the ultimate protein expression levels. Despite a longstanding interest in the differences between the nuclear and cytosolic transcriptomes, it is only recently that data have become available to study such differences and their associated features on a genome-wide scale. Here, we compared the nuclear and cytosolic transcriptomes of HepG2 and HeLa cells. HepG2 and HeLa cells vary significantly in the differential compartmentalization of their transcript isoforms, indicating that nucleocytoplasmic compartmentalization is a cell-specific characteristic. The differential compartmentalization is manifested at the transcript isoform level instead of the gene level because alternative isoforms of one gene can display different nucleocytoplasmic distributions. The isoforms enriched in the cytosol tend to have more introns and longer introns in their pre-mRNAs. They have more functional RNA folds and unique exons in the 3′ regions. These isoforms are more conserved than the isoforms enriched in the nucleus. Surprisingly, the presence of microRNAs does not have a significant impact on the nucleocytoplasmic distribution of their target isoforms. In contrast, nonsense-mediated decay is significantly more associated with the isoforms enriched in the nucleus than those enriched in the cytosol. PMID:19969546

  1. Molecular Mechanisms for High Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Wing Mutagenesis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Kai; Xiao, Guanjun; Ma, Junfeng; Wang, Bingying; Shen, Sile; Fu, Xueqi; Zou, Guangtian; Zou, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Although High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) as an important physical and chemical tool has been increasingly applied to research of organism, the response mechanisms of organism to HHP have not been elucidated clearly thus far. To identify mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organisms, here, we treated Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster) eggs with HHP. Approximately 75% of the surviving flies showed significant morphological abnormalities from the egg to the adult stages compared with control flies (p < 0.05). Some eggs displayed abnormal chorionic appendages, some larvae were large and red, and some adult flies showed wing abnormalities. Abnormal wing phenotypes of D. melanogaster induced by HHP were used to investigate the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP on organism. Thus 285 differentially expressed genes associated with wing mutations were identified using Affymetrix Drosophila Genome Array 2.0 and verified with RT-PCR. We also compared wing development-related central genes in the mutant flies with control flies using DNA sequencing to show two point mutations in the vestigial (vg) gene. This study revealed the mutagenic mechanisms of HHP-induced mutagenesis in D. melanogaster and provided a new model for the study of evolution on organisms. PMID:26446369

  2. Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Wheat Germ Agglutinin and Starvation in Drosophila melanogaster Larval Midgut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One function of plant lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is to serve as defenses against herbivorous insects. The midgut is one critical site affected by dietary lectins. We observed marked cellular, structural, and gene expression changes in the midguts of Drosophila melanogaster third-i...

  3. Physiological and behavioral responses in Drosophila melanogaster to odorants present at different plant maturation stages.

    PubMed

    Versace, Elisabetta; Eriksson, Anna; Rocchi, Federico; Castellan, Irene; Sgadò, Paola; Haase, Albrecht

    2016-09-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster feeds and oviposits on fermented fruit, hence its physiological and behavioral responses are expected to be tuned to odorants abundant during later stages of fruit maturation. We used a population of about two-hundred isogenic lines of D. melanogaster to assay physiological responses (electroantennograms (EAG)) and behavioral correlates (preferences and choice ratio) to odorants found at different stages of fruit maturation. We quantified electrophysiological and behavioral responses of D. melanogaster for the leaf compound β-cyclocitral, as well as responses to odorants mainly associated with later fruit maturation stages. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses were modulated by the odorant dose. For the leaf compound we observed a steep dose-response curve in both EAG and behavioral data and shallower curves for odorants associated with later stages of maturation. Our data show the connection between sensory and behavioral responses and are consistent with the specialization of D. melanogaster on fermented fruit and avoidance of high doses of compounds associated with earlier stages of maturation. Odor preferences were modulated in a non-additive way when flies were presented with two alternative odorants, and combinations of odorants elicited higher responses than single compounds. PMID:27195459

  4. Transcriptomic profile of Drosophila melanogaster larval midgut and responses to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligoarray analysis was used to determine the number and nature of genes expressed in third-instar Drosophila melanogaster larval midguts. The majority of transcripts were associated with protein synthesis and metabolism. Serine proteases were the main proteolytic enzymes detected. Some 40% of th...

  5. Three Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens Exhibit Differential Toxicity Against Drosophila melanogaster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were tested for toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster in an insect feeding assay. Insect eggs were placed on the surface of a non-nutritive agar plate supplemented with a food source that was non-inoculated or inoculated with P. fluorescens Pf0-1, SBW25, or Pf-...

  6. Drosophila melanogaster as a model host to dissect the immunopathogenesis of zygomycosis.

    PubMed

    Chamilos, Georgios; Lewis, Russell E; Hu, Jianhua; Xiao, Lianchun; Zal, Tomasz; Gilliet, Michel; Halder, Georg; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2008-07-01

    Zygomycosis is an emerging frequently fatal opportunistic mycosis whose immunopathogenesis is poorly understood. We developed a zygomycosis model by injecting Drosophila melanogaster flies with a standardized amount of fungal spores from clinical Zygomycetes isolates to study virulence and host defense mechanisms. We found that, as opposed to most other fungi, which are nonpathogenic in D. melanogaster (e.g., Aspergillus fumigatus), Zygomycetes rapidly infect and kill wild-type flies. Toll-deficient flies exhibited increased susceptibility to Zygomycetes, whereas constitutive overexpression of the antifungal peptide Drosomycin in transgenic flies partially restored resistance to zygomycosis. D. melanogaster Schneider 2 phagocytic cells displayed decreased phagocytosis and caused less hyphal damage to Zygomycetes compared with that to A. fumigatus. Furthermore, phagocytosis-defective eater mutant flies displayed increased susceptibility to Zygomycetes infection. Classic enhancers of Zygomycetes virulence in humans, such as corticosteroids, increased iron supply, and iron availability through treatment with deferoxamine dramatically increased Zygomycetes pathogenicity in our model. In contrast, iron starvation induced by treatment with the iron chelator deferasirox significantly protected flies infected with Zygomycetes. Whole-genome expression profiling in wild-type flies after infection with Zygomycetes vs. A. fumigatus identified genes selectively down-regulated by Zygomycetes, which act in pathogen recognition, immune defense, stress response, detoxification, steroid metabolism, or tissue repair or have unknown functions. Our results provide insights into the factors that mediate host-pathogen interactions in zygomycosis and establish D. melanogaster as a promising model to study this important mycosis. PMID:18583479

  7. Differential responses to artificial selection on oviposition site preferences in Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans.

    PubMed

    Soto, Eduardo M; Betti, María I L; Hurtado, Juan; Hasson, Esteban

    2015-12-01

    The preference-performance relationship in plant-insect interactions is a central theme in evolutionary ecology. Among many insects, eggs are vulnerable and larvae have limited mobility, making the choice of an appropriate oviposition site one of the most important decisions for a female. We investigated the evolution of oviposition preferences in Drosophila melanogaster Meigen and Drosophila simulans Sturtevant by artificially selecting for the preference for 2 natural resources, grape and quince. The main finding of our study is the differential responses of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Although preferences evolved in the experimental populations of D. melanogaster, responses were not consistent with the selection regimes applied. In contrast, responses in D. simulans were consistent with expectations, demonstrating that this species has selectable genetic variation for the trait. Furthermore, crosses between D. simulans divergent lines showed that the genetic factors involved in grape preference appear to be largely recessive. In summary, our artificial selection study suggests that D. melanogaster and D. simulans possess different genetic architectures for this trait. PMID:25263841

  8. Genetic basis of the difference in alcohol dehydrogenase expression between Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed Central

    Laurie, C C; Heath, E M; Jacobson, J W; Thomson, M S

    1990-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species, Drosophila simulans, differ in expression of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). Adult melanogaster flies that are homozygous for the Slow allozyme have approximately twice the level of ADH activity and crossreacting material as simulans adults. There is no corresponding difference in ADH mRNA, however, so this difference in ADH protein level is evidently due to a difference in the rate of translation of the two RNAs and/or to a difference in protein stability. Here we report an interspecific gene-transfer experiment, using P-element transformation, to determine whether this expression difference is due to genetic background differences between the species (trans-acting modifiers) or to cis-acting factors within the Adh gene. When the Adh genes from D. melanogaster and D. simulans are put into the same genetic background, there is no detectable difference in their level of expression. The level is relatively high in the melanogaster background and relatively low in the simulans background. Therefore, the interspecific difference in Adh expression is due entirely to trans-acting modifiers, in spite of the many sequence differences between the Adh genes of the two species, which include two amino acid substitutions. PMID:2124699

  9. Bowman-Birk inhibitor affects pathways associated with energy metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) is toxic when fed to certain insects, including the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Dietary BBI has been demonstrated to slow growth and increase insect mortality by inhibiting the digestive enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin, resulting in a reduced supply of amino acid...

  10. Wolbachia Influences the Maternal Transmission of the gypsy Endogenous Retrovirus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Touret, Franck; Guiguen, François

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The endosymbiotic bacteria of the genus Wolbachia are present in most insects and are maternally transmitted through the germline. Moreover, these intracellular bacteria exert antiviral activity against insect RNA viruses, as in Drosophila melanogaster, which could explain the prevalence of Wolbachia bacteria in natural populations. Wolbachia is maternally transmitted in D. melanogaster through a mechanism that involves distribution at the posterior pole of mature oocytes and then incorporation into the pole cells of the embryos. In parallel, maternal transmission of several endogenous retroviruses is well documented in D. melanogaster. Notably, gypsy retrovirus is expressed in permissive follicle cells and transferred to the oocyte and then to the offspring by integrating into their genomes. Here, we show that the presence of Wolbachia wMel reduces the rate of gypsy insertion into the ovo gene. However, the presence of Wolbachia does not modify the expression levels of gypsy RNA and envelope glycoprotein from either permissive or restrictive ovaries. Moreover, Wolbachia affects the pattern of distribution of the retroviral particles and the gypsy envelope protein in permissive follicle cells. Altogether, our results enlarge the knowledge of the antiviral activity of Wolbachia to include reducing the maternal transmission of endogenous retroviruses in D. melanogaster. PMID:25182324

  11. Differential response of DDT susceptible and resistant Drosophila melanogaster strains to DDT and oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metabolic DDT resistance in Drosophila melanogaster is associated with increased cytochrome P450 expression. Increased P450 activity is also associated with increased oxidative stress. In contrast, increased glutathione S transferase (GST) expression has been associated with a greater ability of o...

  12. Lethality and Developmental Delay of Drosophila melanogaster Following Ingestion of Selected Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens secretes antimicrobial compounds that promote plant health and provide protection from pathogens. We used a non-invasive feeding assay to study the toxicity of P. fluorescens strains Pf0-1, SBW25, and Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains of P. fluorescens varie...

  13. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  14. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  15. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  16. 40 CFR 798.5275 - Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... recommendations as specified under 40 CFR part 792, subpart J the following specific information shall be reported... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sex-linked recessive lethal test in....5275 Sex-linked recessive lethal test in drosophila melanogaster. (a) Purpose. The sex-linked...

  17. Microarray Analysis of Juvenile Hormone Response in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A microchip array encompassing probes for 14,010 genes of Drosophila melanogaster was used to analyze the effect of juvenile hormone (JH) on genome-wide gene expression. JH is a member of a key group of insect hormones involved in regulating larval development and adult reproductive processes. Altho...

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster methuselah Gene: A Novel Gene with Ancient Functions

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Helder; Aguiar, Bruno; Morales-Hojas, Ramiro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Reboiro-Jato, David; Reboiro-Jato, Miguel; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Vieira, Cristina P.; Vieira, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster G protein-coupled receptor gene, methuselah (mth), has been described as a novel gene that is less than 10 million years old. Nevertheless, it shows a highly specific expression pattern in embryos, larvae, and adults, and has been implicated in larval development, stress resistance, and in the setting of adult lifespan, among others. Although mth belongs to a gene subfamily with 16 members in D. melanogaster, there is no evidence for functional redundancy in this subfamily. Therefore, it is surprising that a novel gene influences so many traits. Here, we explore the alternative hypothesis that mth is an old gene. Under this hypothesis, in species distantly related to D. melanogaster, there should be a gene with features similar to those of mth. By performing detailed phylogenetic, synteny, protein structure, and gene expression analyses we show that the D. virilis GJ12490 gene is the orthologous of mth in species distantly related to D. melanogaster. We also show that, in D. americana (a species of the virilis group of Drosophila), a common amino acid polymorphism at the GJ12490 orthologous gene is significantly associated with developmental time, size, and lifespan differences. Our results imply that GJ12490 orthologous genes are candidates for developmental time and lifespan differences in Drosophila in general. PMID:23696853

  19. S Elements: A Family of Tc1-like Transposons in the Genome of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Merriman, P. J.; Grimes, C. D.; Ambroziak, J.; Hackett, D. A.; Skinner, P.; Simmons, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    The S elements form a diverse family of long-inverted-repeat transposons within the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. These elements vary in size and sequence, the longest consisting of 1736 bp with 234-bp inverted terminal repeats. The longest open reading frame in an intact S element could encode a 345-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide is homologous to the transposases of the mariner-Tc1 superfamily of transposable elements. S elements are ubiquitous in D. melanogaster populations and also appear to be present in the genomes of two sibling species; however, they seem to be absent from 17 other Drosophila species that were examined. Within D. melanogaster strains, there are, on average, 37.4 cytologically detectable S elements per diploid genome. These elements are scattered throughout the chromosomes, but several sites in both the euchromatin and β heterochromatin are consistently occupied. The discovery of an S-element-insertion mutation and a reversion of this mutation indicates that S elements are at least occasionally mobile in the D. melanogaster genome. These elements seem to insert at an AT dinucleotide within a short palindrome and apparently duplicate that dinucleotide upon insertion. PMID:8601484

  20. S elements: A family of Tc1-like transposons in the genome of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Merriman, P.J.; Grimes, C.D.; Ambroziak, J.

    1995-12-01

    The S elements form a diverse family of long-inverted-repeat transposons within the genome of Drosophila melanogaster. These elements very in size and sequence, the longest consisting of 1736 bp with 234-bp inverted terminal repeats. The longest open reading frame in an intact S element could encode a 345-amino acid polypeptide. This polypeptide is homologous to the transposases of the mariner-Tc1 superfamily of transposable elements. S elements are ubiquitous in D. melanogaster populations and also appear to be present in the genomes of two sibling species; however, they seem to be absent from 17 other Drosophila species that were examined. Within D. melanogaster strains, there are, on average, 37.4 cytologically detectable S elements per diploid genome. These elements are scattered throughout the chromosomes, but several sites in both the euchromatin and {beta} heterochromatin are consistently occupied. The discovery of an S-element-insertion mutation and a reversion of this mutation indicates that S elements are at least occasionally mobile in the D. melanogaster genome. These elements seem to insert at an AT dinucleotide within a short palindrome and apparently duplicate that dinucleotide upon insertion. 44 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Male Mating Success: Preference or Prowess? Investigating Sexual Selection in the Laboratory Using "Drosophila melanogaster"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Seth; Jensen, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Sexual selection is the primary force affecting the evolution of the elaborate sexual displays common in animals, yet sexual selection experiments are largely absent from introductory biology laboratories. Here we describe the rationale, methodology, and results of several experiments using "Drosophila melanogaster" to demonstrate sexual selection…

  2. Exo70 Isoform Switching upon Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Mediates Cancer Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hezhe; Liu, Jianglan; Liu, Shujing; Zeng, Jingwen; Ding, Deqiang; Carstens, Russ P.; Cong, Yusheng; Xu, Xiaowei; Guo, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Summary Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important developmental process hijacked by cancer cells for their dissemination. Here we show that Exo70, a component of the exocyst complex, undergoes isoform switching mediated by ESRP1, a pre-mRNA splicing factor that regulates EMT. Expression of the epithelial isoform of Exo70 affects the levels of key EMT transcriptional regulators such as Snail and ZEB2, and is sufficient to drive the transition to epithelial phenotypes. Differential Exo70 isoforms expression in human tumors correlates with cancer progression, and increased expression of the epithelial isoform of Exo70 inhibits tumor metastasis in mice. At the molecular level, the mesenchymal but not the epithelial isoform of Exo70 interacts with the Arp2/3 complex and stimulates actin polymerization for tumor invasion. Our findings provide a mechanism by which the exocyst function and actin dynamics are modulated for EMT and tumor invasion. PMID:24331928

  3. The mouse dead-end gene isoform alpha is necessary for germ cell and embryonic viability.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Aggarwal, Sita; Zhu, Rui; Kumar, Madhu; Zhao, Ming; Meistrich, Marvin L; Matin, Angabin

    2007-03-30

    Inactivation of the dead-end (Dnd1) gene in the Ter mouse strain results in depletion of primordial germ cells (PGCs) so that mice become sterile. However, on the 129 mouse strain background, loss of Dnd1 also increases testicular germ cell tumor incidence in parallel to PGC depletion. We report that inactivation of Dnd1 also affects embryonic viability in the 129 strain. Mouse Dnd1 encodes two protein isoforms, DND1-isoform alpha (DND1-alpha) and DND1-isoform beta (DND1-beta). Using isoform-specific antibodies, we determined DND1-alpha is expressed in embryos and embryonic gonads whereas DND1-beta expression is restricted to germ cells of the adult testis. Our data implicate DND1-alpha isoform to be necessary for germ cell viability and therefore its loss in Ter mice results in PGC depletion, germ cell tumor development and partial embryonic lethality in the 129 strain. PMID:17291453

  4. Differential recruitment of PKC isoforms in HeLa cells during redox stress

    PubMed Central

    Rimessi, Alessandro; Rizzuto, Rosario; Pinton, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family is a major transducer of several intracellular pathways. In confirmation of this important role, PKCs exhibit high molecular heterogeneity, because they occur in at least 10 different isoforms differing in biochemical properties and sensitivity to activators. In this report we focused on the ability of different redox agents to induce modification of intracellular distribution of specific PKC isoforms in HeLa cells. To this end we utilized a panel of green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeras and a high-speed digital imaging system. We observed a remarkable complexity of PKC signalling patterns occurring during redox stress with marked differences among PKC isoforms also belonging to the same subgroup. Moreover our results suggest that modifications of the intracellular redox state can modulate the responsiveness of specific PKC isoforms and, in turn, change the sensitivity of the different isoforms to cell stimulation. PMID:18229448

  5. Pharmacological targeting of PI3K isoforms as a therapeutic strategy in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Blunt, Matthew D.; Steele, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    PI3Kδ inhibitors such as idelalisib are providing improved therapeutic options for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). However under certain conditions, inhibition of a single PI3K isoform can be compensated by the other PI3K isoforms, therefore PI3K inhibitors which target multiple PI3K isoforms may provide greater efficacy. The development of compounds targeting multiple PI3K isoforms (α, β, δ, and γ) in CLL cells, in vitro, resulted in sustained inhibition of BCR signalling but with enhanced cytotoxicity and the potential for improve clinical responses. This review summarises the progress of PI3K inhibitor development and describes the rationale and potential for targeting multiple PI3K isoforms. PMID:26500849

  6. Isoforms, structures, and functions of versatile spectraplakin MACF1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Lifang; Su, Peihong; Li, Runzhi; Yin, Chong; Zhang, Yan; Shang, Peng; Yang, Tuanmin; Qian, Airong

    2016-01-01

    Spectraplakins are crucially important communicators, linking cytoskeletal components to each other and cellular junctions. Microtubule actin crosslinking factor 1 (MACF1), also known as actin crosslinking family 7 (ACF7), is a member of the spectraplakin family. It is expressed in numerous tissues and cells as one extensively studied spectraplakin. MACF1 has several isoforms with unique structures and well-known function to be able to crosslink F-actin and microtubules. MACF1 is one versatile spectraplakin with various functions in cell processes, embryo development, tissue-specific functions, and human diseases. The importance of MACF1 has become more apparent in recent years. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the presence and function of MACF1 and provide perspectives on future research of MACF1 based on our studies and others. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(1): 37-44] PMID:26521939

  7. Quantitative isoform-profiling of highly diversified recognition molecules

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Dietmar; Simicevic, Jovan; Ahrné, Erik; Schmidt, Alexander; Scheiffele, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Complex biological systems rely on cell surface cues that govern cellular self-recognition and selective interactions with appropriate partners. Molecular diversification of cell surface recognition molecules through DNA recombination and complex alternative splicing has emerged as an important principle for encoding such interactions. However, the lack of tools to specifically detect and quantify receptor protein isoforms is a major impediment to functional studies. We here developed a workflow for targeted mass spectrometry by selected reaction monitoring that permits quantitative assessment of highly diversified protein families. We apply this workflow to dissecting the molecular diversity of the neuronal neurexin receptors and uncover an alternative splicing-dependent recognition code for synaptic ligands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07794.001 PMID:25985086

  8. Extracellular rigidity sensing by talin isoform-specific mechanical linkages.

    PubMed

    Austen, Katharina; Ringer, Pia; Mehlich, Alexander; Chrostek-Grashoff, Anna; Kluger, Carleen; Klingner, Christoph; Sabass, Benedikt; Zent, Roy; Rief, Matthias; Grashoff, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    The ability of cells to adhere and sense differences in tissue stiffness is crucial for organ development and function. The central mechanisms by which adherent cells detect extracellular matrix compliance, however, are still unknown. Using two single-molecule-calibrated biosensors that allow the analysis of a previously inaccessible but physiologically highly relevant force regime in cells, we demonstrate that the integrin activator talin establishes mechanical linkages following cell adhesion, which are indispensable for cells to probe tissue stiffness. Talin linkages are exposed to a range of piconewton forces and bear, on average, 7-10 pN during cell adhesion depending on their association with F-actin and vinculin. Disruption of talin's mechanical engagement does not impair integrin activation and initial cell adhesion but prevents focal adhesion reinforcement and thus extracellular rigidity sensing. Intriguingly, talin mechanics are isoform specific so that expression of either talin-1 or talin-2 modulates extracellular rigidity sensing. PMID:26523364

  9. Differential expression of two scribble isoforms during Drosophila embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, M; Marhold, J; Gatos, A; Török, I; Mechler, B M

    2001-10-01

    The tumour suppressor gene scribble (scrib) is required for epithelial polarity and growth control in Drosophila. Here, we report the identification and embryonic expression pattern of two Scrib protein isoforms resulting from alternative splicing during scrib transcription. Both proteins are first ubiquitously expressed during early embryogenesis. Then, during morphogenesis each Scrib protein displays a specific pattern of expression in the central and peripheral nervous systems, CNS and PNS, respectively. During germ band extension, the expression of the longer form Scrib1 occurs predominantly in the neuroblasts derived from the neuro-ectoderm and becomes later restricted to CNS neurones as well as to the pole cells in the gonads. By contrast, the shorter form Scrib2 is strongly expressed in the PNS and a subset of CNS neurones. PMID:11578873

  10. Spontaneous Hepatocellular Carcinoma after the Combined Deletion of Akt Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Yu, Wan-Ni; Chen, Xinyu; Peng, Xiao-Ding; Jeon, Sang-Min; Birnbaum, Morris J; Guzman, Grace; Hay, Nissim

    2016-04-11

    Akt is frequently hyperactivated in human cancers and is targeted for cancer therapy. However, the physiological consequences of systemic Akt isoform inhibition were not fully explored. We showed that while combined Akt1 and Akt3 deletion in adult mice is tolerated, combined Akt1 and Akt2 deletion induced rapid mortality. Akt2(-/-) mice survived hepatic Akt1 deletion but all developed spontaneous hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is associated with FoxO-dependent liver injury and inflammation. The gene expression signature of HCC-bearing livers is similar to aggressive human HCC. Consistently, neither Akt1(-/-) nor Akt2(-/-) mice are resistant to diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis, and Akt2(-/-) mice display a high incidence of lung metastasis. Thus, in contrast to other cancers, hepatic Akt inhibition induces liver injury that could promote HCC. PMID:26996309

  11. Locomotion in Lymphocytes is Altered by Differential PKC Isoform Expression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    1999-01-01

    Lymphocyte locomotion is critical for proper elicitation of the immune response. Locomotion of immune cells via the interstitium is essential for optimal immune function during wound healing, inflammation and infection. There are conditions which alter lymphocyte locomotion and one of them is spaceflight. Lymphocyte locomotion is severely inhibited in true spaceflight (true microgravity) and in rotating wall vessel culture (modeled microgravity). When lymphocytes are activated prior to culture in modeled microgravity, locomotion is not inhibited and the levels are comparable to those of static cultured lymphocytes. When a phorbol ester (PMA) is used in modeled microgravity, lymphocyte locomotion is restored by 87%. This occurs regardless if PMA is added after culture in the rotating wall vessel or during culture. Inhibition of DNA synthesis also does not alter restoration of lymphocyte locomotion by PMA. PMA is a direct activator of (protein kinase C) PKC . When a calcium ionophore, ionomycin is used it does not possess any restorative properties towards locomotion either alone or collectively with PMA. Since PMA brings about restoration without help from calcium ionophores (ionomycin), it is infer-red that calcium independent PKC isoforms are involved. Changes were perceived in the protein levels of PKC 6 where levels of the protein were downregulated at 24,72 and 96 hours in untreated rotated cultures (modeled microgravity) compared to untreated static (1g) cultures. At 48 hours there is an increase in the levels of PKC & in the same experimental set up. Studies on transcriptional and translational patterns of calcium independent isoforms of PKC such as 8 and E are presented in this study.

  12. Functional Cooperativity between ABCG4 and ABCG1 Isoforms.

    PubMed

    Hegyi, Zoltán; Homolya, László

    2016-01-01

    ABCG4 belongs to the ABCG subfamily, the members of which are half transporters composed of a single transmembrane and a single nucleotide-binding domain. ABCG proteins have a reverse domain topology as compared to other mammalian ABC transporters, and have to form functional dimers, since the catalytic sites for ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as the transmembrane domains are composed of distinct parts of the monomers. Here we demonstrate that ABCG4 can form homodimers, but also heterodimers with its closest relative, ABCG1. Both the full-length and the short isoforms of ABCG1 can dimerize with ABCG4, whereas the ABCG2 multidrug transporter is unable to form a heterodimer with ABCG4. We also show that contrary to that reported in some previous studies, ABCG4 is predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. While both ABCG1 and ABCG4 have been suggested to be involved in lipid transport or regulation, in accordance with our previous results regarding the long version of ABCG1, here we document that the expression of both the short isoform of ABCG1 as well as ABCG4 induce apoptosis in various cell types. This apoptotic effect, as a functional read-out, allowed us to demonstrate that the dimerization between these half transporters is not only a physical interaction but functional cooperativity. Given that ABCG4 is predominantly expressed in microglial-like cells and endothelial cells in the brain, our finding of ABCG4-induced apoptosis may implicate a new role for this protein in the clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system. PMID:27228027

  13. Isoform-selective Inhibition of Facilitative Glucose Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Hresko, Richard C.; Kraft, Thomas E.; Tzekov, Anatoly; Wildman, Scott A.; Hruz, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologic HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and structurally related oligopeptides are known to reversibly bind and inactivate the insulin-responsive facilitative glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Several PIs exhibit isoform selectivity with little effect on GLUT1. The ability to target individual GLUT isoforms in an acute and reversible manner provides novel means both to investigate the contribution of individual GLUTs to health and disease and to develop targeted treatment of glucose-dependent diseases. To determine the molecular basis of transport inhibition, a series of chimeric proteins containing transmembrane and cytosolic domains from GLUT1 and GLUT4 and/or point mutations were generated and expressed in HEK293 cells. Structural integrity was confirmed via measurement of N-[2-[2-[2-[(N-biotinylcaproylamino)ethoxy)ethoxyl]-4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)-3H-diazirin-3-yl]benzoyl]-1,3-bis(mannopyranosyl-4-yloxy)-2-propylamine (ATB-BMPA) labeling of the chimeric proteins in low density microsome fractions isolated from stably transfected 293 cells. Functional integrity was assessed via measurement of zero-trans 2-deoxyglucose (2-DOG) uptake. ATB-BMPA labeling studies and 2-DOG uptake revealed that transmembrane helices 1 and 5 contain amino acid residues that influence inhibitor access to the transporter binding domain. Substitution of Thr-30 and His-160 in GLUT1 to the corresponding positions in GLUT4 is sufficient to completely transform GLUT1 into GLUT4 with respect to indinavir inhibition of 2-DOG uptake and ATB-BMPA binding. These data provide a structural basis for the selectivity of PIs toward GLUT4 over GLUT1 that can be used in ongoing novel drug design. PMID:24706759

  14. p53 isoforms regulate astrocyte-mediated neuroprotection and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Turnquist, C; Horikawa, I; Foran, E; Major, E O; Vojtesek, B; Lane, D P; Lu, X; Harris, B T; Harris, C C

    2016-09-01

    Bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons have physiological roles in the central nervous system and an altered state or dysfunction of such interactions may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Astrocytes exert structural, metabolic and functional effects on neurons, which can be either neurotoxic or neuroprotective. Their neurotoxic effect is mediated via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) involving pro-inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-6), while their neuroprotective effect is attributed to neurotrophic growth factors (e.g., NGF). We here demonstrate that the p53 isoforms Δ133p53 and p53β are expressed in astrocytes and regulate their toxic and protective effects on neurons. Primary human astrocytes undergoing cellular senescence upon serial passaging in vitro showed diminished expression of Δ133p53 and increased p53β, which were attributed to the autophagic degradation and the SRSF3-mediated alternative RNA splicing, respectively. Early-passage astrocytes with Δ133p53 knockdown or p53β overexpression were induced to show SASP and to exert neurotoxicity in co-culture with neurons. Restored expression of Δ133p53 in near-senescent, otherwise neurotoxic astrocytes conferred them with neuroprotective activity through repression of SASP and induction of neurotrophic growth factors. Brain tissues from AD and ALS patients possessed increased numbers of senescent astrocytes and, like senescent astrocytes in vitro, showed decreased Δ133p53 and increased p53β expression, supporting that our in vitro findings recapitulate in vivo pathology of these neurodegenerative diseases. Our finding that Δ133p53 enhances the neuroprotective function of aged and senescent astrocytes suggests that the p53 isoforms and their regulatory mechanisms are potential targets for therapeutic intervention in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27104929

  15. Functional Cooperativity between ABCG4 and ABCG1 Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Hegyi, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    ABCG4 belongs to the ABCG subfamily, the members of which are half transporters composed of a single transmembrane and a single nucleotide-binding domain. ABCG proteins have a reverse domain topology as compared to other mammalian ABC transporters, and have to form functional dimers, since the catalytic sites for ATP binding and hydrolysis, as well as the transmembrane domains are composed of distinct parts of the monomers. Here we demonstrate that ABCG4 can form homodimers, but also heterodimers with its closest relative, ABCG1. Both the full-length and the short isoforms of ABCG1 can dimerize with ABCG4, whereas the ABCG2 multidrug transporter is unable to form a heterodimer with ABCG4. We also show that contrary to that reported in some previous studies, ABCG4 is predominantly localized to the plasma membrane. While both ABCG1 and ABCG4 have been suggested to be involved in lipid transport or regulation, in accordance with our previous results regarding the long version of ABCG1, here we document that the expression of both the short isoform of ABCG1 as well as ABCG4 induce apoptosis in various cell types. This apoptotic effect, as a functional read-out, allowed us to demonstrate that the dimerization between these half transporters is not only a physical interaction but functional cooperativity. Given that ABCG4 is predominantly expressed in microglial-like cells and endothelial cells in the brain, our finding of ABCG4-induced apoptosis may implicate a new role for this protein in the clearance mechanisms within the central nervous system. PMID:27228027

  16. Subunit isoform selectivity in assembly of Na,K-ATPase α-β heterodimers.

    PubMed

    Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Clifford, Rebecca J; Kaplan, Jack H; Sachs, George; Vagin, Olga

    2012-07-27

    To catalyze ion transport, the Na,K-ATPase must contain one α and one β subunit. When expressed by transfection in various expression systems, each of the four α subunit isoforms can assemble with each of the three β subunit isoforms and form an active enzyme, suggesting the absence of selective α-β isoform assembly. However, it is unknown whether in vivo conditions the α-β assembly is random or isoform-specific. The α(2)-β(2) complex was selectively immunoprecipitated by both anti-α(2) and anti-β(2) antibodies from extracts of mouse brain, which contains cells co-expressing multiple Na,K-ATPase isoforms. Neither α(1)-β(2) nor α(2)-β(1) complexes were detected in the immunoprecipitates. Furthermore, in MDCK cells co-expressing α(1), β(1), and β(2) isoforms, a greater fraction of the β(2) subunits was unassembled with α(1) as compared with that of the β(1) subunits, indicating preferential association of the α(1) isoform with the β(1) isoform. In addition, the α(1)-β(2) complex was less resistant to various detergents than the α(1)-β(1) complex isolated from MDCK cells or the α(2)-β(2) complex isolated from mouse brain. Therefore, the diversity of the α-β Na,K-ATPase heterodimers in vivo is determined not only by cell-specific co-expression of particular isoforms, but also by selective association of the α and β subunit isoforms. PMID:22696220

  17. Dissecting signalling by individual Akt/PKB isoforms, three steps at once.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Fuentealba, Cesar; Klip, Amira

    2015-09-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt/PKB (protein kinase B) is key for mammalian cell growth, survival, metabolism and oncogenic transformation. The diverse level and tissue expression of its three isoforms, Akt1/PKBα, Akt2/PKBβ and Akt3/PKBγ, make it daunting to identify isoform-specific actions in vivo and even in isolated tissues/cells. To date, isoform-specific knockout and knockdown have been the best strategies to dissect their individual overall functions. In a recent article in the Biochemical Journal, Kajno et al. reported a new strategy to study isoform selectivity in cell lines. Individual Akt/PKB isoforms in 3T3-L1 pre-adipocytes are first silenced via shRNA and stable cellular clones lacking one or the other isoform are selected. The stably silenced isoform is then replaced by a mutant engineered to be refractory to inhibition by MK-2206 (Akt1(W80A) or Akt2(W80A)). Akt1(W80A) or Akt2(W80A) are functional and effectively recruited to the plasma membrane in response to insulin. The system affords the opportunity to acutely control the activity of the endogenous non-silenced isoform through timely addition of MK-2206. Using this approach, it is confirmed that Akt1/PKBα is the preferred isoform sustaining adipocyte differentiation, but both Akt1/PKBα and Akt2/PKBβ can indistinctly support insulin-dependent FoxO1 (forkhead box O1) nuclear exclusion. Surprisingly, either isoform can also support insulin-dependent glucose transporter (GLUT) 4 translocation to the membrane, in contrast with the preferential role of Akt2/PKBβ assessed by knockdown studies. The new strategy should allow analysis of the plurality of Akt/PKB functions in other cells and in response to other stimuli. It should also be amenable to high-throughput studies to speed up advances in signal transmission by this pivotal kinase. PMID:26348913

  18. Human Disease Models in Drosophila melanogaster and the Role of the Fly in Therapeutic Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Udai Bhan

    2011-01-01

    The common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a well studied and highly tractable genetic model organism for understanding molecular mechanisms of human diseases. Many basic biological, physiological, and neurological properties are conserved between mammals and D. melanogaster, and nearly 75% of human disease-causing genes are believed to have a functional homolog in the fly. In the discovery process for therapeutics, traditional approaches employ high-throughput screening for small molecules that is based primarily on in vitro cell culture, enzymatic assays, or receptor binding assays. The majority of positive hits identified through these types of in vitro screens, unfortunately, are found to be ineffective and/or toxic in subsequent validation experiments in whole-animal models. New tools and platforms are needed in the discovery arena to overcome these limitations. The incorporation of D. melanogaster into the therapeutic discovery process holds tremendous promise for an enhanced rate of discovery of higher quality leads. D. melanogaster models of human diseases provide several unique features such as powerful genetics, highly conserved disease pathways, and very low comparative costs. The fly can effectively be used for low- to high-throughput drug screens as well as in target discovery. Here, we review the basic biology of the fly and discuss models of human diseases and opportunities for therapeutic discovery for central nervous system disorders, inflammatory disorders, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes. We also provide information and resources for those interested in pursuing fly models of human disease, as well as those interested in using D. melanogaster in the drug discovery process. PMID:21415126

  19. The Discovery, Distribution, and Evolution of Viruses Associated with Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Webster, Claire L; Waldron, Fergal M; Robertson, Shaun; Crowson, Daisy; Ferrari, Giada; Quintana, Juan F; Brouqui, Jean-Michel; Bayne, Elizabeth H; Longdon, Ben; Buck, Amy H; Lazzaro, Brian P; Akorli, Jewelna; Haddrill, Penelope R; Obbard, Darren J

    2015-07-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a valuable invertebrate model for viral infection and antiviral immunity, and is a focus for studies of insect-virus coevolution. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify more than 20 previously undetected RNA viruses and a DNA virus associated with wild D. melanogaster. These viruses not only include distant relatives of known insect pathogens but also novel groups of insect-infecting viruses. By sequencing virus-derived small RNAs, we show that the viruses represent active infections of Drosophila. We find that the RNA viruses differ in the number and properties of their small RNAs, and we detect both siRNAs and a novel miRNA from the DNA virus. Analysis of small RNAs also allows us to identify putative viral sequences that lack detectable sequence similarity to known viruses. By surveying >2,000 individually collected wild adult Drosophila we show that more than 30% of D. melanogaster carry a detectable virus, and more than 6% carry multiple viruses. However, despite a high prevalence of the Wolbachia endosymbiont--which is known to be protective against virus infections in Drosophila--we were unable to detect any relationship between the presence of Wolbachia and the presence of any virus. Using publicly available RNA-seq datasets, we show that the community of viruses in Drosophila laboratories is very different from that seen in the wild, but that some of the newly discovered viruses are nevertheless widespread in laboratory lines and are ubiquitous in cell culture. By sequencing viruses from individual wild-collected flies we show that some viruses are shared between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Our results provide an essential evolutionary and ecological context for host-virus interaction in Drosophila, and the newly reported viral sequences will help develop D. melanogaster further as a model for molecular and evolutionary virus research. PMID:26172158

  20. The Discovery, Distribution, and Evolution of Viruses Associated with Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Claire L.; Waldron, Fergal M.; Robertson, Shaun; Crowson, Daisy; Ferrari, Giada; Quintana, Juan F.; Brouqui, Jean-Michel; Bayne, Elizabeth H.; Longdon, Ben; Buck, Amy H.; Lazzaro, Brian P.; Akorli, Jewelna; Haddrill, Penelope R.; Obbard, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is a valuable invertebrate model for viral infection and antiviral immunity, and is a focus for studies of insect-virus coevolution. Here we use a metagenomic approach to identify more than 20 previously undetected RNA viruses and a DNA virus associated with wild D. melanogaster. These viruses not only include distant relatives of known insect pathogens but also novel groups of insect-infecting viruses. By sequencing virus-derived small RNAs, we show that the viruses represent active infections of Drosophila. We find that the RNA viruses differ in the number and properties of their small RNAs, and we detect both siRNAs and a novel miRNA from the DNA virus. Analysis of small RNAs also allows us to identify putative viral sequences that lack detectable sequence similarity to known viruses. By surveying >2,000 individually collected wild adult Drosophila we show that more than 30% of D. melanogaster carry a detectable virus, and more than 6% carry multiple viruses. However, despite a high prevalence of the Wolbachia endosymbiont—which is known to be protective against virus infections in Drosophila—we were unable to detect any relationship between the presence of Wolbachia and the presence of any virus. Using publicly available RNA-seq datasets, we show that the community of viruses in Drosophila laboratories is very different from that seen in the wild, but that some of the newly discovered viruses are nevertheless widespread in laboratory lines and are ubiquitous in cell culture. By sequencing viruses from individual wild-collected flies we show that some viruses are shared between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Our results provide an essential evolutionary and ecological context for host–virus interaction in Drosophila, and the newly reported viral sequences will help develop D. melanogaster further as a model for molecular and evolutionary virus research. PMID:26172158

  1. The Genetic Basis for Variation in Sensitivity to Lead Toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shanshan; Morozova, Tatiana V.; Hussain, Yasmeen N.; Luoma, Sarah E.; McCoy, Lenovia; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Mackay, Trudy F.C.; Anholt, Robert R.H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lead toxicity presents a worldwide health problem, especially due to its adverse effects on cognitive development in children. However, identifying genes that give rise to individual variation in susceptibility to lead toxicity is challenging in human populations. Objectives: Our goal was to use Drosophila melanogaster to identify evolutionarily conserved candidate genes associated with individual variation in susceptibility to lead exposure. Methods: To identify candidate genes associated with variation in susceptibility to lead toxicity, we measured effects of lead exposure on development time, viability and adult activity in the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and performed genome-wide association analyses to identify candidate genes. We used mutants to assess functional causality of candidate genes and constructed a genetic network associated with variation in sensitivity to lead exposure, on which we could superimpose human orthologs. Results: We found substantial heritabilities for all three traits and identified candidate genes associated with variation in susceptibility to lead exposure for each phenotype. The genetic architectures that determine variation in sensitivity to lead exposure are highly polygenic. Gene ontology and network analyses showed enrichment of genes associated with early development and function of the nervous system. Conclusions: Drosophila melanogaster presents an advantageous model to study the genetic underpinnings of variation in susceptibility to lead toxicity. Evolutionary conservation of cellular pathways that respond to toxic exposure allows predictions regarding orthologous genes and pathways across phyla. Thus, studies in the D. melanogaster model system can identify candidate susceptibility genes to guide subsequent studies in human populations. Citation: Zhou S, Morozova TV, Hussain YN, Luoma SE, McCoy L, Yamamoto A, Mackay TF, Anholt RR. 2016. The genetic basis for variation in

  2. Merlin Isoforms 1 and 2 Both Act as Tumour Suppressors and Are Required for Optimal Sperm Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Zoch, Ansgar; Mayerl, Steffen; Schulz, Alexander; Greither, Thomas; Frappart, Lucien; Rübsam, Juliane; Heuer, Heike; Giovannini, Marco; Morrison, Helen

    2015-01-01

    The tumour suppressor Merlin, encoded by the gene NF2, is frequently mutated in the autosomal dominant disorder neurofibromatosis type II, characterised primarily by the development of schwannoma and other glial cell tumours. However, NF2 is expressed in virtually all analysed human and rodent organs, and its deletion in mice causes early embryonic lethality. Additionally, NF2 encodes for two major isoforms of Merlin of unknown functionality. Specifically, the tumour suppressor potential of isoform 2 remains controversial. In this study, we used Nf2 isoform-specific knockout mouse models to analyse the function of each isoform during development and organ homeostasis. We found that both isoforms carry full tumour suppressor functionality and can completely compensate the loss of the other isoform during development and in most adult organs. Surprisingly, we discovered that spermatogenesis is strictly dependent on the presence of both isoforms. While the testis primarily expresses isoform 1, we noticed an enrichment of isoform 2 in spermatogonial stem cells. Deletion of either isoform was found to cause decreased sperm quality as observed by maturation defects and head/midpiece abnormalities. These defects led to impaired sperm functionality as assessed by decreased sperm capacitation. Thus, we describe spermatogenesis as a new Nf2-dependent process. Additionally, we provide for the first time in vivo evidence for equal tumour suppressor potentials of Merlin isoform 1 and isoform 2. PMID:26258444

  3. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster. PMID:27271968

  4. Non-Nutritive Polyol Sweeteners Differ in Insecticidal Activity When Ingested by Adult Drosophila melanogaster (Diptera: Drosophilidae).

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Sean; Baudier, Kaitlin; Marenda, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    Previous work showed the non-nutritive polyol sweetener Erythritol was toxic when ingested by Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen, 1930). This study assessed whether insect toxicity is a general property of polyols. Among tested compounds, toxicity was highest for erythritol. Adult fruit flies (D. melanogaster) fed erythritol had reduced longevity relative to controls. Other polyols did not reduce longevity; the only exception was a weaker but significant reduction of female (but not male) longevity when flies were fed D-mannitol. We conclude at least some non-nutritive polyols are not toxic to adult D. melanogaster when ingested for 17 days. The longer time course (relative to erythritol) and female specificity of D-mannitol mortality suggests different mechanisms for D-mannitol and erythritol toxicity to D. melanogaster. PMID:27271968

  5. Dysregulation of miRNA isoform level at 5' end in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengqin; Xu, Yuming; Li, Musheng; Tu, Jing; Lu, Zuhong

    2016-06-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, whose mechanism is still not yet fully understood. A miRNA-based signature method, commonly according to the changes of expression levels, is widely used for AD analysis in previous studies. Recently, miRNA isoforms called as isomiR variants, which is considered to play important biological roles, have been demonstrated as the applications of high throughput sequencing platforms. Here, we presented an entropy-based model to detect the miRNA isoform level at the 5' end, and found many miRNAs with significant changes of isoform levels between the early stage and the late stage of AD by the application of this model to the public data. The statistical significance of the overlap between isoform-level changed miRNAs and AD related miRNAs extracted from HMDD2 supports that these miRNA isoforms are not degradation products. Based on the most common isomiR seed analysis of isoform-level changed AD related miRNAs, the predicted targets are also found to be enriched for genes involved in transcriptional regulation and the nervous system. After comparing with the expression level based method, we detected that changes of 5' isoform levels are more stable than those of expression levels for AD related miRNA detecting. PMID:26899870

  6. The isolation of parvalbumin isoforms from the tail muscle of the American alligator (Alligator mississipiensis).

    PubMed

    Laney, E L; Shabanowitz, J; King, G; Hunt, D F; Nelson, D J

    1997-04-01

    Multiple parvalbumin isoforms have been detected in the tail (skeletal) muscle of the American alligator (Alligator mississipiensis). One of these isoforms (APV-1) has been highly purified and partially characterized. Protein purification involved mainly gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography, and characterization included gel electrophoresis, amino acid composition analysis, metal ion analysis, MALDI-TOF and ESI mass spectrometry, ultraviolet and fluorescence spectroscopy, and one- and two-dimensional 500 MHz proton NMR spectroscopy. The alligator isoforms are rich in phenylalanine and deficient in the other aromatic residues as is typical for parvalbumins. In fact, the one highly purified isoform that forms the basis of this study has only phenyl-alanine as an aromatic residue. Ion exchange chromatography further indicates that this isoform has a relatively high isoelectric point (pl approximately 5.0), indicating that it is an alpha-lineage parvalbumin. This alligator parvalbumin isoform is unusual in that it has an atypically high Ca2+ content (almost 3.0 mole of Ca2+ per mole of protein) following purification, a fact supported by terbium fluorescence titration experiments. Preliminary comparative analysis of the highly purified alligator parvalbumin isoform (in the Ca2-loaded state) by two-dimensional 1H-NMR (2D 1H TOCSY and 2D 1H NOESY) indicates that there is considerable similarity in structure between the alligator protein and a homologous protein obtained from the silver hake (a saltwater fish species). PMID:9076974

  7. Cloning and Characterisation of Multiple Ferritin Isoforms in the Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun-Hoe; Pooley, Nicholas J.; Mohd-Adnan, Adura; Martin, Samuel A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Ferritin is a highly-conserved iron-storage protein that has also been identified as an acute phase protein within the innate immune system. The iron-storage function is mediated through complementary roles played by heavy (H)-chain subunit as well as the light (L) in mammals or middle (M)-chain in teleosts, respectively. In this study, we report the identification of five ferritin subunits (H1, H2, M1, M2, M3) in the Atlantic salmon that were supported by the presence of iron-regulatory regions, gene structure, conserved domains and phylogenetic analysis. Tissue distribution analysis across eight different tissues showed that each of these isoforms is differentially expressed. We also examined the expression of the ferritin isoforms in the liver and kidney of juvenile Atlantic salmon that was challenged with Aeromonas salmonicida as well as in muscle cell culture stimulated with interleukin-1β. We found that each isoform displayed unique expression profiles, and in certain conditions the expressions between the isoforms were completely diametrical to each other. Our study is the first report of multiple ferritin isoforms from both the H- and M-chains in a vertebrate species, as well as ferritin isoforms that showed decreased expression in response to infection. Taken together, the results of our study suggest the possibility of functional differences between the H- and M-chain isoforms in terms of tissue localisation, transcriptional response to bacterial exposure and stimulation by specific immune factors. PMID:25078784

  8. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fearnley, Gareth W.; Smith, Gina A.; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A.; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T.; Zachary, Ian C.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Wheatcroft, Stephen B.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A–VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor–ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  9. Identification of Cardiac Myofilament Protein Isoforms Using Multiple Mass Spectrometry Based Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jonathan A.; Ubaida-Mohien, Ceereena; Graham, David R.; Faber, Matthijs J.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The identification of protein isoforms in complex biological samples is challenging. We, therefore, used a mass spectrometry (MS) approach to unambiguously identify cardiac myofilament protein isoforms based on the observation of a tryptic peptide consisting of a sequence unique to a particular isoform. Experimental design Three different workflows were used to isolate and fractionate rat cardiac myofilament subproteomes. All fractions were analyzed on an LTQ-Orbitrap MS, proteins were identified using various search engines (Mascot, X!Tandem, X!Tandem Kscore and OMSSA) with results combined via PepArML Meta-Search Engine, and a post-search analysis was performed by MASPECTRAS. Results The combination of multiple workflows and search engines resulted in a larger number of non-redundant proteins identified than with individual methods. A total of 102 myofilament annotated proteins were observed overlapping in two or three of the workflows. Literature search for myofilament presence with manual validation of the MS spectra was carried out for unambiguous identification: 10 cardiac myofilament and 17 cardiac myofilament-associated proteins were identified with 39 isoforms and sub-isoforms. Conclusion and clinical relevance We have identified multiple isoforms of myofilament proteins that are present in cardiac tissue using unique tryptic peptides. Changes in distribution of these protein isoforms under pathological conditions could ultimately allow for clinical diagnostics or as therapeutic targets. PMID:24974818

  10. CK-MB isoforms for early risk stratification of emergency department patients.

    PubMed

    Green, G B; Dehlinger, E; McGrievey, T S; Li, D J; Jones, K A; Kelen, G D; Chan, D W

    2000-10-01

    The potential clinical utility of single sample CK-MB isoforms measurement for early risk stratification of Emergency Department (ED) patients with possible myocardial ischemia was evaluated among 405 patients presenting to two urban EDs. Clinical and serologic data were prospectively collected and the occurrence of adverse events (AEs) and myocardial infarction (MI) during the 14-day outcome period was recorded and utilized to calculate and compare relative risks (RR) and predictive values of isoforms and CK-MB alone. Among the 405 patients, 67 accrued 105 AEs. Both isoforms and CK-MB alone were predictive of AEs with RR of 3.32 (2.09, 5.27) and 6.28 (4.64, 8.52), respectively. Isoforms had higher sensitivity for AEs compared to CK-MB (65.7% [54.3, 77.0] vs. 14.9% [6.4, 23.5]; p<0. 01) but lower specificity (69.2% [64.3, 74.2] vs. 99.7% [99.1,100. 0]; p<0.01). Isoforms' superior sensitivity allowed identification of many high risk patients missed by CK-MB alone. Further, for the prediction of MI, isoforms had superior diagnostic sensitivity and equivalent specificity. This investigation supports the emergency department use of early, single sample CK-MB isoform testing. PMID:10958863

  11. TMPRSS2 Isoform 1 Activates Respiratory Viruses and Is Expressed in Viral Target Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zmora, Pawel; Moldenhauer, Anna-Sophie; Hofmann-Winkler, Heike; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The cellular protease TMPRSS2 cleaves and activates the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) and TMPRSS2 expression is essential for viral spread and pathogenesis in mice. Moreover, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and other respiratory viruses are activated by TMPRSS2. However, previous studies on viral activation by TMPRSS2 focused on a 492 amino acids comprising form of the protein (isoform 2) while other TMPRSS2 isoforms, generated upon alternative splicing of the tmprss2 mRNA, have not been characterized. Here, we show that the mRNA encoding a TMPRSS2 isoform with an extended N-terminal cytoplasmic domain (isoform 1) is expressed in lung-derived cell lines and tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that TMPRSS2 isoform 1 colocalizes with HA and cleaves and activates HA. Finally, we show that isoform 1 activates the SARS-CoV spike protein for cathepsin L-independent entry into target cells. Our results indicate that TMPRSS2 isoform 1 is expressed in viral target cells and might contribute to viral activation in the host. PMID:26379044

  12. Diversification of importin-α isoforms in cellular trafficking and disease states

    PubMed Central

    Pumroy, Ruth A.; Cingolani, Gino

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes seven isoforms of importin α which are grouped into three subfamilies known as α1, α2 and α3. All isoforms share a fundamentally conserved architecture that consists of an N-terminal, autoinhibitory, importin-β-binding (IBB) domain and a C-terminal Arm (Armadillo)-core that associates with nuclear localization signal (NLS) cargoes. Despite striking similarity in amino acid sequence and 3D structure, importin-α isoforms display remarkable substrate specificity in vivo. In the present review, we look at key differences among importin-α isoforms and provide a comprehensive inventory of known viral and cellular cargoes that have been shown to associate preferentially with specific isoforms. We illustrate how the diversification of the adaptor importin α into seven isoforms expands the dynamic range and regulatory control of nucleocytoplasmic transport, offering unexpected opportunities for pharmacological intervention. The emerging view of importin α is that of a key signalling molecule, with isoforms that confer preferential nuclear entry and spatiotemporal specificity on viral and cellular cargoes directly linked to human diseases. PMID:25656054

  13. VEGF-A isoforms program differential VEGFR2 signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Fearnley, Gareth W; Smith, Gina A; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Yuldasheva, Nadira; Mughal, Nadeem A; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Kearney, Mark T; Zachary, Ian C; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase VEGFR2 triggers multiple signal transduction pathways, which regulate endothelial cell responses that control vascular development. Multiple isoforms of VEGF-A can elicit differential signal transduction and endothelial responses. However, it is unclear how such cellular responses are controlled by isoform-specific VEGF-A-VEGFR2 complexes. Increasingly, there is the realization that the membrane trafficking of receptor-ligand complexes influences signal transduction and protein turnover. By building on these concepts, our study shows for the first time that three different VEGF-A isoforms (VEGF-A165, VEGF-A121 and VEGF-A145) promote distinct patterns of VEGFR2 endocytosis for delivery into early endosomes. This differential VEGFR2 endocytosis and trafficking is linked to VEGF-A isoform-specific signal transduction events. Disruption of clathrin-dependent endocytosis blocked VEGF-A isoform-specific VEGFR2 activation, signal transduction and caused substantial depletion in membrane-bound VEGFR1 and VEGFR2 levels. Furthermore, such VEGF-A isoforms promoted differential patterns of VEGFR2 ubiquitylation, proteolysis and terminal degradation. Our study now provides novel insights into how different VEGF-A isoforms can bind the same receptor tyrosine kinase and elicit diverse cellular outcomes. PMID:27044325

  14. Myosin isoform fiber type and fiber size in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana).

    PubMed

    Hazimihalis, P J; Gorvet, M A; Butcher, M T

    2013-01-01

    Muscle fiber type is a well studied property in limb muscles, however, much less is understood about myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform expression in caudal muscles of mammalian tails. Didelphid marsupials are an interesting lineage in this context as all species have prehensile tails, but show a range of tail-function depending on either their arboreal or terrestrial locomotor habits. Differences in prehensility suggest that MHC isoform fiber types may also be different, in that terrestrial opossums may have a large distribution of oxidative fibers for object carrying tasks instead of faster, glycolytic fiber types expected in mammals with long tails. To test this hypothesis, MHC isoform fiber type and their regional distribution (proximal/transitional/distal) were determined in the tail of the Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana). Fiber types were determined by a combination of myosin-ATPase histochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and SDS-PAGE. Results indicate a predominance of the fast MHC-2A and -2X isoforms in each region of the tail. The presence of two fast isoforms, in addition to the slow MHC-1 isoform, was confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis. The overall MHC isoform fiber type distribution for the tail was: 25% MHC-1, 71% MHC-2A/X hybrid, and 4% MHC-1/2A hybrid. Oxidative MHC-2A/X isoform fibers were found to be relatively large in cross-section compared to slow, oxidative MHC-1 and MHC-1/2A hybrid fibers. A large percentage of fast MHC-2A/X hybrids fibers may be suggestive of an evolutionary transition in MHC isoform distribution (fast-to-slow fiber type) in the tail musculature of an opossum with primarily a terrestrial locomotor habit and adaptive tail-function. PMID:23152195

  15. Profilin Isoforms Modulate Astrocytic Morphology and the Motility of Astrocytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Schweinhuber, Stefanie K.; Meßerschmidt, Tania; Hänsch, Robert; Korte, Martin; Rothkegel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of astrocytic processes determines their close structural association with synapses referred to as the ‘tripartite synapse’. Concerted morphological plasticity processes at tripartite synapses are supposed to shape neuronal communication. Morphological changes in astrocytes as well as the motility of astrocytic processes require remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Among the regulators of fast timescale actin-based motility, the actin binding protein profilin 1 has recently been shown to control the activity-dependent outgrowth of astrocytic processes. Here, we demonstrate that cultured murine astrocytes in addition to the ubiquitous profilin 1 also express the neuronal isoform profilin 2a. To analyze the cellular function of both profilins in astrocytes, we took advantage of a shRNA mediated isoform-specific downregulation. Interestingly, consistent with earlier results in neurons, we found redundant as well as isoform-specific functions of both profilins in modulating cellular physiology. The knockdown of either profilin 1 or profilin 2a led to a significant decrease in cell spreading of astrocytes. In contrast, solely the knockdown of profilin 2a resulted in a significantly reduced morphological complexity of astrocytes in both dissociated and slice culture astrocytes. Moreover, both isoforms proved to be crucial for forskolin-induced astrocytic stellation. Furthermore, forskolin treatment resulted in isoform-specific changes in the phosphorylation level of profilin 1 and profilin 2a, leading to a PKA-dependent phosphorylation of profilin 2a. In addition, transwell assays revealed an involvement of both isoforms in the motility of astrocytic processes, while FRAP analysis displayed an isoform-specific role of profilin 1 in the regulation of actin dynamics in peripheral astrocytic processes. Taken together, we suggest profilin isoforms to be important modulators of astrocytic morphology and motility with overlapping as well as isoform

  16. Substrate specificity, kinetic properties and inhibition by fumonisin B1 of ceramide synthase isoforms from Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Luttgeharm, Kyle D; Cahoon, Edgar B; Markham, Jonathan E

    2016-03-01

    Ceramide makes up the acyl-backbone of sphingolipids and plays a central role in determining the function of these essential membrane lipids. In Arabidopsis, the varied chemical composition of ceramide is determined by the specificity of three different isoforms of ceramide synthase, denoted LAG one homologue 1, -2 and -3 (LOH1, LOH2 and LOH3), for a range of long-chain base (LCB) and acyl-CoA substrates. The contribution of each of these isoforms to the synthesis of ceramide was investigated by in vitro ceramide synthase assays. The plant LCB phytosphingosine was efficiently used by the LOH1 and LOH3 isoforms, with LOH1 having the lowest Km for the LCB substrate of the three isoforms. In contrast, sphinganine was used efficiently only by the LOH2 isoform. Acyl-CoA specificity was also distinguished between the three isoforms with LOH2 almost completely specific for palmitoyl-CoA whereas the LOH1 isoform showed greatest activity with lignoceroyl- and hexacosanoyl-CoAs. Interestingly, unsaturated acyl-CoAs were not used efficiently by any isoform whereas unsaturated LCB substrates were preferred by LOH2 and 3. Fumonisin B1 (FB1) is a general inhibitor of ceramide synthases but LOH1 was found to have a much lower Ki than the other isoforms pointing towards the origin of FB1 sensitivity in plants. Overall, the data suggest distinct roles and modes of regulation for each of the ceramide synthases in Arabidopsis sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:26635357

  17. NSMAP: A method for spliced isoforms identification and quantification from RNA-Seq

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The development of techniques for sequencing the messenger RNA (RNA-Seq) enables it to study the biological mechanisms such as alternative splicing and gene expression regulation more deeply and accurately. Most existing methods employ RNA-Seq to quantify the expression levels of already annotated isoforms from the reference genome. However, the current reference genome is very incomplete due to the complexity of the transcriptome which hiders the comprehensive investigation of transcriptome using RNA-Seq. Novel study on isoform inference and estimation purely from RNA-Seq without annotation information is desirable. Results A Nonnegativity and Sparsity constrained Maximum APosteriori (NSMAP) model has been proposed to estimate the expression levels of isoforms from RNA-Seq data without the annotation information. In contrast to previous methods, NSMAP performs identification of the structures of expressed isoforms and estimation of the expression levels of those expressed isoforms simultaneously, which enables better identification of isoforms. In the simulations parameterized by two real RNA-Seq data sets, more than 77% expressed isoforms are correctly identified and quantified. Then, we apply NSMAP on two RNA-Seq data sets of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) samples and one normal sample in order to identify differentially expressed known and novel isoforms in MDS disease. Conclusions NSMAP provides a good strategy to identify and quantify novel isoforms without the knowledge of annotated reference genome which can further realize the potential of RNA-Seq technique in transcriptome analysis. NSMAP package is freely available at https://sites.google.com/site/nsmapforrnaseq. PMID:21575225

  18. Complex Interplay of the UL136 Isoforms Balances Cytomegalovirus Replication and Latency

    PubMed Central

    Caviness, Katie; Bughio, Farah; Crawford, Lindsey B.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Nelson, Jay A.; Caposio, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a betaherpesvirus, persists indefinitely in the human host through poorly understood mechanisms. The UL136 gene is carried within a genetic locus important to HCMV latency termed the UL133/8 locus, which also carries UL133, UL135, and UL138. Previously, we demonstrated that UL136 is expressed as five protein isoforms ranging from 33-kDa to 19-kDa, arising from alternative transcription and, likely, translation initiation mechanisms. We previously showed that the UL136 isoforms are largely dispensable for virus infection in fibroblasts, a model for productive virus replication. In our current work, UL136 has emerged as a complex regulator of HCMV infection in multiple contexts of infection relevant to HCMV persistence: in an endothelial cell (EC) model of chronic infection, in a CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) model of latency, and in an in vivo NOD-scid IL2Rγcnull humanized (huNSG) mouse model for latency. The 33- and 26-kDa isoforms promote replication, while the 23- and 19-kDa isoforms suppress replication in ECs, in CD34+ HPCs, and in huNSG mice. The role of the 25-kDa isoform is context dependent and influences the activity of the other isoforms. These isoforms localize throughout the secretory pathway, and loss of the 33- and 26-kDa UL136 isoforms results in virus maturation defects in ECs. This work reveals an intriguing functional interplay between protein isoforms that impacts virus replication, latency, and dissemination, contributing to the overall role of the UL133/8 locus in HCMV infection. PMID:26933055

  19. PML isoforms in response to arsenic: high-resolution analysis of PML body structure and degradation.

    PubMed

    Hands, Katherine J; Cuchet-Lourenco, Delphine; Everett, Roger D; Hay, Ronald T

    2014-01-15

    Arsenic is a clinically effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL) in which the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) protein is fused to retinoic receptor alpha (RARα). PML-RARα is degraded by the proteasome by a SUMO-dependent, ubiquitin-mediated pathway in response to arsenic treatment, curing the disease. Six major PML isoforms are expressed as a result of alternative splicing, each of which encodes a unique C-terminal region. Using a system in which only a single EYFP-linked PML isoform is expressed, we demonstrate that PMLI, PMLII and PMLVI accumulate in the cytoplasm following arsenic treatment, whereas PMLIII, PMLIV and PMLV do not. 3D structured illumination was used to obtain super-resolution images of PML bodies, revealing spherical shells of PML along with associated SUMO. Arsenic treatment results in dramatic isoform-specific changes to PML body ultrastructure. After extended arsenic treatment most PML isoforms are degraded, leaving SUMO at the core of the nuclear bodies. A high-content imaging assay identifies PMLV as the isoform most readily degraded following arsenic treatment, and PMLIV as relatively resistant to degradation. Immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrates that all PML isoforms are modified by SUMO and ubiquitin after arsenic treatment, and by using siRNA, we demonstrate that arsenic-induced degradation of all PML isoforms is dependent on the ubiquitin E3 ligase RNF4. Intriguingly, depletion of RNF4 results in marked accumulation of PMLV, suggesting that this isoform is an optimal substrate for RNF4. Thus the variable C-terminal domain influences the rate and location of degradation of PML isoforms following arsenic treatment. PMID:24190887

  20. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-02-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  1. Drosophila melanogaster alcohol dehydrogenase: mechanism of aldehyde oxidation and dismutation.

    PubMed Central

    Winberg, J O; McKinley-McKee, J S

    1998-01-01

    Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) catalyses the oxidation of both alcohols and aldehydes. In the latter case, the oxidation is followed by a reduction of the aldehyde, i.e. a dismutation reaction. At high pH, dismutation is accompanied by a small release of NADH, which is not observed at neutral pH. Previously it has been emphasized that kinetic coefficients obtained by measuring the increase in A340, i.e. the release of NADH at high pH is not a direct measure of the aldehyde oxidation reaction and these values cannot be compared with those for alcohol dehydrogenation. In this article we demonstrate that this is not entirely true, and that the coefficients phiB and phiAB, where B is the aldehyde and A is NAD+, are the same for a dismutation reaction and a simple aldehyde dehydrogenase reaction. Thus the substrate specificity of the aldehyde oxidation reaction can be determined by simply measuring the NADH release. The coefficients for oxidation and dehydrogenation reactions (phi0d and phiAd respectively) are complex and involve the constants for the dismutation reaction. However, dead-end inhibitors can be used to determine the quantitative contribution of the kinetic constants for the aldehyde oxidation and reduction pathways to the phi0d and phiAd coefficients. The combination of dead-end and product inhibitors can be used to determine the reaction mechanism for the aldehyde oxidation pathway. Previously, we showed that with Drosophila Adh, the interconversion between alcohols and aldehydes followed a strictly compulsory ordered pathway, although aldehydes and ketones formed binary complexes with the enzyme. This raised the question regarding the reaction mechanism for the oxidation of aldehydes, i.e. whether a random ordered pathway was followed. In the present work, the mechanism for the oxidation of different aldehydes and the accompanying dismutation reaction with the slow alleloenzyme (AdhS) from Drosophila melanogaster has been studied. To obtain

  2. Isoform analysis of LC-MS/MS data from multidimensional fractionation of the serum proteome.

    PubMed

    Krasnoselsky, Alexei L; Faca, Vitor M; Pitteri, Sharon J; Zhang, Qing; Hanash, Samir M

    2008-06-01

    We developed a visualization approach for the identification of protein isoforms, precursor/mature protein combinations, and fragments from LC-MS/MS analysis of multidimensional fractionation of serum and plasma proteins. We also describe a pattern recognition algorithm to automatically detect and flag potentially heterogeneous species of proteins in proteomic experiments that involve extensive fractionation and result in a large number of identified serum or plasma proteins in an experiment. Examples are given of proteins with known isoforms that validate our approach and present a subset of precursor/mature protein pairs that were detected with this approach. Potential applications include identification of differentially expressed isoforms in disease states. PMID:18419151

  3. A novel alternative splicing isoform of NF2 identified in human Schwann cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fang; Zhou, Zhengguang; Su, Wen; Wang, Zishu; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) is a benign, slow-growing cranial tumor that originates from the hypertrophy of Schwann cells. The majority of sporadic VS are unilateral, and the mechanisms underlying VS tumorigenesis are not fully understood. The human neurofibromin 2 (NF2) gene encodes the tumor suppressor protein merlin and the NF2 transcript can be alternatively spliced to form numerous isoforms. The present study investigated human Schwann cells (HSCs) at the mRNA and protein level to understand the function of the alternative splicing (AS) isoform of NF2. The total RNA of HSCs was isolated and the full-length coding sequence of NF2 was amplified. The amplified products were excised from agarose gels, purified and sequenced. NF2 at a protein level was assayed by immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. The full-length and spliced NF2 forms were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from the HSC complementary DNA and ligated into eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). The plasmids were transfected into the HSC HEI-193 cell line and cell proliferation assays were performed using Cell Counting Kit-8. PCR analysis using HSC total RNA as a template revealed the presence of a shortened NF2 transcript, which was due to splicing at the 3′-end of the NF2 mRNA. Sequence analysis confirmed that this AS isoform omitted exons 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16. Immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis demonstrated that the AS isoform was highly expressed in the HSCs at 38 kDa, while the wild-type (WT) isoform, which was expected at 66 kDa, was undetectable. Transfection and cell proliferation assays revealed that the WT isoform exhibited significant growth inhibition, while the AS isoform did not suppress cell growth. In conclusion, the present study detected AS NF2 isoforms in HSC for the first time, and investigated the function of the principle AS isoform. The present study suggests that although HSCs have an undetectable level of WT isoform of the NF2 protein

  4. Nitric oxide synthases activation and inhibition by metallacarborane cluster-based isoform-specific affectors

    PubMed Central

    Kaplánek, Robert; Martásek, Pavel; Grüner, Bohumír; Panda, Satya; Rak, Jakub; Masters, Bettie Sue Siler; Král, Vladimír; Roman, Linda J.

    2012-01-01

    A small library of boron cluster and metallacarborane cluster-based ligands was designed, prepared and tested for isoform-selective activation or inhibition of the three nitric oxide synthase isoforms. Based on the concept of creating a hydrophobic analog of a natural substrate, a stable and non-toxic basic boron cluster system, previously used for boron neutron capture therapy, was modified by the addition of positively charged moieties to its periphery, providing hydrophobic and non-classical hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein. Several of these compounds show efficacy for inhibition of NO synthesis with differential effects on the various nitric oxide synthase isoforms. PMID:23075390

  5. Application of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to detect DNA sequence differences encoding apolipoprotein E isoforms

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S.; Angelico, M.C.; Laffel, L.; Krolewski, A.S. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA )

    1993-04-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in plasma lipid metabolism. Three common isoforms of this protein have been identified by the isoelectric focusing method. In this report the authors describe a new method for distinguishing these isoforms. Their method employs PCR amplification of the DNA sequence of exon 4 in the apoE gene followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to distinguish its different melting characteristics. Identification of the ApoE isoforms through DNA melting behavior rather than protein charge differences eliminates the problems associated with isoelectric focusing and facilitates screening for additional mutations at the apoE locus. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Incompatibility Between X Chromosome Factor and Pericentric Heterochromatic Region Causes Lethality in Hybrids Between Drosophila melanogaster and Its Sibling Species

    PubMed Central

    Cattani, M. Victoria; Presgraves, Daven C.

    2012-01-01

    The Dobzhansky–Muller model posits that postzygotic reproductive isolation results from the evolution of incompatible epistatic interactions between species: alleles that function in the genetic background of one species can cause sterility or lethality in the genetic background of another species. Progress in identifying and characterizing factors involved in postzygotic isolation in Drosophila has remained slow, mainly because Drosophila melanogaster, with all of its genetic tools, forms dead or sterile hybrids when crossed to its sister species, D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana. To circumvent this problem, we used chromosome deletions and duplications from D. melanogaster to map two hybrid incompatibility loci in F1 hybrids with its sister species. We mapped a recessive factor to the pericentromeric heterochromatin of the X chromosome in D. simulans and D. mauritiana, which we call heterochromatin hybrid lethal (hhl), which causes lethality in F1 hybrid females with D. melanogaster. As F1 hybrid males hemizygous for a D. mauritiana (or D. simulans) X chromosome are viable, the lethality of deficiency hybrid females implies that a dominant incompatible partner locus exists on the D. melanogaster X. Using small segments of the D. melanogaster X chromosome duplicated onto the Y chromosome, we mapped a dominant factor that causes hybrid lethality to a small 24-gene region of the D. melanogaster X. We provide evidence suggesting that it interacts with hhlmau. The location of hhl is consistent with the emerging theme that hybrid incompatibilities in Drosophila involve heterochromatic regions and factors that interact with the heterochromatin. PMID:22446316

  7. Cytoplasmic Dynein Antagonists with Improved Potency and Isoform Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins 1 and 2 are related members of the AAA+ superfamily (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) that function as the predominant minus-end-directed microtubule motors in eukaryotic cells. Dynein 1 controls mitotic spindle assembly, organelle movement, axonal transport, and other cytosolic, microtubule-guided processes, whereas dynein 2 mediates retrograde trafficking within motile and primary cilia. Small-molecule inhibitors are important tools for investigating motor protein-dependent mechanisms, and ciliobrevins were recently discovered as the first dynein-specific chemical antagonists. Here, we demonstrate that ciliobrevins directly target the heavy chains of both dynein isoforms and explore the structure–activity landscape of these inhibitors in vitro and in cells. In addition to identifying chemical motifs that are essential for dynein blockade, we have discovered analogs with increased potency and dynein 2 selectivity. These antagonists effectively disrupt Hedgehog signaling, intraflagellar transport, and ciliogenesis, making them useful probes of these and other cytoplasmic dynein 2-dependent cellular processes. PMID:26555042

  8. Autophagosome-associated variant isoforms of cytosolic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Fengsrud, M; Raiborg, C; Berg, T O; Strømhaug, P E; Ueno, T; Erichsen, E S; Seglen, P O

    2000-01-01

    In a search for autophagosome-associated proteins, two-dimensional gel separations of proteins from purified autophagosomes, postnuclear supernatant, cytosol, lysosomes, mitochondria, endosomes and a cytomembrane fraction (mostly endoplasmic reticulum) were compared. Three proteins, with monomeric molecular masses of 43, 35 and 31 kDa, were enriched in total or sedimentable fractions of autophagosomes relative to the corresponding fractions of postnuclear supernatant, suggesting an association with the autophagosomal delimiting membrane. These proteins were also present on lysosomal membranes, but they were absent from mitochondria, and detected only in small amounts in the cytomembrane fraction and in endosomes, indicating that they were not associated with organelles sequestered by autophagy. However, all three proteins were present in the cytosol, suggesting that they were cytosolic proteins binding peripherally to the delimiting membrane of autophagosomes, probably to its innermost surface as indicated by their resistance to treatment of intact autophagosomes with proteinase or protein-stripping agents. Amino acid sequencing identified these proteins as an isoform of argininosuccinate synthase, an N-truncated variant of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and a sequence variant of short-chain 2-enoyl-CoA hydratase. PMID:11104685

  9. RAS isoforms and mutations in cancer at a glance.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, G Aaron; Der, Channing J; Rossman, Kent L

    2016-04-01

    RAS proteins (KRAS4A, KRAS4B, NRAS and HRAS) function as GDP-GTP-regulated binary on-off switches, which regulate cytoplasmic signaling networks that control diverse normal cellular processes. Gain-of-function missense mutations in RAS genes are found in ∼25% of human cancers, prompting interest in identifying anti-RAS therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment. However, despite more than three decades of intense effort, no anti-RAS therapies have reached clinical application. Contributing to this failure has been an underestimation of the complexities of RAS. First, there is now appreciation that the four human RAS proteins are not functionally identical. Second, with >130 different missense mutations found in cancer, there is an emerging view that there are mutation-specific consequences on RAS structure, biochemistry and biology, and mutation-selective therapeutic strategies are needed. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and accompanying poster, we provide a snapshot of the differences between RAS isoforms and mutations, as well as the current status of anti-RAS drug-discovery efforts. PMID:26985062

  10. Splice isoform estrogen receptors as integral transmembrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hee; Toomre, Derek; Bender, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    In addition to enhancing or repressing transcription, steroid hormone receptors rapidly transduce kinase activation signals. On ligand engagement, an N-terminus–truncated splice isoform of estrogen receptor (ER) α, ER46, triggers membrane-initiated signals, resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation and endothelial NO production. The orientation of ER46 at the plasma membrane is incompletely defined. With the use of ecliptic pHluorin-fused ER46, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy in live human endothelial cells illustrates that ER46 can topologically conform to a type I transmembrane protein structure. Mutation of isoleucine-386 at the center of ER46's transmembrane hydrophobic core prevents membrane spanning, obscures the N-terminal ectodomain, and effects a marked reduction in membrane-impermeant estrogen binding with diminished rapid eNOS activation and NO production, despite maintained genomic induction of an estrogen response element–luciferase reporter. Thus there exist pools of transmembrane steroid hormone receptors that are efficient signaling molecules and potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21937726

  11. Identification and Characterization of Lipoxygenase Isoforms in Senescing Carnation Petals

    PubMed Central

    Rouet-Mayer, Marie-Aude; Bureau, Jean-Marc; Laurière, Christiane

    1992-01-01

    A membrane-associated lipoxygenase and a soluble lipoxygenase have been identified in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. cv Rêve) petals. Treatments of microsomal membranes by nonionic or zwitterionic detergents indicated that lipoxygenase is tightly bound to the membranes. By phase separation in Triton X-114, microsomal lipoxygenase can be identified in part as an integral membrane protein. Soluble lipoxygenase had an optimum pH range of 4.9 to 5.8, whereas microsomal lipoxygenase exhibited maximum activity at pH 6.1. Both soluble and membrane-associated lipoxygenases produced carbonyl compounds and hydroperoxides simultaneously, in the presence of oxygen. The membranous enzyme was fully inhibited by 0.1 millimolar n-propyl gallate, nordihydroguaiaretic acid, or salicylhydroxamic acid, but the effect of the three inhibitors on the soluble enzyme was much lower. The soluble lipoxygenase is polymorphic and three isoforms greatly differing by their isoelectric points were identified. Lipoxygenase activity in flowers was maximal at the beginning of withering, both in the microsomal and the soluble fractions. Substantial variations in the ratio of the two forms of lipoxygenase were noted at different sampling dates. Our results allowed us to formulate the hypothesis of a strong association of one soluble form with defined membrane constituents. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16668773

  12. Immunochemical characterization and transacting properties of upstream stimulatory factor isoforms.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Lefrançois-Martinez, A M; Henrion, A; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M; Martinez, A

    1996-01-19

    The ubiquitous upstream stimulatory factor (USF) transcription factors encoded by two distinct genes (USF1 and USF2) exist under the form of various dimers able to bind E-boxes. We report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of USF2 isoforms, corresponding to a 44-kDa subunit, USF2a, and a new 38-kDa subunit, USF2b, generated by differential splicing. Using specific anti-USF antibodies, we define the different binding complexes in various nuclear extracts. In vivo, the USF1/USF2a heterodimer represents over 66% of the USF binding activity whereas the USF1 and USF2a homodimers represent less than 10%, which strongly suggests an in vivo preferential association in heterodimers. In particular, an USF1/USF2b heterodimer accounted for almost 15% of the USF species in some cells. The preferential heterodimerization of USF subunits was reproduced ex vivo, while the in vitro association of cotranslated subunits, or recombinant USF proteins, appeared to be random. In transiently transfected HeLa or hepatoma cells, USF2a and USF1 homodimers transactivated a minimal promoter with similar efficiency, whereas USF2b, which lacks an internal 67-amino acid domain, was a poor transactivator. Additionally, USF2b was an efficient as USF1 and USF2a homodimers in transactivating the liver-specific pyruvate kinase gene promoter. PMID:8576131

  13. Behavioral role of the sexcombs in Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans.

    PubMed

    Cook, R M

    1977-09-01

    The sexcombs were amputated from males of three strains of Drosophila melanogaster and one strain of D. simulans in order to assess the importance of these structures in the sexual behavior of these species. In D. melanogaster the sexcombs are important in attempts to copulate with the female. Their removal delays copulation but does not suppress it entirely. Other aspects of courtship are not influenced by removal of the sexcombs. Strain differences in quanitative aspects of courtship were found, and also in the insemination rates of females by males without sexcombs. The present evidence suggests that the sexcombs are primarily structures adapted to grasping the female securely during the act of intromission. PMID:411471

  14. Mating success of wild type and sepia mutants Drosophila melanogaster in different choice.

    PubMed

    Stanić, Snezana; Pavković-Lucic, Sofija

    2005-01-01

    Mating behaviour of red-eyed (wt) and brown-eyed (sepia) Drosophila melanogaster was studied under light conditions. Mating success was directly observed in mating vials and techniques usually applied in the studies of sexual selection ("female choice" and "multiple choice"). The comparison of sexual activity of mutant and wild types clearly indicates that they are not equally successful in matings. Sepia eye colour mutation decreases sexual activity of Drosophila melanogaster males, influences the preference ability of females and decreases the number of progeny from homogamic mating of the se x se type, as well as from heterogamic copulations in which sepia females take part. Non-random mating of wild type males and sepia females (in "multiple-choice" situation), with genetically and phenotypically different individuals, could be another mechanism for conservation of genetic polymorphism in natural populations. PMID:16440285

  15. Role of Enhancer of zeste on the Production of Drosophila melanogaster Pheromonal Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicker-Thomas, C.; Jallon, J.-M.

    In a search for genes controlling the production of Drosophila melanogaster contact pheromones, the gene Enhancer of zeste [E(z)] was found to be one player. Flies mutant for either the amorphic or the antimorphic allele of E(z) showed a similar hydrocarbon phenotype as those with the overlapping Df lxd15deficiency: decreased amounts of total hydrocarbons and especially unsaturated ones in both sexes. The decrease in the level of D. melanogaster female sex pheromone 7,11-heptacosadiene was dramatic and was correlated with an increase in 7-heptacosene. Females mutant for a gain-of-function allele had increased amounts of total hydrocarbons with wild-type proportions of dienes. Thus the E(z) gene seems to affect hydrocarbon biosynthesis, especially its desaturation steps and even more so the female-specific desaturation step transforming 7-monoenic fatty acids to 7,11-dienic ones and leading to female pheromones.

  16. Starvation-Induced Dietary Behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Safee Ullah; Afzal, Ahmed Jawaad; Tariq, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae are classified as herbivores and known to feed on non-carnivorous diet under normal conditions. However, when nutritionally challenged these larvae exhibit cannibalistic behaviour by consuming a diet composed of larger conspecifics. Herein, we report that cannibalism in Drosophila larvae is confined not only to scavenging on conspecifics that are larger in size, but also on their eggs. Moreover, such cannibalistic larvae develop as normally as those grown on standard cornmeal medium. When stressed, Drosophila melanogaster larvae can also consume a carnivorous diet derived from carcasses of organisms belonging to diverse taxonomic groups, including Musca domestica, Apis mellifera, and Lycosidae sp. While adults are ill-equipped to devour conspecific carcasses, they selectively oviposit on them and also consume damaged cadavers of conspecifics. Thus, our results suggest that nutritionally stressed Drosophila show distinct as well as unusual feeding behaviours that can be classified as detritivorous, cannibalistic and/or carnivorous. PMID:26399327

  17. Extensive local adaptation within the chemosensory system following Drosophila melanogaster's global expansion

    PubMed Central

    Arguello, J. Roman; Cardoso-Moreira, Margarida; Grenier, Jennifer K.; Gottipati, Srikanth; Clark, Andrew G.; Benton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    How organisms adapt to new environments is of fundamental biological interest, but poorly understood at the genetic level. Chemosensory systems provide attractive models to address this problem, because they lie between external environmental signals and internal physiological responses. To investigate how selection has shaped the well-characterized chemosensory system of Drosophila melanogaster, we have analysed genome-wide data from five diverse populations. By couching population genomic analyses of chemosensory protein families within parallel analyses of other large families, we demonstrate that chemosensory proteins are not outliers for adaptive divergence between species. However, chemosensory families often display the strongest genome-wide signals of recent selection within D. melanogaster. We show that recent adaptation has operated almost exclusively on standing variation, and that patterns of adaptive mutations predict diverse effects on protein function. Finally, we provide evidence that chemosensory proteins have experienced relaxed constraint, and argue that this has been important for their rapid adaptation over short timescales. PMID:27292132

  18. [dFOXO Transcription Factor Regulates Juvenile Hormone Metabolism in Drosophila melanogaster Females].

    PubMed

    Rauschenbach, I Yu; Karpova, E K; Gruntenko, N E

    2015-09-01

    dFOXO transcription factor is a component of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway in Drosophila. Juvenile hormone negatively regulates dFOXO gene expression. In the present work, the effect of hypomorphic dFOXO mutation on juvenile hormone metabolism under normal and stressing conditions and on D. melanogaster female resistance to thermal stress was studied. It was demonstrated that dFOXO mutation in D. melanogaster females induces (1) an increase in the level of juvenile hormone degradation and in the intensity of the response of the juvenile hormone metabolism system to thermal stress and (2) a decrease in thermal stress resistance. These parameters are indicators of the level of juvenile hormone synthesis and indicate its decrease in females with decreased dFOXO expression. Thus, the presence of feedback in the regulation of dFOXO gene expression by juvenile hormone was established for the first time. PMID:26606805

  19. Revisiting classic clines in Drosophila melanogaster in the age of genomics

    PubMed Central

    Adrion, Jeffrey R.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Cooper, Brandon S.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptation to spatially varying environments has been studied for decades, but advances in sequencing technology are now enabling researchers to investigate the landscape of genetic variation underlying this adaptation genome wide. In this review, we highlight some of the decades-long research on local adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster from well-studied clines in North America and Australia. We explore the evidence for parallel adaptation and identify commonalities in the genes responding to clinal selection across continents as well as discuss instances where patterns differ among clines. We also investigate recent studies utilizing whole-genome data to identify clines in D. melanogaster and a number of other systems. Although connecting segregating genomic variation to variation in phenotypes and fitness remains challenging, clinal genomics is poised to increase our understanding of local adaptation and the selective pressures that drive the extensive phenotypic diversity observed in nature. PMID:26072452

  20. Starvation-Induced Dietary Behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster Larvae and Adults.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muhammad; Chaudhary, Safee Ullah; Afzal, Ahmed Jawaad; Tariq, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster larvae are classified as herbivores and known to feed on non-carnivorous diet under normal conditions. However, when nutritionally challenged these larvae exhibit cannibalistic behaviour by consuming a diet composed of larger conspecifics. Herein, we report that cannibalism in Drosophila larvae is confined not only to scavenging on conspecifics that are larger in size, but also on their eggs. Moreover, such cannibalistic larvae develop as normally as those grown on standard cornmeal medium. When stressed, Drosophila melanogaster larvae can also consume a carnivorous diet derived from carcasses of organisms belonging to diverse taxonomic groups, including Musca domestica, Apis mellifera, and Lycosidae sp. While adults are ill-equipped to devour conspecific carcasses, they selectively oviposit on them and also consume damaged cadavers of conspecifics. Thus, our results suggest that nutritionally stressed Drosophila show distinct as well as unusual feeding behaviours that can be classified as detritivorous, cannibalistic and/or carnivorous. PMID:26399327

  1. Trichostatin A extends the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster by elevating hsp22 expression.

    PubMed

    Tao, Dan; Lu, Jun; Sun, Hui; Zhao, Yan-Mei; Yuan, Zhi-Gen; Li, Xiao-Xue; Huang, Bai-Qu

    2004-09-01

    The level of acetylation of histones in nucleosomes is related to the longevity of yeast and animals. However, the mechanisms by which acetylation and deacetylation affect longevity remain unclear. In present study, we investigated the influence of histone acetylation modification on the expression of hsp22 gene and the lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster using histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA). The results showed that TSA could extend the lifespan of Drosophila melanogaster. Furthermore, TSA significantly promoted the hsp22 gene transcription, and affected the chromatin morphology at the locus of hsp22 gene along the polytene chromosome. Present data implicate that TSA may affect the lifespan of Drosophila through changing the level of histone acetylation and influencing the expression of hsp22 gene that is related to aging. PMID:15346199

  2. Revisiting classic clines in Drosophila melanogaster in the age of genomics.

    PubMed

    Adrion, Jeffrey R; Hahn, Matthew W; Cooper, Brandon S

    2015-08-01

    Adaptation to spatially varying environments has been studied for decades, but advances in sequencing technology are now enabling researchers to investigate the landscape of genetic variation underlying this adaptation genome wide. In this review we highlight some of the decades-long research on local adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster from well-studied clines in North America and Australia. We explore the evidence for parallel adaptation and identify commonalities in the genes responding to clinal selection across continents as well as discussing instances where patterns differ among clines. We also investigate recent studies utilizing whole-genome data to identify clines in D. melanogaster and several other systems. Although connecting segregating genomic variation to variation in phenotypes and fitness remains challenging, clinal genomics is poised to increase our understanding of local adaptation and the selective pressures that drive the extensive phenotypic diversity observed in nature. PMID:26072452

  3. Infection-Related Declines in Chill Coma Recovery and Negative Geotaxis in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Jessica A.; Chambers, Moria C.; Gupta, Avni S.; Schneider, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of infection in Drosophila melanogaster provide insight into both mechanisms of host resistance and tolerance of pathogens. However, research into the pathways involved in these processes has been limited by the relatively few metrics that can be used to measure sickness and health throughout the course of infection. Here we report measurements of infection-related declines in flies' performance on two different behavioral assays. D. melanogaster are slower to recover from a chill-induced coma during infection with either Listeria monocytogenes or Streptococcus pneumoniae. L. monocytogenes infection also impacts flies' performance during a negative geotaxis assay, revealing a decline in their rate of climbing as part of their innate escape response after startle. In addition to providing new measures for assessing health, these assays also suggest pathological consequences of and metabolic shifts that may occur over the course of an infection. PMID:23028430

  4. The Mechanisms Underlying α-Amanitin Resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: A Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Chelsea L.; Saul, Michael C.; Lei, Liang; Wei, Hairong; Werner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The rapid evolution of toxin resistance in animals has important consequences for the ecology of species and our economy. Pesticide resistance in insects has been a subject of intensive study; however, very little is known about how Drosophila species became resistant to natural toxins with ecological relevance, such as α-amanitin that is produced in deadly poisonous mushrooms. Here we performed a microarray study to elucidate the genes, chromosomal loci, molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components that contribute to the α-amanitin resistance phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster. We suggest that toxin entry blockage through the cuticle, phase I and II detoxification, sequestration in lipid particles, and proteolytic cleavage of α-amanitin contribute in concert to this quantitative trait. We speculate that the resistance to mushroom toxins in D. melanogaster and perhaps in mycophagous Drosophila species has evolved as cross-resistance to pesticides, other xenobiotic substances, or environmental stress factors. PMID:24695618

  5. [The effect of mutagenic environmental factors on recombination in Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L P; Lapteva, N Sh; Shevchenko, V A

    1999-01-01

    We studied recombination in Drosophila melanogaster males exposed in a thermoelectric power station in Moscow for six years and, for comparison, in another thermoelectric power station during 1994. The frequency of recombination in the experimental males was two to three times that in the control. The annual differences in the frequency of recombination in the experimental males were not statistically significant. The differences between the data obtained for two different thermoelectric power stations were not statistically significant as well. A marked increase in the frequency of recombination in the D. melanogaster males exposed at thermoelectric power stations may be considered as an adequate reaction to the presence of a sufficient amount of effective mutagens in discharges of thermoelectric power stations. PMID:10520285

  6. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray data analysis of β-alanine synthase from Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, Stina; Andersen, Birgit; Piškur, Jure; Dobritzsch, Doreen

    2007-10-01

    β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from D. melanogaster belong to space group C2. Diffraction data to 3.3 Å resolution were collected and analyzed. β-Alanine synthase catalyzes the last step in the reductive degradation pathway for uracil and thymine, which represents the main clearance route for the widely used anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. Crystals of the recombinant enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, which is closely related to the human enzyme, were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. They diffracted to 3.3 Å at a synchrotron-radiation source, belong to space group C2 (unit-cell parameters a = 278.9, b = 95.0, c = 199.3 Å, β = 125.8°) and contain 8–10 molecules per asymmetric unit.

  7. Molecular characterization of the breakpoints of an inversion fixed between Drosophila melanogaster and D. subobscura

    SciTech Connect

    Cirera, S.; Martin-Campos, J.M.; Segarra, C.

    1995-01-01

    The two breakpoints of a chromosomal inversion fixed since the split of Drosophila melanogaster and D. subobscura lineages have been isolated and sequenced in both species. The regions spanning the break-points initially were identified by the presence of two signals after interspecific in situ hybridization on polytene chromosomes. Interspecific comparison of the sequenced regions allowed us to delineate the location of the breakpoints. Close to one of these breakpoints a new transcription unit (bcn92) has been identified in both species. The inversion fixed between D. melanogaster and D. subobscura does not seem to have broken any transcription unit. Neither complete nor defective transposable elements were found in the regions encompassing the breakpoints. Short thymine-rich sequences (30-50 hp long) have been found bordering the breakpoint regions. Although alternating Pur-Pyr sequences were detected, these putative target sites for topoisomerase II were not differentially clustered in the breakpoints. 22 refs., 6 figs.

  8. AGI, a previously unreported D. melanogaster {alpha}-glucosidase: Partial purification, characterization, and cytogenetic mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.F.; Roberts, D.B.

    1996-04-01

    Inbred Drosophila melanogaster stocks were surveyed for {alpha}-glucosidases with nondenaturing gel electrophoresis using a fluorogenic substrate to stain the gels. The glucosidase most active under these conditions is polymorphic. We established that the polymorphism is genetic in origin and that the glucosidase was not likely to be a previously characterized enzyme. The gene encoding the enzyme was mapped cytogenetically to 33 A1-2- 33A8-B1, confirming that this is an enzyme not yet reported in D. melanogaster. The enzyme was partially purified by elution from nondenaturing gels, which enable us to establish that it has optimal activity at pH 6 and interacts most strongly with {alpha}- 1 -4 glucosides. A developmental and tissue survey suggested that this enzyme could have a purely digestive role or be involved in carbohydrate metabolism inside the organism. We propose that this enzyme is involved in either starch digestion or glycogen metabolism. 37 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. A Synaptotagmin Isoform Switch during the Development of an Identified CNS Synapse.

    PubMed

    Kochubey, Olexiy; Babai, Norbert; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Various Synaptotagmin (Syt) isoform genes are found in mammals, but it is unknown whether Syts can function redundantly in a given nerve terminal, or whether isoforms can be switched during the development of a nerve terminal. Here, we investigated the possibility of a developmental Syt isoform switch using the calyx of Held as a model synapse. At mature calyx synapses, fast Ca(2+)-driven transmitter release depended entirely on Syt2, but the release phenotype of Syt2 knockout (KO) mice was weaker at immature calyces, and absent at pre-calyceal synapses early postnatally. Instead, conditional genetic inactivation shows that Syt1 mediates fast release at pre-calyceal synapses, as well as a fast release component resistant to Syt2 deletion in immature calyces. This demonstrates a developmental Syt1-Syt2 isoform switch at an identified synapse, a mechanism that could fine-tune the speed, reliability, and plasticity of transmitter release at fast releasing CNS synapses. PMID:27210552

  10. Enhanced protein electrophoresis technique for separating human skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain isoforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bamman, M. M.; Clarke, M. S.; Talmadge, R. J.; Feeback, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Talmadge and Roy (J. Appl. Physiol. 1993, 75, 2337-2340) previously established a sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) protocol for separating all four rat skeletal muscle myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx, IIb); however, when applied to human muscle, the type II MHC isoforms (Ila, IIx) are not clearly distinguished. In this brief paper we describe a modification of the SDS-PAGE protocol which yields distinct and consistent separation of all three adult human MHC isoforms (MHC I, IIa, IIx) in a minigel system. MHC specificity of each band was confirmed by Western blot using three monoclonal IgG antibodies (mAbs) immunoreactive against MHCI (mAb MHCs, Novacastra Laboratories), MHCI+IIa (mAb BF-35), and MHCIIa+IIx (mAb SC-71). Results provide a valuable SDS-PAGE minigel technique for separating MHC isoforms in human muscle without the difficult task of casting gradient gels.

  11. Temporal regulation of proteome profile in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Perumal; Jayapalan, Jaime J; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S; Arumugam, Manjula; Hashim, Onn H

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diurnal rhythms of protein synthesis controlled by the biological clock underlie the rhythmic physiology in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we conducted a proteome-wide investigation of rhythmic protein accumulation in D. melanogaster. Materials and Methods. Total protein collected from fly samples harvested at 4 h intervals over the 24 h period were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, trypsin digestion and MS/MS analysis. Protein spots/clusters were identified with MASCOT search engine and Swiss-Prot database. Expression of proteins was documented as percentage of volume contribution using the Image Master 2D Platinum software. Results. A total of 124 protein spots/clusters were identified using MS/MS analysis. Significant variation in the expression of 88 proteins over the 24-h period was observed. A relatively higher number of proteins was upregulated during the night compared to the daytime. The complexity of temporal regulation of the D. melanogaster proteome was further reflected from functional annotations of the differently expressed proteins, with those that were upregulated at night being restricted to the heat shock proteins and proteins involved in metabolism, muscle activity, protein synthesis/folding/degradation and apoptosis, whilst those that were overexpressed in the daytime were apparently involved in metabolism, muscle activity, ion-channel/cellular transport, protein synthesis/folding/degradation, redox homeostasis, development and transcription. Conclusion. Our data suggests that a wide range of proteins synthesized by the fruit fly, D. melanogaster, is under the regulation of the biological clock. PMID:27257555

  12. Increased mutation in crosses between geographically separated strains of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, J N; Woodruff, R C

    1980-01-01

    Mutator activity associated with the common male recombination (MR) chromosomes in Drosophila melanogaster appears to be suppressed in natural populations. Crosses between geographically separated populations, however, lead to the release of mutator activity as measured by a significant increase in visible mutations. Such an increase in mutation in hybrid individuals may be a powerful factor in inducing or releasing variation in nature, and in more extreme instances may contribute to the separation of microdifferentiated populations. PMID:6767240

  13. Silver nanoparticles induced heat shock protein 70, oxidative stress and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Posgai, Ryan; Gorey, Timothy J.; Nielsen, Mark; Hussain, Saber M.; Rowe, John J.

    2010-02-01

    Due to the intensive commercial application of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs), risk assessment of this nanoparticle is of great importance. Our previous in vitro study demonstrated that Ag NPs caused DNA damage and apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells and fibroblasts. However, toxicity of Ag NPs in vivo is largely lacking. This study was undertaken to examine the toxic effects of well-characterized polysaccharide coated 10 nm Ag NPs on heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster. Third instar larvae of D. melanogaster were fed a diet of standard cornmeal media mixed with Ag NPs at the concentrations of 50 and 100 mug/ml for 24 and 48 h. Ag NPs up-regulated the expression of heat shock protein 70 and induced oxidative stress in D. melanogaster. Malondialdehyde level, an end product of lipid peroxidation was significantly higher while antioxidant glutathione content was significantly lower in Ag NPs exposed organisms. Activities of antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase and catalase were also significantly higher in the organisms exposed to Ag NPs. Furthermore, Ag NPs up-regulated the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 that are involved in the DNA damage repair pathway. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis were significantly higher in Ag NPs exposed organisms. The results indicate that Ag NPs in D. melanogaster induce heat shock stress, oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis. This study suggests that the organism is stressed and thus warrants more careful assessment of Ag NPs using in vivo models to determine if chronic exposure presents developmental and reproductive toxicity.

  14. [Retrotransposon MDG4 and its role in genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster].

    PubMed

    Liubomirskaia, N V; Kim, A I; Il'in, Iu V

    2003-02-01

    This article summarizes the results of a ten-year study of genetic instability of a mutator strain of Drosophila melanogaster caused by transposition of the gypsy retrotransposon. The results of other authors working with an analogous system are analyzed. Possible mechanisms are suggested for the interaction of gypsy with the cell gene flamenco that participates in transposition control of this mobile element. PMID:12669411

  15. Versatile P(acman) BAC Libraries for Transgenesis Studies in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Venken, Koen J.T.; Carlson, Joseph W.; Schulze, Karen L.; Pan, Hongling; He, Yuchun; Spokony, Rebecca; Wan, Kenneth H.; Koriabine, Maxim; de Jong, Pieter J.; White, Kevin P.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Hoskins, Roger A.

    2009-04-21

    We constructed Drosophila melanogaster BAC libraries with 21-kb and 83-kb inserts in the P(acman) system. Clones representing 12-fold coverage and encompassing more than 95percent of annotated genes were mapped onto the reference genome. These clones can be integrated into predetermined attP sites in the genome using Phi C31 integrase to rescue mutations. They can be modified through recombineering, for example to incorporate protein tags and assess expression patterns.

  16. DNA damage-responsive Drosophila melanogaster gene is also induced by heat shock

    SciTech Connect

    Vivino, A.A.; Smith, M.D.; Minton, K.W.

    1986-12-01

    A gene isolated by screening Drosophila melanogaster tissue culture cells for DNA damage regulation was also found to be regulated by heat shock. After UV irradiation or heat shock, induction is at the transcriptional level and results in the accumulation of a 1.0-kilobase polyadenylated transcript. The restriction map of the clone bears no resemblance to the known heat shock genes, which are shown to be uninduced by UV irradiation.

  17. Wolbachia Variants Induce Differential Protection to Viruses in Drosophila melanogaster: A Phenotypic and Phylogenomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chrostek, Ewa; Marialva, Marta S. P.; Esteves, Sara S.; Weinert, Lucy A.; Martinez, Julien; Jiggins, Francis M.; Teixeira, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Wolbachia are intracellular bacterial symbionts that are able to protect various insect hosts from viral infections. This tripartite interaction was initially described in Drosophila melanogaster carrying wMel, its natural Wolbachia strain. wMel has been shown to be genetically polymorphic and there has been a recent change in variant frequencies in natural populations. We have compared the antiviral protection conferred by different wMel variants, their titres and influence on host longevity, in a genetically identical D. melanogaster host. The phenotypes cluster the variants into two groups — wMelCS-like and wMel-like. wMelCS-like variants give stronger protection against Drosophila C virus and Flock House virus, reach higher titres and often shorten the host lifespan. We have sequenced and assembled the genomes of these Wolbachia, and shown that the two phenotypic groups are two monophyletic groups. We have also analysed a virulent and over-replicating variant, wMelPop, which protects D. melanogaster even better than the closely related wMelCS. We have found that a ∼21 kb region of the genome, encoding eight genes, is amplified seven times in wMelPop and may be the cause of its phenotypes. Our results indicate that the more protective wMelCS-like variants, which sometimes have a cost, were replaced by the less protective but more benign wMel-like variants. This has resulted in a recent reduction in virus resistance in D. melanogaster in natural populations worldwide. Our work helps to understand the natural variation in wMel and its evolutionary dynamics, and inform the use of Wolbachia in arthropod-borne disease control. PMID:24348259

  18. A Novel Cell Death Gene Acts to Repair Patterning Defects in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kentaro M.; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development. PMID:24671768

  19. A novel cell death gene acts to repair patterning defects in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahashi, Aya; Fuse, Naoyuki; Takano-Shimizu-Kouno, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Cell death is a mechanism utilized by organisms to eliminate excess cells during development. Here, we describe a novel regulator of caspase-independent cell death, Mabiki (Mabi), that is involved in the repair of the head patterning defects caused by extra copies of bicoid in Drosophila melanogaster. Mabiki functions together with caspase-dependent cell death mechanisms to provide robustness during development. PMID:24671768

  20. Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model system to study neurotransmitter transporters

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Ciara A.; Krantz, David E.

    2014-01-01

    The model genetic organism Drosophila melanogaster, commonly known as the fruit fly, uses many of the same neurotransmitters as mammals and very similar mechanisms of neurotransmitter storage, release and recycling. This system offers a variety of powerful molecular-genetic methods for the study of transporters, many of which would be difficult in mammalian models. We review here progress made using Drosophila to understand the function and regulation of neurotransmitter transporters and discuss future directions for its use. PMID:24704795

  1. Trehalose as an indicator of desiccation stress in Drosophila melanogaster larvae: A potential marker of anhydrobiosis

    SciTech Connect

    Thorat, Leena J.; Gaikwad, Sushama M.; Nath, Bimalendu B.

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report confirming anhydrobiosis in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis and accumulation in larvae that hydrolyzed on rehydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose synthesis in concert with the enzymes involved in trehalose metabolism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of trehalose hydrolysis in presence of a specific trehalase inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trehalose proposed as a reliable marker for biomonitoring of climate change studies. -- Abstract: In the current scenario of global climate change, desiccation is considered as one of the major environmental stressors for the biota exposed to altered levels of ambient temperature and humidity. Drosophila melanogaster, a cosmopolitan terrestrial insect has been chosen as a humidity-sensitive bioindicator model for the present study since its habitat undergoes frequent stochastic and/or seasonally aggravated dehydration regimes. We report here for the first time the occurrence of anhydrobiosis in D. melanogaster larvae by subjecting them to desiccation stress under laboratory conditions. Larvae desiccated for ten hours at <5% relative humidity could enter anhydrobiosis and could revive upon rehydration followed by resumption of active metabolism. As revealed by FTIR and HPLC analyzes, our findings strongly indicated the synthesis and accumulation of trehalose in the desiccating larvae. Biochemical measurements pointed out the desiccation-responsive trehalose metabolic pathway that was found to be coordinated in concert with the enzymes trehalose 6-phosphate synthase and trehalase. Further, an inhibitor-based experimental approach using deoxynojirimycin, a specific trehalase inhibitor, demonstrated the pivotal role of trehalose in larval anhydrobiosis of D. melanogaster. We therefore propose trehalose as a potential marker for the assessment of anhydrobiosis in Drosophila. The present findings thus add

  2. Temporal regulation of proteome profile in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Jayapalan, Jaime J.; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S.; Arumugam, Manjula; Hashim, Onn H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diurnal rhythms of protein synthesis controlled by the biological clock underlie the rhythmic physiology in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. In this study, we conducted a proteome-wide investigation of rhythmic protein accumulation in D. melanogaster. Materials and Methods. Total protein collected from fly samples harvested at 4 h intervals over the 24 h period were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, trypsin digestion and MS/MS analysis. Protein spots/clusters were identified with MASCOT search engine and Swiss-Prot database. Expression of proteins was documented as percentage of volume contribution using the Image Master 2D Platinum software. Results. A total of 124 protein spots/clusters were identified using MS/MS analysis. Significant variation in the expression of 88 proteins over the 24-h period was observed. A relatively higher number of proteins was upregulated during the night compared to the daytime. The complexity of temporal regulation of the D. melanogaster proteome was further reflected from functional annotations of the differently expressed proteins, with those that were upregulated at night being restricted to the heat shock proteins and proteins involved in metabolism, muscle activity, protein synthesis/folding/degradation and apoptosis, whilst those that were overexpressed in the daytime were apparently involved in metabolism, muscle activity, ion-channel/cellular transport, protein synthesis/folding/degradation, redox homeostasis, development and transcription. Conclusion. Our data suggests that a wide range of proteins synthesized by the fruit fly, D. melanogaster, is under the regulation of the biological clock. PMID:27257555

  3. Purification and Characterization of Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoforms from the Periderm of Eucalyptus gunnii Hook.

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, S. W.; Boudet, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD, EC 1.1.1.195) isoforms were purified from the periderm (containing both suberized and lignified cell layers) of Eucalyptus gunnii Hook stems. Two isoforms (CAD 1P and CAD 2P) were initially characterized, and the major form, CAD 2P, was resolved into three further isoforms by ion-exchange chromatography. Crude extracts contained two aliphatic alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) and one aromatic ADH, which was later resolved into two further isoforms. Aliphatic ADHs did not use hydroxycinnamyl alcohols as substrates, whereas both aromatic ADH isoforms used coniferyl and sinapyl alcohol as substrates but with a much lower specific activity when compared with benzyl alcohol. The minor form, CAD 1P, was a monomer with a molecular weight of 34,000 that did not co-elute with either aromatic or aliphatic ADH activity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blot analysis demonstrated that this protein was very similar to another CAD isoform purified from Eucalyptus xylem tissue. CAD 2P had a native molecular weight of approximately 84,000 and was a dimer consisting of two heterogenous subunits (with molecular weights of 42,000 and 44,000). These subunits were differentially combined to give the heterodimer and two homodimers. SDS-PAGE, western blots, and nondenaturing PAGE indicated that the CAD 2P heterodimer was very similar to the main CAD isoform previously purified in our laboratory from differentiating xylem tissue of E. gunnii (D. Goffner, I. Joffroy, J. Grima-Pettenati, C. Halpin, M.E. Knight, W. Schuch, A.M. Boudet [1992] Planta 188: 48-53). Kinetic data indicated that the different CAD 2P isoforms may be implicated in the preferential production of different monolignols used in the synthesis of lignin and/or suberin. PMID:12232063

  4. Structural basis for the superior activity of the large isoform of snow flea antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Mok, Yee-Foong; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Graham, Laurie A; Celik, Yeliz; Braslavsky, Ido; Davies, Peter L

    2010-03-23

    The snow flea (Hypogastrum harveyi) is protected from freezing at sub-zero temperatures by a glycine-rich antifreeze protein (AFP) that binds to seed ice crystals and prevents them from growing larger. This AFP is hyperactive and comprises two isoforms [Graham, L. A., and Davies, P. L. (2005) Science 310, 461]. The larger isoform (15.7 kDa) exhibits several-fold higher activity than the smaller isoform (6.5 kDa), although it is considerably less abundant. To establish the molecular basis for this difference in activity, we determined the sequence of the large isoform. The primary sequences of these two isoforms are surprisingly divergent. However, both contain tripeptide repeats and turn motifs that enabled us to build a three-dimensional model of the large isoform based upon the six-polyproline helix structure of the small isoform. Our model contains 13 polyproline type II helices connected by proline-containing loops stacked into two flat sheets oriented antiparallel to one another. The structure is strictly amphipathic, with a hydrophilic surface on one side and a hydrophobic, putative ice-binding surface on the other. The putative ice-binding site is approximately twice as large in area as that of the small isoform, providing an explanation for the difference in activity that is consistent with other examples noted. By tagging the recombinant AFP with green fluorescent protein, we observed its binding to multiple planes of ice, especially the basal plane. This finding supports the correlation between AFP hyperactivity and basal plane binding first observed with spruce budworm AFP. PMID:20158269

  5. Recombinant Erythropoietin in Humans Has a Prolonged Effect on Circulating Erythropoietin Isoform Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob; Just Christensen, Søren; Lisbjerg, Kristian; Oturai, Peter; Meinild-Lundby, Anne-Kristine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Lundby, Carsten; Vidiendal Olsen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-assisted isoform immunoassay (MAIIA) quantitates erythropoietin (EPO) isoforms as percentages of migrated isoforms (PMI). We evaluated the effect of recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) on the distribution of EPO isoforms in plasma in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded, cross-over study. 16 healthy subjects received either low-dose Epoetin beta (5000 IU on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13); high-dose Epoetin beta (30.000 IU on days 1, 2 and 3 and placebo on days 5, 7, 9, 11 and 13); or placebo on all days. PMI on days 4, 11 and 25 was determined by interaction of N-acetyl glucosamine with the glycosylation dependent desorption of EPO isoforms. At day 25, plasma-EPO in both rhEPO groups had returned to values not different from the placebo group. PMI with placebo, reflecting the endogenous EPO isoforms, averaged 82.5 (10.3) % (mean (SD)). High-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 31.0 (4.2)% (p<0.00001) and 45.2 (7.3)% (p<0.00001). Low-dose Epoetin beta decreased PMI on days 4 and 11 to 46.0 (12.8)% (p<0.00001) and 46.1 (10.4)% (p<0.00001). In both rhEPO groups, PMI on day 25 was still decreased (high-dose Epoetin beta: 72.9 (19.4)% (p = 0.029); low-dose Epoetin beta: 73.1 (17.8)% (p = 0.039)). In conclusion, Epoetin beta leaves a footprint in the plasma-EPO isoform pattern. MAIIA can detect changes in EPO isoform distribution up til at least three weeks after administration of Epoetin beta even though the total EPO concentration has returned to normal. PMID:25335123

  6. Differential distribution of aggrecan isoforms in perineuronal nets of the human cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Virgintino, Daniela; Perissinotto, Daniela; Girolamo, Francesco; Mucignat, Maria T; Montanini, Luisa; Errede, Mariella; Kaneiwa, Tomoyuki; Yamada, Shushei; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Roncali, Luisa; Perris, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Aggrecan is a component of the CNS extracellular matrix (ECM) and we show here that the three primary alternative spliced transcripts of the aggrecan gene found in cartilage are also present in the adult CNS. Using a unique panel of core protein-directed antibodies against human aggrecan we further show that different aggrecan isoforms are deposited in perineuronal nets (PNNs) and neuropil ECM of Brodmann’s area 6 of the human adult cerebral cortex. According to their distribution pattern, the identified cortical aggrecan isoforms were subdivided into five clusters spanning from cluster 1, comprised isoforms that appeared widespread throughout the cortex, to cluster 5, which was an aggrecan-free subset. Comparison of brain and cartilage tissues showed a different relative abundance of aggrecan isoforms, with cartilage-specific isoforms characterizing cluster 5, and PNN-associated isoforms lacking keratan sulphate chains. In the brain, isoforms of cluster 1 were disclosed in PNNs surrounding small-medium interneurons of layers II–V, small-medium pyramidal neurons of layers III and V and large interneurons of layer VI. Aggrecan PNNs enveloped both neuron bodies and neuronal processes, encompassing pre-terminal nerve fibres, synaptic boutons and terminal processes of glial cells and aggrecan was also observed in continuous ‘coats’ associated with satellite, neuron-associated cells of a putative glial nature. Immunolabelling for calcium-binding proteins and glutamate demonstrated that aggrecan PNNs were linked to defined subsets of cortical interneurons and pyramidal cells. We suggest that in the human cerebral cortex, discrete, layer-specific PNNs are assembled through the participation of selected aggrecan isoforms that characterize defined subsets of cortical neurons. PMID:19220578

  7. Expression analysis of ATAD3 isoforms in rodent and human cell lines and tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuijie; Lamarche, Fredéric; Charton, Romain; Delphin, Christian; Gires, Olivier; Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Schlattner, Uwe; Rousseau, Denis

    2014-02-01

    ATAD3 (ATPase family AAA-Domain containing protein 3) is a mitochondrial inner membrane ATPase with unknown but vital functions. Initial researches have focused essentially on the major p66-ATAD3 isoform, but other proteins and mRNAs are described in the data banks. Using a set of anti-peptide antibodies and by the use of rodent and human cell lines and organs, we tried to detail ATAD3 gene expression profiles and to verify the existence of the various ATAD3 isoforms. In rodent, the single ATAD3 gene is expressed as a major isoform of 67 kDa, (ATAD3l; long), in all cells and organs studied. A second isoform, p57-ATAD3s (small), is expressed specifically throughout brain development and in adult, and overexpressed around the peri-natal period. p57-ATAD3s is also expressed in neuronal and glial rodent cell lines, and during in vitro differentiation of primary cultured rat oligodendrocytes. Other smaller isoforms were also detected in a tissue-specific manner. In human and primates, ATAD3 paralogues are encoded by three genes (ATAD3A, 3B and 3C), each of them presenting several putative variants. Analyzing the expression of ATAD3A and ATAD3B with four specific anti-peptide antibodies, and comparing their expressions with in vitro expressed ATAD3 cDNAs, we were able to observe and define five isoforms. In particular, the previously described p72-ATAD3B is confirmed to be in certain cases a phosphorylated form of ATAD3As. Moreover, we observed that the ATAD3As phosphorylation level is regulated by insulin and serum. Finally, exploring ATAD3 mRNA expression, we confirmed the existence of an alternative splicing in rodent and of several mRNA isoforms in human. Considering these observations, we propose the development of a uniform denomination for ATAD3 isoforms in rodent and human. PMID:24239551

  8. Sodium pump isoform specificity for the digitalis-like factor isolated from human peritoneal dialysate.

    PubMed

    Tao, Q F; Hollenberg, N K; Price, D A; Graves, S W

    1997-03-01

    We have isolated a labile, specific sodium pump inhibitor or digitalis-like factor from the peritoneal dialysate of volume-expanded renal failure patients whose levels correlated closely with volume status and blood pressure. This study characterizes the inhibitory profile of this agent compared with that of ouabain against the three alpha-isoforms of the sodium pump. We prepared microsomal Na,K-ATPase from rat tissues representing the highest proportion of one of the alpha-isoforms. Both Northern and Western blot analyses confirmed that kidney had predominantly the alpha1-isoform, skeletal muscle the alpha2-isoform, and fetal brain the alpha3-isoform. Ouabain (5 x 10(-6) mol/L) produced little inhibition of kidney Na,K-ATPase (3.4+/-2.0%) but significant inhibition of skeletal muscle (37.2+/-3.7%, P<.001) and fetal brain (38.8+/-3.5%, P<.001) activity. In contrast, the labile digitalis-like factor, causing comparable inhibition of fetal brain Na,K-ATPase activity (33.3+/-4.7%), produced markedly greater inhibition of kidney (42.5+/-5.6%, P<.001) and moderately greater inhibition of skeletal muscle pump activity (57.7+/-6.3%, P<.05). In addition, the labile digitalis-like factor produced a marked concentration-dependent inhibition of the alpha2- and alpha3-isoforms (r=.79, P=.00005). Experiments combining the labile digitalis-like factor and ouabain confirmed that digitalis-like factor, unlike ouabain, was an effective inhibitor of all three isoforms in rat, in particular alpha2. The different pattern of isoform sensitivity displayed by the labile digitalis-like factor and ouabain further differentiates the two agents and raises some interesting possibilities about the functional implications of the endogenous factor. PMID:9052901

  9. Network-Based Isoform Quantification with RNA-Seq Data for Cancer Transcriptome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chang, Jae-Woong; Lin, Lilong; Minn, Kay; Wu, Baolin; Chien, Jeremy; Yong, Jeongsik; Zheng, Hui; Kuang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is widely used for transcript quantification of gene isoforms. Since RNA-Seq data alone is often not sufficient to accurately identify the read origins from the isoforms for quantification, we propose to explore protein domain-domain interactions as prior knowledge for integrative analysis with RNA-Seq data. We introduce a Network-based method for RNA-Seq-based Transcript Quantification (Net-RSTQ) to integrate protein domain-domain interaction network with short read alignments for transcript abundance estimation. Based on our observation that the abundances of the neighboring isoforms by domain-domain interactions in the network are positively correlated, Net-RSTQ models the expression of the neighboring transcripts as Dirichlet priors on the likelihood of the observed read alignments against the transcripts in one gene. The transcript abundances of all the genes are then jointly estimated with alternating optimization of multiple EM problems. In simulation Net-RSTQ effectively improved isoform transcript quantifications when isoform co-expressions correlate with their interactions. qRT-PCR results on 25 multi-isoform genes in a stem cell line, an ovarian cancer cell line, and a breast cancer cell line also showed that Net-RSTQ estimated more consistent isoform proportions with RNA-Seq data. In the experiments on the RNA-Seq data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the transcript abundances estimated by Net-RSTQ are more informative for patient sample classification of ovarian cancer, breast cancer and lung cancer. All experimental results collectively support that Net-RSTQ is a promising approach for isoform quantification. Net-RSTQ toolbox is available at http://compbio.cs.umn.edu/Net-RSTQ/. PMID:26699225

  10. Network-Based Isoform Quantification with RNA-Seq Data for Cancer Transcriptome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Chang, Jae-Woong; Lin, Lilong; Minn, Kay; Wu, Baolin; Chien, Jeremy; Yong, Jeongsik; Zheng, Hui; Kuang, Rui

    2015-12-01

    High-throughput mRNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) is widely used for transcript quantification of gene isoforms. Since RNA-Seq data alone is often not sufficient to accurately identify the read origins from the isoforms for quantification, we propose to explore protein domain-domain interactions as prior knowledge for integrative analysis with RNA-Seq data. We introduce a Network-based method for RNA-Seq-based Transcript Quantification (Net-RSTQ) to integrate protein domain-domain interaction network with short read alignments for transcript abundance estimation. Based on our observation that the abundances of the neighboring isoforms by domain-domain interactions in the network are positively correlated, Net-RSTQ models the expression of the neighboring transcripts as Dirichlet priors on the likelihood of the observed read alignments against the transcripts in one gene. The transcript abundances of all the genes are then jointly estimated with alternating optimization of multiple EM problems. In simulation Net-RSTQ effectively improved isoform transcript quantifications when isoform co-expressions correlate with their interactions. qRT-PCR results on 25 multi-isoform genes in a stem cell line, an ovarian cancer cell line, and a breast cancer cell line also showed that Net-RSTQ estimated more consistent isoform proportions with RNA-Seq data. In the experiments on the RNA-Seq data in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), the transcript abundances estimated by Net-RSTQ are more informative for patient sample classification of ovarian cancer, breast cancer and lung cancer. All experimental results collectively support that Net-RSTQ is a promising approach for isoform quantification. Net-RSTQ toolbox is available at http://compbio.cs.umn.edu/Net-RSTQ/. PMID:26699225

  11. Myosin heavy-chain isoforms in the flight and leg muscles of hummingbirds and zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Velten, Brandy P; Welch, Kenneth C

    2014-06-01

    Myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform complement is intimately related to a muscle's contractile properties, yet relatively little is known about avian MHC isoforms or how they may vary with fiber type and/or the contractile properties of a muscle. The rapid shortening of muscles necessary to power flight at the high wingbeat frequencies of ruby-throated hummingbirds and zebra finches (25-60 Hz), along with the varied morphology and use of the hummingbird hindlimb, provides a unique opportunity to understand how contractile and morphological properties of avian muscle may be reflected in MHC expression. Isoforms of the hummingbird and zebra finch flight and hindlimb muscles were electrophoretically separated and compared with those of other avian species representing different contractile properties and fiber types. The flight muscles of the study species operate at drastically different contraction rates and are composed of different histochemically defined fiber types, yet each exhibited the same, single MHC isoform corresponding to the chicken adult fast isoform. Thus, despite quantitative differences in the contractile demands of flight muscles across species, this isoform appears necessary for meeting the performance demands of avian powered flight. Variation in flight muscle contractile performance across species may be due to differences in the structural composition of this conserved isoform and/or variation within other mechanically linked proteins. The leg muscles were more varied in their MHC isoform composition across both muscles and species. The disparity in hindlimb MHC expression between hummingbirds and the other species highlights previously observed differences in fiber type composition and thrust production during take-off. PMID:24671242

  12. Tau isoform regulation is region- and cell-specific in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Pamela; Korvatska, Elena; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Evstafjeva, Zana; Robinson, Linda; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James; Schellenberg, Gerard D; D'Souza, Ian

    2008-12-20

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Alternative splicing of the tau gene (MAPT) generates six tau isoforms, distinguishable by the exclusion or inclusion of a repeat region of exon 10, which are referred to as 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat (4R) tau, respectively. We developed transgenic mouse models that express the entire human MAPT gene in the presence and absence of the mouse Mapt gene and compared the expression and regulation of mouse and human tau isoforms during development and in the young adult. We found differences between mouse and human tau in the regulation of exon 10 inclusion. Despite these differences, the isoform splicing pattern seen in normal human brain is replicated in our mouse models. In addition, we found that all tau, both in the neonate and young adult, is phosphorylated. We also examined the normal anatomic distribution of mouse and human tau isoforms in mouse brain. We observed developmental and species-specific variations in the expression of 3R- and 4R-tau within the frontal cortex and hippocampus. In addition, there were differences in the cellular distribution of the isoforms. Mice transgenic for the human MAPT gene exhibited higher levels of neuronal cell body expression of tau compared to wildtype mice. This neuronal cell body expression of tau was limited to the 3R isoform, whereas expression of 4R-tau was more "synaptic like," with granular staining of neuropil rather than in neuronal cell bodies. These developmental and species-specific differences in the regulation and distribution of tau isoforms may be important to the understanding of normal and pathologic tau isoform expression. PMID:18925637

  13. Tau isoform regulation is region and cell-specific in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Pamela; Korvatska, Elena; Poorkaj, Parvoneh; Evstafjeva, Zana; Robinson, Linda; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; D’Souza, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein implicated in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Alternative splicing of the tau gene (MAPT) generates six tau isoforms, distinguishable by the exclusion or inclusion of a repeat region of exon 10, that are referred to as 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat (4R) tau, respectively. We developed transgenic mouse models that express the entire human MAPT gene in the presence and absence of the mouse Mapt gene and compared the expression and regulation of mouse and human tau isoforms during development and in the young adult. We found differences between mouse and human tau in the regulation of exon 10 inclusion. Despite these differences, the isoform splicing pattern seen in normal human brain is replicated in our mouse models. In addition, we found that all tau, both in the neonate and young adult, is phosphorylated. We also examined the normal anatomic distribution of mouse and human tau isoforms in mouse brain. We observed developmental and species-specific variations in the expression of 3R and 4R-tau within the frontal cortex and hippocampus. In addition, there were differences in the cellular distribution of the isoforms. Mice transgenic for the human MAPT gene exhibited higher levels of neuronal cell body expression of tau compared to wild-type mice. This neuronal cell body expression of tau was limited to the 3R isoform, whereas expression of 4R tau was more “synaptic like”, with granular staining of neuropil rather than in neuronal cell bodies. These developmental and species-specific differences in the regulation and distribution of tau isoforms may be important to the understanding of normal and pathologic tau isoform expression. PMID:18925637

  14. High Rate of Recent Transposable Element–Induced Adaptation in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    González, Josefa; Lenkov, Kapa; Lipatov, Mikhail; Macpherson, J. Michael; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2008-01-01

    Although transposable elements (TEs) are known to be potent sources of mutation, their contribution to the generation of recent adaptive changes has never been systematically assessed. In this work, we conduct a genome-wide screen for adaptive TE insertions in Drosophila melanogaster that have taken place during or after the spread of this species out of Africa. We determine population frequencies of 902 of the 1,572 TEs in Release 3 of the D. melanogaster genome and identify a set of 13 putatively adaptive TEs. These 13 TEs increased in population frequency sharply after the spread out of Africa. We argue that many of these TEs are in fact adaptive by demonstrating that the regions flanking five of these TEs display signatures of partial selective sweeps. Furthermore, we show that eight out of the 13 putatively adaptive elements show population frequency heterogeneity consistent with these elements playing a role in adaptation to temperate climates. We conclude that TEs have contributed considerably to recent adaptive evolution (one TE-induced adaptation every 200–1,250 y). The majority of these adaptive insertions are likely to be involved in regulatory changes. Our results also suggest that TE-induced adaptations arise more often from standing variants than from new mutations. Such a high rate of TE-induced adaptation is inconsistent with the number of fixed TEs in the D. melanogaster genome, and we discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy. PMID:18942889

  15. Evolution, Expression, and Function of Nonneuronal Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Remnant, Emily J; Williams, Adam; Lumb, Chris; Yang, Ying Ting; Chan, Janice; Duchêne, Sebastian; Daborn, Phillip J; Batterham, Philip; Perry, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-gated chloride channels have established roles in inhibitory neurotransmission in the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Paradoxically, expression databases in Drosophila melanogaster have revealed that three uncharacterized ligand-gated chloride channel subunits, CG7589, CG6927, and CG11340, are highly expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Furthermore, subunit copy number varies between insects, with some orders containing one ortholog, whereas other lineages exhibit copy number increases. Here, we show that the Dipteran lineage has undergone two gene duplications followed by expression-based functional differentiation. We used promoter-GFP expression analysis, RNA-sequencing, and in situ hybridization to examine cell type and tissue-specific localization of the three D. melanogaster subunits. CG6927 is expressed in the nurse cells of the ovaries. CG7589 is expressed in multiple tissues including the salivary gland, ejaculatory duct, malpighian tubules, and early midgut. CG11340 is found in malpighian tubules and the copper cell region of the midgut. Overexpression of CG11340 increased sensitivity to dietary copper, and RNAi and ends-out knockout of CG11340 resulted in copper tolerance, providing evidence for a specific nonneuronal role for this subunit in D. melanogaster Ligand-gated chloride channels are important insecticide targets and here we highlight copy number and functional divergence in insect lineages, raising the potential that order-specific receptors could be isolated within an effective class of insecticide targets. PMID:27172217

  16. Ribosome profiling reveals pervasive and regulated stop codon readthrough in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Joshua G; Foo, Catherine K; Belletier, Nicolette G; Gavis, Elizabeth R; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomes can read through stop codons in a regulated manner, elongating rather than terminating the nascent peptide. Stop codon readthrough is essential to diverse viruses, and phylogenetically predicted to occur in a few hundred genes in Drosophila melanogaster, but the importance of regulated readthrough in eukaryotes remains largely unexplored. Here, we present a ribosome profiling assay (deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments) for Drosophila melanogaster, and provide the first genome-wide experimental analysis of readthrough. Readthrough is far more pervasive than expected: the vast majority of readthrough events evolved within D. melanogaster and were not predicted phylogenetically. The resulting C-terminal protein extensions show evidence of selection, contain functional subcellular localization signals, and their readthrough is regulated, arguing for their importance. We further demonstrate that readthrough occurs in yeast and humans. Readthrough thus provides general mechanisms both to regulate gene expression and function, and to add plasticity to the proteome during evolution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01179.001 PMID:24302569

  17. The influence of Adh function on ethanol preference and tolerance in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Ogueta, Maite; Cibik, Osman; Eltrop, Rouven; Schneider, Andrea; Scholz, Henrike

    2010-11-01

    Preference determines behavioral choices such as choosing among food sources and mates. One preference-affecting chemical is ethanol, which guides insects to fermenting fruits or leaves. Here, we show that adult Drosophila melanogaster prefer food containing up to 5% ethanol over food without ethanol and avoid food with high levels (23%) of ethanol. Although female and male flies behaved differently at ethanol-containing food sources, there was no sexual dimorphism in the preference for food containing modest ethanol levels. We also investigated whether Drosophila preference, sensitivity and tolerance to ethanol was related to the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), the primary ethanol-metabolizing enzyme in D. melanogaster. Impaired Adh function reduced ethanol preference in both D. melanogaster and a related species, D. sechellia. Adh-impaired flies also displayed reduced aversion to high ethanol concentrations, increased sensitivity to the effects of ethanol on postural control, and negative tolerance/sensitization (i.e., a reduction of the increased resistance to ethanol's effects that normally occurs upon repeated exposure). These data strongly indicate a linkage between ethanol-induced behavior and ethanol metabolism in adult fruit flies: Adh deficiency resulted in reduced preference to low ethanol concentrations and reduced aversion to high ones, despite recovery from ethanol being strongly impaired. PMID:20739429

  18. Adenylate kinase isozyme 2 is essential for growth and development of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Koichi; Murakami, Ryutaro; Horiguchi, Taigo; Noma, Takafumi

    2009-05-01

    Adenylate kinases are phylogenetically widespread, highly conserved, and involved in energy metabolism and energy transfer. Of these, adenylate kinase (AK) isozyme 2 is uniquely localized in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and its physiological role remains largely unknown. In this study, we selected Drosophila melanogaster to analyze its role in vivo. AK isozyme cDNAs were cloned and their gene expressions were characterized in D. melanogaster. The deduced amino acid sequences contain highly conserved motifs for P-loop, NMP binding, and LID domains of AKs. In addition, the effects of AK2 gene knockout on phenotype of AK2 mutants were examined using P-element technology. Although homozygous AK2 mutated embryos developed without any visible defects, their growth ceased and they died before reaching the third instar larval stage. Maternally provided AK2 mRNA was detected in fertilized eggs, and weak AK2 activity was observed in first and second instar larvae of the homozygous AK2 mutants, suggesting that maternally provided AK2 is sufficient for embryonic development. Disappearance of AK2 activity during larval stages resulted in growth arrest and eventual death. These results demonstrate that AK2 plays a critical role in adenine nucleotide metabolism in the mitochondrial intermembrane space and is essential for growth in D. melanogaster. PMID:19416704

  19. Mechanistic and Structural Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster Arylalkylamine N-Acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of melatonin and other N-acetylarylalkylamides from the corresponding arylalkylamine and acetyl-CoA. The N-acetylation of arylalkylamines is a critical step in Drosophila melanogaster for the inactivation of the bioactive amines and the sclerotization of the cuticle. Two AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) have been identified in D. melanogaster, in which AANATA differs from AANATB by the truncation of 35 amino acids from the N-terminus. We have expressed and purified both D. melanogaster AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) in Escherichia coli and used the purified enzymes to demonstrate that this N-terminal truncation does not affect the activity of the enzyme. Subsequent characterization of the kinetic and chemical mechanism of AANATA identified an ordered sequential mechanism, with acetyl-CoA binding first, followed by tyramine. We used a combination of pH–activity profiling and site-directed mutagenesis to study prospective residues believed to function in AANATA catalysis. These data led to an assignment of Glu-47 as the general base in catalysis with an apparent pKa of 7.0. Using the data generated for the kinetic mechanism, structure–function relationships, pH–rate profiles, and site-directed mutagenesis, we propose a chemical mechanism for AANATA. PMID:25406072

  20. Valeriana officinalis attenuates the rotenone-induced toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sudati, Jéssie Haigert; Vieira, Francielli Araújo; Pavin, Sandra Sartoretto; Dias, Glaecir Roseni Mundstock; Seeger, Rodrigo Lopes; Golombieski, Ronaldo; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Soares, Félix Antunes; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Barbosa, Nilda Vargas

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of Valeriana officinalis (V. officinalis) against the toxicity induced by rotenone in Drosophila melanogaster (D. melanogaster). Adult wild-type flies were concomitantly exposed to rotenone (500 μM) and V. officinalis aqueous extract (10mg/mL) in the food during 7 days. Rotenone-fed flies had a worse performance in the negative geotaxis assay (i.e. climbing capability) and open-field test (i.e. mobility time) as well as a higher incidence of mortality when compared to control group. V. officinalis treatment offered protection against these detrimental effects of rotenone. In contrast, the decreased number of crossings observed in the flies exposed to rotenone was not modified by V. officinalis. Rotenone toxicity was also associated with a marked decrease on the total-thiol content in the homogenates and cell viability of flies, which were reduced by V. officinalis treatment. Indeed, rotenone exposure caused a significant increase in the mRNA expression of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) and also in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene. The expression of SOD and CAT mRNAs was normalized by V. officinalis treatment. Our results suggest that V. officinalis extract was effective in reducing the toxicity induced by rotenone in D. melanogaster as well as confirm the utility of this model to investigate potential therapeutic strategies on movement disorders, including Parkinson disease (PD). PMID:23639798

  1. Impaired climbing and flight behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster following carbon dioxide anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bartholomew, Nathan R.; Burdett, Jacob M.; VandenBrooks, John M.; Quinlan, Michael C.; Call, Gerald B.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratories that study Drosophila melanogaster or other insects commonly use carbon dioxide (CO2) anaesthesia for sorting or other work. Unfortunately, the use of CO2 has potential unwanted physiological effects, including altered respiratory and muscle physiology, which impact motor function behaviours. The effects of CO2 at different levels and exposure times were examined on the subsequent recovery of motor function as assessed by climbing and flight assays. With as little as a five minute exposure to 100% CO2, D. melanogaster exhibited climbing deficits up to 24 hours after exposure. Any exposure length over five minutes produced climbing deficits that lasted for days. Flight behaviour was also impaired following CO2 exposure. Overall, there was a positive correlation between CO2 exposure length and recovery time for both behaviours. Furthermore, exposure to as little as 65% CO2 affected the motor capability of D. melanogaster. These negative effects are due to both a CO2-specific mechanism and an anoxic effect. These results indicate a heretofore unconsidered impact of CO2 anaesthesia on subsequent behavioural tests revealing the importance of monitoring and accounting for CO2 exposure when performing physiological or behavioural studies in insects. PMID:26477397

  2. Aging and CaMKII alter intracellular Ca2+ transients and heart rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  3. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  4. Mechanistic and structural analysis of Drosophila melanogaster arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Daniel R; Jeffries, Kristen A; Bond, Jason D; Carpenter, Anne-Marie; Rodriguez-Ospina, Santiago; Breydo, Leonid; Caswell, K Kenneth; Merkler, David J

    2014-12-16

    Arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the biosynthesis of melatonin and other N-acetylarylalkylamides from the corresponding arylalkylamine and acetyl-CoA. The N-acetylation of arylalkylamines is a critical step in Drosophila melanogaster for the inactivation of the bioactive amines and the sclerotization of the cuticle. Two AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) have been identified in D. melanogaster, in which AANATA differs from AANATB by the truncation of 35 amino acids from the N-terminus. We have expressed and purified both D. melanogaster AANAT variants (AANATA and AANATB) in Escherichia coli and used the purified enzymes to demonstrate that this N-terminal truncation does not affect the activity of the enzyme. Subsequent characterization of the kinetic and chemical mechanism of AANATA identified an ordered sequential mechanism, with acetyl-CoA binding first, followed by tyramine. We used a combination of pH-activity profiling and site-directed mutagenesis to study prospective residues believed to function in AANATA catalysis. These data led to an assignment of Glu-47 as the general base in catalysis with an apparent pKa of 7.0. Using the data generated for the kinetic mechanism, structure-function relationships, pH-rate profiles, and site-directed mutagenesis, we propose a chemical mechanism for AANATA. PMID:25406072

  5. Parallel Gene Expression Differences between Low and High Latitude Populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Wit, Janneke; Svetec, Nicolas; Begun, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression variation within species is relatively common, however, the role of natural selection in the maintenance of this variation is poorly understood. Here we investigate low and high latitude populations of Drosophila melanogaster and its sister species, D. simulans, to determine whether the two species show similar patterns of population differentiation, consistent with a role for spatially varying selection in maintaining gene expression variation. We compared at two temperatures the whole male transcriptome of D. melanogaster and D. simulans sampled from Panama City (Panama) and Maine (USA). We observed a significant excess of genes exhibiting differential expression in both species, consistent with parallel adaptation to heterogeneous environments. Moreover, the majority of genes showing parallel expression differentiation showed the same direction of differential expression in the two species and the magnitudes of expression differences between high and low latitude populations were correlated across species, further bolstering the conclusion that parallelism for expression phenotypes results from spatially varying selection. However, the species also exhibited important differences in expression phenotypes. For example, the genomic extent of genotype × environment interaction was much more common in D. melanogaster. Highly differentiated SNPs between low and high latitudes were enriched in the 3’ UTRs and CDS of the geographically differently expressed genes in both species, consistent with an important role for cis-acting variants in driving local adaptation for expression-related phenotypes. PMID:25950438

  6. Nonrandom Wolbachia Infection Status of Drosophila melanogaster Strains with Different mtDNA Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria D. S.; Nolte, Viola

    2008-01-01

    Wolbachia are maternally inherited bacteria, which typically spread in the host population by inducing cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI). In Drosophila melanogaster, Wolbachia is quite common but CI is variable, with most of the studies reporting low levels of CI. Surveying mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation and infection status in a worldwide D. melanogaster collection, we found that the Wolbachia infection was not randomly distributed among flies with different mtDNA haplotypes. This preferential infection of some mtDNA haplotypes could be caused by a recent spread of mtDNA haplotypes associated with the infection. The comparison of contemporary D. melanogaster samples with lines collected more than 50 years ago shows that indeed one haplotype with a high incidence of Wolbachia infection has increased in frequency. Consistent with this observation, we found that the acquisition of a Wolbachia infection in a population from Crete was accompanied with an almost complete mtDNA replacement, with the Wolbachia-associated haplotype becoming abundant. Although it is difficult to identify the evolutionary forces causing the global increase of wMel, the parallel sweep of Wolbachia and an mtDNA haplotype suggests a fitness advantage of the Wolbachia infection. PMID:18780877

  7. Genome-wide modeling of complex phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The genetic and molecular basis for many intermediate and end stage phenotypes in model systems such as C. elegans and D. melanogaster has long been known to involve pleiotropic effects and complex multigenic interactions. Gene sets are groups of genes that contribute to multiple biological or molecular phenomena. They have been used in the analysis of large molecular datasets such as microarray data, Next Generation sequencing, and other genomic datasets to reveal pleiotropic and multigenic contributions to phenotypic outcomes. Many model systems lack species specific organized phenotype based gene sets to enable high throughput analysis of large molecular datasets. Results and discussion Here, we describe two novel collections of gene sets in C. elegans and D. melanogaster that are based exclusively on genetically determined phenotypes and use a controlled phenotypic ontology. We use these collections to build genome-wide models of thousands of defined phenotypes in both model species. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of these gene sets in systems analysis and in analysis of gene expression-based molecular datasets and show how they are useful in analysis of genomic datasets connecting multigenic gene inputs to complex phenotypes. Conclusions Phenotypic based gene sets in both C. elegans and D. melanogaster are developed, characterized, and shown to be useful in the analysis of large scale species-specific genomic datasets. These phenotypic gene set collections will contribute to the understanding of complex phenotypic outcomes in these model systems. PMID:23984798

  8. Edible bird's nest enhances antioxidant capacity and increases lifespan in Drosophila Melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hu, Q; Li, G; Yao, H; He, S; Li, H; Liu, S; Wu, Y; Lai, X

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aims to investigate the effects of edible bird's nest (EBN) on anti-aging efficacy. In order to investigate lifespan and mortality rate of flies, we treated flies with various doses of EBN. Besides, fecundity, water content and food are determined and heat-stress test is conducted after flies treating with different medium. Effects of EBN on total antioxidant activity (T-AOC), super-oxide dismutase activity (SOD), catalase activity (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined in drosophila melanogaster. Results indicated that flies in EBN treated group illustrated significantly lower mortality rates and longer median and maximum lifespan compared to control group (P<0.05). The fecundity in EBN-treated group was increased compared to control group. SOD levels and CAT activity were significantly increased, and MDA levels decreased in EBN-treated group compared to control group (P<0.01). In conclusion, EBN can extend lifespan, decrease mortality rate and increase survival rate in heat-stress test, and which can also promote SOD and CAT activity and reduce MDA levels. EBN is able to delay drosophila melanogaster aging, attributing to the increasing antioxidant enzyme activities and decreasing content of lipid peroxidation products in drosophila melanogaster. PMID:27188745

  9. The role of Rdl in resistance to phenylpyrazoles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Remnant, Emily J; Morton, Craig J; Daborn, Phillip J; Lumb, Christopher; Yang, Ying Ting; Ng, Hooi Ling; Parker, Michael W; Batterham, Philip

    2014-11-01

    Extensive use of older generation insecticides may result in pre-existing cross-resistance to new chemical classes acting at the same target site. Phenylpyrazole insecticides block inhibitory neurotransmission in insects via their action on ligand-gated chloride channels (LGCCs). Phenylpyrazoles are broad-spectrum insecticides widely used in agriculture and domestic pest control. So far, all identified cases of target site resistance to phenylpyrazoles are based on mutations in the Rdl (Resistance to dieldrin) LGCC subunit, the major target site for cyclodiene insecticides. We examined the role that mutations in Rdl have on phenylpyrazole resistance in Drosophila melanogaster, exploring naturally occurring variation, and generating predicted resistance mutations by mutagenesis. Natural variation at the Rdl locus in inbred strains of D. melanogaster included gene duplication, and a line containing two Rdl mutations found in a highly resistant line of Drosophila simulans. These mutations had a moderate impact on survival following exposure to two phenylpyrazoles, fipronil and pyriprole. Homology modelling suggested that the Rdl chloride channel pore contains key residues for binding fipronil and pyriprole. Mutagenesis of these sites and assessment of resistance in vivo in transgenic lines showed that amino acid identity at the Ala(301) site influenced resistance levels, with glycine showing greater survival than serine replacement. We confirm that point mutations at the Rdl 301 site provide moderate resistance to phenylpyrazoles in D. melanogaster. We also emphasize the beneficial aspects of testing predicted mutations in a whole organism to validate a candidate gene approach. PMID:25193377

  10. Sodium distribution predicts the chill tolerance of Drosophila melanogaster raised in different thermal conditions.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Heath A; Andersen, Jonas L; Loeschcke, Volker; Overgaard, Johannes

    2015-05-15

    Many insects, including the model holometabolous insect Drosophila melanogaster, display remarkable plasticity in chill tolerance in response to the thermal environment experienced during development or as adults. At low temperatures, many insects lose the ability to regulate Na(+) balance, which is suggested to cause a secondary loss of hemolymph water to the tissues and gut lumen that concentrates the K(+) remaining in the hemolymph. The resultant increase in extracellular [K(+)] inhibits neuromuscular excitability and is proposed to cause cellular apoptosis and injury. The present study investigates whether and how variation in chill tolerance induced through developmental and adult cold acclimation is associated with changes in Na(+), water, and K(+) balance. Developmental and adult cold acclimation improved the chilling tolerance of D. melanogaster in an additive manner. In agreement with the proposed model, these effects were intimately related to differences in Na(+) distribution prior to cold exposure, such that chill-tolerant flies had low hemolymph [Na(+)], while intracellular [Na(+)] was similar among treatment groups. The low hemolymph Na(+) of cold-acclimated flies allowed them to maintain hemolymph volume, prevent hyperkalemia, and avoid injury following chronic cold exposure. These findings extend earlier observations of hemolymph volume disruption during cold exposure to the most ubiquitous model insect (D. melanogaster), highlight shared mechanisms of developmental and adult thermal plasticity and provide strong support for ionoregulatory failure as a central mechanism of insect chill susceptibility. PMID:25761700

  11. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. PMID:24845200

  12. Rapid desiccation hardening changes the cuticular hydrocarbon profile of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Stinziano, Joseph R; Sové, Richard J; Rundle, Howard D; Sinclair, Brent J

    2015-02-01

    The success of insects in terrestrial environments is due in large part to their ability to resist desiccation stress. Since the majority of water is lost across the cuticle, a relatively water-impermeable cuticle is a major component of insect desiccation resistance. Cuticular permeability is affected by the properties and mixing effects of component hydrocarbons, and changes in cuticular hydrocarbons can affect desiccation tolerance. A pre-exposure to a mild desiccation stress increases duration of desiccation survival in adult female Drosophila melanogaster, via a decrease in cuticular permeability. To test whether this acute response to desiccation stress is due to a change in cuticular hydrocarbons, we treated male and female D. melanogaster to a rapid desiccation hardening (RDH) treatment and used gas chromatography to examine the effects on cuticular hydrocarbon composition. RDH led to reduced proportions of unsaturated and methylated hydrocarbons compared to controls in females, but although RDH modified the cuticular hydrocarbon profile in males, there was no coordinated pattern. These data suggest that the phenomenon of RDH leading to reduced cuticular water loss occurs via an acute change in cuticular hydrocarbons that enhances desiccation tolerance in female, but not male, D. melanogaster. PMID:25460832

  13. Flying the fly: long-range flight behavior of Drosophila melanogaster to attractive odors.

    PubMed

    Becher, Paul G; Bengtsson, Marie; Hansson, Bill S; Witzgall, Peter

    2010-06-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae), is a model for how animals sense, discriminate, and respond to chemical signals. However, with D. melanogaster our knowledge of the behavioral activity of olfactory receptor ligands has relied largely on close-range attraction, rather than on long-range orientation behavior. We developed a flight assay to relate chemosensory perception to behavior. Headspace volatiles from vinegar attracted 62% of assayed flies during a 15-min experimental period. Flies responded irrespective of age, sex, and mating state, provided they had been starved. To identify behaviorally relevant chemicals from vinegar, we compared the responses to vinegar and synthetic chemicals. Stimuli were applied by a piezoelectric sprayer at known and constant release rates. Re-vaporized methanol extracts of Super Q-trapped vinegar volatiles attracted as many flies as vinegar. The main volatile component of vinegar, acetic acid, elicited significant attraction as a single compound. Two other vinegar volatiles, 2-phenyl ethanol and acetoin, produced a synergistic effect when added to acetic acid. Geosmin, a microbiological off-flavor, diminished attraction to vinegar. This wind tunnel assay based on a conspicuous and unambiguous behavioral response provides the necessary resolution for the investigation of physiologically and ecologically relevant odors and will become an essential tool for the functional analysis of the D. melanogaster olfactory system. PMID:20437263

  14. Sequence Analysis of N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea-Induced Vermilion Mutations in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Pastink, A.; Vreeken, C.; Nivard, MJM.; Searles, L. L.; Vogel, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    The mutational specificity of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) was determined in Drosophila melanogaster using the vermilion locus as a target gene. 25 mutants (16 F(1) and 9 F(2) mutants) were cloned and sequenced. Only base-pair changes were observed; three of the mutants represented double base substitutions. Transition mutations were the most prominent sequence change: 61% were GC->AT and 18% AT->GC substitutions. Both sequence changes can be explained by the miscoding properties of the modified guanine and thymine bases. A strong bias of neighboring bases on the occurrence of the GC->AT transitions or a strand preference of both types of transition mutations was not observed. The spectrum of ENU mutations in D. melanogaster includes a significant fraction (21%) of transversion mutations. Our data indicate that like in other prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems also in D. melanogaster the O(6)-ethylguanine adduct is the most prominent premutational lesion after ENU treatment. The strong contribution of the O(6)-ethylguanine adduct to the mutagenicity of ENU possibly explains the absence of distinct differences between the type of mutations observed in the F(1) and F(2) mutants. Although the latter arise later during development, the spectrum of mosaic mutations is also dominated by GC->AT transition mutations. PMID:2572507

  15. Quantitative Bioimaging to Investigate the Uptake of Mercury Species in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, Ann-Christin; Bauer, Oliver Bolle; Kröger, Sabrina; Fingerhut, Stefanie; Schulz, Jacqueline; Meyer, Sören; Sperling, Michael; Jeibmann, Astrid; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Karst, Uwe

    2015-10-20

    The uptake of mercury species in the model organism Drosophila melanogaster was investigated by elemental bioimaging using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS). The mercury distribution in Drosophila melanogaster was analyzed for the three species mercury(II) chloride, methylmercury chloride, and thimerosal after intoxication. A respective analytical method was developed and applied to the analysis of the entire Drosophila melanogaster first, before a particular focus was directed to the cerebral areas of larvae and adult flies. For quantification of mercury, matrix-matched standards based on gelatin were prepared. Challenges of spatially dissolved mercury determination, namely, strong evaporation issues of the analytes and an inhomogeneous distribution of mercury in the standards due to interactions with cysteine containing proteins of the gelatin were successfully addressed by complexation with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). No mercury was detected in the cerebral region for mercury(II) chloride, whereas both organic species showed the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier. Quantitatively, the mercury level in the brain exceeded the fed concentration indicating mercury enrichment, which was approximately 3 times higher for methylmercury chloride than for thimerosal. PMID:26424032

  16. West Nile Virus Infection of Drosophila melanogaster Induces a Protective RNAi Response

    PubMed Central

    Chotkowski, Heather L.; Ciota, Alexander T.; Jia, Yongqing; Puig-Basagoiti, Francesc; Kramer, Laura D.; Shi, Pei-Yong; Glaser, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    To determine if West Nile virus (WNV) infection of insect cells induces a protective RNAi response, Drosophila melanogaster S2 and Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells were infected with WNV, and the production of WNV-homologous small RNAs was assayed as an indicator of RNAi induction. A distinct population of ~25 nt WNV-homologous small RNAs was detected in infected S2 cells but not C6/36 cells. RNAi knockdown of Argonaute 2 in S2 cells resulted in slightly increased susceptibility to WNV infection, suggesting that some WNV-homologous small RNAs produced in infected S2 cells are functional small interfering RNAs. WNV was shown to infect adult D. melanogaster, and adult flies containing mutations in each of four different RNAi genes (Argonaute 2, spindle-E, piwi, and Dicer-2) were significantly more susceptible to WNV infection than wildtype flies. These results combined with the analysis of WNV infection of S2 and C6/36 cells support the conclusion that WNV infection of D. melanogaster, but perhaps not Ae. albopictus, induces a protective RNAi response. PMID:18501400

  17. Evolution, Expression, and Function of Nonneuronal Ligand-Gated Chloride Channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Remnant, Emily J.; Williams, Adam; Lumb, Chris; Yang, Ying Ting; Chan, Janice; Duchêne, Sebastian; Daborn, Phillip J.; Batterham, Philip; Perry, Trent

    2016-01-01

    Ligand-gated chloride channels have established roles in inhibitory neurotransmission in the nervous systems of vertebrates and invertebrates. Paradoxically, expression databases in Drosophila melanogaster have revealed that three uncharacterized ligand-gated chloride channel subunits, CG7589, CG6927, and CG11340, are highly expressed in nonneuronal tissues. Furthermore, subunit copy number varies between insects, with some orders containing one ortholog, whereas other lineages exhibit copy number increases. Here, we show that the Dipteran lineage has undergone two gene duplications followed by expression-based functional differentiation. We used promoter-GFP expression analysis, RNA-sequencing, and in situ hybridization to examine cell type and tissue-specific localization of the three D. melanogaster subunits. CG6927 is expressed in the nurse cells of the ovaries. CG7589 is expressed in multiple tissues including the salivary gland, ejaculatory duct, malpighian tubules, and early midgut. CG11340 is found in malpighian tubules and the copper cell region of the midgut. Overexpression of CG11340 increased sensitivity to dietary copper, and RNAi and ends-out knockout of CG11340 resulted in copper tolerance, providing evidence for a specific nonneuronal role for this subunit in D. melanogaster. Ligand-gated chloride channels are important insecticide targets and here we highlight copy number and functional divergence in insect lineages, raising the potential that order-specific receptors could be isolated within an effective class of insecticide targets. PMID:27172217

  18. Molecular nature of 11 spontaneous de novo mutations in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Yang, H P; Tanikawa, A Y; Kondrashov, A S

    2001-03-01

    To investigate the molecular nature and rate of spontaneous mutation in Drosophila melanogaster, we screened 887,000 individuals for de novo recessive loss-of-function mutations at eight loci that affect eye color. In total, 28 mutants were found in 16 independent events (13 singletons and three clusters). The molecular nature of the 13 events was analyzed. Coding exons of the locus were affected by insertions or deletions >100 nucleotides long (6 events), short frameshift insertions or deletions (4 events), and replacement nucleotide substitutions (1 event). In the case of 2 mutant alleles, coding regions were not affected. Because approximately 70% of spontaneous de novo loss-of-function mutations in Homo sapiens are due to nucleotide substitutions within coding regions, insertions and deletions appear to play a much larger role in spontaneous mutation in D. melanogaster than in H. sapiens. If so, the per nucleotide mutation rate in D. melanogaster may be lower than in H. sapiens, even if their per locus mutation rates are similar. PMID:11238412

  19. A novel tropomyosin isoform functions at the mitotic spindle and Golgi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Goins, Lauren M.; Mullins, R. Dyche

    2015-01-01

    Most eukaryotic cells express multiple isoforms of the actin-binding protein tropomyosin that help construct a variety of cytoskeletal networks. Only one nonmuscle tropomyosin (Tm1A) has previously been described in Drosophila, but developmental defects caused by insertion of P-elements near tropomyosin genes imply the existence of additional, nonmuscle isoforms. Using biochemical and molecular genetic approaches, we identified three tropomyosins expressed in Drosophila S2 cells: Tm1A, Tm1J, and Tm2A. The Tm1A isoform localizes to the cell cortex, lamellar actin networks, and the cleavage furrow of dividing cells—always together with myosin-II. Isoforms Tm1J and Tm2A colocalize around the Golgi apparatus with the formin-family protein Diaphanous, and loss of either isoform perturbs cell cycle progression. During mitosis, Tm1J localizes to the mitotic spindle, where it promotes chromosome segregation. Using chimeras, we identified the determinants of tropomyosin localization near the C-terminus. This work 1) identifies and characterizes previously unknown nonmuscle tropomyosins in Drosophila, 2) reveals a function for tropomyosin in the mitotic spindle, and 3) uncovers sequence elements that specify isoform-specific localizations and functions of tropomyosin. PMID:25971803

  20. Role of acyl carrier protein isoforms in plant lipid metabolism: Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from my lab has revealed that several higher plant species have multiple isoforms of acyl carrier protein (ACP) and therefore this trait appears highly conserved among higher plants. This level of conservation suggests that the existence of ACP isoforms is not merely the results of neutral gene duplications. We have developed techniques to examine a wider range of species. Acyl carrier proteins can be labelled very specifically and to high specific activity using H-palmitate and the E. coli enzyme acyl-ACP synthetase. Isoforms were then resolved by western blotting and native PAGE of H-palmitate labelled ACP's. Multiple isoforms of ACP were observed the leaf tissue of the monocots Avena sativa and Hordeum vulgare and dicots including Arabidopsis thallina, Cuphea wrightii, and Brassica napus. Lower vascular plants including the cycad, Dioon edule, Ginkgo biloba, the gymnosperm Pinus, the fern Anernia phyllitidis and Psilotum nudum, the most primitive known extant vascular plant, were also found to have multiple ACP isoforms as were the nonvascular liverwort, Marchantia and moss, Polytrichum. Therefore, the development of ACP isoforms occurred early in evolution. However, the uniellular alge Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella and the photosynthetic cyanobacteria Synechocystis and Agmnellum have only a single elecrophotetic form of ACP. Thus, multiple forms of ACP do not occur in all photosynthetic organisms but may be associated with multicellular plants.

  1. FTICR-MS analysis of 14-3-3 isoform substrate selection.

    PubMed

    Cardasis, Helene L; Sehnke, Paul C; Laughner, Beth; Eyler, John R; Powell, David H; Ferl, Robert J

    2007-07-01

    The 14-3-3s are a ubiquitous class of eukaryotic proteins that participate in a second regulatory step in many phosphorylation-based signal transduction systems. The Arabidopsis family of 14-3-3 proteins represents a rather large 14-3-3 gene family. The biological motive for such diversity within a single protein family is not yet completely understood. The work presented here utilizes 14-3-3 micro-affinity chromatography in conjunction with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry to survey the substrate sequence selectivity of two Arabidopsis 14-3-3 isoforms that represent the two major subclasses of this protein family. A method was developed to compare the relative binding of eight synthetic phosphopeptide sequences. The degree to which each phosphopeptide bound to either isoform was assigned a relative value, defined here as the binding ratio. The method provided a simple means for visualizing differences in substrate sequence selection among different 14-3-3 isoforms. A reproducible preference for specific phosphopeptide sequences was measured for both isoforms. This binding preference was consistent among the two classes of isoforms, suggesting that any pressure for isoform selectivity must reside outside the central core that interacts with the phosphopeptide sequence of the client. PMID:17569603

  2. Regulated Expression of a Calmodulin Isoform Alters Growth and Development in Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poovaiah, B. W.; Takezawa, D.; An, G.; Han, T.-J.

    1996-01-01

    A transgene approach was taken to study the consequences of altered expression of a calmodutin iso-form on plant growth and development. Eight genomic clones of potato calmodulin (PCM 1 to 8) have been isolated and characterized. Among the potato calmodulin isoforms studied, PCM 1 differs from the other isoforms because of its unique amino acid substitutions. Transgenic potato plants were produced carrying sense construct of PCM 1 fused to the CAMV 35S promoter. Transgenic plants showing a moderate increase in PCM 1 MRNA exhibited strong apical dominance, produced elongated tubers, and were taller than the controls. Interestingly, the plants expressing the highest level of PCM 1 MRNA did not form underground tubers. Instead, these transgenic plants produced aerial tubers when allowed to grow for longer periods. The expression of different calmodulin isoforms (PCM 1, 5, 6, and 8) was studied in transgenic plants. Among the four potato calmodulin isoforms, only the expression of PCM 1 MRNA was altered in transgenic plants, while the expression of other isoforms was not significantly altered. Western analysis revealed increased PCM 1 protein in transgenic plants, indicating that the expression of both MRNA and protein are altered in transgenic plants. These results suggest that increasing the expression of PCM 1 alters growth and development in potato plants.

  3. PECAM-1 isoform-specific functions in PECAM-1-deficient brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    DiMaio, Terri A; Sheibani, Nader

    2008-03-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) is alternatively spliced generating eight isoforms that only differ in the length of their cytoplasmic domain. Multiple isoforms of PECAM-1 are present in the endothelium and their expression levels are regulated during vascular development and angiogenesis. However, the functional significance of PECAM-1 isoforms during these processes remains largely unknown. We recently showed that mouse brain endothelial (bEND) cells prepared from PECAM-1-deficient (PECAM-1-/-) mice differ in their cell adhesive and migratory properties compared to PECAM-1+/+ bEND cells. Here we demonstrate that the restoration of PECAM-1 expression in these cells affects their adhesive and migratory properties in an isoform-specific manner. Expression of Delta14&15 PECAM-1, the predominant isoform present in the mouse endothelium, in PECAM-1-/- bEND cells activated MAPK/ERKs, disrupted adherens junctions, and enhanced cell migration and capillary morphogenesis in Matrigel. In contrast, expression of Delta15 PECAM-1 in PECAM-1-/- bEND cells had minimal effects on their activation of MAPK/ERKs, migration, and capillary morphogenesis. The effects of PECAM-1 on cell adhesive and migratory properties were mediated in an isoform-specific manner, at least in part, through its interactions with intracellular signaling proteins, including SHP-2 and Src. These results suggest that the impact of PECAM-1 on EC adhesion, migration, and capillary morphogenesis is modulated by alternative splicing of its cytoplasmic domain. PMID:18029285

  4. Characterization of 14-3-3 isoforms expressed in the Echinococcus granulosus pathogenic larval stage.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Aline; Vargas, Daiani M; Monteiro, Karina M; Meneghetti, Bruna V; Dutra, Cristine S; Paredes, Rodolfo; Galanti, Norbel; Zaha, Arnaldo; Ferreira, Henrique B

    2015-04-01

    The 14-3-3 protein family of eukaryotic regulators was studied in Echinococcus granulosus, the causative agent of cystic hydatid disease. These proteins mediate important cellular processes in eukaryotes and are expected to play important roles in parasite biology. Six isoforms of E. granulosus 14-3-3 genes and proteins (Eg14-3-3.1-6) were analyzed, and their phylogenetic relationships were established with bona fide 14-3-3 orthologous proteins from eukaryotic species. Eg14-3-3 isoforms with previous evidence of expression (Eg14-3-3.1-4) in E. granulosus pathogenic larval stage (metacestode) were cloned, and recombinant proteins were used for functional studies. These protein isoforms were detected in different components of E. granulosus metacestode, including interface components with the host. The roles that are played by Eg14-3-3 proteins in parasite biology were inferred from the repertoires of interacting proteins with each isoform, as assessed by gel overlay, cross-linking, and affinity chromatography assays. A total of 95 Eg14-3-3 protein ligands were identified by mass spectrometry. Eg14-3-3 isoforms have shared partners (44 proteins), indicating some overlapping functions; however, they also bind exclusive partners (51 proteins), suggesting Eg14-3-3 functional specialization. These ligand repertoires indicate the involvement of Eg14-3-3 proteins in multiple biochemical pathways in the E. granulosus metacestode and note some degree of isoform specialization. PMID:25748451

  5. Inhibition of various isoforms of rat liver glutathione S-transferases by tannic acid and butein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Mack, P; Wong, K P

    1997-07-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (EC.2.5.1.18, GSTs) were purified from rat liver by S-hexylglutathione affinity chromatography and six isoforms, namely C-1, C-2, C-3, C-4, A-2 and A-1, were isolated by CM-cellulose and DEAE-cellulose ion-exchange columns. Tannic acid and butein showed varying degrees of inhibition on the six individual GST isoforms. When 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB) was used as a substrate, butein exerted significantly more potent inhibition on the cationic isoforms C-2, C-3 and C-4 with IC50 values of 6.8, 8.5 and 8.0 muM respectively. All the isoforms showed lower activity towards p-nitrobenzyt chloride when compared to CDNB and inhibition of the p-nitrobenzyl chloride-activity by tannic acid and butein was also weaker. The inhibitory effects of tannic acid and butein on each isoform decreased generally with increasing pH in the range of 6.0 to 8.0. The optimum pHs for inhibitions by tannic acid and butein on the six individual isoforms lie in the pH range of 6.0 to 6.5. PMID:19856286

  6. Profiling alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms for prostate cancer classification

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chaolin; Li, Hai-Ri; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Downs, Tracy; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Zhang, Michael Q

    2006-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer illness and death among men in the United States and world wide. There is an urgent need to discover good biomarkers for early clinical diagnosis and treatment. Previously, we developed an exon-junction microarray-based assay and profiled 1532 mRNA splice isoforms from 364 potential prostate cancer related genes in 38 prostate tissues. Here, we investigate the advantage of using splice isoforms, which couple transcriptional and splicing regulation, for cancer classification. Results As many as 464 splice isoforms from more than 200 genes are differentially regulated in tumors at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 0.05. Remarkably, about 30% of genes have isoforms that are called significant but do not exhibit differential expression at the overall mRNA level. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier trained on 128 signature isoforms can correctly predict 92% of the cases, which outperforms the classifier using overall mRNA abundance by about 5%. It is also observed that the classification performance can be improved using multivariate variable selection methods, which take correlation among variables into account. Conclusion These results demonstrate that profiling of splice isoforms is able to provide unique and important information which cannot be detected by conventional microarrays. PMID:16608523

  7. Single-cell polyadenylation site mapping reveals 3′ isoform choice variability

    PubMed Central

    Velten, Lars; Anders, Simon; Pekowska, Aleksandra; Järvelin, Aino I; Huber, Wolfgang; Pelechano, Vicent; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2015-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability in gene expression is important for many processes in biology, including embryonic development and stem cell homeostasis. While heterogeneity of gene expression levels has been extensively studied, less attention has been paid to mRNA polyadenylation isoform choice. 3′ untranslated regions regulate mRNA fate, and their choice is tightly controlled during development, but how 3′ isoform usage varies within genetically and developmentally homogeneous cell populations has not been explored. Here, we perform genome-wide quantification of polyadenylation site usage in single mouse embryonic and neural stem cells using a novel single-cell transcriptomic method, BATSeq. By applying BATBayes, a statistical framework for analyzing single-cell isoform data, we find that while the developmental state of the cell globally determines isoform usage, single cells from the same state differ in the choice of isoforms. Notably this variation exceeds random selection with equal preference in all cells, a finding that was confirmed by RNA FISH data. Variability in 3′ isoform choice has potential implications on functional cell-to-cell heterogeneity as well as utility in resolving cell populations. PMID:26040288

  8. C/EBPβ Isoforms Expression in the Rat Brain during the Estrous Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Hansberg-Pastor, Valeria; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; González-Arenas, Aliesha; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor expressed in different areas of the brain that regulates the expression of several genes involved in cell differentiation and proliferation. This protein has three isoforms (LAP1, LAP2, and LIP) with different transcription activation potential. The role of female sex hormones in the expression pattern of C/EBPβ isoforms in the rat brain has not yet been described. In this study we demonstrate by western blot that the expression of the three C/EBPβ isoforms changes in different brain areas during the estrous cycle. In the cerebellum, LAP2 content diminished on diestrus and proestrus and LIP content diminished on proestrus and estrus days. In the prefrontal cortex, LIP content was higher on proestrus and estrus days. In the hippocampus, LAP isoforms presented a switch on diestrus day, since LAP1 content was the highest while that of LAP2 was the lowest. The LAP2 isoform was the most abundant one in all the three brain areas. The LAP/LIP ratio changed throughout the cycle and was tissue specific. These results suggest that C/EBPβ isoforms expression changes in a tissue-specific manner in the rat brain due to the changes in sex steroid hormone levels presented during the estrous cycle. PMID:26064112

  9. Myosin II isoform co-assembly and differential regulation in mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Beach, Jordan R; Hammer, John A

    2015-05-15

    Non-muscle myosin 2 (NM2) is a major force-producing, actin-based motor in mammalian non-muscle cells, where it plays important roles in a broad range of fundamental biological processes, including cytokinesis, cell migration, and epithelial barrier function. This breadth of function at the tissue and cellular levels suggests extensive diversity and differential regulation of NM2 bipolar filaments, the major, if not sole, functional form of NM2s in vivo. Previous in vitro, cellular and animal studies indicate that some of this diversity is supported by the existence of multiple NM2 isoforms. Moreover, two recent studies have shown that these isoforms can co-assemble to form heterotypic filaments, further expanding functional diversity. In addition to isoform co-assembly, cells may differentially regulate NM2 function via isoform-specific expression, RLC phosphorylation, MHC phosphorylation or regulation via binding partners. Here, we provide a brief summary of NM2 filament assembly, summarize the recent findings regarding NM2 isoform co-assembly, consider the mechanisms cells might utilize to differentially regulate NM2 isoforms, and review the data available to support these mechanisms. PMID:25655283

  10. Palmitoylation of the three isoforms of human endothelin-converting enzyme-1.

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, A; Löffler, B M; Rohrer, J

    1999-01-01

    Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) is a membrane-bound metalloprotease that catalyses the conversion of inactive big endothelins into active endothelins. Here we have examined whether the three isoforms of human ECE-1 (ECE-1a, ECE-1b and ECE-1c) are modified by the covalent attachment of the fatty acid palmitate and have evaluated a potential functional role of this modification. To do this, wild-type and mutant enzymes were expressed and analysed by metabolic labelling with [3H]palmitate, immunoprecipitation and SDS/PAGE. All three ECE-1 isoforms were found to be palmitoylated via hydroxylamine-sensitive thioester bonds. In addition, the isoforms showed similar levels of acylation. Cys46 in ECE-1a, Cys58 in ECE-1b and Cys42 in ECE-1c were identified as sites of palmitoylation and each of these cysteines accounted for all the palmitoylation that occured in the corresponding isoform. Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated further that palmitoylated and non-palmitoylated ECE-1 isoforms had the same subcellular localizations. Moreover, complete solubility of the three isoforms in Triton X-100 revealed that palmitoylation does not target ECE-1 to cholesterol and sphingolipid-rich membrane domains or caveolae. The enzymic activities of ECE-1a, ECE-1b and ECE-1c were also not significantly affected by the absence of palmitoylation. PMID:10359648

  11. HPLC analysis of discrete haptoglobin isoform N-linked oligosaccharides following 2D-PAGE isolation.

    PubMed

    He, Zhicong; Aristoteli, Lina P; Kritharides, Leonard; Garner, Brett

    2006-05-01

    Glycosylation is a common but variable modification that regulates glycoprotein structure and function. We combined small format 2D-PAGE with HPLC to analyse discrete human haptoglobin isoform N-glycans. Seven major and several minor haptoglobin isoforms were detected by 2D-PAGE. N-Glycans released from Coomassie-stained gel spots using PNGase were labeled at their reducing termini with 2-aminobenzamide. HPLC analysis of selected major isoform N-glycans indicated that sialic acid composition determined their separation by isoelectric focussing. N-Glycans from two doublets of quantitatively minor isoforms were also analysed. Although separation of each pair of doublets was influenced by sialylation, individual spots within each doublet contained identical N-glycans. Thus, heterogeneity in minor haptoglobin isoforms was due to modifications distinct from N-glycan structure. These studies describe a simple method for analysing low abundance protein N-glycans and provide details of discrete haptoglobin isoform N-glycan structures which will be useful in proteomic analysis of human plasma samples. PMID:16546121

  12. Distribution of tropomyosin isoforms in different types of single fibers isolated from bovine skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Oe, M; Ojima, K; Nakajima, I; Chikuni, K; Shibata, M; Muroya, S

    2016-08-01

    To clarify the relationship between myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms and tropomyosin (TPM) isoforms in single fibers, 64 single fibers were isolated from each of bovine three muscles (masseter, semispinalis and semitendinosus). mRNA expressions of MyHC and TPM isoforms were analyzed by real-time PCR. All single fibers from the masseter expressed MyHC-slow. The fibers from the semispinalis expressed both MyHC-slow and 2a. The fibers from the semitendinosus expressed MyHC-slow, 2a and 2x. TPM-1 and TPM-2 were co-expressed in 2a and 2x type fibers, and TPM-2 and TPM-3 were co-expressed in slow type fibers. The expression pattern of TPM isoforms in each fiber type was similar between fibers isolated from different muscles. These results suggest that TPM-1 and TPM-3 isoforms correspond to the function of 2a or 2x type fibers and slow type fibers, respectively, with TPM-2 in common. Furthermore, the patterns of MyHC and TPM isoform combinations did not vary among single fibers isolated from the individual muscles examined. PMID:27105153

  13. N-Domain Isoform of Angiotensin I Converting Enzyme as a Marker of Hypertension: Populational Study

    PubMed Central

    Maluf-Meiken, Leila C. V.; Fernandes, Fernanda B.; Aragão, Danielle S.; Ronchi, Fernanda A.; Andrade, Maria C. C.; Franco, Maria C.; Febba, Andreia C. S.; Plavnik, Frida L.; Krieger, José E.; Mill, Jose G.; Sesso, Ricardo C. C.; Casarini, Dulce E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the presence of the urinary 90 kDa N-domain ACE in a cohort of the population from Vitoria, Brazil, to verify its association with essential hypertension since this isoform could be a possible genetic marker of hypertension. Anthropometric, clinical, and laboratory parameters of the individuals were evaluated (n = 1150) and the blood pressure (BP) was measured. The study population was divided according to ACE isoforms in urine as follows: ACE 65/90/190, presence of three ACE isoforms (n = 795), ACE 90+ (65/90) (n = 186), and ACE 90− (65/190) (n = 169) based on the presence (+) or absence (−) of the 90 kDa ACE isoform. The anthropometric parameters, lipid profile, serum levels of uric acid, glucose, and the systolic and diastolic BP were significantly greater in the ACE 90+ compared with the ACE 90− and ACE 65/90/190 individuals. We found that 98% of individuals from the ACE 90+ group and 38% from the ACE 65/90/190 group had hypertension, compared to only 1% hypertensive individuals in the ACE 90− group. There is a high presence of the 90 kDa N-domain ACE isoform (85%) in the studied population. The percentile of normotensive subjects with three isoforms was 62%. Our findings could contribute to the development of new efficient strategy to prevent and treat hypertension to avoid the development of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22666552

  14. Molecular characterization of human thyroid hormone receptor β isoform 4.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Futawaka, Kumi; Atake, Asami; Kasahara, Masato; Tagami, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormone exerts a pleiotropic effect on development, differentiation, and metabolism through thyroid hormone receptor (TR). A novel thyroid hormone receptor β isoform (TRβ4) was cloned using PCR from a human pituitary cDNA library as a template. We report here the characterization of TRβ4 from a molecular basis. Temporal expression of TRβ4 during the fetal period is abundant in the brain and kidney, comparable with the adult pattern. Western blot analysis revealed that TRs are ubiquitination labile proteins, while TRβ1 is potentially stable. TRβ1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), and vitamin D receptor (VDR), which belong to class II transcription factors that function via the formation of heterodimeric complexes with retinoid X receptor (RXR), were suppressed by TRβ4 in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, TRβ4 exhibits ligand-independent transcriptional silencing, possibly as a substitute for dimerized RXR. In this study, TRβ1 and TRβ4 transcripts were detected in several cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TRβ4 in human embryonic carcinoma cells of the testis was suppressed by sex hormone in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. In contrast, TRβ4 was expressed under a high dose of triiodothyronine (T3) in a reciprocal manner to TRβ1. Finally, in transiently transfected NIH-3T3 cells, green fluorescence protein (GFP)-tagged TRβ4 was mostly nuclear in both the absence and the presence of T3. By mutating defined regions of both TRβs, we found that both TRβ1 and TRβ4 had altered nuclear/cytoplasmic distribution as compared with wild-type, and different to T3 and the nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR). Thus, site-specific DNA binding is not essential for maintaining TRβs within the nucleus. PMID:26513165

  15. Orthologous myosin isoforms and scaling of shortening velocity with body size in mouse, rat, rabbit and human muscles

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, M A; Canepari, M; Rossi, R; D'Antona, G; Reggiani, C; Bottinelli, R

    2003-01-01

    Maximum shortening velocity (V0) was determined in single fibres dissected from hind limb skeletal muscles of rabbit and mouse and classified according to their myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform composition. The values for rabbit and mouse V0 were compared with the values previously obtained in man and rat under identical experimental conditions. Significant differences in V0 were found between fibres containing corresponding myosin isoforms in different species: as a general rule for each isoform V0 decreased with body mass. Myosin isoform distributions of soleus and tibialis anterior were analysed in mouse, rat, rabbit and man: the proportion of slow myosin generally increased with increasing body size. The diversity between V0 of corresponding myosin isoforms and the different myosin isoform composition of corresponding muscles determine the scaling of shortening velocity of whole muscles with body size, which is essential for optimisation of locomotion. The speed of actin translocation (Vf) in in vitro motility assay was determined with myosins extracted from single muscle fibres of all four species: significant differences were found between myosin isoforms in each species and between corresponding myosin isoforms in different species. The values of V0 and Vf determined for each myosin isoform were significantly correlated, strongly supporting the view that the myosin isoform expressed is the major determinant of maximum shortening velocity in muscle fibres. PMID:12562996

  16. P120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A differently affect invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yang; Dong Qianze; Zhao Yue; Dong Xinjun; Miao Yuan; Dai Shundong; Yang Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Wang Yan; Li Qingchang; Zhao Chen; Wang Enhua

    2009-03-10

    Different isoforms of p120-catenin (p120ctn), a member of the Armadillo gene family, are variably expressed in different tissues as a result of alternative splicing and the use of multiple translation initiation codons. When expressed in cancer cells, these isoforms may confer different properties with respect to cell adhesion and invasion. We have previously reported that the p120ctn isoforms 1 and 3 were the most highly expressed isoforms in normal lung tissues, and their expression level was reduced in lung tumor cells. To precisely define their biological roles, we transfected p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A into the lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Enhanced expression of p120ctn isoform 1A not only upregulated E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin, but also downregulated the Rac1 activity, and as a result, inhibited the ability of cells to invade. In contrast, overexpression of p120ctn isoform 3A led to the inactivation of Cdc42 and the activation of RhoA, and had a smaller influence on invasion. However, we found that isoform 3A had a greater ability than isoform 1A in both inhibiting the cell cycle and reducing tumor cell proliferation. The present study revealed that p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A differently regulated the adhesive, proliferative, and invasive properties of lung cancer cells through distinct mechanisms.

  17. Altered α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin isoform levels in multiple system atrophy brains.

    PubMed

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Rasmussen, Nadja Bredo; Bahl, Justyna Maria Czarna; Tanassi, Julia; Agander, Tina Klitmøller; Hyde, Thomas M; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2016-01-01

    Together with Parkinson's disease (PD) and dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a member of a diverse group of neurodegenerative disorders termed α-synucleinopathies. Previously, it has been shown that α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 display disease-specific transcription patterns in frontal cortex in PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, and MSA, and thus may mediate the development of α-synucleinopathies. In this study, the differential expression of α-synuclein isoforms on transcriptional and translational levels was ascertained in MSA patients in comparison with PD cases and normal controls using isoform-specific primers and exon-specific antibodies in substantia nigra, striatum, cerebellar cortex, and nucleus dentatus. These regions are severely affected by α-synuclein pathology and neurodegeneration. Furthermore, we have also investigated transcript levels for parkin and synphilin-1 isoforms. In MSA brains, α-synuclein140 and α-synuclein 112 isoform levels were significantly increased, whereas levels of the α-synuclein 126 isoform were decreased in the substantia nigra, striatum, cerebellar cortex, and nucleus dentatus versus controls. Moreover, in MSA cases, we showed increased levels of parkin isoforms lacking the N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain and an aggregation-prone synphilin-1A isoform that causes neuronal toxicity in MSA. In PD brains, parkin transcript variant 3, 7, and 11 were significantly and specifically over-expressed in the striatum and cerebellar cortex, together with synphilin-1A and 1C. The changes of isoform expression profiles in neurodegenerative diseases suggest alterations in the regulation of transcription and/or splicing events, leading to regional/cellular events that may be important for the highly increased aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain. We report differential expression of α-synuclein, parkin, and synphilin-1 isoforms in multiple system atrophy (MSA) versus Parkinson's disease and normal

  18. Computational approaches for isoform detection and estimation: good and bad news

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The main goal of the whole transcriptome analysis is to correctly identify all expressed transcripts within a specific cell/tissue - at a particular stage and condition - to determine their structures and to measure their abundances. RNA-seq data promise to allow identification and quantification of transcriptome at unprecedented level of resolution, accuracy and low cost. Several computational methods have been proposed to achieve such purposes. However, it is still not clear which promises are already met and which challenges are still open and require further methodological developments. Results We carried out a simulation study to assess the performance of 5 widely used tools, such as: CEM, Cufflinks, iReckon, RSEM, and SLIDE. All of them have been used with default parameters. In particular, we considered the effect of the following three different scenarios: the availability of complete annotation, incomplete annotation, and no annotation at all. Moreover, comparisons were carried out using the methods in three different modes of action. In the first mode, the methods were forced to only deal with those isoforms that are present in the annotation; in the second mode, they were allowed to detect novel isoforms using the annotation as guide; in the third mode, they were operating in fully data driven way (although with the support of the alignment on the reference genome). In the latter modality, precision and recall are quite poor. On the contrary, results are better with the support of the annotation, even though it is not complete. Finally, abundance estimation error often shows a very skewed distribution. The performance strongly depends on the true real abundance of the isoforms. Lowly (and sometimes also moderately) expressed isoforms are poorly detected and estimated. In particular, lowly expressed isoforms are identified mainly if they are provided in the original annotation as potential isoforms. Conclusions Both detection and quantification

  19. Evolution of hydra, a Recently Evolved Testis-Expressed Gene with Nine Alternative First Exons in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Barbash, Daniel A; Yang, Hsiao-Pei

    2007-01-01

    We describe here the Drosophila gene hydra that appears to have originated de novo in the melanogaster subgroup and subsequently evolved in both structure and expression level in Drosophila melanogaster and its sibling species. D. melanogaster hydra encodes a predicted protein of ~300 amino acids with no apparent similarity to any previously known proteins. The syntenic region flanking hydra on both sides is found in both D. ananassae and D. pseudoobscura, but hydra is found only in melanogaster subgroup species, suggesting that it originated less than ~13 million y ago. Exon 1 of hydra has undergone recurrent duplications, leading to the formation of nine tandem alternative exon 1s in D. melanogaster. Seven of these alternative exons are flanked on their 3′ side by the transposon DINE-1 (Drosophila interspersed element-1). We demonstrate that at least four of the nine duplicated exon 1s can function as alternative transcription start sites. The entire hydra locus has also duplicated in D. simulans and D. sechellia. D. melanogaster hydra is expressed most intensely in the proximal testis, suggesting a role in late-stage spermatogenesis. The coding region of hydra has a relatively high Ka/Ks ratio between species, but the ratio is less than 1 in all comparisons, suggesting that hydra is subject to functional constraint. Analysis of sequence polymorphism and divergence of hydra shows that it has evolved under positive selection in the lineage leading to D. melanogaster. The dramatic structural changes surrounding the first exons do not affect the tissue specificity of gene expression: hydra is expressed predominantly in the testes in D. melanogaster, D. simulans, and D. yakuba. However, we have found that expression level changed dramatically (~ >20-fold) between D. melanogaster and D. simulans. While hydra initially evolved in the absence of nearby transposable element insertions, we suggest that the subsequent accumulation of repetitive sequences in the hydra