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Sample records for melanoma tumor cell

  1. Tumor Cell Plasticity in Uveal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Folberg, Robert; Arbieva, Zarema; Moses, Jonas; Hayee, Amin; Sandal, Tone; Kadkol, ShriHari; Lin, Amy Y.; Valyi-Nagy, Klara; Setty, Suman; Leach, Lu; Chévez-Barrios, Patricia; Larsen, Peter; Majumdar, Dibyen; Pe’er, Jacob; Maniotis, Andrew J.

    2006-01-01

    The histological detection of laminin-rich vasculogenic mimicry patterns in human primary uveal melanomas is associated with death from metastases. We therefore hypothesized that highly invasive uveal melanoma cells forming vasculogenic mimicry patterns after exposure to a laminin-rich three-dimensional microenvironment would differentially express genes associated with invasive and metastatic behavior. However, we discovered that genes associated with differentiation (GDF15 and ATF3) and suppression of proliferation (CDKNa1/p21) were up-regulated in highly invasive uveal melanoma cells forming vasculogenic mimicry patterns, and genes associated with promotion of invasive and metastatic behavior such as CD44, CCNE2 (cyclin E2), THBS1 (thrombospondin 1), and CSPG2 (chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan; versican) were down-regulated. After forming vasculogenic mimicry patterns, uveal melanoma cells invaded only short distances, failed to replicate, and changed morphologically from the invasive epithelioid to the indolent spindle A phenotype. In human tissue samples, uveal melanoma cells within vasculogenic mimicry patterns assumed the spindle A morphology, and the expression of Ki67 was significantly reduced in adjacent melanoma cells. Thus, the generation of vasculogenic mimicry patterns is accompanied by dampening of the invasive and metastatic uveal melanoma genotype and phenotype and underscores the plasticity of these cells in response to cues from the microenvironment. PMID:17003493

  2. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  3. Melanoma Cell-Intrinsic PD-1 Receptor Functions Promote Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Kleffel, Sonja; Posch, Christian; Barthel, Steven R; Mueller, Hansgeorg; Schlapbach, Christoph; Guenova, Emmanuella; Elco, Christopher P; Lee, Nayoung; Juneja, Vikram R; Zhan, Qian; Lian, Christine G; Thomi, Rahel; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Cozzio, Antonio; Dummer, Reinhard; Mihm, Martin C; Flaherty, Keith T; Frank, Markus H; Murphy, George F; Sharpe, Arlene H; Kupper, Thomas S; Schatton, Tobias

    2015-09-10

    Therapeutic antibodies targeting programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) activate tumor-specific immunity and have shown remarkable efficacy in the treatment of melanoma. Yet, little is known about tumor cell-intrinsic PD-1 pathway effects. Here, we show that murine and human melanomas contain PD-1-expressing cancer subpopulations and demonstrate that melanoma cell-intrinsic PD-1 promotes tumorigenesis, even in mice lacking adaptive immunity. PD-1 inhibition on melanoma cells by RNAi, blocking antibodies, or mutagenesis of melanoma-PD-1 signaling motifs suppresses tumor growth in immunocompetent, immunocompromised, and PD-1-deficient tumor graft recipient mice. Conversely, melanoma-specific PD-1 overexpression enhances tumorigenicity, as does engagement of melanoma-PD-1 by its ligand, PD-L1, whereas melanoma-PD-L1 inhibition or knockout of host-PD-L1 attenuate growth of PD-1-positive melanomas. Mechanistically, the melanoma-PD-1 receptor modulates downstream effectors of mTOR signaling. Our results identify melanoma cell-intrinsic functions of the PD-1:PD-L1 axis in tumor growth and suggest that blocking melanoma-PD-1 might contribute to the striking clinical efficacy of anti-PD-1 therapy. PMID:26359984

  4. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  5. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer without effective treatment. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a naturally occurring nucleoside with differential effects on normal and transformed cells. MTA has been widely demonstrated to promote anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic responses in different cell types. In this study we have assessed the therapeutic potential of MTA in melanoma treatment. Methods To investigate the therapeutic potential of MTA we performed in vitro proliferation and viability assays using six different mouse and human melanoma cell lines wild type for RAS and BRAF or harboring different mutations in RAS pathway. We also have tested its therapeutic capabilities in vivo in a xenograft mouse melanoma model and using variety of molecular techniques and tissue culture we investigated its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic properties. Results In vitro experiments showed that MTA treatment inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and viability in a dose dependent manner, where BRAF mutant melanoma cell lines appear to be more sensitive. Importantly, MTA was effective inhibiting in vivo tumor growth. The molecular analysis of tumor samples and in vitro experiments indicated that MTA induces cytostatic rather than pro-apoptotic effects inhibiting the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein and inducing the down-regulation of cyclin D1. Conclusions MTA inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and in vivo tumor growth particularly in BRAF mutant melanoma cells. These data reveal a naturally occurring drug potentially useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:20529342

  6. β-Catenin Signaling Increases during Melanoma Progression and Promotes Tumor Cell Survival and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Sinnberg, Tobias; Menzel, Moritz; Ewerth, Daniel; Sauer, Birgit; Schwarz, Michael; Schaller, Martin; Garbe, Claus; Schittek, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    Beta-catenin plays an important role in embryogenesis and carcinogenesis by controlling either cadherin-mediated cell adhesion or transcriptional activation of target gene expression. In many types of cancers nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been observed. Our data indicate that during melanoma progression an increased dependency on the transcriptional function of beta-catenin takes place. Blockade of beta-catenin in metastatic melanoma cell lines efficiently induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion in monolayer and 3-dimensional skin reconstructs and decreases chemoresistance. In addition, subcutaneous melanoma growth in SCID mice was almost completely inhibited by an inducible beta-catenin knockdown. In contrast, the survival of benign melanocytes and primary melanoma cell lines was less affected by beta-catenin depletion. However, enhanced expression of beta-catenin in primary melanoma cell lines increased invasive capacity in vitro and tumor growth in the SCID mouse model. These data suggest that beta-catenin is an essential survival factor for metastatic melanoma cells, whereas it is dispensable for the survival of benign melanocytes and primary, non-invasive melanoma cells. Furthermore, beta-catenin increases tumorigenicity of primary melanoma cell lines. The differential requirements for beta-catenin signaling in aggressive melanoma versus benign melanocytic cells make beta-catenin a possible new target in melanoma therapy. PMID:21858114

  7. Measurements of tumor cell autophagy predict invasiveness, resistance to chemotherapy, and survival in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaohong; Piao, Shengfu; Wang, Dan; Mcafee, Quentin; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Lum, Julian J.; Li, Lin Z.; Amaravadi, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Autophagy consists of lysosome-dependent degradation of cytoplasmic contents sequestered by autophagic vesicles (AV). The role of autophagy in determining tumor aggressiveness and response to therapy in melanoma was investigated in this study. Experimental Design Autophagy was measured in tumor biopsies obtained from metastatic melanoma patients enrolled on a phase II trial of temozolomide and sorafenib and correlated to clinical outcome. These results were compared to autophagy measurements in aggressive and indolent melanoma cells grown in two and three dimensional culture and as xenograft tumors. The effects of autophagy inhibition with either hydroxychloroquine or inducible shRNA against the autophagy gene ATG5 were assessed in three dimensional spheroids. Results Patients whose tumors had a high autophagic index were less likely to respond to treatment and had a shorter survival compared to those with a low autophagic index. Differences in autophagy were less evident in aggressive and indolent melanoma cells grown in monolayer culture. In contrast, autophagy was increased in aggressive compared to indolent melanoma xenograft tumors. This difference was recapitulated when aggressive and indolent melanoma cells were grown as spheroids. Autophagy inhibition with either hydroxychloroquine or inducible shRNA against ATG5 resulted in cell death in aggressive melanoma spheroids, and significantly augmented temozolomide-induced cell death. Conclusions Autophagy is a potential prognostic factor and therapeutic target in melanoma. Three dimensional culture mimics the tumor microenvironment better than monolayer culture and is an appropriate model for studying therapeutic combinations involving autophagy modulators autophagy inhibition should be tested clinically in patients with melanoma. PMID:21325076

  8. Is Melanoma a stem cell tumor? Identification of neurogenic proteins in trans-differentiated cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Suraiya; Mao, Zisu; Chan, Jane MC; Chan, Linda S

    2005-01-01

    Background Although several genes and proteins have been implicated in the development of melanomas, the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of these tumors are not well understood. To gain a better understanding of the relationship between the cell growth, tumorigenesis and differentiation, we have studied a highly malignant cat melanoma cell line that trans-differentiates into neuronal cells after exposure to a feline endogenous retrovirus RD114. Methods To define the repertoire of proteins responsible for the phenotypic differences between melanoma and its counterpart trans-differentiated neuronal cells we have applied proteomics technology and compared protein profiles of the two cell types and identified differentially expressed proteins by 2D-gel electrophoresis, image analyses and mass spectrometry. Results The melanoma and trans-differentiated neuronal cells could be distinguished by the presence of distinct sets of proteins in each. Although approximately 60–70% of the expressed proteins were shared between the two cell types, twelve proteins were induced de novo after infection of melanoma cells with RD114 virus in vitro. Expression of these proteins in trans-differentiated cells was significantly associated with concomitant down regulation of growth promoting proteins and up-regulation of neurogenic proteins (p = < 0.001). Based on their physiologic properties, >95% proteins expressed in trans-differentiated cells could be associated with the development, differentiation and regulation of nervous system cells. Conclusion Our results indicate that the cat melanoma cells have the ability to differentiate into distinct neuronal cell types and they express proteins that are essential for self-renewal. Since melanocytes arise from the neural crest of the embryo, we conclude that this melanoma arose from embryonic precursor stem cells. This model system provides a unique opportunity to identify domains of interactions between the expressed

  9. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Cassandra C.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C.; Abrams, Zachary B.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and negative control, respectively. FR-positive and negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G (C-IgG) in the presence or absence of cytokines in order to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells enhanced following treatment with F-IgG, as compared to C-IgG at all effector:target (E:T) ratios (p<0.01). This trend was further enhanced by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12). NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were also significantly increased in response to co-stimulation with IL-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells, as compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells which can be further enhanced by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  10. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Cassandra C; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C; Abrams, Zachary B; Lee, Robert J; Carson, William E

    2016-08-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is overexpressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is overexpressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and a negative control, respectively. FR-positive and FR-negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G in the presence or absence of cytokines to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells increased following treatment with F-IgG compared with control immunoglobulin G at all effector : target (E : T) ratios (P<0.01). This trend further increased by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12. NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) was also significantly increased in response to costimulation with interleukin-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells compared with controls (P<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells, which can be further increased by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  11. A Novel Approach for the Detection and Genetic Analysis of Live Melanoma Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Melody J.; Cooke, Mariana; Steinmetz, David; Karakousis, Giorgos; Saxena, Deeksha; Bartlett, Edmund; Xu, Xiaowei; Hahn, Stephen M.; Dorsey, Jay F.; Kao, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection and genetic analysis may complement currently available disease assessments in patients with melanoma to improve risk stratification and monitoring. We therefore sought to establish the feasibility of a telomerase-based assay for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. Methods The telomerase-based CTC assay utilizes an adenoviral vector that, in the presence of elevated human telomerase activity, drives the amplification of green fluorescent protein. Tumor cells are then identified via an image processing system. The protocol was tested on melanoma cells in culture or spiked into control blood, and on samples from patients with metastatic melanoma. Genetic analysis of the isolated melanoma CTCs was then performed for BRAF mutation status. Results The adenoviral vector was effective for all melanoma cell lines tested with sensitivity of 88.7% (95%CI 85.6-90.4%) and specificity of 99.9% (95%CI 99.8-99.9%). In a pilot trial of patients with metastatic disease, CTCs were identified in 9 of 10 patients, with a mean of 6.0 CTCs/mL. At a cutoff of 1.1 CTCs/mL, the telomerase-based assay exhibits test performance of 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. BRAF mutation analysis of melanoma cells isolated from culture or spiked control blood, or from pilot patient samples was found to match the known BRAF mutation status of the cell lines and primary tumors. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report of a telomerase-based assay effective for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. These promising findings support further studies, including towards integrating into the management of patients with melanoma receiving multimodality therapy. PMID:25807549

  12. Modulation of tumor growth by inhibitory Fcγ receptor expressed by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cassard, Lydie; Cohen-Solal, Joël F.G.; Galinha, Annie; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Mathiot, Claire; Galon, Jérôme; Dorval, Thierry; Bernheim, Alain; Fridman, Wolf H.; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-tumor IgG reflects the balance between opposing signals mediated by activating and inhibitory Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) expressed by effector cells. Here, we show that human malignant melanoma cells express the inhibitory low-affinity Fcγ receptor FcγRIIB1 in 40% of tested metastases. When melanoma cells were grafted in nude mice, a profound inhibition of FcγRIIB1 tumor growth that required the intracytoplasmic region of the receptor was observed. IgG immune complexes (ICs) may be required for this inhibition, since sera from nude mice bearing tumors contained IgG that decreased the proliferation of FcγRIIB1-positive cells in vitro, and tumor development of FcγRIIB1-positive melanoma lines was not inhibited in antibody-defective severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. Passive immunization of SCID mice with anti–ganglioside GD2 antibody resulted in significant inhibition of growth of FcγRIIB1-positive tumors in an intracytoplasmic-dependent manner. Altogether, these data suggest that human melanoma cells express biologically active inhibitory FcγRIIB1, which regulates their development upon direct interaction with anti-tumor antibodies. Therefore, FcγR expression on human tumors may be one component of the efficacy of antibody-mediated therapies, and FcγR-positive tumors could be the most sensitive candidates for such treatments. PMID:12438452

  13. Tumor-associated B cells in cutaneous primary melanoma and improved clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kanika; Maurer, Margarita; Griss, Johannes; Brüggen, Marie-Charlotte; Wolf, Ingrid H; Wagner, Christine; Willi, Niels; Mertz, Kirsten D; Wagner, Stephan N

    2016-08-01

    B cells often infiltrate the microenvironment of human tumors. B cells can both positively and negatively regulate antitumor immune responses. In several human cancers, higher numbers of CD20(+) TAB are associated with a favorable prognosis, whereas in human primary melanomas, this association is contentious. In this study, we determined the association of TAB numbers in cutaneous primary melanoma tissue samples and patients' overall survival. The CD20 immunohistochemistry on archival nonmetastasized and metastasized cutaneous primary melanoma tissues from 2 independent patient cohorts was performed. One cohort was used in class comparison for metastasis, the most important prognostic factor for overall survival, and the other cohort for a subsequent survival analysis. Survival association was further validated with RNA data from a third independent cohort. Whole tissue sections were read automatically via quantitative digital imaging and analysis. Survival data were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard modeling. We discovered that cutaneous primary melanomas without metastasis contain significantly more TAB than primary melanomas that had metastasized. At time of first diagnosis, a higher number of TAB is associated with a significantly better overall survival in patients with cutaneous primary melanomas of >1 mm Breslow depth. Also, higher CD20/CD19 tumor mRNA levels are correlated with a significantly better overall survival. Thus, our data support TAB numbers as a prognostic biomarker in cutaneous primary melanoma patients with a tumor of >1 mm Breslow depth. For a survey in larger studies, whole tissue section analysis seems to be key to accurate assessment of TAB numbers. PMID:27107457

  14. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  15. New Functional Signatures for Understanding Melanoma Biology from Tumor Cell Lineage-Specific Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rambow, Florian; Job, Bastien; Petit, Valérie; Gesbert, Franck; Delmas, Véronique; Seberg, Hannah; Meurice, Guillaume; Van Otterloo, Eric; Dessen, Philippe; Robert, Caroline; Gautheret, Daniel; Cornell, Robert A; Sarasin, Alain; Larue, Lionel

    2015-10-27

    Molecular signatures specific to particular tumor types are required to design treatments for resistant tumors. However, it remains unclear whether tumors and corresponding cell lines used for drug development share such signatures. We developed similarity core analysis (SCA), a universal and unsupervised computational framework for extracting core molecular features common to tumors and cell lines. We applied SCA to mRNA/miRNA expression data from various sources, comparing melanoma cell lines and metastases. The signature obtained was associated with phenotypic characteristics in vitro, and the core genes CAPN3 and TRIM63 were implicated in melanoma cell migration/invasion. About 90% of the melanoma signature genes belong to an intrinsic network of transcription factors governing neural development (TFAP2A, DLX2, ALX1, MITF, PAX3, SOX10, LEF1, and GAS7) and miRNAs (211-5p, 221-3p, and 10a-5p). The SCA signature effectively discriminated between two subpopulations of melanoma patients differing in overall survival, and classified MEKi/BRAFi-resistant and -sensitive melanoma cell lines. PMID:26489459

  16. A temporarily distinct subpopulation of slow-cycling melanoma cells is required for continuous tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Roesch, Alexander; Fukunaga-Kalabis, Mizuho; Schmidt, Elizabeth C.; Zabierowski, Susan E.; Brafford, Patricia A.; Vultur, Adina; Basu, Devraj; Gimotty, Phyllis; Vogt, Thomas; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2010-01-01

    Summary Melanomas are highly heterogeneous tumors, but the biological significance of their different subpopulations is not clear. Using the H3K4 demethylase JARID1B (KDM5B/PLU-1/RBP2-H1) as a biomarker, we have characterized a small subpopulation of slow-cycling melanoma cells that cycle with doubling times of >4 weeks within the rapidly proliferating main population. Isolated JARID1B-positive melanoma cells give rise to a highly proliferative progeny. Knock-down of JARID1B leads to an initial acceleration of tumor growth followed by exhaustion which suggests that the JARID1B-positive subpopulation is essential for continuous tumor growth. Expression of JARID1B is dynamically regulated and does not follow a hierarchical cancer stem cell model because JARID1B-negative cells can become positive and even single melanoma cells irrespective of selection are tumorigenic. These results suggest a new understanding of melanoma heterogeneity with tumor maintenance as a dynamic process mediated by a temporarily distinct subpopulation. PMID:20478252

  17. BRAFV600E immunopositive Melanomas Show Low Frequency of Heterogeneity and Association With Epithelioid Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Verlinden, Ivana; van den Hurk, Karin; Clarijs, Ruud; Willig, Arjan P.; Stallinga, Cecile M.H.A.; Roemen, Guido M.J.M.; van den Oord, Joost J.; zur Hausen, Axel; Speel, Ernst-Jan M.; Winnepenninckx, Véronique J.L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of BRAFV600E-mutant melanoma by small molecule inhibitors that target BRAF or MEK kinases is increasingly used in clinical practice and significantly improve patient outcome. However, patients eventually become resistant and therapeutic improvement is required. Molecular diversity within individual tumors (intratumor heterogeneity) and between tumors within a single patient (intrapatient heterogeneity) poses a significant challenge to precision medicine. Using immunohistochemistry, we determined the extent of BRAFV600E intratumor and intrapatient heterogeneity and the influence of morphological heterogeneity in a large series of 171 melanomas of 81 patients. The BRAFV600E mutation rate found in our melanoma series is 44%, with none of 22 (0%) melanoma in situ, 23 of 56 (41%) primary tumors, 28 of 59 (48%) regional metastases, and 24 of 34 (71%) distant metastases harboring the mutation. In general, a diffuse homogeneous immunostaining was seen, even in tumors consisting of more than one cell type, that is, epithelioid, spindle, and/or small cell types. Nevertheless, BRAFV600E-mutant melanomas more often had a purely epithelioid cell population (P = 0.063), that is more evident among distant metastases (P = 0.014). Only two of 75 (3%) mutated specimens (one primary and one metastasis) displayed heterogeneous BRAFV600E expression. The primary tumor was also morphologically heterogeneous and exclusively displayed BRAFV600E in the epithelioid component, confirming an association between BRAFV600E and epithelioid cells. Twenty-eight of 30 patients (93%) had concordant BRAF mutation status between their tumors. Taken together, BRAFV600E intratumor and intrapatient heterogeneity in melanoma is diminutive, nevertheless, the identified exceptions will have important implications for the clinical management of this disease. PMID:25526463

  18. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  19. Reprogramming of Melanoma Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hidehito; Okita, Keisuke; Fusaki, Noemi; Sabel, Michael S; Chang, Alfred E; Ito, Fumito

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients hold great promise for autologous cell therapies. One of the possible applications of iPSCs is to use them as a cell source for producing autologous lymphocytes for cell-based therapy against cancer. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that express programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) are tumor-reactive T cells, and adoptive cell therapy with autologous TILs has been found to achieve durable complete response in selected patients with metastatic melanoma. Here, we describe the derivation of human iPSCs from melanoma TILs expressing high level of PD-1 by Sendai virus-mediated transduction of the four transcription factors, OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. TIL-derived iPSCs display embryonic stem cell-like morphology, have normal karyotype, express stem cell-specific surface antigens and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, and have the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in vivo. A wide variety of T cell receptor gene rearrangement patterns in TIL-derived iPSCs confirmed the heterogeneity of T cells infiltrating melanomas. The ability to reprogram TILs containing patient-specific tumor-reactive repertoire might allow the generation of patient- and tumor-specific polyclonal T cells for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057178

  20. Reprogramming of Melanoma Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Hidehito; Okita, Keisuke; Fusaki, Noemi; Sabel, Michael S.; Chang, Alfred E.; Ito, Fumito

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from somatic cells of patients hold great promise for autologous cell therapies. One of the possible applications of iPSCs is to use them as a cell source for producing autologous lymphocytes for cell-based therapy against cancer. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) that express programmed cell death protein-1 (PD-1) are tumor-reactive T cells, and adoptive cell therapy with autologous TILs has been found to achieve durable complete response in selected patients with metastatic melanoma. Here, we describe the derivation of human iPSCs from melanoma TILs expressing high level of PD-1 by Sendai virus-mediated transduction of the four transcription factors, OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. TIL-derived iPSCs display embryonic stem cell-like morphology, have normal karyotype, express stem cell-specific surface antigens and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, and have the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in vivo. A wide variety of T cell receptor gene rearrangement patterns in TIL-derived iPSCs confirmed the heterogeneity of T cells infiltrating melanomas. The ability to reprogram TILs containing patient-specific tumor-reactive repertoire might allow the generation of patient- and tumor-specific polyclonal T cells for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27057178

  1. Tumor Cell Adhesion As a Risk Factor for Sentinel Lymph Node Metastasis in Primary Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Meves, Alexander; Nikolova, Ekaterina; Heim, Joel B.; Squirewell, Edwin J.; Cappel, Mark A.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Otley, Clark C.; Behrendt, Nille; Saunte, Ditte M.; Lock-Andersen, Jorgen; Schenck, Louis A.; Weaver, Amy L.; Suman, Vera J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Less than 20% of patients with melanoma who undergo sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy based on American Society of Clinical Oncology/Society of Surgical Oncology recommendations are SLN positive. We present a multi-institutional study to discover new molecular risk factors associated with SLN positivity in thin and intermediate-thickness melanoma. Patients and Methods Gene clusters with functional roles in melanoma metastasis were discovered by next-generation sequencing and validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction using a discovery set of 73 benign nevi, 76 primary cutaneous melanoma, and 11 in-transit melanoma metastases. We then used polymerase chain reaction to quantify gene expression in a model development cohort of 360 consecutive thin and intermediate-thickness melanomas and a validation cohort of 146 melanomas. Outcome of interest was SLN biopsy metastasis within 90 days of melanoma diagnosis. Logic and logistic regression analyses were used to develop a model for the likelihood of SLN metastasis from molecular, clinical, and histologic variables. Results ITGB3, LAMB1, PLAT, and TP53 expression were associated with SLN metastasis. The predictive ability of a model that included these molecular variables in combination with clinicopathologic variables (patient age, Breslow depth, and tumor ulceration) was significantly greater than a model that only considered clinicopathologic variables and also performed well in the validation cohort (area under the curve, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.97; false-positive and false-negative rates of 22% and 0%, respectively, using a 10% cutoff for predicted SLN metastasis risk). Conclusion The addition of cell adhesion–linked gene expression variables to clinicopathologic variables improves the identification of patients with SLN metastases within 90 days of melanoma diagnosis. PMID:26150443

  2. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lobos-González, L; Aguilar, L; Diaz, J; Diaz, N; Urra, H; Torres, V; Silva, V; Fitzpatrick, C; Lladser, A; Hoek, K.S.; Leyton, L; Quest, AFG

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis, and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10(cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10(E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10(cav1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity and cell migration observed with B16F10(cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  3. E-cadherin determines Caveolin-1 tumor suppression or metastasis enhancing function in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lobos-González, Lorena; Aguilar, Lorena; Diaz, Jorge; Diaz, Natalia; Urra, Hery; Torres, Vicente A; Silva, Veronica; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Lladser, Alvaro; Hoek, Keith S; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2013-07-01

    The role of caveolin-1 (CAV1) in cancer is highly controversial. CAV1 suppresses genes that favor tumor development, yet also promotes focal adhesion turnover and migration of metastatic cells. How these contrasting observations relate to CAV1 function in vivo is unclear. Our previous studies implicate E-cadherin in CAV1-dependent tumor suppression. Here, we use murine melanoma B16F10 cells, with low levels of endogenous CAV1 and E-cadherin, to unravel how CAV1 affects tumor growth and metastasis and to assess how co-expression of E-cadherin modulates CAV1 function in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. We find that overexpression of CAV1 in B16F10 (cav-1) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation, but enhances metastasis relative to control cells. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression in B16F10 (E-cad) cells reduces subcutaneous tumor formation and lung metastasis when intravenously injected. Importantly, co-expression of CAV1 and E-cadherin in B16F10 (cav-1/E-cad) cells abolishes tumor formation, lung metastasis, increased Rac-1 activity, and cell migration observed with B16F10 (cav-1) cells. Finally, consistent with the notion that CAV1 participates in switching human melanomas to a more malignant phenotype, elevated levels of CAV1 expression correlated with enhanced migration and Rac-1 activation in these cells. PMID:23470013

  4. A colonization of basal cell carcinoma by malignant melanoma in situ resembling a malignant basomelanocytic tumor.

    PubMed

    Goeser, Megan; DiMaio, Dominick J

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of colonization of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) by malignant melanoma in situ (MIS) simulating a malignant basomelanocytic tumor. A biopsy of a pigmented lesion present on an 83-year-old man's scalp displayed intimate admixing of basaloid and melanocytic cells. This seemingly inseparable combination of BCC and neoplastic melanocytes has been referred to as a malignant basomelanocytic tumor. However, our case also displays an adjacent component of MIS, thus favoring colonization of BCC by MIS as the etiology. To our knowledge, this is the third case report of colonization of BCC by MIS resembling a malignant basomelanocytic tumor. PMID:24752214

  5. Tumor cells disseminate early, but immunosurveillance limits metastatic outgrowth, in a mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Jo; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Wang, Xiaojie; Toh, Benjamin; Prakash, Celine; Hong, Michelle; Tan, Tze Guan; Zheng, Lin; Ong, Lai Chun; Jin, Yi; Kato, Masashi; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Chow, Pierce; Yang, Henry; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Although metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death, it is not clear why some patients with localized cancer develop metastatic disease after complete resection of their primary tumor. Such relapses have been attributed to tumor cells that disseminate early and remain dormant for prolonged periods of time; however, little is known about the control of these disseminated tumor cells. Here, we have used a spontaneous mouse model of melanoma to investigate tumor cell dissemination and immune control of metastatic outgrowth. Tumor cells were found to disseminate throughout the body early in development of the primary tumor, even before it became clinically detectable. The disseminated tumor cells remained dormant for varying periods of time depending on the tissue, resulting in staggered metastatic outgrowth. Dormancy in the lung was associated with reduced proliferation of the disseminated tumor cells relative to the primary tumor. This was mediated, at least in part, by cytostatic CD8+ T cells, since depletion of these cells resulted in faster outgrowth of visceral metastases. Our findings predict that immune responses favoring dormancy of disseminated tumor cells, which we propose to be the seed of subsequent macroscopic metastases, are essential for prolonging the survival of early stage cancer patients and suggest that therapeutic strategies designed to reinforce such immune responses may produce marked benefits in these patients. PMID:20501944

  6. Extract of Cordyceps militaris inhibits angiogenesis and suppresses tumor growth of human malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ruma, I Made Winarsa; Putranto, Endy Widya; Kondo, Eisaku; Watanabe, Risayo; Saito, Ken; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Ken-Ichi; Nakata, Susumu; Kaihata, Masaji; Murata, Hitoshi; Sakaguchi, Masakiyo

    2014-07-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor development and metastasis. Among several angiogenic factors, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGF) is important for tumor-derived angiogenesis and commonly overexpressed in solid tumors. Thus, many antitumor strategies targeting VEGF have been developed to inhibit cancer angiogenesis, offering insights into the successful treatment of solid cancers. However, there are a number of issues such as harmful effects on normal vascularity in clinical trials. Taking this into consideration, we employed Cordyceps militaris as an antitumor approach due to its biological safety in vivo. The herbal medicinal mushroom Cordyceps militaris has been reported to show potential anticancer properties including anti-angiogenic capacity; however, its concrete properties have yet to be fully demonstrated. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the biological role of Cordyceps militaris extract in tumor cells, especially in regulating angiogenesis and tumor growth of a human malignant melanoma cell line. We demonstrated that Cordyceps militaris extract remarkably suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptotic cell death in culture that links to the abrogation of VEGF production in melanoma cells. This was followed by mitigation of Akt1 and GSK-3β activation, while p38α phosphorylation levels were increased. Extract treatment in mouse model xenografted with human melanoma cells resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect with down-regulation of VEGF expression. The results suggest that suppression of tumor growth by Cordyceps militaris extract is, at least, mediated by its anti-angiogenicity and apoptosis induction capacities. Cordyceps militaris extract may be a potent antitumor herbal drug for solid tumors. PMID:24789042

  7. SCS macrophages suppress melanoma by restricting tumor-derived vesicle-B cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Pucci, Ferdinando; Garris, Christopher; Lai, Charles P; Newton, Andita; Pfirschke, Christina; Engblom, Camilla; Alvarez, David; Sprachman, Melissa; Evavold, Charles; Magnuson, Angela; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Glatz, Katharina; Breakefield, Xandra O; Mempel, Thorsten R; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2016-04-01

    Tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (tEVs) are important signals in tumor-host cell communication, yet it remains unclear how endogenously produced tEVs affect the host in different areas of the body. We combined imaging and genetic analysis to track melanoma-derived vesicles at organismal, cellular, and molecular scales to show that endogenous tEVs efficiently disseminate via lymphatics and preferentially bind subcapsular sinus (SCS) CD169(+) macrophages in tumor-draining lymph nodes (tdLNs) in mice and humans. The CD169(+) macrophage layer physically blocks tEV dissemination but is undermined during tumor progression and by therapeutic agents. A disrupted SCS macrophage barrier enables tEVs to enter the lymph node cortex, interact with B cells, and foster tumor-promoting humoral immunity. Thus, CD169(+) macrophages may act as tumor suppressors by containing tEV spread and ensuing cancer-enhancing immunity. PMID:26989197

  8. Comparison of melanoma antigens in whole tumor vaccine to those from IIB-MEL-J cells.

    PubMed

    McGee, J M; Patten, M R; Malnar, K F; Price, J A; Mayes, J S; Watson, G H

    1999-06-01

    Immunotherapy for melanoma shows promise. Our previous whole tumor (WT) vaccine was noted to have positive clinical effects. We have now developed a new, safer melanoma vaccine that is derived from IIB-MEL-J tissue culture (TC) cells. In this study, we compare by Western blot analyses the antigens in the WT vaccine to antigens in the TC vaccine. Sera from 12 WT vaccine recipients, 8 melanoma patients who received no immunotherapy, and 8 controls served as a source of antibodies to investigate potential antigens in the vaccines. Three major antigenic peptides with approximate molecular weighs of 46, 40, and 36 kDA were present in both vaccines, while two other antigenic peptides with approximate molecular weighs of 68 and 48 kDA were present only in the TC vaccine. The reaction was similar between the patients who received the WT vaccine and those who did not receive the vaccine. Some of the individuals who did not have melanoma showed some reaction, but not to the extent of the melanoma patients. The intensity of immunostaining was greater for the TC vaccine when compared to the WT vaccine, indicating that these proteins are in a higher concentration in the TC vaccine. This new vaccine from IIB-MEL-J tissue culture cells provides a higher yield and a much more consistent source of potentially clinically relevant antigens without risk of infection or contamination by other irrelevant materials. PMID:10850304

  9. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen–specific (TA-specific) CD8+ T cells and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8+ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8+ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1+TIM-3+ TA-specific CD8+ T cells. PD-1+TIGIT+, PD-1–TIGIT+, and PD-1+TIGIT– CD8+ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand–expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8+ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:25866972

  10. The Cinnamon-derived Michael Acceptor Cinnamic Aldehyde Impairs Melanoma Cell Proliferation, Invasiveness, and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cabello, Christopher M.; Bair, Warner B.; Lamore, Sarah D.; Ley, Stephanie; Bause, Alexandra S.; Azimian, Sara; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2009-01-01

    Redox dysregulation in cancer cells represents a chemical vulnerability that can be targeted by prooxidant redox intervention. Dietary constituents that contain an electrophilic Michael acceptor pharmacophore may therefore display promising chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic anti-cancer activity. Here, we demonstrate that the cinnamon-derived dietary Michael acceptor trans-cinnamic aldehyde (CA) impairs melanoma cell proliferation and tumor growth. Feasibility of therapeutic intervention using high doses of CA (120 mg/kg, p.o., q.d., 10 days) was demonstrated in a human A375 melanoma SCID-mouse xenograft model. Low micromolar concentrations (IC50 < 10 μM) of CA, but not closely related CA-derivatives devoid of Michael acceptor activity, suppressed proliferation of human metastatic melanoma cell lines (A375, G361, LOX) with G1 cell cycle arrest, elevated intracellular ROS, and impaired invasiveness. Expression array analysis revealed that CA induced an oxidative stress response in A375 cells, up-regulating heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1), sulfiredoxin 1 homolog (SRXN1), thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1), and other genes including the cell cycle regulator and stress-responsive tumor suppressor gene cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), a key mediator of G1 phase arrest. CA, but not Michael-inactive derivatives, inhibited NFκB transcriptional activity and TNFα-induced IL-8 production in A375 cells. These findings support a previously unrecognized role of CA as a dietary Michael acceptor with potential anticancer activity. PMID:19000754

  11. MT1-MMP dependent repression of the tumor suppressor SPRY4 contributes to MT1-MMP driven melanoma cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Shaverdashvili, Khvaramze; Zhang, Keman; Osman, Iman; Honda, Kord; Jobava, Rauli; Bedogni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic melanoma is the deadliest of all skin cancers. Despite progress in diagnostics and treatment of melanoma, the prognosis for metastatic patients remains poor. We previously showed that Membrane-type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is one of the drivers of melanoma metastasis. Classically, MT1-MMP regulates a verity of cellular functions including cell-to-cell interaction and cell-to-matrix communication. Recently, MT1-MMP has been found to also modulate gene expression. To specifically assess MT1-MMP dependent gene regulation in melanoma, microarray gene expression analysis was performed in a melanoma cell line whose metastatic properties depend on the activity of MT1-MMP. We identified the tumor suppressor gene SPRY4 as a new transcriptional target of MT1-MMP that is negatively regulated by the protease. Knockdown of MT1-MMP enhances SPRY4 expression at the mRNA and protein level. SPRY4 expression inversely correlates with that of MT1-MMP in melanoma samples and importantly, correlates with melanoma patient survival. SPRY4 modulates MT1-MMP dependent cell migration such that inhibition of SPRY4 rescues cell migration that has been impaired by MT1-MMP knock down. MT1-MMP decreases SPRY4 in part through an MMP2/RAC1 axis we previously show promotes cell motility downstream of MT1-MMP. These results identify the tumor suppressor SPRY4 as a novel molecular effector of MT1-MMP affecting melanoma cell motility. PMID:26392417

  12. Double Positive CD4CD8 αβ T Cells: A New Tumor-Reactive Population in Human Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Desfrançois, Juliette; Moreau-Aubry, Agnès; Vignard, Virginie; Godet, Yann; Khammari, Amir; Dréno, Brigitte; Jotereau, Francine; Gervois, Nadine

    2010-01-01

    Background Double positive (DP) CD4CD8 Tαβ cells have been reported in normal individuals as well as in different pathological conditions including inflammatory diseases, viral infections and cancer, but their function remains to be elucidated. We recently reported the increased frequency of DP Tαβ cells in human breast pleural effusions. This manuscript addresses the question of the existence and above all the role of this non-conventional DP sub-population among tumor associated lymphocytes in melanomas. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the intratumoral cell infiltrate in solid metastasis (n = 6) and tumor invaded lymph nodes (n = 26) samples from melanomas patients by multiparametric cytometry. Here we documented for the first time significant increased frequency of DP T cells in about 60% of melanoma tumors compared to blood samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of these cells produced TNF-α in response to autologous melanoma cell lines. Besides, they are characterized by a unique cytokine profile corresponding to higher secretion of IL-13, IL-4 and IL-5 than simple positive T cells. In deep analysis, we derived a representative tumor-reactive DP T cell clone from a melanoma patient's invaded lymph node. This clone was restricted by HLA-A*2402 and recognized both autologous and allogeneic tumor cells of various origins as well as normal cells, suggesting that the target antigen was a ubiquitous self antigen. However, this DP T cell clone failed to kill HLA-A*2402 EBV-transformed B cells, probably due to the constitutive expression of immunoproteasome by these cells. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, we can postulate that, according to their broad tumor reactivity and to their original cytokine profile, the tumor associated DP T cells could participate in immune responses to tumors in vivo. Therefore, the presence of these cells and their role will be crucial to address in cancer patients, especially in the context of

  13. Born to be Alive: A Role for the BCL-2 Family in Melanoma Tumor Cell Survival, Apoptosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Anvekar, Rina A.; Asciolla, James J.; Missert, Derek J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.

    2011-01-01

    The global incidence of melanoma has dramatically increased during the recent decades, yet the advancement of primary and adjuvant therapies has not kept a similar pace. The development of melanoma is often centered on cellular signaling that hyper-activates survival pathways, while inducing a concomitant blockade to cell death. Aberrations in cell death signaling not only promote tumor survival and enhanced metastatic potential, but also create resistance to anti-tumor strategies. Chemotherapeutic agents target melanoma tumor cells by inducing a form of cell death called apoptosis, which is governed by the BCL-2 family of proteins. The BCL-2 family is comprised of anti-apoptotic proteins (e.g., BCL-2, BCL-xL, and MCL-1) and pro-apoptotic proteins (e.g., BAK, BAX, and BIM), and their coordinated regulation and function are essential for optimal responses to chemotherapeutics. Here we will discuss what is currently known about the mechanisms of BCL-2 family function with a focus on the signaling pathways that maintain melanoma tumor cell survival. Importantly, we will critically evaluate the literature regarding how chemotherapeutic strategies directly impact on BCL-2 family function and offer several suggestions for future regimens to target melanoma and enhance patient survival. PMID:22268005

  14. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4(+) T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4(+) T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4(+) T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  15. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1–specific CD4+ T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4+ T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4+ T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4+ T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  16. Oncogenic B-RAF Negatively Regulates the Tumor Suppressor LKB1 to Promote Melanoma Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Bin; Jeong, Joseph H.; Asara, John M.; Yuan, Yuan-Ying; Granter, Scott R.; Chin, Lynda; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The LKB1 – AMPK signaling pathway serves as a critical cellular sensor coupling energy homeostasis to cell growth, proliferation and survival. However, how tumor cells suppress this signaling pathway to gain growth advantage under conditions of energy stress is largely unknown. Here, we show that AMPK activation is suppressed in melanoma cells with the B-RAF V600E mutation and that down-regulation of B-RAF signaling activates AMPK. We find that in these cells LKB1 is phosphorylated by ERK and Rsk, two kinases downstream of B-RAF, and that this phosphorylation compromises the ability of LKB1 to bind and activate AMPK. Furthermore, expression of a phosphorylation-deficient mutant of LKB1 allows activation of AMPK and inhibits melanoma cell proliferation and anchorage-independent cell growth. Our findings provide a molecular linkage between the LKB1-AMPK and the RAF-MEK-ERK pathways and suggest that suppression of LKB1 function by B-RAF V600E plays an important role in B-RAF V600E-driven tumorigenesis. PMID:19187764

  17. Modeling the Spatiotemporal Evolution of the Melanoma Tumor Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Signoriello, Alexandra; Bosenberg, Marcus; Shattuck, Mark; O'Hern, Corey

    The tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), cancer-associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells, drives the formation and progression of melanoma tumors. Using quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal images of melanoma tumors in three spatial dimensions, we examine the physical properties of the melanoma tumor microenvironment, including the numbers of different cells types, cell size, and morphology. We also compute the nearest neighbor statistics and measure intermediate range spatial correlations between different cell types. We also calculate the step size distribution, mean-square displacement, and non-Gaussian parameter from the spatial trajectories of different cell types in the tumor microenvironment.

  18. Evaluation of the Photodynamic Therapy effect using a tumor model in Chorioallantoic Membrane with Melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzá, Hilde H.; Pires, Layla; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a type of cancer treatment that is based on the interaction of light (with specific wavelength), a photosensitizing agent and molecular oxygen. The photosensitizer (PS) is activated by light and reacts with oxygen resulting in the production of singlet oxygen that is highly reactive and responsible for the cell death. The Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM) model is a transparent membrane that allows visualization and evaluation of blood vessels and structural changes, where a tumor model was developed. Two induction tumor models were investigated: tumor biopsy or cell culture. It was used a murine melanoma cell B16F10 in culture and a biopsy from a xenograft tumor in hairless mouse. Two PS were tested: Photodithazine® and Photogem®, a chlorine and porphyrin compounds, respectively. Using intravenous administration, the light-drug interval was of 30 minutes, 1 and 3 hours. Illumination was performed at 630 nm and 660 nm, and the vascular and tumor response was monitored and analyzed. The PS distribution was checked with confocal microscopy. This model can be useful to study several parameters of PDT and the effect of this therapy in the cancer treatment since it allows direct visualization of its effects.

  19. Monoclonal Antibody and an Antibody-Toxin Conjugate to a Cell Surface Proteoglycan of Melanoma Cells Suppress in vivo Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumol, T. F.; Wang, Q. C.; Reisfeld, R. A.; Kaplan, N. O.

    1983-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a cell surface chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of human melanoma cells, 9.2.27, and its diphtheria toxin A chain (DTA) conjugate were investigated for their effects on in vitro protein synthesis and in vivo tumor growth of human melanoma cells. The 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate display similar serological activities against melanoma target cells but only the conjugate can induce consistent in vitro inhibition of protein synthesis and toxicity in M21 melanoma cells. However, both 9.2.27 IgG and its DTA conjugate effect significant suppression of M21 tumor growth in vivo in an immunotherapy model of a rapidly growing tumor in athymic nu/nu mice, suggesting that other host mechanisms may mediate monoclonal antibody-induced tumor suppression.

  20. Cloning of the gene coding for a shared human melanoma antigen recognized by autologous T cells infiltrating into tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Y; Eliyahu, S; Delgado, C H; Robbins, P F; Rivoltini, L; Topalian, S L; Miki, T; Rosenberg, S A

    1994-01-01

    By cDNA expression cloning we have isolated a gene encoding a shared human melanoma antigen recognized by HLA-A2 restricted autologous and allogenic tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with metastatic melanoma. By using both transient and stable expression systems, transfection of this gene into non-antigen-expressing HLA-A2+ cell lines resulted in recognition by the antigen-specific TILs. The sequence of this cDNA revealed a previously undescribed putative transmembrane protein whose expression was restricted to melanoma and melanocyte cell lines and human retina but no other fresh or cultured normal tissues tested or other tumor histologies. Thus, we have identified a gene encoding a melanocyte lineage-specific protein (MART-1; melanoma antigen recognized by T cells 1) that is a widely shared melanoma antigen recognized by the T lymphocytes of patients with established malignancy. Identification of this gene opens possibilities for the development of immunotherapies for patients with melanoma. PMID:8170938

  1. Molecular Pathogenesis of Sporadic Melanoma and Melanoma-Initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yunyi; Kumar, Suresh M.; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetics and cancer stem cell biology have shed some light on the molecular basis of melanomagenesis. In this review, we will focus on major genetic alterations in the melanoma, particularly pathways involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumor suppression. The potential role of melanoma-initiating cells during melanomagenesis and progression will also be discussed. Understanding pathogenesis of melanoma may uncover new diagnostic clues and therapeutic targets for this increasingly prevalent disease. PMID:21128770

  2. Heat Shock Protein-90 Inhibitors Enhance Antigen Expression on Melanomas and Increase T Cell Recognition of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Timothy J.; Dunn, Ian S.; Rose, Lenora B.; Newton, Estelle E.; Pandolfi, Franco; Kurnick, James T.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90) share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:25503774

  3. Dehydroleucodine inhibits tumor growth in a preclinical melanoma model by inducing cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Costantino, Valeria V; Lobos-Gonzalez, Lorena; Ibañez, Jorge; Fernandez, Dario; Cuello-Carrión, F Darío; Valenzuela, Manuel A; Barbieri, Manuel A; Semino, Silvana N; Jahn, Graciela A; Quest, Andrew F G; Lopez, Luis A

    2016-03-01

    Malignant melanoma represents the fastest growing public health risk of all cancer types worldwide. Several strategies and anti-cancer drugs have been used in an effort to improve treatments, but the development of resistance to anti-neoplastic drugs remains the major cause of chemotherapy failure in melanomas. Previously, we showed that the sesquiterpene lactone, dehydroleucodine (DhL), promotes the accumulation of DNA damage markers, such as H2AX and 53BP1, in human tumor cells. Also DhL was shown to trigger either cell senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in HeLa and MCF7 cells. Here, we evaluated the effects of DhL on B16F0 mouse melanoma cells in vitro and in a pre-clinical melanoma model. DhL inhibited the proliferation of B16F0 cells by inducing senescence or apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Also, DhL reduced the expression of the cell cycle proteins cyclin D1 and B1 and the inhibitor of apoptosis protein, survivin. In melanomas generated by subcutaneous injection of B16F0 cells into C57/BL6 mice, the treatment with 20 mg DhL /Kg/day in preventive, simultaneous and therapeutic protocols reduced tumor volumes by 70%, 60% and 50%, respectively. DhL treatments reduced the number of proliferating, while increasing the number of senescent and apoptotic tumor cells. To estimate the long-term effects of DhL, a mathematical model was applied to fit experimental data. Extrapolation beyond experimental time points revealed that DhL administration following preventive and therapeutic protocols is predicted to be more effective than simultaneous treatments with DhL in restricting tumor growth. PMID:26718258

  4. Human hemokinin-1 promotes migration of melanoma cells and increases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP expression by activating tumor cell NK1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixin; Li, Xiaofang; Li, Jingyi; Hu, Hui; Miao, Xiaokang; Song, Xiaoyun; Yang, Wenle; Zeng, Qian; Mou, Lingyun; Wang, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Receptors and their regulatory peptides are aberrantly expressed in tumors, suggesting a potential tumor therapy target. Human hemokinin-1 (hHK-1) is a tachykinin peptide ligand of the neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor which is overexpressed in melanoma and other tumor tissues. Here, we investigated the role of hHK-1 and the NK1 receptor in melanoma cell migration. NK1 receptor expression was associated with melanoma metastatic potential. Treatment with hHK-1 significantly enhanced A375 and B16F10 melanoma cell migration and an NK1 receptor antagonist L732138 blocked this effect. MMP-2 and MT1-MMP expression were up-regulated in hHK-1-treated melanoma cells and cell signaling data suggested that hHK-1 induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK and p38 by way of PKC or PKA. Kinase activation led to increased MMP-2 and MT1-MMP expression and melanoma cell migration induced by hHK-1. Thus, hHK-1 and the NK1 receptor are critical to melanoma cell migration and each may be a promising chemotherapeutic target. PMID:27458061

  5. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of a new curcumin-related compound against melanoma and neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sharing the common neuroectodermal origin, melanoma and neuroblastoma are tumors widely diffused among adult and children, respectively. Clinical prognosis of aggressive neuroectodermal cancers remains dismal, therefore the search for novel therapies against such tumors is warranted. Curcumin is a phytochemical compound widely studied for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Recently, we have synthesized and tested in vitro various curcumin-related compounds in order to select new anti-tumor agents displaying stronger and selective growth inhibition activity on neuroectodermal tumors. Results In this work, we have demonstrated that the new α,β-unsaturated ketone D6 was more effective in inhibiting tumor cells growth when compared to curcumin. Normal fibroblasts proliferation was not affected by this treatment. Clonogenic assay showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in both melanoma and neuroblastoma colony formation only after D6 treatment. TUNEL assay, Annexin-V staining, caspases activation and PARP cleavage unveiled the ability of D6 to cause tumor cell death by triggering apoptosis, similarly to curcumin, but with a stronger and quicker extent. These apoptotic features appear to be associated with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c release. In vivo anti-tumor activity of curcumin and D6 was surveyed using sub-cutaneous melanoma and orthotopic neuroblastoma xenograft models. D6 treated mice exhibited significantly reduced tumor growth compared to both control and curcumin treated ones (Melanoma: D6 vs control: P < 0.001 and D6 vs curcumin P < 0.01; Neuroblastoma: D6 vs both control and curcumin: P < 0.001). Conclusions Our data indicate D6 as a good candidate to develop new therapies against neural crest-derived tumors. PMID:20525240

  6. LncRNA GAS5 is a critical regulator of metastasis phenotype of melanoma cells and inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Yang, Huixin; Xiao, Yanbin; Tang, Xiaoxia; Li, Yuqian; Han, Qiaoqiao; Fu, Junping; Yang, Yuye; Zhu, Yuechun

    2016-01-01

    The present study intended to demonstrate the effects of long noncoding RNA growth arrest-specific transcript 5 (GAS5) on the migration and invasion of melanoma cells. We first detected the expression of GAS5 among four kinds of melanoma cell lines, followed by constructing GAS5-knocked down and overexpressed stable cells. Next, we evaluated the effects of GAS5 on cell migration and invasion using wound healing and gelatin zymography assays. Finally, melanoma cells with different GAS5 expression were injected into nude mice, and the tumor volumes were recorded and tumor tissues were analyzed after sacrificing the mice. This study systematically examined the function of GAS5 in mediating melanoma metastasis and revealed that GAS5 plays an anticancer role in melanoma via regulating gelatinase A and B, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27445498

  7. Lymphadenectomy promotes tumor growth and cancer cell dissemination in the spontaneous RET mouse model of human uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Pin, Yeo Kim; Khoo, Karen; Tham, Muly; Karwai, Tan; Hwee, Thiam Chung; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Phua, Meow Ling Cindy; Kato, Masashi; Angeli, Veronique; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-29

    Resection of infiltrated tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) is a standard practice for the treatment of several cancers including breast cancer and melanoma. However, many randomized prospective trials have failed to show convincing clinical benefits associated with LN removal and the role of TDLNs in cancer dissemination is poorly understood. Here, we found in a well-characterized spontaneous mouse model of uveal melanoma that the growth of the primary tumor was accompanied by increased lymphangiogenesis and cancer cell colonization in the LNs draining the eyes. But, unexpectedly, early resection of the TDLNs increased the growth of the primary tumor and associated blood vessels as well as promoted cancer cell survival and dissemination. These effects were accompanied by increased tumor cell proliferation and expression of phosphorylated AKT. Topical application of a broad anti-inflammatory agent, Tobradex, or an oral treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 specific inhibitor, Celecoxib, reversed tumor progression observed after complete lymphadenectomy. Our study confirms the importance of tumor homeostasis in cancer progression by showing the enhancing effects of TDLN removal on tumor growth and cancer cell dissemination, and suggests that TDLN resection may only be beneficial if used in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs such as Tobradex and Celecoxib. PMID:26575174

  8. Lymphadenectomy promotes tumor growth and cancer cell dissemination in the spontaneous RET mouse model of human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Pin, Yeo Kim; Khoo, Karen; Tham, Muly; Karwai, Tan; Hwee, Thiam Chung; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Cindy Phua, Meow Ling; Kato, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Resection of infiltrated tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLNs) is a standard practice for the treatment of several cancers including breast cancer and melanoma. However, many randomized prospective trials have failed to show convincing clinical benefits associated with LN removal and the role of TDLNs in cancer dissemination is poorly understood. Here, we found in a well-characterized spontaneous mouse model of uveal melanoma that the growth of the primary tumor was accompanied by increased lymphangiogenesis and cancer cell colonization in the LNs draining the eyes. But, unexpectedly, early resection of the TDLNs increased the growth of the primary tumor and associated blood vessels as well as promoted cancer cell survival and dissemination. These effects were accompanied by increased tumor cell proliferation and expression of phosphorylated AKT. Topical application of a broad anti-inflammatory agent, Tobradex, or an oral treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 specific inhibitor, Celecoxib, reversed tumor progression observed after complete lymphadenectomy. Our study confirms the importance of tumor homeostasis in cancer progression by showing the enhancing effects of TDLN removal on tumor growth and cancer cell dissemination, and suggests that TDLN resection may only be beneficial if used in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs such as Tobradex and Celecoxib. PMID:26575174

  9. Endothelin-1 in the tumor microenvironment correlates with melanoma invasion.

    PubMed

    Chiriboga, Luis; Meehan, Shane; Osman, Iman; Glick, Michael; de la Cruz, Gelo; Howell, Brittny S; Friedman-Jiménez, George; Schneider, Robert J; Jamal, Sumayah

    2016-06-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a vasoactive peptide that also plays a role in the tanning response of the skin. Animal and cell culture studies have also implicated ET-1 in melanoma progression, but no association studies have been performed to link ET-1 expression and melanoma in humans. Here, we present the first in-vivo study of ET-1 expression in pigmented lesions in humans: an ET-1 immunohistochemical screen of melanocytic nevi, melanoma in situ lesions, invasive melanomas, metastatic melanomas, and blue nevi was performed. Twenty-six percent of melanocytic nevi and 44% of melanoma in situ lesions demonstrate ET-1 expression in the perilesional microenvironment, whereas expression in nevus or melanoma cells was rare to absent. In striking contrast, 100% of moderately to highly pigmented invasive melanomas contained numerous ET-1-positive cells in the tumor microenvironment, with 79% containing ET-1-positive melanoma cells, confirmed by co-staining with melanoma tumor marker HMB45. Hypopigmented invasive melanomas had reduced ET-1 expression, suggesting a correlation between ET-1 expression and pigmented melanomas. ET-1-positive perilesional cells were CD68-positive, indicating macrophage origin. Sixty-two percent of highly pigmented metastatic melanomas demonstrated ET-1 expression in melanoma cells, in contrast to 28.2% of hypopigmented specimens. Eighty-nine percent of benign nevi, known as blue nevi, which have a dermal localization, were associated with numerous ET-1-positive macrophages in the perilesional microenvironment, but no ET-1 expression was detected in the melanocytes. We conclude that ET-1 expression in the microenvironment increases with advancing stages of melanocyte transformation, implicating a critical role for ET-1 in melanoma progression, and the importance of the tumor microenvironment in the melanoma phenotype. PMID:26825037

  10. αvβ3-dependent cross-presentation of matrix metalloproteinase–2 by melanoma cells gives rise to a new tumor antigen

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Moreau-Aubry, Agnes; Diez, Elisabeth; Dreno, Brigitte; Jotereau, Francine; Guilloux, Yannick

    2005-01-01

    A large array of antigens that are recognized by tumor-specific T cells has been identified and shown to be generated through various processes. We describe a new mechanism underlying T cell recognition of melanoma cells, which involves the generation of a major histocompatibility complex class I–restricted epitope after tumor-mediated uptake and processing of an extracellular protein—a process referred to as cross-presentation—which is believed to be restricted to immune cells. We show that melanoma cells cross-present, in an αvβ3-dependent manner, an antigen derived from secreted matrix metalloproteinase–2 (MMP-2) to human leukocyte antigen A*0201-restricted T cells. Because MMP-2 activity is critical for melanoma progression, the MMP-2 peptide should be cross-presented by most progressing melanomas and represents a unique antigen for vaccine therapy of these tumors. PMID:15998788

  11. Adjuvant dendritic cell vaccination induces tumor-specific immune responses in the majority of stage III melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Bol, Kalijn F.; Schreibelt, Gerty; Westdorp, Harm; Textor, Johannes C.; van Rossum, Michelle M.; Scharenborg, Nicole M.; de Boer, Annemiek J.; van de Rakt, Mandy W. M. M.; Pots, Jeanne M.; van Oorschot, Tom G. M.; Duiveman-de Boer, Tjitske; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A.; van Meeteren, Wilmy S. E. C.; van der Graaf, Winette T. A.; Bonenkamp, Johannes J.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.; Aarntzen, Erik H. J. G.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Gerritsen, Winald R.; Figdor, Carl G.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effectiveness of adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) vaccination to induce tumor-specific immunological responses in stage III melanoma patients. Experimental design: Retrospective analysis of stage III melanoma patients, vaccinated with autologous monocyte-derived DC loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAA) gp100 and tyrosinase after radical lymph node dissection. Skin-test infiltrating lymphocytes (SKILs) obtained from delayed-type hypersensitivity skin-test biopsies were analyzed for the presence of TAA-specific CD8+ T cells by tetrameric MHC-peptide complexes and by functional TAA-specific T cell assays, defined by peptide-recognition (T2 cells) and/or tumor-recognition (BLM and/or MEL624) with specific production of Th1 cytokines and no Th2 cytokines. Results: Ninety-seven patients were analyzed: 21 with stage IIIA, 34 with stage IIIB, and 42 had stage IIIC disease. Tetramer-positive CD8+ T cells were present in 68 patients (70%), and 24 of them showed a response against all 3 epitopes tested (gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377) at any point during vaccinations. A functional T cell response was found in 62 patients (64%). Rates of peptide-recognition of gp100:154–162, gp100:280–288, and tyrosinase:369–377 were 40%, 29%, and 45%, respectively. Median recurrence-free survival and distant metastasis-free survival of the whole study population were 23.0 mo and 36.8 mo, respectively. Conclusions: DC vaccination induces a functional TAA-specific T cell response in the majority of stage III melanoma patients, indicating it is more effective in stage III than in stage IV melanoma patients. Furthermore, performing multiple cycles of vaccinations enhances the chance of a broader immune response. PMID:27622047

  12. Melanoma Cancer Stem Cells: Markers and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Parmiani, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human solid tumors has allowed a better understanding of the biology and neoplastic transformation of normal melanocytes, and the possible mechanisms by which melanoma cells acquire tumorigenicity. In this review I summarize the literature findings on the potential biomarkers of melanoma CSCs, their presence in the melanoma cell populations, the interaction with the immune system (with both T and NK cells) and the role of melanoma CSCs in the clinics. Given the extraordinary progress in the therapy of melanoma caused by immune checkpoint antibodies blockade, I discuss how these antibodies can work by the activation of melanoma infiltrating T cells specifically recognizing neo-antigens expressed even by melanoma CSCs. This is the mechanism that can induce a regression of the metastatic melanomas. PMID:26978405

  13. Extensive tumoral melanosis associated with ipilimumab-treated melanoma.

    PubMed

    Staser, K; Chen, D; Solus, J; Rosman, I S; Schaffer, A; Cornelius, L; Linette, G P; Fields, R C

    2016-08-01

    Tumoral melanosis describes a pigmented lesion clinically similar to melanoma but on histology reveals dense aggregates of melanin-laden, benign macrophages without malignant cells. In the few reported cases so far, tumoral melanosis has arisen in the skin or lymph node of a patient with a regressed melanoma or an epithelioid tumour. As a marker of regressed primary melanoma, its discovery may prompt investigation and surveillance for undiagnosed local or metastatic disease. Here, we present a unique case of extensive tumoral melanosis arising during ipilimumab treatment of in-transit metastases from a previously excised melanoma. PMID:26877232

  14. Secretome from senescent melanoma engages the STAT3 pathway to favor reprogramming of naive melanoma towards a tumor-initiating cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bonet, Caroline; Bonazzi, Vanessa F; Allegra, Marylin; Giuliano, Sandy; Bille, Karine; Bahadoran, Philippe; Giacchero, Damien; Lacour, Jean Philippe; Boyle, Glen M; Hayward, Nicholas F

    2013-01-01

    Here, we showed that the secretome of senescent melanoma cells drives basal melanoma cells towards a mesenchymal phenotype, with characteristic of stems illustrated by increased level of the prototype genes FN1, SNAIL, OCT4 and NANOG. This molecular reprogramming leads to an increase in the low-MITF and slow-growing cell population endowed with melanoma-initiating cell features. The secretome of senescent melanoma cells induces a panel of 52 genes, involved in cell movement and cell/cell interaction, among which AXL and ALDH1A3 have been implicated in melanoma development. We found that the secretome of senescent melanoma cells activates the STAT3 pathway and STAT3 inhibition prevents secretome effects, including the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Collectively, the findings provide insights into how the secretome of melanoma cells entering senescence upon chemotherapy treatments increases the tumorigenicity of naïve melanoma cells by inducing, through STAT3 activation, a melanoma-initiating cell phenotype that could favor chemotherapy resistance and relapse. PMID:24344100

  15. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyi; Barry, Samantha; Kmetz, Daniel; Egger, Michael; Pan, Jianmin; Rai, Shesh N; Qu, Jifu; McMasters, Kelly M; Hao, Hongying

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is abundant with exosomes that are secreted by the cancer cells themselves. Exosomes are nanosized, organelle-like membranous structures that are increasingly being recognized as major contributors in the progression of malignant neoplasms. A critical element in melanoma progression is its propensity to metastasize, but little is known about how melanoma cell-derived exosomes modulate the microenvironment to optimize conditions for tumor progression and metastasis. Here, we provide evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote phenotype switching in primary melanocytes through paracrine/autocrine signaling. We found that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway was activated during the exosome-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-resembling process, which promotes metastasis. Let-7i, an miRNA modulator of EMT, was also involved in this process. We further defined two other miRNA modulators of EMT (miR-191 and let-7a) in serum exosomes for differentiating stage I melanoma patients from non-melanoma subjects. These results provide the first strong molecular evidence that melanoma cell-derived exosomes promote the EMT-resembling process in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, novel strategies targeting EMT and modulating the tumor microenvironment may emerge as important approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27063098

  16. The highly attenuated vaccinia virus strain modified virus Ankara induces apoptosis in melanoma cells and allows bystander dendritic cells to generate a potent anti-tumoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, S; Humrich, J Y; Thuman, P; Sauter, B; Schuler, G; Jenne, L

    2006-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) has been tested as oncolytic virus against malignant melanoma in clinical trials for more than 40 years. Until now, mainly strains comparable to viral strains used for smallpox vaccination have been probed for anti-tumoral therapy. We have shown recently that the wild-type strain Western Reserve (WR) can interfere with crucial functions of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Our aim was to examine whether viral immune evasion mechanisms might be responsible for the ineffectiveness of WR-based vaccination strategies and whether the highly attenuated strain modified virus Ankara (MVA) differs from WR with respect to its possible immunostimulatory capacity after intratumoral injection. Using in vitro experiments, we compared the effect of both strains on melanoma cells and on local bystander DCs. We found that both VV-strains infected melanoma cells efficiently and caused disintegration of the actin cytoskeleton, as shown by fluorescence microscopy. In addition, both VV-strains caused apoptotic cell death in melanoma cells after infection. In contrast to MVA, WR underwent a complete viral replication cycle in melanoma cells. Bystander DCs were consecutively infected by newly generated WR virions and lost their capacity to induce allogeneic T cell proliferation. DCs in contact with MVA-infected melanoma cells retained their capacity to induce T cell proliferation. Immature DCs were capable of phagocytosing MVA-infected melanoma cells. Priming of autologous CD8+ T cells by DCs that had phagocytosed MVA-infected, MelanA positive melanoma cells resulted in the induction of T cell clones specifically reactive against the model antigen MelanA as shown by enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) analysis. We conclude that the clinical trials with oncolytic wild-type VV failed probably because of suppression of bystander DCs and consecutive suppression of T cell-mediated anti-melanoma immunity. The attenuated VV-strain MVA facilitates the generation of

  17. A FAK scaffold inhibitor disrupts FAK and VEGFR-3 signaling and blocks melanoma growth by targeting both tumor and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kurenova, Elena; Ucar, Deniz; Liao, Jianqun; Yemma, Michael; Gogate, Priyanka; Bshara, Wiam; Sunar, Ulas; Seshadri, Mukund; Hochwald, Steven N; Cance, William G

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma has the highest mortality rate of all skin cancers and a major cause of treatment failure is drug resistance. Tumors heterogeneity requires novel therapeutic strategies and new drugs targeting multiple pathways. One of the new approaches is targeting the scaffolding function of tumor related proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK). FAK is overexpressed in most solid tumors and is involved in multiple protein-protein interactions critical for tumor cell survival, tumor neovascularization, progression and metastasis. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of the FAK scaffold inhibitor C4, targeted to the FAK-VEGFR-3 complex, against melanomas. We compared C4 inhibitory effects in BRAF mutant vs BRAF wild type melanomas. C4 effectively caused melanoma tumor regression in vivo, when administered alone and sensitized tumors to chemotherapy. The most dramatic effect of C4 was related to reduction of vasculature of both BRAF wild type and V600E mutant xenograft tumors. The in vivo effects of C4 were assessed in xenograft models using non-invasive multimodality imaging in conjunction with histologic and molecular biology methods. C4 inhibited cell viability, adhesion and motility of melanoma and endothelial cells, specifically blocked phosphorylation of VEGFR-3 and FAK and disrupted their complexes. Specificity of in vivo effects for C4 were confirmed by a decrease in tumor FAK and VEGFR-3 phosphorylation, reduction of vasculogenesis and reduced blood flow. Our collective observations provide evidence that a small molecule inhibitor targeted to the FAK protein-protein interaction site successfully inhibits melanoma growth through dual targeting of tumor and endothelial cells and is effective against both BRAF wild type and mutant melanomas. PMID:25486195

  18. Isolation of tumorigenic circulating melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Alloo, Allireza; Wilson, Brian J.; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; Murphy, George F.; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Gasser, Martin; Hodi, F. Stephen; Frank, Natasha Y.; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been identified in several human malignancies, including malignant melanoma. However, whether melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and cause metastatic progression is currently unknown. Here we isolate for the first time viable tumorigenic melanoma CTC and demonstrate that this cell population is capable of metastasis formation in human-to-mouse xenotransplantation experiments. The presence of CTC among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of murine recipients of subcutaneous (s.c.) human melanoma xenografts could be detected based on mRNA expression for human GAPDH and/or ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5), a marker of malignant melanoma-initiating cells previously shown to be associated with metastatic disease progression in human patients. ABCB5 expression could also be detected in PBMC preparations from human stage IV melanoma patients but not healthy controls. The detection of melanoma CTC in human-to-mouse s.c. tumor xenotransplantation models correlated significantly with pulmonary metastasis formation. Moreover, prospectively isolated CTC from murine recipients of s.c. melanoma xenografts were capable of primary tumor initiation and caused metastasis formation upon xenotransplantation to secondary murine NOD-scid IL2Rγnull recipients. Our results provide initial evidence that melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and demonstrate that CTC are capable of causing metastatic tumor progression. These findings suggest a need for CTC eradication to inhibit metastatic progression and provide a rationale for assessment of therapeutic responses of this tumorigenic cell population to promising emerging melanoma treatment modalities. PMID:20977885

  19. SNPase-ARMS qPCR: Ultrasensitive Mutation-Based Detection of Cell-Free Tumor DNA in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Julia; Eder, Johanna; Pratscher, Barbara; Brandt, Sabine; Schneller, Doris; Müllegger, Robert; Vogl, Claus; Trautinger, Franz; Brem, Gottfried; Burgstaller, Joerg P.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in the plasma of cancer patients has become a common point of interest as indicator of therapy options and treatment response in clinical cancer research. Especially patient- and tumor-specific single nucleotide variants that accurately distinguish tumor DNA from wild type DNA are promising targets. The reliable detection and quantification of these single-base DNA variants is technically challenging. Currently, a variety of techniques is applied, with no apparent “gold standard”. Here we present a novel qPCR protocol that meets the conditions of extreme sensitivity and specificity that are required for detection and quantification of tumor DNA. By consecutive application of two polymerases, one of them designed for extreme base-specificity, the method reaches unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Three qPCR assays were tested with spike-in experiments, specific for point mutations BRAF V600E, PTEN T167A and NRAS Q61L of melanoma cell lines. It was possible to detect down to one copy of tumor DNA per reaction (Poisson distribution), at a background of up to 200 000 wild type DNAs. To prove its clinical applicability, the method was successfully tested on a small cohort of BRAF V600E positive melanoma patients. PMID:26562020

  20. Timosaponin AIII inhibits melanoma cell migration by suppressing COX-2 and in vivo tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Mo; Im, A-Rang; Kim, Seung Hyung; Hyun, Jin Won; Chae, Sungwook

    2016-02-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease, due in large part to its propensity to metastasize. We examined the effects of timosaponin AIII, a compound isolated from Anemarrhena asphodeloides Bunge, on melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using B16-F10 and WM-115 melanoma cells lines. Overexpression of COX-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4) promoted cell migration in vitro. Exposure to timosaponin AIII resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of cell migration, which was associated with reduced levels of COX-2, PGE2 , and PGE2 receptors. Transient transfection of COX-2 siRNA also inhibited cell migration. Exposure to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate enhanced cell migration, whereas timosaponin AIII inhibited 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbal-13-acetate-induced cell migration and reduced basal levels of EP2 and EP4. Moreover, timosaponin AIII inhibited activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2 in B16-F10 cells. Consistent with our in vitro findings, in vivo studies showed that timosaponin AIII treatment significantly reduced the total number of metastatic nodules in the mouse lung and improved histological alterations in B16-F10-injected C57BL/6 mice. In addition, C57BL/6 mice treated with timosaponin AIII showed reduced expression of COX-2 and NF-κB in the lung. Together, these results indicate that timosaponin AIII has the capacity to inhibit melanoma cell migration, an essential step in the process of metastasis, by inhibiting expression of COX-2, NF-κB, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors. PMID:26595378

  1. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Maenhout, Sarah K; Du Four, Stephanie; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L

    2014-08-30

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-γ secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-γ secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  2. AZD1480 delays tumor growth in a melanoma model while enhancing the suppressive activity of myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Maenhout, Sarah K.; Four, Stephanie Du; Corthals, Jurgen; Neyns, Bart; Thielemans, Kris; Aerts, Joeri L.

    2014-01-01

    AZD1480 is a potent, competitive small-molecule inhibitor of JAK1/2 kinase which inhibits STAT3 phosphorylation and tumor growth. Here we investigated the effects of AZD1480 on the function of different immune cell populations in a melanoma model. When MO4 tumor-bearing mice were treated with AZD1480 we observed a strong inhibition of tumor growth as well as a prolonged survival. Moreover, a significant decrease in the percentage of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) was observed after treatment with AZD1480. However, AZD1480 enhanced the suppressive capacity of murine MDSCs while at the same time impairing the proliferative as well as the IFN-γ secretion capacity of murine T cells. The addition of AZD1480 to co-cultures of human MDSCs and T cells does not affect the suppressive activity of MDSCs but it does reduce the IFN-γ secretion and the proliferative capacity of T cells. We showed that although AZD1480 has the ability to delay the tumor growth of MO4 tumor-bearing mice, this drug has detrimental effects on several aspects of the immune system. These data indicate that systemic targeting of the JAK/STAT pathway by JAK1/2 inhibition can have divergent effects on tumor growth and anti-tumor immune responses. PMID:25149535

  3. Adoptive cell therapy with autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and low-dose Interleukin-2 in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adoptive cell therapy may be based on isolation of tumor-specific T cells, e.g. autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), in vitro activation and expansion and the reinfusion of these cells into patients upon chemotherapy induced lymphodepletion. Together with high-dose interleukin (IL)-2 this treatment has been given to patients with advanced malignant melanoma and impressive response rates but also significant IL-2 associated toxicity have been observed. Here we present data from a feasibility study at a Danish Translational Research Center using TIL adoptive transfer in combination with low-dose subcutaneous IL-2 injections. Methods This is a pilot trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00937625) including patients with metastatic melanoma, PS ≤1, age <70, measurable and progressive disease and no involvement of the central nervous system. Six patients were treated with lymphodepleting chemotherapy, TIL infusion, and 14 days of subcutaneous low-dose IL-2 injections, 2 MIU/day. Results Low-dose IL-2 considerably decreased the treatment related toxicity with no grade 3–4 IL-2 related adverse events. Objective clinical responses were seen in 2 of 6 treated patients with ongoing complete responses (30+ and 10+ months), 2 patients had stable disease (4 and 5 months) and 2 patients progressed shortly after treatment. Tumor-reactivity of the infused cells and peripheral lymphocytes before and after therapy were analyzed. Absolute number of tumor specific T cells in the infusion product tended to correlate with clinical response and also, an induction of peripheral tumor reactive T cells was observed for 1 patient in complete remission. Conclusion Complete and durable responses were induced after treatment with adoptive cell therapy in combination with low-dose IL-2 which significantly decreased toxicity of this therapy. PMID:22909342

  4. Direct Melanoma Cell Contact Induces Stromal Cell Autocrine Prostaglandin E2-EP4 Receptor Signaling That Drives Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Inada, Masaki; Takita, Morichika; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kenta; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Maru, Yoshiro; Maruyama, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2015-12-11

    The stromal cells associated with tumors such as melanoma are significant determinants of tumor growth and metastasis. Using membrane-bound prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPges1(-/-)) mice, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by host tissues is critical for B16 melanoma growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis to both bone and soft tissues. Concomitant studies in vitro showed that PGE2 production by fibroblasts is regulated by direct interaction with B16 cells. Autocrine activity of PGE2 further regulates the production of angiogenic factors by fibroblasts, which are key to the vascularization of both primary and metastatic tumor growth. Similarly, cell-cell interactions between B16 cells and host osteoblasts modulate mPGES-1 activity and PGE2 production by the osteoblasts. PGE2, in turn, acts to stimulate receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression, leading to osteoclast differentiation and bone erosion. Using eicosanoid receptor antagonists, we show that PGE2 acts on osteoblasts and fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment through the EP4 receptor. Metastatic tumor growth and vascularization in soft tissues was abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. EP4-null Ptger4(-/-) mice do not support B16 melanoma growth. In vitro, an EP4 receptor antagonist modulated PGE2 effects on fibroblast production of angiogenic factors. Our data show that B16 melanoma cells directly influence host stromal cells to generate PGE2 signals governing neoangiogenesis and metastatic growth in bone via osteoclast erosive activity as well as angiogenesis in soft tissue tumors. PMID:26475855

  5. Inhibition of Autophagy Enhances Curcumin United light irradiation-induced Oxidative Stress and Tumor Growth Suppression in Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Mei, Zhusong; Guo, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin carcinoma, which possesses fast propagating and highly invasive characteristics. Curcumin is a natural phenol compound that has various biological activities, such as anti-proliferative and apoptosis-accelerating impacts on tumor cells. Unfortunately, the therapeutical activities of Cur are severely hindered due to its extremely low bioavailability. In this study, a cooperative therapy of low concentration Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation was performed to inspect the synergistic effects on the apoptosis, proliferation and autophagy in human melanoma A375 cell. The results showed that red united blue light irradiation efficaciously synergized with Cur to trigger oxidative stress-mediated cell death, induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. Meanwhile, Western blotting revealed that combined disposure induced the formation of autophagosomes. Conversely, inhibition of the autophagy enhanced apoptosis, obstructed cell cycle arrest and induced reversible proliferation arrest to senescence. These findings suggest that Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation could generate photochemo-preventive effects via enhancing apoptosis and triggering autophagy, and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy convert reversible arrested cells to senescence, therefore reducing the possibility that damaged cells might escape programmed death. PMID:27502897

  6. Inhibition of Autophagy Enhances Curcumin United light irradiation-induced Oxidative Stress and Tumor Growth Suppression in Human Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Tianhui; Tian, Yan; Mei, Zhusong; Guo, Guangjin

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin carcinoma, which possesses fast propagating and highly invasive characteristics. Curcumin is a natural phenol compound that has various biological activities, such as anti-proliferative and apoptosis-accelerating impacts on tumor cells. Unfortunately, the therapeutical activities of Cur are severely hindered due to its extremely low bioavailability. In this study, a cooperative therapy of low concentration Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation was performed to inspect the synergistic effects on the apoptosis, proliferation and autophagy in human melanoma A375 cell. The results showed that red united blue light irradiation efficaciously synergized with Cur to trigger oxidative stress-mediated cell death, induce apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation. Meanwhile, Western blotting revealed that combined disposure induced the formation of autophagosomes. Conversely, inhibition of the autophagy enhanced apoptosis, obstructed cell cycle arrest and induced reversible proliferation arrest to senescence. These findings suggest that Cur combined with red united blue light irradiation could generate photochemo-preventive effects via enhancing apoptosis and triggering autophagy, and pharmacological inhibition of autophagy convert reversible arrested cells to senescence, therefore reducing the possibility that damaged cells might escape programmed death. PMID:27502897

  7. Amblyomin-X induces ER stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and caspase activation in human melanoma and pancreatic tumor cell.

    PubMed

    Morais, Katia L P; Pacheco, Mario Thiego Fernandes; Berra, Carolina Maria; Bosch, Rosemary V; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Chammas, Roger; de Freitas Saito, Renata; Iqbal, Asif; Chudzinski-Tavassi, Ana Marisa

    2016-04-01

    During the last two decades, new insights into proteasome function and its role in several human diseases made it a potential therapeutic target. In this context, Amblyomin-X is a Kunitz-type FXa inhibitor similar to endogenous tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) and is a novel proteasome inhibitor. Herein, we have demonstrated Amblyomin-X cytotoxicity to different tumor cells lines such as pancreatic (Panc1, AsPC1BxPC3) and melanoma (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). Of note, Amblyomin-X was not cytotoxic to normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, Amblyomin-X promoted accumulation of ER stress markers (GRP78 and GADD153) in sensitive (SK-MEL-28) and bortezomib-resistant (Mia-PaCa-2) tumor cells. The intracellular calcium concentration [Ca(2+)] i was slightly modulated in human tumor cells (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) after 24 h of Amblyomin-X treatment. Furthermore, Amblyomin-X induced mitochondrial dysfunction, cytochrome-c release, PARP cleavage, and activation of caspase cascade in both human tumor (SK-MEL-28 and Mia-PaCa-2) cells. These investigations might help in further understanding of the antitumor properties of Amblyomin-X. PMID:27015684

  8. BRAFV600E immunopositive melanomas show low frequency of heterogeneity and association with epithelioid tumor cells: a STROBE-compliant article.

    PubMed

    Verlinden, Ivana; van den Hurk, Karin; Clarijs, Ruud; Willig, Arjan P; Stallinga, Cecile M H A; Roemen, Guido M J M; van den Oord, Joost J; zur Hausen, Axel; Speel, Ernst-Jan M; Winnepenninckx, Véronique J L

    2014-12-01

    Treatment of BRAFV600E-mutant melanoma by small molecule inhibitors that target BRAFV600E or MEK kinases is increasingly used in clinical practice and significantly improve patient outcome. However, patients eventually become resistant and therapeutic improvement is required. Molecular diversity within individual tumors (intratumor heterogeneity) and between tumors within a single patient (intrapatient heterogeneity) poses a significant challenge to precision medicine. Using immunohistochemistry, we determined the extent of BRAFV600E intratumor and intrapatient heterogeneity and the influence of morphological heterogeneity in a large series of 171 melanomas of 81 patients. The BRAFV600E mutation rate found in our melanoma series is 44%, with none of 22 (0%) melanoma in situ, 23 of 56 (41%) primary tumors, 28 of 59 (48%) regional metastases, and 24 of 34 (71%) distant metastases harboring the mutation. In general, a diffuse homogeneous immunostaining was seen, even in tumors consisting of more than one cell type, that is, epithelioid, spindle, and/or small cell types. Nevertheless, BRAFV600E-mutant melanomas more often had a purely epithelioid cell population (P=0.063), that is more evident among distant metastases (P=0.014). Only two of 75 (3%) mutated specimens (one primary and one metastasis) displayed heterogeneous BRAFV600E expression. The primary tumor was also morphologically heterogeneous and exclusively displayed BRAFV600E in the epithelioid component, confirming an association between BRAFV600E and epithelioid cells. Twenty-eight of 30 patients (93%) had concordant BRAFV600E mutation status between their tumors. Taken together, BRAFV600E intratumor and intrapatient heterogeneity in melanoma is diminutive, nevertheless, the identified exceptions will have important implications for the clinical management of this disease. PMID:25526463

  9. Systemic Combination Virotherapy for Melanoma with Tumor Antigen-Expressing Vesicular Stomatitis Virus and Adoptive T-cell Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Rommelfanger, Diana M.; Wongthida, Phonphimon; Diaz, Rosa M.; Kaluza, Karen M.; Thompson, Jill M.; Kottke, Timothy J.; Vile, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy offers the potential to treat tumors both as a single agent and in combination with traditional modalities such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Here we describe an effective, fully systemic treatment regimen, which combines virotherapy, acting essentially as an adjuvant immunotherapy, with adoptive cell transfer (ACT). The combination of ACT with systemic administration of a vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) engineered to express the endogenous melanocyte antigen glycoprotein 100 (gp100) resulted in regression of established melanomas and generation of antitumor immunity. Tumor response was associated with in vivo T-cell persistence and activation as well as treatment-related vitiligo. However, in a proportion of treated mice, initial tumor regressions were followed by recurrences. Therapy was further enhanced by targeting an additional tumor antigen with the VSV-antigen + ACT combination strategy, leading to sustained response in 100% of mice. Together, our findings suggest that systemic virotherapy combined with antigen-expressing VSV could be used to support and enhance clinical immunotherapy protocols with adoptive T-cell transfer, which are already used in the clinic. PMID:22836753

  10. Fisetin, a phytochemical, potentiates sorafenib-induced apoptosis and abrogates tumor growth in athymic nude mice implanted with BRAF-mutated melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Harish Chandra; Baxter, Ronald D.; Hunt, Katherine M.; Agarwal, Jyoti; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad; Afaq, Farrukh

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly form of cutaneous malignancy, and its incidence rates are rising worldwide. In melanoma, constitutive activation of the BRAF/MEK/ERK (MAPK) and PI3K/AKT/mTOR (PI3K) signaling pathways plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation, survival and tumorigenesis. A combination of compounds that lead to an optimal blockade of these critical signaling pathways may provide an effective strategy for prevention and treatment of melanoma. The phytochemical fisetin is known to possess anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. We found that fisetin treatment inhibited PI3K signaling pathway in melanoma cells. Therefore, we investigated the effect of fisetin and sorafenib (an RAF inhibitor) alone and in combination on cell proliferation, apoptosis and tumor growth. Combination treatment (fisetin + sorafenib) more effectively reduced the growth of BRAF-mutated human melanoma cells at lower doses when compared to individual agents. In addition, combination treatment resulted in enhanced (i) apoptosis, (ii) cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP, (iii) expression of Bax and Bak, (iv) inhibition of Bcl2 and Mcl-1, and (v) inhibition of expression of PI3K, phosphorylation of MEK1/2, ERK1/2, AKT and mTOR. In athymic nude mice subcutaneously implanted with melanoma cells (A375 and SK-MEL-28), we found that combination therapy resulted in greater reduction of tumor growth when compared to individual agents. Furthermore, combination therapy was more effective than monotherapy in: (i) inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis, (ii) induction of apoptosis, and (iii) inhibition of the MAPK and PI3K pathways in xenograft tumors. These data suggest that simultaneous inhibition of both these signaling pathways using combination of fisetin and sorafenib may serve as a therapeutic option for the management of melanoma. PMID:26299806

  11. Simultaneous Inhibition of Key Growth Pathways in Melanoma Cells and Tumor Regression by a Designed Bidentate Constrained Helical Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Amlanjyoti; Mallick, Shampa; Ghosh, Piya; Maiti, Atanu; Ahmed, Israr; Bhattacharyya, Seemana; Mandal, Tapashi; Manna, Asit; Roy, Koushik; Singh, Sandeep; Nayak, Dipak Kumar; Wilder, Paul T.; Markowitz, Joseph; Weber, David J.; Ghosh, Mrinal K.; Chattopadhyay, Samit; Guha, Rajdeep; Konar, Aditya; Bandyopadhyay, Santu; Roy, Siddhartha

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are part of a large number of signaling networks and potential targets for drug development. However, discovering molecules that can specifically inhibit such interactions is a major challenge. S100B, a calcium-regulated protein, plays a crucial role in the proliferation of melanoma cells through protein-protein interactions. In this article, we report the design and development of a bidentate conformationally constrained peptide against dimeric S100B based on a natural tight binding peptide, TRTK-12. The helical conformation of the peptide was constrained by substitution of α-amino isobutyric acid----an amino acid having high helical propensity----in positions which do not interact with S100B. A branched bidentate version of the peptide, bound to S100B tightly with a dissociation constant of 8 nM. When conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide, it caused growth inhibition and rapid apoptosis in melanoma cells. The molecule exerts anti-proliferative action through simultaneous inhibition of key growth pathways including reactivation of wild-type p53 and inhibition of Akt and STAT-3 phosphorylation. The apoptosis induced by the bidentate constrained helix is caused by direct migration of p53 to mitochondria. At moderate intravenous dose, the peptide completely inhibits melanoma growth in a mouse model without any significant observable toxicity. The specificity was shown by lack of ability of a double mutant peptide to cause tumor regression at the same dose level. The methodology described here for direct protein-protein interaction inhibition may be effective for rapid development of inhibitors against relatively weak protein-protein interactions for de novo drug development. PMID:24839139

  12. Applications for quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA in the plasma of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schreuer, Max; Meersseman, Geert; van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Bott, Ambre; Chevolet, Ines; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Maertens, Geert; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Small fragments of cell-free DNA that are shed by normal and tumor cells can be detected in the plasma of patients with advanced melanoma. Quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant DNA within the cell-free DNA holds promise as a tumor-specific biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with BRAF V600 mutant melanoma. Allele-specific quantitative PCR analysis for BRAF V600 E/E2/D/K/R/M mutations on DNA extracted from 1 ml of plasma is currently under evaluation in a number of ongoing prospective clinical studies. We report five patient cases that indicate the potential applications and utility of quantitative measurements of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA as a diagnostic test and as a therapeutic monitoring tool in stage IV melanoma patients treated with BRAF-targeted therapy or immunotherapy. Finally, we offer novel insights into the dynamics of cell-free tumor DNA in melanoma. PMID:26636909

  13. Mdm2 and Aurora A inhibitors synergize to block melanoma growth by driving apoptosis and immune clearance of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vilgelm, Anna E.; Pawlikowski, Jeff S.; Liu, Yan; Hawkins, Oriana E.; Davis, Tyler A.; Smith, Jessica; Weller, Kevin P.; Horton, Linda W.; McClain, Colt M.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Turner, David C.; Essaka, David C.; Stewart, Clinton F.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Kelley, Mark C.; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A.; Johnston, Jeffrey N.; Richmond, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutics that induce cancer cell senescence can block cell proliferation and promote immune rejection. However, the risk of tumor relapse due to senescence escape may remain high due to the long lifespan of senescent cells that are not cleared. Here we show how combining a senescence-inducing inhibitor of the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA) with an MDM2 antagonist activates p53 in senescent tumors harboring wildtype 53. In the model studied, this effect is accompanied proliferation arrest, mitochondrial depolarization, apoptosis and immune clearance of cancer cells by antitumor leukocytes in a manner reliant upon CCL5, CCL1 and CXCL9. The AURKA/MDM2 combination therapy shows adequate bioavailability and low toxicity to the host. Moreover, the prominent response of patient-derived melanoma tumors to co-administered MDM2 and AURKA inhibitors offers a sound rationale for clinical evaluation. Taken together, our work provides a preclinical proof-of-concept for a combination treatment which leverages both senescence and immune surveillance to therapeutic ends. PMID:25398437

  14. Inhibition of cytokine-induced microvascular arrest of tumor cells by recombinant endostatin prevents experimental hepatic melanoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Lorea; Valcárcel, María; Carrascal, Teresa; Egilegor, Eider; Salado, Clarisa; Sim, B Kim Lee; Vidal-Vanaclocha, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    We investigated effects of endostatin (ES) in the prometastatic microenvironment of inflammation occurring during the microvascular phase of cancer cell infiltration in the liver. We used a model of intrasplenic injection of B16 melanoma (B16M) cells leading to hepatic metastasis through vascular cell adhesion molecule-(VCAM-1)-mediated capillary arrest of cancer cells via interleukin-18 (IL-18)-dependent mechanism. We show that administration of 50 mg/kg recombinant human (rh) ES 30 min before B16M, plus repetition of same dose for 3 additional days decreased metastasis number by 60%. A single dose of rhES before B16M injection reduced hepatic microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M by 40% and inhibited hepatic production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-18 and VCAM-1 expression by hepatic sinusoidal endothelia (HSE). Consistent with these data, rhES inhibited VCAM-1-dependent B16M cell adhesion to primary cultured HSE receiving B16M conditioned medium, and it abolished the HSE cell production of TNF-alpha and IL-18 induced by tumor-derived vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF). rhES abrogated recombinant murine VEGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of KDR/flk-1 receptor in HSE cells, preventing the proinflammatory action of tumor-derived VEGF on HSE. rhES also abolished hepatic production of TNF-alpha, microvascular retention of luciferase-transfected B16M, and adhesion of B16M cells to isolated HSE cells, all of them induced in mice given 5 micro g/kg recombinant murine VEGF for 18 h. This capillary inflammation-deactivating capability constitutes a nonantiangiogenic antitumoral action of endostatin that decreases cancer cell arrest within liver microvasculature and prevents metastases promoted by proinflammatory cytokines induced by VEGF. PMID:14729638

  15. Culturing Uveal Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Angi, Martina; Versluis, Mieke; Kalirai, Helen

    2015-04-01

    A major challenge in cancer research is the use of appropriate models with which to study a specific biological question. Cell lines have long been used to study cellular processes and the effects of individual molecules because they are easy to use, grow rapidly, produce reproducible results and have a strong track record in research. In uveal melanoma in particular, the absence of animal models that faithfully replicate the behavior of the human disease has propagated the generation and use of numerous cell lines by individual research groups. This in itself, however, can be viewed as a problem due to the lack of standardization when characterizing these entities to determine how closely they reflect the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of this disease. The alternative is to use in vitro primary cultures of cells obtained directly from uveal melanoma patient samples, but this too has its difficulties. Primary cell cultures are difficult to use, hard to obtain and can show considerable heterogeneity. In this article, we review the following: (1) the uveal melanoma cell lines that are currently available, discussing the importance of establishing a bank of those that represent the molecular heterogeneity of uveal melanoma; (2) the methods used to isolate and perform short-term cultures of primary uveal melanoma cells, and (3) the establishment of 3D tissue culture models that bridge the gap between 2D in vitro systems and in vivo models with which to dissect cancer biology and perform therapeutic screens. PMID:27171555

  16. In vitro and in vivo studies on the cytotoxicity of irradiated silk fibroin against mouse melanoma tumor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Kwon, Sun-Kyu; Song, Beom-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hun; Choi, Jong-il; Hwang, Han-Joon; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Ju-Woon

    2009-07-01

    The physicochemical properties of proteins can be altered by irradiation. But, it is rarely that the researches on the functional properties of irradiated proteins have been reported. Fibroin is a fibrous protein derived from silkworm Bombyx mori and has been suggested as a biomaterial for biomedical application. Therefore, fibroin was selected as a model protein and was examined with the irradiation effects on the cytotoxicity of fibroin on tumor cell. The cytotoxicity of fibroin against mouse melanoma cell (B16BL6) showed a significant increase dependent upon the increase of irradiation dose. And also, the splenocyte proliferation activities of fibroin were increased by gamma irradiation. In addition, the oral administration of irradiated fibroin significantly increased the inhibition rate of tumor growth in tumor-bearing mouse model. The reason might be due to the change of protein structure by gamma irradiation and is being studied. From these result, it could be concluded that the irradiated fibroin might be a potential candidate as a valuable product in food and medical industry.

  17. Melanoma cell galectin-1 ligands functionally correlate with malignant potential*

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Erika M.; Geddes-Sweeney, Jenna E.; Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Walley, Kempland C.; Barthel, Steven R.; Opperman, Matthew J.; Liang, Jennifer; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Schatton, Tobias; Laga, Alvaro C.; Mihm, Martin C.; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Widlund, Hans R.; Murphy, George F.; Dimitroff, Charles J.

    2015-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1)-binding to Gal-1 ligands on immune and endothelial cells can influence melanoma development through dampening anti-tumor immune responses and promoting angiogenesis. However, whether Gal-1 ligands are functionally expressed on melanoma cells to help control intrinsic malignant features remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed expression, identity and function of Gal-1 ligands in melanoma progression. Immunofluorescent analysis of benign and malignant human melanocytic neoplasms revealed that Gal-1 ligands were abundant in severely-dysplastic nevi as well as in primary and metastatic melanomas. Biochemical assessments indicated that melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM) was a major Gal-1 ligand on melanoma cells that was largely dependent on its N-glycans. Other melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand activity conferred by O-glycans was negatively regulated by α2,6 sialyltransferase ST6GalNAc2. In Gal-1-deficient mice, MCAM-silenced (MCAMKD) or ST6GalNAc2-overexpressing (ST6O/E) melanoma cells exhibited slower growth rates, underscoring a key role for melanoma cell Gal-1 ligands and host Gal-1 in melanoma growth. Further analysis of MCAMKD or ST6O/E melanoma cells in cell migration assays indicated that Gal-1 ligand-dependent melanoma cell migration was severely inhibited. These findings provide a refined perspective on Gal-1 – melanoma cell Gal-1 ligand interactions as contributors to melanoma malignancy. PMID:25756799

  18. Resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Carletto, Bruna; Berton, Juliana; Ferreira, Tamara Nascimento; Dalmolin, Luciana Facco; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Favero, Giovani Marino

    2016-08-01

    In this study, resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were developed and its antitumor activity tested on a melanoma mice model. These nanocapsules were spherically-shaped and presented suitable size, negative charge and high encapsulation efficiency for their use as a modified-release system of resveratrol. Nanoencapsulation leads to the drug amorphization. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles reduced cell viability of murine melanoma cells. There was a decrease in tumor volume, an increase in the necrotic area and inflammatory infiltrate of melanoma when resveratrol-loaded nanocapsules were compared to free resveratrol in treated mice. Nanoencapsulation of resveratrol also prevented metastasis and pulmonary hemorrhage. This modified-release technology containing resveratrol can be used as a feasible approach in order to inhibit murine melanoma tumor growth. PMID:27070053

  19. SKI knockdown inhibits human melanoma tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dahu; Lin, Qiushi; Box, Neil; Roop, Dennis; Ishii, Shunsuke; Matsuzaki, Koichi; Fan, Tao; Hornyak, Thomas J; Reed, Jon A; Stavnezer, Ed; Timchenko, Nikolai A; Medrano, Estela E

    2009-12-01

    The SKI protein represses the TGF-beta tumor suppressor pathway by associating with the Smad transcription factors. SKI is upregulated in human malignant melanoma tumors in a disease-progression manner and its overexpression promotes proliferation and migration of melanoma cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which SKI antagonizes TGF-beta signaling in vivo have not been fully elucidated. Here we show that human melanoma cells in which endogenous SKI expression was knocked down by RNAi produced minimal orthotopic tumor xenograft nodules that displayed low mitotic rate and prominent apoptosis. These minute tumors exhibited critical signatures of active TGF-beta signaling including high levels of nuclear Smad3 and p21(Waf-1), which are not found in the parental melanomas. To understand how SKI promotes tumor growth we used gain- and loss-of-function approaches and found that simultaneously to blocking the TGF-beta-growth inhibitory pathway, SKI promotes the switch of Smad3 from tumor suppression to oncogenesis by favoring phosphorylations of the Smad3 linker region in melanoma cells but not in normal human melanocytes. In this context, SKI is required for preventing TGF-beta-mediated downregulation of the oncogenic protein c-MYC, and for inducing the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, a mediator of tumor growth and angiogenesis. Together, the results indicate that SKI exploits multiple regulatory levels of the TGF-beta pathway and its deficiency restores TGF-beta tumor suppressor and apoptotic activities in spite of the likely presence of oncogenic mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:19845874

  20. Gene silencing in primary and metastatic tumors by small interfering RNA delivery in mice: quantitative analysis using melanoma cells expressing firefly and sea pansy luciferases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2005-07-20

    Silencing of oncogenes or other genes contributing to tumor malignancy or progression by RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising approach to treating tumor patients. To achieve RNAi-based tumor therapy, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) or siRNA-expressing vector needs to be delivered to tumor cells, but little information about its in vivo delivery has been reported. In this study, we examined whether the expression of the target gene in tumor cells can be suppressed by the delivery of RNAi effectors to primary and metastatic tumor cells. To quantitatively evaluate the RNAi effects in tumor cells, mouse melanoma B16-BL6 cells were stably transfected with both firefly (a model target gene) and sea pansy (an internal standard gene) luciferase genes to obtain B16-BL6/dual Luc cells. The target gene expression in subcutaneous primary tumors of B16-BL6/dual Luc cells was significantly suppressed by direct injection of the RNAi effectors followed by electroporation. The expression in metastatic hepatic tumors was also significantly reduced by an intravenous injection of either RNAi effector by the hydrodynamics-based procedure. These results indicate that the both RNAi effectors have a potential to silence target gene in tumor cells in vivo when successfully delivered to tumor cells. PMID:15936841

  1. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  2. APN401 in Treating Patients With Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Pancreatic Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-07

    Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Melanoma; Stage IIIB Melanoma; Stage IIIC Melanoma; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  3. A novel miR-451a isomiR, associated with amelanotypic phenotype, acts as a tumor suppressor in melanoma by retarding cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Babapoor, Sankhiros; Fleming, Elizabeth; Wu, Rong; Dadras, Soheil S

    2014-01-01

    miRNAs are key regulatory small non-coding RNAs involved in critical steps of melanoma tumorigenesis; however, the relationship between sequence specific variations at the 5' or 3' termini (isomiR) of a miRNA and cancer phenotype remains unclear. Deep-sequencing and qRT-PCR showed reduced expression of miR-144/451a cluster and most abundant isomiR (miR451a.1) in dysplastic nevi, in-situ and invasive melanomas compared to common nevi and normal skin (n = 101). miRNA in situ hybridization reproducibly confirmed lost miR-451a.1 in melanoma compared to nevus cells or adjacent keratinocytes. Significantly higher expression of miR-451a.1 was associated with amelanotic phenotype in melanomas (n = 47). In contrast, miR-451a was associated with melanotic phenotype, absent pagetoid scatter of intraepidermal melanocytes, superficial spreading histological subtype and tumor inflammation. Sequencing miRNAs from cultured melanocytes with cytoplasmic melanin gradient (light, medium to dark) showed absent miR-451a while revealing other melanin-associated miRNAs, e.g. miR-30b, miR-100 and miR-590 in darkly and let-7a, let-7i and let-7f in lightly to moderately pigmented cultured melanocytes. Ectopic expression of miR-144/451a in melanoma cell lines resulted in markedly higher levels of mature miR-451a.1 than miR451a or miR-144; and significantly retarded cell migration and inhibited invasion in a glucose-sensitive manner. Surprisingly, these effects were not mediated by calcium binding protein 39 (CAB39), a proven miR451a gene target. miR-144/miR-451a cluster is a novel miRNA locus with tumor suppressive activity in melanoma. PMID:25237911

  4. Enrichment of CD56dimKIR+CD57+ highly cytotoxic NK cells in tumor infiltrated lymph nodes of melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Mortarini, Roberta; Anichini, Andrea; Garofalo, Cinzia; Tallerico, Rossana; Santinami, Mario; Gulletta, Elio; Ietto, Caterina; Galgani, Mario; Matarese, Giuseppe; Bifulco, Maurizio; Ferrone, Soldano; Colucci, Francesco; Moretta, Alessandro; Kärre, Klas; Carbone, Ennio

    2014-01-01

    An important checkpoint in the progression of melanoma is the metastasis to lymph nodes. Here, to investigate the role of lymph node NK cells in disease progression, we analyze frequency, phenotype and functions of NK cells from tumor-infiltrated (TILN) and tumor-free ipsilateral lymph nodes (TFLN) of the same patients. We show an expansion of CD56dimCD57dimCD69+CCR7+KIR+ NK cells in TILN. TILN NK cells display robust cytotoxic activity against autologous melanoma cells. In the blood of metastatic melanoma patients the frequency of NK cells expressing the receptors for CXCL8 receptor is increased compared to healthy subjects, and blood NK cells also express the receptors for CCL2 and IL6. These factors are produced in high amount in TILN and in vitro switch the phenotype of blood NK cells from healthy donors to the phenotype associated with TILN. Our data suggest that the microenvironment of TILN generates and/or recruits a particularly effective NK cell subset. PMID:25472612

  5. Norepinephrine promotes tumor microenvironment reactivity through β3-adrenoreceptors during melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Maura; Pelon, Floriane; Comito, Giuseppina; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Moretti, Silvia; Innocenti, Stefania; Nassini, Romina; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Bambi, Franco; Giannoni, Elisa; Filippi, Luca; Chiarugi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Stress has an emerging role in cancer and targeting stress-related β-adrenergic receptors (AR) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach in melanoma. Here we report that β3-AR expression correlates with melanoma aggressiveness. In addition, we highlight that β3-AR expression is not only restricted to cancer cells, but it is also expressed in vivo in stromal, inflammatory and vascular cells of the melanoma microenvironment. Particularly, we demonstrated that β3-AR can (i) instruct melanoma cells to respond to environmental stimuli, (ii) enhance melanoma cells response to stromal fibroblasts and macrophages, (iii) increase melanoma cell motility and (iv) induce stem-like traits. Noteworthy, β3-AR activation in melanoma accessory cells drives stromal reactivity by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and de novo angiogenesis, sustaining tumor growth and melanoma aggressiveness. β3-ARs also play a mandatory role in the recruitment to tumor sites of circulating stromal cells precursors, in the differentiation of these cells towards different lineages, further favoring tumor inflammation, angiogenesis and ultimately melanoma malignancy. Our findings validate selective β3-AR antagonists as potential promising anti-metastatic agents. These could be used to complement current therapeutic approaches for melanoma patients (e.g. propranolol) by targeting non-neoplastic stromal cells, hence reducing therapy resistance of melanoma. PMID:25474135

  6. Establishment and characterization of a transplantable tumor line (RMM) and cell line (RMM-C) from a malignant amelanotic melanoma in the F344 rat, with particular reference to galectin-3 expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bondoc, Alexandra; Katou-Ichikawa, Chisa; Golbar, Hossain M; Tanaka, Miyuu; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2016-11-01

    To investigate characteristics of malignant melanomas with various pathobiological features, a homotransplantable tumor line (RMM) was established from a spontaneous amelanotic melanoma found in the pinna of an aged F344 rat. RMM tumors were transplanted in syngeneic rats by serial subcutaneous implantation with 100% intake. The original and RMM tumors consisted of spindle-shaped cells arranged mainly in interlacing bundles. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were positive to PNL-2 (melanocytes), nestin (neuroectodermal stem cells), S-100 (neurogenic cells) and vimentin (mesenchymal cells). Electron microscopically, tumor cells possessed single membrane-bound pre-melanosomes. Further, a cell line (RMM-C) was induced from an RMM tumor. RMM-C cells and the induced tumors in syngeneic rats showed immunohistochemical reactions similar to the original and RMM tumors. Interestingly, serum level of galectin-3 expression was increased with growing RMM tumors, and the expression was influenced by TNF-α (increase) or TGF-β1 (decrease), indicating a possible biomarker of amelanotic melanomas. The RMM tumors and RMM-C cell line could become useful tools for studies on the pathobiology, including tumor immunity, and development of therapeutic strategies against this malignancy. These tools are the first tumor lines of amelanotic melanomas in the rat. PMID:26949998

  7. Targeting activating mutations of EZH2 leads to potent cell growth inhibition in human melanoma by derepression of tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Tiffen, Jessamy C.; Gunatilake, Dilini; Gallagher, Stuart J.; Gowrishankar, Kavitha; Heinemann, Anja; Cullinane, Carleen; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Pupo, Gulietta M.; Strbenac, Dario; Yang, Jean Y.; Madore, Jason; Mann, Graham J.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; McArthur, Grant A.; Filipp, Fabian V.; Hersey, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The epigenetic modifier EZH2 is part of the polycomb repressive complex that suppresses gene expression via histone methylation. Activating mutations in EZH2 are found in a subset of melanoma that contributes to disease progression by inactivating tumor suppressor genes. In this study we have targeted EZH2 with a specific inhibitor (GSK126) or depleted EZH2 protein by stable shRNA knockdown. We show that inhibition of EZH2 has potent effects on the growth of both wild-type and EZH2 mutant human melanoma in vitro particularly in cell lines harboring the EZH2Y646 activating mutation. This was associated with cell cycle arrest, reduced proliferative capacity in both 2D and 3D culture systems, and induction of apoptosis. The latter was caspase independent and mediated by the release of apoptosis inducing factor (AIFM1) from mitochondria. Gene expression arrays showed that several well characterized tumor suppressor genes were reactivated by EZH2 inhibition. This included activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) that was validated as an EZH2 target gene by ChIP-qPCR. These results emphasize a critical role for EZH2 in the proliferation and viability of melanoma and highlight the potential for targeted therapy against EZH2 in treatment of patients with melanoma. PMID:26304929

  8. CARI III inhibits tumor growth in a melanoma-bearing mouse model through induction of G0/G1 cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Mushroom-derived natural products have been used to prevent or treat cancer for millennia. In this study, we evaluated the anticancer effects of CARI (Cell Activation Research Institute) III, which consists of a blend of mushroom mycelia from Phellinus linteus grown on germinated brown rice, Inonotus obliquus grown on germinated brown rice, Antrodia camphorata grown on germinated brown rice and Ganoderma lucidum. Here, we showed that CARI III exerted anti-cancer activity, which is comparable to Dox against melanoma in vivo. B16F10 cells were intraperitoneally injected into C57BL6 mice to develop solid intra-abdominal tumors. Three hundred milligrams of the CARI III/kg/day p.o. regimen reduced tumor weight, comparable to the doxorubicin (Dox)-treated group. An increase in life span (ILS% = 50.88%) was observed in the CARI III-administered group, compared to the tumor control group. CARI III demonstrates anti-proliferative activity against B16F10 melanoma cells through inducing G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. CARI III inhibits the expression of cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK2 and induces p21. Therefore, CARI III could be a potential chemopreventive supplement to melanoma patients. PMID:25221864

  9. Cross-talk between Dopachrome Tautomerase and Caveolin-1 Is Melanoma Cell Phenotype-specific and Potentially Involved in Tumor Progression.

    PubMed

    Popa, Ioana L; Milac, Adina L; Sima, Livia E; Alexandru, Petruta R; Pastrama, Florin; Munteanu, Cristian V A; Negroiu, Gabriela

    2016-06-10

    l-Dopachrome tautomerase (l-DCT), also called tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP-2), is a melanoma antigen overexpressed in most chemo-/radiotherapeutic stress-resistant tumor clones, and caveolin-1 (CAV1) is a main regulator of numerous signaling processes. A structural and functional relationship between DCT and CAV1 is first presented here in two human amelanotic melanoma cell lines, derived from vertical growth phase (MelJuSo) and metastatic (SKMel28) melanomas. DCT co-localizes at the plasma membrane with CAV1 and Cavin-1, another molecular marker for caveolae in both cell phenotypes. Our novel structural model proposed for the DCT-CAV1 complex, in addition to co-immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry data, indicates a possible direct interaction between DCT and CAV1. The CAV1 control on DCT gene expression, DCT post-translational processing, and subcellular distribution is cell phenotype-dependent. DCT is a modulator of CAV1 stability and supramolecular assembly in both cell phenotypes. During autocrine stimulation, the expressions of DCT and CAV1 are oppositely regulated; DCT increases while CAV1 decreases. Sub-confluent MelJuSo clones DCT(high)/CAV1(low) are proliferating and acquire fibroblast-like morphology, forming massive, confluent clusters as demonstrated by immunofluorescent staining and TissueFAXS quantitative image cytometry analysis. CAV1 down-regulation directly contributes to the expansion of MelJuSo DCT(high) subtype. CAV1 involved in the perpetuation of cell phenotype-overexpressing anti-stress DCT molecule supports the concept that CAV1 functions as a tumor suppressor in early stages of melanoma. DCT is a regulator of the CAV1-associated structures and is possibly a new molecular player in CAV1-mediated processes in melanoma. PMID:27053106

  10. Tamoxifen inhibits tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma through suppression of PKC/MEK/ERK and PKC/PI3K/Akt pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuoka, Hiroshi; Tsubaki, Masanobu; Yamazoe, Yuzuru; Ogaki, Mitsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Itoh, Tatsuki; Kusunoki, Takashi; Nishida, Shozo

    2009-07-15

    In melanoma, several signaling pathways are constitutively activated. Among these, the protein kinase C (PKC) signaling pathways are activated through multiple signal transduction molecules and appear to play major roles in melanoma progression. Recently, it has been reported that tamoxifen, an anti-estrogen reagent, inhibits PKC signaling in estrogen-negative and estrogen-independent cancer cell lines. Thus, we investigated whether tamoxifen inhibited tumor cell invasion and metastasis in mouse melanoma cell line B16BL6. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited lung metastasis, cell migration, and invasion at concentrations that did not show anti-proliferative effects on B16BL6 cells. Tamoxifen also inhibited the mRNA expressions and protein activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Furthermore, tamoxifen suppressed phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and Akt through the inhibition of PKC{alpha} and PKC{delta} phosphorylation. However, other signal transduction factor, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) was unaffected. The results indicate that tamoxifen suppresses the PKC/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/ERK and PKC/phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathways, thereby inhibiting B16BL6 cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Moreover, tamoxifen markedly inhibited not only developing but also clinically evident metastasis. These findings suggest that tamoxifen has potential clinical applications for the treatment of tumor cell metastasis.

  11. The novel tumor suppressor p33ING2 enhances UVB-induced apoptosis in human melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, M.Y.; Ng, Kin Cheung P.; Li Gang . E-mail: gangli@interchange.ubc.ca

    2005-04-01

    The roles of p33ING2 as a tumor suppressor candidate have been shown through regulation of gene transcription, induction of cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. As p33ING2 shares 58.9% homology with p33ING1b, we hypothesized that p33ING2 shares functional similarities with p33ING1b. We previously found that p33ING1b cooperates with p53 to enhance UVB-induced apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of p33ING2 enhanced apoptosis in UVB-irradiated and non-irradiated melanoma MMRU cells. We demonstrate that enhancement of apoptosis by p33ING2 requires the presence of functional p53. Furthermore, we found that overexpression of p33ING2 significantly downregulated the expression of Bcl-2 after UVB irradiation, resulting in an increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Moreover, we found that p33ING2 promoted Bax translocation to mitochondria, altered the mitochondrial membrane potential, and induced cytochrome c release and thus the activation of caspases 9 and 3. In addition, we showed that under non-stress conditions p33ING2 upregulates Fas expression and activates caspase 8. Taken together, we demonstrate that p33ING2 cooperates with p53 to regulate apoptosis via activation of both the mitochondrial/intrinsic and death-receptor/extrinsic apoptotic pathways.

  12. Isolation of melanoma cell subpopulations using negative selection

    PubMed Central

    Slipicevic, Ana; Somasundaram, Rajasekharan; Sproesser, Katrin; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2014-01-01

    Melanomas are phenotypically and functiwonally heterogeneous tumors comprising of distinct subpopulations that drive disease progression and are responsible for resistance to therapy. Identification and characterization of such subpopulations are highly important to develop novel targeted therapies. However, this can be a challenging task as there is a lack of clearly defined markers to distinguish the melanoma subpopulations from a general tumor cell population. Also, there is a lack of optimal isolation methods and functional assays that can fully recapitulate their phenotype. Here we describe a method for isolating tumor cells from fresh human tumor tissue specimens using an antibody coupled magnetic bead sorting technique that is well established in our laboratory. Thus, melanoma cells are enriched by negative cell sorting and elimination of non-tumor cell population such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and endothelial cells. Enriched unmodified tumor cells can be further used for phenotypic and functional characterization of melanoma subpopulations. PMID:24258995

  13. PD-1 and Tim-3 regulate the expansion of tumor antigen-specific CD8⁺ T cells induced by melanoma vaccines.

    PubMed

    Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Pagliano, Ornella; Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Sander, Cindy; Janjic, Bratislav; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Tawbi, Hussein A; Kirkwood, John M; Moschos, Stergios; Wang, Hong; Guillaume, Philippe; Luescher, Immanuel F; Krieg, Arthur; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Zarour, Hassane M

    2014-02-15

    Although melanoma vaccines stimulate tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, objective clinical responses are rarely observed. To investigate this discrepancy, we evaluated the character of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells with regard to the inhibitory T-cell coreceptors PD-1 and Tim-3 in patients with metastatic melanoma who were administered tumor vaccines. The vaccines included incomplete Freund's adjuvant, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG), and the HLA-A2-restricted analog peptide NY-ESO-1 157-165V, either by itself or in combination with the pan-DR epitope NY-ESO-1 119-143. Both vaccines stimulated rapid tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses detected ex vivo, however, tumor antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells produced more IFN-γ and exhibited higher lytic function upon immunization with MHC class I and class II epitopes. Notably, the vast majority of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells upregulated PD-1 and a minority also upregulated Tim-3. Levels of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression by vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells at the time of vaccine administration correlated inversely with their expansion in vivo. Dual blockade of PD-1 and Tim-3 enhanced the expansion and cytokine production of vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Collectively, our findings support the use of PD-1 and Tim-3 blockades with cancer vaccines to stimulate potent antitumor T-cell responses and increase the likelihood of clinical responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:24343228

  14. Bonded Cumomer Analysis of Human Melanoma Metabolism Monitored by 13C NMR Spectroscopy of Perfused Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Shestov, Alexander A; Mancuso, Anthony; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Guo, Lili; Nelson, David S; Roman, Jeffrey C; Henry, Pierre-Gilles; Leeper, Dennis B; Blair, Ian A; Glickson, Jerry D

    2016-03-01

    A network model for the determination of tumor metabolic fluxes from (13)C NMR kinetic isotopomer data has been developed and validated with perfused human DB-1 melanoma cells carrying the BRAF V600E mutation, which promotes oxidative metabolism. The model generated in the bonded cumomer formalism describes key pathways of tumor intermediary metabolism and yields dynamic curves for positional isotopic enrichment and spin-spin multiplets. Cells attached to microcarrier beads were perfused with 26 mm [1,6-(13)C2]glucose under normoxic conditions at 37 °C and monitored by (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Excellent agreement between model-predicted and experimentally measured values of the rates of oxygen and glucose consumption, lactate production, and glutamate pool size validated the model. ATP production by glycolytic and oxidative metabolism were compared under hyperglycemic normoxic conditions; 51% of the energy came from oxidative phosphorylation and 49% came from glycolysis. Even though the rate of glutamine uptake was ∼ 50% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux, the rate of ATP production from glutamine was essentially zero (no glutaminolysis). De novo fatty acid production was ∼ 6% of the tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway flux was 3.6% of glycolysis, and three non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway exchange fluxes were calculated. Mass spectrometry was then used to compare fluxes through various pathways under hyperglycemic (26 mm) and euglycemic (5 mm) conditions. Under euglycemic conditions glutamine uptake doubled, but ATP production from glutamine did not significantly change. A new parameter measuring the Warburg effect (the ratio of lactate production flux to pyruvate influx through the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier) was calculated to be 21, close to upper limit of oxidative metabolism. PMID:26703469

  15. BFD-22 a new potential inhibitor of BRAF inhibits the metastasis of B16F10 melanoma cells and simultaneously increased the tumor immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adilson Kleber; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Kruyt, Frank A E; Palace-Berl, Fanny; Azevedo, Ricardo Alexandre; Turra, Kely Medeiros; Rodrigues, Cecilia Pessoa; Ferreira, Ana Carolina Franco; Salomón, Maria Alejandra Clavijo; de Sá Junior, Paulo Luiz; Farias, Camyla Fernandes; Figueiredo, Carlos Rogerio; Tavares, Leoberto Costa; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; Jorge, Salomão Dória

    2016-03-15

    Benzofuroxan is an interesting ring system, which has shown a wide spectrum of biological responses against tumor cell lines. We investigated, herein, the antitumor effects of benzofuroxan derivatives (BFDs) in vitro and in a melanoma mouse model. Cytotoxic effects of twenty-two BFDs were determined by MTT assay. Effects of BFD-22 in apoptosis and cell proliferation were evaluated using Annexin V-FITC/PI and CFSE staining. In addition, the effects in the cell cycle were assessed. Flow cytometry, western blot, and fluorescence microscopy analysis were employed to investigate the apoptosis-related proteins and the BRAF signaling. Cell motility was also exploited through cell invasion and migration assays. Molecular docking approach was performed in order to verify the BFD-22 binding mode into the ATP catalytic site of BRAF kinase. Moreover, the BFD-22 antitumor effects were evaluated in a melanoma murine model using B16F10. BFD-22 was identified as a potential hit against melanoma cells. BFD-22 induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation of B16F10 cells. BFD-22 has suppressed, indeed, the migratory and invasive behavior of B16F10 cells. Cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression were reduced leading to cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Of note, phosphorylation of BRAF at Ser338 was strongly down-regulated by BFD-22 in B16F10 cells. The accommodation/orientation into the binding site of BRAF was similar of BAY43-9006 (co-crystallized inhibitor of BRAF, sorafenib). Importantly, BFD-22 presented in vivo antimetastatic effects and showed better therapeutic efficacy than sorafenib and taxol. BFD-22 can be considered as a new lead compound and, then, can be helpful for the designing of novel drug candidates to treat melanoma. PMID:26876618

  16. TLR-3 stimulation improves anti-tumor immunity elicited by dendritic cell exosome-based vaccines in a murine model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Damo, Martina; Wilson, David S.; Simeoni, Eleonora; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-derived exosomes (Dexo) contain the machinery necessary to activate potent antigen-specific immune responses. As promising cell-free immunogens, Dexo have been tested in previous clinical trials for cancer vaccine immunotherapy, yet resulted in limited therapeutic benefit. Here, we explore a novel Dexo vaccine formulation composed of Dexo purified from DCs loaded with antigens and matured with either the TLR-3 ligand poly(I:C), the TLR-4 ligand LPS or the TLR-9 ligand CpG-B. When poly(I:C) was used to produce exosomes together with ovalbumin (OVA), the resulting Dexo vaccine strongly stimulated OVA-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to proliferate and acquire effector functions. When a B16F10 melanoma cell lysate was used to load DCs with tumor antigens during exosome production together with poly(I:C), we obtained a Dexo vaccine capable of inducing robust activation of melanoma-specific CD8+ T cells and the recruitment of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, NK and NK-T cells to the tumor site, resulting in significantly reduced tumor growth and enhanced survival as compared to a Dexo vaccine formulation similar to the one previously tested on human patients. Our results indicate that poly(I:C) is a particularly favorable TLR agonist for DC maturation during antigen loading and exosome production for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26631690

  17. Variant G6PD levels promote tumor cell proliferation or apoptosis via the STAT3/5 pathway in the human melanoma xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), elevated in tumor cells, catalyzes the first reaction in the pentose-phosphate pathway. The regulation mechanism of G6PD and pathological change in human melanoma growth remains unknown. Methods HEM (human epidermal melanocyte) cells and human melanoma cells with the wild-type G6PD gene (A375-WT), G6PD deficiency (A375-G6PD∆), G6PD cDNA overexpression (A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-WT), and mutant G6PD cDNA (A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-G487A) were subcutaneously injected into 5 groups of nude mice. Expressions of G6PD, STAT3, STAT5, cell cycle-related proteins, and apoptotic proteins as well as mechanistic exploration of STAT3/STAT5 were determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry and western blot. Results Delayed formation and slowed growth were apparent in A375-G6PD∆ cells, compared to A375-WT cells. Significantly decreased G6PD expression and activity were observed in tumor tissues induced by A375-G6PD∆, along with down-regulated cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E, p53, and S100A4. Apoptosis-inhibited factors Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl were up-regulated; however, apoptosis factor Fas was down-regulated, compared to A375-WT cells. Moderate protein expressions were observed in A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-WT and A375-G6PD∆-G6PD-G487A cells. Conclusions G6PD may regulate apoptosis and expression of cell cycle-related proteins through phosphorylation of transcription factors STAT3 and STAT5, thus mediating formation and growth of human melanoma cells. Further study will, however, be required to determine potential clinical applications. PMID:23693134

  18. Ex Vivo Derived Primary Melanoma Cells: Implications for Immunotherapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Suriano, Robert; Rajoria, Shilpi; L.George, Andrea; Geliebter, Jan; Wallack, Marc; Tiwari, Raj K.

    2013-01-01

    Transformation of the pigment producing melanocytes into melanoma is a complex multi-step process involving the enhanced expression of various antigens considered as immunotherapeutic targets. Significant progress in melanoma research has been made over the years and has resulted in the identification of various antigens over expressed in melanoma as well as advances in immunotherapeutic treatments, which focus on modulating the immune systems response to melanoma. Despite these advances, incidences of melanoma are still on the rise thus warranting additional research in identifying new therapeutic treatments. Our focus is on developing a multivalent immunotherapeutic vaccine that targets various melanoma associated antigens. The approach focuses on the use of five primary patient derived melanoma cells (MEL-2, MEL-V, 3MM, KFM, and GLM-2, which have been characterized in this study. These cells express differential amounts of various melanoma associated antigens such as MART-1, gp100 (Pmel17), MAGE-A1 and tyrosinase as well a cell surface antigens essential for melanoma cell metastasis, such as CD146 and CD71. In addition these cells display differential in vitro migratory and invasive properties as well as have the ability to form solid tumors when implanted into BALB/c nude mice. The retention of the innate phenotype of these primary patient derived cells together with the expression of a multitude repertoire of melanoma associated antigens offers a novel opportunity to target melanoma so as to avoid immune evasion. PMID:23833682

  19. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bol, Kalijn F; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Pots, Jeanette M; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; de Boer, Annemiek J; van Oorschot, Tom G M; Croockewit, Sandra A J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Mus, Roel D M; van Rossum, Michelle M; van der Graaf, Chantal A A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Adema, Gosse J; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combined intradermal/intravenous injection (16 patients) with VAC-DC loaded with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mRNA encoding tumor antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Tumor antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored in blood and skin-test infiltrating-lymphocyte cultures. Almost all patients mounted prophylactic vaccine- or KLH-specific immune responses. Both after intranodal injection and after intradermal/intravenous injection, tumor antigen-specific immune responses were detected, which coincide with longer overall survival in stage IV melanoma patients. VAC-DC induce local and systemic CTC grade 2 and 3 toxicity, which is most likely caused by BCG in the maturation cocktail. The side effects were self-limiting or resolved upon a short period of systemic steroid therapy. We conclude that VAC-DC can induce functional tumor-specific responses. Unfortunately, toxicity observed after vaccination precludes the general application of VAC-DC, since in DC maturated with prophylactic vaccines BCG appears to be essential in the maturation cocktail. PMID:26861670

  20. High frequencies of circulating melanoma-reactive CD8+ T cells in patients with advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Letsch, A; Keilholz, U; Schadendorf, D; Nagorsen, D; Schmittel, A; Thiel, E; Scheibenbogen, C

    2000-09-01

    To determine whether circulating tumor-reactive T cells are present in melanoma patients, unstimulated T cells from peripheral blood were tested for recognition of HLA-A2- or HLA-A1-matched melanoma cell lines using the ELISPOT assay. Eleven out of 19 patients with metastatic melanoma had a T-cell response with up to 0.81%, 0.78%, 0. 53%, 0.12%, 0.10%, 0.09%, 0.07%, 0.06%, 0.06%, 0.04%, and 0.04% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) secreting IFNgamma upon exposure to various HLA-A2- or HLA-A1-matched melanoma cell lines. These T-cell responses were mediated by CD8+ T cells and could specifically be blocked by an anti-HLA-A2 antibody in HLA-A2-positive patients. Separation experiments performed in one melanoma patient showed tumor-reactive T cells in both the CD8+ effector T cell (CD45RA+/IFNgamma+) as well as the CD8+ memory T-cell compartment (CD45RO+/IFNgamma+). In 3 out of 5 patients, in whom autologous cell lines were available, similar frequencies of T cells in response to HLA-A1- or HLA-A2-matched allogeneic and autologous tumor cells were observed, while 2 patients had a T-cell response restricted to either the autologous or the allogeneic cell lines. These results give evidence for the presence of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells in more than half of melanoma patients tested. Although some of these patients have clinical evidence for an immunological-mediated tumor control, several patients have growing tumors suggesting presence of escape mechanisms. PMID:10925359

  1. Development of potent autophagy inhibitors that sensitize oncogenic BRAF V600E mutant melanoma tumor cells to vemurafenib.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Megan L; Wang, Tong; Martin, Katie R; Kortus, Matthew G; Kauffman, Audra L; Trent, Jeffrey M; Gately, Stephen; MacKeigan, Jeffrey P

    2014-06-01

    Autophagy is a dynamic cell survival mechanism by which a double-membrane vesicle, or autophagosome, sequesters portions of the cytosol for delivery to the lysosome for recycling. This process can be inhibited using the antimalarial agent chloroquine (CQ), which impairs lysosomal function and prevents autophagosome turnover. Despite its activity, CQ is a relatively inadequate inhibitor that requires high concentrations to disrupt autophagy, highlighting the need for improved small molecules. To address this, we screened a panel of antimalarial agents for autophagy inhibition and chemically synthesized a novel series of acridine and tetrahydroacridine derivatives. Structure-activity relationship studies of the acridine ring led to the discovery of VATG-027 as a potent autophagy inhibitor with a high cytotoxicity profile. In contrast, the tetrahydroacridine VATG-032 showed remarkably little cytotoxicity while still maintaining autophagy inhibition activity, suggesting that both compounds act as autophagy inhibitors with differential effects on cell viability. Further, knockdown of autophagy-related genes showed no effect on cell viability, demonstrating that the ability to inhibit autophagy is separate from the compound cytotoxicity profiles. Next, we determined that both inhibitors function through lysosomal deacidification mechanisms and ultimately disrupt autophagosome turnover. To evaluate the genetic context in which these lysosomotropic inhibitors may be effective, they were tested in patient-derived melanoma cell lines driven by oncogenic BRAF (v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B). We discovered that both inhibitors sensitized melanoma cells to the BRAF V600E inhibitor vemurafenib. Overall, these autophagy inhibitors provide a means to effectively block autophagy and have the potential to sensitize mutant BRAF melanomas to first-line therapies. PMID:24879157

  2. In vitro melanoma cell growth after preenucleation radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneally, C.Z.; Farber, M.G.; Smith, M.E.; Devineni, R.

    1988-02-01

    The in vitro efficacy of 20 Gy (2000 rad) of external beam irradiation delivered to patients with choroidal melanomas prior to enucleation was investigated in 11 patients whose tumors were grown in cell culture. Phase-contrast microscopy was used to compare growth patterns between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. Cell types were determined by histologic stains, and electron microscopy identified intracytoplasmic melanin. Irradiated melanomas did not grow and did not attach to culture flasks, thus demonstrating that preenucleation irradiation alters the in vitro growth of melanoma cells.

  3. Fc-dependent depletion of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells co-defines the efficacy of anti–CTLA-4 therapy against melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Tyler R.; Li, Fubin; Montalvo-Ortiz, Welby; Sepulveda, Manuel A.; Bergerhoff, Katharina; Arce, Frederick; Roddie, Claire; Henry, Jake Y.; Yagita, Hideo; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Peggs, Karl S.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibody specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), an inhibitory receptor expressed by T lymphocytes, has emerged as an effective therapy for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Although subject to debate, current models favor a mechanism of activity involving blockade of the inhibitory activity of CTLA-4 on both effector (T eff) and regulatory (T reg) T cells, resulting in enhanced antitumor effector T cell activity capable of inducing tumor regression. We demonstrate, however, that the activity of anti–CTLA-4 antibody on the T reg cell compartment is mediated via selective depletion of T reg cells within tumor lesions. Importantly, T reg cell depletion is dependent on the presence of Fcγ receptor–expressing macrophages within the tumor microenvironment, indicating that T reg cells are depleted in trans in a context-dependent manner. Our results reveal further mechanistic insight into the activity of anti-CTLA-4–based cancer immunotherapy, and illustrate the importance of specific features of the local tumor environment on the final outcome of antibody-based immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:23897981

  4. Fc-dependent depletion of tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells co-defines the efficacy of anti-CTLA-4 therapy against melanoma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Tyler R; Li, Fubin; Montalvo-Ortiz, Welby; Sepulveda, Manuel A; Bergerhoff, Katharina; Arce, Frederick; Roddie, Claire; Henry, Jake Y; Yagita, Hideo; Wolchok, Jedd D; Peggs, Karl S; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Allison, James P; Quezada, Sergio A

    2013-08-26

    Treatment with monoclonal antibody specific for cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4), an inhibitory receptor expressed by T lymphocytes, has emerged as an effective therapy for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Although subject to debate, current models favor a mechanism of activity involving blockade of the inhibitory activity of CTLA-4 on both effector (T eff) and regulatory (T reg) T cells, resulting in enhanced antitumor effector T cell activity capable of inducing tumor regression. We demonstrate, however, that the activity of anti-CTLA-4 antibody on the T reg cell compartment is mediated via selective depletion of T reg cells within tumor lesions. Importantly, T reg cell depletion is dependent on the presence of Fcγ receptor-expressing macrophages within the tumor microenvironment, indicating that T reg cells are depleted in trans in a context-dependent manner. Our results reveal further mechanistic insight into the activity of anti-CTLA-4-based cancer immunotherapy, and illustrate the importance of specific features of the local tumor environment on the final outcome of antibody-based immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:23897981

  5. Melanoma Stem Cells and Metastasis: Mimicking Hematopoietic Cell Trafficking?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nayoung; Barthel, Steven R.; Schatton, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a highly metastatic cancer that bears responsibility for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Amidst the research efforts to better understand melanoma progression, there has been increasing evidence that hints at a role for a subpopulation of virulent cancer cells, termed malignant melanoma stem or initiating cells (MMICs), in metastasis formation. MMICs are characterized by their preferential ability to initiate and propagate tumor growth and their selective capacity for self-renewal and differentiation into less tumorigenic melanoma cells. The frequency of MMICs has been shown to correlate with poor clinical prognosis in melanoma. Additionally, MMICs are enriched among circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of cancer patients, suggesting that MMICs may be a critical player in the metastatic cascade. Although these links exist between MMICs and metastatic disease, the mechanisms by which MMICs may advance metastatic progression are only beginning to be elucidated. Recent studies have shown that MMICs express molecules critical for hematopoietic cell maintenance and trafficking, providing a possible explanation for how circulating MMICs could drive melanoma dissemination. We therefore propose that MMICs might fuel melanoma metastasis by exploiting homing mechanisms commonly utilized by hematopoietic cells. Here we review the biological properties of MMICs and the existing literature on their metastatic potential. We will discuss possible mechanisms by which MMICs might initiate metastases in the context of established knowledge of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in other cancers and of hematopoietic homing molecules, with a particular focus on selectins, integrins, chemokines, and chemokine receptors known to be expressed by melanoma cells. Biological understanding of how these molecules might be utilized by MMICs to propel the metastatic cascade could critically impact the development of more effective therapies for advanced

  6. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-15

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  7. Melanoma educates mesenchymal stromal cells towards vasculogenic mimicry

    PubMed Central

    VARTANIAN, AMALIA; KARSHIEVA, SAIDA; DOMBROVSKY, VLADISLAV; BELYAVSKY, ALEXANDER

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor, and promote tumor development and growth. The present study was performed to investigate the communication between aggressive melanoma and MSCs in vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Normal human MSCs plated on Matrigel were unable to form capillary-like structures (CLSs). By contrast, MSCs co-cultured with aggressive melanoma cell lines, namely, Mel Cher, Mel Kor and Mel P, generated CLSs. Significantly, MSCs co-cultured with poorly aggressive melanoma cells, namely, Mel Me, failed to form CLSs. To identify factors responsible for VM, the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), pro-epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor 1α on the formation of CLSs by MSCs were tested. VM was induced by the addition of VEGFA, whereas other cytokines were inefficient. To confirm the hypothesis that aggressive tumor cells can increase the vasculogenic ability of MSCs, a standard B16/F10 mouse melanoma test system was used. MSCs isolated from the adipose tissues of C57BL/6 mice with melanoma formed a vascular-like network on Matrigel, whereas MSCs from healthy mice failed to form such structures. This study provides the first direct evidence that melanoma tumors educate MSCs to engage in VM. The education may occur distantly. These findings offer promise for novel therapeutic directions in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27313776

  8. Regulation of class II beta-tubulin expression by tumor suppressor p53 protein in mouse melanoma cells in response to Vinca alkaloid.

    PubMed

    Arai, Katsuhiko; Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Nagashima, Yuko; Yagasaki, Kazumi

    2006-04-01

    The continuous exposure of antimicrotubule drugs to tumors often results in the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells with altered expression of several beta-tubulin isotypes. We found that Vinca alkaloid enhanced expression of class II beta-tubulin isotype (mTUBB2) in mouse B16F10 melanoma cells via alteration of the tumor suppressor p53 protein. Vincristine treatment stimulated an increase in mTUBB2 mRNA expression and promoted accumulation of this isotype around the nuclei. Transient transfection assays employing a reporter construct, together with site-directed mutagenesis studies, suggested that the p53-binding site found in the first intron was a critical region for mTUBB2 expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and associated antibody supershift experiments showed that vincristine promoted release of p53 protein from the binding site. In addition, exogenous induction of TAp63gamma (p51A), a homologue of p53, canceled the effect of vincristine on mTUBB2 expression. These results suggest that p53 protein may function as a suppressor of mTUBB2 expression and vincristine-mediated inhibition of p53 binding results in enhanced mTUBB2 expression. This phenomenon could be related with the emergence of drug-resistant tumor cells induced by Vinca alkaloid and may participate in determining the fate of these cells. PMID:16603638

  9. Noninvasive and label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Wei, Xunbin

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Circulating melanoma cell has high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC). PAFC is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. In our research, we developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting PA signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals were detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtained the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation. Our PAFC system is an efficient tool to monitor melanoma metastases, cancer recurrence and therapeutic efficacy.

  10. Melanoma (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor that involves the skin cells that produce pigment (melanin). The risk of melanoma increases with age, but frequently effects young, otherwise healthy people. Melanoma is an aggressive type of cancer that can spread very rapidly.

  11. Conditional ablation of Ikkb inhibits melanoma tumor development in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jinming; Splittgerber, Ryan; Yull, Fiona E.; Kantrow, Sara; Ayers, Gregory D.; Karin, Michael; Richmond, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that tumor cells show elevated activity of the NF-κB transcription factor, a phenomenon often resulting from constitutive activity of IκB kinase β (IKKβ). However, others have found that loss of NF-κB activity or IKKβ is tumor promoting. The role of NF-κB in tumor progression is therefore controversial and varies with tumor type. We sought to more extensively investigate the role IKKβ in melanoma tumor development by specifically disrupting Ikkb in melanocytes in an established mouse model of spontaneous melanoma, whereby HRasV12 is expressed in a melanocyte-specific, doxycycline-inducible manner in mice null for the gene encoding the tumor suppressor inhibitor cyclin-dependent kinase 4/alternative reading frame (Ink4a/Arf). Our results show that Ink4a/Arf–/– mice with melanocyte-specific deletion of Ikkb were protected from HRasV12-initiated melanoma only when p53 was expressed. This protection was accompanied by cell cycle arrest, with reduced cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), Cdk4, Aurora kinase A, and Aurora kinase B expression. Increased p53-mediated apoptosis was also observed, with decreased expression of the antiapoptotic proteins Bcl2 and survivin. Enhanced stabilization of p53 involved increased phosphorylation at Ser15 and reduced phosphorylation of double minute 2 (Mdm2) at Ser166. Together, our findings provide genetic and mechanistic evidence that mutant HRas initiation of tumorigenesis requires Ikkβ-mediated NF-κB activity. PMID:20530876

  12. Hinokitiol, a tropolone derivative, inhibits mouse melanoma (B16-F10) cell migration and in vivo tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lu, Shing-Hwa; Chang, Chao-Chien; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis are the major causes of treatment failure in patients with cancer. Hinokitiol, a natural bioactive compound found in Chamacyparis taiwanensis, has been used in hair tonics, cosmetics, and food as an antimicrobial agent. In this study, we investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of action of hinokitiol on migration by the metastatic melanoma cell line, B16-F10, in which matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) is found to be highly- expressed. Treatment with hinokitiol revealed a concentration-dependent inhibition of migration of B16-F10 melanoma cells. Hinokitiol appeared to achieve this effect by reducing the expression of MMP-1 and by suppressing the phosphorylation of mitogen- activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling molecules such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38 MAPK and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). On the other hand, hinokitiol treatment reversed IκB-α degradation and inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and cJun in B16-F10 cells. In addition, hinokitiol suppressed the translocation of p65 NF-κB from the cytosol to the nucleus, suggesting reduced NF-κB activation. Consistent with these in vitro findings, our in vivo study demonstrated that hinokitiol treatment significantly reduced the total number of mouse lung metastatic nodules and improved histological alterations in B16-F10 injected C57BL/6 mice. These findings suggest that treatment of B16-F10 cells with hinokitiol significantly inhibits metastasis, possibly by blocking MMP-1 activation, MAPK signaling pathways and inhibition of the transcription factors, NF-κB and c-Jun, involved in cancer cell migration. These results may accelerate the development of novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant cancers. PMID:25449038

  13. Tumor immunotherapy in melanoma: strategies for overcoming mechanisms of resistance and escape.

    PubMed

    Zigler, Maya; Villares, Gabriel J; Lev, Dina C; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of melanoma has been steadily increasing over the last 3 decades. Currently, there are several approved treatments for metastatic melanoma, including chemotherapy and biologic therapy as both single treatments and in combination, but none is associated with a significant increase in survival. The chemotherapeutic agent dacarbazine is the standard treatment for metastatic melanoma, with a response rate of 15-20%, although most responses are not sustained. One of the main problems with melanoma treatment is chemotherapeutic resistance. The mechanisms of resistance of melanoma cells to chemotherapy have yet to be elucidated. Following treatment with dacarbazine, melanoma cells activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway, which results in over-expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 and vascular endothelial growth factor. Melanoma cells utilize this mechanism to escape from the cytotoxic effect of the drug. We have previously reported on the development of fully human neutralizing antibodies against IL-8 (anti-IL-8-monoclonal-antibody [ABX-IL8]). In preclinical studies, ABX-IL8 inhibited tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis of human melanoma in vivo. We propose that combination treatment with dacarbazine and IL-8 will potentiate the cytotoxic effect of the drug. Furthermore, formation of metastasis is a multistep process that includes melanoma cell adhesion to endothelial cells. Melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MUC18) mediates these processes in melanoma and is therefore a good target for eliminating metastasis. We have developed a fully human antibody against MUC18 that has shown promising results in preclinical studies. Since resistance is one of the major obstacles in the treatment of melanoma, we propose that utilization of antibodies against IL-8 or MUC18 alone, or as part of a 'cocktail' in combination with dacarbazine, may be a new treatment modality for metastatic melanoma that overcomes resistance of the disease to

  14. Salmonella VNP20009-mediated RNA interference of ABCB5 moderated chemoresistance of melanoma stem cell and suppressed tumor growth more potently

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxin; Cheng, Xiawei; Lai, Yueyang; Zhou, Yuqiang; Cao, Wenmin; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance remains an obstacle hindering the success of chemotherapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been recently found to confer resistance to chemotherapy. Therefore functional markers of CSCs should be discovered and specific therapies targeting these cells should be developed. In our investigation, a small population of B16F10 cells which was positive for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 5 (ABCB5) was isolated. This population displayed characteristics similar to those of CSCs and ABCB5 was identified to confer tumor growth and drug resistance in B16F10 cell line. Although targeting ABCB5 by small short interfering RNA delivered by VNP20009 failed to inhibit tumor growth, the combined treatment of VNP-shABCB5 and chemotherapy can act synergistically to delay tumor growth and enhance survival time in a primary B16F10 mice model. Results suggest that the combined treatment of VNP-shABCB5 and chemotherapy can improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. Therefore, this combination therapy is of potential significance for melanoma treatment. PMID:26910836

  15. NFAT1 Directly Regulates IL8 and MMP3 to Promote Melanoma Tumor Growth and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Shoshan, Einav; Braeuer, Russell R; Kamiya, Takafumi; Mobley, Aaron K; Huang, Li; Vasquez, Mayra E; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Chakravarti, Nitin; Ivan, Cristina; Prieto, Victor; Villares, Gabriel J; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT1, NFATC2) is a transcription factor that binds and positively regulates IL2 expression during T-cell activation. NFAT1 has important roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses, but its involvement in cancer is not completely understood. We previously demonstrated that NFAT1 contributes to melanoma growth and metastasis by regulating the autotaxin gene (Enpp2). Here, we report a strong correlation between NFAT1 expression and metastatic potential in melanoma cell lines and tumor specimens. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying NFAT1 overexpression during melanoma progression, we conducted a microarray on a highly metastatic melanoma cell line in which NFAT1 expression was stably silenced. We identified and validated two downstream targets of NFAT1, IL8, and MMP3. Accordingly, NFAT1 depletion in metastatic melanoma cell lines was associated with reduced IL8 and MMP3 expression, whereas NFAT1 overexpression in a weakly metastatic cell line induced expression of these targets. Restoration of NFAT1 expression recovered IL8 and MMP3 expression levels back to baseline, indicating that both are direct targets of NFAT1. Moreover, in vivo studies demonstrated that NFAT1 and MMP3 promoted melanoma tumor growth and lung metastasis. Collectively, our findings assign a new role for NFAT1 in melanoma progression, underscoring the multifaceted functions that immunomodulatory factors may acquire in an unpredictable tumor microenvironment. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3145-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013197

  16. Cell Cycle Regulation and Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen; McArthur, Grant

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulation of cell cycle control is a hallmark of melanomagenesis. Agents targeting the G1-S and G2-M checkpoints, as well as direct anti-mitotic agents, have all shown promising preclinical activity in melanoma. However, in vivo, standalone single agents targeting cell cycle regulation have only demonstrated modest efficacy in unselected patients. The advent of specific CDK 4/6 inhibitors targeting the G1-S transition, with an improved therapeutic index, is a significant step forward. Potential synergy exists with the combination of CDK4/6 inhibitors with existing therapies targeting the MAPK pathway, particularly in subsets of metastatic melanomas such as NRAS and BRAF mutants. This reviews summaries of the latest developments in both preclinical and clinical data with cell cycle-targeted therapies in melanoma. PMID:27106898

  17. Molecular biology of malignant melanoma and other cutaneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Pons, M; Quintanilla, M

    2006-07-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer worldwide. Its incidence is doubling every 15-20 years likely because of an aging population, changes in behaviour towards sun exposure, and increased UV light fluency at the earth surface due to ozone depletion. In this review, we summarize the most important genetic changes contributing to the development of malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, the main tumor entities arising in the skin. While our understanding of the oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes involved in the development and progression of skin tumors is still fragmentary, recent advances have shown alterations affecting conserved signalling pathways that control cellular proliferation and viability. These pathways include INK4alpha/Rb, ARF/p53, RAS/MAPKs, and sonic hedgehog/Gli. PMID:16870533

  18. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumors and spitzoid melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T; Stephens, Philip J; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumors with distinctive histopathologic features. They include benign tumors (Spitz nevi), malignant tumors (spitzoid melanomas), and tumors with borderline histopathologic features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumors). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes are typically absent. Here we show that spitzoid neoplasms harbor kinase fusions of ROS1 (17%), NTRK1 (16%), ALK (10%), BRAF (5%), and RET (3%) in a mutually exclusive pattern. The chimeric proteins are constitutively active, stimulate oncogenic signaling pathways, are tumorigenic, and are found in the entire biologic spectrum of spitzoid neoplasms, including 55% of Spitz nevi, 56% of atypical Spitz tumors, and 39% of spitzoid melanomas. Kinase inhibitors suppress the oncogenic signaling of the fusion proteins in vitro. In summary, kinase fusions account for the majority of oncogenic aberrations in spitzoid neoplasms, and may serve as therapeutic targets for metastatic spitzoid melanomas. PMID:24445538

  19. Novel and enhanced anti-melanoma DNA vaccine targeting the tyrosinase protein inhibits myeloid-derived suppressor cells and tumor growth in a syngeneic prophylactic and therapeutic murine model.

    PubMed

    Yan, J; Tingey, C; Lyde, R; Gorham, T C; Choo, D K; Muthumani, A; Myles, D; Weiner, L P; Kraynyak, K A; Reuschel, E L; Finkel, T H; Kim, J J; Sardesai, N Y; Ugen, K E; Muthumani, K; Weiner, D B

    2014-12-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly type of skin cancer, constituting annually ∼ 75% of all cutaneous cancer-related deaths due to metastatic spread. Currently, because of metastatic spread, there are no effective treatment options for late-stage metastatic melanoma patients. Studies over the past two decades have provided insight into several complex molecular mechanisms as to how these malignancies evade immunological control, indicating the importance of immune escape or suppression for tumor survival. Thus, it is essential to develop innovative cancer strategies and address immune obstacles with the goal of generating more effective immunotherapies. One important area of study is to further elucidate the role and significance of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in the maintenance of the tumor microenvironment. These cells possess a remarkable ability to suppress immune responses and, as such, facilitate tumor growth. Thus, MDSCs represent an important new target for preventing tumor progression and escape from immune control. In this study, we investigated the role of MDSCs in immune suppression of T cells in an antigen-specific B16 melanoma murine system utilizing a novel synthetic tyrosinase (Tyr) DNA vaccine therapy in both prophylactic and therapeutic models. This Tyr vaccine induced a robust and broad immune response, including directing CD8 T-cell infiltration into tumor sites. The vaccine also reduced the number of MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment through the downregulation of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, interleukin-10, CXCL5 and arginase II, factors important for MDSC expansion. This novel synthetic DNA vaccine significantly reduced the melanoma tumor burden and increased survival in vivo, due likely, in part, to the facilitation of a change in the tumor microenvironment through MDSC suppression. PMID:25394503

  20. Dendritic Versus Tumor Cell Presentation of Autologous Tumor Antigens for Active Specific Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma: Impact on Long-Term Survival by Extent of Disease at the Time of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Edward F.; Barth, Neil M.; Amatruda, Thomas T.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Mahdavi, Khosrow; de Leon, Cristina; Ellis, Robin E.; DePriest, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In patients with metastatic melanoma, sequential single-arm and randomized phase II trials with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with antigens from self-renewing, proliferating, irradiated autologous tumor cells (DC-TC) showed superior survival compared with similar patients immunized with irradiated tumor cells (TC). We wished to determine whether this difference was evident in cohorts who at the time of treatment had (1) no evidence of disease (NED) or (2) had detectable disease. Eligibility criteria and treatment schedules were the same for all three trials. Pooled data confirmed that overall survival (OS) was longer in 72 patients treated with DC-TC compared with 71 patients treated with TC (median OS 60 versus 22 months; 5-year OS 51% versus 32%, p=0.004). Treatment with DC-TC was associated with longer OS in both cohorts. Among 70 patients who were NED at the time that treatment was started, OS was better for DC-TC: 5-year OS 73% versus 43% (p=0.015). Among 73 patients who had detectable metastases, OS was better for DC-TC: median 38.8 months versus 14.7 months, 5-year OS 33% versus 20% (p=0.025). This approach is promising as an adjunct to other therapies in patients who have had metastatic melanoma. PMID:26083950

  1. Tumor-suppressive effects of natural-type interferon-β through CXCL10 in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hikaru; Nobeyama, Yoshimasa Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2015-08-21

    Introduction: Type 1 interferon is in widespread use as adjuvant therapy to inhibit melanoma progression. Considering the tumor-suppressive effects of local administration of interferon-β (IFN-β) on lymphatic metastasis, the present study was conducted to identify melanoma-suppressive molecules that are up-regulated by IFN-β treatment of lymphatic endothelial cells. Materials and methods: Lymphatic endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and melanoma cells were treated with natural-type IFN-β, and melanoma cells were treated with CXCL10. Genome-wide oligonucleotide microarray analysis was performed using lymphatic endothelial cells with or without IFN-β treatment. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were performed to examine CXCL10 expression. A proliferation assay was performed to examine the effects of IFN-β and CXCL10 in melanoma cells. Results: Genome-wide microarray analyses detected CXCL10 as a gene encoding a secretory protein that was up-regulated by IFN-β in lymphatic endothelial cells. IFN-β treatment significantly induced CXCL10 in dermal lymphatic endothelial cells and melanoma cells that are highly sensitive to IFN-β. CXCL10 reduced melanoma cell proliferation in IFN-β-sensitive cells as well as resistant cells. Melanoma cells in which CXCL10 was knocked down were sensitive to IFN-β. CXCR3-B, which encodes the CXCL10 receptor, was up-regulated in melanoma cells with high sensitivity to IFN-β and down-regulated in melanoma cells with medium to low sensitivity. Conclusions: Our data suggest that IFN-β suppresses proliferation and metastasis from the local lymphatic system and melanoma cells via CXCL10. Down-regulation of CXCR3-B by IFN-β may be associated with resistance to IFN-β. - Highlights: • We search melanoma-suppressive molecules induced by IFN-β. • IFN-β induces a high amount of CXCL10 from lymphatic endothelial cells. • CXCL10 induction level in melanoma cells is correlated

  2. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  3. Nifuroxazide exerts potent anti-tumor and anti-metastasis activity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongxia; Ye, Tinghong; Yu, Xi; Lei, Qian; Yang, Fangfang; Xia, Yong; Song, Xuejiao; Liu, Li; Deng, Hongxia; Gao, Tiantao; Peng, Cuiting; Zuo, Weiqiong; Xiong, Ying; Zhang, Lidan; Wang, Ningyu; Zhao, Lifeng; Xie, Yongmei; Yu, Luoting; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is a highly malignant neoplasm of melanocytes with considerable metastatic potential and drug resistance, explaining the need for new candidates that inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. The signal transducer and activator of the transcription 3 (Stat3) signaling pathway plays an important role in melanoma and has been validated as promising anticancer target for melanoma therapy. In this study, nifuroxazide, an antidiarrheal agent identified as an inhibitor of Stat3, was evaluated for its anti-melanoma activity in vitro and in vivo. It had potent anti-proliferative activity against various melanoma cell lines and could induce G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. Moreover, nifuroxazide markedly impaired melanoma cell migration and invasion by down-regulating phosphorylated-Src, phosphorylated-FAK, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) -2, MMP-9 and vimentin. It also significantly inhibited tumor growth without obvious side effects in the A375-bearing mice model by inducing apoptosis and reducing cell proliferation and metastasis. Notably, nifuroxazide significantly inhibited pulmonary metastases, which might be associated with the decrease of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These findings suggested that nifuroxazide might be a potential agent for inhibiting the growth and metastasis of melanoma. PMID:26830149

  4. Enrichment of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) using negative selection from patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Jacobs, Barbara; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Moore, Lee R.; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre L.; Borden, Ernest; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells have emerged as prognostic biomarkers in the treatment of metastatic cancers of epithelial origins viz., breast, colorectal and prostate. These tumors express Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) on their cell surface which is used as an antigen for immunoaffinity capture. However, EpCAM capture technologies are of limited utility for non-epithelial cancers such as melanoma. We report a method to enrich Circulating Melanoma Cells (CMCs) that does not presuppose malignant cell characteristics. CMCs were enriched by centrifugation of blood samples from healthy (N = 10) and patient (N = 11) donors, followed by RBC lysis and immunomagnetic depletion of CD45-positive leukocytes in a specialized magnetic separator. CMCs were identified by immunocytochemistry using Melan-A or S100B as melanoma markers and enumerated using automated microscopy image analyses. Separation was optimized for maximum sensitivity and recovery of CMCs. Our results indicate large number of CMCs in Stage IV melanoma patients. Analysis of survival suggested a trend toward decreased survival with increased number of CMCs. Moreover, melanoma-associated miRs were found to be higher in CMC-enriched fractions in two patients when compared with the unseparated samples, validating this method as applicable for molecular analyses. Negative selection is a promising approach for isolation of CMCs and other EpCAM -negative CTCs, and is amenable to molecular analysis of CMCs. Further studies are required to validate its efficacy at capturing specific circulating cells for genomic analysis, and xenograft studies. PMID:24811334

  5. Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells in Cutaneous Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Koenck, Carleigh; Quirk, Shannon K; Lim, Victoria M; Mitkov, Mario V; Trowbridge, Ryan M; Hunter, William J; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-10-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of melanoma, the prototypical immunologic cutaneous malignancy. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family of innate immune receptors modulates inflammatory and innate immune signaling. It has been investigated in various neoplastic diseases, but not in melanoma. This study examines the expression of TREM-1 (a proinflammatory amplifier) and TREM-2 (an anti-inflammatory modulator and phagocytic promoter) in human cutaneous melanoma and surrounding tissue. Indirect immunofluorescence staining was performed on skin biopsies from 10 melanoma patients and staining intensity was semiquantitatively scored. Expression of TREM-1 and TREM-2 was higher in keratinocytes than melanoma tissue (TREM-1: p < 0.01; TREM-2: p < 0.01). Whereas TREM-2 was the dominant isoform expressed in normal keratinocytes, TREM-1 expression predominated in melanoma tissue (TREM-1 to TREM-2 ratio: keratinocytes = 0.78; melanoma = 2.08; p < 0.01). The increased TREM ratio in melanoma tissue could give rise to a proinflammatory and protumor state of the microenvironment. This evidence may be suggestive of a TREM-1/TREM-2 paradigm in which relative levels dictate inflammatory and immune states, rather than absolute expression of one or the other. Further investigation regarding this paradigm is warranted and could carry prognostic or therapeutic value in treatment for melanoma. PMID:26184544

  6. Inhibition of melanocortin 1 receptor slows melanoma growth, reduces tumor heterogeneity and increases survival.

    PubMed

    Kansal, Rita G; McCravy, Matthew S; Basham, Jacob H; Earl, Joshua A; McMurray, Stacy L; Starner, Chelsey J; Whitt, Michael A; Albritton, Lorraine M

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma risk is increased in patients with mutations of melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) yet the basis for the increased risk remains unknown. Here we report in vivo evidence supporting a critical role for MC1R in regulating melanoma tumor growth and determining overall survival time. Inhibition of MC1R by its physiologically relevant competitive inhibitor, agouti signaling protein (ASIP), reduced melanin synthesis and morphological heterogeneity in murine B16-F10 melanoma cells. In the lungs of syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, mCherry-marked, ASIP-secreting lung tumors inhibited MC1R on neighboring tumors lacking ASIP in a dose dependent manner as evidenced by a proportional loss of pigment in tumors from mice injected with 1:1, 3:1 and 4:1 mixtures of parental B16-F10 to ASIP-expressing tumor cells. ASIP-expressing B16-F10 cells formed poorly pigmented tumors in vivo that correlated with a 20% longer median survival than those bearing parental B16-F10 tumors (p=0.0005). Mice injected with 1:1 mixtures also showed survival benefit (p=0.0054), whereas injection of a 4:1 mixture showed no significant difference in survival. The longer survival time of mice bearing ASIP-expressing tumors correlated with a significantly slower growth rate than parental B16-F10 tumors as judged by quantification of numbers of tumors and total tumor load (p=0.0325), as well as a more homogeneous size and morphology of ASIP-expressing lung tumors. We conclude that MC1R plays an important role in regulating melanoma growth and morphology. Persistent inhibition of MC1R provided a significant survival advantage resulting in part from slower tumor growth, establishing MC1R as a compelling new molecular target for metastatic melanoma. PMID:27028866

  7. Cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha on sensitive human melanoma cells in vitro may result in selection of cells with enhanced markers of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C; Schröder, K; Garbe, C; Krasagakis, K; Krüger, S; Orfanos, C E

    1990-12-01

    Monolayer cultures of the human melanoma cell lines StML-12, StML-11, StML-14 (third, respectively, twenty-fifth subculture), and SKMel-28 derived from specimens representing different stages of tumor progression were treated with 10-10,000 U/ml rTNF-alpha applied for 72 h. The effects of rTNF-alpha on cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, cell viability, cloning efficiency, cell division, cell morphology, and the immunophenotype were studied in triplicate experiments. The cell line StML-14(3) revealed a significantly dose-dependent reduction of growth due to both cytostatic and cytotoxic activities of rTNF-alpha as well as a decrease of CE. Increased numbers of cells in prophase were observed 24 h after addition of r-TNF-alpha. In addition, dislocation of chromosomes in the metaphase, formation of micronuclei, and dose-dependent increases of cells exhibiting micronuclei and the DNA amount per cell were detected at the end of treatment. On the other hand, only a slight sensitivity to the anti-proliferative effect of rTNF-alpha was observed with StML-14(25) and SKMel-28, whereas StML-12 and StML-11 were significantly resistant. The last four cell lines were serially subcultivated and presented common phenotypic patterns with more malignant characteristics than the cell line StML-14(3) before treatment. Overall, rTNF-alpha enhanced the malignant immunophenotype of the cell lines tested. It increased the expression of the "late" melanoma progression markers A.10.33 and A.1.43, and Ki67, and it decreased the expression of the "early" progression marker K.1.2. The expression of HLA-I, HLA-DR, and ICAM-1 was also enhanced after rTNF-alpha treatment, whereas in contrast to other cytokines, rTNF-alpha did not induce the de novo expression of HLA-DR in HLA-DR-negative melanoma cell lines. These findings indicate that rTNF-alpha induces cytostasis and decreases cell viability of certain rTNF-alpha-sensitive melanoma cells. These effects may result in selection of r

  8. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Takabe, Piia; Bart, Geneviève; Ropponen, Antti; Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  9. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes predict cutaneous melanoma survival.

    PubMed

    Fortes, Cristina; Mastroeni, Simona; Mannooranparampil, Thomas J; Passarelli, Francesca; Zappalà, Alba; Annessi, Giorgio; Marino, Claudia; Caggiati, Alessio; Russo, Nicoletta; Michelozzi, Paola

    2015-08-01

    Understanding differences in survival across distinct subgroups of melanoma patients may help with the choice of types of therapy. Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are considered a manifestation of the host immune response to tumor, but the role of TILs in melanoma mortality is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate independent prognostic factors for melanoma mortality. We carried out a 10-year cohort study on 4133 melanoma patients from the same geographic area (Lazio) with primary cutaneous melanoma diagnosed between January 1998 and December 2008. The probability of survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods and prognostic factors were evaluated by multivariate analysis (Cox proportional hazards model). The 10-year survival rate for melanoma decreased with increasing Breslow thickness (Pfor trend<0.0001) and with age (Pfor trend<0.0001) whereas survival increased with increasing levels of TILs (Pfor trend=0.0001). The 10-year survival rate for melanoma divided into TILs intensity as scanty, moderate, and marked was 88.0, 92.2, and 97.0%, respectively. In the multivariate Cox model, the presence of high levels of TILs in primary invasive melanomas was associated with a lower risk of melanoma death (hazard ratio 0.32; 95% confidence interval 0.13-0.82) after controlling for sex, age, Breslow thickness, histological type, mitotic rate, and ulceration. After including lymph node status in the multivariate analysis, the protective effect of marked TILs on melanoma mortality remained (hazard ratio 0.37; 95% confidence interval 0.15-0.94). The results of this study suggest that the immune microenvironment affects melanoma survival. PMID:25933208

  10. Photoacoustic imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Ruiying; Xu, Song; Li, Guo; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma, one of the most common types of skin cancer, has a high mortality rate, mainly due to a high propensity for tumor metastasis. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential predictor for metastasis. Label-free imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo provides rich information on tumor progress. Here we present photoacoustic microscopy of single melanoma cells in living animals. We used a fast-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the microvasculature in mouse ears. The imaging system has sub-cellular spatial resolution and works in reflection mode. A fast-scanning mirror allows the system to acquire fast volumetric images over a large field of view. A 500-kHz pulsed laser was used to image blood and CTCs. Single circulating melanoma cells were imaged in both capillaries and trunk vessels in living animals. These high-resolution images may be used in early detection of CTCs with potentially high sensitivity. In addition, this technique enables in vivo study of tumor cell extravasation from a primary tumor, which addresses an urgent pre-clinical need.

  11. Visualization of melanoma tumor with lectin-conjugated rare-earth doped fluoride nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    Dumych, Tetiana; Lutsyk, Maxym; Banski, Mateusz; Yashchenko, Antonina; Sojka, Bartlomiej; Horbay, Rostyslav; Lutsyk, Alexander; Stoika, Rostyslav; Misiewicz, Jan; Podhorodecki, Artur; Bilyy, Rostyslav

    2014-01-01

    Aim To develop specific fluorescent markers for melanoma tumor visualization, which would provide high selectivity and reversible binding pattern, by the use of carbohydrate-recognizing proteins, lectins, combined with the physical ability for imaging deep in the living tissues by utilizing red and near infrared fluorescent properties of specific rare-earth doped nanocrystals (NC). Methods B10F16 melanoma cells were inoculated to C57BL/6 mice for inducing experimental melanoma tumor. Tumors were removed and analyzed by lectin-histochemistry using LABA, PFA, PNA, HPA, SNA, GNA, and NPL lectins and stained with hematoxylin and eosin. NPL lectin was conjugated to fluorescent NaGdF4:Eu3+-COOH nanoparticles (5 nm) via zero length cross-linking reaction, and the conjugates were purified from unbound substances and then used for further visualization of histological samples. Fluorescent microscopy was used to visualize NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ with the fluorescent emission at 600-720 nm range. Results NPL lectin selectively recognized regions of undifferentiated melanoblasts surrounding neoangiogenic foci inside melanoma tumor, PNA lectin recognized differentiated melanoblasts, and LCA and WGA were bound to tumor stroma regions. NPL-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC were efficiently detecting newly formed regions of melanoma tumor, confirmed by fluorescent microscopy in visible and near infrared mode. These conjugates possessed high photostability and were compatible with convenient xylene-based mounting systems and preserved intensive fluorescent signal at samples storage for at least 6 months. Conclusion NPL lectin-NaGdF4:Eu3+ conjugated NC permitted distinct identification of contours of the melanoma tissue on histological sections using red excitation at 590-610 nm and near infrared emission of 700-720 nm. These data are of potential practical significance for development of glycans-conjugated nanoparticles to be used for in vivo visualization of melanoma tumor. PMID:24891277

  12. Critical Role for CD103(+)/CD141(+) Dendritic Cells Bearing CCR7 for Tumor Antigen Trafficking and Priming of T Cell Immunity in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Edward W; Broz, Miranda L; Binnewies, Mikhail; Headley, Mark B; Nelson, Amanda E; Wolf, Denise M; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Bogunovic, Dusan; Bhardwaj, Nina; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-08-01

    Intratumoral dendritic cells (DC) bearing CD103 in mice or CD141 in humans drive intratumoral CD8(+) T cell activation. Using multiple strategies, we identified a critical role for these DC in trafficking tumor antigen to lymph nodes (LN), resulting in both direct CD8(+) T cell stimulation and antigen hand-off to resident myeloid cells. These effects all required CCR7. Live imaging demonstrated direct presentation to T cells in LN, and CCR7 loss specifically in these cells resulted in defective LN T cell priming and increased tumor outgrowth. CCR7 expression levels in human tumors correlate with signatures of CD141(+) DC, intratumoral T cells, and better clinical outcomes. This work identifies an ongoing pathway to T cell priming, which should be harnessed for tumor therapies. PMID:27424807

  13. Bone marrow contains melanoma-reactive CD8+ effector T cells and, compared with peripheral blood, enriched numbers of melanoma-reactive CD8+ memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich; Assfalg, Geraldine; Mailänder, Volker; Thiel, Eckhard; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2003-09-01

    Circulating melanoma-specific T cells can be frequently detected in patients with melanoma. Effective T-cell immunity and tumor surveillance, however, requires the presence of specific T cells in tissues populated by tumor cells. The bone marrow (BM) is a compartment frequently harboring micrometastatic tumor cells. Here, we compared directly ex vivo in peripheral blood (PB) and BM frequencies and differentiation phenotypes of T cells reactive with the melanoma-associated antigen tyrosinase and with autologous melanoma cells. Using intracellular cytokine and tetramer staining, we detected tyrosinase- and melanoma-reactive CD3+CD8+ T cells in the BM in similar or enhanced frequencies as in PB. Additional characterization of the differentiation subset using CD45RA and CCR7 revealed the presence of specific effector and memory T cells in the BM in all five patients analyzed. Remarkably, the frequency of tyrosinase- and melanoma-specific memory T cells was significantly increased in BM compared with PB. Thus, the BM may be an important compartment for tumor surveillance harboring a tumor-specific memory T-cell pool in addition to effector T cells. PMID:14500398

  14. In vivo 6-thioguanine-resistant T cells from melanoma patients have public TCR and share TCR beta amino acid sequences with melanoma-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zuleger, Cindy L.; Macklin, Michael D.; Bostwick, Bret L.; Pei, Qinglin; Newton, Michael A.; Albertini, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    In vivo hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT)-deficient T cells (MT) from melanoma patients are enriched for T cells with in vivo clonal amplifications that traffic between blood and tumor tissues. Melanoma is thus a model cancer to test the hypothesis that in vivo MT from cancer patients can be used as immunological probes for immunogenic tumor antigens. MT were obtained by 6-thioguanine (TG) selection of lymphocytes from peripheral blood and tumor tissues, and wild-type T cells (WT) were obtained analogously without TG selection. cDNA sequences of the T cell receptor beta chains (TRB) were used as unambiguous biomarkers of in vivo clonality and as indicators of T cell specificity. Public TRB were identified in MT from the blood and tumor of different melanoma patients. Such public TRB were not found in normal control MT or WT. As an indicator of T cell specificity for melanoma, the >2600 MT and WT TRB, including the public TRB from melanoma patients, were compared to a literature-derived empirical database of >1270 TRB from melanoma-reactive T cells. Various degrees of similarity, ranging from 100% conservation to 3-amino acid motifs (3-mer), were found between both melanoma patient MT and WT TRBs and the empirical database. The frequency of 3-mer and 4-mer TRB matching to the empirical database was significantly higher in MT compared with WT in the tumor (p=0.0285 and p=0.006, respectively). In summary, in vivo MT from melanoma patients contain public TRB as well as T cells with specificity for characterized melanoma antigens. We conclude that in vivo MT merit study as novel probes for uncharacterized immunogenic antigens in melanoma and other malignancies. PMID:21182840

  15. Thigmotropism of malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Quatresooz, Pascale; Piérard-Franchimont, Claudine; Noël, Fanchon; Piérard, Gérald E

    2012-01-01

    During malignant melanoma (MM) progression including incipient metastasis, neoplastic cells follow some specific migration paths inside the skin. In particular, they progress along the dermoepidermal basement membrane, the hair follicles, the sweat gland apparatus, nerves, and the near perivascular space. These features evoke the thigmotropism phenomenon defined as a contact-sensing growth of cells. This process is likely connected to modulation in cell tensegrity (control of the cell shape). These specifically located paucicellular aggregates of MM cells do not appear to be involved in the tumorigenic growth phase, but rather they participate in the so-called "accretive" growth model. These MM cell collections are often part of the primary neoplasm, but they may, however, correspond to MM micrometastases and predict further local overt metastasis spread. PMID:22203839

  16. Advances in Personalized Targeted Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma and Non-Invasive Tumor Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Klinac, Dragana; Gray, Elin S.; Millward, Michael; Ziman, Mel

    2013-01-01

    Despite extensive scientific progress in the melanoma field, treatment of advanced stage melanoma with chemotherapeutics and biotherapeutics has rarely provided response rates higher than 20%. In the past decade, targeted inhibitors have been developed for metastatic melanoma, leading to the advent of more personalized therapies of genetically characterized tumors. Here we review current melanoma treatments and emerging targeted molecular therapies. In particular we discuss the mutant BRAF inhibitors Vemurafenib and Dabrafenib, which markedly inhibit tumor growth and advance patients’ overall survival. However this response is almost inevitably followed by complete tumor relapse due to drug resistance hampering the encouraging initial responses. Several mechanisms of resistance within and outside the MAPK pathway have now been uncovered and have paved the way for clinical trials of combination therapies to try and overcome tumor relapse. It is apparent that personalized treatment management will be required in this new era of targeted treatment. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide an easily accessible means of monitoring patient relapse and several new approaches are available for the molecular characterization of CTCs. Thus CTCs provide a monitoring tool to evaluate treatment efficacy and early detection of drug resistance in real time. We detail here how advances in the molecular analysis of CTCs may provide insight into new avenues of approaching therapeutic options that would benefit personalized melanoma management. PMID:23515890

  17. Effects of Wnt-10b on proliferation and differentiation of murine melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Misu, Masayasu; Ouji, Yukiteru; Kawai, Norikazu; Nishimura, Fumihiko; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Yoshikawa, Masahide

    2015-08-07

    In spite of the strong expression of Wnt-10b in melanomas, its role in melanoma cells has not been elucidated. In the present study, the biological effects of Wnt-10b on murine B16F10 (B16) melanoma cells were investigated using conditioned medium from Wnt-10b-producing COS cells (Wnt-CM). After 2 days of culture in the presence of Wnt-CM, proliferation of B16 melanoma cells was inhibited, whereas tyrosinase activity was increased. An in vitro wound healing assay demonstrated that migration of melanoma cells to the wound area was inhibited with the addition of Wnt-CM. Furthermore, evaluation of cellular senescence revealed prominent induction of SA-β-gal-positive senescent cells in cultures with Wnt-CM. Finally, the growth of B16 melanoma cell aggregates in collagen 3D-gel cultures was markedly suppressed in the presence of Wnt-CM. These results suggest that Wnt-10b represses tumor cell properties, such as proliferation and migration of B16 melanoma cells, driving them toward a more differentiated state along a melanocyte lineage. - Highlights: • Wnt-10b inhibited proliferation and migration of melanoma cells. • Wnt-10b induced tyrosinase activity and senescence of melanoma cells. • Wnt-10b suppressed growth of cell aggregates in collagen 3D-gel cultures. • Wnt-10b represses tumor cell properties, driving them toward a more differentiated state along a melanocyte lineage.

  18. Ubiquitin ligase UBE3C promotes melanoma progression by increasing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Li; Yi, Xue-Mei; Chen, Jia; Chen, Fu-Juan; Lou, Wei; Gao, Yun-Lu; Zhou, Jing; Su, Li-Na; Xu, Xin; Lu, Jia-Qing; Ma, Jun; Yu, Ning; Ding, Yang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, exhibiting extensive local invasion and early distant metastasis. Aberrant expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase E3C (UBE3C) plays a key role in tumor development and progression. In the present study, we analyzed UBE3C expression in samples of cancerous and normal skin tissue. Levels of UBE3C expression were much higher in primary and metastatic melanoma tissues than in normal skin, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma or basal cell carcinoma. Melanoma cells overexpressing UBE3C frequently exhibited a mesenchymal phenotype, including reduced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and expression of the mesenchymal marker vimentin. Knockdown of UBE3C expression in melanoma cells significantly suppressed melanoma growth and progression. Furthermore, silencing UBE3C led to increased E-cadherin expression and decreased vimentin and Snail1 expression. Thus UBE3C promotes melanoma progression, possibly by inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in melanoma cells. Inhibiting UBE3C activity may suppress melanoma invasion and metastasis and may represent a targeted therapeutic approach. PMID:26894856

  19. Subcutaneous Adipocytes Promote Melanoma Cell Growth by Activating the Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Hiu Yee; Fu, Xiuqiong; Liu, Bin; Chao, Xiaojuan; Chan, Chi Leung; Cao, Huihui; Su, Tao; Tse, Anfernee Kai Wing; Fong, Wang Fun; Yu, Zhi-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Tumorigenesis involves constant communication between tumor cells and neighboring normal cells such as adipocytes. The canonical function of adipocytes is to store triglyceride and release fatty acids for other tissues. This study was aimed to find out if adipocytes promoted melanoma cell growth and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Here we isolated adipocytes from inguinal adipose tissue in mice and co-cultured with melanoma cells. We found that the co-cultured melanoma had higher lipid accumulation compared with mono-cultured melanoma. In addition, fluorescently labeled fatty acid BODIPY® FLC16 signal was detected in melanoma co-cultured with the adipocytes that had been loaded with the fluorescent dye, suggesting that the adipocytes provide fatty acids to melanoma cells. Compared with mono-cultured melanoma, co-cultured melanoma cells had a higher proliferation and phospho-Akt (Ser-473 and Thr-450) expression. Overexpression of Akt mutants in melanoma cells reduced the co-culture-enhanced proliferation. A lipidomic study showed that the co-cultured melanoma had an elevated palmitic acid level. Interestingly, we found that palmitic acid stimulated melanoma cell proliferation, changed the cell cycle distribution, and increased phospho-Akt (Ser-473 and Thr-450) and PI3K but not phospho-PTEN (phosphophosphatase and tensin homolog) expressions. More importantly, the palmitic acid-stimulated proliferation was further enhanced in the Akt-overexpressed melanoma cells and was reduced by LY294002 or knockdown of endogenous Akt or overexpression of Akt mutants. We also found that palmitic acid-pretreated B16F10 cells were grown to a significantly larger tumor in mice compared with control cells. Taken together, we suggest that adipocytes may serve as an exogenous source of palmitic acid that promotes melanoma cell growth by activating Akt. PMID:25228694

  20. Cell proliferation and expression of connexins differ in melanotic and amelanotic canine oral melanomas.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Tarso Felipe; Gentile, Luciana Boffoni; da Silva, Tereza Cristina; Mennecier, Gregory; Chaible, Lucas Martins; Cogliati, Bruno; Roman, Marco Antonio Leon; Gioso, Marco Antonio; Dagli, Maria Lucia Zaidan

    2014-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant neoplasm occurring in several animal species, and is the most frequently found tumor in the oral cavity in dogs. Melanomas are classified into two types: melanotic and amelanotic. Prior research suggests that human amelanotic melanomas are more aggressive than their melanotic counterparts. This study evaluates the behavior of canine melanotic and amelanotic oral cavity melanomas and quantifies cell proliferation and the expression of connexins. Twenty-five melanomas (16 melanotic and 9 amelanotic) were collected from dogs during clinical procedures at the Veterinary Hospital of the School of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. After diagnosis, dogs were followed until death or euthanasia. Histopathology confirmed the gross melanotic or amelanotic characteristics and tumors were classified according to the WHO. HMB45 or Melan A immunostainings were performed to confirm the diagnosis of amelanotic melanomas. Cell proliferation was quantified both by counting mitotic figures and PCNA positive nuclei. Expressions of connexins 26 and 43 were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR and Western blot. Dogs bearing amelanotic melanomas presented a shorter lifespan in comparison to those with melanotic melanomas. Cell proliferation was significantly higher in amelanotic melanomas. Expressions of Connexins 26 and 43 were significantly reduced in amelanotic melanomas. The results presented here suggest that oral cavity melanotic and amelanotic melanomas differ regarding their behavior, cell proliferation and connexin expression in dogs, indicating a higher aggressiveness of amelanotic variants. PMID:24126842

  1. Enhanced detection of circulating melanoma cells using gold nanoparticles as photoacoustic contrasting agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, Devin R.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Kannan, Raghuraman; Katti, Kattesh; Viator, John A.

    2010-02-01

    Nanotechnology and the various properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are quickly changing the field of cancer detection and treatment. Photoacoustic detection methods show an increase in sensitivity using gold nanoparticle antibody conjugation, which selectively targets melanoma cancer cells. Instead of targeting melanoma tumors, we tag single cells, analogous to circulating metastatic melanoma cells. Using an in vitro, stationary cell system and planar samples, we demonstrate an average of 24% improved optical detectability of melanoma cells tagged with AuNPs over unprocessed melanoma cells. Tagged cells showed a raised plateau of absorbance from 470nm to 550nm. Untagged cells showed a general decline in absorption as wavelength increased. The results of our study have the potential to not only better develop photoacoustic detection of melanoma, but also extend the viability and use of photoacoustics into detection of otherwise unpigmented cancers.

  2. Clinicopathologic features of incident and subsequent tumors in patients with multiple primary cutaneous melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Murali, Rajmohan; Goumas, Chris; Kricker, Anne; From, Lynn; Busam, Klaus J.; Begg, Colin B.; Dwyer, Terence; Gruber, Stephen B.; Kanetsky, Peter A.; Orlow, Irene; Rosso, Stefano; Thomas, Nancy E.; Berwick, Marianne; Scolyer, Richard A.; Armstrong, Bruce K.

    2011-01-01

    Background 0.6–12.7% of patients with primary cutaneous melanoma will develop additional melanomas. Pathologic features of tumors in patients with multiple primary cutaneous melanomas have not been well described. In this large international multi-center case-control study, we compared the clinicopathologic features of a subsequent melanoma with the preceding (usually the first) melanoma in patients with multiple primary cutaneous melanomas, and with those of melanomas in patients with single primary cutaneous melanomas. Methods Multiple primary melanoma (cases) and single primary invasive melanoma (controls) patients from the Genes, Environment and Melanoma (GEM) study were included if their tumors were available for pathologic review and confirmed as melanoma. Clinicopathologic characteristics of invasive subsequent and first melanomas in cases and invasive single melanomas in controls were compared. Results 473 pairs comprising a subsequent and a first melanoma and 1989 single melanomas were reviewed. Forward stepwise regression modeling in 395 pairs with complete data showed that, compared to first melanomas, subsequent melanomas were: more commonly contiguous with a dysplastic nevus; more prevalent on the head/neck and legs than other sites; and thinner. Compared with single primary melanomas, subsequent melanomas were also more likely to be: associated with a contiguous dysplastic nevus; more prevalent on the head/neck and legs; and thinner. The same differences were observed when subsequent melanomas were compared with single melanomas. First melanomas were more likely than single melanomas to have associated solar elastosis and no observed mitoses. Conclusions Thinner subsequent than first melanomas suggest earlier diagnosis, perhaps due to closer clinical scrutiny. The association of subsequent melanomas with dysplastic nevi is consistent with the latter being risk factors or risk markers for melanoma. PMID:21913010

  3. Patient derived cell culture and isolation of CD133⁺ putative cancer stem cells from melanoma.

    PubMed

    Welte, Yvonne; Davies, Cathrin; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R A

    2013-01-01

    Despite improved treatments options for melanoma available today, patients with advanced malignant melanoma still have a poor prognosis for progression-free and overall survival. Therefore, translational research needs to provide further molecular evidence to improve targeted therapies for malignant melanomas. In the past, oncogenic mechanisms related to melanoma were extensively studied in established cell lines. On the way to more personalized treatment regimens based on individual genetic profiles, we propose to use patient-derived cell lines instead of generic cell lines. Together with high quality clinical data, especially on patient follow-up, these cells will be instrumental to better understand the molecular mechanisms behind melanoma progression. Here, we report the establishment of primary melanoma cultures from dissected fresh tumor tissue. This procedure includes mincing and dissociation of the tissue into single cells, removal of contaminations with erythrocytes and fibroblasts as well as primary culture and reliable verification of the cells' melanoma origin. Recent reports revealed that melanomas, like the majority of tumors, harbor a small subpopulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which seem to exclusively fuel tumor initiation and progression towards the metastatic state. One of the key markers for CSC identification and isolation in melanoma is CD133. To isolate CD133(+) CSCs from primary melanoma cultures, we have modified and optimized the Magnetic-Activated Cell Sorting (MACS) procedure from Miltenyi resulting in high sorting purity and viability of CD133(+) CSCs and CD133(-) bulk, which can be cultivated and functionally analyzed thereafter. PMID:23525090

  4. An electrochemical immunosensing method for detecting melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Seenivasan, Rajesh; Maddodi, Nityanand; Setaluri, Vijaysaradhi; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2015-01-01

    An electrochemical immunosensing method was developed to detect melanoma cells based on the affinity between cell surface melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) antigen and anti-MC1R antibody (MC1R-Ab). The MC1R-Abs were immobilized in amino-functionalized silica nanoparticles (n-SiNPs)-polypyrrole (PPy) nanocomposite modified on working electrode surface of screen-printed electrode (SPE). Cyclic voltammetry was employed, with the help of redox mediator ([Fe(CN)6]3−), to measure the change in anodic oxidation peak current arising due to the specific interaction between MC1R antigens and MC1R-Abs when the target melanoma cells are present in the sample. Various factors affecting the sensor performance, such as the amount of MC1R-Abs loaded, incubation time with the target melanoma cells, the presence of interfering non-melanoma cells, were tested and optimized over different expected melanoma cell loads in the range of 50–7500 cells/2.5 mL. The immunosensor is highly sensitive (20 cells/mL), specific, and reproducible, and the antibody-loaded electrode in ready-to-use stage is stable over two weeks. Thus, in conjunction with a microfluidic lab-on-a-chip device our electrochemical immunosensing approach may be suitable for highly sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood samples. PMID:25636023

  5. Ultrasonic enhancement of gene transfection in murine melanoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Miller, D L; Bao, S; Gies, R A; Thrall, B D

    1999-11-01

    The enhancement of gene transfection by ultrasound (US) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using the B16 mouse melanoma model. Cultured cells were either exposed in suspensions in vitro or implanted subcutaneously in female C57BL/6 mice for 10-14 days and, subsequently exposed, in vivo. For comparison to results with a luciferase plasmid, a reporter plasmid for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used to evaluate transfection efficiency. US was supplied by a system, similar to a Dornier HM-3 lithotripter, that produced shock waves (SW) of 24.4 MPa peak positive and 5.2 MPa peak negative pressure amplitudes at the focus. The plasmids were mixed with the suspensions to achieve 20 ,microL mL(-1), or were injected intratumorally to provide 0.2 mg DNA per mL of tumor. Acoustic cavitation was promoted by retaining 0.2 mL of air in the 1.2-mL exposure chambers in vitro and by injecting air at 10% of tumor volume in vivo. In vitro, cell counts declined to 5.3% of shams after 800 SW exposure, with 1.4% of the cells expressing GFP after 2 days of culture. In vivo, 2 days after 400 SW exposure, viable-cell recovery from excised tumors was reduced to 4.2% of shams and cell transfection was enhanced by a factor of about 8, reaching 2.5% of cell counts (p < 0.005 in t-test). These results show that strong tumor ablation induced by US shock wave treatment can be coupled with simultaneous enhancement of gene transfection. PMID:10626630

  6. β-Actin-binding Complementarity-determining Region 2 of Variable Heavy Chain from Monoclonal Antibody C7 Induces Apoptosis in Several Human Tumor Cells and Is Protective against Metastatic Melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Arruda, Denise C.; Santos, Luana C. P.; Melo, Filipe M.; Pereira, Felipe V.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Mortara, Renato A.; Juliano, Maria A.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Polonelli, Luciano; Travassos, Luiz R.

    2012-01-01

    Complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) from monoclonal antibodies tested as synthetic peptides display anti-infective and antitumor activities, independent of the specificity of the native antibody. Previously, we have shown that the synthetic peptide C7H2, based on the heavy chain CDR 2 from monoclonal antibody C7, a mAb directed to a mannoprotein of Candida albicans, significantly reduced B16F10 melanoma growth and lung colony formation by triggering tumor apoptosis. The mechanism, however, by which C7H2 induced apoptosis in tumor cells remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that C7H2 interacts with components of the tumor cells cytoskeleton, being rapidly internalized after binding to the tumor cell surface. Mass spectrometry analysis and in vitro validation revealed that β-actin is the receptor of C7H2 in the tumor cells. C7H2 induces β-actin polymerization and F-actin stabilization, linked with abundant generation of superoxide anions and apoptosis. Major phenotypes following peptide binding were chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, annexin V binding, lamin disruption, caspase 8 and 3 activation, and organelle alterations. Finally, we evaluated the cytotoxic efficacy of C7H2 in a panel of human tumor cell lines. All tumor cell lines studied were equally susceptible to C7H2 in vitro. The C7H2 amide without further derivatization significantly reduced lung metastasis of mice endovenously challenged with B16F10-Nex2 melanoma cells. No significant cytotoxicity was observed toward nontumorigenic cell lines on short incubation in vitro or in naïve mice injected with a high dose of the peptide. We believe that C7H2 is a promising peptide to be developed as an anticancer drug. PMID:22334655

  7. PRMT1 regulates tumor growth and metastasis of human melanoma via targeting ALCAM.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Zhengwen; Ma, Tengxiao; Huo, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Overexpression of protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) is associated with various types of cancer. The present study aimed to determine the expression level of PRMT1 in human melanoma and investigate its biological function. The clinical significance of PRMT1 was determined by screening the Oncomine database, and the increased expression of PRMT in melanoma was confirmed by western blot analysis. Furthermore, the current study demonstrated that PRMT1 was overexpressed in melanoma cell lines compared with human immortalized keratinocytes and PIG1 immortalized human melanocytes. Silencing PRMT1 in A375 and Hs294T cells significantly suppressed tumor growth and metastatic ability of the melanoma cell line compared with the negative control. These changes were in accordance with the upregulation of the cadherin 1 level and downregulation of several metastatic‑associated genes determined by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction array. Liquid chromatography‑mass spectrometry demonstrated that activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) may be a direct target of PRMT1, and the interaction was confirmed by co‑immunoprecipitation. Compared with negative controls, the protein level of ALCAM was decreased following the silencing of PRMT1, and re‑expression of ALCAM in A375/shPRMT1 or Hs294T/shPRMT1 cells using an expression vector restored the colony formation and metastatic ability of the cells. In conclusion, the current results indicated that PRMT1 is overexpressed in human melanoma, and may regulate tumor growth and metastasis via targeting ALCAM. PMID:27175582

  8. Interferon-γ Reduces Melanosomal Antigen Expression and Recognition of Melanoma Cells by Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Poole, I. Caroline; Riker, Adam I.; Quevedo, M. Eugenia; Stennett, Lawrence S.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Kast, W. Martin; Robinson, June K.; Nickoloff, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are frequently reactive with melanosomal antigens. Achieving complete remissions by peptide therapy is frequently hampered by metastases evading immune recognition. The tumor microenvironment seems to favor reduced expression of target antigens by melanoma cells. Among candidate factors, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) (102 to 103 U/ml) suppressed expression of antigens MART-1, TRP-1, and gp100 by M14 melanoma cells as shown by immunohistology and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, reducing MART-1 expression by >65%. Northern blot analysis revealed that reduced expression was regulated at the transcriptional level, demonstrating a 79% reduction in MART-1 transcript abundance after 32 hours of IFN-γ treatment. To evaluate consequences of IFN-γ exposure for immune recognition, MART-1-responsive T cells were reacted with pretreated HLA-matched melanoma cells. Cytotoxicity was reduced up to 78% by IFN-γ pretreatment, and was restored by addition of MART-1 peptide AAGIGILTV for 2 hours. Examination of melanoma lesions by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed up to 188-fold more abundant IFN-γ transcripts when compared to control skin. Laser capture microdissection and immunohistology localized most IFN-γ-producing T cells to the tumor stroma. Reduced MART-1 expression was frequently observed in adjacent tumor cells. Consequently, IFN-γ may enhance inflammatory responses yet hamper effective recognition of melanoma cells. PMID:11839572

  9. Novel Anti-Melanoma Immunotherapies: Disarming Tumor Escape Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sapoznik, Sivan; Hammer, Ohad; Ortenberg, Rona; Besser, Michal J.; Ben-Moshe, Tehila; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2012-01-01

    The immune system fights cancer and sometimes temporarily eliminates it or reaches an equilibrium stage of tumor growth. However, continuous immunological pressure also selects poorly immunogenic tumor variants that eventually escape the immune control system. Here, we focus on metastatic melanoma, a highly immunogenic tumor, and on anti-melanoma immunotherapies, which recently, especially following the FDA approval of Ipilimumab, gained interest from drug development companies. We describe new immunomodulatory approaches currently in the development pipeline, focus on the novel CEACAM1 immune checkpoint, and compare its potential to the extensively described targets, CTLA4 and PD1. This paper combines multi-disciplinary approaches and describes anti-melanoma immunotherapies from molecular, medical, and business angles. PMID:22778766

  10. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  11. Tumor necrosis is associated with increased alphavbeta3 integrin expression and poor prognosis in nodular cutaneous melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, Ingeborg M; Ladstein, Rita G; Straume, Oddbjørn; Naumov, George N; Akslen, Lars A

    2008-01-01

    Background Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are considered important in cancer progression, but these features have not been much studied in melanomas. Our hypothesis was that rapid growth in cutaneous melanomas of the vertical growth phase might lead to tissue hypoxia, alterations in apoptotic activity and tumor necrosis. We proposed that these tumor characteristics might be associated with changes in expression of cell adhesion proteins leading to increased invasive capacity and reduced patient survival. Methods A well characterized series of nodular melanoma (originally 202 cases) and other benign and malignant melanocytic tumors (109 cases) were examined for the presence of necrosis, apoptotic activity (TUNEL assay), immunohistochemical expression of hypoxia markers (HIF-1 α, CAIX, TNF-α, Apaf-1) and cell adhesion proteins (αvβ3 integrin, CD44/HCAM and osteopontin). We hypothesized that tumor hypoxia and necrosis might be associated with increased invasiveness in melanoma through alterations of tumor cell adhesion proteins. Results Necrosis was present in 29% of nodular melanomas and was associated with increased tumor thickness, tumor ulceration, vascular invasion, higher tumor proliferation and apoptotic index, increased expression of αvβ3 integrin and poor patient outcome by multivariate analysis. Tumor cell apoptosis did also correlate with reduced patient survival. Expression of TNF-α and Apaf-1 was significantly associated with tumor thickness, and osteopontin expression correlated with increased tumor cell proliferation (Ki-67). Conclusion Tumor necrosis and apoptotic activity are important features of melanoma progression and prognosis, at least partly through alterations in cell adhesion molecules such as increased αvβ3 integrin expression, revealing potentially important targets for new therapeutic approaches to be further explored. PMID:19061491

  12. Different activities of unscheduled DNA synthesis in human melanoma and bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lewensohn, R.; Ringborg, U.; Hansson, J.

    1982-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) indicated by melphalan was studied in freshly collected tumor cells from human melanoma metastases. Comparative studies were done on human bone marrow blast cells. Significant levels of UDS comparable with those in myeloblasts were found in only two of eight melanoma cell populations. This difference between melanoma and blast cells was not related to different cellular uptake of melphalan. When UDS was induced by ultraviolet irradiation, significant levels of UDS were found in all melanoma and blast cell populations studied. Also, in a human melanoma cell line, high levels of UDS were found after exposure to ultraviolet irradiation, while treatment with melphalan did not result in detectable levels of UDS. Possible explanations for the divergent results of UDS in melphalan-exposed melanoma cells are discussed.

  13. Melanoma cells express ICOS ligand to promote the activation and expansion of T-regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Orozco, Natalia; Li, Yufeng; Wang, Yijun; Liu, Shijuan; Hwu, Patrick; Liu, Yong-Jun; Dong, Chen; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs) accumulate in tumors, however little is known about how the tumor environment influences this process. Here we show that human melanomas express ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L/B7H) that can provide costimulation through ICOS for the expansion of activated Tregs maintaining high Foxp3 and CD25 expression as well as suppressive function. Thus, ICOS-L expression by melanoma tumor cells may directly drive Treg activation and expansion in the tumor microenvironment as another mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:21098714

  14. Identification of a human melanoma antigen recognized by tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes associated with in vivo tumor rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Y; Eliyahu, S; Delgado, C H; Robbins, P F; Sakaguchi, K; Appella, E; Yannelli, J R; Adema, G J; Miki, T; Rosenberg, S A

    1994-01-01

    The cultured T-cell line TIL1200, established from the tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) of a patient with advanced metastatic melanoma, recognized an antigen on most HLA-A2+ melanomas and on all HLA-A2+ cultured neonatal melanocytes in an HLA-A2 restricted manner but not on other types of tissues or cell lines tested. A cDNA encoding an antigen recognized by TIL1200 was isolated by screening an HLA-A2+ breast cancer cell line transfected with an expression cDNA library prepared from an HLA-A2+ melanoma cell line. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of this cDNA were almost identical to the genes encoding glycoprotein gp100 or Pmel17 previously registered in the GenBank. Expression of this gene was restricted to melanoma and melanocyte cell lines and retina but was not expressed on other fresh or cultured normal tissues or other types of tumor tested. The cell line transfected with this cDNA also expressed antigen recognized by the melanoma-specific antibody HMB45 that bound to gp100. A synthetic 10-amino acid peptide derived from gp100 was recognized by TIL1200 in the context of HLA-A2.1. Since the administration of TIL1200 plus interleukin 2 resulted in regression of metastatic cancer in the autologous patient, gp100 is a possible tumor rejection antigen and may be useful for the development of immunotherapies for patients with melanoma. Images PMID:8022805

  15. Microarray evidence of glutaminyl cyclase gene expression in melanoma: implications for tumor antigen specific immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gillis, John Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Background In recent years encouraging progress has been made in developing vaccine treatments for cancer, particularly with melanoma. However, the overall rate of clinically significant results has remained low. The present research used microarray datasets from previous investigations to examine gene expression patterns in cancer cell lines with the goal of better understanding the tumor microenvironment. Methods Principal Components Analyses with Promax rotational transformations were carried out with 90 cancer cell lines from 3 microarray datasets, which had been made available on the internet as supplementary information from prior publications. Results In each of the analyses a well defined melanoma component was identified that contained a gene coding for the enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, which was as highly expressed as genes from a variety of well established biomarkers for melanoma, such as MAGE-3 and MART-1, which have frequently been used in clinical trials of melanoma vaccines. Conclusion Since glutaminyl cyclase converts glutamine and glutamic acid into a pyroglutamic form, it may interfere with the tumor destructive process of vaccines using peptides having glutamine or glutamic acid at their N-terminals. Finding ways of inhibiting the activity of glutaminyl cyclase in the tumor microenvironment may help to increase the effectiveness of some melanoma vaccines. PMID:16820060

  16. Enhancing the treatment effect on melanoma by heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes purified from human melanoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanwei; Gao, Weishi; Chen, Xia; Cha, Nier; Wang, Xiaoli; Jia, Xiangdong; Wang, Bingping; Ren, Meng; Ren, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines are currently one of the most effective approaches to treat melanoma. The immunogenicity of antigens loaded into DCs determines the treatment effects. Patients treated with autologous antigen-loaded DC vaccines achieve the best therapeutic effects. In China, most melanoma patients cannot access their autologous antigens because of formalin treatment of tumor tissue after surgery. In the present study, we purified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-peptide complexes (PCs) from human melanoma cell lines A375, A875, M21, M14, WM-35, and SK-HEL-1. We named the purified product as M-HSP70-PCs, and determined its immunological activities. Autologous HSP70-PCs purified from primary tumor cells of melanoma patients (nine cases) were used as controls. These two kinds of tumor antigenic complexes loaded into DCs were used to stimulate an antitumor response against tumor cells in the corresponding patients. Mature DCs pulsed with M-HSP70-PCs stimulated autologous T cells to secrete the same levels of type I cytokines compared with the autologous HSP70-PCs. Moreover, DCs pulsed with M-HSP70-PCs induced CD8+ T cells with an equal ability to kill melanoma cells from patients compared with autologous HSP70-PCs. Next, we used these PC-pulsed autologous DCs and induced autologous specific CD8+ T cells to treat one patient with melanoma of the nasal skin and lung metastasis. The treatment achieved a good effect after six cycles. These findings provide a new direction for DC-based immunotherapy for melanoma patients who cannot access autologous antigens. PMID:27431432

  17. Enhancing the treatment effect on melanoma by heat shock protein 70-peptide complexes purified from human melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanwei; Gao, Weishi; Chen, Xia; Cha, Nier; Wang, Xiaoli; Jia, Xiangdong; Wang, Bingping; Ren, Meng; Ren, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccines are currently one of the most effective approaches to treat melanoma. The immunogenicity of antigens loaded into DCs determines the treatment effects. Patients treated with autologous antigen-loaded DC vaccines achieve the best therapeutic effects. In China, most melanoma patients cannot access their autologous antigens because of formalin treatment of tumor tissue after surgery. In the present study, we purified heat shock protein 70 (HSP70)-peptide complexes (PCs) from human melanoma cell lines A375, A875, M21, M14, WM‑35, and SK‑HEL‑1. We named the purified product as M‑HSP70‑PCs, and determined its immunological activities. Autologous HSP70‑PCs purified from primary tumor cells of melanoma patients (nine cases) were used as controls. These two kinds of tumor antigenic complexes loaded into DCs were used to stimulate an antitumor response against tumor cells in the corresponding patients. Mature DCs pulsed with M‑HSP70‑PCs stimulated autologous T cells to secrete the same levels of type I cytokines compared with the autologous HSP70‑PCs. Moreover, DCs pulsed with M‑HSP70‑PCs induced CD8+ T cells with an equal ability to kill melanoma cells from patients compared with autologous HSP70‑PCs. Next, we used these PC‑pulsed autologous DCs and induced autologous specific CD8+ T cells to treat one patient with melanoma of the nasal skin and lung metastasis. The treatment achieved a good effect after six cycles. These findings provide a new direction for DC-based immunotherapy for melanoma patients who cannot access autologous antigens. PMID:27431432

  18. Diffuse melanosis after chemotherapy-induced tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Busam, Klaus J; Wolchok, Jedd; Jungbluth, Achim A; Chapman, Paul

    2004-03-01

    Diffuse melanosis is a rare event associated with advanced metastatic malignant melanoma. A 35-year-old woman with stage IV melanoma is presented, who developed slate bluish-gray to brown discoloration of her skin after chemotherapy-induced tumor lysis syndrome. A number of studies were performed to re-evaluate possible mechanisms of melanosis. Skin tissue was examined on routine hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained sections, Fontana stains, immunohistochemical studies with antibodies for Melan-A, gp100, tyrosinase, FXIIIa, and CD68, and by electron microscopy. The main cell types found to contain melanin pigment were histiocytes and dendritic cells. In the dermis, they were distributed mainly around venules. In the subcutaneous fat, they were scattered throughout the fat lobule. Melanin pigment was not only seen within cells but also extracellularly. No melanoma cells were seen in the skin. No increase in melanin pigment or number of melanocytes was seen in the epidermis. A bone marrow biopsy contained melanophages but no melanoma cells. Ultrastructural examination of the patient's serum revealed the presence of melanosomes. Sequence analysis of the tumor's cDNA failed to identify any mutations in the tyrosinase gene, and no tyrosinase protein was detected in non-melanocytic cells, indicating that it was unlikely that a mutation had resulted in a secretory form of the protein. These findings document that diffuse melanosis may result from tumor lysis, with release of melanosomes into the bloodstream. PMID:14984582

  19. Characterization of Ex Vivo Expanded Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes from Patients with Malignant Melanoma for Clinical Application

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Niels; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2011-01-01

    Clinical trials of adoptive transfer of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) to patients with advanced malignant melanoma have shown remarkable results with objective clinical responses in 50% of the treated patients. In order to initiate a clinical trial in melanoma, we have established a method for expanding TILs to clinical relevant quantities in two steps with in 8 weeks. Further characterization of expanded TILs revealed an oligoclonal composition of T-cells with an effector memory like phenotype. When autologous tumor was available, TILs showed specific activity in all patients tested. TIL cultures contained specificity towards tumor cells as well as peptides derived from tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) during expansion procedures. PMID:21773037

  20. Detection of circulating melanoma cells in human blood using photoacoustic flowmetry.

    PubMed

    Weight, Ryan M; Dale, Paul S; Viator, John A

    2009-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTC's) in human blood and lymph systems has the potential to aid clinical decision making in the treatment of cancer. The presence of CTC's may signify the onset of metastasis, indicate relapse, or may be used to monitor disease progression. A photoacoustic flowmetry system was designed and tested for detecting circulating melanoma cells (CMC's) by exploiting the broadband absorption spectrum of melanin within CMC's. The device was tested on cultured melanoma cells in saline suspension and in a Stage IV melanoma patient. The device showed a detection threshold of a single melanotic melanoma cell from culture. Transient photoacoustic events were detected in a sample derived from a Stage IV melanoma patient that corresponded to particles passing through the laser beam path, indicating the presence of single melanoma cells in the human circulatory system. PMID:19965119

  1. BPTF transduces MITF-driven prosurvival signals in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Altaf A.; Majid, Shahana; Bezrookove, Vladimir; Phan, Binh; Ursu, Sarah; Nosrati, Mehdi; De Semir, David; Sagebiel, Richard W.; Miller, James R.; Debs, Robert; Cleaver, James E.; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) plays a critical and complex role in melanocyte transformation. Although several downstream targets of MITF action have been identified, the precise mechanisms by which MITF promotes melanocytic tumor progression are incompletely understood. Recent studies identified an oncogenic role for the bromodomain plant homeodomain finger transcription factor (BPTF) gene in melanoma progression, in part through activation of BCL2, a canonical target of MITF signaling. Analysis of the BPTF promoter identified a putative MITF-binding site, suggesting that MITF may regulate BPTF expression. Overexpression of MITF resulted in up-regulation of BPTF in a panel of melanoma and melanocyte cell lines. shRNA-mediated down-regulation of MITF in melanoma cells was accompanied by down-regulation of BPTF and BPTF-regulated genes (including BCL2) and resulted in reduced proliferative capacity of melanoma cells. The suppression of cell growth mediated by MITF silencing was rescued by overexpression of BPTF cDNA. Binding of MITF to the BPTF promoter was demonstrated using ChIP analysis. MITF overexpression resulted in direct transcriptional activation of BPTF, as evidenced by increased luciferase activity driven by the BPTF promoter. These results indicate that BPTF transduces key prosurvival signals driven by MITF, further supporting its important role in promoting melanoma cell survival and progression. PMID:27185926

  2. Oxidative stress inhibits distant metastasis by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskounova, Elena; Agathocleous, Michalis; Murphy, Malea M.; Hu, Zeping; Huddlestun, Sara E.; Zhao, Zhiyu; Leitch, A. Marilyn; Johnson, Timothy M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancer cells commonly enter the blood and disseminate systemically but are highly inefficient at forming distant metastases for poorly understood reasons. We studied human melanomas that differed in their metastasis histories in patients and in their capacity to metastasize in NSG mice. All melanomas had high frequencies of cells that formed subcutaneous tumours, but much lower percentages of cells that formed tumours after intravenous or intrasplenic transplantation, particularly among inefficient metastasizers. Melanoma cells in the blood and visceral organs experienced oxidative stress not observed in established subcutaneous tumours. Successfully metastasizing melanomas underwent reversible metabolic changes during metastasis that increased their capacity to withstand oxidative stress, including increased dependence upon NADPH-generating enzymes in the folate pathway. Anti-oxidants promoted distant metastasis in NSG mice. Folate pathway inhibition using low-dose methotrexate, ALDH1L2 knockdown, or MTHFD1 knockdown inhibited distant metastasis without significantly affecting the growth of subcutaneous tumors in the same mice. Oxidative stress thus limits distant metastasis by melanoma cells in vivo. PMID:26466563

  3. miR-137 suppresses tumor growth of malignant melanoma by targeting aurora kinase A.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiao; Zhang, Haiping; Lian, Shi; Zhu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    As an oncogene, aurora kinase A (AURKA) is overexpressed in various types of human cancers. However, the expression and roles of AURKA in malignant melanoma are largely unknown. In this study, a miR-137-AURKA axis was revealed to regulate melanoma growth. We found a significant increase in levels of AURKA in melanoma. Both genetic knockdown and pharmacologic inhibition of AURKA decreased tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Further found that miR-137 reduced AURKA expression through interaction with its 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) and that miR-137 was negatively correlated with AURKA expression in melanoma specimens. Overexpression of miR-137 decreased cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. Notably, re-expression of AURKA significantly rescued miR-137-mediated suppression of cell growth and clonality. In summary, these results reveal that miR-137 functions as a tumor suppressor by targeting AURKA, providing new insights into investigation of therapeutic strategies against malignant melanoma. PMID:27233613

  4. Methylation-mediated loss of SFRP2 enhances melanoma cell invasion via Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoji; Wei, Bin; Chen, Aijun; Zhao, Hengguang; Huang, Kun; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays an essential role in the initiation and progression of melanoma tumors. The Secreted Frizzled Related Proteins (SFRPs) are a family of proteins that suppress Wnt signaling. The methylation of SFRPs reduces their activity, and hence augments Wnt signaling. However, whether the methylation of SFRP2, a member of SFRPs, may be involved in the pathogenesis of melanoma is not known. Here we investigated the expression levels of SFRP2 in melanoma specimens. We found that SFRP2 mRNA wassignificantly decreased and methylation of SFRP2 gene was significantly increased in malignant melanoma tumors ascompared to the paired adjacent non-tumor tissue. Moreover, SFRP2 expression was significantly decreased in the malignant melanoma celllines, HTB63, A2058 and A375, but not in the non-transformed melanocyte cell line, Hermes 3A. The demethylation of SFRP2 gene by 5'-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCyd) in melanoma cell lines restored SFRP2 expression, at both mRNA and protein levels, and suppressed cell invasion. Furthermore, the demethylation of SFRP2 geneappeared to inhibit nuclear retention of a key Wnt signaling factor, β-catenin, in melanoma cell lines. Together, these data suggest that SFRP2may function as a melanoma invasion suppressor byinterfering with Wnt signaling, and the methylation of SFRP2 gene may promote pathogenesis of melanoma. PMID:27186276

  5. Methylation-mediated loss of SFRP2 enhances melanoma cell invasion via Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoji; Wei, Bin; Chen, Aijun; Zhao, Hengguang; Huang, Kun; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays an essential role in the initiation and progression of melanoma tumors. The Secreted Frizzled Related Proteins (SFRPs) are a family of proteins that suppress Wnt signaling. The methylation of SFRPs reduces their activity, and hence augments Wnt signaling. However, whether the methylation of SFRP2, a member of SFRPs, may be involved in the pathogenesis of melanoma is not known. Here we investigated the expression levels of SFRP2 in melanoma specimens. We found that SFRP2 mRNA wassignificantly decreased and methylation of SFRP2 gene was significantly increased in malignant melanoma tumors ascompared to the paired adjacent non-tumor tissue. Moreover, SFRP2 expression was significantly decreased in the malignant melanoma celllines, HTB63, A2058 and A375, but not in the non-transformed melanocyte cell line, Hermes 3A. The demethylation of SFRP2 gene by 5’-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dCyd) in melanoma cell lines restored SFRP2 expression, at both mRNA and protein levels, and suppressed cell invasion. Furthermore, the demethylation of SFRP2 geneappeared to inhibit nuclear retention of a key Wnt signaling factor, β-catenin, in melanoma cell lines. Together, these data suggest that SFRP2may function as a melanoma invasion suppressor byinterfering with Wnt signaling, and the methylation of SFRP2 gene may promote pathogenesis of melanoma. PMID:27186276

  6. Malignant melanoma (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor that involves the skin cells that produce pigment (melanin). The risk of melanoma increases with age, but frequently affects young, otherwise healthy people. Melanoma is the number one cause of cancer death in women aged 25 to 30.

  7. In vitro and in vivo anti-tumor activity of CoQ0 against melanoma cells: inhibition of metastasis and induction of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis through modulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hseu, You-Cheng; Thiyagarajan, Varadharajan; Tsou, Hsiao-Tung; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Chen, Hui-Jye; Lin, Chung-Ming; Liao, Jiuun-Wang; Yang, Hsin-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Coenzyme Q0 (CoQ0, 2,3-dimethoxy-5-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone), a novel quinone derivative, has been shown to modulate cellular redox balance. However, effect of this compound on melanoma remains unclear. This study examined the in vitro or in vivo anti-tumor, apoptosis, and anti-metastasis activities of CoQ0 (0-20 μM) through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CoQ0 exhibits a significant cytotoxic effect on melanoma cell lines (B16F10, B16F1, and A2058), while causing little toxicity toward normal (HaCaT) cells. The suppression of β-catenin was seen with CoQ0 administration accompanied by a decrease in the expression of Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target c-myc, cyclin D1, and survivin through GSK3β-independent pathway. We found that CoQ0 treatment caused G1 cell-cycle arrest by reducing the levels of cyclin E and CDK4. Furthermore, CoQ0 treatment induced apoptosis through caspase-9/-3 activation, PARP degradation, Bcl-2/Bax dysregulation, and p53 expression. Notably, non- or sub-cytotoxic concentrations of CoQ0 markedly inhibited migration and invasion, accompanied by the down-regulation of MMP-2 and -9, and up-regulation of TIMP-1 and -2 expressions in highly metastatic B16F10 cells. Furthermore, the in vivo study results revealed that CoQ0 treatment inhibited the tumor growth in B16F10 xenografted nude mice. Histological analysis and western blotting confirmed that CoQ0 significantly decreased the xenografted tumor progression as demonstrated by induction of apoptosis, suppression of β-catenin, and inhibition of cell cycle-, apoptotic-, and metastatic-regulatory proteins. The data suggest that CoQ0 unveils a novel mechanism by down-regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathways and could be used as a potential lead compound for melanoma chemotherapy. PMID:26968952

  8. Melanoma susceptibility as a complex trait: genetic variation controls all stages of tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, B; Ram, R; Handoko, H Y; Mukhopadhyay, P; Muller, H K; Soyer, H P; Morahan, G; Walker, G J

    2015-05-28

    Susceptibility to most common cancers is likely to involve interaction between multiple low risk genetic variants. Although there has been great progress in identifying such variants, their effect on phenotype and the mechanisms by which they contribute to disease remain largely unknown. We have developed a mouse melanoma model harboring two mutant oncogenes implicated in human melanoma, CDK4(R24C) and NRAS(Q61K). In these mice, tumors arise from benign precursor lesions that are a recognized strong risk factor for this neoplasm in humans. To define molecular events involved in the pathway to melanoma, we have for the first time applied the Collaborative Cross (CC) to cancer research. The CC is a powerful resource designed to expedite discovery of genes for complex traits. We characterized melanoma genesis in more than 50 CC strains and observed tremendous variation in all traits, including nevus and melanoma age of onset and multiplicity, anatomical site predilection, time for conversion of nevi to melanoma and metastases. Intriguingly, neonatal ultraviolet radiation exposure exacerbated nevus and melanoma formation in most, but not all CC strain backgrounds, suggesting that genetic variation within the CC will help explain individual sensitivity to sun exposure, the major environmental skin carcinogen. As genetic variation brings about dramatic phenotypic diversity in a single mouse model, melanoma-related endophenotype comparisons provide us with information about mechanisms of carcinogenesis, such as whether melanoma incidence is dependent upon the density of pre-existing nevus cells. Mouse models have been used to examine the functional role of gene mutations in tumorigenesis. This work represents their next phase of development to study how biological variation greatly influences lesion onset and aggressiveness even in the setting of known somatic driver mutations. PMID:25088201

  9. The small molecule curcumin analog FLLL32 induces apoptosis in melanoma cells via STAT3 inhibition and retains the cellular response to cytokines with anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We characterized the biologic effects of a novel small molecule STAT3 pathway inhibitor that is derived from the natural product curcumin. We hypothesized this lead compound would specifically inhibit the STAT3 signaling pathway to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Results FLLL32 specifically reduced STAT3 phosphorylation at Tyr705 (pSTAT3) and induced apoptosis at micromolar amounts in human melanoma cell lines and primary melanoma cultures as determined by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and immunoblot analysis. FLLL32 treatment reduced expression of STAT3-target genes, induced caspase-dependent apoptosis, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. FLLL32 displayed specificity for STAT3 over other homologous STAT proteins. In contrast to other STAT3 pathway inhibitors (WP1066, JSI-124, Stattic), FLLL32 did not abrogate IFN-γ-induced pSTAT1 or downstream STAT1-mediated gene expression as determined by Real Time PCR. In addition, FLLL32 did not adversely affect the function or viability of immune cells from normal donors. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), FLLL32 inhibited IL-6-induced pSTAT3 but did not reduce signaling in response to immunostimulatory cytokines (IFN-γ, IL 2). Treatment of PBMCs or natural killer (NK) cells with FLLL32 also did not decrease viability or granzyme b and IFN-γ production when cultured with K562 targets as compared to vehicle (DMSO). Conclusions These data suggest that FLLL32 represents a lead compound that could serve as a platform for further optimization to develop improved STAT3 specific inhibitors for melanoma therapy. PMID:20576164

  10. Disruption of the protein interaction between FAK and IGF-1R inhibits melanoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Deniz A; Kurenova, Elena; Garrett, Timothy J; Cance, William G; Nyberg, Carl; Cox, Audrey; Massoll, Nicole; Ostrov, David A; Lawrence, Nicholas; Sebti, Said M; Zajac-Kaye, Maria; Hochwald, Steven N

    2012-09-01

    FAK (focal adhesion kinase) and IGF-1R (insulin-like growth factor receptor-1) directly interact with each other and thereby activate crucial signaling pathways that benefit cancer cells. Inhibition of FAK and IGF-1R function has been shown to significantly decrease cancer cell proliferation and increase sensitivity to chemotherapy and radiation treatment. As a novel approach in human melanoma, we evaluated the effect of a small-molecule compound that disrupts the protein interaction of FAK and IGF-1R. Previously, using virtual screening and functional testing, we identified a lead compound (INT2-31) that targets the known FAK-IGF-1R protein interaction site. We studied the ability of this compound to disrupt FAK-IGF-1R protein interactions, inhibit downstream signaling, decrease human melanoma cell proliferation, alter cell cycle progression, induce apoptosis and decrease tumor growth in vivo. INT2-31 blocked the interaction of FAK and IGF-1R in vitro and in vivo in melanoma cells and tumor xenografts through precluding the activation of IRS-1, leading to reduced phosphorylation of AKT upon IGF-1 stimulation. As a result, INT2-31 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and viability (range 0.05-10 μM). More importantly, 15 mg/kg of INT2-31 given for 21 d via intraperitoneal injection disrupted the interaction of FAK and IGF-1R and effectively decreased phosphorylation of tumor AKT, resulting in significant melanoma tumor regression in vivo. Our data suggest that the FAK-IGF-1R protein interaction is an important target, and disruption of this interaction with a novel small molecule (INT2-31) has potential anti-neoplastic therapeutic effects in human melanoma. PMID:22894899

  11. SMARCA4 (BRG1) loss of expression is a useful marker for the diagnosis of ovarian small cell carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (ovarian rhabdoid tumor): a comprehensive analysis of 116 rare gynecologic tumors, 9 soft tissue tumors, and 9 melanomas.

    PubMed

    Karanian-Philippe, Marie; Velasco, Valérie; Longy, Michel; Floquet, Anne; Arnould, Laurent; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Le Naoures-Méar, Cécile; Averous, Gerlinde; Guyon, Frédéric; MacGrogan, Gaëtan; Croce, Sabrina

    2015-09-01

    Ovarian small cell carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT)/ovarian rhabdoid tumor is a rare and highly malignant tumor that typically occurs in young women. Up until now the diagnosis has been made on the basis of morphology without any specific immunohistochemical (IHC) markers. However, several authors have shown recently that SCCOHTs are characterized by inactivation of the SMARCA4 gene (encoding the BRG1 protein) resulting in a loss of BRG1 protein expression in IHC. We evaluated BRG1 and INI1 expression in 12 SCCOHTs and in a series of 122 tumors that could mimic SCCOHT morphologically: 9 juvenile granulosa cell tumors, 47 adult granulosa cell tumors, 33 high-grade ovarian serous carcinomas, 9 desmoplastic round cell tumors, 13 Ewing sarcomas (5 from the pelvis and 8 from soft tissues), 1 round cell sarcoma associated with CIC-DUX4 translocation from soft tissue (thigh), 1 case of high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma of the ovary, and 9 melanomas. Forty-four adult granulosa cell tumors were interpretable by IHC. All 12 SCCOHTs were devoid of BRG1 expression and expressed INI1. All other interpretable 119 tumors showed BRG1 nuclear positivity, with variable staining proportions, ranging from 10% to 100% of positive cells (mean: 77%, median: 80%), variable intensities (weak: 5%, moderate: 37%, strong: 58%), and distributions: diffuse in 82 cases (70%) and heterogenous in 36 cases (30%). BRG1 positivity was heterogenous in desmoplastic round cell tumors and adult granulosa cell tumors. Overall, BRG1 is a useful diagnostic marker in SCCOHT, showing the absence of expression in SCCOHT. Nevertheless, the possible heterogeneity and the variable intensity of this staining warrant caution in the interpretation of BRG1 staining in biopsy specimens. PMID:26135561

  12. Microtubule-Associated Protein 2, a Marker of Neuronal Differentiation, Induces Mitotic Defects, Inhibits Growth of Melanoma Cells, and Predicts Metastatic Potential of Cutaneous Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Mohammad H.; Pichardo, Rita; Song, Ziqui; Sangha, Namrata; Camacho, Fabian; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Sangueza, Omar P.; Setaluri, Vijayasaradhi

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic instability of microtubules is critical for mitotic spindle assembly and disassembly during cell division, especially in rapidly dividing tumor cells. Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are a family of proteins that influence this property. We showed previously that MAP2, a neuron-specific protein that stabilizes microtubules in the dendrites of postmitotic neurons, is induced in primary cutaneous melanoma but is absent in metastatic melanomas. We proposed that induction of a microtubule-stabilizing protein in primary melanoma could disrupt the dynamic instability of microtubules, inhibit cell division and prevent or delay tumor progression. Here we show, by Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analysis, that patients diagnosed with MAP2+ primary melanomas have significantly better metastatic disease-free survival than those with MAP2− disease. Investigation of the mechanisms that underlie the effect of MAP2 on melanoma progression showed that MAP2 expression in metastatic melanoma cell lines leads to microtubule stabilization, cell cycle arrest in G2-M phase and growth inhibition. Disruption of microtubule dynamics by MAP2 resulted in multipolar mitotic spindles, defects in cytokinesis and accumulation of cells with large nuclei, similar to those seen in vivo in MAP2+ primary melanomas cells. These data suggest that ectopic activation of a neuronal differentiation gene in melanoma during early tumor progression inhibits cell division and correlates with inhibition or delay of metastasis. PMID:15920168

  13. Synchronized Targeting of Notch and ERBB Signaling Suppresses Melanoma Tumor Growth through Inhibition of Notch1 and ERBB3.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keman; Wong, Poki; Salvaggio, Christine; Salhi, Amel; Osman, Iman; Bedogni, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    Despite significant advances in melanoma therapy, melanoma remains the deadliest form of skin cancer, with a 5-year survival rate of only 15%. Thus, novel treatments are required to address this disease. Notch and ERBB are evolutionarily conserved signaling cascades required for the maintenance of melanocyte precursors. We show that active Notch1 (Notch1(NIC)) and active (phosphorylated) ERBB3 and ERBB2 correlate significantly and are similarly expressed in both mutated and wild-type BRAF melanomas, suggesting these receptors are co-reactivated in melanoma to promote survival. Whereas blocking either pathway triggers modest effects, combining a ?-secretase inhibitor to block Notch activation and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor to inhibit ERBB3/2 elicits synergistic effects, reducing cell viability by 90% and hampering melanoma tumor growth. Specific inhibition of Notch1 and ERBB3 mimics these results, suggesting these are the critical factors triggering melanoma tumor expansion. Notch and ERBB inhibition blunts AKT and NF?B signaling. Constitutive expression of NF?B partially rescues cell death. Blockade of both Notch and ERBB signaling inhibits the slow cycling JARID1B-positive cell population, which is critical for long-term maintenance of melanoma growth. We propose that blocking these pathways is an effective approach to treatment of melanoma patients regardless of whether they carry mutated or wild-type BRAF. PMID:26967479

  14. Synchronized targeting of Notch and ERBB signaling suppresses melanoma tumor growth through inhibition of Notch1 and ERBB3*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keman; Wong, Poki; Salvaggio, Christine; Salhi, Amel; Osman, Iman; Bedogni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advances in melanoma therapy, melanoma remains the deadliest form of skin cancer, with a five-year survival of only 15%. Novel treatments are therefore required to address this disease. Notch and ERBB are evolutionarily conserved signaling cascades required for the maintenance of melanocyte precursors. We show that active Notch1 (Notch1NIC) and active (phosphorylated) ERBB3 and ERBB2 correlate significantly and are similarly expressed in both mutated and wild type BRAF melanomas, suggesting these receptors are co-reactivated in melanoma to promote survival. Indeed, while blocking either pathway triggers modest effects, combining a γ-secretase inhibitor to block Notch activation, and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor to inhibit ERBB3/2 elicits synergistic effects, reducing cell viability by 90% and by hampering melanoma tumor growth. Specific inhibition of Notch1 and ERBB3 mimics these results, suggesting these are the critical factors triggering melanoma tumor expansion. Notch and ERBB inhibition blunts AKT and NFκB signaling; Constitutive expression of NFκB partially rescues cell death. Finally, blockade of both Notch and ERBB signaling inhibits the slow cycling JARID1B positive cell population, which is critical for long-term maintenance of melanoma growth. We propose that blocking these pathways is an effective approach to treat melanoma patients regardless of whether they carry mutated or wild type BRAF. PMID:26967479

  15. Cannibalism of live lymphocytes by human metastatic but not primary melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lugini, Luana; Matarrese, Paola; Tinari, Antonella; Lozupone, Francesco; Federici, Cristina; Iessi, Elisabetta; Gentile, Massimo; Luciani, Francesca; Parmiani, Giorgio; Rivoltini, Licia; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of cell cannibalism, which generally refers to the engulfment of cells within other cells, was described in malignant tumors, but its biological significance is still largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence, the in vivo relevance, and the underlying mechanisms of cannibalism in human melanoma. As first evidence, we observed that tumor cannibalism was clearly detectable in vivo in metastatic lesions of melanoma and often involved T cells, which could be found in a degraded state within tumor cells. Then, in vitro experiments confirmed that cannibalism of T cells was a property of metastatic melanoma cells but not of primary melanoma cells. In particular, morphologic analyses, including time-lapse cinematography and electron microscopy, revealed a sequence of events, in which metastatic melanoma cells were able to engulf and digest live autologous melanoma-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, this cannibalistic activity significantly increased metastatic melanoma cell survival, particularly under starvation condition, supporting the evidence that tumor cells may use the eating of live lymphocytes as a way to "feed" in condition of low nutrient supply. The mechanism underlying cannibalism involved a complex framework, including lysosomal protease cathepsin B activity, caveolae formation, and ezrin cytoskeleton integrity and function. In conclusion, our study shows that human metastatic melanoma cells may eat live T cells, which are instead programmed to kill them, suggesting a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape. Moreover, our data suggest that cannibalism may represent a sort of "feeding" activity aimed at sustaining survival and progression of malignant tumor cells in an unfavorable microenvironment. PMID:16585188

  16. Honokiol inhibits melanoma stem cells by targeting notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Venugopal, Anand; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Umar, Shahid; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant; Mammen, Joshua M V

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Here, we determined the effects of honokiol (HNK), a biphenolic natural compound on melanoma cells and stemness. HNK significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, viability, clonogenicity and induced autophagy. In addition, HNK significantly inhibited melanosphere formation in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses also demonstrated reduction in stem cell markers CD271, CD166, Jarid1b, and ABCB5. We next examined the effect of HNK on Notch signaling, a pathway involved in stem cell self-renewal. Four different Notch receptors exist in cells, which when cleaved by a series of enzymatic reactions catalyzed by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Converting Enzyme (TACE) and γ-secretase protein complex, results in the release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which then translocates to the nucleus and induces target gene expression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in HNK treated cells there is a significant reduction in the expression of cleaved Notch-2. In addition, there was a reduction in the expression of downstream target proteins, Hes-1 and cyclin D1. Moreover, HNK treatment suppressed the expression of TACE and γ-secretase complex proteins in melanoma cells. To confirm that suppression of Notch-2 activation is critical for HNK activity, we overexpressed NICD1, NICD2, and performed HNK treatment. NICD2, but not NICD1, partially restored the expression of Hes-1 and cyclin D1, and increased melanosphere formation. Taken together, these data suggest that HNK is a potent inhibitor of melanoma cells, in part, through the targeting of melanoma stem cells by suppressing Notch-2 signaling. PMID:25491779

  17. Silencing cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) identifies CYR61 as a tumor suppressor gene in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Dobroff, Andrey S; Wang, Hua; Melnikova, Vladislava O; Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Huang, Li; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-09-18

    Metastatic progression of melanoma is associated with overexpression and activity of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB). However, the mechanism by which CREB contributes to tumor progression and metastasis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that stably silencing CREB expression in two human metastatic melanoma cell lines, A375SM and C8161-c9, suppresses tumor growth and experimental metastasis. Analysis of cDNA microarrays revealed that CREB silencing leads to increased expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1/CYR61) known to mediate adhesion, chemostasis, survival, and angiogenesis. Promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that CREB acts as a negative regulator of CCN1/CYR61 transcription by directly binding to its promoter. Re-expression of CREB in CREB-silenced cells rescued the low CCN1/CYR61 expression phenotype. CCN1/CYR61 overexpression resulted in reduced tumor growth and metastasis and inhibited the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2. Furthermore, its overexpression decreased melanoma cell motility and invasion through Matrigel, which was abrogated by silencing CCN1/CYR61 in low metastatic melanoma cells. Moreover, a significant decrease in angiogenesis as well as an increase in apoptosis was seen in tumors overexpressing CCN1/CYR61. Our results demonstrate that CREB promotes melanoma growth and metastasis by down-regulating CCN1/CYR61 expression, which acts as a suppressor of melanoma cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:19632997

  18. Silencing cAMP-response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Identifies CYR61 as a Tumor Suppressor Gene in Melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Dobroff, Andrey S.; Wang, Hua; Melnikova, Vladislava O.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Zigler, Maya; Huang, Li; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2009-01-01

    Metastatic progression of melanoma is associated with overexpression and activity of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB). However, the mechanism by which CREB contributes to tumor progression and metastasis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that stably silencing CREB expression in two human metastatic melanoma cell lines, A375SM and C8161-c9, suppresses tumor growth and experimental metastasis. Analysis of cDNA microarrays revealed that CREB silencing leads to increased expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1/CYR61) known to mediate adhesion, chemostasis, survival, and angiogenesis. Promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that CREB acts as a negative regulator of CCN1/CYR61 transcription by directly binding to its promoter. Re-expression of CREB in CREB-silenced cells rescued the low CCN1/CYR61 expression phenotype. CCN1/CYR61 overexpression resulted in reduced tumor growth and metastasis and inhibited the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2. Furthermore, its overexpression decreased melanoma cell motility and invasion through Matrigel, which was abrogated by silencing CCN1/CYR61 in low metastatic melanoma cells. Moreover, a significant decrease in angiogenesis as well as an increase in apoptosis was seen in tumors overexpressing CCN1/CYR61. Our results demonstrate that CREB promotes melanoma growth and metastasis by down-regulating CCN1/CYR61 expression, which acts as a suppressor of melanoma cell motility, invasion and angiogenesis. PMID:19632997

  19. INO80 governs superenhancer-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingying; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Bennett, Brian D; He, Fan; Zhang, Yan; Xiong, Chengliang; Han, Leng; Diao, Lixia; Li, Pishun; Fargo, David C; Cox, Adrienne D; Hu, Guang

    2016-06-15

    Superenhancers (SEs) are large genomic regions with a high density of enhancer marks. In cancer, SEs are found near oncogenes and dictate cancer gene expression. However, how oncogenic SEs are regulated remains poorly understood. Here, we show that INO80, a chromatin remodeling complex, is required for SE-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma. The expression of Ino80, the SWI/SNF ATPase, is elevated in melanoma cells and patient melanomas compared with normal melanocytes and benign nevi. Furthermore, Ino80 silencing selectively inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenesis, and tumor maintenance in mouse xenografts. Mechanistically, Ino80 occupies >90% of SEs, and its occupancy is dependent on transcription factors such as MITF and Sox9. Ino80 binding reduces nucleosome occupancy and facilitates Mediator recruitment, thus promoting oncogenic transcription. Consistently, genes co-occupied by Ino80 and Med1 are selectively expressed in melanomas compared with melanocytes. Together, our results reveal an essential role of INO80-dependent chromatin remodeling in SE function and suggest a novel strategy for disrupting SEs in cancer treatment. PMID:27340176

  20. Epigenetic Silencing of SPINT2 promotes Cancer Cell Motility via HGF-MET Pathway Activation in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soonyean; Kim, Hye-Eun; Min, Michelle; Raghunathan, Rekha; Panova, Izabela P.; Munshi, Ruchi; Ryu, Byungwoo

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant HGF-MET signaling activation via interactions with surrounding stromal cells in tumor microenvironment plays significant roles in malignant tumor progression. However, extracellular proteolytic regulation of HGF activation which is influenced by the tumor microenvironment and its consequential effects on melanoma malignancy remain uncharacterized. In this study we identified SPINT2: a proteolytic inhibitor of hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), which plays a significant role in the suppression of the HGF-MET pathway and malignant melanoma progression. SPINT2 expression is significantly lower in metastatic melanoma tissues compared to those in early stage primary melanomas which also corresponded with DNA methylation levels isolated from tissue samples. Treatment with the DNA hypomethylating agent decitabine in cultured melanoma cells induced transcriptional reactivation of SPINT2, suggesting that this gene is epigenetically silenced in malignant melanomas. Furthermore, we show that ectopically expressed SPINT2 in melanoma cells inhibits HGF induced MET-AKT signaling pathway and decreases malignant phenotype potential such as cell motility, and invasive growth of melanoma cells. These results suggest that SPINT2 is associated with tumor suppressive functions in melanoma by inhibiting an extracellular signal regulator of HGF which is typically activated by tumor-stromal interactions. These findings indicate that epigenetic impairment of the tightly regulated cytokine-receptor communications in tumor microenvironment may contribute to malignant tumor progression. PMID:25910030

  1. Embryonic Chicken Transplantation is a Promising Model for Studying the Invasive Behavior of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jayachandran, Aparna; McKeown, Sonja J.; Woods, Briannyn L.; Prithviraj, Prashanth; Cebon, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition is a hallmark event in the metastatic cascade conferring invasive ability to tumor cells. There are ongoing efforts to replicate the physiological events occurring during mobilization of tumor cells in model systems. However, few systems are able to capture these complex in vivo events. The embryonic chicken transplantation model has emerged as a useful system to assess melanoma cells including functions that are relevant to the metastatic process, namely invasion and plasticity. The chicken embryo represents an accessible and economical 3-dimensional in vivo model for investigating melanoma cell invasion as it exploits the ancestral relationship between melanoma and its precursor neural crest cells. We describe a methodology that enables the interrogation of melanoma cell motility within the developing avian embryo. This model involves the injection of melanoma cells into the neural tube of chicken embryos. Melanoma cells are labeled using fluorescent tracker dye, Vybrant DiO, then cultured as hanging drops for 24 h to aggregate the cells. Groups of approximately 700 cells are placed into the neural tube of chicken embryos prior to the onset of neural crest migration at the hindbrain level (embryonic day 1.5) or trunk level (embryonic day 2.5). Chick embryos are reincubated and analyzed after 48 h for the location of melanoma cells using fluorescent microscopy on whole mounts and cross-sections of the embryos. Using this system, we compared the in vivo invasive behavior of epithelial-like and mesenchymal-like melanoma cells. We report that the developing embryonic microenvironment confers motile abilities to both types of melanoma cells. Hence, the embryonic chicken transplantation model has the potential to become a valuable tool for in vivo melanoma invasion studies. Importantly, it may provide novel insights into and reveal previously unknown mediators of the metastatic steps of invasion and dissemination in melanoma

  2. Uptake of indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody ZME-018 as a function of tumor size in a patient with melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Macey, D.J.; Denardo, S.J.; Denardo, G.L.; Goodnight, J.K.; Unger, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of an Indium-111-labeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb), ZME-018, in melanoma tumors in a patient was determined by sequential, quantitative gamma camera imaging. The amount and concentration of In-111 in each tumor changed in a characteristic pattern with time, reaching a peak at day 3 followed by a steady clearance. The concentration of In-111 in the tumor and the ratios of tumor to whole-body or blood decreased as the size of the tumor increased. These results were interpreted to indicate that the fraction of active, perfused tumor decreased as the melanoma lesions increased in size. The maximum number of MoAb molecules bound per melanoma cell was calculated to be abut 35,000. The implications of these observations for radioimmunoimaging and therapy are significant.

  3. Vascular channels formed by subpopulations of PECAM1+ melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavey, James M.; Xiao, Lin; Thompson, Joshua; Kim, Mi Mi; Shields, Janiel M.; Shelton, Sarah E.; Irvin, David M.; Brings, Victoria E.; Ollila, David; Brekken, Rolf A.; Dayton, Paul A.; Melero-Martin, Juan M.; Dudley, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting the vasculature remains a promising approach for treating solid tumors; however, the mechanisms of tumor neovascularization are diverse and complex. Here we uncover a new subpopulation of melanoma cells that express the vascular cell adhesion molecule PECAM1, but not VEGFR-2, and participate in a PECAM1-dependent form of vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Clonally-derived PECAM1+ tumor cells coalesce to form PECAM1-dependent networks in vitro and they generate well-perfused, VEGF-independent channels in mice. The neural crest specifier AP-2α is diminished in PECAM1+ melanoma cells and is a transcriptional repressor of PECAM1. Reintroduction of AP-2α into PECAM1+ tumor cells represses PECAM1 and abolishes tube-forming ability whereas AP-2α knockdown in PECAM1− tumor cells up-regulates PECAM1 expression and promotes tube formation. Thus, VM-competent subpopulations, rather than all cells within a tumor, may instigate VM, supplant host-derived endothelium, and form PECAM1-dependent conduits that are not diminished by neutralizing VEGF. PMID:25335460

  4. Increased NY-ESO-1 expression and reduced infiltrating CD3+ T cells in cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Sotto, Mirian Nacagami; Muzikansky, Alona; Kalil, Jorge; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Duncan, Lyn M

    2015-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 is a cancer-testis antigen aberrantly expressed in melanomas, which may serve as a robust and specific target in immunotherapy. NY-ESO-1 antigen expression, tumor features, and the immune profile of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes were assessed in primary cutaneous melanoma. NY-ESO-1 protein was detected in 20% of invasive melanomas (16/79), rarely in in situ melanoma (1/10) and not in benign nevi (0/20). Marked intratumoral heterogeneity of NY-ESO-1 protein expression was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression was associated with increased primary tumor thickness (P = 0.007) and inversely correlated with superficial spreading melanoma (P < 0.02). NY-ESO-1 expression was also associated with reduced numbers and density of CD3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (P = 0.017). When NY-ESO-1 protein was expressed, CD3+ T cells were less diffusely infiltrating the tumor and were more often arranged in small clusters (P = 0.010) or as isolated cells (P = 0.002) than in large clusters of more than five lymphocytes. No correlation of NY-ESO-1 expression with gender, age, tumor site, ulceration, lymph node sentinel status, or survival was observed. NY-ESO-1 expression in melanoma was associated with tumor progression, including increased tumor thickness, and with reduced tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. PMID:25954764

  5. Human Single-Chain Fv Immunoconjugates Targeted to a Melanoma-Associated Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycan Mediate Specific Lysis of Human Melanoma Cells by Natural Killer Cells and Complement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baiyang; Chen, Yi-Bin; Ayalon, Oran; Bender, Jeffrey; Garen, Alan

    1999-02-01

    Two antimelanoma immunoconjugates containing a human single-chain Fv (scFv) targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1 were synthesized as secreted two-chain molecules in Chinese hamster ovary and Drosophila S2 cells, and purified by affinity chromatography on protein A. The scFv targeting domains originally were isolated as melanoma-specific clones from a scFv fusion-phage library, derived from the antibody repertoire of a vaccinated melanoma patient. The purified immunoconjugates showed similar binding specificity as did the fusion-phage clones. Binding occurred to human melanoma cells but not to human melanocytes or to several other types of normal cells and tumor cells. A 250-kDa melanoma protein was immunoprecipitated by the immunoconjugates and analyzed by mass spectrometry, using two independent procedures. A screen of protein sequence databases showed an exact match of several peptide masses between the immunoprecipitated protein and the core protein of a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, which is expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. The Fc effector domain of the immunoconjugates binds natural killer (NK) cells and also the C1q protein that initiates the complement cascade; both NK cells and complement can activate powerful cytolytic responses against the targeted tumor cells. An in vitro cytolysis assay was used to test for an immunoconjugate-dependent specific cytolytic response against cultured human melanoma cells by NK cells and complement. The melanoma cells, but not the human fibroblast cells used as the control, were efficiently lysed by both NK cells and complement in the presence of the immunoconjugates. The in vitro results suggest that the immunoconjugates also could activate a specific cytolytic immune response against melanoma tumors in vivo.

  6. Leptin serves as angiogenic/mitogenic factor in melanoma tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Amjadi, Fatemehsadat; Mehdipoor, Roshanak; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor development is angiogenesis dependent. There is evidence that leptin contributes to tumor growth. However, all the mechanisms by which leptin does this has not been clearly established. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that leptin enhances melanoma tumor growth through inducing angiogenesis and cell proliferation. Materials and Methods: We injected 2 × 106 B16F10 melanoma cells subcutaneously to 32 C57BL6 mice. The mice were randomly divided into four groups of eight animals, on day 8. Two groups received twice daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of either phosphate buffered saline or recombinant murine leptin (1 μg/g initial body weight). Two groups received i.p. injections of either 9F8 an anti leptin receptor antibody or the control mouse IgG at 50 μg/injection every 3 consecutive days. By the end of the 2nd week, the animals were euthanized and blood samples and tumors were analyzed. Angiogenesis and proliferation were assessed by immunohistochemical staining for CD31 and Ki-67 respectively. Results: Tumors size, capillary density, plasma levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, and the number of Ki-67-positive stained cells were significantly more in the leptin than 9F8 and both control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Taken together, our findings reinforce the idea that leptin acts as an angiogenic and mitogenic factor to promote melanoma growth. PMID:27563637

  7. [Pulsed electric fields inhibit tumor growth but induce myocardial injury of melanoma-bearing mice].

    PubMed

    Pan, Fengying; Wu, Sha; Wang, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Xiaogang

    2016-07-01

    Objective To investigate the tumor inhibiting effect of pulsed electric fields (PEFs) on melanoma-bearing mice, and understand its influence on myocardial cells and cardial electrical activity. Methods The melanoma models of the BALB/c mice were established by subcutaneously injecting B16 melanoma cells. These mice were randomly divided into four groups. The treated groups received pulsed electric stimulation at pulse width of 1, 3, 5 ms, with field strength of 100 V/cm and frequency of 10 Hz for 10 minutes daily in 15 consecutive days. ECG of mice was recorded. Tumor volume was measured with vernier caliper. Morphological changes of tumors were observed by HE staining. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) mRNA was tested by real-time quantitative PCR, and the expression of PCNA protein was detected by immunofluorescence histochemistry. The ultrastructural changes of the cardiac tissues were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The serum levels of cardial troponin T (cTnT) and creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB) were detected by ELISA. Results Compared with the control group, tumor volumes in all treated groups were reduced 7 days after PEFs treatment; more melanin granules in tumor cells were found in the treated groups; the expressions of PCNA mRNA and protein were down-regulated in all treated groups, and there were greater changes in the groups receiving the bigger pulse width. Myocardial injury was found in 3 ms group and 5 ms group, and the expressions of cTnT and CK-MB were significantly higher than those in the control group. Conclusion PEFs can inhibit tumor growth in melanoma-bearing mice. Increase of pulse width will aggravate myocardial injury. PMID:27363271

  8. Characteristics of malignant melanoma cells in the treatment with fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemoto, H.; Morita, S.; Mori, S. )

    1989-07-01

    The radioresistance of malignant melanoma cells has been explained by the wide shoulder of the dose-cell-survival curve of the cells exposed to photon beams. Fast neutrons, 30 MeV d-Be, were used to treat patients who had malignant melanoma in order to confirm the biological effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for tumor control. Seventy-two patients suffering from malignant melanoma participated in the clinical trials with fast neutrons between November 1975 and December 1986. Of 72 patients, 45 had melanoma of the skin, 20 had melanoma of the head and neck, and seven had choroidal melanoma. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had previously untreated melanoma of the skin was 61% and for patients who received postoperative irradiation, it was 35.7% whereas no patients who had recurrent tumor survived over 4 years. Of 22 patients who had melanoma of the skin, stage I, local control in four cases was achieved by irradiation alone, whereas local control was achieved in 17 of 18 patients who required salvage surgery after fast-neutron therapy. The results of pathological studies performed with specimens obtained from salvage surgery have shown that melanoma cells growing in intradermal tissue are radioresistant, compared with cells growing in intraepidermal tissue. This might suggest that melanoma cells acquire radioresistance when the connective tissue is involved. Five-year survival rate of the patients who had locally advanced melanoma of the head and neck, previously untreated, was 15.4%. Radiation therapy with accelerated protons was suitable for patients suffering from choroidal melanoma.

  9. ARMS depletion facilitates UV irradiation induced apoptotic cell death in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Hsu, Su-Ming; Huang, Pei-Hsin

    2007-12-15

    Tumor cells often aberrantly reexpress molecules that mediate proper embryonic development for advantageous growth or survival. Here, we report that ankyrin repeat-rich membrane spanning (ARMS), a transmembrane protein abundant in the developing and adult neural tissues, is overexpressed in melanoma, a tumor ontogenetically originating from neural crest. Immunohistochemical study of 79 melanocytic lesions showed significantly increased expression of ARMS in primary malignant melanomas (92.9%) and metastatic melanoma (60.0%) in comparison with benign nevocellular nevi (26.7%). To investigate the role of ARMS in melanoma formation, murine B16F0 melanoma cells with stable knockdown of ARMS were established by RNA interference. Down-regulation of ARMS resulted in significant inhibition of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and restrictive growth of melanoma in severe combined immunodeficient mice. Importantly, depletion of ARMS facilitated UVB-induced apoptosis in melanoma cells through inactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK)/ERK. Addition of MEK inhibitor PD98059 further sensitized ARMS-depleted melanoma cells to UVB-induced apoptosis, whereas constitutively active MEK rescued ARMS-depleted cells from apoptosis. We further showed that BRAF, a downstream signaling molecule of ARMS in ERK pathway, is not mutated as a constitutively active form in acral lentiginous melanoma; in contrast, BRAF(T1799A) mutation, which leads to constitutive activation of ERK signaling, was detected in 57.1% of superficial spreading melanoma. Our study suggests that overexpression of ARMS per se serves as one mechanism to promote melanoma formation by preventing stress-induced apoptotic death mediated by the MEK/ERK signaling pathway, especially in acral lentiginous melanoma, most of which does not harbor BRAF mutation. PMID:18089783

  10. Intra- and Inter-Tumoral Homogeneity of BRAF(V600E) Mutations in Melanoma Tumors.

    PubMed

    Riveiro-Falkenbach, Erica; Villanueva, Cándida A; Garrido, María C; Ruano, Yolanda; García-Martín, Rosa M; Godoy, Elena; Ortiz-Romero, Pablo L; Ríos-Martín, Juan J; Santos-Briz, Angel; Rodríguez-Peralto, José L

    2015-12-01

    The era of targeted therapy has introduced a new therapeutic perspective for melanoma patients. Treatment with BRAFV600 inhibitors has improved overall and disease-free survival in metastatic melanoma patients whose tumors harbor BRAFV600 mutations. Although the BRAFV600E mutation appears to have a critical role in tumor initiation, its expression during tumor progression remains controversial. In fact, various authors claim that BRAFV600E heterogeneity is evident in melanoma tumors. Herein, we investigated the pattern of BRAFV600E expression in matched primary and metastatic samples from 140 patients. Using a combination of real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analyses, we demonstrated that BRAFV600E expression is homogeneous in melanoma tumors and hypothesized that the heterogeneity described by others might be attributable to technical issues when molecular methods are used. We also demonstrated the high efficiency of the anti-BRAFV600E VE1 antibody for the detection of BRAFV600E mutations in melanoma tumors. PMID:26083553

  11. New thermal neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma: melanogenesis-seeking 10B molecule-melanoma cell interaction from in vitro to first clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mishima, Y.; Ichihashi, M.; Hatta, S.; Honda, C.; Yamamura, K.; Nakagawa, T. )

    1989-07-01

    Human melanoma regression by single thermal neutron capture therapy (NCT) using melanoma-seeking 10B compounds has been achieved. Since 1972, the aim of my team has been to synthesize tumor-seeking 10B-compounds possessing selective affinity for specific metabolic activity of the target cancer cells. Once the melanoma takes up these 10B compounds, thermal neutrons, which cause insignificant cell damage, are easily absorbed by nonradioactive 10B, inducing the 10B(n, alpha)7Li reaction and releasing the high LET particles to 14 mu melanoma cell diameter, destroying the tumor without damaging surrounding tissue. Radiobiological and preclinical studies culminated in the first successful human NCT treatment, with no recurrence of the treated melanoma since July, 1987.23 references.

  12. Honokiol affects melanoma cell growth by targeting the AMPK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Kwatra, Deep; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Jensen, Roy A.; Anant, Shrikant; Mammen, Joshua M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Malignant melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer with limited effective therapeutic options. Melanoma research concentrates on maximizing the effect on cancer cells with minimal toxicity to normal cells. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important regulator of cellular energy homeostasis and has been shown to control tumor progression regulating the cell cycle, protein synthesis and cell growth and/or survival. Honokiol (HNK) is a biphenolic compound derived from Magnolia officianalis, a plant that has been used in traditional Chinese and Japanese medicine for the treatment of various pathological conditions. Recent studies have shown that HNK has antitumor activity with relatively low toxicity. In this study we demonstrated that the growth inhibitory effects of HNK on melanoma and melanoma cancer stem cells (CSCs) was mediated through the activation of AMPK and hence AMPK signaling in melanoma cells. Methods We determined the effects of HNK treatment on various melanoma cell lines. HNK induced cell growth inhibitory effects were determined using hexosaminidase assay. Protein expression studies were done by immunoblotting. Primary spheroid assay was used to assess stemness by growing single suspension cells in ultra-low attachment plates. Results HNK is highly effective in inhibiting melanoma cells by attenuating AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin and AMPK signaling. HNK showed significant inhibition of the spheroid forming capacity of melanoma cells and, hence, stemness. HNK significantly decreased the number and size of melanospheres in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses showed enhanced phosphorylation of AMPK in melanoma cells. Furthermore, HNK decreased the cellular ATP pool in a dose-dependent manner with maximum effects observed at 48 h. Conclusion The results suggest that HNK can target melanoma cells and mark them for cell death through AMPK signaling. Further studies are warranted for developing HNK as an effective

  13. Combination therapy using imatinib and vatalanib improves the therapeutic efficiency of paclitaxel towards a mouse melanoma tumor.

    PubMed

    Kłosowska-Wardęga, Agnieszka; Hasumi, Yoko; Åhgren, Aive; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Hellberg, Carina

    2011-02-01

    Melanomas respond poorly to chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the sensitization of B16 mouse melanoma tumors to paclitaxel by a combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors: vatalanib, targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, and imatinib, an inhibitor targeting for example, Abl/BCR-ABL, the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and stem cell factor receptor c-Kit. C57Bl6/J mice carrying B16/PDGF-BB mouse melanoma tumors were treated daily with vatalanib (25 mg/kg), imatinib (100 mg/kg), or a combination of these drugs. Paclitaxel was given subcutaneously twice during the study. The effects of the drugs on tumor cell proliferation in vitro were determined by counting cells. B16/PDGF-BB mouse melanoma tumors were not sensitive to paclitaxel at doses of either 5 or 20 mg/kg. However, the tumor growth was significantly reduced by 58%, in response to paclitaxel (5 mg/kg) when administered with daily doses of both vatalanib and imatinib. Paclitaxel only inhibited the in-vitro growth of B16/PDGF-BB tumor cells when given in combination with imatinib. Imatinib presumably targets c-Kit, as the cells do not express platelet-derived growth factor receptor and as another c-Abl inhibitor was without effect. This was supported by data from three c-Kit-expressing human melanoma cell lines showing varying sensitization to paclitaxel by the kinase inhibitors. In addition, small interfering RNA knockdown of c-Kit sensitized the cells to paclitaxel. These data show that combination of two tyrosine kinase inhibitors, imatinib and vatalanib, increases the effects of paclitaxel on B16/PDGF-BB tumors, thus suggesting a novel strategy for the treatment of melanomas expressing c-Kit. PMID:20975605

  14. A non-canonical adenosinergic pathway led by CD38 in human melanoma cells induces suppression of T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes are endowed with an extracellular catalytic domain, which is involved in regulating the extracellular nucleotide/nucleoside balance. The tumor microenvironment contains high levels of adenosine (ADO) generated by this enzymatic network, thus promoting tumor growth by inhibiting anti-tumor immune responses. ADO inhibition in melanoma murine models limits tumor metastases and restores anti-tumor immune responses. This work investigates the expression and function of ectoenzymes in primary human melanoma cell lines. All of latter cells expressed CD38, CD39, CD73, and CD203a/PC-1, and produced ADO from AMP and NAD+. Melanoma cells inhibited T cell proliferation through an ADO-dependent mechanism, since such inhibition was reverted using CD38/CD73 specific inhibitors. Melanoma cells abolished the function of effector memory, central memory and reduced naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation. Accordingly, phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p38 and Stat1 was lower in activated memory cells than in naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes. Melanoma cells also inhibited proliferation of naïve, memory and -to a lesser extent- of effector CD8+ T cells. These different inhibitory effects correlated with distinct patterns of expression of the ADO receptor A2a and A2b. These results show that primary human melanoma cell lines suppress in vitro T cell proliferation through an adenosinergic pathway in which CD38 and CD73 play a prominent role. PMID:26329660

  15. Antitumor and antiproliferative effects of an aqueous extract from the marine diatom Haslea ostrearia (Simonsen) against solid tumors: lung carcinoma (NSCLC-N6), kidney carcinoma (E39) and melanoma (M96) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Carbonnelle, D; Pondaven, P; Morancais, M; Masse, G; Bosch, S; Jacquot, C; Briand, G; Robert, J; Roussakis, C

    1999-01-01

    An aqueous extract of the marine diatom Haslea ostrearia (Simonsen) was studied for its antiproliferative properties against human solid tumors: lung carcinoma (NSCLC-N6), kidney carcinoma (E39) and melanoma (M96). These types of carcinoma are particularly chemoresistant. The extract has a potent cytostatic effect in vitro on the three cell lines and blocks the NSCLC-N6 line in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, the extract strongly inhibits tumor growth of NSCLC-N6 bearing nude mice. These preliminary results indicate that the aqueous extract of Haslea ostrearia exhibits inhibitory effects both in vitro and in vivo against solid carcinoma lines, suggesting the presence of a new potent antitumor agent in the aqueous algal homogenate. PMID:10226609

  16. Resistance to BRAF inhibitors induces glutamine dependency in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Baenke, Franziska; Chaneton, Barbara; Smith, Matthew; Van Den Broek, Niels; Hogan, Kate; Tang, Haoran; Viros, Amaya; Martin, Matthew; Galbraith, Laura; Girotti, Maria R.; Dhomen, Nathalie; Gottlieb, Eyal; Marais, Richard

    2016-01-01

    BRAF inhibitors can extend progression-free and overall survival in melanoma patients whose tumors harbor mutations in BRAF. However, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these drugs. Here we show that BRAF mutant melanoma cells that have developed acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitors display increased oxidative metabolism and increased dependency on mitochondria for survival. Intriguingly, the increased oxidative metabolism is associated with a switch from glucose to glutamine metabolism and an increased dependence on glutamine over glucose for proliferation. We show that the resistant cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial poisons and to inhibitors of glutaminolysis, suggesting that targeting specific metabolic pathways may offer exciting therapeutic opportunities to treat resistant tumors, or to delay emergence of resistance in the first-line setting. PMID:26365896

  17. Basic and clinical aspects of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nathanson, L. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: The role of oncogenes in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma; Laminin and fibronectin modulate the metastatic activity of melanoma cells; Structure, function and biosynthesis of ganglioside antigens associated with human tumors derived from the neuroectoderm; Epidemiology of ocular melanoma; Malignant melanoma: Prognostic factors; Endocrine influences on the natural history of human malignant melanoma; Psychosocial factors associated with prognostic indicators, progression, psychophysiology, and tumor-host response in cutaneous malignant melanoma; Central nervous system metastases in malignant melanoma; Interferon trials in the management of malignant melanoma and other neoplasms: an overview; and The treatment of malignant melanoma by fast neutrons.

  18. Directed Dedifferentiation Using Partial Reprogramming Induces Invasive Phenotype in Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Knappe, Nathalie; Novak, Daniel; Weina, Kasia; Bernhardt, Mathias; Reith, Maike; Larribere, Lionel; Hölzel, Michael; Tüting, Thomas; Gebhardt, Christoffer; Umansky, Viktor; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    The combination of cancer-focused studies and research related to nuclear reprogramming has gained increasing importance since both processes-reprogramming towards pluripotency and malignant transformation-share essential features. Studies have revealed that incomplete reprogramming of somatic cells leads to malignant transformation indicating that epigenetic regulation associated with iPSC generation can drive cancer development [J Mol Cell Biol 2011;341-350; Cell 2012;151:1617-1632; Cell 2014;156:663-677]. However, so far it is unclear whether incomplete reprogramming also affects cancer cells and their function. In the context of melanoma, dedifferentiation correlates to therapy resistance in mouse studies and has been documented in melanoma patients [Nature 2012;490:412-416; Clin Cancer Res 2014;20:2498-2499]. Therefore, we sought to investigate directed dedifferentiation using incomplete reprogramming of melanoma cells. Using a murine model we investigated the effects of partial reprogramming on the cellular plasticity of melanoma cells. We demonstrate for the first time that induced partial reprogramming results in a reversible phenotype switch in melanoma cells. Partially reprogrammed cells at day 12 after transgene induction display elevated invasive potential in vitro and increased lung colonization in vivo. Additionally, using global gene expression analysis of partially reprogrammed cells, we identified SNAI3 as a novel invasion-related marker in human melanoma. SNAI3 expression correlates with tumor thickness in primary melanomas and thus, may be of prognostic value. In summary, we show that investigating intermediate states during the process of reprogramming melanoma cells can reveal novel insights into the pathogenesis of melanoma progression. We propose that deeper analysis of partially reprogrammed melanoma cells may contribute to identification of yet unknown signaling pathways that can drive melanoma progression. Stem Cells 2016;34:832-846. PMID

  19. IL-2 Inducible T-cell Kinase, a Novel Therapeutic Target in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Craig C.; Moschos, Stergios J.; Edmiston, Sharon N.; Darr, David B.; Nikolaishvili-Feinberg, Nana; Groben, Pamela A.; Zhou, Xin; Kuan, Pei Fen; Pandey, Shaily; Chan, Keefe T.; Jordan, Jamie L.; Hao, Honglin; Frank, Jill S.; Hopkinson, Dennis A.; Gibbs, David C.; Alldredge, Virginia D.; Parrish, Eloise; Hanna, Sara C.; Berkowitz, Paula; Rubenstein, David S.; Miller, C. Ryan; Bear, James E.; Ollila, David W.; Sharpless, Norman E.; Conway, Kathleen; Thomas, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Interleukin-2 inducible T-cell kinase (ITK) promoter CpG sites are hypomethylated in melanomas compared to nevi. The expression of ITK in melanomas, however, has not been established and requires elucidation. Experimental Design An ITK specific monoclonal antibody was used to probe sections from de-identified, formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor blocks or cell line arrays and ITK was visualized by immunohistochemistry. Levels of ITK protein differed among melanoma cell lines and representative lines were transduced with four different lentiviral constructs that each contained an shRNA designed to knockdown ITK mRNA levels. The effects of the selective ITK inhibitor BI 10N on cell lines and mouse models were also determined. Results ITK protein expression increased with nevus to metastatic melanoma progression. In melanoma cell lines, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of ITK decreased proliferation and migration and increased the percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase. Treatment of melanoma-bearing mice with BI 10N reduced growth of ITK-expressing xenografts or established autochthonous (Tyr-Cre/Pten null/Braf V600E) melanomas. Conclusions We conclude that ITK, formerly considered an immune cell-specific protein, is aberrantly expressed in melanoma and promotes tumor development and progression. Our finding that ITK is aberrantly expressed in most metastatic melanomas suggests that inhibitors of ITK may be efficacious for melanoma treatment. The efficacy of a small molecule ITK inhibitor in the Tyr-Cre/Ptennull/BrafV600E mouse melanoma model supports this possibility. PMID:25934889

  20. Norcantharidin induces melanoma cell apoptosis through activation of TR3 dependent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shujing; Yu, Hong; Kumar, Suresh M.; Martin, James S.; Bing, Zhanyong; Sheng, Weiqi; Bosenberg, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Norcantharidin (NCTD) has been reported to induce tumor cell apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism behinds its antitumor effect remains elusive. We have previously shown that TR3 expression is significantly decreased in metastatic melanomas and involved in melanoma cell apoptosis. In this study, we showed that NCTD inhibited melanoma cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose related manner. NCTD induced translocation of TR3 from nucleus to mitochondria where it co-localized with Bcl-2 in melanoma cells. NCTD also increased cytochome c release from mitochondria to the cytoplasm. These changes were accompanied by increased expression of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 along with decreased expression of Bcl2 and NF-κB2. The effects of NCTD were inhibited by knockdown of TR3 expression using TR3 specific shRNA in melanoma cells. Furthermore, NCTD significantly decreased tumor volume and improved survival of Tyr::CreER; BRAFCa/+; Ptenlox/lox transgenic mice. Our data indicates that NCTD inhibits melanoma growth by inducing tumor cell apoptosis via activation of a TR3 dependent pathway. These results suggest that NCTD is a potential therapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:22123174

  1. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  2. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  3. Mice lacking NCF1 exhibit reduced growth of implanted melanoma and carcinoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Kelkka, Tiina; Pizzolla, Angela; Laurila, Juha Petteri; Friman, Tomas; Gustafsson, Renata; Källberg, Eva; Olsson, Olof; Leanderson, Tomas; Rubin, Kristofer; Salmi, Marko; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Holmdahl, Rikard

    2013-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) complex is a professional producer of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and is mainly expressed in phagocytes. While the activity of the NOX2 complex is essential for immunity against pathogens and protection against autoimmunity, its role in the development of malignant tumors remains unclear. We compared wild type and Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice, which lack functional NOX2 complex, in four different tumor models. Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice developed significantly smaller tumors in two melanoma models in which B16 melanoma cells expressing a hematopoietic growth factor FLT3L or luciferase reporter were used. Ncf1 (m1J) mutated mice developed significantly fewer Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) tumors, but the tumors that did develop, grew at a pace that was similar to the wild type mice. In the spontaneously arising prostate carcinoma model (TRAMP), tumor growth was not affected. The lack of ROS-mediated protection against tumor growth was associated with increased production of immunity-associated cytokines. A significant increase in Th2 associated cytokines was observed in the LLC model. Our present data show that ROS regulate rejection of the antigenic B16-luc and LLC tumors, whereas the data do not support a role for ROS in growth of intrinsically generated tumors. PMID:24358335

  4. Fully humanized neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-8 (ABX-IL8) inhibit angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis of human melanoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Suyun; Mills, Lisa; Mian, Badar; Tellez, Carmen; McCarty, Marya; Yang, X-D; Gudas, Jean M; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2002-07-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) has recently been shown to contribute to human melanoma progression by functioning as a mitogenic and angiogenic factor. In the present study, we investigated whether targeting IL-8 by a fully human anti-IL-8 antibody (ABX-IL8) could be a potential therapeutic strategy to control angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis of melanoma. The human melanoma cells A375SM (high IL-8 producer) and TXM-13 (intermediate IL-8 producer) were injected subcutaneously into nude mice, which were then treated with ABX-IL8 (1 mg/3 times weekly, i.p., for 3 weeks). Tumor growth of both melanomas in ABX-IL8-treated mice was significantly inhibited when compared with control IgG-treated animals. ABX-IL8 treatment also suppressed experimental metastasis when the melanoma cells were injected intravenously. IL-8 blockade by ABX-IL8 significantly inhibited the promoter activity and the collagenase activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in human melanoma cells, resulting in decreased invasion through reconstituted basement membrane in vitro. In vivo, ABX-IL8 treatment resulted in decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, and decreased vascularization (angiogenesis) of tumors concomitant with increased apoptosis of tumor cells. Moreover, in an in vitro vessel formation assay, ABX-IL8 directly interfered with the tubule formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Taken together, these results point to the potential utility of ABX-IL8 as a modality to treat melanoma and other solid tumors either alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy or other anti-tumor agents. PMID:12107097

  5. PGC1α Expression Defines a Subset of Human Melanoma Tumors with Increased Mitochondrial Capacity and Resistance to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Francisca; Lim, Ji-Hong; Chim, Helen; Bhalla, Kavita; Girnun, Geoff; Pierce, Kerry; Clish, Clary B.; Granter, Scott R.; Widlund, Hans R.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.; Puigserver, Pere

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cancer cells reprogram their metabolism using different strategies to meet energy and anabolic demands to maintain growth and survival. Understanding the molecular and genetic determinants of these metabolic programs is critical to successfully exploit them for therapy. Here, we report that the oncogenic melanocyte lineage-specification transcription factor MITF drives PGC1α (PPARGC1A) overexpression in a subset of human melanomas and derived cell lines. Functionally, PGC1α positive melanoma cells exhibit increased mitochondrial energy metabolism and ROS detoxification capacities that enables survival under oxidative stress conditions. Conversely, PGC1α negative melanoma cells are more glycolytic and sensitive to ROS-inducing drugs. These results demonstrate that differences in PGC1α levels in melanoma tumors have a profound impact in their metabolism, biology and drug sensitivity. PMID:23416000

  6. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Montagnani Marelli, Marina; Marzagalli, Monica; Moretti, Roberta M; Beretta, Giangiacomo; Casati, Lavinia; Comitato, Raffaella; Gravina, Giovanni L; Festuccia, Claudio; Limonta, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin cancer. Drug toxicity and resistance represent a serious challange for melanoma treatments. Evidence demonstrates that natural compounds may play a crucial role in cancer prevention, growth and progression. Vitamin E tocotrienols (TT) were shown to possess antitumor activity. Here, we analyzed the effects of δ-TT on melanoma cell growth and the involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this activity. The experiments were performed on human melanoma cell lines, BLM and A375. δ-TT exerted a significant proapoptotic effect on both cell lines, involving the intrinsic apoptosis pathway; importantly, this compound did not affect the viability of normal human melanocytes. In melanoma cells, δ-TT exerted its antitumor effect through activation of the PERK/p-eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP, IRE1α and caspase-4 ER stress-related branches. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of the ER stress, counteracted the cytotoxic activity of δ-TT. In vivo experiments performed in nude mice bearing A375 xenografts evidenced that δ-TT reduces tumor volume and tumor mass; importantly, tumor progression was significantly delayed by δ-TT treatment. In conclusion, δ-TT exerts a proapoptotic activity on melanoma cells, through activation of the ER stress-related pathways. δ-TT might represent an effective option for novel chemopreventive/therapeutic strategies for melanoma. PMID:27461002

  7. Vitamin E δ-tocotrienol triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Montagnani Marelli, Marina; Marzagalli, Monica; Moretti, Roberta M.; Beretta, Giangiacomo; Casati, Lavinia; Comitato, Raffaella; Gravina, Giovanni L.; Festuccia, Claudio; Limonta, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin cancer. Drug toxicity and resistance represent a serious challange for melanoma treatments. Evidence demonstrates that natural compounds may play a crucial role in cancer prevention, growth and progression. Vitamin E tocotrienols (TT) were shown to possess antitumor activity. Here, we analyzed the effects of δ-TT on melanoma cell growth and the involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this activity. The experiments were performed on human melanoma cell lines, BLM and A375. δ-TT exerted a significant proapoptotic effect on both cell lines, involving the intrinsic apoptosis pathway; importantly, this compound did not affect the viability of normal human melanocytes. In melanoma cells, δ-TT exerted its antitumor effect through activation of the PERK/p-eIF2α/ATF4/CHOP, IRE1α and caspase-4 ER stress-related branches. Salubrinal, an inhibitor of the ER stress, counteracted the cytotoxic activity of δ-TT. In vivo experiments performed in nude mice bearing A375 xenografts evidenced that δ-TT reduces tumor volume and tumor mass; importantly, tumor progression was significantly delayed by δ-TT treatment. In conclusion, δ-TT exerts a proapoptotic activity on melanoma cells, through activation of the ER stress-related pathways. δ-TT might represent an effective option for novel chemopreventive/therapeutic strategies for melanoma. PMID:27461002

  8. Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma ...

  9. Semaphorin 3A Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis in Mice Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Goutam; Patil, Tushar V.; Kundu, Gopal C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent understanding on cancer therapy indicated that targeting metastatic signature or angiogenic switch could be a promising and rational approach to combat cancer. Advancement in cancer research has demonstrated the potential role of various tumor suppressor proteins in inhibition of cancer progression. Current studies have shown that axonal sprouting inhibitor, semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A) acts as a potent suppressor of tumor angiogenesis in various cancer models. However, the function of Sema 3A in regulation of melanoma progression is not well studied, and yet to be the subject of intense investigation. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, using multiple in vitro and in vivo approaches we have demonstrated that Sema 3A acts as a potent tumor suppressor in vitro and in vivo mice (C57BL/6) models. Mouse melanoma (B16F10) cells overexpressed with Sema 3A resulted in significant inhibition of cell motility, invasiveness and proliferation as well as suppression of in vivo tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis in mice models. Moreover, we have observed that Sema 3A overexpressed melanoma clone showed increased sensitivity towards curcumin and Dacarbazine, anti-cancer agents. Conclusions Our results demonstrate, at least in part, the functional approach underlying Sema 3A mediated inhibition of tumorigenesis and angiogenesis and a clear understanding of such a process may facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22448259

  10. The application of quantum dots for the melanoma tumor in vivo imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yayi; Zhai, Peng; Wang, Xiaomei; Ying, Ming; Wu, Jinbo; Zhu, Xiaomei; Lin, Guimiao; Chen, Qiang; Xu, Gaixia

    2014-09-01

    Objective: Over the past decade, fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots (QDs), have been applied in biomedical imaging in vitro and in vivo because of their fascinating optical properties. In this work, we investigated the application of CdTe QDs for tumor fluorescence in vivo imaging. Methods: The transparent dorsal skin fold window chamber (DSFC) was constructed on the 4~6 week-old BALB/c mice. The melanoma cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein ---ZsGreen were transplanted into the chamber and the melanoma DSFC model was established successfully. The water soluble CdTe QDs were synthesized and then administrated in the model through the tail intravenous injection. The fluorescent expression of B16 cells were assayed by fluorescent microscopy, the tumor growth, the blood capillaries distributions and its dynamic changes were observed by stereomicroscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy. Results: The results demonstrated that the expression efficiency of ZsGreen was 41%, which met the experimental requirement. The tumors was visible inside the chamber after implantation of melanoma cells for 5~6 days, while no obvious changes in mice behaviors were found. After injection of the QDs, CdTe QDs accumulated at the invading edge of a range of solid tumor. We could also observe the tumor cells growth near the blood vessels, the angiogenesis occurred inside the tumor and the local blood capillaries increased. Conclusions: This work provided a new strategy for the tumor in vivo imaging and the development of targeted antineoplastic drugs.

  11. Blue light inhibits proliferation of melanoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Anja; Distler, Elisabeth; Klapczynski, Anna; Arpino, Fabiola; Kuch, Natalia; Simon-Keller, Katja; Sticht, Carsten; van Abeelen, Frank A.; Gretz, Norbert; Oversluizen, Gerrit

    2016-03-01

    Photobiomodulation with blue light is used for several treatment paradigms such as neonatal jaundice, psoriasis and back pain. However, little is known about possible side effects concerning melanoma cells in the skin. The aim of this study was to assess the safety of blue LED irradiation with respect to proliferation of melanoma cells. For that purpose we used the human malignant melanoma cell line SK-MEL28. Cell proliferation was decreased in blue light irradiated cells where the effect size depended on light irradiation dosage. Furthermore, with a repeated irradiation of the melanoma cells on two consecutive days the effect could be intensified. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with Annexin V and Propidium iodide labeling did not show a higher number of dead cells after blue light irradiation compared to non-irradiated cells. Gene expression analysis revealed down-regulated genes in pathways connected to anti-inflammatory response, like B cell signaling and phagosome. Most prominent pathways with up-regulation of genes were cytochrome P450, steroid hormone biosynthesis. Furthermore, even though cells showed a decrease in proliferation, genes connected to the cell cycle were up-regulated after 24h. This result is concordant with XTT test 48h after irradiation, where irradiated cells showed the same proliferation as the no light negative control. In summary, proliferation of melanoma cells can be decreased using blue light irradiation. Nevertheless, the gene expression analysis has to be further evaluated and more studies, such as in-vivo experiments, are warranted to further assess the safety of blue light treatment.

  12. Induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-10 by TGFbeta1 in melanoma enhances tumor infiltration and immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Valdés, Nancy; Basagoiti, María; Dotor, Javier; Aranda, Fernando; Monreal, Iñaki; Riezu-Boj, José Ignacio; Borrás-Cuesta, Francisco; Sarobe, Pablo; Feijoó, Esperanza

    2011-02-01

    Melanoma progression is associated with the expression of different growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines. Because TGFβ1 is a pleiotropic cytokine involved not only in physiologic processes but also in cancer development, we analyzed in A375 human melanoma cells, the effect of TGFβ1 on monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression, two known factors responsible for melanoma progression. TGFβ1 increased the expression of MCP-1 and IL-10 in A375 cells, an effect mediated by the cross-talk between Smad, PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/AKT, and BRAF-MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) signaling pathways. Supernatants from TGFβ1-treated A375 cells enhanced MCP-1-dependent migration of monocytes, which, in turn, expressed high levels of TGF,β1, bFGF, and VEGF mRNA. Moreover, these supernatants also inhibited functional properties of dendritic cells through IL-10-dependent mechanisms. When using in vitro, the TGFβ1-blocking peptide P144, TGFβ1-dependent Smad3 phosphorylation, and expression of MCP-1 and IL-10 were inhibited. In vivo, treatment of A375 tumor-bearing athymic mice with P144 significantly reduced tumor growth, associated with a lower macrophage infiltrate and decreased intratumor MCP-1 and VEGF levels, as well as angiogenesis. Finally, in C57BL/6 mice with B16-OVA melanoma tumors, when administered with immunotherapy, P144 decreased tumor growth and intratumor IL-10 levels, linked to enhanced activation of dendritic cells and natural killer cells, as well as anti-OVA T-cell responses. These results show new effects of TGFβ1 on melanoma cells, which promote tumor progression and immunosuppression, strongly reinforcing the relevance of this cytokine as a molecular target in melanoma. PMID:21159663

  13. Bisphosphonamidate Clodronate Prodrug Exhibits Selective Cytotoxic Activity Against Melanoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Marie R.; Kamat, Chandrashekhar; Connis, Nick; Zhao, Ming; Weeraratna, Ashani T.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Hann, Christine L.; Freel Meyers, Caren L.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are used clinically to treat disorders of calcium metabolism and malignant bone disease and are known to inhibit cancer cell growth, adhesion, and invasion. However, clinical use of these agents for the treatment of extraskeletal disease is limited due to low cell permeability. We recently described a bisphosphonamidate prodrug strategy for efficient intracellular release of bisphosphonates, including clodronate (CLO), in NSCLC cells. To evaluate anticancer activity of this prodrug class across many cancer cell types, the bisphosphonamidate clodronate prodrug (CLO prodrug) was screened against the NCI-60 cell line panel, and was found to exhibit selectivity toward melanoma cell lines. Here, we confirm efficient cellular uptake and intracellular activation of this prodrug class in melanoma cells. We further demonstrate inhibition of melanoma cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and an anti-tumor effect of CLO prodrug in a xenograft model. These data suggest a novel therapeutic application for the CLO prodrug and potential to selectively target melanoma cells. PMID:24310621

  14. Parthenolide reduces the frequency of ABCB5-positive cells and clonogenic capacity of melanoma cells from anchorage independent melanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, Malgorzata; Koprowska, Kamila; Sztiller-Sikorska, Malgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the cancer stem cell phenotype in melanoma is dynamically regulated. Therefore, effective therapies have to target simultaneously bulk tumor cells and melanoma stem-like cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of parthenolide on heterogeneous cancer cell populations from anchorage-independent melanospheres. Cells derived from nodular melanoma specimens were grown under serum-free sphere-forming conditions. The effects of parthenolide on cellular viability, immunophenotype and self-renewing capacity were assessed with cells from dissociated melanospheres. Its penetration capacity was evaluated with intact melanospheres. In melanoma cells that survived treatment with parthenolide, a different immunophenotype than that in untreated control was found. The frequency of cells expressing the ABCB5 transporter was markedly reduced. Most importantly, melanoma cells that survived parthenolide treatment lost their self-renewing capacity. Significantly lower influence of drug on cellular viability and frequency of ABCB5-positive cells was observed in intact melanospheres. The potential clinical significance of our findings is based on the ability of parthenolide to affect both bulk and melanoma stem-like cells with clonogenic capacity and high expression of the ABCB5 transporter. Its low penetration capacity, however, may limit its action to easily accessible melanoma cells, either circulating in the blood or those in the vicinity to blood vessels within the tumor. Because of limited penetration capacity of parthenolide, this drug should be further explored as a part of multimodal therapies rather than as a stand-alone therapeutic agent. PMID:23192276

  15. Phyllodes Tumor of the Breast With Malignant Melanoma Component: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vergine, Marco; Guy, Catherine; Taylor, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    Phyllodes tumors of the breast display a wide variation in histological appearance and are classified into benign, borderline, and malignant categories based on a combination of histological parameters. These tumors may include a malignant heterologous component that is believed to originate through a process of multidirectional differentiation from a cancer stem cell. In these cases, the tumor is classified as a malignant phyllodes tumor. Among the heterologous elements that have been described in malignant phyllodes tumors are rhabdomyosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, osteosarcoma, liposarcoma and angiosarcoma. We present the first case of a phyllodes tumor with a malignant melanoma component in the breast of a 71-year-old lady, discussing the clinical implications of this diagnosis. PMID:26113664

  16. Vaccination with autologous dendritic cells loaded with autologous tumor lysate or homogenate combined with immunomodulating radiotherapy and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α in patients with metastatic melanoma: a randomised “proof-of-principle” phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination with dendritic cells (DC) loaded with tumor antigens elicits tumor-specific immune responses capable of killing cancer cells without inducing meaningful side-effects. Patients with advanced melanoma enrolled onto our phase II clinical studies have been treated with autologous DC loaded with autologous tumor lysate/homogenate matured with a cytokine cocktail, showing a clinical benefit (PR + SD) in 55.5% of evaluable cases to date. The beneficial effects of the vaccine were mainly restricted to patients who developed vaccine-specific immune response after treatment. However, immunological responses were only induced in about two-thirds of patients, and treatments aimed at improving immunological responsiveness to the vaccine are needed. Methods/Design This is a phase II, “proof-of-principle”, randomized, open-label trial of vaccination with autologous DC loaded with tumor lysate or homogenate in metastatic melanoma patients combined with immunomodulating RT and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α. All patients will receive four bi-weekly doses of the vaccine during the induction phase and monthly doses thereafter for up to a maximum of 14 vaccinations or until confirmed progression. Patients will be randomized to receive: (1.) three daily doses of 8 Gy up to 12 Gy radiotherapy delivered to one non-index metastatic field between vaccine doses 1 and 2 and, optionally, between doses 7 and 8, using IMRT-IMAT techniques; (2.) daily 3 MU subcutaneous IFN-α for 7 days before leukapheresis; (3.) both 1 and 2; (4.) neither 1 nor 2. At least six patients eligible for treatment will be enrolled per arm. Daily 3 MU IL-2 will be administered subcutaneously for 5 days starting from the second day after each vaccine dose. Serial DTH testing and blood sampling to evaluate treatment-induced immune response will be performed. Objective response will be evaluated according to immune-related response criteria (irRC). Discussion Based upon the emerging role of

  17. The Disintegrin-like and Cysteine-rich domains of ADAM-9 Mediate Interactions between Melanoma Cells and Fibroblasts*

    PubMed Central

    Zigrino, Paola; Nischt, Roswitha; Mauch, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    A characteristic of malignant cells is their capacity to invade their surrounding and to metastasize to distant organs. During these processes, proteolytic activities of tumor and stromal cells modify the extracellular matrix to produce a microenvironment suitable for their growth and migration. In recent years the family of ADAM proteases has been ascribed important roles in these processes. ADAM-9 is expressed in human melanoma at the tumor-stroma border where direct or indirect interactions between tumor cells and fibroblasts occur. To analyze the role of ADAM-9 for the interaction between melanoma cells and stromal fibroblasts, we produced the recombinant disintegrin-like and cysteine-rich domain of ADAM-9 (DC-9). Melanoma cells and human fibroblasts adhered to immobilized DC-9 in a Mn2+-dependent fashion suggesting an integrin-mediated process. Inhibition studies showed that adhesion of fibroblasts was mediated by several β1 integrin receptors independent of the RGD and ECD recognition motif. Furthermore, interaction of fibroblasts and high invasive melanoma cells with soluble recombinant DC-9 resulted in enhanced expression of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Silencing of ADAM-9 in melanoma cells significantly reduced cell adhesion to fibroblasts. Ablation of ADAM-9 in fibroblasts almost completely abolished these cellular interactions and melanoma cell invasion in vitro. In summary, these results suggest that ADAM-9 expression plays an important role in mediating cell-cell contacts between fibroblasts and melanoma cells and that these interactions contribute to proteolytic activities required during invasion of melanoma cells. PMID:21135106

  18. Melanoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... have melanoma that has spread. Help the patient’s immune system fight the cancer Ipilimumab (Yervoy®), which was FDA ... How ipilimumab works : This drug helps the patient’s immune system to recognize, target, and attack cancer cells. Healthy ...

  19. Efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Vad, Nikhil M; Kudugunti, Shashi K; Wang, Hezhen; Bhat, G Jayarama; Moridani, Majid Y

    2014-05-01

    Several epidemiological studies show that aspirin can act as a chemopreventive agent and decrease the incidences of various cancers including melanoma. In this work, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) as an antimelanoma agent in B16-F0 cells and skin B16-F0 melanoma tumor mouse model. Our findings indicate that the IC50 (48 h) for ASA in B16-F0 melanoma cells was 100 μM and that ASA caused a dose- and time-dependent GSH depletion and increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in B16-F0 melanoma cells. Male C57BL/6 mice were inoculated s.c. with 1 × 10(6) B16-F0 melanoma cells. ASA (80, 100, and 150 mg/kg) was initiated on day 1 or day 7, or day 9 after cell inoculation and continued daily for 13, 7, and 5 days, respectively. Animals were weighed daily and sacrificed on day 13. The tumors were excised and weighed. The animals receiving 13 days of ASA therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 1 ± 12%, 19 ± 22%, and 50 ± 29%, respectively. Animals receiving 7 days of therapy at 80, 100, and 150 mg/kg demonstrated tumor growth inhibition by 12 ± 14%, 27 ± 14%, and 40 ± 14%, respectively. No significant tumor growth inhibition was observed with 5 days of therapy. ASA at 100 and 150 mg/kg caused significant tumor growth inhibition in C57BL/6 mice when administered for 13 and 7 days, respectively. The results obtained in this study are consistent with the recent epidemiologically based report that aspirin is associated with lower melanoma risk in humans. PMID:24492939

  20. Cell Cycle Phase-Specific Drug Resistance as an Escape Mechanism of Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Hill, David S; Daignault, Sheena M; Lui, Goldie Y L; Sharp, Danae M; Gabrielli, Brian; Weninger, Wolfgang; Haass, Nikolas K

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by cancer cell subpopulations with heterogeneous cell cycle profiles. For example, hypoxic tumor zones contain clusters of cancer cells that arrest in G1 phase. It is conceivable that neoplastic cells exhibit differential drug sensitivity based on their residence in specific cell cycle phases. In this study, we used two-dimensional and organotypic melanoma culture models in combination with fluorescent cell cycle indicators to investigate the effects of cell cycle phases on clinically used drugs. We demonstrate that G1-arrested melanoma cells, irrespective of the underlying cause mediating G1 arrest, are resistant to apoptosis induced by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib or the alkylating agent temozolomide. In contrast, G1-arrested cells were more sensitive to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor-induced cell death. Of clinical relevance, pretreatment of melanoma cells with a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor, which induced G1 arrest, resulted in resistance to temozolomide or bortezomib. On the other hand, pretreatment with temozolomide, which induced G2 arrest, did not result in resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors. In summary, we established a model to study the effects of the cell cycle on drug sensitivity. Cell cycle phase-specific drug resistance is an escape mechanism of melanoma cells that has implications on the choice and timing of drug combination therapies. PMID:26970356

  1. Dissecting the multicellular ecosystem of metastatic melanoma by single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh, Itay; Izar, Benjamin; Prakadan, Sanjay M.; Wadsworth, Marc H.; Treacy, Daniel; Trombetta, John J.; Rotem, Asaf; Rodman, Christopher; Lian, Christine; Murphy, George; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jia-Ren; Cohen, Ofir; Shah, Parin; Lu, Diana; Genshaft, Alex S.; Hughes, Travis K.; Ziegler, Carly G. K.; Kazer, Samuel W.; Gaillard, Aleth; Kolb, Kellie E.; Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Johannessen, Cory M.; Andreev, Aleksandr Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Sorger, Peter K.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Yoon, Charles H.; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Shalek, Alex K.; Regev, Aviv; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the distinct genotypic and phenotypic states of melanoma tumors we applied single-cell RNA-seq to 4,645 single cells isolated from 19 patients, profiling malignant, immune, stromal and endothelial cells. Malignant cells within the same tumor displayed transcriptional heterogeneity associated with the cell cycle, spatial context, and a drug resistance program. In particular, all tumors harbored malignant cells from two distinct transcriptional cell states, such that “MITF-high” tumors also contained “AXL-high” tumor cells. Single-cell analyses suggested distinct tumor micro-environmental patterns, including cell-to-cell interactions. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed exhaustion programs, their connection to T cell activation and to clonal expansion, and their variability across patients. Overall, we begin to unravel the cellular ecosystem of tumors and how single cell genomics offers insights with implications for both targeted and immune therapies. PMID:27124452

  2. Reprogramming metastatic melanoma cells to assume a neural crest cell-like phenotype in an embryonic microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kulesa, Paul M.; Kasemeier-Kulesa, Jennifer C.; Teddy, Jessica M.; Margaryan, Naira V.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Seftor, Richard E. B.; Hendrix, Mary J. C.

    2006-01-01

    Human metastatic melanoma cells express a dedifferentiated, plastic phenotype, which may serve as a selective advantage, because melanoma cells invade various microenvironments. Over the last three decades, there has been an increased focus on the role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer progression, with the goal of reversing the metastatic phenotype. Here, using an embryonic chick model, we explore the possibility of reverting the metastatic melanoma phenotype to its cell type of origin, the neural-crest-derived melanocyte. GFP-labeled adult human metastatic melanoma cells were transplanted in ovo adjacent to host chick premigratory neural crest cells and analyzed 48 and 96 h after egg reincubation. Interestingly, the transplanted melanoma cells do not form tumors. Instead, we find that transplanted melanoma cells invade surrounding chick tissues in a programmed manner, distributing along host neural-crest-cell migratory pathways. The invading melanoma cells display neural-crest-cell-like morphologies and populate host peripheral structures, including the branchial arches, dorsal root and sympathetic ganglia. Analysis of a melanocyte-specific phenotype marker (MART-1) and a neuronal marker (Tuj1) revealed a subpopulation of melanoma cells that invade the chick periphery and express MART-1 and Tuj1. Our results demonstrate the ability of adult human metastatic melanoma cells to respond to chick embryonic environmental cues, a subset of which may undergo a reprogramming of their metastatic phenotype. This model has the potential to provide insights into the regulation of tumor cell plasticity by an embryonic milieu, which may hold significant therapeutic promise. PMID:16505384

  3. Electrotransfer of Plasmid DNA Encoding an Anti-Mouse Endoglin (CD105) shRNA to B16 Melanoma Tumors with Low and High Metastatic Potential Results in Pronounced Anti-Tumor Effects.

    PubMed

    Dolinsek, Tanja; Sersa, Gregor; Prosen, Lara; Bosnjak, Masa; Stimac, Monika; Razborsek, Urska; Cemazar, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Endoglin overexpression is associated with highly proliferative tumor endothelium and also with some tumors, including melanoma. Its targeting has anti-tumor effectiveness, which can also be obtained by RNA interference. The aim of our study was to explore the anti-tumor effectiveness of endoglin silencing by electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding short hairpin RNA against endoglin in two murine B16 melanoma variants with different metastatic potential on cells, spheroids and subcutaneous tumors in mice. The results demonstrate that endoglin silencing with gene electrotransfer reduces the proliferation, survival and migration of melanoma cells and also has anti-tumor effectiveness, as the therapy resulted in a high percentage of tumor cures (23% and 58% on B16F1 and B16F10 tumors, respectively). The effectiveness of the therapy correlated with endoglin expression in melanoma cells; in vitro the effects were more pronounced in B16F1 cells, which express more endoglin than B16F10. However, the opposite was observed in vivo in tumors, where there was a higher expression of endoglin and better anti-tumor effectiveness in the B16F10 tumor. In conclusion, targeting endoglin for the treatment of melanoma seems to be a concept worthy of further exploration due to the increased therapeutic effect of the therapy based on simultaneous vascular targeting and its direct effect on tumor cells. PMID:26712792

  4. Electrotransfer of Plasmid DNA Encoding an Anti-Mouse Endoglin (CD105) shRNA to B16 Melanoma Tumors with Low and High Metastatic Potential Results in Pronounced Anti-Tumor Effects

    PubMed Central

    Dolinsek, Tanja; Sersa, Gregor; Prosen, Lara; Bosnjak, Masa; Stimac, Monika; Razborsek, Urska; Cemazar, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Endoglin overexpression is associated with highly proliferative tumor endothelium and also with some tumors, including melanoma. Its targeting has anti-tumor effectiveness, which can also be obtained by RNA interference. The aim of our study was to explore the anti-tumor effectiveness of endoglin silencing by electrotransfer of plasmid DNA encoding short hairpin RNA against endoglin in two murine B16 melanoma variants with different metastatic potential on cells, spheroids and subcutaneous tumors in mice. The results demonstrate that endoglin silencing with gene electrotransfer reduces the proliferation, survival and migration of melanoma cells and also has anti-tumor effectiveness, as the therapy resulted in a high percentage of tumor cures (23% and 58% on B16F1 and B16F10 tumors, respectively). The effectiveness of the therapy correlated with endoglin expression in melanoma cells; in vitro the effects were more pronounced in B16F1 cells, which express more endoglin than B16F10. However, the opposite was observed in vivo in tumors, where there was a higher expression of endoglin and better anti-tumor effectiveness in the B16F10 tumor. In conclusion, targeting endoglin for the treatment of melanoma seems to be a concept worthy of further exploration due to the increased therapeutic effect of the therapy based on simultaneous vascular targeting and its direct effect on tumor cells. PMID:26712792

  5. Fas-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells and infiltrating lymphocytes in human malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Shukuwa, Tetsuo; Katayama, Ichiro; Koji, Takehiko

    2002-04-01

    In a rodent system, melanoma cells expressing Fas ligand (FasL) could kill Fas-positive lymphocytes, suggesting that FasL expression was an essential factor for melanoma cell survival in vivo. These findings led us to investigate apoptosis, and to histochemically analyze involvement of Fas and FasL in the induction of apoptosis, in human malignant melanoma tissues. The percentages of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotin-dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive melanoma cells and of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-positive melanoma cells in melanoma tissues (n = 22) were greater than those in melanocytes in uninvolved skin (n = 6) and nevus cells in nevi tissues (n = 9). The infiltrating lymphocytes around melanomas were also TUNEL positive. Immunohistochemistry revealed expression of Fas and FasL in melanoma cells and lymphocytes, whereas no Fas or FasL expression was detected in normal skin melanocytes and nevus cells. There was significant correlation between Fas-positive indices and TUNEL indices in melanoma tissues. Moreover, TUNEL-, Fas-, and FasL-positive indices of melanoma cells from patients with Stage 3 melanomas were significantly lower than those with Stage 2 melanomas. The PCNA index of Stage 1 melanoma was significantly lower than that of the other stages, although the difference of PCNA index was insignificant among Stages 2 to 4. Among Stages 1 to 4, there was no difference in the PCNA, TUNEL-, and Fas-positive indices of lymphocytes, although the FasL-positive index of lymphocytes from Stage 3 melanomas was significantly lower than in that from Stage 2. These data reveal that melanoma cells and infiltrating lymphocytes have the potential to induce their own apoptosis regulated by Fas and FasL in an autocrine and/or paracrine fashion and that the decline of Fas-mediated apoptosis of melanoma cells, rather than the apoptosis of infiltrating lymphocytes, may affect the prognosis of melanoma patients, possibly through the

  6. Detection and isolation of circulating melanoma cells using photoacoustic flowmetry.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; DeSouza, Thiago; Cook, Aaron; Viator, John A

    2011-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that have separated from a macroscopic tumor and spread through the blood and lymph systems to seed secondary tumors(1,2,3). CTCs are indicators of metastatic disease and their detection in blood samples may be used to diagnose cancer and monitor a patient's response to therapy. Since CTCs are rare, comprising about one tumor cell among billions of normal blood cells in advanced cancer patients, their detection and enumeration is a difficult task. We exploit the presence of pigment in most melanoma cells to generate photoacoustic, or laser induced ultrasonic waves in a custom flow cytometer for detection of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs)(4,5). This process entails separating a whole blood sample using centrifugation and obtaining the white blood cell layer. If present in whole blood, CMCs will separate with the white blood cells due to similar density. These cells are resuspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and introduced into the flowmeter. Rather than a continuous flow of the blood cell suspension, we induced two phase flow in order to capture these cells for further study. In two phase flow, two immiscible liquids in a microfluidic system meet at a junction and form alternating slugs of liquid(6,7). PBS suspended white blood cells and air form microliter slugs that are sequentially irradiated with laser light. The addition of a surfactant to the liquid phase allows uniform slug formation and the user can create different sized slugs by altering the flow rates of the two phases. Slugs of air and slugs of PBS with white blood cells contain no light absorbers and hence, do not produce photoacoustic waves. However, slugs of white blood cells that contain even single CMCs absorb laser light and produce high frequency acoustic waves. These slugs that generate photoacoustic waves are sequestered and collected for cytochemical staining for verification of CMCs. PMID:22143421

  7. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  8. Raman spectroscopy detects melanoma and the tissue surrounding melanoma using tissue-engineered melanoma models

    PubMed Central

    Yorucu, Ceyla; Lau, Katherine; Mittar, Shweta; Green, Nicola H.; Raza, Ahtasham; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur; MacNeil, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Invasion of melanoma cells from the primary tumor involves interaction with adjacent tissues and extracellular matrix. The extent of this interaction is not fully understood. In this study Raman spectroscopy was applied to cryo-sections of established 3D models of melanoma in human skin. Principal component analysis was used to investigate differences between the tumor and normal tissue and between the peri-tumor area and the normal skin. Two human melanoma cells lines A375SM and C8161 were investigated and compared in 3D melanoma models. Changes were found in protein conformations and tryptophan configurations across the entire melanoma samples, in tyrosine orientation and in more fluid lipid packing only in tumor dense areas, and in increased glycogen content in the peri-tumor areas of melanoma. Raman spectroscopy revealed changes around the perimeter of a melanoma tumor as well as detecting differences between the tumor and the normal tissue. PMID:27158185

  9. Transcriptional control of melanoma metastasis: the importance of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Braeuer, Russell R; Zigler, Maya; Villares, Gabriel J; Dobroff, Andrey S; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-04-01

    The molecular changes associated with the transition of melanoma cells from radial growth phase (RGP) to vertical growth phase (VGP) and the metastatic phenotype are not very well defined. However, some of the genes involved in this process and their transcriptional regulation are beginning to be elucidated. For example, the switch from RGP to VGP and the metastatic phenotype is associated with loss of the AP-2α transcription factor. AP-2α regulates the expression of c-KIT, MMP-2, VEGF, and the adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18. Recently, we reported that AP-2α also regulates two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) PAR-1 and PAFR. In turn, the thrombin receptor, PAR-1, regulates the expression of the gap junction protein Connexin-43 and the tumor suppressor gene Maspin. Activation of PAR-1 also leads to overexpression and secretion of proangiogenic factors such as IL-8, uPA, VEGF, PDGF, as well certain integrins. PAR-1 also cooperates with PAFR to regulate the expression of the MCAM/MUC18 via phosphorylation of CREB. The ligands for these GPCRs, thrombin and PAF, are secreted by stromal cells, emphasizing the importance of the tumor microenvironment in melanoma metastasis. The metastatic phenotype of melanoma is also associated with overexpression and function of CREB/ATF-1. Loss of AP-2α and overexpression of CREB/ATF-1 results in the overexpression of MCAM/MUC18 which by itself contributes to melanoma metastasis by regulating the inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (Id-1). CREB/ATF-1 also regulates the angiogenic factor CYR-61. Our recent data indicate that CREB/ATF-1 regulates the expression of AP-2α, thus, supporting the notion that CREB is an important "master switch" in melanoma progression. PMID:21147226

  10. Transcriptional Control of Melanoma Metastasis: The Importance of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Braeuer, Russell R.; Zigler, Maya; Villares, Gabriel J.; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2010-01-01

    The molecular changes associated with the transition of melanoma cells from radial growth phase (RGP) to vertical growth phase (VGP) and the metastatic phenotype are not very well defined. However, some of the genes involved in this process and their transcriptional regulation are beginning to be elucidated. For example, the switch from RGP to VGP and the metastatic phenotype is associated with loss of the AP-2α transcription factor. AP-2α regulates the expression of c-KIT, MMP-2, VEGF, and the adhesion molecule MCAM/MUC18. Recently, we reported that AP-2α also regulates two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) PAR-1 and PAFR. In turn, the thrombin receptor, PAR-1, regulates the expression of the gap junction protein Connexin-43 and the tumor suppressor gene Maspin. Activation of PAR-1 also leads to overexpression and secretion of proangiogenic factors such as IL-8, uPA, VEGF, PDGF, as well certain integrins. PAR-1 also cooperates with PAFR to regulate the expression of the MCAM/MUC18 via phosphorylation of CREB. The ligands for these GPCRs, thrombin and PAF, are secreted by stromal cells, emphasizing the importance of the tumor microenvironment in melanoma metastasis. The metastatic phenotype of melanoma is also associated with overexpression and function of CREB/ATF-1. Loss of AP-2α and overexpression of CREB/ATF-1 results in the overexpression of MCAM/MUC18 which by itself contributes to melanoma metastasis by regulating the inhibitor of DNA binding-1 (Id-1). CREB/ATF-1 also regulates the angiogenic factor CYR-61. Our recent data indicate that CREB/ATF-1 regulates the expression of AP-2α, thus, supporting the notion that CREB is an important “master switch” in melanoma progression. PMID:21147226

  11. AMP kinase-related kinase NUAK2 affects tumor growth, migration, and clinical outcome of human melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Namiki, Takeshi; Tanemura, Atsushi; Valencia, Julio C.; Coelho, Sergio G.; Passeron, Thierry; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Vieira, Wilfred D.; Ishikawa, Masashi; Nishijima, Wataru; Izumo, Toshiyuki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Ichiro; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Yin, Lanlan; Polley, Eric C.; Liu, Hongfang; Kawakami, Yutaka; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Eishi; Yokozeki, Hiroo; Hearing, Vincent J.

    2011-01-01

    The identification of genes that participate in melanomagenesis should suggest strategies for developing therapeutic modalities. We used a public array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) database and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses to identify the AMP kinase (AMPK)-related kinase NUAK2 as a candidate gene for melanomagenesis, and we analyzed its functions in melanoma cells. Our analyses had identified a locus at 1q32 where genomic gain is strongly associated with tumor thickness, and we used real-time qPCR analyses and regression analyses to identify NUAK2 as a candidate gene at that locus. Associations of relapse-free survival and overall survival of 92 primary melanoma patients with NUAK2 expression measured using immunohistochemistry were investigated using Kaplan–Meier curves, log rank tests, and Cox regression models. Knockdown of NUAK2 induces senescence and reduces S-phase, decreases migration, and down-regulates expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). In vivo analysis demonstrated that knockdown of NUAK2 suppresses melanoma tumor growth in mice. Survival analysis showed that the risk of relapse is greater in acral melanoma patients with high levels of NUAK2 expression than in acral melanoma patients with low levels of NUAK2 expression (hazard ratio = 3.88; 95% confidence interval = 1.44–10.50; P = 0.0075). These data demonstrate that NUAK2 expression is significantly associated with the oncogenic features of melanoma cells and with the survival of acral melanoma patients. NUAK2 may provide a drug target to suppress melanoma progression. This study further supports the importance of NUAK2 in cancer development and tumor progression, while AMPK has antioncogenic properties. PMID:21460252

  12. GLI inhibitor GANT61 kills melanoma cells and acts in synergy with obatoclax.

    PubMed

    Vlčková, Kateřina; Réda, Jiri; Ondrušová, Lubica; Krayem, Mohammad; Ghanem, Ghanem; Vachtenheim, Jiri

    2016-09-01

    MEK kinase inhibitors (trametinib and selumetinib) or kinase inhibitors directed against mutated BRAF(V600E) (vemurafenib and dabrafenib) have initial encouraging effects in the treatment of melanoma but acquired resistance appears almost invariably after some months. Studies revealed mutually exclusive NRAS and BRAF activating mutations driving the MAPK/ERK pathway among human melanomas. Although combination therapy exerts significantly better antitumor cell efficacy, complete remission is rarely achieved. To employ an alternative approach, we have targeted the Hedgehog/GLI pathway, which is deregulated in melanomas, through the GLI1/2 inhibitor GANT61, alone or accompanied with the treatment by the BCL2 family inhibitor obatoclax in 9 melanoma cell lines. Thus, we targeted melanoma cells irrespective of their NRAS or BRAF mutational status. After GANT61 treatment, the cell viability was drastically diminished via apoptosis, as substantial nuclear DNA fragmentation was detected. In all tested melanoma cell lines, the combined treatment was more efficient than the application of each drug alone at the end of the cell growth with inhibitors. GANT61 was efficient also alone in most cell lines without the addition of obatoclax, which had only a limited effect when used as a single drug. In most cell lines, tumor cells were eradicated after 5-9 days of combined treatment in colony outgrowth assay. To conclude, GANT61 treatment might become a hopeful and effective anti-melanoma targeted therapy, especially when combined with the BCL2 family inhibitor obatoclax. PMID:27572939

  13. A Comparative Study of Adhesion of Melanoma and Breast Cancer Cells to Blood and Lymphatic Endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Safuan, Sabreena; Storr, Sarah J.; Patel, Poulam M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Lymphovascular invasion (LVI) is an important step in the metastatic cascade; tumor cell migration and adhesion to blood and lymphatic vessels is followed by invasion through the vessel wall and subsequent systemic spread. Although primary breast cancers and melanomas have rich blood vascular networks, LVI is predominately lymphatic in nature. Whilst the adhesion of tumor cells to blood endothelium has been extensively investigated, there is a paucity of information on tumor cell adhesion to lymphatic endothelium. Methods and Results Breast cancer (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7) and melanoma (MeWo and SKMEL-30) cell adhesion to lymphatic (hTERT-LEC and HMVEC dLy Neo) and blood (HUVEC and hMEC-1) endothelial cells were assessed using static adhesion assays. The effect of inflammatory conditions, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) stimulation of endothelial and tumor cells, on the adhesive process was also examined. In addition, the effects of TNF-α stimulation on tumor cell migration was investigated using haplotaxis (scratch wound) assays. Breast cancer and melanoma cells exhibited higher levels of adhesion to blood compared to lymphatic endothelial cells (p<0.001). TNF-α stimulation of endothelial cells, or of tumor cells alone, did not significantly alter tumor–endothelial cell adhesion or patterns. When both tumor and endothelial cells were stimulated with TNF-α, a significant increase in adhesion was observed (p<0.01), which was notably higher in the lymphatic cell models (p<0.001). TNF-α-stimulation of all tumor cell lines significantly increased their migration rate (p<0.01). Conclusions Results suggest that metastasis resultant from lymphatic vessel-tumor cell adhesion may be modulated by cytokine stimulation, which could represent an important therapeutic target in breast cancer and melanoma. PMID:23215743

  14. Blockade of FLT4 suppresses metastasis of melanoma cells by impaired lymphatic vessels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Hong, Seok-Ho; Shin, Minsang; Heo, Hye-Ryeon; Jang, In Ho

    2016-09-16

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells via lymphatic vessels affects the relapse of tumor patients. New lymphatic vessel formation, including lymphangiogenesis, is promoted in the tumor environment. The lymphangiogenic factor VEGF-C can mediate lymphatic vessel formation and induce tumor metastasis by binding with FLT4. In melanoma, metastasis via lymphatics such as lymph nodes is one of the main predictors of poor outcome. Thus, we investigated whether blockade of FLT4 can reduce metastasis via the suppression of lymphatic capillaries. Proliferative lymphatic capillaries in melanoma were estimated by immunohistochemistry using FLT4 antibody after the injection of the FLT4 antagonist MAZ51. The numbers of tumor modules in metastasised lungs were calculated by gross examination and lymphatic related factors were examined by qRT-PCR. MAZ51 injection resulted in the suppression of tumor size and module number and the inhibition of proliferative lymphatic vessels in the intratumoral region in the lung and proliferating melanoma cells in the lung compared to those of untreated groups. Additionally, high FLT4 and TNF-alpha were detected in melanoma-induced tissue, while lymphatic markers such as VEGF-C, FLT4 and Prox-1 were significantly decreased in MAZ51 treated groups, implying that anti-lymphangiogenesis by MAZ51 may provide a potential strategy to prevent tumor metastasis in melanoma and high number of lymphatic capillaries could be used diagnosis for severe metastasis. PMID:27507214

  15. CIZ/NMP4 is expressed in B16 melanoma and forms a positive feedback loop with RANKL to promote migration of the melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Tomomi; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Kitazawa, Sohei; Kitazawa, Riko; Notomi, Takuya; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Ezura, Yoichi; Amagasa, Teruo; Noda, Masaki

    2012-07-01

    Tumor metastasis to bone is a serious pathological situation that causes severe pain, and deterioration in locomoter function. However, the mechanisms underlying tumor metastasis is still incompletely understood. CIZ/NMP4 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein and its roles in tumor cells have not been known. We, therefore, hypothesized the role of CIZ/NMP4 in B16 melanoma cells that metastasize to bone. CIZ/NMP4 is expressed in B16 cells. The CIZ/NMP4 expression levels are correlated to the metastatic activity in divergent types of melanoma cells. Overexpression of CIZ/NMP4 increased B16 cell migration in Trans-well assay. Conversely, siRNA-based knockdown of CIZ/NMP4 suppressed migratory activity of these cells. As RANKL promotes metastasis of tumor cells in bone, we tested its effect on CIZ in melanoma cells. RANKL treatment enhanced CIZ/NMP4 expression. This increase of CIZ by RANKL promoted migration. Conversely, we identified CIZ/NMP4 binding site in the promoter of RANKL. Furthermore, luciferase assay indicated that CIZ/NMP4 overexpression enhanced RANKL promoter activities, revealing a positive feedback loop of CIZ/NMP4 and RANKL in melanoma. These observations indicate that CIZ/NMP4 is critical regulator of metastasis of melanoma cells. PMID:22307584

  16. Dissecting the multicellular ecosystem of metastatic melanoma by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Itay; Izar, Benjamin; Prakadan, Sanjay M; Wadsworth, Marc H; Treacy, Daniel; Trombetta, John J; Rotem, Asaf; Rodman, Christopher; Lian, Christine; Murphy, George; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jia-Ren; Cohen, Ofir; Shah, Parin; Lu, Diana; Genshaft, Alex S; Hughes, Travis K; Ziegler, Carly G K; Kazer, Samuel W; Gaillard, Aleth; Kolb, Kellie E; Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Johannessen, Cory M; Andreev, Aleksandr Y; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Bertagnolli, Monica; Sorger, Peter K; Sullivan, Ryan J; Flaherty, Keith T; Frederick, Dennie T; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Yoon, Charles H; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Garraway, Levi A

    2016-04-01

    To explore the distinct genotypic and phenotypic states of melanoma tumors, we applied single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to 4645 single cells isolated from 19 patients, profiling malignant, immune, stromal, and endothelial cells. Malignant cells within the same tumor displayed transcriptional heterogeneity associated with the cell cycle, spatial context, and a drug-resistance program. In particular, all tumors harbored malignant cells from two distinct transcriptional cell states, such that tumors characterized by high levels of the MITF transcription factor also contained cells with low MITF and elevated levels of the AXL kinase. Single-cell analyses suggested distinct tumor microenvironmental patterns, including cell-to-cell interactions. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed exhaustion programs, their connection to T cell activation and clonal expansion, and their variability across patients. Overall, we begin to unravel the cellular ecosystem of tumors and how single-cell genomics offers insights with implications for both targeted and immune therapies. PMID:27124452

  17. Systemic oxidative profile after tumor removal and the tumor microenvironment in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Sara Santos; de Souza-Neto, Fernando Pinheiro; Ramalho, Leandra Náira Zambelli; Derossi, Daniela Rudgeri; Guarnier, Flávia Alessandra; da Silva, Cássio Fernando Nunes; Melo, Gabriella Pascoal; Simão, Andréa Name Colado; Cecchini, Rubens; Cecchini, Alessandra Lourenço

    2015-06-01

    This study highlights the systemic oxidative changes in patients submitted to primary cutaneous melanoma removal. Cutaneous melanoma is highly aggressive and its incidence is increasing worldwide. We evaluated systemic oxidative stress (OS) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) expression in melanoma tissue in relation to the Breslow thickness in patients under surveillance. Forty-three patients with cutaneous melanoma and 50 healthy volunteers were recruited. Patients were divided into two groups according to the tumor's Breslow thickness: T1/T2 (<2 mm) and T3/T4 (≥2 mm). Systemic OS and inflammatory mediators were evaluated in plasma, and the 3-NT expression was analyzed via immunohistochemistry. Compared with the controls, the patients had lower blood levels of reduced glutathione, higher malondialdehyde and thiol levels, and a higher total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter to uric acid ratio. The C-reactive protein and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase were increased only in the T3/T4 group. High levels of 3-NT were present only in T3/T4 patients. Our data suggested that a correlation exists between the Breslow thickness and a systemic pro-oxidant status, and that oxidative changes induced by the melanoma remain in the microenvironment post-surgery, demonstrating a role for oxygen species in melanoma. PMID:25772650

  18. Akt Inhibitor MK2206 and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Melanoma, Prostate or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-05

    Adult Solid Neoplasm; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  19. Melanoma-Derived BRAFV600E Mutation in Peritumoral Stromal Cells: Implications for in Vivo Cell Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Kemény, Lajos V.; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Oláh, Judit; Jakab, Ádám; Polyánka, Hilda; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma often recurs in patients after the removal of the primary tumor, suggesting the presence of recurrent tumor-initiating cells that are undetectable using standard diagnostic methods. As cell fusion has been implicated to facilitate the alteration of a cell’s phenotype, we hypothesized that cells in the peritumoral stroma having a stromal phenotype that initiate recurrent tumors might originate from the fusion of tumor and stromal cells. Here, we show that in patients with BRAFV600E melanoma, melanoma antigen recognized by T-cells (MART1)-negative peritumoral stromal cells express BRAFV600E protein. To confirm the presence of the oncogene at the genetic level, peritumoral stromal cells were microdissected and screened for the presence of BRAFV600E with a mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Interestingly, cells carrying the BRAFV600E mutation were not only found among cells surrounding the primary tumor but were also present in the stroma of melanoma metastases as well as in a histologically tumor-free re-excision sample from a patient who subsequently developed a local recurrence. We did not detect any BRAFV600E mutation or protein in the peritumoral stroma of BRAFWT melanoma. Therefore, our results suggest that peritumoral stromal cells contain melanoma-derived oncogenic information, potentially as a result of cell fusion. These hybrid cells display the phenotype of stromal cells and are therefore undetectable using routine histological assessments. Our results highlight the importance of genetic analyses and the application of mutation-specific antibodies in the identification of potentially recurrent-tumor-initiating cells, which may help better predict patient survival and disease outcome. PMID:27338362

  20. LKB1/STK11 Inactivation Leads to Expansion of a Prometastatic Tumor Subpopulation in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjin; Monahan, Kimberly B.; Pfefferle, Adam D.; Shimamura, Takeshi; Sorrentino, Jessica; Chan, Keefe T.; Roadcap, David W.; Ollila, David W.; Thomas, Nancy E.; Castrillon, Diego H.; Miller, C. Ryan; Perou, Charles M.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Bear, James E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Germline mutations in LKB1 (STK11) are associated with the Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), which includes aberrant mucocutaneous pigmentation, and somatic LKB1 mutations occur in 10% of cutaneous melanoma. By somatically inactivating Lkb1 with K-Ras activation (±p53 loss) in murine melanocytes, we observed variably pigmented and highly metastatic melanoma with 100% penetrance. LKB1 deficiency resulted in increased phosphorylation of the SRC family kinase (SFK) YES, increased expression of WNT target genes, and expansion of a CD24+ cell population, which showed increased metastatic behavior in vitro and in vivo relative to isogenic CD24− cells. These results suggest that LKB1 inactivation in the context of RAS activation facilitates metastasis by inducing an SFK-dependent expansion of a prometastatic, CD24+ tumor subpopulation. PMID:22698401

  1. ADAM15 expression is downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ungerer, Christopher; Doberstein, Kai; Boehm, Beate; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Gutwein, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Strong ADAM15 expression is found in normal melanocytes. {yields} ADAM15 expression is significantly downregulated in patients with melanoma metastasis. {yields} TGF-{beta} can downregulate ADAM15 expression in melanoma cells. {yields} Overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells inhibits migration, proliferation and invasion of melanoma cells. {yields} Conclusion: ADAM15 represents an tumor suppressor protein in melanoma. -- Abstract: In a mouse melanoma metastasis model it has been recently shown that ADAM15 overexpression in melanoma cells significantly reduced the number of metastatic nodules on the lung. Unfortunately, the expression of ADAM15 in human melanoma tissue has not been determined so far. In our study, we characterized the expression of ADAM15 in tissue micro-arrays of patients with primary melanoma with melanoma metastasis. ADAM15 was expressed in melanocytes and endothelial cells of benign nevi and melanoma tissue. Importantly, ADAM15 was significantly downregulated in melanoma metastasis compared to primary melanoma. We further demonstrate that IFN-{gamma} and TGF-{beta} downregulate ADAM15 protein levels in melanoma cells. To investigate the role of ADAM15 in melanoma progression, we overexpressed ADAM15 in melanoma cells. Importantly, overexpression of ADAM15 in melanoma cells reduced the migration, invasion and the anchorage dependent and independent cell growth of melanoma cells. In summary, the downregulation of ADAM15 plays an important role in melanoma progression and ADAM15 act as a tumorsuppressor in melanoma.

  2. HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits growth of human melanoma cells by induction of cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Mikochik, Peter J; Ra, Jin H; Lei, Hanqin; Flaherty, Keith T; Winkler, Jeffrey D; Spitz, Francis R

    2007-02-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (HIV PI) are a class of antiretroviral drugs that are designed to target the viral protease. Unexpectedly, this class of drugs is also reported to have antitumor activity. In this study, we have evaluated the in vitro activity of nelfinavir, a HIV PI, against human melanoma cells. Nelfinavir inhibits the growth of melanoma cell lines at low micromolar concentrations that are clinically attainable. Nelfinavir promotes apoptosis and arrests cell cycle at G(1) phase. Cell cycle arrest is attributed to inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and concomitant dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. We further show that nelfinavir inhibits CDK2 through proteasome-dependent degradation of Cdc25A phosphatase. Our results suggest that nelfinavir is a promising candidate chemotherapeutic agent for advanced melanoma, for which novel and effective therapies are urgently needed. PMID:17283158

  3. Expression of Tissue Factor by Melanoma Cells Promotes Efficient Hematogenous Metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Barbara M.; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Edgington, Thomas S.; Ruf, Wolfram

    1992-12-01

    Metastasis is a multistep process which requires highly adapted interactions of tumor cells with host target organs. Compared with nonmetastatic cells, metastatic human melanoma cells express 1000-fold higher levels of tissue factor (TF), the major cellular initiator of the plasma coagulation protease cascades. To explore whether TF may contribute to metastatic tumor dissemination, we analyzed the effect of specific inhibition of TF function on human melanoma metastasis in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Using species-specific antibodies to TF, we demonstrate that initial adherence is insufficient for successful tumor cell implantation in a target organ. Rapid arrest of human tumor cells in the lungs of mice was not diminished by inhibition of TF. However, inhibition of TF receptor function and consequent reduction in local protease generation abolished prolonged adherence of tumor cells, resulting in significantly reduced numbers of tumor cells retained in the vasculature of the lungs. The growth of pulmonary metastases was also significantly inhibited by a blocking anti-TF monoclonal antibody and Fab fragments thereof, whereas a noninhibitory antibody lacked antimetastatic effects. Cell surface expression of functional TF thus contributes to melanoma progression by allowing metastatic cells to provide requisite signals for prolonged adhesive interactions and/or transmigration of tumor cells across the endothelium, resulting in successful metastatic tumor implantation.

  4. Melanoma Affects the Composition of Blood Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Koliha, Nina; Heider, Ute; Ozimkowski, Tobias; Wiemann, Martin; Bosio, Andreas; Wild, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are specifically loaded with nucleic acids, lipids, and proteins from their parental cell. Therefore, the constitution of EVs reflects the type and status of the originating cell and EVs in melanoma patient’s plasma could be indicative for the tumor. Likewise, EVs might influence tumor progression by regulating immune responses. We performed a broad protein characterization of EVs from plasma of melanoma patients and healthy donors as well as from T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs), and platelets using a multiplex bead-based platform. Using this method, we succeeded in analyzing 58 proteins that were differentially displayed on EVs. Hierarchical clustering of protein intensity patterns grouped EVs according to their originating cell type. The analysis of EVs from stimulated B cells and moDCs revealed the transfer of surface proteins to vesicles depending on the cell status. The protein profiles of plasma vesicles resembled the protein profiles of EVs from platelets, antigen-presenting cells and NK cells as shown by platelet markers, co-stimulatory proteins, and a NK cell subpopulation marker. In comparison to healthy plasma vesicles, melanoma plasma vesicles showed altered signals for platelet markers, indicating a changed vesicle secretion or protein loading of EVs by platelets and a lower CD8 signal that might be associated with a diminished activity of NK cells or T cells. As we hardly detected melanoma-derived vesicles in patient’s plasma, we concluded that blood cells induced the observed differences. In summary, our results question a direct effect of melanoma cells on the composition of EVs in melanoma plasma, but rather argue for an indirect influence of melanoma cells on the vesicle secretion or vesicle protein loading by blood cells. PMID:27507971

  5. Lentivirus-mediated bifunctional cell labeling for in vivo melanoma study

    PubMed Central

    Day, Chi-Ping; Carter, John; Bonomi, Carrie; Esposito, Dominic; Crise, Bruce; Ortiz-Conde, Betty; Hollingshead, Melinda; Merlino, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Lentiviral vectors (LVs) are capable of labeling a broad spectrum of cell types, achieving stable expression of transgenes. However, for in vivo studies, the duration of marker gene expression has been highly variable. We have developed a series of LVs harboring different promoters for expressing reporter gene in mouse cells. Long-term culture and colony formation of several LV-labeled mouse melanoma cells showed that promoters derived from mammalian house-keeping genes, especially those encoding RNA polymerase II (Pol2) and ferritin (FerH), provided the highest consistency for reporter expression. For in vivo studies, primary B16BL6 mouse melanoma were infected with LVs whose luciferase-GFP fusion gene (Luc/GFP) was driven by either Pol2 or FerH promoters. When transplanted into syngeneic C57BL/6 mice, Luc/GFP-labeled B16BL6 mouse melanoma cells can be monitored by bioluminescence imaging in vivo, and GFP-positive cells can be isolated from the tumors by FACS. Pol2-Luc/GFP labeling, while lower in activity, was more sustainable than FerH-Luc/GFP labeling in B16BL6 over consecutive passages into mice. We conclude that Pol-2-Luc/GFP labeling allows long-term in vivo monitoring and tumor cell isolation in immunocompetent mouse melanoma models. SIGNIFICANCE In this study we have developed and identified lentiviral vectors that allow labeled mouse melanoma cells to maintain long-term and consistent expression of a bifunctional luciferase-GFP marker gene, even in syngeneic mice with an intact immune function. This cell-labeling system can be used to build immunocompetent mouse melanoma models that permit both tumor monitoring and FACS-based tumor cell isolation from tissues, greatly facilitating the in vivo study of melanoma. PMID:19175523

  6. Overexpression of Annexin II Receptor-Induced Autophagy Protects Against Apoptosis in Uveal Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuelu; Song, Hongyuan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Yongzhe; Tang, Hailin; Qi, Zhongtian; Zhao, Ping; Zhao, Shihong

    2016-05-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary malignant intraocular tumor in adults and still lacks effective systemic therapies. Annexin A2 receptor (AXIIR), a receptor for Annexin II, was demonstrated to play an important role in multiple cells, but its role in uveal melanoma cells remains exclusive. Herein, the authors reported that overexpression of AXIIR was able to reduce cell viability and activate apoptosis apparently in the Mum2C uveal melanoma cell line. Meanwhile, overexpression of AXIIR could induce autophagy and increase autophagy flux. After autophagy was inhibited by chloroquine, enhanced apoptosis and cytotoxicity could be detected. In summary, these data highlighted the crucial role of AXIIR in reducing Mum2C cell viability through inducing apoptosis, while autophagy played a protective role in this process. Interference of this gene may be a promising method for uveal melanoma therapy and combination with specific inhibitor of autophagy may serve as a supplementary. PMID:27183438

  7. Melanoma Development and Progression Are Associated with Rad6 Upregulation and β-Catenin Relocation to the Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mehregan, Darius R.; Abrams, Judith; Haynes, Brittany; Shekhar, Malathy P. V.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Rad6 and β-catenin enhance each other's expression through a positive feedback loop to promote breast cancer development/progression. While β-catenin has been implicated in melanoma pathogenesis, Rad6 function has not been investigated. Here, we examined the relationship between Rad6 and β-catenin in melanoma development and progression. Eighty-eight cutaneous tumors, 30 nevi, 29 primary melanoma, and 29 metastatic melanomas, were immunostained with anti-β-catenin and anti-Rad6 antibodies. Strong expression of Rad6 was observed in only 27% of nevi as compared to 100% of primary and 96% of metastatic melanomas. β-Catenin was strongly expressed in 97% of primary and 93% of metastatic melanomas, and unlike Rad6, in 93% of nevi. None of the tumors expressed nuclear β-catenin. β-Catenin was exclusively localized on the cell membrane of 55% of primary, 62% of metastatic melanomas, and only 10% of nevi. Cytoplasmic β-catenin was detected in 90% of nevi, 17% of primary, and 8% of metastatic melanoma, whereas 28% of primary and 30% of metastatic melanomas exhibited β-catenin at both locations. These data suggest that melanoma development and progression are associated with Rad6 upregulation and membranous redistribution of β-catenin and that β-catenin and Rad6 play independent roles in melanoma development. PMID:24891954

  8. [Role of cancer stem cells in the progression and heterogeneity of melanoma].

    PubMed

    Széky, Balázs; Silló, Pálma; Fábián, Melinda; Mayer, Balázs; Kárpáti, Sarolta; Németh, Krisztián

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decade a rare cell population called cancer stem cells has been identified in both solid tumors and hematologic cancers. These cells are reminiscent of somatic and embryonic stem cells and play a critical role in the initiation and progression of malignancies. As all stem cells, they are able to undergo asymmetric cell division and hence renew themselves and create various other progenies with heterogenous phenotypes. A growing body of literature suggested that stem cell subpopulations contribute significantly to the growth and metastatic properties of melanoma. This review gives a comprehensive overview of the current literature on melanoma stem cells, with a special emphasis on the signaling pathways responsible for the homeostatic growth of melanocytes and the uncontrolled proliferation of melanoma cells. The importance of the local microenvironment are demonstrated through summarizing the role of various cell types, soluble factors and cell adhesion molecules in the progression of melanoma and the creation of treatment resistant cancer cell clones. Last but not least, the models of melanoma progression will be introduced and a variety of cellular markers will be presented that may be used to identify and therapeutically target melanoma. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(34), 1339-1348. PMID:27546799

  9. Standard melanoma-associated markers do not identify the MM127 metastatic melanoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Haridas, Parvathi; McGovern, Jacqui A.; Kashyap, Abhishek S.; McElwain, D. L. Sean; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Reliable identification of different melanoma cell lines is important for many aspects of melanoma research. Common markers used to identify melanoma cell lines include: S100; HMB-45; and Melan-A. We explore the expression of these three markers in four different melanoma cell lines: WM35; WM793; SK-MEL-28; and MM127. The expression of these markers is examined at both the mRNA and protein level. Our results show that the metastatic cell line, MM127, cannot be detected using any of the commonly used melanoma-associated markers. This implies that it would be very difficult to identify this particular cell line in a heterogeneous sample, and as a result this cell line should be used with care. PMID:27087056

  10. Standard melanoma-associated markers do not identify the MM127 metastatic melanoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Parvathi; McGovern, Jacqui A; Kashyap, Abhishek S; McElwain, D L Sean; Simpson, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Reliable identification of different melanoma cell lines is important for many aspects of melanoma research. Common markers used to identify melanoma cell lines include: S100; HMB-45; and Melan-A. We explore the expression of these three markers in four different melanoma cell lines: WM35; WM793; SK-MEL-28; and MM127. The expression of these markers is examined at both the mRNA and protein level. Our results show that the metastatic cell line, MM127, cannot be detected using any of the commonly used melanoma-associated markers. This implies that it would be very difficult to identify this particular cell line in a heterogeneous sample, and as a result this cell line should be used with care. PMID:27087056