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  1. Greater Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Wulff, M; Burke, T; Newton, P

    1986-03-01

    With more than a quarter of its population born overseas, Melbourne, Australia, is rapidly changing from an all-white British outpost to a multicultural, multilingual community. Since the "white" Australian policy was abandoned after World War II, 3 million immigrants from 100 different countries have moved to Australia. Most of the immigrants come from New Zealand, Rhodesia, South Africa, Britain, Ireland, Greece, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Poland, and Indochina. Melbourne is Australia's 2nd largest city and houses 1 out of 5 Australians. Its 1984 population was 2,888,400. Melbourne's housing pattern consists of subdivisions; 75% of the population live in detached houses. Between 1954 and 1961 Melbourne grew at an annual rate of 3.5%; its growth rate between 1961 and 1971 still averaged 2.5%. In the 1970s the growth rate slowed to 1.4%. Metropolitan Melbourne has no central government but is divided into 56 councils and 8 regions. Both Australia's and Melbourne's fertility rates are high compared to the rest of the developed world, partly because of their younger age structure. 41% of Melbourne's population was under age 24 in 1981. Single-person households are growing faster than any other type. 71% of the housing is owner-occupied; in 1981 the median sized dwelling had 5.2 rooms. Public housing only accounts for 2.6% of all dwellings. Fewer students graduate from high school in Australia than in other developed countries, and fewer graduates pursue higher education. Melbourne's suburban sprawl promotes private car travel. In 1980 Melbourne contained more than 28,000 retail establishments and 4200 restaurants and hotels. Industry accounts for 30% of employment, and services account for another 30%. Its largest industries are motor vehicles, clothing, and footware. Although unemployment reached 10% after the 1973 energy crisis, by 1985 it was down to 6%. PMID:12340610

  2. Physics in Melbourne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Home, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    I survey highlights of the practice of physics and allied sciences in Melbourne,Australia, from the 1850s, soon after Europeans first settled in the area, to the present. I note recognizable sites of past and current physical-science activity that may be visited, as well as exhibits of historic items of physics apparatus. I trace the role of physics, in the course of a century and a half, in the evolution of a pioneering settlement into a large city embedded in a modern industrial economy.

  3. Ventilation first for Melbourne hospital.

    PubMed

    2010-11-01

    Infection control is a paramount concern for hospitals worldwide. AECOM engineers in Australia designed the first ever displacement ventilation solution for a Melbourne hospital, researching how materials and systems can assist management of, and reduce, infection transmission within healthcare environments. PMID:21141233

  4. Bilingual Advertising in Melbourne Chinatown

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Sherry Yong

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the function of bilingual advertising by analyzing a case study of bilingual advertising in the Chinatown of Melbourne, Australia. The use of bilingual advertising in an immigrant setting differentiates itself from those in Asian settings where English is not used by dominant proportion of speakers in the society, and this…

  5. Energy Management at the University of Melbourne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marginson, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A program to reduce energy consumption and limit fuel expenditures at the University of Melbourne involved a study of consumption and facility usage, installation of a central energy monitoring system, and a university and public relations effort to enlist student and staff help. (MSE)

  6. The Ecology of Minority Languages in Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Melbourne's linguistic and cultural diversity has continually changed in response to global economic forces and shifting patterns of war and conflict. Immigrant and refugee communities have arrived with different skills, educational and professional profiles, and cultural and religious values. The ecological niches of three contrasting…

  7. The Ecology of Minority Languages in Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Melbourne's linguistic and cultural diversity has continually changed in response to global economic forces and shifting patterns of war and conflict. Immigrant and refugee communities have arrived with different skills, educational and professional profiles, and cultural and religious values. The ecological niches of three contrasting…

  8. New geophysical views of Mt.Melbourne Volcano (East Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armadillo, E.; Gambetta, M.; Ferraccioli, F.; Corr, H.; Bozzo, E.

    2009-05-01

    Mt. Melbourne volcano is located along the transition between the Transantarctic Mountains and the West Antarctic Rift System. Recent volcanic activity is suggested by the occurrence of blankets of pyroclastic pumice and scoria fall around the eastern and southern flanks of Mt Melbourne and by pyroclastic layers interbedded with the summit snows. Geothermal activity in the crater area of Mount Melbourne may be linked to the intrusion of dykes within the last 200 years. Geophysical networks suggest that Mount Melbourne is a quiescent volcano, possibly characterised by slow internal dynamics. During the 2002-2003 Italian Antarctic campaign a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey was performed within the TIMM (Tectonics and Interior of Mt. Melbourne area) project. This helicopter-borne survey was flown at low-altitude and in drape-mode configuration (305 m above terrain) with a line separation less than 500 m. Our new high-resolution magnetic maps reveal the largely ice-covered magmatic and tectonic patters in the Mt. Melbourne volcano area. Additionally, in the frame of the UK-Italian ISODYN-WISE project (2005-06), an airborne ice-sounding radar survey was flown. We combine the sub-ice topography with images and models of the interior of Mt. Melbourne volcano, as derived from the high resolution aeromagnetic data and land gravity data. Our new geophysical maps and models also provide a new tool to study the regional setting of the volcano. In particular we re-assess whether there is geophysical evidence for coupling between strike-slip faulting, the Terror Rift, and Mount Melbourne volcano.

  9. Extreme Droughts In Sydney And Melbourne Since The 1850s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Selim

    2014-05-01

    Sydney and Melbourne are the two highly populated and very well known Australian cities. Population is over 4 million for each. These cities are subject to extreme droughts which affect regional water resources and cause substantial agricultural and economic losses. This study presents a drought analysis of Sydney and Melbourne for the period of 1850s to date by using Effective Drought Index (EDI) and Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI). EDI is a function of precipitation needed for return to normal conditions, the amount of precipitation necessary for recovery from the accumulated deficit since the beginning of a drought. SPI is the most popular and widely used drought index for the last decades. According to the results of EDI analysis; 8 different extreme drought events identified in Sydney, and 5 events in Melbourne since 1850s. The characterization of these extreme drought events were investigated in terms of magnitude, duration, intensity and interarrival time between previous drought event. EDI results were compared with the results of SPI and the similarities and differences were then discussed in more detail. The most severe drought event was identified for the period of July 1979 to February 1981 (lasted 19 months) for Sydney, while the most severe drought took longer in Melbourne for the period of March 2006 to February 2010 (47 months). This study focuses on the benefits of the use of EDI and SPI methods in order to monitor droughts beside presenting the extreme drought case study of Sydney and Melbourne.

  10. A Comparison of Montessori With Traditional Pre-School Education in Melbourne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Karin; Langford, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Briefly compares the actual practice of five Melbourne Montessori preschools with the practice of four Melbourne traditional kindergartens, in an effort to identify discrete and common philosophical and applied elements of the two kinds of programs. (Author/CM)

  11. Selling University Reform: The University of Melbourne and the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the "Times Higher Education Supplement World University Rankings" and the "Academic Rankings of World Universities" by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, some Australian universities have become especially concerned with being ranked among the 100 leading universities. The University of Melbourne, Australia's second oldest…

  12. Selling University Reform: The University of Melbourne and the Press

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the "Times Higher Education Supplement World University Rankings" and the "Academic Rankings of World Universities" by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, some Australian universities have become especially concerned with being ranked among the 100 leading universities. The University of Melbourne, Australia's second oldest…

  13. Increasing Opportunities for Apprenticeships and Traineeships in Melbourne's Western Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martino, John; Holden, Sue; Demediuk, Tess

    A research study was conducted to identify barriers to enrollment in and expansion of apprenticeships and traineeships in the western region of Melbourne, Australia. Data were collected through conducting six focus groups (a total of 180 tenth- and twelfth-grade students) from six schools in three Local Government Areas; surveying 400 local…

  14. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Stephanie J.; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B.

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h-1 and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h-1 to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience.

  15. Heat stress during the Black Saturday event in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stephanie J; Vihma, Timo; Pezza, Alexandre B

    2015-06-01

    The Black Saturday bushfire event of February 7, 2009, devastated the state of Victoria, Australia, resulting in 173 deaths. On this day, the maximum temperature in Melbourne (state capital of Victoria, population 4 million people) exceeded 46 °C, there were wind gusts of over 80 km h(-1) and the relative humidity dropped below 5 %. We investigated the severe meteorological conditions of Black Saturday and the risk of heat stress and dehydration for the residents of Melbourne. This was through the analysis of weather station data, air pollution data, the apparent temperature (AT) and the COMfort FormulA human energy budget model. A very strong pressure gradient caused hot and dry air to be advected to Melbourne from the desert interior of Australia creating the extreme weather conditions. The AT showed that on Black Saturday, heat stress conditions were present, though underrepresented due to assumptions in the AT formula. Further investigation into the human energy budget revealed that the conditions required a sweating rate of 1.4 kg h(-1) to prevent heat accumulation into the body. If sweating stopped, hyperthermia could occur in 15 min. Sensitivity tests indicated that the dry air and strong winds on Black Saturday helped to release latent heat, but the required sweating rate was virtually unattainable for an average person and would result in intense dehydration. Air particulates were at dangerous concentrations in Melbourne on Black Saturday, further intensifying the stresses to the human body. In the future, we recommend that the AT is not used as a thermal comfort measure as it underestimates the physical stress people experience. PMID:25172086

  16. Patterns of weak, near-surface winds at Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapp, R. G.

    1985-12-01

    Up to 30 months of near-surface anemograph records have been examined from 13 locations in and near Melbourne, Australia, to determine the wind patterns which existed during prolonged periods of light winds (at least 3 hours at 2 m s-1 or less). A coherent katabatic wind system was found to develop in at least part of the monitored region on approximately 30% of nights. The flow broadly followed the slope of the basin surrounding the city, with a strong flow down the main river valley, and was partly reinforced by a land breeze in bayside areas. Other valleys also acted as channels for these winds. The general tendency of these katabatic winds was to converge towards the central business district and the northern part of Port Phillip Bay adjacent to the city centre. Where winds from different directions interacted, one of the winds dominated or successive replacement occurred causing the wind direction to vary considerably during a period. There were indications that in the presence of low-level stability with a synoptic gradient wind between east and north, the gradient flow may be deflected around the major topographic barrier to the northeast of the city. The existence of such a situation would have major implications in terms of air quality due to the possibility of pollutants being recirculated in conditions when vertical diffusion was very limited.

  17. A simple heat alert system for Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Neville; Skinner, Carol; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2008-05-01

    A simple heat alert system, based solely on predicted maximum and minimum daily temperatures, has been developed for the city of Melbourne in southeast Australia. The system is based upon a demonstration that, when mean daily temperature exceeds a threshold of 30 degrees C (mean of today's maximum temperature and tonight's minimum temperature), the average daily mortality of people aged 65 years or more is about 15-17% greater than usual. Similar numbers of excess deaths also occur when daily minimum temperatures exceed 24 degrees C (increases of 19-21% over expected death rate), so a heat alert system based solely on this widely available weather forecast variable is also feasible. No strong signal of excess heat-related deaths appears when the data are stratified using daily maximum temperatures. This may be because in Melbourne some days with very high maximum temperatures will be affected by the passage of cool changes and cold fronts in the afternoon, leading to a rapid drop in temperature (i.e., some days with high maximum temperatures will not continue to be hot throughout the day and into the evening). A single day with temperatures exceeding the thresholds noted above is sufficient to cause this increase in mortality, rather than requiring an extended heat wave. The increased daily mortality does not appear to represent a short-term advancement of mortality. PMID:18058138

  18. Reliability of the Melbourne assessment of unilateral upper limb function.

    PubMed

    Randall, M; Carlin, J B; Chondros, P; Reddihough, D

    2001-11-01

    This study examines the reliability of the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function: a quantitative test of quality of movement in children with neurological impairment. The assessment was administered to 20 children aged from 5 to 16 years (mean age 9 years 10 months, SD 2 years 10 months) who had various types and degrees of cerebral palsy (CP). The performances of the 20 children during assessment were videotaped for subsequent scoring by 15 occupational therapists. Scores were analyzed for internal consistency of test items, inter- and intrarater reliability of scorings of the same videotapes, and test-retest reliability using repeat videotaping. Results revealed very high internal consistency of test items (alpha=0.96), moderate to high agreement both within and between raters for all test items (intraclass correlations of at least 0.7) apart from item 16 (hand to mouth and down), and high interrater reliability (0.95) and intrarater reliability (0.97) for total test scores. Test-retest results revealed moderate to high intrarater reliability for item totals (mean of 0.83 and 0.79) for each rater and high reliability for test totals (0.98 and 0.97). These findings indicate that the Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function is a reliable tool for measuring the quality of unilateral upper-limb movement in children with CP. PMID:11730151

  19. Breastfeeding practices of ethnic Indian immigrant women in Melbourne, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The health benefits of breastfeeding are well documented in public health and medical literature worldwide. Despite this, global rates of breastfeeding steadily decline during the first couple of months postpartum. Although immigrant women have higher initiation rates and a longer duration of breastfeeding overall, breastfeeding practices are compromised because of a myriad of socioeconomic and cultural factors, including the acculturation process. The objective of this study was to show how acculturation and cultural identity influenced breastfeeding practices among Indian immigrants in Melbourne, Australia. Methods Twelve case studies were employed to gather narratives of women’s lived experiences. Ethnographic field research methods were used to collect data, including participant observation, semi-structured interviews, case studies, and life histories. This provided in-depth information from women on various aspects of the immigrant experience of motherhood, including infant care and feeding. Participants were opportunistically recruited from Indian obstetricians and gynaecologists. Women identifying as ethnic Indian and in their third trimester of pregnancy were recruited. Interviews were conducted in women’s homes in metropolitan Melbourne over a 12 month period between 2004 and 2005. Data were coded and analysed thematically. Results All women identified as ethnic Indian and initiated breastfeeding in accordance with their cultural identity. Social support and cultural connectivity impacted positively on duration of breastfeeding. However, acculturation (adopting Australian cultural values and gender norms, including returning to paid employment) negatively influenced breastfeeding duration. In addition, the high reliance of recent immigrants on the advice of healthcare professionals who gave inconsistent advice negatively affected exclusive breastfeeding. Conclusions For ethnic Indian immigrant women breastfeeding practice is closely linked to acculturation and identity construction, both personal and communal. The lack of social and cultural networks for recent immigrants prevents their involvement in the cultural systems that traditionally support breastfeeding. With this in mind, healthcare professionals should deliver services in a culturally appropriate and sensitive manner where women feel supported as well as empowered. PMID:24345192

  20. Video-assisted thoracoscopic pulmonary resections - The Melbourne experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite its privileged economic and educational place in the world, Melbourne was relatively slow to embrace video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) for lobectomy. The initial driver of this was Professor C Peter Clarke at the Austin Hospital at the beginning of the new millennium. His legacy was carried on by his apprentice, but at St Vincent’s Hospital. After a period of slow development, it became the procedure of choice from 2005, and began to filter sporadically to other hospitals from 2010. Methods This paper details the historical development, techniques and results of 343 VATS pulmonary resections (including lobectomies, sub-lobar anatomical resections, sleeve resections, bi-lobectomies and pneumonectomies). Results In-hospital and 30-day mortality was 2.0% and 5-year survival for all stages of NSCLC was 70%. Over 36% of patients were stage II-III using the new 7th revision TNM staging system. The conversion to thoracotomy rate was 4.7%. The estimated learning curve for this experience VATS lobectomy appears to be in the range of 15-20 cases. In this series, the same lymph node dissection or sampling was attempted and usually achieved as would have occurred at thoracotomy. Conclusions The results confirm the findings of other large case series that the benefits of a minimally invasive approach are achieved without compromising the long-term survival. PMID:23977458

  1. Factors controlling volatile organic compounds in dwellings in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, M; Galbally, I E; Molloy, S B; Selleck, P W; Keywood, M D; Lawson, S J; Powell, J C; Gillett, R W; Dunne, E

    2016-04-01

    This study characterized indoor volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and investigated the effects of the dwelling characteristics, building materials, occupant activities, and environmental conditions on indoor VOC concentrations in 40 dwellings located in Melbourne, Australia, in 2008 and 2009. A total of 97 VOCs were identified. Nine VOCs, n-butane, 2-methylbutane, toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, d-limonene, ethanol, 2-propanol, and acetic acid, accounted for 68% of the sum of all VOCs. The median indoor concentrations of all VOCs were greater than those measured outdoors. The occupant density was positively associated with indoor VOC concentrations via occupant activities, including respiration and combustion. Terpenes were associated with the use of household cleaning and laundry products. A petroleum-like indoor VOC signature of alkanes and aromatics was associated with the proximity of major roads. The indoor VOC concentrations were negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with ventilation. Levels of VOCs in these Australian dwellings were lower than those from previous studies in North America and Europe, probably due to a combination of an ongoing temporal decrease in indoor VOC concentrations and the leakier nature of Australian dwellings. PMID:25788118

  2. On the causes of variability in amounts of airborne grass pollen in Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Morton, Julian; Bye, John; Pezza, Alexandre; Newbigin, Edward

    2011-07-01

    In Melbourne, Australia, airborne grass pollen is the predominant cause of hay fever (seasonal rhinitis) during late spring and early summer, with levels of airborne grass pollen also influencing hospital admissions for asthma. In order to improve predictions of conditions that are potentially hazardous to susceptible individuals, we have sought to better understand the causes of diurnal, intra-seasonal and inter-seasonal variability of atmospheric grass pollen concentrations (APC) by analysing grass pollen count data for Melbourne for 16 grass pollen seasons from 1991 to 2008 (except 1994 and 1995). Some of notable features identified in this analysis were that on days when either extreme (>100 pollen grains m-3) or high (50-100 pollen grains m-3) levels of grass pollen were recorded the winds were of continental origin. In contrast, on days with a low (<20 pollen grains m-3) concentration of grass pollen, winds were of maritime origin. On extreme and high grass pollen days, a peak in APC occurred on average around 1730 hours, probably due to a reduction in surface boundary layer turbulence. The sum of daily APC for each grass pollen season was highly correlated ( r = 0.79) with spring rainfall in Melbourne for that year, with about 60% of a declining linear trend across the study period being attributable to a reduction of meat cattle and sheep (and hence grazing land) in rural areas around Melbourne. Finally, all of the ten extreme pollen events (3 days or more with APC > 100 pollen grains m-3) during the study period were characterised by an average downward vertical wind anomaly in the surface boundary layer over Melbourne. Together these findings form a basis for a fine resolution atmospheric general circulation model for grass pollen in Melbourne's air that can be used to predict daily (and hourly) APC. This information will be useful to those sectors of Melbourne's population that suffer from allergic problems.

  3. Stratigraphy, geochronology and evolution of the Mt. Melbourne volcanic field (North Victoria Land, Antarctica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, Guido; Lucci, Federico; Phillips, David; Cozzupoli, Domenico; Runci, Valentina

    2012-11-01

    Mt. Melbourne (2,732 m a.s.l.) is a large quiescent stratovolcano located in Northern Victoria Land (Antarctica) and is one of a handful of volcanoes on the Antarctic plate with the potential for large-scale explosive eruptions. During the XVIII Italian Expedition in 2002-2003, the Mt. Melbourne volcanic succession was studied in terms of stratigraphy and sampled for 40Ar/39Ar age determinations and geochemistry. The early, Lower Pleistocene, volcanism was largely alkali basaltic to hawaiitic in composition and monogenetic in style, producing tens of small scoria cones and lava flows scattered over a wide area across the Transantarctic Mountains (Random Hills Period). During the Middle Pleistocene, volcanic activity focused to the area of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano, where several monogenetic centres show the transition from early sub-glacial/subaqueous conditions to emergent subaerial conditions (Shield Nunatak Period). The oldest exposed deposit associated with the early activity of the Mt. Melbourne stratovolcano (Mt. Melbourne Period) is a trachytic subaerial ignimbrite dated at 123.6 ± 6.0 ka, which reflects the establishment of a crustal magma chamber. Above the ignimbrite a succession of alkali basaltic, hawaiitic, and subordinate benmoreitic lavas and scoria cones is exposed, dated at 90.7 ± 19.0 ka. The Holocene deposits are exposed at the top of Mt. Melbourne, where the crater rim is composed of trachytic to rhyolitic pumice fall deposits, which are also extensively dispersed around the volcano, likely originated from Plinian-scale eruptions. The most recent explosive deposit proved difficult to date accurately because very low quantities of radiogenic 40Ar were released, resulting in imprecise plateau ages of 50 ± 70 and 35 ± 22 ka.

  4. Engaging Staff Communities in a Knowledge Transfer Strategy: A Case Study at the University of Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwill, Robyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the strategic journey undertaken between 2005 and 2010, this paper seeks to examine how the University of Melbourne sought to differentiate itself through the introduction and reconceptualisation of a "third stream" of academic work. Specifically, this paper seeks to investigate, through qualitative methods, how those in…

  5. Student Learning Centre (SLC) Embraces the New Melbourne Model of Teaching: Facilitating Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    Learning is about discovery and change. As schools and universities look to the future, it is fundamental that they provide environments that facilitate collaborative learning and act as points for interaction and social activity. The redevelopment of the existing Engineering Library into a Student Learning Centre (SLC) embraces the new Melbourne…

  6. Study on the Validity and Reliability of Melbourne Decision Making Scale in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çolakkadioglu, Oguzhan; Deniz, M. Engin

    2015-01-01

    This study is to analyze the validity and reliability of Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ). The sample consisted of 650 university students. The structural validity of the MDMQ, as well as correlations among its sub-scales, measure-bound validity, internal consistency, item total correlations and test-retest reliability coefficients…

  7. Engaging Staff Communities in a Knowledge Transfer Strategy: A Case Study at the University of Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwill, Robyn J.

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of the strategic journey undertaken between 2005 and 2010, this paper seeks to examine how the University of Melbourne sought to differentiate itself through the introduction and reconceptualisation of a "third stream" of academic work. Specifically, this paper seeks to investigate, through qualitative methods, how those in…

  8. The Japanese Language Development of Children through the "One Parent-One Language" Approach in Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeuchi, Masae

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the process of Japanese language maintenance or shift among children who were exposed to Japanese and English through the "one parent-one language" approach in Melbourne. The aim was to identify factors that correlate with successful and unsuccessful cases of Japanese language maintenance of such children. The data were based…

  9. Competing frameworks in planning for the aged in the growth corridors of Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Ozanne, Elizabeth; Biggs, Simon; Kurowski, William

    2014-01-01

    The Ageing in the Growth Corridors Project was initiated as a partnership between the University of Melbourne and the Department of Health in the Northwest Metropolitan Region of Melbourne, Australia. It involved a research team working with six project officers appointed to stimulate development in relation to an aging population in the sprawling outer metropolitan growth corridors. This article identifies the key lessons learned in terms of project implementation relating to attitudinal and structural barriers to the development of an age-friendly environment in areas of rapid urban growth. The findings illustrate some of the dilemmas raised by competing program conceptions, a dynamic and changing federal/state policy context, and local resource and strategic management constraints. The partnership with the university, nevertheless, provided a point of stability and continuity for the project officers in implementing their mandate. PMID:24224881

  10. An analysis of associations between social class and ambient magnetic fields in metropolitan Melbourne

    SciTech Connect

    Salzberg, M.R.; Farish, S.J.; Delpizzo, V. )

    1992-01-01

    In the course of a study on residential magnetic-field exposure, some incidental data were obtained that bear on the issue of confounding of magnetic field exposure by social class. We have explored the possibility that the magnetic flux density of 50 Hz fields measured in Melbourne streets is correlated with a number of variables that index the socio-economic status of the neighborhood. We have examined also for a correlation between field-intensity levels and sums of some or all of the indicators, which were weighted to provide an overall score on socio-economic status. Although some of the indexes were weakly, but significantly, correlated with environmental levels of magnetic fields, the combined indices were not. These results indicate that socio-economic status is not likely to be a confounder in epidemiological studies of residential exposure to ELF magnetic fields in Melbourne.

  11. The availability of snack food displays that may trigger impulse purchases in Melbourne supermarkets

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Supermarkets play a major role in influencing the food purchasing behaviours of most households. Snack food exposures within these stores may contribute to higher levels of consumption and ultimately to increasing levels of obesity, particularly within socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. We aimed to examine the availability of snack food displays at checkouts, end-of-aisle displays and island displays in major supermarket chains in the least and most socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods of Melbourne. Methods Within-store audits of 35 Melbourne supermarkets. Supermarkets were sampled from the least and most socioeconomically disadvantaged suburbs within 30 km of the Melbourne CBD. We measured the availability of crisps, chocolate, confectionery, and soft drinks (diet and regular) at the checkouts, in end-of-aisle displays, and in island bin displays. Results Snack food displays were most prominent at checkouts with only five stores not having snack foods at 100% of their checkouts. Snack foods were also present at a number of end-of-aisle displays (at both the front (median 38%) and back (median 33%) of store), and in island bin displays (median number of island displays: 7; median total circumference of island displays: 19.4 metres). Chocolate items were the most common snack food item on display. There was no difference in the availability of these snack food displays by neighbourhood disadvantage. Conclusions As a result of the high availability of snack food displays, exposure to snack foods is almost unavoidable in Melbourne supermarkets, regardless of levels of neighbourhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Results of this study could promote awareness of the prominence of unhealthy food items in chain-brand supermarkets outlets. PMID:22420759

  12. Role of public transport in accessibility to emergency dental care in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Carla M; Kruger, Estie; McGuire, Shane; Tennant, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method for the analysis of the influence of public transport supply in a large city (Melbourne) on the access to emergency dental treatment. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools were used to associate the geographical distribution of patients (and their socioeconomic status) with accessibility (through public transport supply, i.e. bus, tram and/or train) to emergency dental care. The methodology used allowed analysis of the socioeconomic status of patient residential areas and both spatial location and supply frequency of public transport by using existing data from patient records, census and transport departments. In metropolitan Melbourne, a total of 13 784 patients met the inclusion criteria for the study sample, of which 95% (n = 13 077) were living within a 50 km radius of the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne. Low socioeconomic areas had a higher demand for dental emergency care in the Royal Dental Hospital of Melbourne. Public transport supply was similar across the various socioeconomic strata in the population, with 80% of patients having good access to public transport. However, when considering only high-frequency bus stops, the percentage of patients living within 400 m from a bus stop dropped to 65%. Despite this, the number of patients (adjusted to the population) coming from areas not supplied by public transport, and from areas with good or poor public transport supply, was similar. The methodology applied in the present study highlights the importance of evaluating not only the spatial distribution but also the frequency of public transport supply when studying access to services. This methodology can be extrapolated to other settings to identity transport/access patterns for a variety of services. PMID:26509207

  13. The enabling institutional context for integrated water management: lessons from Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Briony C; Brown, Rebekah R; Frantzeskaki, Niki; de Haan, Fjalar J; Deletic, Ana

    2013-12-15

    There is widespread international acceptance that climate change, demographic shifts and resource limitations impact on the performance of water servicing in cities. In response to these challenges, many scholars propose that a fundamental move away from traditional centralised infrastructure towards more integrated water management is required. However, there is limited practical or scholarly understanding of how to enable this change in practice and few modern cities have done so successfully. This paper addresses this gap by analysing empirical evidence of Melbourne's recent experience in shifting towards a hybrid of centralised and decentralised infrastructure to draw lessons about the institutional context that enabled this shift. The research was based on a qualitative single-case study, involving interviews and envisioning workshops with urban water practitioners who have been directly involved in Melbourne's water system changes. It was found that significant changes occurred in the cultural-cognitive, normative and regulative dimensions of Melbourne's water system. These included a shift in cultural beliefs for the water profession, new knowledge through evidence and learning, additional water servicing goals and priorities, political leadership, community pressure, better coordinated governance arrangements and strong market mechanisms. The paper synthesises lessons from the case study that, with further development, could form the basis of prescriptive guidance for enabling the shift to new modes of water servicing to support more liveable, sustainable and resilient outcomes for future cities. PMID:24148920

  14. Forest Fire Smoke Exposures and Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests in Melbourne, Australia: A Case-Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Straney, Lahn D.; Erbas, Bircan; Abramson, Michael J.; Keywood, Melita; Smith, Karen; Sim, Malcolm R.; Glass, Deborah C.; Del Monaco, Anthony; Haikerwal, Anjali; Tonkin, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Millions of people can potentially be exposed to smoke from forest fires, making this an important public health problem in many countries. Objective In this study we aimed to measure the association between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) and forest fire smoke exposures in a large city during a severe forest fire season, and estimate the number of excess OHCAs due to the fire smoke. Methods We investigated the association between particulate matter (PM) and other air pollutants and OHCA using a case-crossover study of adults (? 35 years of age) in Melbourne, Australia. Conditional logistic regression models were used to derive estimates of the percent change in the rate of OHCA associated with an interquartile range (IQR) increase in exposure. From July 2006 through June 2007, OHCA data were collected from the Victorian Ambulance Cardiac Arrest Registry. Hourly air pollution concentrations and meteorological data were obtained from a central monitoring site. Results There were 2,046 OHCAs with presumed cardiac etiology during our study period. Among men during the fire season, greater increases in OHCA were observed with IQR increases in the 48-hr lagged PM with diameter ? 2.5 ?m (PM2.5) (8.05%; 95% CI: 2.30, 14.13%; IQR = 6.1 ?g/m3) or ? 10 ?m (PM10) (11.1%; 95% CI: 1.55, 21.48%; IQR = 13.7 ?g/m3) and carbon monoxide (35.7%; 95% CI: 8.98, 68.92%; IQR = 0.3 ppm). There was no significant association between the rate of OHCA and air pollutants among women. One hundred seventy-four “fire-hours” (i.e., hours in which Melbourne’s air quality was affected by forest fire smoke) were identified during 12 days of the 2006/2007 fire season, and 23.9 (95% CI: 3.1, 40.2) excess OHCAs were estimated to occur due to elevations in PM2.5 during these fire-hours. Conclusions This study found an association between exposure to forest fire smoke and an increase in the rate of OHCA. These findings have implications for public health messages to raise community awareness and for planning of emergency services during forest fire seasons. Citation Dennekamp M, Straney LD, Erbas B, Abramson MJ, Keywood M, Smith K, Sim MR, Glass DC, Del Monaco A, Haikerwal A, Tonkin AM. 2015. Forest fire smoke exposures and out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in Melbourne, Australia: a case-crossover study. Environ Health Perspect 123:959–964;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408436 PMID:25794411

  15. Measuring food access in Melbourne: access to healthy and fast foods by car, bus and foot in an urban municipality in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Burns, C M; Inglis, A D

    2007-12-01

    Access to healthy food can be an important determinant of a healthy diet. This paper describes the assessment of access to healthy and unhealthy foods using a GIS accessibility programme in a large outer municipality of Melbourne. Access to a major supermarket was used as a proxy for access to a healthy diet and fast food outlet as proxy for access to unhealthy food. Our results indicated that most (>80%) residents lived within an 8-10 min car journey of a major supermarket i.e. have good access to a healthy diet. However, more advantaged areas had closer access to supermarkets, conversely less advantaged areas had closer access to fast food outlets. These findings have application for urban planners, public health practitioners and policy makers. PMID:17470408

  16. Sexual Health Knowledge and Needs: Young Muslim Women in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Meldrum, Rebecca M; Liamputtong, Pranee; Wollersheim, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the sexual health knowledge and needs among young Muslim women living in Melbourne, Australia. Eleven young Muslim women were individually interviewed about issues relating to sexual health knowledge and needs, access to sexual health services, and their experiences of balancing their lives in relation to sexual health. Findings revealed a marked influence of religion and culture on sexual health of young Muslim women. They often faced challenges balancing Muslim culture, Australian culture, and Islamic religion. Our findings have implications for health services in a multicultural society. They could be used to promote culturally sensitive sexual health services for young Muslim women in Australia and elsewhere. PMID:26536914

  17. Counterpublic health and the design of drug services for methamphetamine consumers in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Duff, Cameron; Moore, David

    2015-01-01

    This article is interested in how notions of the 'public' are conceived, marshalled and enacted in drug-treatment responses to methamphetamine use in Melbourne, Australia. After reviewing qualitative data collected among health-care providers and methamphetamine consumers, we draw on the work of Michael Warner to argue that services for methamphetamine consumers in Melbourne betray ongoing tensions between 'public' and 'counterpublic' constituencies. Our analysis indicates that these tensions manifest in two ways: in the management of 'street business' in the delivery of services and in negotiating the meaning of health and the terms of its restoration or promotion. Reflecting these tensions, while the design of services for methamphetamine consumers is largely modelled on public health principles, the everyday experience of these services may be more accurately characterised in terms of what Kane Race has called 'counterpublic health'. Extending Race's analysis, we conclude that more explicit focus on the idea of counterpublic health may help local services engage with methamphetamine consumers in new ways, providing grounds for novel outreach, harm-reduction and treatment strategies. PMID:24948593

  18. Impact of Interdecadal Hydroclimatic Variability on the Management of Water Supply for Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiew, F. H.; Rhodes, B.; Peel, M. C.; Amirthanathan, G. E.

    2004-12-01

    This paper presents the implications of interdecadal hydroclimatic variability on the management of Melbourne's water supply system. Melbourne is the second largest city in Australia with a population of over three million. Streamflow and reservoir inflow data from seven water supply catchments and rainfall data from 18 stations are used in this study. The empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is used to identify cycles in the long rainfall and flow time series. The EMD analysis is also applied to bootstrap samples from the original time series to test the statistical significance of the identified cycles. In EMD analysis, a time series is decomposed into a set of intrinsic mode functions that are mutually independent. The decomposition is based on the direct extraction of energy (variance) associated with various intrinsic time scales that are automatically and adaptively selected from the time series. The EMD is a relatively new technique that is able to deal with both non-linear and non-stationary data, and has several advantages over other spectral analysis techniques. The EMD analyses of data from Melbourne's water supply catchments show statistically significant interdecadal cycles in many, but not all, of the time series data. The study also shows that the rainfall, runoff and storage characteristics are different in different interdecadal periods. The region is considerably wetter, with the storages spilling more often (or less drawn down) during the negative IPO phase compared to the positive IPO phase. The El Niño/Southern Oscillation versus hydroclimate teleconnection is also stronger during the negative IPO phase. The Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO) represents a low frequency ocean-atmosphere fluctuation in the Pacific region. However, the wet and dry cycles in the rainfall and flow data, and the cycles identified in the EMD analysis, are not necessarily in phase with the IPO periods. Nevertheless, although natural cycles are evident in the historical data, their future characteristics are difficult to predict. In addition, the future hydroclimatic characteristics are likely to be modified by global warming. This paper will discuss the implications of interdecadal hydroclimatic variability and climate change on the concept of reliability/security of water supply and the management of water resources.

  19. The Early Years: Embracing the Challenges. 1997 Early Years of Schooling Conference Proceedings (Melbourne, Australia, July 20-21, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Victoria Education Dept. (Australia).

    These conference proceedings comprise 19 papers and the plenary session presented at the Early Years Schooling Conference held in Melbourne, Australia. The plenary session was "A Developmental Approach to Teaching Young Children" conducted by Lilian Katz. The keynote addresses and breakout sessions were: (1) "Developmental Learning: How to Learn"…

  20. Students Working in the Melbourne Sex Industry: Education, Human Capital and the Changing Patterns of the Youth Labour Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lantz, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    Students in Australia are entering the sex industry as a pragmatic response to increasing education costs and a reduction in government income support. This paper examines the lived experiences of a group of 40 young women, all post-secondary education students, working in the Melbourne sex industry. Their experiences suggest that while the…

  1. "Why Has It Only become an Issue Now?": Young Drug Users' Perceptions of Drug Driving in Melbourne, Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laura Ann; Wilson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary research into drug-user perceptions of drug driving was undertaken with a sample group of drug users aged 18 to 24 from Melbourne, Victoria. Eleven males and nine females participated in semi-structured interviews and completed self-report surveys. Participants discussed their drug driving and their perceptions of the likelihood of…

  2. Educational Concerns of Arabic Speaking Migrants from Sudan and Iraq to Melbourne: Expectations on Migrant Parents in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sainsbury, W. J.; Renzaho, A. M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Families immigrating to Australia face many challenges integrating into the educational system, including language barriers and interrupted schooling. We have qualitatively evaluated the educational concerns of Arabic migrants from Sudan and Iraq to Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, a city that receives a high percentage of Australia's immigrants.…

  3. Ruth Flockart and Dr Wood: A Crucial Relationship in the Development of Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College Music Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Louise

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the notion that particular working relationships within school music programs can have a significant affect on the program's development and progress. To explore this notion the research focussed on the working relationship of a music teacher at Melbourne Methodist Ladies' College (MLC), Ruth Flockart (1891-1985) and the…

  4. "Why Has It Only become an Issue Now?": Young Drug Users' Perceptions of Drug Driving in Melbourne, Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laura Ann; Wilson, Dean

    2010-01-01

    Preliminary research into drug-user perceptions of drug driving was undertaken with a sample group of drug users aged 18 to 24 from Melbourne, Victoria. Eleven males and nine females participated in semi-structured interviews and completed self-report surveys. Participants discussed their drug driving and their perceptions of the likelihood of…

  5. Educational Concerns of Arabic Speaking Migrants from Sudan and Iraq to Melbourne: Expectations on Migrant Parents in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sainsbury, W. J.; Renzaho, A. M. N.

    2011-01-01

    Families immigrating to Australia face many challenges integrating into the educational system, including language barriers and interrupted schooling. We have qualitatively evaluated the educational concerns of Arabic migrants from Sudan and Iraq to Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, a city that receives a high percentage of Australia's immigrants.…

  6. The Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, type 2 diabetes (T2DM) prevalence has more than doubled over two decades. In Australia, diabetes is the second highest contributor to the burden of disease. Lifestyle modification programs comprising diet changes, weight loss and moderate physical activity, have been proven to reduce the incidence of T2DM in high risk individuals. As part of the Council of Australia Governments, the State of Victoria committed to develop and support the diabetes prevention program ‘Life! Taking action on diabetes’ (Life!) which has direct lineage from effective clinical and implementation trials from Finland and Australia. The Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS) has been set up to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a specific version of the Life! program. Methods/design We intend to recruit 796 participants for this open randomized clinical trial; 398 will be allocated to the intervention arm and 398 to the usual care arm. Several methods of recruitment will be used in order to maximize the number of participants. Individuals aged 50 to 75 years will be screened with a risk tool (AUSDRISK) to detect those at high risk of developing T2DM. Those with existing diabetes will be excluded. Intervention participants will undergo anthropometric and laboratory tests, and comprehensive surveys at baseline, following the fourth group session (approximately three months after the commencement of the intervention) and 12 months after commencement of the intervention, while control participants will undergo testing at baseline and 12 months only. The intervention consists of an initial individual session followed by a series of five structured-group sessions. The first four group sessions will be carried out at two week intervals and the fifth session will occur eight months after the first group session. The intervention is based on the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA) model and sessions will empower and enable the participants to follow the five goals of the Life! program. Discussion This study will determine whether the effect of this intervention is larger than the effect of usual care in reducing central obesity and cardiovascular risk factors and thus the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Also it will evaluate how these two options compare economically. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000507280 PMID:23369724

  7. 3D calculation of Tucson-Melbourne 3NF effect in triton binding energy

    SciTech Connect

    Hadizadeh, M. R.; Tomio, L.; Bayegan, S.

    2010-08-04

    As an application of the new realistic three-dimensional (3D) formalism reported recently for three-nucleon (3N) bound states, an attempt is made to study the effect of three-nucleon forces (3NFs) in triton binding energy in a non partial wave (PW) approach. The spin-isospin dependent 3N Faddeev integral equations with the inclusion of 3NFs, which are formulated as function of vector Jacobi momenta, specifically the magnitudes of the momenta and the angle between them, are solved with Bonn-B and Tucson-Melbourne NN and 3N forces in operator forms which can be incorporated in our 3D formalism. The comparison with numerical results in both, novel 3D and standard PW schemes, shows that non PW calculations avoid the very involved angular momentum algebra occurring for the permutations and transformations and it is more efficient and less cumbersome for considering the 3NF.

  8. The incidence and characteristics of volatile substance use related ambulance attendances in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Cvetkovski, Stefan; Dietze, Paul

    2008-02-01

    While there has been substantial community discussion and concern expressed about volatile substance use (VSU), there has been little research on the use and related harms of these substances compared to other drugs. In this study we address a need in existing epidemiological research on VSU harms by describing the incidence and characteristics of VSU ambulance attendances between August 1998 and May 2004 across metropolitan Melbourne relative to heroin attendances, a drug class that has received more research attention. Our analysis showed that the crude rate of VSU attendance (5.03 per 100,000 population) over the period was substantially lower than the rates of heroin "involved" and heroin "overdose" attendances (33.40 and 54.87 per 100,000, respectively). Mean age of VSU cases was 20, with users on average 8 years younger than heroin cases. Two-thirds of VSU cases were male, with the likelihood of male attendance similar to heroin involved, but significantly less likely than heroin overdose. VSU attendances were geographically more evenly distributed than heroin attendances, with VSU cases more likely to occur at public and outdoor spaces. VSU cases were also less likely to be in an altered conscious state than heroin cases, but more likely to be co-attended by police and accept transportation to hospital. We conclude that VSU and heroin related harms occurred in different cohorts across metropolitan Melbourne, and that ambulance data can supplement existing data sources to inform policy and programme development, and the monitoring of VSU harms. PMID:18023515

  9. Investigating the sensitivity of ozone to changes in meteorology using hierarchical statistical modelling in Melbourne, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, J.; Walsh, S.; Utiola, P.; Beringer, J.

    2009-04-01

    Introduction: The magnitude in which climate change will influence regional air quality will depend largely on the resulting impacts on local meteorological conditions. Additionally, changing patterns of atmospheric circulation at the hemispheric to global level are likely to be just as important as regional patterns for future local air quality. In order to assess these likely impacts air quality managers must first understand the current impacts of meteorological regimes on local air quality. Methods: First, meteorological observations and air pollutant monitoring data from the Port Phillip Bay monitoring network were obtained for the period of 1997-2001from EPA Victoria and the Bureau of Meteorology. Second, a synoptic climatology of continental circulation patterns over Australia were classified into ‘types' by applying a neural networking algorithm known as self-organizing maps (SOM) on ERA-40 reanalysis fields. Third, a hierarchical model was used to assess the influence of meteorological conditions on monitored air pollutant concentrations. Results: General linear modelling with backward selection yielded temperature (t=4.38, p<0.001), relative humidity (t=-3.03, p=0.003), wind speed (t=5.72, p<0.001), and synoptic type as significant predictors for log O3, with a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.337. Log O3 increases with increasing temperature and wind speed. Log O3 decreases with increasing relative humidity. Relationships with synoptic patterns show that log O3 increases when high pressure systems are to the east of Melbourne. Discussion: Local variations seem to be influenced, to varying degrees, by synoptic-scale conditions, temperature, relative humidity, and wind-speed. Further analysis is necessary to incorporate the spatio-temporal components of the data. Conclusion: Combining ERA-40, regional meteorological data and hierarchical statistical methods proved to be a complementary suite of tools for investigating the meteorological sensitivity of ozone in Melbourne, Australia. This analysis is crucial a step in preparing for the impacts of climate change on regional air quality.

  10. Accessing maternal and child health services in Melbourne, Australia: Reflections from refugee families and service providers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Often new arrivals from refugee backgrounds have experienced poor health and limited access to healthcare services. The maternal and child health (MCH) service in Victoria, Australia, is a joint local and state government operated, cost-free service available to all mothers of children aged 0–6 years. Although well-child healthcare visits are useful in identifying health issues early, there has been limited investigation in the use of these services for families from refugee backgrounds. This study aims to explore experiences of using MCH services, from the perspective of families from refugee backgrounds and service providers. Methods We used a qualitative study design informed by the socioecological model of health and a cultural competence approach. Two geographical areas of Melbourne were selected to invite participants. Seven focus groups were conducted with 87 mothers from Karen, Iraqi, Assyrian Chaldean, Lebanese, South Sudanese and Bhutanese backgrounds, who had lived an average of 4.7 years in Australia (range one month-18 years). Participants had a total of 249 children, of these 150 were born in Australia. Four focus groups and five interviews were conducted with MCH nurses, other healthcare providers and bicultural workers. Results Four themes were identified: facilitating access to MCH services; promoting continued engagement with the MCH service; language challenges; and what is working well and could be done better. Several processes were identified that facilitated initial access to the MCH service but there were implications for continued use of the service. The MCH service was not formally notified of new parents arriving with young children. Pre-arranged group appointments by MCH nurses for parents who attended playgroups worked well to increase ongoing service engagement. Barriers for parents in using MCH services included access to transportation, lack of confidence in speaking English and making phone bookings. Service users and providers reported that continuity of nurse and interpreter is preferred for increasing client-provider trust and ongoing engagement. Conclusions Although participants who had children born in Melbourne had good initial access to, and experience of, using MCH services, significant barriers remain. A systems-oriented, culturally competent approach to service provision would improve the service utilisation experience for parents and providers, including formalising links and notifications between settlement services and MCH services. PMID:22587587

  11. Domestic residence to multi-storey building. The lived experience of hospital grounds in Melbourne before World War II.

    PubMed

    Bourke, Anne

    2012-09-01

    Hospital grounds in Melbourne, Australia, before World War I resembled imposing residential sites with grand mansions surrounded by shrubberies, circular drives and tennis courts. By World War II hospitals had become multi-storey buildings surrounded by car parks and grass. Although there have been numerous studies that link the changing built environment of hospitals to social, medical and architectural narratives, there has been little emphasis on the impact of these changes on the experience of the hospital as a place, and its identity as an institution. The broader meanings for staff and patients are not explored. This paper then investigates the outdoor grounds of hospitals as places before World War II in Melbourne, Australia. This analysis illuminates a hitherto neglected aspect of hospital history that not only enriches an understanding of this period but provides insights into the role of outdoor grounds that has implications for twenty-first century hospitals. PMID:22796371

  12. International Intercomparison of Solar UVR Spectral Measurement Systems in Melbourne in 2013.

    PubMed

    Gies, Peter; Hooke, Rebecca; McKenzie, Richard; O'Hagan, John; Henderson, Stuart; Pearson, Andy; Khazova, Marina; Javorniczky, John; King, Kerryn; Tully, Matt; Kotkamp, Michael; Forgan, Bruce; Rhodes, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring ambient solar UVR levels provides information on how much there is in both real time and historically. Quality assurance of ambient measurements of solar UVR is critical to ensuring accuracy and stability and this can be achieved by regular intercomparisons of spectral measurement systems with those of other organizations. In October and November of 2013 a solar UVR spectroradiometer from Public Health England (PHE) was brought to Melbourne for a campaign of intercomparisons with a new Bentham spectrometer of Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) and one at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BOM), supported by New Zealand's National Institute for Water and Atmosphere (NIWA). Given all three spectroradiometers have calibrations that are traceable to various national standards, the intercomparison provides a chance to determine measurement uncertainties and traceability that support UV measurement networks in Australia, New Zealand and the UK. UV Index measurements from all three systems were compared and ratios determined for clear sky conditions when the scans from each instrument were within 2 min of each other. While wavelengths below 305 nm showed substantial differences between the PHE unit and the two other systems, overall the intercomparison results were encouraging, with mean differences in measured UV Index between the BOM/NIWA and those of PHE and ARPANSA of <0.1% and 7.5%, respectively. PMID:26147793

  13. Musculoskeletal injuries in the ultramarathon: the 1990 Westfield Sydney to Melbourne run.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, K E

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To document the injuries sustained by participants in a 1005 km ultramarathon. METHODS: Clinical notes were reviewed on entrants in the 1005 km Sydney to Melbourne ultramarathon. An injury was recorded following self referral by a participant or if the history obtained from the runner or his support crew indicated the likelihood of a significant injury which could have an impact upon performance. RESULTS: 64 injuries were found in 32 runners. The knee (31.3%) and ankle (28.1%) regions were most commonly injured. The most common single diagnosis was retropatellar pain syndrome, and Achilles tendinitis and medial tibial stress syndrome were the next most common injuries. Peritendinitis/tendinitis of the tendons passing under the extensor retinaculum at the ankle, an injury infrequently reported in other sports, was common (19% of all injuries). CONCLUSIONS: The injuries were typically associated with running but 12 (19% of the total) involved the tendons of the muscles of the anterior compartment of the lower leg, and in almost every case the major site of inflammation was at the extensor retinaculum at the anterior aspect of the ankle. This injury appears to be relatively specific to the ultramarathon-"ultramarathoner's ankle". Images p321-a PMID:9015594

  14. Reaching out to Ray: delivering palliative care services to a homeless person in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    MacWilliams, Judy; Bramwell, Michael; Brown, Sally; O'Connor, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Most terminally ill people express a preference for dying at home. Within established models of palliative care, achieving death at home is a particular challenge for homeless people. This paper describes a quality-improvement project undertaken by a community-based palliative care service in Melbourne, Australia, to understand homeless people's palliative care needs and the challenges that workers face. Six semi-structured interviews with workers in hospital and community-based settings were undertaken and a case study documented. The results were used to initiate discussion about how policy and protocols for the community-based palliative care service might serve this population more effectively. The findings confirmed that homeless people have complex psychosocial and medical needs. They may be periodically uncontactable or living in unsafe settings, experience isolation from social support networks, and have issues of compliance with treatment protocols exacerbated by mental health problems and/or substance abuse. Service providers had particular challenges in meeting the palliative care needs of homeless people. A flexible, compassionate, and coordinated response is required, and more work is needed to explore how the needs of this particular group can be met. PMID:24577214

  15. The Melbourne Assessment of Schizotypy in Kids: A Useful Measure of Childhood Schizotypal Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Harvey P.; Testa, Renee R.; Ross, Nola; Seal, Marc L.; Tonge, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Despite being identified as a high risk cohort for psychosis, there has been relatively little research on the clinical presentation and assessment of Schizotypal Personality Disorder (SPD) in childhood. The current study aimed to develop a measure of childhood SPD (Melbourne Assessment of Schizotypy in Kids (MASK)) and assess discriminant validity against another neurodevelopmental disorder, autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sixty-eight children aged between 5 and 12 (21 SPD, 15 ASD, and 32 typically developing) and their parents were administered the MASK. The MASK is a 57-item semistructured interview that obtains information from the child, their parents, and the clinician. The results showed high internal consistency for the MASK and higher scores in the SPD group. A factor analysis revealed two MASK factors: social/pragmatic symptoms and positive schizotypal symptoms. Both factors were associated with SPD, while only the social/pragmatic factor was associated with ASD. Within the two clinical groups, a receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the MASK (cut-off score: 132 out of 228) was a good indicator of SPD diagnosis. These preliminary MASK findings were reliable and consistent and suggest that childhood SPD is characterised by complex symptomology distinguishable from ASD. PMID:25629050

  16. Early childhood predictors of toddlers’ physical activity: longitudinal findings from the Melbourne InFANT Program

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Young children are at risk of not meeting physical activity recommendations. Identifying factors from the first year of life which influence toddlers’ physical activity levels may help to develop targeted intervention strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine early childhood predictors of toddlers’ physical activity across the domains of maternal beliefs and behaviours, infant behaviours and the home environment. Methods Data from 206 toddlers (53% male) participating in the Melbourne InFANT Program were collected in 2008–2010 and analysed in 2012. Mothers completed a survey of physical activity predictors when their child was 4- (T1) and 9- months old (T2). Physical activity was assessed by ActiGraph GT1M accelerometers at 19- months (T3) of age. Results One infant behaviour at T1 and one maternal belief and two infant behaviours at T2 showed associations with physical activity at T3 and were included in multivariate analyses. After adjusting for the age at which the child started walking and maternal education, the time spent with babies of a similar age at 4-months (??=?0.06, 95% CI [0.02, 0.10]) and the time spent being physically active with their mother at 9-months (??=?0.06, 95% CI [0.01, 0.12]) predicted children’s physical activity at 19-months of age. Conclusions Promotion of peer-interactions and maternal-child co-participation in physical activity could serve as a health promotion strategy to increase physical activity in young children. Future research is required to identify other early life predictors not assessed in this study and to examine whether these factors predict physical activity in later life stages. PMID:24188589

  17. Demographic, seasonal, and spatial differences in acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital in Melbourne Australia

    PubMed Central

    Loughnan, Margaret E; Nicholls, Neville; Tapper, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    Background Seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the northern hemisphere are well described in the literature. More recently age and gender differences in cardiac mortality and to a lesser extent morbidity have been presented. To date spatial differences between the seasonal patterns of cardiac disease has not been presented. Literature relating to seasonal patterns in cardiac disease in the southern hemisphere and in Australia in particular is scarce. The aim of this paper is to describe the seasonal, age, gender, and spatial patterns of cardiac disease in Melbourne Australia by using acute myocardial infarction admissions to hospital as a marker of cardiac disease. Results There were 33,165 Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) admissions over 2186 consecutive days. There is a seasonal pattern in AMI admissions with increased rates during the colder months. The peak month is July. The admissions rate is greater for males than for females, although this difference decreases with advancing age. The maximal AMI season for males extends from April to November. The difference between months of peak and minimum admissions was 33.7%. Increased female AMI admissions occur from May to November, with a variation between peak and minimum of 23.1%. Maps of seasonal AMI admissions demonstrate spatial differences. Analysis using Global and Local Moran's I showed increased spatial clustering during the warmer months. The Bivariate Moran's I statistic indicated a weaker relationship between AMI and age during the warmer months. Conclusion There are two distinct seasons with increased admissions during the colder part of the year. Males present a stronger seasonal pattern than females. There are spatial differences in AMI admissions throughout the year that cannot be explained by the age structure of the population. The seasonal difference in AMI admissions warrants further investigation. This includes detailing the prevalence of cardiac disease in the community and examining issues of social and environmental justice. PMID:18664293

  18. Drug use among homeless young people in Los Angeles and Melbourne

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Doreen; Mallett, Shelley; Milburn, Norweeta; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To examine the effect of time spent homeless on young people’s substance use and use of drug and alcohol services in two countries with contrasting policy and service environments. Methods A cross-national survey was conducted of recently homeless and experienced homeless young people in Melbourne (N=674) and Los Angeles (N=620). Questions were asked about alcohol and drug use in the past three months, frequency of use, injecting drug use, drug dependency and perceived need for, and use of, drug and alcohol services. Data were analyzed using logistic regression. Results Substantial numbers of young people reported use of alcohol and drugs. More Australians than Americans and more experienced than newly homeless reported drug use, although there were no differences in frequency of use in the past three months. Polydrug use was common, as were injecting drugs and responses that signified drug dependency. All were more common among Australians and experienced homeless young people. A substantial number of young people had ‘ever’ taken part in a drug or alcohol program but only a minority believed that they needed help from services. Of these, only a minority had sought help. This was particularly so among those who were classified as drug dependent. Reasons for failure to seek help varied. Conclusion Substance use is alarmingly high compared to national samples of young people, especially among those who had been homeless for longer periods. Programs to reduce substance use must take account of the prevailing drug cultures, as well as different sub-groups of the population. PMID:18710685

  19. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden (n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  20. P-wave velocity structure beneath Mt. Melbourne in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica: Evidence of partial melting and volcanic magma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yongcheol; Yoo, Hyun Jae; Lee, Won Sang; Lee, Choon-Ki; Lee, Joohan; Park, Hadong; Kim, Jinseok; Kim, Yeadong

    2015-12-01

    Mt. Melbourne is a late Cenozoic intraplate volcano located ∼30 km northeast of Jang Bogo Station in Antarctica. The volcano is quiescent with fumarolic activity at the summit. To monitor volcanic activity and glacial movements near Jang Bogo Station, a seismic network was installed during the 2010-11 Antarctic summer field season. The network is maintained during the summer field season every year, and the number of stations has been increased. We used continuous seismic data recorded by the network and an Italian seismic station (TNV) at Mario Zucchelli Station to develop a 3-D P-wave velocity model for the Mt. Melbourne area based on the teleseismic P-wave tomographic method. The new 3-D model presented a relative velocity structure for the lower part of the crust and upper mantle between depths of 30 and 160 km and revealed the presence of two low-velocity anomalies beneath Mt. Melbourne and the Priestley Fault. The low-velocity anomaly beneath Mt. Melbourne may be caused by the edge flow of hot mantle material at the lithospheric step between the thick East Antarctic Craton and thin Ross Sea crust. The other low-velocity anomaly along the Priestley Fault may have been beneath Mt. Melbourne and moved to the southern tip of the Deep Freeze Range, where the crustal thickness is relatively thin. The anomaly was trapped on the fault line and laterally flowed along the fault line in the northwest direction.

  1. Does parkland influence walking? The relationship between area of parkland and walking trips in Melbourne, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Using two different measures of park area, at three buffer distances, we sought to investigate the ways in which park area and proximity to parks, are related to the frequency of walking (for all purposes) in Australian adults. Little previous research has been conducted in this area, and results of existing research have been mixed. Methods Residents of 50 urban areas in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia completed a physical activity survey (n = 2305). Respondents reported how often they walked for ≥10 minutes in the previous month. Walking frequency was dichotomised to ‘less than weekly’ (less than 1/week) and ‘at least weekly’ (1/week or more). Using Geographic Information Systems, Euclidean buffers were created around each respondent’s home at three distances: 400metres (m), 800 m and 1200 m. Total area of parkland in each person’s buffer was calculated for the three buffers. Additionally, total area of ‘larger parks’, (park space ≥ park with Australian Rules Football oval (17,862 m2)), was calculated for each set of buffers. Area of park was categorised into tertiles for area of all parks, and area of larger parks (the lowest tertile was used as the reference category). Multilevel logistic regression, with individuals nested within areas, was used to estimate the effect of area of parkland on walking frequency. Results No statistically significant associations were found between walking frequency and park area (total and large parks) within 400 m of respondent’s homes. For total park area within 800 m, the odds of walking at least weekly were lower for those in the mid (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.46-0.91) and highest (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.44-0.95) tertile of park area compared to those living in areas with the least amount of park area. Similar results were observed for total park area in the 1200 m buffers. When only larger parks were investigated, again more frequent walking was less likely when respondents had access to a greater amount of park area. Conclusions In this study we found that more park area in residential environments reduced the odds of walking more frequently. Other area characteristics such as street connectivity and destinations may underlie these associations by negatively correlating with park area. PMID:22989176

  2. Depression literacy among Australians of Chinese-speaking background in Melbourne, Australia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study investigated the knowledge of depression and preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods among Australians of Chinese-speaking background, and the perceptions of this population of the causes of mental illness. Methods Adopting a cluster convenience sampling method, the study recruited 200 Chinese-speaking subjects from four major areas in metropolitan Melbourne where many Chinese live. The respondents were presented with a vignette describing an individual with depression and then asked questions to assess their understanding of depression and preference for professional help, medications and treatment methods. A comparative approach was used to compare the findings with those of a previous study of the mental health literacy of Australian and Japanese adults. Results Compared to the Australian and Japanese samples, a much lower percentage of Chinese-speaking Australians (14%) could correctly identify major depression described in the vignette, and a higher percentage believed that counseling professionals could be helpful. Higher percentages of those who believed that close family members could be helpful were found in the Chinese-speaking Australian and Japanese samples, and these two groups also expressed more uncertainty about the usefulness or harmfulness of certain medications compared to the Australian sample. Higher percentages of respondents in both the Chinese-speaking Australian and the Australian sample considered "lifestyle changes" to be helpful compared to the Japanese sample. In the Chinese-speaking sample, 30%, 17.4%, 33% and 27% of the respondents rated "traditional Chinese medicine doctors," "Chinese herbal medications," "taking Chinese nutritional foods/supplements" and "qiqong" as helpful. Many perceived "changing fungshui" and "traditional Chinese worship" to be harmful. Regarding the perception of causes of mental illness, items related to psychosocial perspectives including "life stress" and "interpersonal conflict" were rated highly by the respondents, whereas traditional beliefs including "punishment for misdeeds conducted by ancestors" and "demon possession" had the lowest ratings. Conclusions Campaigns to increase the mental health literacy of Chinese-speaking Australians are needed. The abovementioned socially and culturally driven beliefs need to be taken into consideration in the development of culturally relevant education programs. PMID:20082724

  3. Film and Language Learning in Victorian Schools: A Study of the 2009 Next Gen Program of the "Melbourne International Film Festival"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Bianco, Hana

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the role of film in language education based on a study of the 2009 "Melbourne International Film Festival" (MIFF). It is structured around a literature review and results from surveys of students and teachers who participated in the young people's section of the program, Next Gen. The article argues that film can provide…

  4. A Comparison of the Motor Ability of 8 and 9 Year Old Primary School Children in Hamburg, Melbourne and Cape Town--An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmer, Jurgen; Saunders, John; Bressan, Liz; Erhorn, Jan; Wirszing, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    An increasing worldwide concern about a decline in the quality of the motor ability of children was the motivation for this exploratory comparative study. It involves a comparison of the motor ability of children aged 8 and 9 years from Hamburg (n = 774), Melbourne (n = 141) and Cape Town (n = 81). Since each of these global cities represents a…

  5. Film and Language Learning in Victorian Schools: A Study of the 2009 Next Gen Program of the "Melbourne International Film Festival"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Bianco, Hana

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the role of film in language education based on a study of the 2009 "Melbourne International Film Festival" (MIFF). It is structured around a literature review and results from surveys of students and teachers who participated in the young people's section of the program, Next Gen. The article argues that film can provide…

  6. Philosophy for Children and the Teaching of Thinking. Conference Report of the National Conference on Philosophy for Children (1st, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, July 12-16, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melbourne Univ. (Australia).

    This report presents the conference proceedings of a meeting held at Trinity College in Melbourne, Australia. An edited text of the keynote address, the question and answer session by Matthew Lipman, two symposia ("Philosophy, Society and the Environment," and "Talking and Meaning") and the speeches at the Conference Dinner are included. The…

  7. Age Related Macular Degeneration and Total Hip Replacement Due to Osteoarthritis or Fracture: Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Elaine W.; Wang, Yuanyuan; Robman, Liubov D.; Aung, Khin Zaw; Makeyeva, Galina A.; Giles, Graham G.; Graves, Stephen; Cicuttini, Flavia M.; Guymer, Robyn H.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is the leading cause of total hip replacement, accounting for more than 80% of all total hip replacements. Emerging evidence suggests that osteoarthritis has a chronic inflammatory component to its pathogenesis similar to age-related macular degeneration. We evaluated the association between age-related macular degeneration and total hip replacement as proxy for severe osteoarthritis or fractured neck of femur in the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study. 20,744 participants had complete data on both age-related macular degeneration assessed from colour fundus photographs taken during 2003–2007 and total hip replacement. Total hip replacements due to hip osteoarthritis and fractured neck of femur during 2001–2011 were identified by linking the cohort records to the Australian Orthopedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between age-related macular degeneration and risk of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis and fracture separately, adjusted for confounders. There were 791 cases of total hip replacement for osteoarthritis and 102 cases of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur. After adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, and grouped country of birth, intermediate age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement for osteoarthritis (odds ratio 1.22, 95% CI 1.00–1.49). Late age-related macular degeneration was directly associated with total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur (odds ratio 5.21, 95% CI2.25–12.02). The association between intermediate age-related macular degeneration and an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to osteoarthritis suggests the possibility of similar inflammatory processes underlying both chronic diseases. The association of late age-related macular degeneration with an increased 10-year incidence of total hip replacement due to fractured neck of femur may be due to an increased prevalence of fractures in those with poor central vision associated with the late complications of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26355683

  8. Patterns and characteristics of ambulance attendance at heroin overdose at a local-area level in Melbourne, Australia: implications for service provision.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Paul; Jolley, Damien; Cvetkovski, Stefan

    2003-06-01

    The monitoring of heroin use and related harms is undertaken in Australia with a view to inform policy responses. Some surveillance data on heroin-related harms is well suited to inform the planning and delivery of heroin-related services, such as needle and syringe provision. This article examines local-area variation in the characteristics of nonfatal heroin overdoses attended by ambulances in Melbourne over the period June 1998 to October 2000 to inform the delivery of services to the heroin-using population in Melbourne. Five so-called hot spot local government areas were considered in relation to the remainder of the Melbourne metropolitan area. Significant local-area variations in the characteristics of nonfatal heroin overdoses were evident over the study period, including the number of heroin overdoses, the age and sex of the people attended, the time of the attendance, the likelihood of hospitalization, and the likelihood of police coattendance. The implications of the findings are discussed in terms of service provision (e.g., opening hours) within the five hot spot local government areas, and it is argued that the analyses undertaken could easily be applied to other jurisdictions for which comparable data are available. PMID:12791801

  9. The long-term outcomes and unmet needs of a cohort of former long-stay patients in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Prem; Herrman, Helen E

    2011-10-01

    Former long-stay patients with psychotic disorders have significant unmet needs. This study assessed the long-term outcomes for the original cohort of 18 residents of the Footbridge Community Care Unit (CCU), a residential psychiatric rehabilitation unit at St Vincent's Mental Health Melbourne. A review of case records and interviews were conducted for each member of the cohort 8 years after admission to the CCU. Members of the cohort were living in a variety of settings after discharge from the CCU. Despite significant gains during the period of residential rehabilitation in the CCU after hospital discharge, by the time of follow-up individuals were in general leading restricted lives characterised by a lack of stable residential and social supports. Most reported positively on the support provided in the CCU although later experiences of moving repeatedly from one setting to another were adverse. Five key unmet needs were identified: promotion of independence; stability in accommodation; stability in social networks; consistency of care; and addressing the theme of loss. A longitudinal perspective in management that focuses on stability in residential care is required for long-stay patients. PMID:20931282

  10. Influenza viruses received and tested by the Melbourne WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza annual report, 2014.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Sheena G; Chow, Michelle K; Barr, Ian G; Kelso, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza in Melbourne is part of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System. In 2014 the Centre received a total of 5,374 influenza samples from laboratories primarily in the Asia-Pacific region. Viruses were characterised by their antigenic, genetic and antiviral drug resistance properties. Of the viruses successfully analysed 52% were A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses. The majority of these were antigenically and genetically similar to the WHO recommended reference strain for the 2014 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine. Results for A(H3N2) and B/Yamagata viruses suggested that circulating viruses of this subtype and lineage, respectively, had undergone antigenic and/or genetic changes, consistent with the decision by WHO to change recommended strains for the 2015 Southern Hemisphere vaccine. A small number of A(H1N1)pdm09 and B/Victoria viruses had highly reduced inhibition to the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir. The Centre also undertook primary isolation of vaccine candidate viruses directly into eggs. A total of 38 viruses were successfully isolated in eggs, of which 1 (B/Phuket/3073/2013) was included in the 2015 Southern Hemisphere influenza vaccine. PMID:26779736

  11. A probabilistic model of norovirus disease burden associated with greywater irrigation of home-produced lettuce in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Fiona Barker, S; O'Toole, Joanne; Sinclair, Martha I; Leder, Karin; Malawaraarachchi, Manori; Hamilton, Andrew J

    2013-03-01

    The reuse of domestic greywater has become common in Australia, especially during periods of extreme drought. Greywater is typically used in a raw, untreated form, primarily for landscape irrigation, but more than a quarter of greywater users irrigate vegetable gardens with the water, despite government advice against this practice. Greywater can be contaminated with enteric pathogens and may therefore pose a health risk if irrigated produce is consumed raw. A quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) model was constructed to estimate the norovirus disease burden associated with consumption of greywater-irrigated lettuce. The annual disease burdens (95th percentile; DALYs per person) attributed to greywater irrigation ranged from 2 × 10(-8) to 5 × 10(-4), depending on the source of greywater and the existence of produce washing within households. Accounting for the prevalence of produce-washing behaviours across Melbourne, the model predicted annual disease burdens ranging from 4 × 10(-9) for bathroom water use only to 3 × 10(-6) for laundry water use only, and accounting for the proportionate use of each greywater type, the annual disease burden was 2 × 10(-6). We recommend the preferential use of bathroom water over laundry water where possible as this would reduce the annual burden of disease to align with the current Australian recycled water guidelines, which recommend a threshold of 10(-6) DALYs per person. It is also important to consider other exposure pathways, particularly considering the high secondary attack rate of norovirus, as it is highly likely that the estimated norovirus disease burden associated with greywater irrigation of vegetables is negligible relative to household contact with an infected individual. PMID:23290124

  12. Parents' dietary patterns are significantly correlated: findings from the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial Program.

    PubMed

    Lioret, Sandrine; McNaughton, Sarah A; Crawford, David; Spence, Alison C; Hesketh, Kylie; Campbell, Karen J

    2012-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to identify dietary patterns independently in first-time mothers and fathers, and to examine whether these patterns were correlated within families. Dietary intakes were collected at baseline in the Melbourne Infant Feeding Activity and Nutrition Trial Program using a validated FFQ in 454 pairs of first-time mothers and fathers. Education level was reported in associated questionnaires. Principal components analyses included frequencies of fifty-five food groups and were performed independently in mothers and fathers. Spearman's correlation coefficients were used to assess associations between dietary pattern scores. A total of four dietary patterns were identified in mothers and fathers. Of these, three dietary patterns had similar characteristics between these two populations, namely 'Fruits and vegetables', 'High-energy snack and processed foods', 'High-fat foods' in mothers; and 'Fruits', 'High-energy snack and processed foods', 'High-fat foods' in fathers. The following two additional patterns were identified: 'Cereals and sweet foods' in mothers and 'Potatoes and vegetables' in fathers. Patterns incorporating healthier food items were found to be positively associated with parent education. An inverse association with education was found for the 'High-fat foods' and 'High-energy snack and processed foods' dietary patterns. Qualitatively similar patterns between corresponding mothers and fathers were the most strongly correlated (ρ = 0·34-0·45, P < 0·001). There were some differences in dietary patterns between mothers and fathers, suggesting that it is worth deriving patterns separately when considering couples, and more generally between men and women. Exploring how these various patterns correlate within households provides important insights to guide the development and implementation of family-based interventions. PMID:22040598

  13. Prospective observational study of emergency airway management in the critical care environment of a tertiary hospital in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Dyett, J F; Moser, M S; Tobin, A E

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the population of patients receiving emergency airway management outside operating theatres at our institution, a tertiary referral centre in Melbourne. A registry of all patients receiving emergency airway management in the emergency department, ICU and on the wards as part of Medical Emergency Response teams' care, was prospectively collected. There were 128 adults and one paediatric patient requiring emergency airway management recruited to the study. Data for analysis included patient demographics, pre-oxygenation and apnoeic oxygenation, staff, drugs, details of laryngoscopic attempts, adjuncts, airway manoeuvres, complications sustained and method of confirmation of endotracheal tube placement. Over a 12-month period, there were 139 intubations of 129 patients, requiring a total of 169 attempts. Respiratory failure was the most common indication for intubation. Intubation was successful on the first episode of laryngoscopy in 116 (83.5%) patients. Complications occurred in 48 patients. In the cohort of patients without respiratory failure, nasal cannulae apnoeic oxygenation significantly reduced the incidence of hypoxaemia (0 out of 31 [0.0%] versus 10 out of 60 [16.7%], P=0.016; absolute risk reduction 16.7%; number needed to treat: 6). Waveform capnography was used to confirm endotracheal tube placement in 133 patients and there were four episodes of oesophageal intubation, all of which were recognised immediately. In the critical care environment of our institution, emergency airway management is achieved with a first-attempt success rate that is comparable to overseas data. Nasal cannulae apnoeic oxygenation appears to significantly reduce the risk of hypoxaemia in patients without respiratory failure and the use of waveform capnography eliminates episodes of unrecognised oesophageal intubation. PMID:26310407

  14. Survey of patient satisfaction with the Breastfeeding Education and Support Services of The Royal Women's Hospital, Melbourne

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Li Yen; Amir, Lisa H

    2008-01-01

    Background The Breastfeeding Education and Support Services (BESS) is a unit of The Royal Women's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, staffed by International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs), providing day/short-stay and an outpatient clinic for mothers and infants with breastfeeding problems. It is important to measure women's experience of visiting the service as part of quality assurance. The aim of this project was to conduct an anonymous postal survey of clients' satisfaction with BESS. Methods An anonymous survey was posted on 16 November 2005 and again on 31 January 2006, to all women who had attended BESS in September 2005. Results The response rate was 60.5% (78/129). Eighty percent (62/78) of respondents attended day-stay, 33% (26/78) attended short-stay and 15% (12/78) attended the outpatient clinic. The percentage of women who responded "strongly agree" to the statement "Overall, I am satisfied with the services" was 49% (35/72) and 50% (6/12) for those who went to day/short-stay and the outpatient clinic respectively. Overall, 56% of all respondents responded that the quality of BESS was "better than expected". The most common breastfeeding problem reported was difficulty attaching the baby to the breast, followed by nipple damage, low milk supply and painful feeding. Conclusion BESS seems to have provided a satisfactory service to most clients. Most respondents were clearly satisfied with the support given by the IBCLCs and have also responded that the staff were professional and knowledgeable in their field of work. PMID:18405394

  15. Challenges of diabetes prevention in the real world: results and lessons from the Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study

    PubMed Central

    Dunbar, James A; Hernan, Andrea L; Janus, Edward D; Vartiainen, Erkki; Laatikainen, Tiina; Versace, Vincent L; Reynolds, John; Best, James D; Skinner, Timothy C; O'Reilly, Sharleen L; Mc Namara, Kevin P; Stewart, Elizabeth; Coates, Michael; Bennett, Catherine M; Carter, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess effectiveness and implementability of the public health programme Life! Taking action on diabetes in Australian people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods Melbourne Diabetes Prevention Study (MDPS) was a unique study assessing effectiveness of Life! that used a randomized controlled trial design. Intervention participants with AUSDRISK score ≥15 received 1 individual and 5 structured 90 min group sessions. Controls received usual care. Outcome measures were obtained for all participants at baseline and 12 months and, additionally, for intervention participants at 3 months. Per protocol set (PPS) and intention to treat (ITT) analyses were performed. Results PPS analyses were considered more informative from our study. In PPS analyses, intervention participants significantly improved in weight (−1.13 kg, p=0.016), waist circumference (−1.35 cm, p=0.044), systolic (−5.2 mm Hg, p=0.028) and diastolic blood pressure (−3.2 mm Hg, p=0.030) compared with controls. Based on observed weight change, estimated risk of developing diabetes reduced by 9.6% in the intervention and increased by 3.3% in control participants. Absolute 5-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk reduced significantly for intervention participants by 0.97 percentage points from 9.35% (10.4% relative risk reduction). In control participants, the risk increased by 0.11 percentage points (1.3% relative risk increase). The net effect for the change in CVD risk was −1.08 percentage points of absolute risk (p=0.013). Conclusions MDPS effectively reduced the risk of diabetes and CVD, but the intervention effect on weight and waist reduction was modest due to the challenges in recruiting high-risk individuals and the abbreviated intervention. PMID:26464804

  16. A parent focused child obesity prevention intervention improves some mother obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne inFANT Program

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The diets, physical activity and sedentary behavior levels of both children and adults in Australia are suboptimal. The family environment, as the first ecological niche of children, exerts an important influence on the onset of children’s habits. Parent modeling is one part of this environment and a logical focus for child obesity prevention initiatives. The focus on parent’s own behaviors provides a potential opportunity to decrease obesity risk behaviors in parents as well. Objective To assess the effect of a parent-focused early childhood obesity prevention intervention on first-time mothers’ diets, physical activity and TV viewing time. Methods The Melbourne InFANT Program is a cluster-randomized controlled trial which involved 542 mothers over their newborn’s first 18 months of life. The intervention focused on parenting skills and strategies, including parental modeling, and aimed to promote development of healthy child and parent behaviors from birth, including healthy diet, increased physical activity and reduced TV viewing time. Data regarding mothers’ diet (food frequency questionnaire), physical activity and TV viewing times (self-reported questionnaire) were collected using validated tools at both baseline and post-intervention. Four dietary patterns were derived at baseline using principal components analyses including frequencies of 55 food groups. Analysis of covariance was used to measure the impact of the intervention. Results The scores of both the "High-energy snack and processed foods" and the "High-fat foods" dietary patterns decreased more in the intervention group: -0.22 (−0.42;-0.02) and −0.25 (−0.50;-0.01), respectively. No other significant intervention vs. control effects were observed regarding total physical activity, TV viewing time, and the two other dietary patterns, i.e. “Fruits and vegetables” and “Cereals and sweet foods”. Conclusions These findings suggest that supporting first-time mothers to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors in their infants impacts maternal dietary intakes positively. Further research needs to assess ways in which we might further enhance those lifestyle behaviors not impacted by the InFANT intervention. PMID:22925356

  17. The Impact of “Unseasonably” Warm Spring Temperatures on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in Melbourne, Australia: A City with a Temperate Climate

    PubMed Central

    Tapper, Nigel; Loughnan, Terence

    2014-01-01

    The effects of extreme temperatures on human health have been well described. However, the adverse health effects of warm weather that occurs outside the summer period have had little attention. We used daily anomalous AMI morbidity and daily anomalous temperature to determine the impact of “unseasonable” temperature on human health. The “unseasonably” warm weather was attributed to a slow moving high pressure system to the east of Melbourne. No morbidity displacement was noted during either of these periods suggesting that morbidity due to “unseasonable” temperatures is avoidable. An increase in warmer weather during the cooler months of spring may result in increased morbidity, and an alert system based on summer thresholds may not be appropriate for early season heat health warnings. A straightforward alert system based on calculating anomalous temperature from daily weather forecasts may reduce the public health impact of “unseasonably” warm weather. PMID:25002870

  18. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined.To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon. PMID:22287918

  19. Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    Changes to the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature are decided on every 6 years at Nomenclature Sections associated with International Botanical Congresses (IBC). The XVIII IBC was held in Melbourne, Australia; the Nomenclature Section met on 18-22 July 2011 and its decisions were accepted by the Congress at its plenary session on 30 July. Several important changes were made to the Code as a result of this meeting that will affect publication of new names. Two of these changes will come into effect on 1 January 2012, some months before the Melbourne Code is published. Electronic material published online in Portable Document Format (PDF) with an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) or an International Standard Book Number (ISBN) will constitute effective publication, and the requirement for a Latin description or diagnosis for names of new taxa will be changed to a requirement for a description or diagnosis in either Latin or English. In addition, effective from 1 January 2013, new names of organisms treated as fungi must, in order to be validly published, include in the protologue (everything associated with a name at its valid publication) the citation of an identifier issued by a recognized repository (such as MycoBank). Draft text of the new articles dealing with electronic publication is provided and best practice is outlined. To encourage dissemination of the changes made to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, this article will be published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany and Taxon. PMID:21917189

  20. Translation into French of: "Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne - what does e-publication mean for you?". Translated by Christian Feuillet and Valéry Malécot Changements des conditions requises pour la publication faits au XVIII Congrès International de Botanique à Melbourne - qu'est-ce que la publication électronique représente pour vous?

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J

    2011-01-01

    RésuméLes changements au CodeInternational de Nomenclature Botanique sont décidés tous les 6 ans aux Sections de Nomenclature associées aux Congrès Internationaux de Botanique (CIB). Le XVIII(e) CIB se tenait à Melbourne, Australie; la Section de Nomenclature s'est réunie les 18-22 juillet 2011 et ses décisions ont été acceptées par le Congrès en session plénière le 30 juillet. Suite à cette réunion, plusieurs modifications importantes ont été apportées au Code et vont affecter la publication de nouveaux noms. Deux de ces changements prendront effet le 1(er) janvier 2012, quelques mois avant que le Code de Melbourne soit publié. Les documents électroniques publiés en ligne en 'Portable Document Format' (PDF) avec un 'International Standard Serial Number' (ISSN) ou un 'International Standard Book Number' (ISBN) constitueront une publication effective, et l'exigence d'une description ou d'une diagnose en latin pour les noms des nouveaux taxa sera changée en l'exigence d'une description ou d'une diagnose en latin ou en anglais. De plus, à partir du 1(er) janvier 2013, les noms nouveaux des organismes traités comme champignons devront, pour que la publication soit valide, inclure dans le protologue (tous ce qui est associé au nom au moment de la publication valide) la citation d'un identifiant ('identifier') fourni par un dépôt reconnu (tel MycoBank). Une ébauche des nouveaux articles concernant la publication électronique est fournie et des conseils de bon usage sont esquissés.Pour encourager la diffusion des changements adoptés au Code International de Nomenclature pour les algues, les champignons et les plantes, cet article sera publié dans BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany et Taxon. PMID:22287925

  1. Translation into French of: “Changes to publication requirements made at the XVIII International Botanical Congress in Melbourne – what does e-publication mean for you?”. Translated by Christian Feuillet and Valéry Malécot Changements des conditions requises pour la publication faits au XVIII e Congrès International de Botanique à Melbourne – qu’est-ce que la publication électronique représente pour vous?

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Sandra; McNeill, John; Turland, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Résumé Les changements au Code International de Nomenclature Botanique sont décidés tous les 6 ans aux Sections de Nomenclature associées aux Congrès Internationaux de Botanique (CIB). Le XVIIIe CIB se tenait à Melbourne, Australie; la Section de Nomenclature s’est réunie les 18-22 juillet 2011 et ses décisions ont été acceptées par le Congrès en session plénière le 30 juillet. Suite à cette réunion, plusieurs modifications importantes ont été apportées au Code et vont affecter la publication de nouveaux noms. Deux de ces changements prendront effet le 1er janvier 2012, quelques mois avant que le Code de Melbourne soit publié. Les documents électroniques publiés en ligne en ‘Portable Document Format’ (PDF) avec un ‘International Standard Serial Number’ (ISSN) ou un ‘International Standard Book Number’ (ISBN) constitueront une publication effective, et l’exigence d’une description ou d’une diagnose en latin pour les noms des nouveaux taxa sera changée en l’exigence d’une description ou d’une diagnose en latin ou en anglais. De plus, à partir du 1er janvier 2013, les noms nouveaux des organismes traités comme champignons devront, pour que la publication soit valide, inclure dans le protologue (tous ce qui est associé au nom au moment de la publication valide) la citation d’un identifiant (‘identifier’) fourni par un dépôt reconnu (tel MycoBank). Une ébauche des nouveaux articles concernant la publication électronique est fournie et des conseils de bon usage sont esquissés. Pour encourager la diffusion des changements adoptés au Code International de Nomenclature pour les algues, les champignons et les plantes, cet article sera publié dans BMC Evolutionary Biology, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, Brittonia, Cladistics, MycoKeys, Mycotaxon, New Phytologist, North American Fungi, Novon, Opuscula Philolichenum, PhytoKeys, Phytoneuron, Phytotaxa, Plant Diversity and Resources, Systematic Botany et Taxon. PMID:22287925

  2. Iron intakes of Australian infants and toddlers: findings from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial (InFANT) Program.

    PubMed

    Atkins, Linda A; McNaughton, Sarah A; Campbell, Karen J; Szymlek-Gay, Ewa A

    2016-01-01

    Fe deficiency remains the most common nutritional deficiency worldwide and young children are at particular risk. Preventative food-based strategies require knowledge of current intakes, sources of Fe, and factors associated with low Fe intakes; yet few data are available for Australian children under 2 years. This study's objectives were to determine intakes and food sources of Fe for Australian infants and toddlers and identify non-dietary factors associated with Fe intake. Dietary, anthropometric and socio-demographic data from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial Program were analysed for 485 infants (mean age: 9·1 (sd 1·2) months) and 423 toddlers (mean age: 19·6 (sd 2·6) months) and their mothers. Dietary intakes were assessed via 24-h recalls over 3 non-consecutive days. Prevalence of inadequate Fe intake was estimated using the full probability approach. Associations between potential non-dietary predictors (sex, breast-feeding status, age when introduced to solid foods, maternal age, maternal education, maternal employment status and mother's country of birth) and Fe intakes were assessed using linear regression. Mean Fe intakes were 9·1 (sd 4·3) mg/d for infants and 6·6 (sd 2·4) mg/d for toddlers. Our results showed that 32·6 % of infants and 18·6 % of toddlers had inadequate Fe intake. Main food sources of Fe were Fe-fortified infant formula and cereals for infants and toddlers, respectively. Female sex and current breast-feeding were negatively associated with infant Fe intakes. Introduction to solid foods at or later than 6 months was negatively associated with Fe intake in toddlers. These data may facilitate food-based interventions to improve Australian children's Fe intake levels. PMID:26571345

  3. Report on the comparison of the scan strategies employed by the Patrick Air Force Base WSR-74C/McGill radar and the NWS Melbourne WSR-88D radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Gregory; Evans, Randolph; Manobianco, John; Schumann, Robin; Wheeler, Mark; Yersavich, Ann

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to determine whether the current standard WSR-88D radar (NEXRAD) scan strategies permit the use of the Melbourne WSR-88D to perform the essential functions now performed by the Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB) WSR-74C/McGill radar for evaluating shuttle weather flight rules (FR) and launch commit criteria (LCC). To meet this objective, the investigation compared the beam coverage patterns of the WSR-74C/McGill radar located at PAFB and the WSR-88D radar located at the Melbourne National Weather Service (NWS) Office over the area of concern for weather FR and LCC evaluations. The analysis focused on beam coverage within four vertical 74 km radius cylinders (1 to 4 km above ground level (AGL), 4 to 8 km AGL, 8 to 12 km AGL, and 1 to 12 km AGL) centered on Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex 39A. The PAFB WSR-74C/McGill radar is approximately 17 km north-northeast of the Melbourne WSR-88D radar. The beam coverage of the WSR-88D using VCP 11 located at the Melbourne NWS Office is comparable (difference in percent of the atmosphere sampled between the two radars is 10 percent or less) within the area of concern to the beam coverage of the WSR-74C/McGill radar located at PAFB. Both radars provide good beam coverage over much of the atmospheric region of concern. In addition, both radars provide poor beam coverage (coverage less than 50 percent) over limited regions near the radars due to the radars' cone of silence and gaps in coverage within the higher elevation scans. Based on scan strategy alone, the WSR-88D radar could be used to perform the essential functions now performed by the PAFB WSR-74C/McGill radar for evaluating shuttle weather FR and LCC. Other radar characteristics may, however, affect the decision as to which radar to use in a given case.

  4. Establishing the Melbourne injecting drug user cohort study (MIX): rationale, methods, and baseline and twelve-month follow-up results

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cohort studies provide an excellent opportunity to monitor changes in behaviour and disease transmission over time. In Australia, cohort studies of people who inject drugs (PWID) have generally focused on older, in-treatment injectors, with only limited outcome measure data collected. In this study we specifically sought to recruit a sample of younger, largely out-of-treatment PWID, in order to study the trajectories of their drug use over time. Methods Respondent driven sampling, traditional snowball sampling and street outreach methods were used to recruit heroin and amphetamine injectors from one outer-urban and two inner-urban regions of Melbourne, Australia. Information was collected on participants’ demographic and social characteristics, drug use characteristics, drug market access patterns, health and social functioning, and health service utilisation. Participants are followed-up on an annual basis. Results 688 PWID were recruited into the study. At baseline, the median age of participants was 27.6 years (IQR: 24.4 years – 29.6 years) and two-thirds (67%) were male. Participants reported injecting for a median of 10.2 years (range: 1.5 months – 21.2 years), with 11% having injected for three years or less. Limited education, unemployment and previous incarceration were common. The majority of participants (82%) reported recent heroin injection, and one third reported being enrolled in Opioid Substitution Therapy (OST) at recruitment. At 12 months follow-up 458 participants (71% of eligible participants) were retained in the study. There were few differences in demographic and drug-use characteristics of those lost to follow-up compared with those retained in the study, with attrition significantly associated with recruitment at an inner-urban location, male gender, and providing incomplete contact information at baseline. Conclusions Our efforts to recruit a sample of largely out-of-treatment PWID were limited by drug market characteristics at the time, where fluctuating heroin availability has led to large numbers of PWID accessing low-threshold OST. Nevertheless, this study of Australian injectors will provide valuable data on the natural history of drug use, along with risk and protective factors for adverse health outcomes associated with injecting drug use. Comprehensive follow-up procedures have led to good participant retention and limited attrition bias. PMID:23786848

  5. Pesticide and trace metal occurrence and aquatic benchmark exceedances in surface waters and sediments of urban wetlands and retention ponds in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Allinson, Graeme; Zhang, Pei; Bui, AnhDuyen; Allinson, Mayumi; Rose, Gavin; Marshall, Stephen; Pettigrove, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    Samples of water and sediments were collected from 24 urban wetlands in Melbourne, Australia, in April 2010, and tested for more than 90 pesticides using a range of gas chromatographic (GC) and liquid chromatographic (LC) techniques, sample 'hormonal' activity using yeast-based recombinant receptor-reporter gene bioassays, and trace metals using spectroscopic techniques. At the time of sampling, there was almost no estrogenic activity in the water column. Twenty-three different pesticide residues were observed in one or more water samples from the 24 wetlands; chemicals observed at more than 40% of sites were simazine (100%), atrazine (79%), and metalaxyl and terbutryn (46%). Using the toxicity unit (TU) concept, less than 15% of the detected pesticides were considered to pose an individual, short-term risk to fish or zooplankton in the ponds and wetlands. However, one pesticide (fenvalerate) may have posed a possible short-term risk to fish (log10TUf > -3), and three pesticides (azoxystrobin, fenamiphos and fenvalerate) may have posed a risk to zooplankton (logTUzp between -2 and -3); all the photosystem II (PSII) inhibiting herbicides may have posed a risk to primary producers in the ponds and wetlands (log10TUap and/or log10TUalg > -3). The wetland sediments were contaminated with 16 different pesticides; no chemicals were observed at more than one third of sites, but based on frequency of detection and concentrations, bifenthrin (33%, maximum 59 μg/kg) is the priority insecticide of concern for the sediments studied. Five sites returned a TU greater than the possible effect threshold (i.e. log10TU > 1) as a result of bifenthrin contamination of their sediments. Most sediments did not exceed Australian sediment quality guideline levels for trace metals. However, more than half of the sites had threshold effect concentration quotients (TECQ) values >1 for Cu (58%), Pb (50%), Ni (67%) and Zn (63%), and 75% of sites had mean probable effect concentration quotients (PECQ) >0.2, suggesting that the collected sediments may have been having some impact on sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:25697552

  6. Influence of climate, fire severity and forest mortality on predictions of long term streamflow: Potential effect of the 2009 wildfire on Melbourne's water supply catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feikema, Paul M.; Sherwin, Christopher B.; Lane, Patrick N. J.

    2013-04-01

    SummaryIn February 2009, wildfire affected nine catchments, or approximately 28% of forested catchment area that supplies water to the city of Melbourne, Australia. This has potential to significantly affect the long term water use of these Eucalyptus forests and the consequential water yield because of the ecohydrologic response of some eucalypt species. Approximately 11% of the catchment area was severely burnt by intense fire, where vegetation mortality is higher. Catchment scale models using a physically-based approach were developed for the fire-affected water supply catchments. Different inputs of climate and forest mortality after fire were used to examine the relative contributions of rainfall, fire severity, forest type and forest age on post-fire streamflow. Simulations show the effect of fire on long term streamflow is likely to depend on a number of factors, the relative influence of which changes as rainfall becomes more limiting. Under average rainfall conditions, total reduction in post-fire streamflow after 100 years estimated to be between 1.4% (˜12 GL year-1) and 2.8% (˜24 GL year-1) are an order of magnitude lower than reductions in total catchment inflow during the period of low rainfall between 1997 and 2009, in which reservoir inflow was reduced by nearly 37%. The main reasons for the lower than expected changes in water yield are that a lower proportion of the catchments were affected by severe fire, and so mortality within the fire area was relatively low, and that the average age of the forest canopy (93 years) is younger than what is generally considered old growth forest. This means that the baseline (no-fire) streamflow used for reference is lower than would be expected with older, mature forest. The greatest post-fire affect on total water yield was predicted for the O'Shannassy catchment. This is due to the average forest age, which is the oldest of any of the catchments, that it has the highest average rainfall (1680 mm year-1), and that it contains the largest proportion of ash-type forest severely burnt (38.7%). Under wetter than average conditions, change in post-fire water yield is largely explained by changes in average age of the forest. The rates of ET are largely determined by the conductance and interception of the forest canopy. Under lower than average rainfall conditions, when water becomes limiting, annual rainfall is the best predictor of post-fire change in water yield. Under conditions of low rainfall and low soil water content that are conducive to larger wildfires, any initial increase in post-fire streamflow due to reduced canopy cover may not occur or be detected because a substantial soil water deficit must first be removed before appreciable changes in streamflow will occur. This partly explains the lack of increase in initial post-fire streamflow reported after wildfire compared to an increase in streamflow following forest harvesting experiments during wetter periods.

  7. Undergraduate Child Psychiatry Teaching in Melbourne, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gough, Jenny K.; McCallum, Zoe; Bevan, Catherine; Vance, Alasdair

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The teaching of child psychiatry in Australian medical schools is under review: the content, the placement of the field within medical curricula, and the appropriate teaching and learning methods are all contested. The authors developed a 1-day program in the 9-week child and adolescent health course conducted in the final two semesters…

  8. 76 FR 70532 - Release of Airport Property: Melbourne International Airport, Melbourne, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... is located west of Apollo Boulevard and North of General Aviation Drive in Brevard County, Florida... of the Apollo Boulevard/General Aviation Way parcel has been determined by appraisal to be $450,000.... Dean Stringer, Manager, Orlando Airports District Office, Southern Region. Revision Date...

  9. Multilinguals and Their Sociolinguistic Profiles: Observations on Language Use Amongst Three Vintages of Migrants in Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hlavac, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents profiles of eight multilinguals and examines the circumstances that determine their continued use, in addition to English, of at least two of their "home" languages. I attempt to identify in which domains this occurs, whether there are established patterns of domain-specific language use and whether these patterns are…

  10. Polish Language Maintenance of the Polish Students at Princes Hill Saturday School in Melbourne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janik, Janusz

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the issue of language ecology, focusing on Polish language maintenance in Victoria, Australia, and reports on a study conducted with Polish students at a Saturday language school. Results indicate that the longer the period of residence in Australia, the less students use Polish. (25 references) (Author/CK)

  11. "The Show Must Go On": Older Entertainers Making Music in the Community in Melbourne, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn; Southcott, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Globally countries are faced with an aging population and Australia is no different. This creates challenges for the maintenance of well-being which can be enhanced by active engagement in society. There is extensive research that confirms that engagement in music by older people is positively related to individual and community well-being. Music…

  12. Minority Language Speakers as Migrants: Some Preliminary Observations on the Sudanese Community in Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musgrave, Simon; Hajek, John

    2013-01-01

    The language problems faced by migrants may be more complex when they come from a minority language group in their homeland. The new arrivals may find that there are few, or even no, speakers of their language in the community to which they have moved. Then decisions have to be made as to whether to attempt to maintain the native language and also…

  13. International Code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi, and Plants (Melbourne Code): Appendices II-VIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Science requires a precise, stable, and simple system of nomenclature used by scientists in all countries of the world, dealing on the one hand with the terms that denote the ranks of taxonomic groups, and on the other with the scientific names that are applied to the individual taxonomic units of a...

  14. Singing in "La Voce Della Luna" Italian Women's Choir in Melbourne, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southcott, Jane; Joseph, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Australia is a country of ongoing migration that embraces diversity, creative expression and cultural activity. Membership of community music groups by older people can enhance life quality, and may provide a space through which cultural and linguistic identity may be shared and celebrated. This qualitative phenomenological case study explores…

  15. Negotiating Family, Navigating Resettlement: Family Connectedness amongst Resettled Youth with Refugee Backgrounds Living in Melbourne, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMichael, C.; Gifford, S. M.; Correa-Velez, I.

    2011-01-01

    Refugee adolescents resettling in a new country face many challenges, and being part of a supportive family is a critical factor in assisting them to achieve wellbeing and create positive futures. This longitudinal study documents experiences of family life in the resettlement context of 120 young people with refugee backgrounds living in…

  16. Business Solutions Case Study: Marketing Zero Energy Homes: LifeStyle Homes, Melbourne, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    Building America research has shown that high-performance homes can potentially give builders an edge in the marketplace and can boost sales. But it doesn't happen automatically. It requires a tailored, easy to understand marketing campaign and sometimes a little flair. This case study highlights LifeStyle Homes’ successful marketing approach for their SunSmart home package, which has helped to boost sales for the company. SunSmart marketing includes a modified logo, weekly blog, social media, traditional advertising, website, and sales staff training. Marketing focuses on quality, durability, healthy indoor air, and energy efficiency with an emphasis on the surety of third-party verification and the scientific approach to developing the SunSmart package. With the introduction of SunSmart, LifeStyle began an early recovery, nearly doubling sales in 2010; SunSmart sales now exceed 300 homes, including more than 20 zero energy homes. Completed homes in 2014 far outpaced the national (19%) and southern census region (27%) recovery rates for the same period. As technology improves and evolves, this builder will continue to collaborate with Building America.

  17. Baby, souls, name and health: traditional customs for a newborn infant among the Hmong in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Rice, P L

    2000-03-01

    In this paper, I discuss childrearing beliefs and practices in Hmong culture. In particular I focus on issues related to souls and ceremonies for a newborn infant in Hmong society. The Hmong believe that each living body has three souls. For a newborn infant, the first soul enters his or her body when he or she is conceived in the mother's womb. The second soul enters when the baby has just emerged from the mother's body and taken its first breath. The third soul, however, will have to be called on the third morning after birth, as will be discussed in this paper. If all three souls are secured in the infant's body, he or she will be healthy and hence thrive well. On the contrary, the infant may become ill and eventually die if all three souls do not reside in his or her body. This, therefore, makes a soul calling ceremony on the third morning after birth essential in Hmong culture. I will show that for Hmong society to survive, the Hmong strongly adhere to their cultural beliefs and practices related to a newborn infant. These beliefs and practices tie the Hmong with not only their family and their society at large, but also the supernatural world. PMID:10742609

  18. The incidence of heat casualties in sprint triathlon: the tale of two Melbourne race events.

    PubMed

    Gosling, Cameron McR; Gabbe, Belinda J; McGivern, Jeanne; Forbes, Andrew B

    2008-01-01

    Triathlon is a popular participation sport combining swimming, cycling and running into a single event. The Triathlon Australia medical policy advocates the use of wet bulb globe temperature as the criterion for altering race distance and an ambient temperature of 35 degrees C as a criterion for consideration of cancellation of an event, but there is little empirical evidence detailing the effectiveness of this policy. Nor has the impact of environmental thermal stress on triathletes in shorter duration events been determined. During an injury surveillance investigation of a triathlon race series over the 2006/2007 seasons, two events with similar environmental conditions were completed. One thousand eight hundred and eighty-four participants competed in event 1 (December 2006) and 2000 competed in event 2 (February 2007). Maximum dry bulb (DBT), minimum vapour pressure (VP) and minimum relative humidity (RH) for event 1 were 37 degrees C DBT, 0.56 kPa VP and 9% RH measured by the Bureau of Meteorology. Fifty-three participants presented for medical aid, 15 due to heat-related collapse. The conditions measured for event 2 were 33 degrees C DBT, 1.16 kPa VP and 24% RH and there were no heat illness presentations despite 38 individuals presenting for medical aid. These observations suggest that the risk of heat-related collapse is greatest when high-environmental temperatures occur early in the competitive season when participants may be inadequately prepared and have not yet acquired natural acclimatisation to heat. Any Triathlon Australia policy revision could place stronger emphasis on the use of ambient temperature as a limiting criterion for race organisers. PMID:17931972

  19. The persistence of predictors of wellbeing among refugee youth eight years after resettlement in Melbourne, Australia.

    PubMed

    Correa-Velez, Ignacio; Gifford, Sandra M; McMichael, Celia

    2015-10-01

    This short report assesses the predictors of subjective health and happiness among a cohort of refugee youth over their first eight years in Australia. Five waves of data collection were conducted between 2004 (n = 120) and 2012-13 (n = 51) using mixed methods. Previous schooling, self-esteem, moving house in the previous year, a supportive social environment, stronger ethnic identity and perceived discrimination were significant predictors of wellbeing after adjusting for demographic and pre-migration factors. When compared with a previous analysis of this cohort over their first three years of settlement, experiences of social exclusion still have a significant impact on wellbeing eight years after arriving in Australia. This study contributes to mounting evidence in support of policies that discourage discrimination and promote social inclusion and cultural diversity and which underpin the wellbeing of resettled refugee youth. PMID:26310592

  20. The foundation of the Melbourne Code Appendices: Announcing a new paradigm for tracking nomenclatural decisions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new expanded digital resource exists for tracking decisions on all nomenclature proposals potentially contributing to Appendices II-VIII of the International Code of Nomenclature. This system owes its origins to the Smithsonian Institution's Proposals and Disposals website created by Dan Nicolson ...

  1. The Marketing of Special Libraries to Their Parent Organisations: A Study of Selected Melbourne Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelso, Helena

    1995-01-01

    A survey of corporate and government libraries in Victoria, Australia, revealed that many are in favor of marketing services to their parent organizations, but in practice very few undertake formal marketing planning. Highlights elements of marketing processes in use by libraries and examines why more libraries are not preparing and implementing…

  2. The Changing Nature of Work. NCVER Research Forum (Melbourne, Australia, November 30, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research, Leabrook (Australia).

    This publication contains materials from a forum on the changing nature of work (CNW) that brought together researchers and research users to hear how to use findings to improve vocational education and training (VET) in Australia. An overview of the program and biographical information on presenters and panel members follow. The next section…

  3. Research and VET Decision-Making: February 1997 Symposium (Melbourne, Australia, February 19-20, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Chris Selby, Ed.

    This document contains the speaking notes, spoken comments, and prepared papers of the participants in a 1997 symposium on utilization of vocational education and training (VET) research in VET decision making in Australia. The document begins with the "Introduction" (Chris Selby Smith). The next six sections contain the speaking notes and/or…

  4. Dietary carbohydrate in relation to cortical and nuclear lens opacities in the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE: In vitro and in vivo animal studies suggest that dietary carbohydrates play a role in cataractogenesis. Few epidemiologic studies have been conducted to evaluate this association. The objective of this study was to examine the cross-sectional associations between total carbohydrate intake, ...

  5. Singing in "La Voce Della Luna" Italian Women's Choir in Melbourne, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southcott, Jane; Joseph, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Australia is a country of ongoing migration that embraces diversity, creative expression and cultural activity. Membership of community music groups by older people can enhance life quality, and may provide a space through which cultural and linguistic identity may be shared and celebrated. This qualitative phenomenological case study explores…

  6. International Students in the Private VET Sector in Melbourne, Australia: Rethinking Their Characteristics and Aspirations outside the Deficit Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasura, Rinos

    2015-01-01

    The reconstruction of the Australian Vocational Education and Training (VET) sector into a competitive training market, which led to the participation of international students and commercial for-profit private VET providers, has until recently focused on the importance of international students to the national economy whilst ignoring the…

  7. Literacy for Youth: Programs, Problems and Perspectives. Proceedings of the Youth Literacy Forum (Melbourne, Australia, July 30, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanguinetti, Jill, Ed.; Jones, Myfanwy, Ed.

    These proceedings document some of the work and the stories of literacy teachers who work with youth outside the school system and help to paint the educational and policy context of their work. "Professionalism and Passion: A Report on Teachers Working with the Literacy Needs of Unemployed Youth" (Beverley Campbell) introduces the report. The…

  8. What Alternative? A Snapshot of VCAL As an Alternative to Senior Secondary Education in the Western Region of Melbourne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Robyn; Papadopoulos, Theo

    2013-01-01

    The Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) is a two-year senior school certificate available to secondary students in Victoria, Australia, and has been operational for almost a decade. It is delivered by secondary schools and further education providers. In 2010, two programmes from each of these providers were reviewed and considered in…

  9. Proceedings of the Conference on Competency-Based Training (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, November 27-29, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Cristene, Ed.

    This document contains summaries of five workshops, each with several speakers, held at a conference on competency-based training (CBT) in Australia. The following are included in Session 1, Developing and Delivering CBT Programs: "Developing and Delivering CBT Programs--Opening Speech" (Steve McDonald); "Competency Standards and the CBT System"…

  10. Prevention of Right Pulmonary Artery Stenosis in Fontan Circulation: The Melbourne Modification of T-Fontan Operation.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Igor E; Naimo, Phillip S; d'Udekem, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Currently, the extracardiac Fontan operation is a procedure of choice in patients undergoing a staged palliation for univentricular hearts. However, it is not always easy to prevent the right pulmonary artery twisting after implantation of the extracardiac conduit. Herein, we described a simple modification, which we referred to as T-Fontan procedure, to prevent right pulmonary artery stenosis after extracardiac Fontan operation. PMID:26700021

  11. Developing programs for African families, by African families: engaging African migrant families in Melbourne in health promotion interventions.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Jennifer A; Green, Julie; Mellor, David; Mutowo, Mutsa P; de Courten, Maximilian; Renzaho, André M N

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an emerging problem for African migrants in Australia, but few prevention programs incorporate their cultural beliefs and values. This study reports on the application of community capacity-building and empowerment principles in 4 workshops with Sudanese families in Australia. Workshop participants prioritized health behaviors, skill and knowledge gaps, and environments for change to identify culturally centered approaches to health promotion. The workshops highlighted a need for culturally and age-appropriate interventions that build whole-of-family skills and knowledge around the positive effects of physical activity and nutrition to improve health within communities while reducing intergenerational and gender role family conflicts. PMID:24297008

  12. Proceedings of the Conference on Competency-Based Training (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, November 27-29, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Cristene, Ed.

    This document contains summaries of five workshops, each with several speakers, held at a conference on competency-based training (CBT) in Australia. The following are included in Session 1, Developing and Delivering CBT Programs: "Developing and Delivering CBT Programs--Opening Speech" (Steve McDonald); "Competency Standards and the CBT System"…

  13. Nutrition in the first year of life in a multi-ethnic poor socio-economic municipality in Melbourne.

    PubMed

    Williams, H E; Carmichael, A

    1983-06-01

    In a longitudinal epidemiological study of 304 consecutively born infants in a poor socio-economic multi-ethnic municipality (Brunswick) nutrition was suboptimal in approximately 50%. This was mainly due to a high failure rate in establishing effective lactation in the 82% of mothers who commenced breast feeding, but also to the early and frequent feeding of solids, usually refined carbohydrates, and minimal use of fresh fruit and vegetables. The low rate of breast feeding to 6 months in Brunswick (16% compared with the State of Victoria average of 27%) was associated with demographic changes due to immigration. Of the 304 mothers, 62% were born overseas, most had limited schooling, no working skills, and 50% were unable to speak English. Successful breast feeding was positively correlated with better education and working skills while early introduction of solids and canned food was negatively correlated. Professional advice and influence in infant feeding was very limited as most mothers decided their feeding methods on their own preferences or their experience with other children, or on advice from their own mothers or relatives. These findings indicate that it will be a slow and complex task to change attitudes and teach poorly educated mothers, especially immigrants with limited English, the importance of optimum nutrition. PMID:6626059

  14. Metal accumulation in roadside soil in Melbourne, Australia: Effect of road age, traffic density and vehicular speed.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Shamali; Ball, Andrew S; Huynh, Trang; Reichman, Suzie M

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of vehicular emitted heavy metals in roadside soils result in long term environmental damage. This study assessed the relationships between traffic characteristics (traffic density, road age and vehicular speed) and roadside soil heavy metals. Significant levels were recorded for Cd (0.06-0.59 mg/kg), Cr (18-29 mg/kg), Cu (4-12 mg/kg), Ni (7-20 mg/kg), Mn (92-599 mg/kg), Pb (16-144 mg/kg) and Zn (10.36-88.75 mg/kg), with Mn concentrations exceeding the Ecological Investigation Level. Significant correlations were found between roadside soil metal concentration and vehicular speed (R = 0.90), road age (R = 0.82) and traffic density (R = 0.68). Recently introduced metals in automotive technology (e.g. Mn and Sb) were higher in younger roads, while the metals present for many years (e.g. Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn) were higher in medium and old age roads confirming the risk of significant metal deposition and soil metal retention in roadside soils. PMID:26603093

  15. Information Management. VALA National Conference on Library Automation Proceedings (2nd, Melbourne, Australia, November 28-December 1, 1983). Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, B. J., Ed.

    The first of two volumes of a conference proceedings, this document contains the welcome, the opening, the keynote addresses, and the invited papers, as well as a submitted paper by John Gillam which was not available for publication in the pre-prints (Volume 2) prior to the conference. Three addresses are not included in these proceedings and…

  16. The Discourse of Public Education: An Urban Campaign for a Local Public High School in Melbourne, Victoria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Emma E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the metonymic slippage surrounding the discourse of public education, through observations and interviews with Lawson High School active campaigners in the state of Victoria, Australia. The notion of campaigning for public education has become an ever-present issue on an international scale, and this article aims to contribute…

  17. Local Data Integration in East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan L.; Manobianco, John T.

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit has configured a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) for east central Florida which assimilates in-situ and remotely-sensed observational data into a series of high-resolution gridded analyses. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate products that may enhance weather nowcasts and short-range (less than 6 h) forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the Melbourne National Weather Service (NWS MLB) operational requirements. LDIS has the potential to provide added value for nowcasts and short-ten-n forecasts for two reasons. First, it incorporates all data operationally available in east central Florida. Second, it is run at finer spatial and temporal resolutions than current national-scale operational models such as the Rapid Update Cycle and Eta models. LDIS combines all available data to produce grid analyses of primary variables (wind, temperature, etc.) at specified temporal and spatial resolutions. These analyses of primary variables can be used to compute diagnostic quantities such as vorticity and divergence. This paper demonstrates the utility of LDIS over east central Florida for a warm season case study. The evolution of a significant thunderstorm outflow boundary is depicted through horizontal and vertical cross section plots of wind speed, divergence, and circulation. In combination with a suitable visualization too], LDIS may provide users with a more complete and comprehensive understanding of evolving mesoscale weather than could be developed by individually examining the disparate data sets over the same area and time.

  18. Objective Lightning Probability Forecasts for East-Central Florida Airports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Winfred C.

    2013-01-01

    The forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL, (NWS MLB) identified a need to make more accurate lightning forecasts to help alleviate delays due to thunderstorms in the vicinity of several commercial airports in central Florida at which they are responsible for issuing terminal aerodrome forecasts. Such forecasts would also provide safer ground operations around terminals, and would be of value to Center Weather Service Units serving air traffic controllers in Florida. To improve the forecast, the AMU was tasked to develop an objective lightning probability forecast tool for the airports using data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The resulting forecast tool is similar to that developed by the AMU to support space launch operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) for use by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) in previous tasks (Lambert and Wheeler 2005, Lambert 2007). The lightning probability forecasts are valid for the time periods and areas needed by the NWS MLB forecasters in the warm season months, defined in this task as May-September.

  19. Social Change and Family Policies. Key Papers, Part 2. International CFR Seminar (20th, Melbourne, Australia, August 19-24, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichler, Margrit; And Others

    These papers from an International Committee on Family Research (CFR) seminar explore seven themes, three of which are presented in Part 2. Work, economic policies, and welfare consequences and responsibilities (Theme 5) are discussed in Margrit Eichler's "The Familism-Individualism Flip-Flop and Its Implications for Economic and Social Welfare…

  20. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (29th, Melbourne, Australia, July 10-15, 2005). Volume 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen L., Ed.; Vincent, Jill L., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This document is the fourth volume of the proceedings of the 29th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Conference papers are centered around the theme of "Learners and Learning Environments." This volume features 42 research reports by presenters with last names beginning between Mul and Wu: (1) Case…

  1. Partnerships in Education. A Collection of Papers Presentation at the International Community Education Association (ICEA) Conference (1st, Melbourne, Australia, September 26-29, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Tony, Ed.; Cowdell, Jennie, Ed.

    The following papers, panel discussion, summaries, and comments are included in this conference proceedings document: "Education: The Essential Partnership" (Ramsey); "Australia's Involvement in Education in the Pacific: Partnership or Patronage?" (Baba); "Report by the Rapporteur to the Final Plenary Session" (Kimberley); "Adult Environmental…

  2. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (29th, Melbourne, Australia, July 10-15, 2005). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen L., Ed.; Vincent, Jill L., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This document contains the second volume of the proceedings of the 29th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education. Conference papers are centered around the theme of "Learners and Learning Environments." This volume features 43 research reports by presenters with last names beginning between Adl and Fre: (1)…

  3. Aiming to increase birth weight: a randomised trial of pre-pregnancy information, advice and counselling in inner-urban Melbourne

    PubMed Central

    Lumley, Judith; Donohue, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Background In the 1980s there was substantial interest in early pregnancy and pre-pregnancy interventions to increase birth weight and reduce preterm birth. We developed an inter-pregnancy intervention, implemented in a randomised controlled trial, to be provided by midwives at home soon after women's first birth. Methods MCH nurses invited women to take part during their home visit to new mothers. Women's contact details, with their permission, were passed to the study midwife. She had a randomisation schedule to which women's names were added before she met the women or their partners. All women recruited had a home visit from the study midwife with a discussion of their first pregnancy, labour and birth and the postpartum experience. Women in the intervention arm received in addition a pre-pregnancy intervention with discussion of social, health or lifestyle problems, preparation and timing for pregnancy, family history, rubella immunisation, referrals for health problems, and a reminder card. The primary outcome was defined as a birth weight difference in the second birth of 100 g (one-sided) in favour of the intervention. Additional data collected were gestational age, perinatal deaths and birth defects. Analyses used EPI-INFO and STATA. Results Intervention and comparison groups were comparable on socioeconomic factors, prior reproductive history and first birth outcomes. Infant birth weight in the second birth was lower (-97.4 g,)) among infants in the intervention arm. There were no significant differences between intervention and comparison arms in the proportion of women having a preterm birth, an infant with low birthweight, or an infant with a birth weight <10th percentile. There were more adverse outcomes in the intervention arm: ten births <32 weeks), compared with one in standard care, and more infants with a birth weight <2000 g, 16 compared with two in standard care Conclusion As the primary outcome was envisaged to be either improved birth weight or no effect, the study was not designed to identify the alternative outcome with confidence. Despite widespread support for pre-pregnancy interventions to improve maternal and perinatal health, this first randomised controlled trial of a multi-component intervention provided at home, did not have a beneficial outcome. PMID:17156466

  4. Research Reports from the First Pre-ICME Satellite Conference on Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics (Monash University, Melbourne, Australia, August 21-22, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blane, Dudley, Ed.

    Provided are the papers presented at a conference which served as an international forum on diagnostic and prescriptive mathematics education. They are: (1) "The Evolution of the Research Council for Diagnostic and Prescriptive Mathematics" by Robert Underhill; (2) "The Interaction of Knowledge and Cognitive Processes in Diagnosis and…

  5. Learning Technologies: Prospects and Pathways. Selected papers from EdTech '96 Biennial Conference of the Australian Society for Educational Technology (Melbourne, Australia, July 7-10, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedberg, John G., Ed.; And Others

    This book presents a series of conference papers dealing with educational technology. The papers are: "The Role of Educational Technology in Upgrading Teacher Education in Pakistan" (M. Hashim Abbasi and Alex C. Millar); "Report on the Teaching and Learning on the Internet Project--RMIT TAFE" (Laurie Armstrong); "A Dissemination Strategy for…

  6. The Maintenance Effect of Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment Groups for the Chinese Parents of Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: A 6-Month Follow-Up Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, D. F. K.; Poon, A.; Kwok, Y. C. Lai

    2011-01-01

    Background: Caring for a child with intellectual disability can be stressful. No data on the longer-term effects of cognitive-behavioural treatment (CBT) on parents from a Chinese-speaking background who have children with intellectual disabilities are available in the literature. This study attempted to fill this research gap by examining the…

  7. Impacts of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants (Melbourne Code) on the scientific names of plant pathogenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent changes in the new International Code of Nomenclature (ICN) for algae, fungi and plants require that only one name be used for pleomorphic fungi many of which have two or more scientific names at present. It is necessary to decide which of two competing scientific names will be applied to one...

  8. Neoliberal Economic Markets in Vocational Education and Training: Shifts in Perceptions and Practices in Private Vocational Education and Training in Melbourne, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasura, Rinos

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that the adoption of the competitive Vocational Education and Training (VET) markets in Australia resulted in shifts in institutional perceptions and practices. Using situated experiences and perspectives from quality assurance auditors, training managers, international students and VET teachers from seven commercial for-profit…

  9. Neoliberal Economic Markets in Vocational Education and Training: Shifts in Perceptions and Practices in Private Vocational Education and Training in Melbourne, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasura, Rinos

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that the adoption of the competitive Vocational Education and Training (VET) markets in Australia resulted in shifts in institutional perceptions and practices. Using situated experiences and perspectives from quality assurance auditors, training managers, international students and VET teachers from seven commercial for-profit…

  10. MCEETYA Four-Year Plan, 2009-2012: A Companion Document for the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth (MCEETYA) four-year plan outlines the key strategies and initiatives Australian governments will undertake in each of these eight areas to support the achievement of the educational goals for young Australians and will be reviewed and updated as needed. The plan is aligned with…

  11. Technology in Mathematics Education: Proceedings of the 19th Annual Conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia (MERGA) (Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, June 30-July 3, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, Philip C., Ed.

    This document contains papers presented at the 19th annual conference of the Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia. Topics of the presentations include learning research, mathematical representations, problem solving, strategic learning behaviors, algebraic thinking and learning environments, teaching and learning of algebra,…

  12. Social Change and Family Policies. Free Papers, Part 4. International CFR Seminar (20th, Melbourne, Australia, August 19-24, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Frances E.; And Others

    These free papers presented at an International Committee on Family Research (CFR) seminar include (1) Frances E. Baum's "There's No Room in the Nuclear Family: Sharing As an Alternative Housing Option"; (2) Paula W. Dail's "Parental Role Perceptions among Young, Dual Parent Families in America: Family Policy Implications for the Future"; (3)…

  13. Social Change and Family Policies. Final Papers, Part 5. International CFR Seminar (20th, Melbourne, Australia, August 19-24, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asche, Justice Austin; And Others

    This document contains final papers presented at an International Committee on Family Research (CFR) seminar; included are key, discussant, and free papers as well as closing and farewell addresses. Key papers covered (1) worldwide trends in administrating family policy and (2) work, economic policies, and welfare consequences and…

  14. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (29th, Melbourne, Australia, July 10-15, 2005). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen L., Ed.; Vincent, Jill L., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The first volume of the 29th annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education contains plenary lecture and research forum papers as listed below. Short oral communications papers, poster presentations, brief summaries of discussion groups, and working sessions are also included in the volume. The plenary…

  15. Social Change and Family Policies. Final Papers, Part 5. International CFR Seminar (20th, Melbourne, Australia, August 19-24, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asche, Justice Austin; And Others

    This document contains final papers presented at an International Committee on Family Research (CFR) seminar; included are key, discussant, and free papers as well as closing and farewell addresses. Key papers covered (1) worldwide trends in administrating family policy and (2) work, economic policies, and welfare consequences and…

  16. Social Change and Family Policies. Key Papers, Part I. International CFR Seminar (20th, Melbourne, Australia, August 19-24, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Randall; And Others

    These papers from an International Committee on Family Research (CFR) seminar explore seven themes, four of which are presented in Part 1. The first set of papers approach the question of whether the family is worth supporting and the related issue of pressures, conflicts, and expectations of family life (Theme 1). Randall Collins discusses…

  17. The effect of an early childhood obesity intervention on father’s obesity risk behaviors: the Melbourne InFANT Program

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To investigate the effect of an early childhood obesity prevention intervention, incorporating a parent modelling component, on fathers’ obesity risk-related behaviours. Methods Cluster randomized-controlled trial in the setting of pre-existing first-time parents groups organised by Maternal and Child Health Nurses in Victoria, Australia. Participants were 460 first-time fathers mean age = 34.2 (s.d.4.90) years. Dietary pattern scores of fathers were derived using principal component analysis, total physical activity and total television viewing time were assessed at baseline (infant aged three to four months) and after 15 months. Results No significant beneficial intervention effect was observed on fathers’ dietary pattern scores, total physical activity or total television viewing time. Conclusion Despite a strong focus on parent modelling (targeting parents own diet, physical activity and television viewing behaviours), and beneficial impact on mothers’ obesity risk behaviours, this intervention, with mothers as the point of contact, had no effect on fathers’ obesity risk-related behaviours. Based on the established links between children’s obesity risk-related behaviors and that of their fathers, a need exists for research testing the effectiveness of interventions with a stronger engagement of fathers. PMID:24524293

  18. The Melbourne Code Appendices: announcing a new approach for tracking nomenclatural decisions and a analysis of the history of nomenclatural proposals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newly expanded digital resource exists for tracking decisions on all nomenclature proposals potentially contributing to Appendices II-VIII of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants. This resource originated with the Smithsonian Institution's Proposals and Disposals web...

  19. The Importance of a Theory-Informed Understanding of Additive Bilingual Education: Supporting Bilingualism and Biliteracy in a Melbourne Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Paul

    2006-01-01

    While Government commitments to supporting instruction in languages other than English have largely been honoured, bilingual education as a form of learning has not been widespread. Acknowledging the benefits of learning a language other than English, the most recent Australian national languages policy statement nonetheless makes no mention of…

  20. Social Change and Family Policies. Free Papers, Part 4. International CFR Seminar (20th, Melbourne, Australia, August 19-24, 1984).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Frances E.; And Others

    These free papers presented at an International Committee on Family Research (CFR) seminar include (1) Frances E. Baum's "There's No Room in the Nuclear Family: Sharing As an Alternative Housing Option"; (2) Paula W. Dail's "Parental Role Perceptions among Young, Dual Parent Families in America: Family Policy Implications for the Future"; (3)…

  1. 1991 AAIR Forum. Refereed Proceedings of the Conference of the Australasian Association for Institutional Research (AAIR) (2nd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, October 1-3, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinburne Inst. of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria (Australia).

    The Australasian Association for Institutional Research (AAIR) conference provided a comprehensive coverage of issues, concepts, and techniques in the areas of planning, data analysis and research, and related aspects of management support in tertiary education. Refereed papers from the conference include: (1) "Changes in Student Approaches to…

  2. Proceedings of the Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (29th, Melbourne, Australia, July 10-15, 2005). Volume 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Helen L., Ed.; Vincent, Jill L., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The third volume of the 29th annual conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education contains full research report papers. Papers include: (1) Students' Use of ICT Tools: Choices and Reasons (Anne Berit Fuglestad); (2) Interaction of Modalities in Cabri: A Case Study (Fulvia Furinghetti, Francesca Morselli, and…

  3. Applying Best Practices to Florida Local Government Retrofit Programs, Central Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    In some communities, local government and non-profit entities have funds to purchase and renovate distressed, foreclosed homes for resale in the affordable housing market. Numerous opportunities to improve whole house energy efficiency are inherent in these comprehensive renovations. BA-PIRC worked together in a multi-year field study making recommendations in individual homes, meanwhile compiling improvement costs, projected energy savings, practical challenges, and labor force factors surrounding common energy-related renovation measures. The field study, Phase 1 of this research, resulted in a set of best practices appropriate to the current labor pool and market conditions in central Florida to achieve projected annual energy savings of 15-30% and higher. This report describes Phase 2 of the work where researchers worked with a local government partner to implement and refine the "current best practices". A simulation study was conducted to characterize savings potential under three sets of conditions representing varying replacement needs for energy-related equipment and envelope components. The three scenarios apply readily to the general remodeling industry as for renovation of foreclosed homes for the affordable housing market. Our new local government partner, the City of Melbourne, implemented the best practices in a community-scale renovation program that included ten homes in 2012. ​

  4. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Applying Best Practices to Florida Local Government Retrofit Programs - Central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    2014-03-01

    In some communities, local government and non-profit entities have funds to purchase and renovate distressed, foreclosed homes for resale in the affordable housing market. Numerous opportunities to improve whole house energy efficiency are inherent in these comprehensive renovations. BA-PIRC worked together in a multiyear field study making recommendations in individual homes, meanwhile compiling improvement costs, projected energy savings, practical challenges, and labor force factors surrounding common energy-related renovation measures. The field study, Phase 1 of this research, resulted in a set of best practices appropriate to the current labor pool and market conditions in central Florida to achieve projected annual energy savings of 15%-30% and higher. This case study describes Phase 2 of the work where researchers worked with a local government partner to implement and refine the "current best practices". A simulation study was conducted to characterize savings potential under three sets of conditions representing varying replacement needs for energy-related equipment and envelope components. The three scenarios apply readily to the general remodeling industry as for renovation of foreclosed homes for the affordable housing market. The new local government partner, the City of Melbourne, implemented the best practices in a community-scale renovation program that included ten homes in 2012.

  5. Team 386 prepares for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Voltage: The South Brevard FIRST Team (386) works on their robot, Sparky. The team of students from Eau Gallie, Satellite, Palm Bay, Melbourne, Bayside and Melbourne Central Catholic high schools was co-sponsored by Intersil Corp., Harris Corp., NASA Kennedy Space Center, Rockwell Collins and Interface & Control Systems, Inc. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  6. 75 FR 12809 - Notice of Intent To Release Certain Properties From All Terms, Conditions, Reservations and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ...The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties, 15.819 acres at the Melbourne International Airport, Melbourne, Florida from the conditions, reservations, and restrictions as contained in a Quitclaim Deed agreement between the FAA and the City of Melbourne, dated August 6, 1947. The release of property will allow the Melbourne Airport Authority to dispose of the......

  7. Prototype Local Data Integration System and Central Florida Data Deficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manobianco, John; Case, Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the Applied Meteorology Unit's (AMU) task on the Local Data Integration System (LDIS) and central Florida data deficiency. The objectives of the task are to identify all existing meteorological data sources within 250 km of the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Eastern Range at Cape Canaveral Air Station (CCAS), identify and configure an appropriate LDIS to integrate these data, and implement a working prototype to be used for limited case studies and data non-incorporation (DNI) experiments. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate products that may enhance weather nowcasts and short-range (less than 6 h) forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS), Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG), and the Melbourne National Weather Service (NWS MLB) operational requirements. The LDIS has the potential to provide added value for nowcasts and short term forecasts for two reasons. First, it incorporates all data operationally available in east central Florida. Second, it is run at finer spatial and temporal resolutions than current national-scale operational models. In combination with a suitable visualization tool, LDIS may provide users with a more complete and comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features than could be developed by individually examining the disparate data sets over the same area and time. The utility of LDIS depends largely on the reliability and availability of observational data. Therefore, it is important to document all existing meteorological data sources around central Florida that can be incorporated by it. Several factors contribute to the data density and coverage over east central Florida including the level in the atmosphere, distance from KSC/CCAS, time, and prevailing weather. The central Florida mesonet consists of existing surface meteorological and hydrological data available from the Tampa NWS and data servers at Miami and Jacksonville. However the utility of these data for operational use is limited, mainly because there are relatively few additional meteorological observations within 50 km of KSC/CCAS to supplement existing METAR and KSC/CCAS tower reports.

  8. A geochronological framework for orogenic gold mineralisation in central Victoria, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierlein, Frank P.; Arne, Dennis C.; Foster, David A.; Reynolds, Peter

    2001-12-01

    New 40Ar/39Ar geochronological data support, and significantly expand upon, preliminary age data that were interpreted to suggest an episodic and diachronous emplacement of gold across the western Lachlan fold belt, Australia. These geochronological data indicate that mineralisation in the central Victorian gold province occurred in response to episodic, eastward progressing deformation, metamorphism and exhumation associated with the formation of the western Lachlan fold belt. Initial gold formation throughout the Stawell and the Bendigo structural zones can be constrained to a broad interval of time between 455 and 435 Ma, with remobilisation of metals into new structures and/or new pulses of mineralisation occurring between 420 and 400 Ma, and again between 380 and 370 Ma, linked to episodic variations in the regional stress-field and during intrusion of felsic dykes and plutons. This separation of ages is incompatible with the view that gold emplacement in the western Lachlan fold belt was the result of a single, orogen-wide event during the Devonian. A distinct phase of gold mineralisation, characterised by elevated Cu, Mo, Sb or W, is associated with both Late Silurian to Early Devonian (~420 to 400 Ma) and Middle to Late Devonian (~380 to 370 Ma) magmatism, when crustal thickening and shortening during the ongoing consolidation of the western Lachlan Fold Belt led to extensive melt development in the lower crust and resulted in widespread magmatism throughout central Victoria. These ~420 to 400 Ma and ~380 to 370 Ma occurrences, best exemplified by the Wonga deposit in the Stawell structural zone and many of the Woods Point deposits in the Melbourne structural zone, but also evidenced by occurrences at Fosterville and Maldon in the Bendigo structural zone, clearly formed synchronous with, or post-date, the emplacement of plutons and dykes, and thus are spatially (if not genetically) related to melt generation at depth. This later, magmatic-associated and polymetallic type of gold mineralisation is economically subordinate to the earlier, metamorphic-associated type of gold deposition in the Stawell and Bendigo structural zones, but tends to be the dominant style in the Melbourne Zone. These new geochronological constraints, together with zircon U-Pb data from felsic intrusive rocks of known relationship to gold mineralisation, demonstrate that initial hydrothermal alteration associated with gold emplacement in the western Lachlan fold belt was metamorphic-related, predating the emplacement of granite plutons by as much as 80 million years. This timing differs from other important orogenic gold districts where gold deposition is closely associated spatially with felsic magmatism. The early introduction of metamorphically derived fluids well before magmatism may reflect variations in the timing of peak metamorphic conditions at different crustal levels in an accretionary prism undergoing simultaneous deformation and erosion. Consequently, no genetic link exists between the main phase(s) of gold mineralisation and magmatism in the central Victorian gold province. With the exception of formation of a minor magmatism-related and geochemically-distinct mineralisation style at about 420 to 400 Ma, and again at about 380 to 370 Ma, the apparent spatial relationship between gold mineralisation and felsic intrusions is merely the result of melts and fluids being channelised along the same structures.

  9. Meeting at the Crossroads. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE 2001) (18th, Melbourne, Australia, December 9-12, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Gregor, Ed.; Keppell, Mike, Ed.; McNaught, Carmel, Ed.; Petrovic, Tom, Ed.

    This proceedings contains 63 papers presented at ASCLITE (Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education) 2001. The focus is on the following themes related to the use of computers in higher education: (1) reflection in and on action, for reflective inquiry, for students, for teachers, for design and…

  10. Academic Communication across Disciplines and Cultures. Selected Proceedings of the National Conference on Tertiary Literacy: Research and Practice, Volume 2 (1st, Melbourne, Australia, March 14-16, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golebiowski, Zofia, Ed.; Borland, Helen, Ed.

    These selected papers from the First Conference on Tertiary Literacy focus on communication across differences of culture and discipline in Australian universities. Many of the papers have resulted from cooperation between applied linguists and specialist lecturers and describe cooperative models of literacy education based on interdisciplinary…

  11. Policy and Practice of Tertiary Literacy. Selected Proceedings of the First National Conference on Tertiary Literacy: Research and Practice, Volume 1 (1st, Melbourne, Australia, March 14-16, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golebiowski, Zofia, Ed.

    This selection of papers from the First Conference on Tertiary Literacy, which examined the role of literacy as a foundation for knowledge acquisition and dissemination that influences the academic success of tertiary students, presents a number of case studies of policy and practice in Australian universities. Keynote addresses included:…

  12. Quality and Diversity in VET [Vocational Education and Training] Research. Proceedings of the National Conference of the Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA) (2nd, Melbourne, Australia, February 11-12, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Alexandria.

    These proceedings consist of 43 presentations clustered into these key areas: position, strategy, contribution, and future issues; diversity of participation and contexts; issues in the workplace and learning settings; question of practitioners work; and questions of knowledge and methodology--all related to the themes of quality and diversity.…

  13. Spotlight on the human factor: building a foundation for the future of haemophilia A management: report from a symposium on human recombinant FVIII at the World Federation of Hemophilia World Congress, Melbourne, Australia on 12 May 2014.

    PubMed

    Kessler, C; Oldenburg, J; Ettingshausen, C Escuriola; Tiede, A; Khair, K; Négrier, C; Klamroth, R

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor development is the most serious and challenging complication in the treatment of severe haemophilia A. Up to 38% of such patients develop inhibitors with current recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) products produced in hamster cell lines. Human-cl rhFVIII is a new generation fully sulfated B-domain-deleted FVIII coagulant glycoprotein, which is generated from a human cell line. Thus, there are no non-human epitopes which would be potentially immunogenic. This molecule has significantly higher VWF-binding affinity compared with existing full-length rFVIII produced in hamster cell lines. The development aim of Human-cl rhFVIII is to address the challenges of FVIII inhibitors and frequent infusions during prophylaxis. Human-cl rhFVIII's mean half-life is very comparable to some of the newer products which involve modification of the FVIII molecule to extend the circulating half-life. There are promising data concerning the use of a personalized prophylaxis regimen with Human-cl rhFVIII. Preliminary data indicate a median dosing interval of 3.5 days with 66.7% of the patients on a twice per week or fewer infusions schedule combined with a low bleeding rate and no increased FVIII consumption when compared to standard prophylaxis. No product-specific laboratory assay is required to monitor the coagulation activity for Human-cl rhFVIII. The results of registration clinical trials with Human-cl rhFVIII as well as the ongoing studies in previously untreated patients (NuProtect) and personalized prophylaxis study in previously treated patients (NuPreviq), will be discussed. The manufacturer has received marketing authorization for Human-cl rhFVIII in Europe and Canada under the name Nuwiq(®) and plans to launch it in the USA and globally in 2015. PMID:25472812

  14. Observations of Total Lightning Associated with Severe Convection During the Wet Season in Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, D.; Williams, E.; Weber, M.; Goodman, Steven J.; Raghavan, R.; Matlin, A.; Boldi, B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will discuss findings of a collaborative lightning research project between National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the National Weather Service office In Melbourne Florida. In August 1996, NWS/MLB received a workstation which incorporates data from the KMLB WSR-88D, Cloud to Ground (CG) stroke data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN), and 3D volumetric lightning data collected from the Kennedy Space Centers' Lightning Detection And Ranging (LDAR) lightning system. The two primary objectives of this lightning workstation, called Lightning Imaging Sensor Data Applications Display (USDAD), are to: observe how total lightning relates to severe convective storm morphology over central Florida, and compare ground based total lightning data (LDAR) to a satellite based lightning detection system. This presentation will focus on objective #1. The LISDAD system continuously displays CG and total lighting activity overlaid on top of the KMLB composite reflectivity product. This allows forecasters to monitor total lightning activity associated with convective cells occurring over the central Florida peninsula and adjacent coastal waters. The LISDAD system also keeps track of the amount of total lightning data, and associated KMLB radar products with individual convective cells occurring over the region. By clicking on an individual cell, a history table displays flash rate information (CG and total lightning) in one minute increments, along with radar parameter trends (echo tops, maximum dBz and height of maximum dBz) every 5 minutes. This history table Is updated continuously, without user intervention, as long as the cell is identified. Reviewing data collected during the 1997 wet season (21 cases) revealed that storms which produced severe weather (hall greater or = 0.75 in. or wind damage) typically showed a rapid rise In total lightning prior to the onset of severe weather. On average, flash rate increases of 25 FPM per minute over a time scale of approximately 5 minutes were common. These pulse severe storms typically reached values of 150 to 200 FPM with some cells exceeding 400 FPM. One finding which could have a direct application to the warning process is that the rapid increase in lightning typically occurred in advance of the warning issuance time. Comparisons between the ending time of the rapid rate increase and the time of when the warning was issued by NWS/MLB meteorologist exhibited a lead time of 8 minutes. It is conceivable that if close monitoring of the LISDAD system by operational meteorologist is routinely performed, warnings for pulse severe storms could be issued up to 4 to 6 minutes earlier than what is issued currently.

  15. Quality, Viability and Relevance: A Strategic Framework for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Mixed-Mode Teaching and Learning in an Undergraduate Biotechnology and Biomedical Science Degree

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kathleen; Piva, Terrence; Nicolettou, Angela

    2004-01-01

    RMIT is a major Australian university of technology based in central Melbourne with regional and international reach. It has made both online education and programme quality two central planks in its teaching and learning strategy in recent years. This paper proposes making the connection between these two strategic directions by working within a…

  16. Teams practice for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Students test their robots in practice sessions before the start of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  17. Workers prepare the tent for FIRST robotic competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Workers at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex make final preparations in the huge tent for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  18. Total Lightning and Radar Storm Characteristics Associated with Severe Storms in Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, Steven J; Raghavan, R.; Buechler, Dennis; Hodanish, S.; Sharp, D.; Williams, E.; Boldi, B.; Matlin, A.; Weber, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper examines the three dimensional characteristics of lightning flashes and severe storms observed in Central Florida during 1997-1998. The lightning time history of severe and tornadic storms were captured during the on-going ground validation campaign supporting the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) experiment on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The ground validation campaign is a collaborative experiment that began in 1997 and involves scientists at the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, MIT/Lincoln Laboratories, and the NWS Forecast Office at Melbourne, FL. Lightning signatures that may provide potential early warning of severe storms are being evaluated by the forecasters at the NWS/MLB office. Severe storms with extreme flash rates sometimes exceeding 300 per minute and accompanying rapid increases in flash rate prior to the onset of the severe weather (hall, damaging winds, tornadoes) have been reported by Hodanish et al. and Williams et al. (1998-this conference). We examine the co-evolving changes in storm structure (mass, echo top, shear, latent heat release) and kinematics associated with these extreme and rapid flash rate changes over time. The flash frequency and density are compared with the three dimensional radar reflectivity structure of the storm to help interpret the possible mechanisms producing the extreme and rapidly increasing flash rates. For two tornadic storms examined thus far, we find the burst of lightning is associated with the development of upper level rotation in the storm. In one case, the lightning burst follows the formation of a bounded weak echo region (BWER). The flash rates diminish with time as the rotation develops to the ground in conjunction with the decent of the reflectivity core. Our initial findings suggest the dramatic increase of flash rates is associated with a sudden and dramatic increase in storm updraft intensity which we hypothesize is stretching vertical vorticity as well as enhancing the development of the mixed phase region of the storm. We discuss the importance of these factors in producing both the observed extreme flash rates and the severe weather that follows in these storms and others to be presented.

  19. The On-Line ERIC Project at the National Library of Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Ian S.

    This report describes the On-Line ERIC Project conducted jointly by the National Library of Australia and by IBM Australia Ltd. between March and May 1976. The Project involved a telecommunications network with video terminals and printers linking the National Library, the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology Central Library, and Macquarie…

  20. Teams begin their preparations for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Team 393 from Morristown, Ind., sets up its robot on a table to prepare it for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. KSC is co-sponsoring the team, The Bee Bots, from Morristown Junior and Senior High Schools. On the floor at right is team 386, known as Voltage: The South Brevard First Team. This team is made up of students from Eau Gallie, Satellite, Palm Bay, Melbourne, Bayside and Melbourne Central Catholic High Schools. They are sponsored by KSC as well as Harris Corp., Intersil Corp., Interface & Control Systems. Inc. and Rockwell Collins. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  1. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida, Phase 2, Part 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2007-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. The forecasters at the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) at Johnson Spaceflight Center in Houston, TX consider lightning in their landing forecasts for space shuttles at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), FL Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). The forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) do the same in their routine Terminal Aerodrome Forecasts (TAFs) for seven airports in the NWS MLB County Warning Area (CWA). The Applied Meteorology Unit created flow regime climatologies of lightning probability in the 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-n mi circles surrounding the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and all airports in the NWS MLB county warning area in 1-, 3-, and 6-hour increments. The results were presented in tabular and graphical format and incorporated into a web-based graphical user interface so forecasters could easily navigate through the data and to make the GUI usable in any web browser on computers with different operating systems.

  2. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase IV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. Previously, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) calculated the gridded lightning climatologies based on seven flow regimes over Florida for 1-, 3- and 6-hr intervals in 5-, 10-,20-, and 30-NM diameter range rings around the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and eight other airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) county warning area (CWA). In this update to the work, the AMU recalculated the lightning climatologies for using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The AMU included all data regardless of flow regime as one of the stratifications, added monthly stratifications, added three years of data to the period of record and used modified flow regimes based work from the AMU's Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool, Phase II. The AMU made changes so the 5- and 10-NM radius range rings are consistent with the aviation forecast requirements at NWS MLB, while the 20- and 30-NM radius range rings at the SLF assist the Spaceflight Meteorology Group in making forecasts for weather Flight Rule violations during Shuttle landings. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface with the new data.

  3. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Joe H., III

    2008-01-01

    This report describes work done by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) to add composite soundings to the Advanced Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). This allows National Weather Service (NWS) forecasters to compare the current atmospheric state with climatology. In a previous phase, the AMU created composite soundings for four rawinsonde observation stations in Florida, for each of eight flow regimes. The composite soundings were delivered to the NWS Melbourne (MLB) office for display using the NSHARP software program. NWS MLB requested that the AMU make the composite soundings available for display in AWIPS. The AMU first created a procedure to customize AWIPS so composite soundings could be displayed. A unique four-character identifier was created for each of the 32 composite soundings. The AMU wrote a Tool Command Language/Tool Kit (TcVTk) software program to convert the composite soundings from NSHARP to Network Common Data Form (NetCDF) format. The NetCDF files were then displayable by AWIPS.

  4. Situational Lightning Climatologies for Central Florida: Phase IV: Central Florida Flow Regime Based Climatologies of Lightning Probabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    The threat of lightning is a daily concern during the warm season in Florida. Research has revealed distinct spatial and temporal distributions of lightning occurrence that are strongly influenced by large-scale atmospheric flow regimes. Previously, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) calculated the gridded lightning climatologies based on seven flow regimes over Florida for 1-, 3- and 6-hr intervals in 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30-NM diameter range rings around the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) and eight other airfields in the National Weather Service in Melbourne (NWS MLB) county warning area (CWA). In this update to the work, the AMU recalculated the lightning climatologies for using individual lightning strike data to improve the accuracy of the climatologies. The AMU included all data regardless of flow regime as one of the stratifications, added monthly stratifications, added three years of data to the period of record and used modified flow regimes based work from the AMU's Objective Lightning Probability Forecast Tool, Phase II. The AMU made changes so the 5- and 10-NM radius range rings are consistent with the aviation forecast requirements at NWS MLB, while the 20- and 30-NM radius range rings at the SLF assist the Spaceflight Meteorology Group in making forecasts for weather Flight Rule violations during Shuttle landings. The AMU also updated the graphical user interface with the new data.

  5. Astronaut David Brown poses with ComBBat team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown poses with members of the team known as ComBBat, representing Central Florida's Astronaut and Titusville high schools. ComBBat was teamed with Boeing at KSC and Brevard Community College. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition being held March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  6. Team 21 cheers during a contest at the FIRST event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Members of the FIRST robotic team, ComBBat, from Central Florida's Astronaut and Titusville high schools, cheer and encourage the contestants during competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  7. Essential Elements of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education. Research and Development in Higher Education, Volume 4. Papers Presented at the Annual Conference of the Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (7th, Melbourne, Victoria, May 9-12, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellard, Rod, Ed.

    Forty-four papers from the 1981 conference of the Higher Education Research and Development Society are presented that focus on issues related to the planning of learning, technique and art in teaching, and judging the effectiveness of learning. Among the papers and authors are: "Planning the Means by Which Teaching and Learning Should Occur" (W.…

  8. Simulation of a Real-Time Local Data Integration System over East-Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Case, Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) simulated a real-time configuration of a Local Data Integration System (LDIS) using data from 15-28 February 1999. The objectives were to assess the utility of a simulated real-time LDIS, evaluate and extrapolate system performance to identify the hardware necessary to run a real-time LDIS, and determine the sensitivities of LDIS. The ultimate goal for running LDIS is to generate analysis products that enhance short-range (less than 6 h) weather forecasts issued in support of the 45th Weather Squadron, Spaceflight Meteorology Group, and Melbourne National Weather Service operational requirements. The simulation used the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (ADAS) software on an IBM RS/6000 workstation with a 67-MHz processor. This configuration ran in real-time, but not sufficiently fast for operational requirements. Thus, the AMU recommends a workstation with a 200-MHz processor and 512 megabytes of memory to run the AMU's configuration of LDIS in real-time. This report presents results from two case studies and several data sensitivity experiments. ADAS demonstrates utility through its ability to depict high-resolution cloud and wind features in a variety of weather situations. The sensitivity experiments illustrate the influence of disparate data on the resulting ADAS analyses.

  9. Using Flow Regime Lightning and Sounding Climatologies to Initialize Gridded Lightning Threat Forecasts for East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred; Short, David; Volkmer, Matthew; Sharp, David; Spratt, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Each morning, the forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) produce an experimental cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning threat index map for their county warning area (CWA) that is posted to their web site (httl://www.srh.weather.gov/mlb/ghwo/lightning.shtml) . Given the hazardous nature of lightning in East Central Florida, especially during the warm season months of May September, these maps help users factor the threat of lightning, relative to their location, into their daily plans. The maps are color-coded in five levels from Very Low to Extreme, with threat level definitions based on the probability of lightning occurrence and the expected amount of CG activity. On a day in which thunderstorms are expected, there are typically two or more threat levels depicted spatially across the CWA. The locations of relative lightning threat maxima and minima often depend on the position and orientation of the low-level ridge axis, forecast propagation and interaction of sea/lake/outflow boundaries, expected evolution of moisture and stability fields, and other factors that can influence the spatial distribution of thunderstorms over the CWA. The lightning threat index maps are issued for the 24-hour period beginning at 1200 UTC each day with a grid resolution of 5 km x 5 km. Product preparation is performed on the AWIPS Graphical Forecast Editor (GFE), which is the standard NWS platform for graphical editing. Until recently, the forecasters created each map manually, starting with a blank map. To improve efficiency of the forecast process, NWS MLB requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) create gridded warm season lightning climatologies that could be used as first-guess inputs to initialize lightning threat index maps. The gridded values requested included CG strike densities and frequency of occurrence stratified by synoptic-scale flow regime. The intent was to improve consistency between forecasters while allowing them to focus on the mesoscale detail of the forecast. Several studies took place at the Florida State University (FSU) and NWS Tallahassee (TAE) in which they created daily flow regimes using Florida 1200 UTC synoptic soundings and CG strike densities, or number of strikes per specified area. The soundings used to determine the flow regimes were taken at Miami (MIA), Tampa (TBW), and Jacksonville (JAX), FL, and the lightning data for the strike densities came from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The densities were created on a 2.5 km x 2.5 km grid for every hour of every day during the warm seasons in the years 1989-2004. The grids encompass an area that includes the entire state of Florida and adjacent Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico waters. Personnel at FSU and NWS TAE provided this data and supporting software for the work performed by the AMU.

  10. Using Flow Regime Lightning and Sounding Climatologies to Initialize Gridded Lightning Threat Forecasts for East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winifred; Short, David; Wolkmer, Matthew; Sharp, David; Spratt, Scott

    2006-01-01

    Each morning, the forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourne, FL (NWS MLB) produce an experimental cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning threat index map for their county warning area (CWA) that is posted to their web site (http://www.srh.weather.gov/mlb/ghwo/lightning.shtml) . Given the hazardous nature of lightning in East Central Florida, especially during the warm season months of May September, these maps help users factor the threat of lightning, relative to their location, into their daily plans. The maps are color-coded in five levels from Very Low to Extreme, with threat level definitions based on the probability of lightning occurrence and the expected amount of CG activity. On a day in which thunderstorms are expected, there are typically two or more threat levels depicted spatially across the CWA. The locations of relative lightning threat maxima and minima often depend on the position and orientation of the low-level ridge axis, forecast propagation and interaction of sea/lake/outflow boundaries, expected evolution of moisture and stability fields, and other factors that can influence the spatial distribution of thunderstorms over the CWA. The lightning threat index maps are issued for the 24-hour period beginning at 1200 UTC each day with a grid resolution of 5 km x 5 km. Product preparation is performed on the AWIPS Graphical Forecast Editor (GFE), which is the standard NWS platform for graphical editing. Currently, the forecasters create each map manually, starting with a blank map. To improve efficiency of the forecast process, NWS MLB requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) create gridded warm season lightning climatologies that could be used as first-guess inputs to initialize lightning threat index maps. The gridded values requested included CG strike densities and frequency of occurrence stratified by synoptic-scale flow regime. The intent is to improve consistency between forecasters while allowing them to focus on the mesoscale detail of the forecast, ultimately benefiting the end-users of the product. Several studies took place at the Florida State University (FSU) and NWS Tallahassee (TAE) in which they created daily flow regimes using Florida 1200 UTC synoptic soundings and CG strike densities, or number of strikes per specified area. The soundings used to determine the flow regimes were taken at Miami (MIA), Tampa (TBW), and Jacksonville (JAX), FL, and the lightning data for the strike densities came from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN). The densities were created on a 2.5 km x 2.5 km grid for every hour of every day during the warm seasons in the years 1989-2004. The grids encompass an area that includes the entire state of Florida and adjacent Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico waters. Personnel at FSU and NWS TAE provided this data and supporting software for the work performed by the AMU.

  11. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the conclusion of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex, KSC Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings speaks to the teams and other attendees. At left is Gregg Gale, with Walt Disney World, which is the site of the national competition (at EPCOT) April 6-8. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  12. Team 233 prepares for FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Space Coast FIRST Team (233) works on their robot, which is named RoccoBot, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Rockledge and Cocoa Beach high schools was co- sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center, Lockheed Martin and Dynacs. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  13. A crowd watches practice sessions for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Visitors to Kennedy Space Center, team members and their families fill the stands during practice sessions of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  14. Teams begin their preparations for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Students from high schools around the United States busily prepare their robots for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. In the front is a team called Lightning, from Dr. Michael M. Krop Senior High School in Miami, Fla. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  15. Teams begin their preparations for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Students from high schools around the United States busily prepare their robots for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  16. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Members of the team known as Heatwave, from St. Petersburg, Fla., get 'high fives' from Jim Jennings (wearing a straw hat), KSC's deputy director for Business Operations, during closing ceremonies for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Heatwave came in second for the final competition, plus received awards for Number One Seed, Best Offensive round, and the DaimlerChrysler Team Spirit. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  17. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    After the finals of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition, Team 86 from Jacksonville, Fla., receives from the FIRST crew an award for Best Play of the Day. At left is Nap Carroll, chief financial officer, Kennedy Space Center. The event was held at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  18. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The team known as Heatwave, from St. Petersburg, Fla., celebrates after their win at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex. They came in second for the final competition, plus received awards for Number One Seed, Best Offensive round, and the DaimlerChrysler Team Spirit. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  19. Teams practice for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Two student teams test their robots in practice sessions before the start of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  20. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Members of one of the teams competing in the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition, wait to receive their medals from the FIRST crew. At left is Nap Carroll, chief financial officer, Kennedy Space Center. The event was held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  1. Teams practice for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Student teams test their robots in practice sessions before the start of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  2. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At the conclusion of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex, the Center's Deputy Director for Business Operations Jim Jennings presents shirts to Dave Alonso (left) and Eduardo Lopez del Castillo (right). Alonso, who is chief of the Program Control Contract Office, helped make possible the KSC sponsorship of the event. Castillo helped introduce the FIRST organization to KSC several years ago. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  3. Team 393 robot scores in FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Bee Bots team (393) robot, named Dr. Beevil, scores by gathering balls. The team is composed of students from Morristown Jr. and Sr. high schools in Morristown, Ind., and is co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and IPT Inc. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  4. FIRST teams watch the competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    FIRST teams watch robots in action during the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  5. Team 278 gets help from KSC machine shop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Hero Team (278) robot, named Hero, is repaired in a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop. The team of Edgewater High School students was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  6. Astronaut David Brown talks to FIRST team members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown talks with FIRST team members, Baxter Bomb Squad, from Mountain Home High School, Mountain Home, Ariz., during the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  7. Team 408 prepares for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Roboticks team (408) carries their robot, which is named R2K, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Blanche Ely High School in Ft. Lauderdale was co-sponsored by Nortel Networks and NASA Kennedy Space Center. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  8. Crowd enjoys the FIRST event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    FIRST team members and friends enjoy the FIRST event. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  9. Team 278 gets help from KSC machine shop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Hero Team (278) gets some help from a Kennedy Space Center research and development machine shop in repairing their robot, named Hero. The team of Edgewater High School students was co- sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center and Honeywell. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  10. Astronaut David Brown talks with team members from South Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown looks over the robot named 'L'il Max' with members of the team The Bot Kickers! from Northwestern High School, Rock Hill, S.C. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition being held March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  11. FIRST robots compete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    FIRST teams and their robots work to go through the right motions at the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  12. Teams begin their preparations for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A crate containing a robot for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 is unloaded near the Rocket Garden at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Inside the crate is 'RoccoBot,' the entry from The Space Coast FIRST Team, comprising students from Rockledge and Cocoa Beach High Schools. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  13. Astronaut David Brown talks with team members from Lake Buena Vista, Fla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Astronaut David Brown chats with members of the Explorers team, from Lake Buena Vista, Fla., during the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held March 9-11 in the KSC Visitor Complex Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students from all over the country are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  14. Team members cheer their team during FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Members of a FIRST robotic team cheer their teammates on during early competition at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held March 9-11 in the KSC Visitor Complex Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students from all over the country are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  15. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Members of the team known as Heatwave, from St. Petersburg, Fla., accept one of their four awards earned during the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Heatwave came in second for the final competition, plus received awards for Number One Seed, Best Offensive round, and the DaimlerChrysler Team Spirit. At far left is Nap Carroll, chief financial officer, Kennedy Space Center. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  16. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The crowd filling the bleachers cheer and applaud during the closing presentations of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  17. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Adult members of the team known as Heatwave, from St. Petersburg, Fla., get 'high fives' from Nap Carroll (center), chief financial officer, Kennedy Space Center, and other officials of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Heatwave came in second for the final competition, plus received awards for Number One Seed, Best Offensive round, and the DaimlerChrysler Team Spirit. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  18. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Crowds of students, friends and family fill the bleachers to cheer and applaud during the closing presentations of the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  19. Saving History and (Sometimes) Money.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Offers a sampling of historic preservation projects by school districts. Examples include New York City Public School 157; Edward Lee McClain High School in Greenfield, Ohio; Dillard High School in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; Melbourne High School in Melbourne, Florida; and Colonial High School in Orange County, Florida. (EV)

  20. Graduate Design Education: The Case for an Accretive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walliss, Jillian; Greig, Joan

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 the University of Melbourne began implementation of the Melbourne Model, its new vision for higher education in Australia. Six broad undergraduate university degrees have been introduced and graduate schools created. Students may now progress from an undergraduate generalist degree, with major, to a professional Masters. Alternatively,…

  1. Comparison of in-situ Electric Field and Radar Derived Parameters for Stratiform Clouds in Central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bateman, M.; Mach, D.; Lewis, S.; Dye, J.; Defer, E.; Grainger, C.; Willis, P.; Christian, H.; Merceret, F.

    2003-12-01

    Airborne measurements of electric fields and particle microphysics were made during a field program at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The aircraft, a Cessna Citation II jet operated by the University of North Dakota, carried six rotating-vane style electric field mills, several microphysics instruments, and thermodynamic instruments. In addition to the aircraft measurements, we also have data from both the Eastern Test Range WSR-74C (Patrick AFB) and the U.S. National Weather Service WSR-88D radars (primarily Melbourne, FL). One specific goal of this program was to try to develop a radar-based rule for estimating the hazard that an in-cloud electric field would present to a vehicle launched into the cloud. Based on past experience, and our desire to quantify the mixed-phase region of the cloud in question, we have assessed several algorithms for integrating radar reflectivity data in and above the mixed-phase region as a proxy for electric field. A successful radar proxy is one that can accurately predict the presence or absence of significant electric fields. We have compared various proxies with the measured in-cloud electric field strength in an attempt to develop a radar rule for assessing launch hazard. Assessment of the best proxy is presented.

  2. Prioritizing Urban Habitats for Connectivity Conservation: Integrating Centrality and Ecological Metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poodat, Fatemeh; Arrowsmith, Colin; Fraser, David; Gordon, Ascelin

    2015-09-01

    Connectivity among fragmented areas of habitat has long been acknowledged as important for the viability of biological conservation, especially within highly modified landscapes. Identifying important habitat patches in ecological connectivity is a priority for many conservation strategies, and the application of `graph theory' has been shown to provide useful information on connectivity. Despite the large number of metrics for connectivity derived from graph theory, only a small number have been compared in terms of the importance they assign to nodes in a network. This paper presents a study that aims to define a new set of metrics and compares these with traditional graph-based metrics, used in the prioritization of habitat patches for ecological connectivity. The metrics measured consist of "topological" metrics, "ecological metrics," and "integrated metrics," Integrated metrics are a combination of topological and ecological metrics. Eight metrics were applied to the habitat network for the fat-tailed dunnart within Greater Melbourne, Australia. A non-directional network was developed in which nodes were linked to adjacent nodes. These links were then weighted by the effective distance between patches. By applying each of the eight metrics for the study network, nodes were ranked according to their contribution to the overall network connectivity. The structured comparison revealed the similarity and differences in the way the habitat for the fat-tailed dunnart was ranked based on different classes of metrics. Due to the differences in the way the metrics operate, a suitable metric should be chosen that best meets the objectives established by the decision maker.

  3. Prioritizing Urban Habitats for Connectivity Conservation: Integrating Centrality and Ecological Metrics.

    PubMed

    Poodat, Fatemeh; Arrowsmith, Colin; Fraser, David; Gordon, Ascelin

    2015-09-01

    Connectivity among fragmented areas of habitat has long been acknowledged as important for the viability of biological conservation, especially within highly modified landscapes. Identifying important habitat patches in ecological connectivity is a priority for many conservation strategies, and the application of 'graph theory' has been shown to provide useful information on connectivity. Despite the large number of metrics for connectivity derived from graph theory, only a small number have been compared in terms of the importance they assign to nodes in a network. This paper presents a study that aims to define a new set of metrics and compares these with traditional graph-based metrics, used in the prioritization of habitat patches for ecological connectivity. The metrics measured consist of "topological" metrics, "ecological metrics," and "integrated metrics," Integrated metrics are a combination of topological and ecological metrics. Eight metrics were applied to the habitat network for the fat-tailed dunnart within Greater Melbourne, Australia. A non-directional network was developed in which nodes were linked to adjacent nodes. These links were then weighted by the effective distance between patches. By applying each of the eight metrics for the study network, nodes were ranked according to their contribution to the overall network connectivity. The structured comparison revealed the similarity and differences in the way the habitat for the fat-tailed dunnart was ranked based on different classes of metrics. Due to the differences in the way the metrics operate, a suitable metric should be chosen that best meets the objectives established by the decision maker. PMID:25924790

  4. Genes Help Set Menopause Timing

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hutt of the department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia, said, "it ... Ph.D., professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cell Biology and Anatomy, Medicine, and Pathology, and director, Division ...

  5. Guided Learning Applied to Optical Mineralogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driver, S. C.; Hunter, W. R.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an individual programmed study method used in a second year Geology course at the University of Melbourne. Outlines the criteria that make this instructional style useful and presents the student questionnaire used to evaluate the course. (GS)

  6. 75 FR 26787 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ..., Melbourne, 10000285 Lawrence County Walnut Ridge Commercial Historic District, Roughly bounded by E and W Main, N and S Front Sts, W Vine, and SW Third Sts, Walnut Ridge, 10000286 Monroe County Fargo...

  7. Review of “Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From Soil to Hman Health”

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a book review of "Managing Arsenic in the Environment: From Soil to Human Health," R. Naidu, E. Smith, G. Owens, P. Bhattacharya, and P. Nadebaum eds., CSIRO Publishing, Melbourne, Australia, 656 pp.,

  8. View of the SRB problems with Challenger after launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    51-L investigation at time 76.425 seconds, Right hand solid rocket booster nose cap separates/Drogue chute deploys,ROTI/MELBOURNE BEACH. Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-386C-642/775.

  9. View of the SRB problems with Challenger after launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    51-L investigation at time 60.500 seconds, Evidence of flame from right hand solid rocket booster in -Z direction, ROTI/MELBOURNE BEACH. Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-386C-642/131.

  10. View of the SRB problems with Challenger after launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    51-L investigation at time 73.326 seconds, Increased intensity of white flashing region of external tank (ET) liquid oxygen tank, ROTI/MELBOURNE BEACH. Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-386C-559/57.

  11. 78 FR 57353 - Endangered Species; File No. 14726

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ...Notice is hereby given that Blair Witherington, Ph.D., Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, 9700 South A1A, Melbourne Beach, FL, 32951, has requested a modification to scientific research Permit No....

  12. Insulated Concrete Homes Increase Durability and Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    2001-05-01

    New houses designed by Mercedes Homes in Melbourne, Florida, save their homeowners money by using energy efficient features such as a high performance heat pump and solar control glazing to reduce cooling costs.

  13. Using Cloud-to-Ground Lightning Climatologies to Initialize Gridded Lightning Threat Forecasts for East Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, Winnie; Sharp, David; Spratt, Scott; Volkmer, Matthew

    2005-01-01

    Each morning, the forecasters at the National Weather Service in Melbourn, FL (NWS MLB) produce an experimental cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning threat index map for their county warning area (CWA) that is posted to their web site (http://www.srh.weather.gov/mlb/ghwo/lightning.shtml) . Given the hazardous nature of lightning in central Florida, especially during the warm season months of May-September, these maps help users factor the threat of lightning, relative to their location, into their daily plans. The maps are color-coded in five levels from Very Low to Extreme, with threat level definitions based on the probability of lightning occurrence and the expected amount of CG activity. On a day in which thunderstorms are expected, there are typically two or more threat levels depicted spatially across the CWA. The locations of relative lightning threat maxima and minima often depend on the position and orientation of the low-level ridge axis, forecast propagation and interaction of sea/lake/outflow boundaries, expected evolution of moisture and stability fields, and other factors that can influence the spatial distribution of thunderstorms over the CWA. The lightning threat index maps are issued for the 24-hour period beginning at 1200 UTC (0700 AM EST) each day with a grid resolution of 5 km x 5 km. Product preparation is performed on the AWIPS Graphical Forecast Editor (GFE), which is the standard NWS platform for graphical editing. Currently, the forecasters create each map manually, starting with a blank map. To improve efficiency of the forecast process, NWS MLB requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) create gridded warm season lightning climatologies that could be used as first-guess inputs to initialize lightning threat index maps. The gridded values requested included CG strike densities and frequency of occurrence stratified by synoptic-scale flow regime. The intent is to increase consistency between forecasters while enabling them to focus on the mesoscale detail of the forecast, ultimately benefiting the end-users of the product. Several studies took place at the Florida State University (FSU) and NWS Tallahassee (TAE) for which they created daily flow regimes using Florida 1200 UTC synoptic soundings and CG strike densities from National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) data. The densities were created on a 2.5 km x 2.5 km grid for every hour of every day during the warm seasons in the years 1989-2004. The grids encompass an area that includes the entire state of Florida and adjacent Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico waters. Personnel at the two organizations provided this data and supporting software for the work performed by the AMU. The densities were first stratified by flow regime, then by time in 1-, 3-, 6-, 12-, and 24-hour increments while maintaining the 2.5 km x 2.5 km grid resolution. A CG frequency of occurrence was calculated for each stratification and grid box by counting the number of days with lightning and dividing by the total number of days in the data set. New CG strike densities were calculated for each stratification and grid box by summing the strike number values over all warm seasons, then normalized by dividing the summed values by the number of lightning days. This makes the densities conditional on whether lightning occurred. The frequency climatology values will be used by forecasters as proxy inputs for lightning prObability, while the density climatology values will be used for CG amount. In addition to the benefits outlined above, these climatologies will provide improved temporal and spatial resolution, expansion of the lightning threat area to include adjacent coastal waters, and potential to extend the forecast to include the day-2 period. This presentation will describe the lightning threat index map, discuss the work done to create the maps initialized with climatological guidance, and show examples of the climatological CG lightning densities and frequencies of occurren based on flow regime.

  14. Central hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal; Lee, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Central hypothyroidism is defined as hypothyroidism due to insufficient stimulation by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) of an otherwise normal thyroid gland. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1 in 80,000 to 1 in 120,000. It can be secondary hypothyroidism (pituitary) or tertiary hypothyroidism (hypothalamus) in origin. In children, it is usually caused by craniopharyngiomas or previous cranial irradiation for brain tumors or hematological malignancies. In adults, it is usually due to pituitary macroadenomas, pituitary surgeries or post-irradiation. Fatigue and peripheral edema are the most specific clinical features. Diagnosis is established by the presence of normal to low-normal TSH on the background of low-normal thyroid hormones, confirmed by the thyrotropin releasing hormone stimulation test. Therapy includes use of levothyroxine titrated to improvement in symptomology and keeping free T4 in the upper limit of normal reference range. PMID:21966662

  15. Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The crater in this VIS image is a beautiful example of a central peak crater. Note also the slumped interior crater walls and the well defined lobes of the ejecta blanket. This crater is located in the Isidis basin.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.6, Longitude 83.8 East (276.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. When smoke comes to town - effects of biomass burning smoke on air quality down under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keywood, Melita; Cope, Martin; (C. P) Meyer, Mick; Iinuma, Yoshi; Emmerson, Kathryn

    2014-05-01

    Annually, biomass burning results in the emission of quantities of trace gases and aerosol to the atmosphere. Biomass burning emissions have a significant effect on atmospheric chemistry due to the presence of reactive species. Biomass burning aerosols influence the radiative balance of the earth-atmosphere system directly through the scattering and absorption of radiation, and indirectly through their influence on cloud microphysical processes, and therefore constitute an important forcing in climate models. They also reduce visibility, influence atmospheric photochemistry and can be inhaled into the deepest parts of the lungs, so that they can have a significant effect on human health. Australia experiences bushfires on an annual basis. In most years fires are restricted to the tropical savannah forests of Northern Australia. However in the summer of 2006/2007 (December 2006 - February 2007), South Eastern Australia was affected by the longest recorded fires in its history. During this time the State of Victoria was ravaged by 690 separate bushfires, including the major Great Divide Fire, which devastated 1,048,238 hectares over 69 days. On several occasions, thick smoke haze was transported to the Melbourne central business district and PM10 concentrations at several air quality monitoring stations peaked at over 200 µg m-3 (four times the National Environment Protection Measure PM10 24 hour standard). During this period, a comprehensive suite of air quality measurements was carried out at a location 25 km south of the Melbourne CBD, including detailed aerosol microphysical and chemical composition measurements. Here we examine the chemical and physical properties of the smoke plume as it impacted Melbourne's air shed and discuss its impact on air quality over the city. We estimate the aerosol emission rates of the source fires, the age of the plumes and investigate the transformation of the smoke as it progressed from its source to the Melbourne airshed. We show that the smoke plumes that reached Melbourne during the summer of 2006/2007 resulted in elevated concentrations of particles and gases relative to non-fire impacted periods. The age of the plume was greater when smoke reached Melbourne (note that in our calculation of the plume age we do not distinguish between smoke and anthropogenic plumes). In addition, the older smoke plumes (30 hours) displayed higher concentrations of a number of gaseous and aerosol species relative to the younger smoke plumes (3 hours), particularly secondary reaction products, while the younger smoke plumes had higher concentrations of biomass burning marker compounds. This suggests that the enhanced photochemical activity in the smoke plumes significantly changes the aerosol composition of the smoke, potentially affecting the optical and thus radiative properties of the aerosol. This has implications for the modelling of aged smoke in chemical transport and climate models.

  17. Central Pain Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Central Pain Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Central Pain Syndrome? Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition ...

  18. Team 282 prepares for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Orange Crusher team (282) works on their robot, which is named Rust Bot, during the FIRST competition. The team of students from Lake Howell, Winter Springs and Orange Christian Private high schools was co-sponsored by NASA Kennedy Space Center, Matern Professional Engineering The Foundation, Control Technologies, Lucent Technologies and Sandy Engineering. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  19. Teams begin their preparations for the FIRST competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Students and advisors are busy setting up their robots for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 at the KSC Visitor Complex. Team 243 (left) comprises students from Fredrick Douglass High School and employees of Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems, from Marietta, Ga. The uncrated entry from Team 233 is at right. It was built by The Space Coast FIRST Team, comprising students from Rockledge and Cocoa Beach High Schools, with NASA, Lockheed Martin and Dynacs as sponsors. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at KSC, 16 are Florida teams co- sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  20. Closing ceremonies of the FIRST Southeast Regional robotics competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Members of the team known as Heatwave, from St. Petersburg, Fla., are excited after receiving an award at the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition held at the KSC Visitor Complex. At left are Carol Cavanaugh, Public Affairs, and Nap Carroll, chief financial officer, Kennedy Space Center. Heatwave came in second for the final competition, plus received awards for Number One Seed, Best Offensive round, and the DaimlerChrysler Team Spirit. Teams of high school students from all over the country tested the limits of their imagination using robots they designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing at the Southeast Regional event, 16 were Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  1. Collaborative development of anatomy workshops for medical and dental students in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jennifer A; Ivanusic, Jason J; le Roux, Cara M; Hatzopoulos, Kate; Gonsalvez, David; Hong, Someth; Durward, Callum

    2011-01-01

    After Phnom Penh was liberated from the Khmer Rouge in 1979, health science education in Cambodia had to be completely rebuilt. In this article, the authors report the results of a teaching collaboration between the University of Melbourne (Australia), the International University (Cambodia), and the University of Health Sciences (Cambodia). The main objectives in this collaboration were to provide the opportunity for dental and medical students in Cambodia to attend resourced anatomy workshops and to provide an opportunity for anatomy teachers in Cambodia to gain experience in implementing anatomy workshops of the style that are routinely used in the medical and dental curricula at the University of Melbourne. Experienced anatomy educators from the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Melbourne, designed and resourced a series of workshops and then delivered these in collaboration with Cambodian teaching staff in Phnom Penh. The Cambodian students who participated in the workshops were incredibly engaged and enthusiastic. The students' evaluations (by questionnaire) indicated a very positive response to the workshops. All of the workshop resources were donated to the two universities so that the staff could continue to implement similar workshops, and plans were developed to continue our collaboration by developing more resourced workshops for this purpose in the future. Two staff members from Cambodia will travel to Melbourne to participate in anatomy workshops and dissection classes at the University of Melbourne. We hope that this extension of the collaboration provides further support and impetus for the development of anatomy education in Cambodia in the future. PMID:21710643

  2. Central Nervous System Vasculitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Nervous System (CNS) Vasculitis Central Nervous System (CNS) Vasculitis Central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis is inflammation of ... CNS (PACNS). What is the cause of CNS Vasculitis? How the vessels in the brain become inflamed ...

  3. Central venous catheters - ports

    MedlinePLUS

    Central venous catheter - subcutaneous; Port-a-Cath; InfusaPort; PasPort; Subclavian port; Medi - port; Central venous line - port ... catheter is attached to a device called a port that will be under your skin. The port ...

  4. Central Neuropathic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Watson, James C; Sandroni, Paola

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pain is common in patients with neurologic complications of a central nervous system insult such as stroke. The pain is most commonly musculoskeletal or related to obligatory overuse of neurologically unaffected limbs. However, neuropathic pain can result directly from the central nervous system injury. Impaired sensory discrimination can make it challenging to differentiate central neuropathic pain from other pain types or spasticity. Central neuropathic pain may also begin months to years after the injury, further obscuring recognition of its association with a past neurologic injury. This review focuses on unique clinical features that help distinguish central neuropathic pain. The most common clinical central pain syndromes-central poststroke pain, multiple sclerosis-related pain, and spinal cord injury-related pain-are reviewed in detail. Recent progress in understanding of the pathogenesis of central neuropathic pain is reviewed, and pharmacological, surgical, and neuromodulatory treatments of this notoriously difficult to treat pain syndrome are discussed. PMID:26944242

  5. Centrality of Cognitive Attributes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, William A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Develops measures of individual differences in attribute centrality, investigates convergent validity, and explores differences in central and noncentral attribute functions within same person. University students in three countries completed questionnaires. Four relative centrality measures correlated with information required to make decisions…

  6. Martian Central Pit Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillman, E.; Barlow, N. G.

    2005-01-01

    Impact craters containing central pits are rare on the terrestrial planets but common on icy bodies. Mars is the exception among the terrestrial planets, where central pits are seen on crater floors ( floor pits ) as well as on top of central peaks ( summit pits ). Wood et al. [1] proposed that degassing of subsurface volatiles during crater formation produced central pits. Croft [2] argued instead that central pits might form during the impact of volatile-rich comets. Although central pits are seen in impact craters on icy moons such as Ganymede, they do show some significant differences from their martian counterparts: (a) only floor pits are seen on Ganymede, and (b) central pits begin to occur at crater diameters where the peak ring interior morphology begins to appear in terrestrial planet craters [3]. A study of craters containing central pits was conducted by Barlow and Bradley [4] using Viking imagery. They found that 28% of craters displaying an interior morphology on Mars contain central pits. Diameters of craters containing central pits ranged from 16 to 64 km. Barlow and Bradley noted that summit pit craters tended to be smaller than craters containing floor pits. They also noted a correlation of central pit craters with the proposed rings of large impact basins. They argued that basin ring formation fractured the martian crust and allowed subsurface volatiles to concentrate in these locations. They favored the model that degassing of the substrate during crater formation was responsible for central pit formation due to the preferential location of central pit craters along these basin rings.

  7. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  8. Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Blattner, Collin; Polley, Dennis C.; Ferritto, Frank; Elston, Dirk M.

    2013-01-01

    Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia is a common cause of progressive permanent apical alopecia. This unique form of alopecia includes entities previously know as “hot comb alopecia,” “follicular degeneration syndrome,” “pseudopelade” in African Americans and “central elliptical pseudopelade” in Caucasians. The etiology appears to be multifactorial and the condition occurs in all races. PMID:23440368

  9. Organizational centralization in radiology.

    PubMed

    Aas, I H Monrad

    2006-01-01

    Traditionally, hospitals have a radiology department, where images are taken and interpretation occurs. Teleradiology makes it possible to capture images in one location and transmit them elsewhere for interpretation. Organizational centralization of radiology interpretations is therefore of interest. Empirical data have been collected in qualitative interviews of 26 resource persons with substantial experience with picture archiving and communication systems and teleradiology, from 12 departments of radiology in Norway. The response rate was 90%. A total of 21 theoretically possible types of centralization of image interpretation were identified, representing combinations of three categories of geographical centralization, and seven categories of centralization according to function. Various advantages and disadvantages of centralization were identified. Organizational changes may be decisive for the future of teleradiology, but it may be wise to plan for change in small steps, since we know little about how broad future organizational changes based on teleradiology will be, or what will decide how far particular organizations will go. PMID:16438776

  10. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePLUS

    ... samples taken more than once a day Need kidney dialysis Anyone who has a central line can get ... body Make sure everything they touch during the procedure is sterile Cover the catheter with gauze or ...

  11. Central ballast tanker design

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER Design. This design is intended to reduce the volume of oil spilled from tankers by giving the crew a tanker properly designed and equipped to allow large quantities of oil from ruptured tank(s) to flow safely to a fully-inerted central ballast tank. In addition to reducing the volume of oil spilled, the design also addresses many of the shortcomings of the DOUBLE HULL DESIGN which are increasingly becoming a concern. The following is a brief review of the development of the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER. The simple operational features, stability, low cost and ease of maintenance of the single hull tanker were important and can be retained with the CENTRAL BALLAST DESIGN.

  12. Central pontine myelinolysis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... caused by the destruction of the layer ( myelin sheath ) covering nerve cells in the middle of the ... The destruction of the myelin sheath that covers nerve cells prevents ... from one nerve to another. The most common cause of central ...

  13. Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Families Recursos en Español Teaching Resources Medical and Science Glossaries More Quick Links Evaluating Health Information Financial ... Links About the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) GARD Home Diseases Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome ...

  14. Central nervous system

    MedlinePLUS

    The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord. Your brain and spinal cord serve as the main "processing center" for your entire nervous system. They control all the workings of your body.

  15. Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William; Crawford, Winifred; Watson, Leela; Wheeler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This Quarter's Highlights incllude: completion of the second phase of verifying the performance of the MesoNAM weather model at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). (1) The data was delivered to the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) and the final report was distributed (2) Staff completed modifying and updating lightning c1imatologies for KSC/CCAFS and other airfields around central Florida. We delivered the tool to the National Weather Service in Melbourne and 45 WS and distributed the final report (3) Staff completed modifying the AMU peak wind tool by analyzing wind tower data to determine peak wind behavior during times of onshore and offshore flow. This was delivered the to the 45 WS and distributed the final report.

  16. Observation Denial and Performance of a Local Mesoscale Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.; Bauman, William H., III

    2009-01-01

    .Forecasters at the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) use observations from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) wind tower network and the CCAFS (XMR) daily rawinsonde observations (RAOB) to issue and verify wind advisories and warnings for operations. These observations are also used by the National Weather Service (NWS) Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) in Houston, Texas and the NWS Melbourne, Florida (NWS MLB) to initialize their locally-run mesoscale models. In addition, SMG uses these observations to support shuttle landings at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF). Due to impending budget cuts, some or all of the wind towers on the east-central Florida mainland and the XMR RAOBs may be eliminated. The locations of the mainland towers and XMR RAOB site are shown in Figure 1. The loss of these data may impact the forecast capability of the 45 WS, SMG and NWS MLB.

  17. Examples of Models Fit to Magnetic Anomalies Observed Over Subaerial, Submarine, and Subglacial Volcanoes in the West Antarctic Rift System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, J. C.; Finn, C. A.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2006-12-01

    Aeromagnetic and marine magnetic surveys over the volcanically active West Antarctic rift system, constrained by seismic reflection profiles over the Ross Sea continual shelf, and radar ice sounding surveys over the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) allowed calculation of models fit to very high-amplitude anomalies. We present several examples: exposed 2700-m high, subaerial erupted volcano Mt Melbourne; the 750-m high source of anomaly D (Hamilton submarine volcano) in the Ross sea; and the 600-m high edifice of Mt. CASERTZ beneath the WAIS. The character of these anomalies and their sources varies greatly, and is inferred to be the result of subaerial, submarine and subglacial emplacement respectively. Mt. Melbourne erupted through the WAIS at a time when it was grounded over the Ross Sea continental shelf. Highly magnetic volcanic flows inferred to have high remanent (normal) magnetization in the present field direction produce the 600-nT positive anomaly. The flows protected the edifice above the ice from erosion. Negligible amounts of probably subglacially erupted, apparently non-magnetic hyaloclastite exist in association with Mt. Melbourne. Mt. CASERTZ is nonmagnetic and the edifice is interpreted as consisting of a transient mound of unconsolidated hyaloclastite injected into the WAIS. However Mt. CASERTZ, about 8-km diameter, overlies a 200-m high, 40-km wide highly magnetic residual edifice modeled as the top of the source (an active subglacial volcano) of a 400-nT high positive anomaly. Any former edifices comprising hyaloclastite, pillow breccia or other volcanic debris injected into the moving WAIS apparently have been removed. About 400 other high- amplitude anomalies associated with low relief (80 percent less than 200 m) edifices at the base of the ice (the tops of the sources of these steep gradient anomalies) beneath the WAIS defined by radar ice sounding have been interpreted as having former hyaloclastite edifices, which were removed by the moving ice. The source of the -1300-nT negative anomaly D projecting 600 m above the Ross Sea continental shelf is enigmatic. We interpret models as either the result of reversed magnetization (less than 780 Ka) at a time of deglaciation of the continental shelf, or a hydrothermally altered central core surrounded by highly magnetic flows erupted beneath the Ross sea since deglaciation in Holocene time.

  18. Context: a central concept.

    PubMed

    Fantino, E

    2001-05-01

    Seminal research in several areas has underscored the central role played by context in the control of behavior. Landmark studies in classical conditioning (with both conditioned suppression and autoshaping procedures) and in conditioned reinforcement (using the observing paradigm) are reviewed. The role of context also proved central in the study of choice (including the matching law and delay-reduction theory). This latter work contributed to the development of experimental analogs to foraging behavior. Research on foraging has also highlighted the importance of context and has led to some counterintuitive predictions that are mediated by context. PMID:11369463

  19. Central American update

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, S.F.

    1987-07-01

    The Central American Energy Resources Project is designed to help the countries of Honduras, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama develop their geothermal resources. Auxiliary project goals are to increase economic development and employment in Central America; to provide a scientific basis for the private sector to develop natural resources; and to provide scientific training to in-country scientists, engineers, and technicians. The energy resources project began in March 1985. The progress being made in El Salvador (production well logging and geophysical operations), Panama (site selection for the first temperature-gradient well), and Honduras (well drilling of temperature-gradient wells) is summarized.

  20. Centralized Mouse Repositories

    PubMed Central

    Donahue, Leah Rae; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Hagn, Michael; Franklin, Craig; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Magnuson, Terry; McKerlie, Colin; Nakagata, Naomi; Obata, Yuichi; Read, Stuart; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hörlein, Andreas; Davisson, Muriel T.

    2013-01-01

    Because the mouse is used so widely for biomedical research and the number of mouse models being generated is increasing rapidly, centralized repositories are essential if the valuable mouse strains and models that have been developed are to be securely preserved and fully exploited. Ensuring the ongoing availability of these mouse strains preserves the investment made in creating and characterizing them and creates a global resource of enormous value. The establishment of centralized mouse repositories around the world for distributing and archiving these resources has provided critical access to and preservation of these strains. This article describes the common and specialized activities provided by major mouse repositories around the world. PMID:22945696

  1. Hale Central Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the mountains that make up the central peak region of Hale Crater, located near 35.8oS, 36.5oW. Dark, smooth-surfaced sand dunes are seen to be climbing up the mountainous slopes. The central peak of a crater consists of rock brought up during the impact from below the crater floor. This autumn image is illuminated from the upper left and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across.

  2. Multicultural Central Asia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Eric D.

    This article addresses the multicultural aspect of Central Asia in response to the discussion on diversity in U.S. classrooms. Many areas of the world are more diverse than the U.S., and these areas experience successes and failures with many of the same issues the U.S. is currently struggling with. Comparing the U.S. diversity debate with similar…

  3. Central Idaho Debris Flow

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    During August 2013, the Beaver Creek wildfire burned more than 114,000 acres in south-central Idaho. Shortly after the fire was contained, heavy rainfall triggered numerous debris flows, including this one in Badger Gulch. USGS hydrologists Dave Evetts (left) and Jake Jacobson examine the debris flo...

  4. Ghrelin in Central Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ferrini, F; Salio, C; Lossi, L; Merighi, A

    2009-01-01

    Ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide synthesized by endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa, is released in the bloodstream in response to a negative energetic status. Since discovery, the hypothalamus was identified as the main source of ghrelin in the CNS, and effects of the peptide have been mainly observed in this area of the brain. In recent years, an increasing number of studies have reported ghrelin synthesis and effects in specific populations of neurons also outside the hypothalamus. Thus, ghrelin activity has been described in midbrain, hindbrain, hippocampus, and spinal cord. The spectrum of functions and biological effects produced by the peptide on central neurons is remarkably wide and complex. It ranges from modulation of membrane excitability, to control of neurotransmitter release, neuronal gene expression, and neuronal survival and proliferation. There is not at present a general consensus concerning the source of ghrelin acting on central neurons. Whereas it is widely accepted that the hypothalamus represents the most important endogenous source of the hormone in CNS, the existence of extra-hypothalamic ghrelin-synthesizing neurons is still controversial. In addition, circulating ghrelin can theoretically be another natural ligand for central ghrelin receptors. This paper gives an overview on the distribution of ghrelin and its receptor across the CNS and critically analyses the data available so far as regarding the effects of ghrelin on central neurotransmission. PMID:19721816

  5. Central venous access with occlusive superior central venous thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Torosian, M H; Meranze, S; McLean, G; Mullen, J L

    1986-01-01

    Thrombotic occlusion of the entire superior central venous system is a rare complication of central venous catheterization. Three patients are presented with complete occlusion of the superior vena cava secondary to prolonged central venous catheterization. Thrombotic occlusion of the superior vena cava precludes central venous access by conventional techniques. Thoracotomy with direct catheterization of the right atrium and inferior vena cava cannulation represent alternative approaches but may be associated with significant morbidity. The present report describes a unique combined angiographic/operative technique designed to obtain central venous access with low morbidity in patients with occlusive thrombosis of the superior central venous system. Images FIG. 1. FIG. 2. PMID:3942419

  6. Central venous catheterisation.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Walls, A. D.

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-one central venous catheter placements have been carried out with a serious-complication rate of 3.7%. Major long-term complications occurred in 5 patients. Malplacement of the catheter was more common when the infraclavicular subclavian route was used. Inadvertent removal occurred on 10 occasions and a new design of catheter hub is expected to eliminate this problem. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 3 PMID:6776868

  7. FNAL central email systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jack; Lilianstrom, Al; Pasetes, Ray; Hill, Kevin; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The FNAL Email System is the primary point of entry for email destined for an employee or user at Fermilab. This centrally supported system is designed for reliability and availability. It uses multiple layers of protection to help ensure that: (1) SPAM messages are tagged properly; (2) All mail is inspected for viruses; and (3) Valid mail gets delivered. This system employs numerous redundant subsystems to accomplish these tasks.

  8. Central core disease

    PubMed Central

    Jungbluth, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Central core disease (CCD) is an inherited neuromuscular disorder characterised by central cores on muscle biopsy and clinical features of a congenital myopathy. Prevalence is unknown but the condition is probably more common than other congenital myopathies. CCD typically presents in infancy with hypotonia and motor developmental delay and is characterized by predominantly proximal weakness pronounced in the hip girdle; orthopaedic complications are common and malignant hyperthermia susceptibility (MHS) is a frequent complication. CCD and MHS are allelic conditions both due to (predominantly dominant) mutations in the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor (RYR1) gene, encoding the principal skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel (RyR1). Altered excitability and/or changes in calcium homeostasis within muscle cells due to mutation-induced conformational changes of the RyR protein are considered the main pathogenetic mechanism(s). The diagnosis of CCD is based on the presence of suggestive clinical features and central cores on muscle biopsy; muscle MRI may show a characteristic pattern of selective muscle involvement and aid the diagnosis in cases with equivocal histopathological findings. Mutational analysis of the RYR1 gene may provide genetic confirmation of the diagnosis. Management is mainly supportive and has to anticipate susceptibility to potentially life-threatening reactions to general anaesthesia. Further evaluation of the underlying molecular mechanisms may provide the basis for future rational pharmacological treatment. In the majority of patients, weakness is static or only slowly progressive, with a favourable long-term outcome. PMID:17504518

  9. Centralized versus distributed propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The functions and requirements of auxiliary propulsion systems are reviewed. None of the three major tasks (attitude control, stationkeeping, and shape control) can be performed by a collection of thrusters at a single central location. If a centralized system is defined as a collection of separated clusters, made up of the minimum number of propulsion units, then such a system can provide attitude control and stationkeeping for most vehicles. A distributed propulsion system is characterized by more numerous propulsion units in a regularly distributed arrangement. Various proposed large space systems are reviewed and it is concluded that centralized auxiliary propulsion is best suited to vehicles with a relatively rigid core. These vehicles may carry a number of flexible or movable appendages. A second group, consisting of one or more large flexible flat plates, may need distributed propulsion for shape control. There is a third group, consisting of vehicles built up from multiple shuttle launches, which may be forced into a distributed system because of the need to add additional propulsion units as the vehicles grow. The effects of distributed propulsion on a beam-like structure were examined. The deflection of the structure under both translational and rotational thrusts is shown as a function of the number of equally spaced thrusters. When two thrusters only are used it is shown that location is an important parameter. The possibility of using distributed propulsion to achieve minimum overall system weight is also examined. Finally, an examination of the active damping by distributed propulsion is described.

  10. Central respiratory chemoreception

    PubMed Central

    Guyenet, Patrice G.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary By definition central respiratory chemoreceptors (CRCs) are cells that are sensitive to changes in brain PCO2 or pH and contribute to the stimulation of breathing elicited by hypercapnia or metabolic acidosis. CO2 most likely works by lowering pH. The pertinent proton receptors have not been identified and may be ion channels. CRCs are probably neurons but may also include acid-sensitive glia and vascular cells that communicate with neurons via paracrine mechanisms. Retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) neurons are the most completely characterized CRCs. Their high sensitivity to CO2 in vivo presumably relies on their intrinsic acid-sensitivity, excitatory inputs from the carotid bodies and brain regions such as raphe and hypothalamus, and facilitating influences from neighboring astrocytes. RTN neurons are necessary for the respiratory network to respond to CO2 during the perinatal period and under anesthesia. In conscious adults, RTN neurons contribute to an unknown degree to the pH-dependent regulation of breathing rate, inspiratory and expiratory activity. The abnormal prenatal development of RTN neurons probably contributes to the congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. Other CRCs presumably exist but the supportive evidence is less complete. The proposed locations of these CRCs are the medullary raphe, the nucleus tractus solitarius, the ventrolateral medulla, the fastigial nucleus and the hypothalamus. Several wake-promoting systems (serotonergic and catecholaminergic neurons, orexinergic neurons) are also putative CRCs. Their contribution to central respiratory chemoreception may be behavior-dependent or vary according to the state of vigilance. PMID:20737591

  11. West and Central Africa.

    PubMed

    Lydie, N; Robinson, N J

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews scientific and other literature during the 1990s that links migration and mobility with the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV/AIDS. The focus is on key population groups linked to the spread of HIV and STDs in West and Central Africa: migrant laborers, truck drivers, itinerant traders, commercial sex workers (CSWs), and refugees. Countries with high emigration and immigration tend to have high levels of HIV infection, with the exception of Senegal. The main destination of immigrants are Senegal, Nigeria, and Cote d'Ivoire in West Africa and Cameroon, Congo, Gabon, and Congo in Central Africa. The risk of infection and the spread of HIV is variable among migrants. There is little in the literature that substantiates hypotheses about the strong association between migration and HIV-positive status. Information is needed on the duration, frequency of return visits, living conditions, sexual activities with multiple partners, and information before departure, along the routes, at final destination, and at the time of returns. Action-based research in five West African countries (Burkina Faso, Cote d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, and Senegal) should produce results in late 1998. Comparable studies in Central Africa are unknown. Regional studies should be complemented by local studies. Prevention would benefit from studies on the relative size of these five population groups by geographic location. PMID:12295094

  12. Choosing to live in a nursing home: a culturally and linguistically diverse perspective.

    PubMed

    Yeboah, Cecilia A

    2015-01-01

    As part of the findings of a study on culturally and linguistically diverse older people relocating to a nursing home, this paper contributes to our understanding of how older people draw on their cultural history to explain their decisions to relocate. Family reciprocity was identified by most participants as central to their decisions, regardless of their specific cultural origins. Using the grounded theory methodology, data were collected through progressive, semi-structured, repeated, in-person, individual interviews with 20 residents of four nursing homes in the northern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. Culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) older people, regardless of specific cultural origin, make relocation decisions based on the importance and meaning of reciprocity within families. Understanding their decisions as reflecting a culturally valued reciprocity offered a sense of cultural continuity to the relocation and was comforting to the older adults involved in the study. This study also suggests that culturally and linguistically diverse older people are much more active participants in the decision to relocate to a nursing home than is commonly recognised. The four nursing homes in the northern suburbs of Melbourne and the 20 participants studied constitute only a small proportion of all culturally and linguistically diverse older nursing home residents in Australia. Therefore, the findings may not be pertinent to other culturally and linguistically diverse elderly. Nonetheless, this study makes an important contribution to future discussions regarding cultural diversity in the nursing home relocation of culturally and linguistically diverse older Australians. The study findings provide some insight into the conditions and contexts that impact nursing home relocation. PMID:24861162

  13. Central American resource studies

    SciTech Connect

    Van Eeckhout, E.; Laughlin, A.W.

    1989-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been working with five Central American countries to assist in the development of their energy and mineral resources. Since 1985, mineral resources in Costa Rica, peat resources in Costa Rica and Panama, geothermal energy resources in Honduras and Guatemala, and geothermal field development in El Salvador and Costa Rica have been topics of study. This paper presents an overview of this work -- within these proceedings are papers that deal with specific aspects of each topic, and these will be duly noted. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Floods in Central China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This pair of true- and false-color images from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) shows flooding in central China on July 4, 2002. In the false-color image vegetation appears orange and water appears dark blue to black. Because of the cloud cover and the fact that some of the water is filled with sediment, the false-color image provides a clearer picture of where rivers have exceeded their banks and lakes have risen. The river in this image is the Yangtze River, and the large lake is the Poyang Hu. Credits: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  15. Flooding in Central Siberia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of snowmelt and ice jams in late May and June of this year caused the Taz River (left) and the Yenisey River (right) in central Siberia to overflow their banks. The flooding can be seen in this image taken on June 11, 2002, by the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) instrument aboard the Terra satellite. Normally, the rivers would resemble thin black lines in MODIS imagery. In the false-color images sage green and rusty orange is land, and water is black. Clouds are white and pink. Credit: Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  16. Fires in Central Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hundreds of fires are set every year during the dry season in Central Africa. This true color image from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) shows dozens of smoke plumes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo on June 29, 2000. Residents burn away scrub and brush annually in the woody savanna to clear land for farming and grazing. For more information, visit the SeaWiFS Home Page, Global Fire Monitoring Fact Sheet, and 4km2 Fire Data Image Provided by the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  17. Central odontogenic fibroma.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Felipe Rodrigues; de Moraes, Maiara; Neto, Antonio Capistrano; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa; da Silveira, Ericka Janine Dantas

    2011-12-01

    Odontogenic fibroma (OF) is a benign odontogenic tumor characterized by various amounts of odontogenic epithelium in a mature fibrous stroma. Two variants can be distinguished: an intraosseous or central OF (COF) and an extraosseous or peripheral. The intraosseous variant is an extremely rare tumor that presents clinical, radiographic, and histopathologic variable findings. A thorough review of the English literature revealed 78 cases of COF so far. Thus, we report an additional case of COF occurring in the maxilla of a 36-year-old woman. In addition, we performed a brief description and discussion of the cases reported in the maxilla and mandible. PMID:20971024

  18. Central American electrical interconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    A technical cooperation grant of $2.25 million, designed to strengthen the capacity of Central American countries to operate their regional interconnected electrical system, was announced by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). The grant, extended from the banks Fund for Special Operations, will help improve the capacity of the regions electric power companies to achieve economical, safe operation of the interconnected electric power systems. The funds will also be used to finance regional studies of the accords, procedures, regulations, and supervisory mechanisms for the system, as well as program development and data bases.

  19. Central ignition scenarios for TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.; Redi, M.H.; Bateman, G.

    1986-03-01

    The possibility of obtaining ignition in TFTR by means of very centrally peaked density profiles is examined. It is shown that local central alpha heating can be made to exceed local central energy losses (''central ignition'') under global conditions for which Q greater than or equal to 1. Time dependent 1-D transport simulations show that the normal global ignition requirements are substantially relaxed for plasmas with peaked density profiles. 18 refs., 18 figs.

  20. Intercultural Crossings in a Digital Age: ICT Pathways with Migrant and Refugee-Background Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mara, Ben; Harris, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article problematises the uptake and use of digital technologies by migrant and refugee-background young people, through the lens of a site-based arts pedagogy program, Culture Shack (CS), in Melbourne, Australia. It argues that online pedagogies including animation, Facebook, photoshop, mobile phones and Youtube can be used effectively for…

  1. Academic Literacy and Cultural Familiarity: Developing and Assessing Academic Literacy Resources for Chinese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Fiona; Whitelaw, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Academic dishonesty, including plagiarism, is a chronic problem. This paper reports the results of a project undertaken at a public funded university in Melbourne, Australia, in partnership with colleagues from a public funded university in Beijing, China, to combat this and other problems associated with academic literacy. The prime focus of the…

  2. Two-Way Radio in Schools (or, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Learner). An Evaluation of a High Frequency Short Wave, Two-Way Radio Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Ian

    The Country Education Project in Victoria, Australia, tested the use of two-way radios to bring educational resources to isolated children studying correspondence courses in small rural high schools and to increase interaction among rural schools. Eight rural Victoria schools and the Secondary Correspondence School in Melbourne used two-way…

  3. The RMIT Wuhan Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Alan

    In March 1995, Australia's Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology began offering Australian and Chinese students an Associate Diploma of Business in International Trade at the Wuhan Yejin University of Science and Technology, in China. The course is offered at the University's China Iron and Steel Industry Training Centre, a joint project between…

  4. Whole School Initiative: Has Inclusive Education Gone Astray?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbenyega, Joseph; Klibthong, Sunanta

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the social theory concepts of Bourdieu (Field, Capital and Habitus) we explored and gained insights into the perspectives of sub-Saharan African refugee families and preschool educators regarding inclusive education of young children in the South Eastern suburbs of Melbourne, Australia. The study is informed by two curriculum…

  5. Is "Learning" Science Enough?--A Cultural Model of Religious Students of Science in an Australian Government School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joseph Paul; Kameniar, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the cognitive experiences of four religious students studying evolutionary biology in an inner city government secondary school in Melbourne, Australia. The participants in the study were identified using the Religious Background and Behaviours questionnaire (Connors, Tonigan, & Miller, 1996). Participants were…

  6. What Happens when Supply Lags behind Demand? Disadvantaged Students and the Ever Increasing Competition for University Places

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Competition for entry to university has escalated in Australia over the past decade. This rise in competition is attributable to a number of factors, a major one being that the provision of university places has not kept pace with growth in the population of university-aged persons. Using the city of Melbourne as a case study, this paper…

  7. Rejecting Ahmed's "Melancholy Migrant": South Sudanese Australians in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Anne; Marlowe, Jay; Nyuon, Nyadol

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on related research studies in two urban centres (Melbourne and Adelaide, Australia) with South Sudanese men and women engaged in varying degrees with higher education. The co-authors examine some gendered differences in the process and demands of resettlement, including within employment and education, and its implications for…

  8. Applied Linguistics and Measurement: A Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Tim

    2011-01-01

    The paper by Wilson and Moore (this volume), based on the Messick Lecture delivered in 2006 at the annual Language Testing Research Colloquium in Melbourne, may present a familiar challenge to some language testers: of reading outside one's comfort zone. The distinctive character of language testing lies in its combination of two primary fields of…

  9. Reaching for the Arts in Unexpected Places: Public Pedagogy in the Gardens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelosi, Ligia

    2015-01-01

    What constitutes public pedagogy? The term is broad and can be applied in so many situations and settings to the learning that occurs outside of formal schooling. In this article, the author explores how a community event--a painting competition held in a Melbourne suburb's botanic gardens--constitutes public pedagogy. The event centres on…

  10. Computer Networking with the Victorian Correspondence School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conboy, Ian

    During 1985 the Education Department installed two-way radios in 44 remote secondary schools in Victoria, Australia, to improve turn-around time for correspondence assignments. Subsequently, teacher supervisors at Melbourne's Correspondence School sought ways to further augument audio interactivity with computer networking. Computer equipment was…

  11. Flexible Models for Learning English Are Needed for Refugee Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Elisha; Block, Karen; Gibbs, Lisa; Davis, Elise; Szwarc, Josef; Casey, Sue; Duell-Piening, Philippa; Waters, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The importance of English language acquisition for resettlement of refugees is well established, particularly as a pathway to education, employment, health and social connections. A qualitative study was conducted in 2011 in Melbourne, Australia utilising focus groups with 87 refugee background women from Karen, Iraqi, Assyrian Chaldean, Lebanese,…

  12. "This Is My Thing!": Middle Years Students' Engagement and Learning Using Digital Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Paul; Godinho, Sally

    2012-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that multimodal digital texts support student engagement with ideas, knowledge and new forms of literate practice. With this in mind, an interdisciplinary team at The University of Melbourne collaborated to create a digital resource--"The Venom Patrol" website--to teach scientific concepts about Australia's venomous…

  13. Address Pronouns in French: Variation within and outside the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Jane

    2006-01-01

    This article examines speakers' perceptions of and attitudes towards address pronoun usage in Paris and Toulouse. The data on which this article is based come from a comparative project based at the University of Melbourne, "Address in some western European languages, and were generated in focus groups in both Paris and Toulouse, as well as…

  14. Perceived Stress, Perceived Social Support, and Wellbeing among Mothers of School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skok, Anita; Harvey, David; Reddihough, Dinah

    2006-01-01

    Background: The study considers how severity of disability, perceived stress, and perceived social support impact on the well-being of a group of mothers caring for school-aged children with cerebral palsy. Method: Forty-three mothers attending clinics at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia were interviewed and completed the…

  15. (Re)Configuring Masculinities in an Ethno-Centric Australian Community School: Complexity and Contradictions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godinho, Sally; Garas, Dimitri

    2012-01-01

    This article draws on a case study of 15 boys aged between 13 and 14 years who attend an urban ethno-centric community school located in Melbourne, Australia. The study investigated how the boys' constructions of masculinity were mediated by a strong connectedness to their Greek cultural traditions and ideals. Data generated from focus group…

  16. The Knowledge Economy and University Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Raewyn

    2015-01-01

    This article is a condensed analysis of the developing sustainability crisis of Australian universities. It is based on an address to National Council of the National Tertiary Education Union, Melbourne, 3 October 2014. Thanks to all my fellow-members, who have kept my hopes for the modern university alive.

  17. Teaching English Teachers for the Future: Speaking Back to TPACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Graham; Bellis, Natalie; Bulfin, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This essay presents a critical, reflexive account of a twelve-month collaboration, when a practising secondary English teacher was seconded to work with a team of English teacher educators in a faculty of education in Melbourne. The collaboration was made possible by funding from DEEWR as part of the Teaching Teachers for the Future project (TTF).…

  18. Changes in Coverage of Sun Protection in the News: Threats and Opportunities from Emerging Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Maree; Makin, Jennifer; Maloney, Sarah; Wakefield, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether there have been shifts in news coverage of sun protection issues over a 12-year period in the context of an evolving skin cancer prevention agenda. A content analysis was performed on all relevant articles (N = 552) published in the two metropolitan daily newspapers in Melbourne, Australia, from 2001 to 2012.…

  19. Video Streaming of Lectures via the Internet: An Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrohon, Mark; Lo, Victor; Dang, Jim; Johnston, Carol

    This paper reports on an investigation into methods of efficiently introducing video streaming into subjects in the economics and commerce faculty at the University of Melbourne (Australia). Several software options were investigated before finally settling on RealSystems. The paper provides a brief review of the background of the project followed…

  20. "Every Family": A Population Approach to Reducing Behavioral and Emotional Problems in Children Making the Transition to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Matthew R.; Ralph, Alan; Sofronoff, Kate; Gardiner, Paul; Thompson, Rachel; Dwyer, Sarah; Bidwell, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    A large-scale population trial using the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program (TPS) was evaluated. The target population was all parents of 4- to 7-year-old children residing in ten geographical catchment areas in Brisbane (intervention communities) and ten sociodemographically matched catchment areas from Sydney (5) and Melbourne (5), care as…

  1. Connecting Younger Second-Language Learners and Older Bilinguals: Interconnectedness and Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyne, Michael; Cordella, Marisa; Schüpbach, Doris; Maher, Brigid

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an inter-generational inter-cultural pilot project carried out in suburban Melbourne which supports the second-language acquisition of younger people and enhances the social inclusion of older people of migrant background. The article begins with an outline of the multilingual context in which the project is based. The…

  2. Boys' Music? School Context and Middle-School Boys' Musical Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennetts, Kathleen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This article focusses primarily on the findings relating to the musical participation of boys in one Melbourne school. As part of a project that investigated boys' attitudes and participation at fifty-one schools, several contextual features were identified that set "Balton Boys" High School' apart from other participating…

  3. Collaborative Development of Anatomy Workshops for Medical and Dental Students in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Jennifer A.; Ivanusic, Jason J.; le Roux, Cara M.; Hatzopoulos, Kate; Gonsalvez, David; Hong, Someth; Durward, Callum

    2011-01-01

    After Phnom Penh was liberated from the Khmer Rouge in 1979, health science education in Cambodia had to be completely rebuilt. In this article, the authors report the results of a teaching collaboration between the University of Melbourne (Australia), the International University (Cambodia), and the University of Health Sciences (Cambodia). The…

  4. Teaching Mixed-Mode: A Case Study in Remote Delivery of Computer Science in Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Sheila; Harris, Michael; Wilkinson, Simon; Zuluaga, Catherine; Voutier, Paul

    2004-01-01

    In February 2003, RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, commenced delivery of a Computer Science diploma and degree programme using mixed mode delivery to 250 university students in sub-Saharan Africa, through a World Bank funded project designed for the African Virtual University (AVU). The project is a unique experience made possible by…

  5. National Assessment Program--ICT Literacy Years 6 & 10 Report, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, John; Fraillon, Julian; Freeman, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Australia's national educational goals place considerable importance on the place of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in education. The Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians of December 2008 asserted that "in this digital age young people need to be highly skilled in the use of ICT" (MCEETYA, 2008). This…

  6. Early Childhood Inclusion: A Silver Lining in the Dark Clouds for African Immigrant Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agbenyega, Joseph; Peers, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This article presents preliminary findings of an ongoing study that attempts to gauge the level of access to and support for early childhood education and care programs for sub Saharan African immigrant families living in Melbourne Australia. Using the Australian Early Years Learning Framework as a guide, we explored 30 parents' perception of…

  7. "Working Your Words": Appraisal in the AFL Post-Match Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the language used by Australian Football League (AFL) footballers and Australian Broadcast Corporation (ABC) journalists in their post-match interviews broadcast on ABC (774 Melbourne) radio. From Systemic Functional Linguistics (SFL), Appraisal is used to investigate the evaluative language expressed by the AFL footballers in…

  8. Peer Reviewing Preservice Teachers of Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the contributions peer review makes to the formation of preservice teachers of religious education within the context of Christian higher education. The participants were postgraduate students undertaking a preservice teacher training course at Australian Catholic University, Australia (Melbourne campus). Those training to…

  9. The Many-Headed Hydra: Information Networking at LAA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winzenried, Arthur P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an integrated computer library system installed at Lilydale Adventist Academy (LAA) in Melbourne (Australia) in response to a limited budget, increased demand, and greater user expectations. Topics include student workstations, cost effectiveness, CD-ROMS on local area networks, and student input regarding their needs. (Author/LRW)

  10. "It's a Sort of "Ad Hoc" Roadshow": Disruptive Pedagogies and Digital Introductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This article explores disruption of habituated literacy practices through the creation of new possibilities in a digital space. Preservice English method teachers at a Melbourne university were invited to create a digital introduction and to reflect after the presentation on aspects of technology, representation and learning that were brought into…

  11. The Ethiopian Adolescent and the Effect of Cultural Difference on Immigrant Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bitew, Getnet; Ferguson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of cultural difference on the secondary school induction and learning of Ethiopian-Australian immigrant students living in Melbourne, Australia. A qualitative methodology was employed using interviews as data-collection instruments. Secondary school students, their teachers, and parents acted as participants in…

  12. By Accident or Design? The Origins of the Victorian School of Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascitelli, Bruno; Merlino, Frank

    2011-01-01

    In 1935, the then Minister of Public Instruction established the delivery of two foreign languages under the title of a special experiment taught at Mac.Robertson Girls' High School in Melbourne. This was the first step in the creation of what is known today as the Victorian School of Languages (VSL). It was at the time the small, seemingly…

  13. Predictors of Close Family Relationships over One Year among Homeless Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, N.G.; Jane Rotheram-Borus, M.; Batterham, P.; Brumback, B.; Rosenthal, D.; Mallett, S.

    2005-01-01

    Predictors of perceived family bonds were examined among homeless young people who initially left home one year earlier. Newly homeless young people aged 12-20 years who had recently left home were recruited in Los Angeles County, United States (n=201) and Melbourne, Australia (n=124) and followed longitudinally at 3, 6, and 12 months (follow-up…

  14. Promotional Discourse in the Websites of Two Australian Universities: A Discourse Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Thi Van Yen; Rojas-Lizana, Isolda

    2015-01-01

    This article shows how universities represent themselves through the use of language on their institutional websites. Specifically, it compares and contrasts how a long established university, the University of Melbourne and a young university, Macquarie University construct their institutional identities and build up a relationship with potential…

  15. Skilling and Reskilling for Our (Greener) Future. Conference Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karmel, Tom

    2010-01-01

    This paper was presented at the 2009 Economic and Social Outlook Conference, November 5-6 at the University of Melbourne. It takes a sceptical view of the push for "green skills", arguing that skills required in the labour market evolve relatively slowly, and that the way business operates is driven by changing costs, new technologies and new…

  16. Looking Forward: Community Gateways at Victoria University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountford, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The mission and values of Victoria University provide the underlying criteria for the development and implementation of the Community Gateways initiative, which aims to transform the lives of those living in the west of Melbourne through the power of further education. Community Gateways takes the university into the community by providing career…

  17. Sharing Music and Culture through Singing in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the notion of sharing music and culture as an effective platform to celebrate diversity in Melbourne, Australia. My research project "Celebrating Music Making and Finding Meaning" investigates and illustrates a context of diversity, one that promotes respect in a multicultural society sharing music and culture of a minority…

  18. Locating Non-Western Enlightenment Texts for a Global Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The context of this paper is a university-based teacher education course in Melbourne, Australia. The assumption underpinning the course is that it is crucial for trainee teachers to examine the lenses they typically use in terms of common-sense understandings of children and adolescents. We point to the 18th century Western enlightenment period…

  19. Multicultural Education and Racism: The Case of Arab-Australian Students in Contemporary Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansouri, Fethi; Trembath, Anna

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses the social and cultural dimensions of the educational experiences of Arab-Australian students. It seeks to explore the cultural attitudes and the social experiences of Arab-Australian secondary school students from two schools situated in Melbourne's northern region. The paper seeks to examine how Arab-Australian students and…

  20. Language Choice in Multilingual Peer Groups: Insights from an Australian High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willoughby, Louisa

    2009-01-01

    Despite Australia's strong tradition of research on language maintenance and shift, little is known about the ways in which migrant background students continue to use their heritage languages in Australian schools. This paper presents an in-depth case study of students' linguistic practices at a multiethnic Melbourne high school, where over 95%…

  1. The Babushka Project: Mediating between the Margins and Wider Community through Public Art Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Bronwen Lucie

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the theoretical and social contexts of a community art project that took place at a public housing estate located in Melbourne, Australia. The art intervention was aimed at increasing the residents' health and well-being through the empowerment of their own cultural creations. Three sculptures in the form of giant babushka…

  2. The Failure of Non-Binding Declarations to Achieve University Sustainability: A Need for Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekessy, S. A.; Samson, K.; Clarkson, R. E.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to assess the impact and value of non-binding agreements or declarations in achieving sustainability in universities. Design/methodology/approach: A case study of Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) University is presented, analysing the reasons for lack of progress towards sustainability and evaluating best…

  3. 77 FR 42354 - Designation of Transportation Management Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... Register on July 8, 2002, at 67 FR 45173. DATES: Effective Date: July 18, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION..., 2011 (76 FR 53030). As a result of using these definitions, there were significant changes in the...--Bradenton, FL 643,260 Cape Coral, FL 530,290 Palm Bay--Melbourne, FL 452,791 Port St. Lucie, FL 376,047...

  4. "This Is My Thing!": Middle Years Students' Engagement and Learning Using Digital Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molyneux, Paul; Godinho, Sally

    2012-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that multimodal digital texts support student engagement with ideas, knowledge and new forms of literate practice. With this in mind, an interdisciplinary team at The University of Melbourne collaborated to create a digital resource--"The Venom Patrol" website--to teach scientific concepts about Australia's venomous…

  5. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  6. Accessing Results from Research on Technology in Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Kaye

    2005-01-01

    In his recent article in this journal, John Gough (2004) concludes that the practical results of the considerable academic research undertaken at the University of Melbourne into the uses and impacts of graphics calculators and CAS (computer algebra systems) should be made more widely available in journals for teachers. This short article is…

  7. Make a World of Difference: Hearing Each Other, Healing the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakurai, Hiro

    2010-01-01

    This article is the edited text of the presentation made by the author at the Parliament of the World's Religions in Melbourne, Australia, 3-9 December 2009. The session was titled "Healing the Earth with Care and Concern: Religious Responses to the Earth Charter". The article highlights some of the efforts that the Soka Gakkai International (SGI)…

  8. Young Children's Musical Explorations: The Potential of Using Learning Stories for Recording, Planning and Assessing Musical Experiences in a Preschool Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice; Acker, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the early childhood years and describes research that has examined children's music experiences in formal care and education settings in Melbourne, Australia. This research uses a contextual view of children and their learning and is based on an assumption that learning is social, involves engagement with others and is…

  9. Blurred Boundaries: Negotiating a Common Core Subject in a Multi-Faculty Bachelor of Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onsman, Andrys; Newton, Clare

    2015-01-01

    In 2008, the University of Melbourne rolled out its restructured undergraduate degree program offerings. Rather than offering a multitude of faculty-specific degrees, the University started to offer a limited number of generalist degrees that serve as developmental pathways to specialist masters programs as well as stand-alone employment…

  10. Collaborative Development of Anatomy Workshops for Medical and Dental Students in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Jennifer A.; Ivanusic, Jason J.; le Roux, Cara M.; Hatzopoulos, Kate; Gonsalvez, David; Hong, Someth; Durward, Callum

    2011-01-01

    After Phnom Penh was liberated from the Khmer Rouge in 1979, health science education in Cambodia had to be completely rebuilt. In this article, the authors report the results of a teaching collaboration between the University of Melbourne (Australia), the International University (Cambodia), and the University of Health Sciences (Cambodia). The…

  11. Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy: Benefits and Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdolsek, Helena Aniansson; Olesch, Christine; Antolovich, Giuliana; Reddihough, Dinah

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spasticity and dystonia in children with cerebral palsy has been treated with intrathecal baclofen therapy (ITB) at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia (RCH) since 1999. Methods: The records of children having received or still receiving ITB during the period September 1999 until August 2005 were studied to evaluate…

  12. Developing a Peace Education Curriculum for Vietnamese Primary Schools: A Case Study of Participatory Action Research in Cross-Cultural Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley Tyler, Melissa H.; Bretherton, Diane; Halafoff, Anna; Nietschke, Yung

    2008-01-01

    In 2003, the International Conflict Resolution Centre at the University of Melbourne, Australia, produced a primary school teaching manual for UNESCO Vietnam. The finished manual included lesson plans and materials for a five year, 50 lesson peace education course. The manual is one of the first examples of a systematic core national curriculum in…

  13. City Beats: A Creative Community Partnership Initiative at ArtPlay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanneret, Neryl; Brown, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The City of Melbourne's ArtPlay is open to children and young people aged 3-13 years, and provides a wide range of artist-led programs that serve a broad community within and outside the municipality. Its sister facility, Signal, caters for young people 13-22 years. An Australia Council of the Arts funded Creative Community Partnership Initiative,…

  14. Aptitude Sensitive Instruction: The Role of Media Attributes in Optimizing Transfer of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Margaret

    The supplantation approach of this study hypothesized that media attributes may serve to bridge the processing link between learner aptitude capacity and the demands of a concept attainment task. Subjects were 492 males aged 16-21, drawn from a College of Technical and Further Education in Melbourne, Australia. All subjects were trade apprentices,…

  15. A Contrasting Courtship: The Monash Takeover of Chisholm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodan, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This article compares the strikingly similar experiences of Monash and Chisholm in Melbourne at the same time. The author states that Roger Scott's account of the abortive ANU/CCAE merger brought back memories of the Monash University/Chisholm Institute of Technology amalgamation, effected around the same time. The outstanding point of difference…

  16. Wilderness Adventure Therapy in Adolescent Psychiatry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crisp, Simon; O'Donnell, Matthew

    The Brief Intervention Program (BIP) is a mental health day program in Melbourne (Australia) for adolescents with severe mental health problems who are at risk for suicide. The 10-week program serves closed groups of 6-8 adolescents aged 13-18 years and has 3 phases: engagement and orientation (week 1), treatment (weeks 2-9), and integration (week…

  17. Divergent Orientations to Greek and its Teaching in an Australian Greek School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Julie; Truckenbrodt, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    The Greek community in Australia attempts, with reasonable success, to maintain Greek language proficiency in succeeding generations, but attitudinal barriers within the community may be impeding the process. A study of the stakeholders (primary and secondary staff, parents, students and management) of one Greek independent school in Melbourne…

  18. Is "Learning" Science Enough?--A Cultural Model of Religious Students of Science in an Australian Government School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Joseph Paul; Kameniar, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the cognitive experiences of four religious students studying evolutionary biology in an inner city government secondary school in Melbourne, Australia. The participants in the study were identified using the Religious Background and Behaviours questionnaire (Connors, Tonigan, & Miller, 1996). Participants were…

  19. Touching the Screen: Issues Related to the Use of Touchscreen Technology in Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romeo, Geoff; Edwards, Suzy; McNamara, Sue; Walker, Ian; Ziguras, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Reports on research that investigated use of touchscreens by children in early childhood and junior primary settings by introducing touchscreens in five classrooms in Melbourne, Australia. Five themes were identified, relating to developmental issues, input device performance, technical issues, individual differences in children's use of…

  20. An Institutional Approach to the Evaluation of Educational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Gregor E.

    2003-01-01

    Outlines an institutional approach that guides the evaluation of educational technology in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia). Roles for an internal evaluator and educational technology practitioners are proposed, and a conceptual framework that guides the evaluation process…

  1. Secondary School Science Predictors of Academic Performance in University Bioscience Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Rod; Brown, Elizabeth; Ward, Alex

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 the Faculty of Health Sciences at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia is introducing a common first year for 11 different undergraduate courses in the faculty. Current prerequisite science entry requirements vary with course and range from none to at least two science or mathematics subjects and from [approximately]50 to 99 in…

  2. Australian Adult Consumers' Beliefs about Plant Foods: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Emma; Worsley, Anthony; Crawford, David

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study examined consumers' perceived barriers and benefits of plant food (fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, seeds) consumption and views on the promotion of these foods. Ten focus groups were conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Groups consisted of employees of various workplaces, community group members,…

  3. EPortfolios, Professional Development and Employability: Some Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodley, Carolyn; Sims, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore business students' views about using ePortfolios at Victoria University (VU) in Melbourne. It also examines the extent to which students present ePortfolios to prospective employers in applying for jobs. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws on the literature on ePortfolio use and the role…

  4. Facility Focus: Science Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design and architectural features of two new science facilities at the Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida, and a new graduate research tower the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Notes the important convenience associated with interior windows in these facilities, which allow researchers, faculty, and students to see…

  5. Audacious Beginnings: The Establishment of Universities in Australasia 1850-1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Kaye; Whitehead, Clive

    2009-01-01

    There have been various published histories of Australasian universities but none as rich as the two most recent relating to the universities of Sydney (1991) and Melbourne (2003). The latter, in particular, was the catalyst for this exploratory study. How was it that at a time when many major British cities lacked a university institution, towns…

  6. Shared Pedagogical Understandings: Schoolwide Inclusion Practices Supporting Learner Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abawi, Lindy; Oliver, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Educational perspectives that recommend inclusion of children with special needs into mainstream classrooms remain a controversial topic. The Melbourne Declaration declares that all young Australians should be supported to become successful learners; confident and creative individuals; and active and informed citizens. So the question remains how…

  7. Theorising "Geo-Identity" and David Harvey's Space: School Choices of the Geographically Bound Middle-Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on David Harvey's theories of absolute and relational space in order to critique geographically bound school choices of the gentrified middle-class in the City of Melbourne, Australia. The paper relies on interviews with inner-city school choosers as generated by a longitudinal ethnographic school choice study. I argue that the…

  8. Young People and the Environment in Australia: Beliefs, Knowledge, Commitment and Educational Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connell, Sharon; Fien, John; Sykes, Helen; Yencken, David

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of research in Australia on the nature of young people's attitudes, knowledge and actions. This paper reports on the findings from one such study of Australian high school students. The research was based on a survey of 5,688 students form Melbourne and Brisbane. These young people identified protection of the environment…

  9. Students' Attitudes toward Introductory Physics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Demirci, Neset

    2004-01-01

    The problem examined in this study deals with students' attitude toward physics among the freshmen and sophomore students who were taking first introductory physics course. In the study there were 176 students, and they were chosen sample of convenience from Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, Florida. 125 subjects were male students, and…

  10. Prayer Is a Positive Activity for Children--A Report on Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain, Vivienne

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on Australian research investigating the meaning and function of prayer for children. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 60 primary school participants selected from six different schools in Melbourne, reflecting some of the diverse philosophical and religious traditions found in the Australian society. The three…

  11. Global Selves: Marginalised Young People and Aesthetic Reflexivity in Inhalant Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Sociologists have observed that young people increasingly draw on global as well as local images in their constructions of individual selfhood. This article provides a narrative analysis of stories of inhalant use-induced hallucination, drawn from interviews conducted with young people in Melbourne, Australia. Young people's stories of the…

  12. "It's a Sort of "Ad Hoc" Roadshow": Disruptive Pedagogies and Digital Introductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Julie

    2012-01-01

    This article explores disruption of habituated literacy practices through the creation of new possibilities in a digital space. Preservice English method teachers at a Melbourne university were invited to create a digital introduction and to reflect after the presentation on aspects of technology, representation and learning that were brought into…

  13. Experiential Online Development for Educators: The Example of the Carpe Diem MOOC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Gilly; Gregory, Janet; Lokuge Dona, Kulari; Ross, Bella

    2015-01-01

    We report on educators' experiences of a massive open online course (MOOC) focused on the Carpe Diem learning design process. The MOOC was developed in-house using Blackboard CourseSites by a university innovation and development unit, Learning Transformations, at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. We report on a study of…

  14. An Embedded Professional Paired Placement Model: "I Know I Am Not an Expert, but I Am at a Point Now Where I Could Step into the Classroom and Be Responsible for the Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine; Neal, Deborah; Karvouni, Maria; Chandler, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    We present a sustainable and innovative model for pre-service teacher paired professional placements called the Teaching School model. The Teaching School model was piloted initially in partnership with a Metropolitan University and a P-12 College located in Melbourne's northern suburbs in 2013. It was expanded in 2014 to capitalise on an existing…

  15. Professor's Page: Do Demonstration Lessons Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Doug

    2011-01-01

    As part of a large research and professional development project funded by the Catholic Education Office Melbourne (CEOM), called "Contemporary Teaching and Learning of Mathematics," the ACU team has been leading demonstration lessons. There is certainly not universal agreement on the worth of demonstration lessons in the mathematics education…

  16. Developing the Understanding and Practice of Inclusion in Higher Education for International Students with Disabilities/Additional Needs: A Whole Schooling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Supple, Briony; Abgenyega, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present research on inclusion in higher education using a whole schooling philosophy. We seek insight into the perspectives of international students with disabilities/additional needs, three of whom from this particular research group are from non-English speaking backgrounds and attending the same university in Melbourne

  17. Crossing Borders: Evaluating a Work Integrated Learning Project Involving Australian and Vietnamese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Bernadette; Vo-Tran, Huan; Pittayachawan, Siddhi; Reynolds, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The value of work integrated learning (WIL) is well-established in the education of information management (IM) professionals. Adding value to WIL through cross-cultural or cross-disciplinary experiences is considered in this article. Using online communication, simulation activities, and onsite work, students from RMIT Melbourne and RMIT Ho Chi…

  18. Visy Cares Hub and Victoria University: Making the Door of a University Open to the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Robyn

    2011-01-01

    In 1999, a group of men embarked on a remarkable project that resulted in building a two million dollar youth centre in one of Melbourne's most disadvantaged communities. From the outset, Victoria University (VU) was a keen partner in the project. This project had key synergies with the current experiences of the University--a dual sector higher…

  19. Improving Access to Online Multilingual Resources by Adopting the My Language Portal in the City of Greater Dandenong Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdanovic, Marijana; Johanson, Graeme

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of "My Language Portal" in the City of Greater Dandenong Libraries (CGDL), Melbourne, Victoria, through the development of a "My Language Portal Project Plan" in 2006. It discusses how the aims of the designers of My Language Portal (MLP) are fulfilled in the exceptional, changing demographics of Dandenong.…

  20. The Rediscovered Agents of Change: Librarians Working with Academics To Close the Information Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Sabina; Sullivan, Shirley

    This document contains two papers that discuss information provision to customers at the University of Melbourne (Australia) library in light of the merger of the library with information technology (IT) and multimedia education. The first paper addresses the following issues involved in providing this service: content--collection and access…

  1. The Power of a Single Game to Address a Range of Important Ideas in Fraction Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Doug; Roche, Anne

    2010-01-01

    As part of the Contemporary Teaching and Learning of Mathematics Project (CTLM), the mathematics education team at Australian Catholic University has the privilege of working with principals, teachers, students, and parents in schools in the Melbourne Archdiocese. A particular highlight is the opportunity to work alongside project teachers and…

  2. RMIT Vietnam and Vietnam's Development: Risk and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilmoth, David

    2004-01-01

    To help bridge the gap between demand and supply for tertiary education, Vietnam has opened to direct, foreign providers, and the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) International University Vietnam is the first of this category. By sponsoring a large project in a country that some see as risky, RMIT Vietnam needs to be triply viable.…

  3. Dog Ownership, Dog Walking, and Children's and Parents' Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Jo; Timperio, Anna; Chu, Binh; Veitch, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to determine cross-sectional associations of dog ownership, dog walking, and physical activity (PA) among children and their parents. Objective measures of PA were obtained for children ages 5-6 and 10-12 years from 19 primary schools across Melbourne, Australia. Parents self-reported their PA, dog ownership, and frequency of dog…

  4. The Common First Year Programme: Some Lessons from a Construction Science Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Patricia; Simpson, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the School of Property, Construction and Project Management at RMIT University, Melbourne, introduced a new curriculum format for all first year students. All students enrolling in one of the four undergraduate degrees offered by the school commenced a common first year programme. This new curriculum was adopted to provide students with a…

  5. Maximising Target Language Use in the Immersion Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veque, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This article is the second part of a report on research that examined immersion language teachers' strategies to modify their speech in order to maintain use of the target language. As described in the first part in "Babel," Volume 40, Number 2 (Veque, 2005), this classroom-based research, undertaken at Methodist Ladies College (MLC) in Melbourne

  6. Peer Reviewing Preservice Teachers of Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the contributions peer review makes to the formation of preservice teachers of religious education within the context of Christian higher education. The participants were postgraduate students undertaking a preservice teacher training course at Australian Catholic University, Australia (Melbourne campus). Those training to…

  7. The SNAP Platform: Social Networking for Academic Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to introduce an enterprise-wide Web 2.0 learning support platform--SNAP, developed at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Design/methodology/approach: Pointing to the evolution of the social web, the paper discusses the potential for the development of e-learning platforms that employ constructivist, connectivist,…

  8. Historic Australian Conceptualisations of English, Literacy and Multimodality in Policy and Curriculum and Conflicts with Educational Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Joy; Kimber, Kay; Wyatt-Smith, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Attainment of functional English literacy skills by all students has been a focus of Australian national policy since the 1989 Hobart Declaration (MCEETYA, 1989). This focus underpins current educational accountability policy enacted through the National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). The Adelaide and Melbourne Declarations…

  9. Global Selves: Marginalised Young People and Aesthetic Reflexivity in Inhalant Drug Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    Sociologists have observed that young people increasingly draw on global as well as local images in their constructions of individual selfhood. This article provides a narrative analysis of stories of inhalant use-induced hallucination, drawn from interviews conducted with young people in Melbourne, Australia. Young people's stories of the…

  10. Intrathecal Baclofen Therapy: Benefits and Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdolsek, Helena Aniansson; Olesch, Christine; Antolovich, Giuliana; Reddihough, Dinah

    2011-01-01

    Background: Spasticity and dystonia in children with cerebral palsy has been treated with intrathecal baclofen therapy (ITB) at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, Australia (RCH) since 1999. Methods: The records of children having received or still receiving ITB during the period September 1999 until August 2005 were studied to evaluate…

  11. Using the Learning Federation's Learning Objects in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronn, Donna; Clarke, Olivia; Lewis, Gerard

    2006-01-01

    During Term 3 2004, 19 teachers and more than 400 students in six Catholic parish primary schools in the Archdiocese of Melbourne trialled the new mathematics and numeracy "learning objects" from The Learning Federation (TLF). Learning objects are small, reusable digital resources that can be used with a web browser. Teachers in the trial used…

  12. The Monsoon Wedding Phenomenon: Understanding Indian Students Studying in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard; Kumar, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    How does the University sector identify and support the diverse needs of Indian students? This paper reports on a research project carried out on undergraduate students from India enrolled at a Melbourne-based University. The focus is the need to understand why Indian students choose an overseas destination for tertiary study. The intent is to…

  13. Victoria's Leading Edge: Australian State Puts Human Capital at the Heart of its Improvement Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Frank, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Principal Wilma Culton's professional development in the last few years has had her setting out for Singapore, conferencing in Canada, and bopping over to Berlin to check out what experts and the best educators around the world know about helping kids learn. The head of a primary school just outside Melbourne, Australia, Culton is a prime…

  14. Report on the Development of the University Experience Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radloff, Ali; Coates, Hamish; James, Richard; Krause, Kerri-Lee

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) commissioned a Consortium led by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) and including the University of Melbourne's Centre for the Study of Higher Education (CSHE) and the Griffith Institute for Higher Education (GIHE) to develop an instrument and…

  15. Multilingualism among University Staff: A Case Study of Language Management at an Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marriott, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Employing the language management framework, this paper reports on multilingual use among the staff of a major metropolitan university in Melbourne and covers both simple and organised management. It describes a top-down attempt to survey staffs' (academic and general) background in Languages other than English (LOTE), LOTE usage and…

  16. A Defining Time for Physical Education Futures? Exploring the Legacy of Fritz Duras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, David

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the legacy of Dr Fritz Duras in order to address the issue of whether the implementation of a new curriculum for health and physical education in Australia represents a defining time for the subject. Dr Duras was Director of the first physical education teacher education course at the University of Melbourne during an earlier…

  17. Students' Conflicting Attitudes towards Games as a Vehicle for Learning Mathematics: A Methodological Dilemma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Leicha

    2007-01-01

    Mathematics games are widely employed in school classrooms for such reasons as a reward for early finishers or to enhance students' attitude towards mathematics. During a four week period, a total of 222 Grade 5 and 6 (9 to 12 years old) children from Melbourne, Australia, were taught multiplication and division of decimal numbers using calculator…

  18. South African Children's Concepts of Their Future Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Staden, Christie J. S.

    2006-01-01

    This article, which is a revised version of a paper presented at the XXIV World Congress of OMEP conference in Melbourne in July 2004, reports on a study that explored young children's (5-9 years) vision of their future environment in South Africa--as temporal dimension, illustrating their conceptual understanding of this concept. A sample of 320…

  19. Breaking with Precedent: Community-Based Development of a CAC Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruba, Paul; Tapper, Joanna

    The Communication across the Curriculum (CAC) program at the University of Melbourne (Australia) was set up in a top-down manner, which was partly driven by outside pressures. Although informed by writing-across-the-curriculum theory and practice, the program reflects the university's original concern about the teaching of communication skills by…

  20. Emotional Intelligence and Decisional Conflict Styles: Some Empirical Evidence among Italian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Blustein, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between emotional intelligence and decisional conflict styles. Five hundred and twenty-eight Italian high school students (median age = 18; SD = 0.76) were given the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory: short (Bar-On EQ-i:S). The "Intrapersonal" dimension…

  1. Family History and the History of Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selleck, R. J. W.

    2004-01-01

    The State Library of Victoria, which opened its doors in Melbourne in 1856, was designed and built in a confident and expansive decade. Even as war clouds gathered in 1913 the Library's confidence remained strong and it added a magnificent domed reading room, designed with the British Museum Library very much in mind. In the Library's genealogical…

  2. Language and Language Education: Working Papers of The National Languages Institute of Australia, Volume 1, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Language and Language Education: Working Papers of the National Languages Institute of Australia, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This volume on language issues within Australia contains five research papers: "Patterns of Inter-Cultural Communication in Melbourne Factories: Some Research in Progress" (Michael Clyne); "Developing Proficiency Scales for Communicative Assessment" (D. E. Ingram, Elaine Wylie); "Rapid Profile: A Second Language Screening Procedure" (Alison…

  3. Uncovering the Secrets behind the Successful Integration of GIS into the Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeson, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    Presbyterian Ladies College (PLC) is a 130-year-old independent girls' school in the eastern suburbs of Melbourne. Teaching students from ages 4 to 18, PLC has a reputation for academic excellence. Geography is a separate subject taught as a part of the core curriculum in the secondary school. The College, which uses principally Macintosh…

  4. Emotional Intelligence and Decisional Conflict Styles: Some Empirical Evidence among Italian High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Blustein, David L.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between emotional intelligence and decisional conflict styles. Five hundred and twenty-eight Italian high school students (median age = 18; SD = 0.76) were given the Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) and the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory: short (Bar-On EQ-i:S). The "Intrapersonal" dimension…

  5. Crossing Borders: Evaluating a Work Integrated Learning Project Involving Australian and Vietnamese Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Bernadette; Vo-Tran, Huan; Pittayachawan, Siddhi; Reynolds, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The value of work integrated learning (WIL) is well-established in the education of information management (IM) professionals. Adding value to WIL through cross-cultural or cross-disciplinary experiences is considered in this article. Using online communication, simulation activities, and onsite work, students from RMIT Melbourne and RMIT Ho Chi…

  6. "English" in the "Australian Curriculum: English"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the text of a paper given at the 2011 Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities on the theme, "Educating the Nation: The Humanities in the New Australian Curriculum", the 42nd Annual Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities at the University of Melbourne, 17 November 2011. It was presented in a session on "History,…

  7. Travelling Drum with Different Beats: Experiencing African Music and Culture in Australian Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a study that examined the effectiveness of introducing African music and culture to Australian non-specialist primary teacher education students at Deakin University in Melbourne (Australia). The study demonstrates that African music enhanced the generic musical experiences, learning, motivation, interest, confidence and…

  8. Report on the Development of the University Experience Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radloff, Ali; Coates, Hamish; James, Richard; Krause, Kerri-Lee

    2011-01-01

    In 2011, the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) commissioned a Consortium led by the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) and including the University of Melbourne's Centre for the Study of Higher Education (CSHE) and the Griffith Institute for Higher Education (GIHE) to develop an instrument and…

  9. Marina's Fish Shop: A Mathematically- and Technologically-Rich Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wander, Roger; Pierce, Robyn

    2009-01-01

    In early 2008 researchers from the University of Melbourne's "New Technologies for Teaching Mathematics" project created a lesson for the Year 10 students at their Victorian research schools. Two important goals of secondary school mathematics education are to build students' conceptual knowledge and to teach students to think mathematically.…

  10. Peered and Tiered Learning: Action Research as Creative Cultural Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Anne

    2013-01-01

    This article presents and problematizes a peered and tiered model of creative and educational knowledge transfer piloted in Culture Shack, a community-based arts education program in Melbourne, Australia. Drawing on Eisner and Sefton-Green and Soep, I argue the value of this approach as a potential new pedagogical strategy in both secondary…

  11. Workshops to Implement an Affirmative Action Program for Women in Academe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Ethel; Harper, Jan

    1993-01-01

    Reviews Affirmative Action Act passed by Australian government in 1986 to prevent discrimination against women in employment. Notes that legislation requires universities to implement eight-step program. Explains how University of Melbourne used workshop approach to encourage people on campus to believe in new rules and procedures and to follow…

  12. Perspectives on ... Information Literacy in the ''E'' Environment: An Approach for Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgland, Angela; Whitehead, Martha

    2005-01-01

    This article examines an organizational approach to information literacy at the University of Melbourne involving information specialists who bridge information management, teaching, and technology. It discusses the circumstances leading to this approach, the benefits and challenges of the information specialists' mandate, the importance of social…

  13. 77 FR 43108 - Endangered Species; Marine Mammals; Receipt of Applications for Permit

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Departments and Agencies of January 21, 2009--Transparency and Open Government (74 FR 4685; January 26, 2009... applicant over a 5-year period. Applicant: Rosamond Gifford Zoo at Burnet Park, Syracuse, NY; PRT- 79875A... rosalia) to the Melbourne Zoo, Australia, for the purpose of enhancement of the species through...

  14. TRIHALOMETHANE PRECURSOR REMOVAL BY THE MAGNESIUM CARBONATE PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A project was conducted to determine and improve the ability of the magnesium carbonate process to remove trihalomethane (THM) precursors in treated drinking water. The project was conducted at a drinking water treatment plant in Melbourne, FL, which had been developed and instal...

  15. Pioneering Culture: Mechanics' Institutes and Schools of Arts in Australia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candy, Philip C., Ed.; Laurent, John, Ed.

    This book contains the following papers about the history and role of Australia's mechanics' institutes and schools of arts: "'The Light of Heaven Itself': The Contribution of the Institutes to Australia's Cultural History" (Candy); "Dispelling 'the Stagnant Waters of Ignorance': The Early Institutes in Context" (Webby); "The Melbourne Mechanics'…

  16. PowerPoint Presentation

    Cancer.gov

    Providing cancer biospecimens to researchers in industry and academia 1A Thompson, 2L Devereux, 3P Mamers 4C Murone, 5A Partanen, and 5G Lindeman 1Victorian Cancer Biobank, The Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Australia, 2Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre,

  17. The Virtual Print Exhibition: A Case of Learning by Designing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidu, Som; Anderson, Jaynie; Riddle, Mathew

    This paper describes work that has been in progress on the use of information and communications technology in the transformation of teaching and learning in several subjects in the School of Fine Arts, Classical Studies and Archaeology at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Its specific focus is on the "Virtual Print Room" project. This…

  18. The Experience of Practitioners with Technology-Enhanced Teaching and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidu, Som; Cunnington, David; Jasen, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a research project which seeks to explore the experience of educators with technology-enhanced teaching and learning, particularly on how the use of information and communications technology is influencing teaching practices and students' approaches to learning at the University of Melbourne. (Author/LRW)

  19. View of the SRB problems with Challenger after launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    51-L investigation at time 73.201 seconds, Flash from region between orbiter and external tank (ET) liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank, ROTI/MELBOURNE BEACH. Kennedy Space Center alternative photo number is 108-KSC-386C-559/53.

  20. Using MITSI as a KBS Tool for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Geoff; Abbott, Elizabeth

    Students aged 10 to 17 years in a primary school and a secondary school in an industrial suburb of Melbourne, Australia, were observed as they worked at activities in both curriculum and non-curriculum areas using MITSI, a computer program, as a KBS (knowledge-based system) tool. Evaluations of the students' general abilities, computer abilities,…

  1. Embed with the Faculty: Legal Information Skills Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nicki McLaurin; Presser, Prue

    2005-01-01

    This article evaluates the Legal Information Skills Tutorial (LIST), a successful multi-media online learning project at the University of Melbourne Law School based on the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) Information Literacy Standards. (Council of Australian University Librarians, Information Literacy Standards (2001)…

  2. Young Children's Musical Explorations: The Potential of Using Learning Stories for Recording, Planning and Assessing Musical Experiences in a Preschool Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyland, Berenice; Acker, Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the early childhood years and describes research that has examined children's music experiences in formal care and education settings in Melbourne, Australia. This research uses a contextual view of children and their learning and is based on an assumption that learning is social, involves engagement with others and is…

  3. Learning between Schools and Hospitals--Young People and a Curriculum of (Dis)connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Mary

    2014-01-01

    As noted in other papers in this volume, a group of health and education researchers and practitioners came together to further develop their understanding of the situation of young people, who were clients of The Royal Children's Hospital Education Institute in 2007 in Melbourne, Australia. The resultant research project, funded by the…

  4. Maximising Target Language Use in the Immersion Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veque, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This article is the second part of a report on research that examined immersion language teachers' strategies to modify their speech in order to maintain use of the target language. As described in the first part in "Babel," Volume 40, Number 2 (Veque, 2005), this classroom-based research, undertaken at Methodist Ladies College (MLC) in Melbourne,…

  5. Teacher Talk in the Immersion Classroom: Strategies to Communicate in the Target Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veque, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on strategies used by immersion teachers to modify their speech in order to maintain the use of the target language while sustaining interactive communication and the concomitant teaching of the content and the second language. This classroom-based research, undertaken at Methodist Ladies College (MLC) in Melbourne, sources…

  6. Internationalizing the Curriculum: The Implementation Experience in a Faculty of Business and Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosling, Glenda; Edwards, Ron; Schroder, Bill

    2008-01-01

    Curriculum internationalization is a strategy adopted by many universities as they prepare their graduates for employment in the global economy. This paper is a case study of the organizational change involved in one institution's (Monash University, Melbourne, Australia) attempts to implement curriculum internationalization in the foundation…

  7. EPortfolios, Professional Development and Employability: Some Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodley, Carolyn; Sims, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore business students' views about using ePortfolios at Victoria University (VU) in Melbourne. It also examines the extent to which students present ePortfolios to prospective employers in applying for jobs. Design/methodology/approach: This paper draws on the literature on ePortfolio use and the role…

  8. Adventures in Evaluation: Reviewing a CD-ROM Based Adventure Game Designed for Young People Recovering from Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrimpton, Bradley; Hurworth, Rosalind

    2005-01-01

    Recently the Centre for Program Evaluation (CPE) at the University of Melbourne was approached by a mental health agency to undertake the unique and challenging task of evaluating a prototype CD-ROM based adventure game designed for young people recovering from psychosis. This unusual and inventive game, titled Pogo's Pledge, used "edutainment" in…

  9. No Time for the "Airy Fairy": Teacher Perspectives on Creative Writing in High Stakes Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frawley, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a research project undertaken to examine teachers' perceptions of creative writing in the senior English curriculum. It was a case study undertaken in a state high school in Melbourne under the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE). The project investigated the challenges facing English teachers as they prepare…

  10. Video Streaming of Lectures via the Internet: An Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrohon, Mark; Lo, Victor; Dang, Jim; Johnston, Carol

    This paper reports on an investigation into methods of efficiently introducing video streaming into subjects in the economics and commerce faculty at the University of Melbourne (Australia). Several software options were investigated before finally settling on RealSystems. The paper provides a brief review of the background of the project followed…

  11. Spaces of Trauma: Young People, Homelessness and Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Little contemporary research has examined young people's experiences of violence and homelessness in detail within the Australian context. This article draws upon qualitative research with 33 homeless youth in Melbourne and seeks to enhance understanding of the impact of violence on young people. It argues that everyday experiences of violence…

  12. Supporting Component-Based Courseware Development Using Virtual Apparatus Framework Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ip, Albert; Fritze, Paul

    This paper reports on the latest development of the Virtual Apparatus (VA) framework, a contribution to efforts at the University of Melbourne (Australia) to mainstream content and pedagogical functions of curricula. The integration of the educational content and pedagogical functions of learning components using an XML compatible script,…

  13. Connecting Younger Second-Language Learners and Older Bilinguals: Interconnectedness and Social Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clyne, Michael; Cordella, Marisa; Schüpbach, Doris; Maher, Brigid

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an inter-generational inter-cultural pilot project carried out in suburban Melbourne which supports the second-language acquisition of younger people and enhances the social inclusion of older people of migrant background. The article begins with an outline of the multilingual context in which the project is based. The…

  14. The SNAP Platform: Social Networking for Academic Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to introduce an enterprise-wide Web 2.0 learning support platform--SNAP, developed at Victoria University in Melbourne, Australia. Design/methodology/approach: Pointing to the evolution of the social web, the paper discusses the potential for the development of e-learning platforms that employ constructivist, connectivist,…

  15. Teaching English Teachers for the Future: Speaking Back to TPACK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parr, Graham; Bellis, Natalie; Bulfin, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This essay presents a critical, reflexive account of a twelve-month collaboration, when a practising secondary English teacher was seconded to work with a team of English teacher educators in a faculty of education in Melbourne. The collaboration was made possible by funding from DEEWR as part of the Teaching Teachers for the Future project (TTF).…

  16. Multifocal German Program for Beginners: Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brazaitis, Kristina

    1998-01-01

    Describes a project at Australia's University of Melbourne to design and trial a new interactive multimedia package for teaching German to beginners. The package includes an interactive computer-based program and a learner textbook/workbook. The multimedia component comprises dialogs, dictations, and various question formats. Student reaction to…

  17. Brief Report: The Factor Structure of Mood States in an Early Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Christopher J.; Cunningham, Everarda G.; Moore, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the structure of negative mood states among young adolescents. Students (N=216) aged 11-15 years from a secondary school in Melbourne, Australia, completed the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS) [Lovibond, S. H., & Lovibond, P. F. (1996). "Depression anxiety stress scales." Sydney: The Psychology…

  18. What Can We Learn from the Marketing of Independent Schools?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauber, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    Melbourne (Australia) independent schools often advertize their high academic standards, quality curriculum, and competent and caring teaching staff. American public schools should highlight their own strengths by aggressively marketing their college-bound to vocational curricula, their expert and caring faculty, and their disciplined environment.…

  19. "English" in the "Australian Curriculum: English"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the text of a paper given at the 2011 Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities on the theme, "Educating the Nation: The Humanities in the New Australian Curriculum", the 42nd Annual Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities at the University of Melbourne, 17 November 2011. It was presented in a session on "History,…

  20. Rewriting "The Road to Nowhere": Place Pedagogies in Western Sydney

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannon, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    Negative representations of parts of our cities are endemic in the Australian media, where certain suburbs function as motifs for failure--past, present, and future. Indeed, as one journalist put it after invoking the "interchangeable" triumvirate of Sydney's Mount Druitt, Melbourne's West Heidelberg, and Brisbane's Inala, "geography is destiny"…

  1. Web-Based Teaching: The Beginning of the End for Universities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Ray

    This paper describes a World Wide Web-based, generic, inter-disciplinary subject called computer-aided policymaking. It has been offered at Melbourne University (Australia) from the beginning of 2001. It has generated some salutary lessons in marketing and pedagogy, but overall it is concluded that Web-based teaching has a rosy future.…

  2. Make a World of Difference: Hearing Each Other, Healing the Earth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakurai, Hiro

    2010-01-01

    This article is the edited text of the presentation made by the author at the Parliament of the World's Religions in Melbourne, Australia, 3-9 December 2009. The session was titled "Healing the Earth with Care and Concern: Religious Responses to the Earth Charter". The article highlights some of the efforts that the Soka Gakkai International (SGI)…

  3. Jewish Holocaust Histories and the Work of Chronological Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Jordana

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the ways that, in Holocaust education in Jewish schools in Melbourne and New York at the beginning of the 21st century, knowledge of the Holocaust is transferred to students in chronological form. It begins by asking: What work do chronological narratives do within the Holocaust historical narratives offered within Jewish…

  4. Singing and Companionship in the Hawthorn University of the Third-Age Choir, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn; Southcott, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The international University of the Third Age (U3A) embodies the principles of lifelong learning and personal fulfilment amongst members. The research reported in this article focused on the Choir of the U3A Hawthorn, Melbourne, Australia and the benefits perceived by members undertaking this active music engagement in non-competitive choral…

  5. Jewish Holocaust Histories and the Work of Chronological Narratives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Jordana

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the ways that, in Holocaust education in Jewish schools in Melbourne and New York at the beginning of the 21st century, knowledge of the Holocaust is transferred to students in chronological form. It begins by asking: What work do chronological narratives do within the Holocaust historical narratives offered within Jewish…

  6. Making Visible the First Women in Astronomy in Australia: The Measurers and Computers Employed for the Astrographic Catalogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, T.

    In Australia a significant number of women were employed to measure and compute the position of stars for the Astrographic Catalogue at Adelaide, Sydney, Melbourne and Perth Observatories. New archival research has provided evidence that the first women employed in astronomy in Australia were engaged due to this project.

  7. A Conversation on Mobility, Aspiration and Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Critical Studies in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    On 11 and 12 October 2010, the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education held its second annual "Student Equity in Higher Education National Conference" in Melbourne, Australia. The conference theme was "Aspiration, Mobility, Voice". During the conference the three keynote speakers--Gareth Parry (University of Sheffield, UK), Jane…

  8. Nomenclatural realignment of Neotyphodium species with genus Epichloe

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nomenclatural rule changes in the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants made at the 18th International Botanical Congress in Melbourne, Australia in 2011 require that a single name is used for all fungi. Since the anamorphic stages of Epichloë species have been classified i...

  9. Australian Adult Consumers' Beliefs about Plant Foods: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Emma; Worsley, Anthony; Crawford, David

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study examined consumers' perceived barriers and benefits of plant food (fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts, seeds) consumption and views on the promotion of these foods. Ten focus groups were conducted in Melbourne, Australia. Groups consisted of employees of various workplaces, community group members,…

  10. Audacious Beginnings: The Establishment of Universities in Australasia 1850-1900

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tully, Kaye; Whitehead, Clive

    2009-01-01

    There have been various published histories of Australasian universities but none as rich as the two most recent relating to the universities of Sydney (1991) and Melbourne (2003). The latter, in particular, was the catalyst for this exploratory study. How was it that at a time when many major British cities lacked a university institution, towns…

  11. Spaces of Trauma: Young People, Homelessness and Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Lucinda

    2012-01-01

    Little contemporary research has examined young people's experiences of violence and homelessness in detail within the Australian context. This article draws upon qualitative research with 33 homeless youth in Melbourne and seeks to enhance understanding of the impact of violence on young people. It argues that everyday experiences of violence…

  12. An Institutional Approach to the Evaluation of Educational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Gregor E.

    2003-01-01

    Outlines an institutional approach that guides the evaluation of educational technology in the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Melbourne (Victoria, Australia). Roles for an internal evaluator and educational technology practitioners are proposed, and a conceptual framework that guides the evaluation process…

  13. Aptitude Sensitive Instruction: The Role of Media Attributes in Optimizing Transfer of Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Margaret

    The supplantation approach of this study hypothesized that media attributes may serve to bridge the processing link between learner aptitude capacity and the demands of a concept attainment task. Subjects were 492 males aged 16-21, drawn from a College of Technical and Further Education in Melbourne, Australia. All subjects were trade apprentices,…

  14. Internet Use of Polish by Polish Melburnians: Implications for Maintenance and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Michael; Debski, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The Internet has become an important communication medium and it is having a significant impact on language use. The present study takes a "snapshot" of how the Polish language is currently used with modern communications technologies by Polish-Australians living in Melbourne. Through a questionnaire, it surveys which communications technologies…

  15. Brief Report: The Factor Structure of Mood States in an Early Adolescent Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Christopher J.; Cunningham, Everarda G.; Moore, Susan M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the structure of negative mood states among young adolescents. Students (N=216) aged 11-15 years from a secondary school in Melbourne, Australia, completed the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS) [Lovibond, S. H., & Lovibond, P. F. (1996). "Depression anxiety stress scales." Sydney: The Psychology…

  16. Boys' Music? School Context and Middle-School Boys' Musical Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennetts, Kathleen Scott

    2013-01-01

    This article focusses primarily on the findings relating to the musical participation of boys in one Melbourne school. As part of a project that investigated boys' attitudes and participation at fifty-one schools, several contextual features were identified that set "Balton Boys" High School' apart from other participating…

  17. Keeping Connected: The Design and Overview of the Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Julianne

    2014-01-01

    The special issue "Keeping Connected: Identity, Social Connection and Education for Young People" opens with a paper that discusses the research design and overview of a three-year project by a Melbourne (Australia)-based multi-disciplinary team. Over 2007-2009, the Keeping Connected team of 10 researchers investigated the lives of…

  18. The First Year Experience in Australian Universities: Findings from Two Decades, 1994-­2014

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baik, Chi; Naylor, Ryan; Arkoudis, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    This report provides an analysis of trends over a twenty year period in the attitudes and experiences of first year students in Australian universities. It is based on the national survey of first year students undertaken by the Melbourne Centre for the Study of Higher Education at five-yearly intervals since 1994. Dramatic changes have taken…

  19. Promotional Discourse in the Websites of Two Australian Universities: A Discourse Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoang, Thi Van Yen; Rojas-Lizana, Isolda

    2015-01-01

    This article shows how universities represent themselves through the use of language on their institutional websites. Specifically, it compares and contrasts how a long established university, the University of Melbourne and a young university, Macquarie University construct their institutional identities and build up a relationship with potential…

  20. Bilateral Learning and Teaching in Chinese-Australian Arts and Architecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joubert, Lindy; Whitford, Steven

    2006-01-01

    A collaborative design-based, cross-cultural exchange between the Chinese School of Architecture, Tsinghua University of Beijing, and the Faculty of Architecture, Building, and Planning at the University of Melbourne is the case study presented in this article. Two design studios were conducted: one in the Master of Urban Design program, and the…

  1. Historic Australian Conceptualisations of English, Literacy and Multimodality in Policy and Curriculum and Conflicts with Educational Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Joy; Kimber, Kay; Wyatt-Smith, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Attainment of functional English literacy skills by all students has been a focus of Australian national policy since the 1989 Hobart Declaration (MCEETYA, 1989). This focus underpins current educational accountability policy enacted through the National Assessment Program-Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). The Adelaide and Melbourne Declarations…

  2. Showcasing Faculty Experiences with Technology Enhanced Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidu, Som; Cunnington, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a research project that seeks to explore the experience of faculty with technology-enhanced teaching and learning. A particular focus of this investigation is on how the use of information and communications technology is influencing teaching practices and students' approaches to learning at the University of Melbourne. This…

  3. Staff Characteristics and Attitudes towards the Sexuality of People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meaney-Tavares, Rebecca; Gavidia-Payne, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Background: The identification of individual staff characteristics that have a relationship with specific attitudes of staff caring for people with intellectual disability (ID) may enable targeted training and better support. Method: Sixty-six participants from services for people with ID in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia, completed a survey,…

  4. Secondary School Science Predictors of Academic Performance in University Bioscience Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Rod; Brown, Elizabeth; Ward, Alex

    2009-01-01

    In 2009 the Faculty of Health Sciences at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia is introducing a common first year for 11 different undergraduate courses in the faculty. Current prerequisite science entry requirements vary with course and range from none to at least two science or mathematics subjects and from [approximately]50 to 99 in…

  5. When Traditions Become Innovations and Innovations Become Traditions in Everyday Food Pedagogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benny, Helen

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the way learning to cook remains important for the maintenance of "ethnic" food traditions and how sharing food knowledge plays a role in intercultural exchanges. Ethnographic data from an ongoing study in Melbourne is presented to highlight how, in everyday practices, both tradition and innovation are involved in learning…

  6. Sharing Place, Learning Together: Perspectives and Reflections on an Educational Partnership Formation with a Remote Indigenous Community School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godinho, Sally Caroline; Woolley, Marilyn; Webb, Jessie; Winkel, Kenneth Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable partnership formation in a remote Indigenous community involves social, cultural and political considerations. This article reports on the project, "Sharing Place, Learning Together: Supporting Sustainable Educational Partnerships to Advance Social Equity," funded by the Melbourne Social Equity Institute (MSEI) at the…

  7. Adventures in Evaluation: Reviewing a CD-ROM Based Adventure Game Designed for Young People Recovering from Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrimpton, Bradley; Hurworth, Rosalind

    2005-01-01

    Recently the Centre for Program Evaluation (CPE) at the University of Melbourne was approached by a mental health agency to undertake the unique and challenging task of evaluating a prototype CD-ROM based adventure game designed for young people recovering from psychosis. This unusual and inventive game, titled Pogo's Pledge, used "edutainment" in…

  8. Self-Reported and Actual Use of Proactive and Reactive Classroom Management Strategies and Their Relationship with Teacher Stress and Student Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clunies-Ross, Penny; Little, Emma; Kienhuis, Mandy

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between primary school teachers' self-reported and actual use of classroom management strategies, and examined how the use of proactive and reactive strategies is related to teacher stress and student behaviour. The total sample consisted of 97 teachers from primary schools within Melbourne. Teachers…

  9. Perceived Stress, Perceived Social Support, and Wellbeing among Mothers of School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skok, Anita; Harvey, David; Reddihough, Dinah

    2006-01-01

    Background: The study considers how severity of disability, perceived stress, and perceived social support impact on the well-being of a group of mothers caring for school-aged children with cerebral palsy. Method: Forty-three mothers attending clinics at the Royal Children's Hospital in Melbourne, Australia were interviewed and completed the…

  10. Theorising "Geo-Identity" and David Harvey's Space: School Choices of the Geographically Bound Middle-Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Emma

    2015-01-01

    This paper draws on David Harvey's theories of absolute and relational space in order to critique geographically bound school choices of the gentrified middle-class in the City of Melbourne, Australia. The paper relies on interviews with inner-city school choosers as generated by a longitudinal ethnographic school choice study. I argue that the…

  11. Zebra Crossing: Walking in Two Continents Sharing and Celebrating Difference through Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn

    2011-01-01

    I use the metaphor "zebra crossing" in my reflective narrative to describe my plight and struggle as a non-white person growing up and working in Johannesburg, South Africa, during the apartheid era. This article considers and compares the notions of culture, diversity and identity as I now work in a tertiary institution in Melbourne, Australia. I…

  12. Family Intervention Services Program Evaluation: A Brief Report on Initial Outcomes for Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Warren; Rogers, Helen; Matthews, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Reports on a preliminary evaluation of the Metropolitan Family Intervention Service at the Victorian Parenting Centre, Melbourne, Australia. It presents an analysis of pre-post data collected from 589 mothers who commenced and completed parenting programs between 1999 and early 2003. Significant improvements were noted in measures of parental…

  13. Watermarks within the Middle Eastern Manuscript Collection of the Baillieu Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewincamp, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The University of Melbourne's Middle Eastern Manuscript collection housed at the Baillieu Library was acquired by Professor John Bowman in the 1950s as part of a teaching collection to promote greater learning of Middle Eastern culture and civilisation (Pryde 2007, 3). The collection is a rare example within Australia and represents many different…

  14. An Embedded Professional Paired Placement Model: "I Know I Am Not an Expert, but I Am at a Point Now Where I Could Step into the Classroom and Be Responsible for the Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Catherine; Neal, Deborah; Karvouni, Maria; Chandler, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    We present a sustainable and innovative model for pre-service teacher paired professional placements called the Teaching School model. The Teaching School model was piloted initially in partnership with a Metropolitan University and a P-12 College located in Melbourne's northern suburbs in 2013. It was expanded in 2014 to capitalise on an existing…

  15. Showcasing Faculty Experiences with Technology Enhanced Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naidu, Som; Cunnington, David

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a research project that seeks to explore the experience of faculty with technology-enhanced teaching and learning. A particular focus of this investigation is on how the use of information and communications technology is influencing teaching practices and students' approaches to learning at the University of Melbourne. This…

  16. Global Education in Teacher Education Programs: Views from Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson-Patrick, Kate; Macqueen, Suzanne; Reynolds, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    National government education policies in Australia and elsewhere are concerned with preparing citizens who can engage with a global economy and be internationally competitive. For example, the preamble to The Melbourne Declaration (Ministerial Council on Education Employment Training & Youth Affairs [MCEETYA], 2008) focuses on the need for young…

  17. Education Policy Reforms of Secondary Education in the Northern Territory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Bill

    2004-01-01

    An original study of the Ramsay Committee report entitled "Future Directions for Secondary Education in the Northern Territory" (the "Secondary Review") was presented in December 2004 at the ANZCIES National Conference in Melbourne. This was prior to the Northern Territory Government deciding how many of the recommendations of the "Secondary…

  18. A Space for Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine the possibilities of reparation in an era of privatisation and de-industrialisation. I examine the effect of a recent project Sunshine Memory Space, a space, designed to evoke memories of a de-industrialised urban Melbourne suburb Sunshine. This project offered the opportunity for the effects of industrial change to be…

  19. Changes in Coverage of Sun Protection in the News: Threats and Opportunities from Emerging Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Maree; Makin, Jennifer; Maloney, Sarah; Wakefield, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether there have been shifts in news coverage of sun protection issues over a 12-year period in the context of an evolving skin cancer prevention agenda. A content analysis was performed on all relevant articles (N = 552) published in the two metropolitan daily newspapers in Melbourne, Australia, from 2001 to 2012.…

  20. Minimizing the chaos following the loss of article 59: suggestions for a necessary discussion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We believe that the decision at the 2011 Melbourne Botanical Congress to suppress the dual nomenclature for pleomorphic fungi was premature since the great majority of fungal genera still remain inadequately typified and need molecularly based revisions. We deplore the move from a clearly rule-deter...

  1. Global Flows as Gendered Cultural Pedagogies: Learning Gangsta in the "Durty South"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Glenn C.; Hickey-Moody, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article theorizes empirical data from an ethnographic project conducted in and around the economically disadvantaged suburb of Noble Park in southeast suburban Melbourne (Victoria, Australia). Exploring the politics around gendered identities of young people involved in the research, particularly Australian-Sudanese men, the authors theorize…

  2. [Central manifestations of dystrophinopathies].

    PubMed

    Cuisset, J-M; Rivier, F

    2015-12-01

    Le gène dystrophine impliqué dans les dystrophies musculaires de Duchenne et de Becker est exprimé dans 3 principaux tissus à l'origine des manifestations cliniques: le muscle strié squelettique, le cœur et le système nerveux central. Les 6 dystrophines différentes présentes au niveau du cerveau joueraient un rôle dans la maturation et la plasticité des synapses des neurones en particulier par leur fonction au niveau de l'agrégation et de la stabilisation de différents récepteurs de la membrane post synaptique. La possibilité d'une déficience intellectuelle dans la dystrophie musculaire de Duchenne est connue depuis la description princeps par Duchenne lui-même. Les données actuelles vont dans le sens d'une atteinte cognitive constante avec une courbe de Gauss des quotients intellectuels (QI) décalée de -1 écart-type par rapport à la population standard, et un QI moyen autour de 80. Les manifestations témoignant d'une atteinte du système nerveux central peuvent concerner l'ensemble des dystrophinopathies classiques avec atteinte musculaire, et se présenter isolément, sans signe myopathique. Le spectre phénotypique apparaît plus large et subtil que la déficience intellectuelle. L'atteinte isolée ou combinée de fonctions cognitives spécifiques (fonctions mnésiques, fonctions exécutives, attention) est possible, associée ou non à une déficience intellectuelle. Les troubles du spectre de l'autisme font également partie des manifestations rencontrées. En pratique clinique, il faut penser à réaliser un dosage des CPK plasmatiques dans ces différentes situations, en sachant qu'il a été rapporté très récemment des formes centrales pures de dystrophinopathies à CPK plasmatiques normales. PMID:26773588

  3. Central solar energy receiver

    DOEpatents

    Drost, M. Kevin (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01

    An improved tower-mounted central solar energy receiver for heating air drawn through the receiver by an induced draft fan. A number of vertically oriented, energy absorbing, fin-shaped slats are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical arrays on top of the tower coaxially surrounding a pipe having air holes through which the fan draws air which is heated by the slats which receive the solar radiation from a heliostat field. A number of vertically oriented and wedge-shaped columns are radially arranged in a number of concentric cylindrical clusters surrounding the slat arrays. The columns have two mirror-reflecting sides to reflect radiation into the slat arrays and one energy absorbing side to reduce reradiation and reflection from the slat arrays.

  4. Central banking of hybridomas.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, H

    1981-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases is developing, with the American Type Culture Collection, a central facility for the acquisition, maintenance, and distribution of hybridoma cell lines. This effort finds its principal justification in the great activity in this field and in the large variety of hybridoma lines that are produced because of the intrinsic immense diversity of antibodies the immune system is capable of generating. Thus there clearly needs to exist a mechanism both to facilitate exchange of these cell lines and to assure the preservation of the ones of greatest interest. The burgeoning involvement of commercial interests in the production and marketing of monoclonal antibodies complicates, but in no way vitiates the institute's efforts. PMID:6976304

  5. Central Nervous System Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nabors, Louis Burt; Ammirati, Mario; Bierman, Philip J.; Brem, Henry; Butowski, Nicholas; Chamberlain, Marc C.; DeAngelis, Lisa M.; Fenstermaker, Robert A.; Friedman, Allan; Gilbert, Mark R.; Hesser, Deneen; Holdhoff, Matthias; Junck, Larry; Lawson, Ronald; Loeffler, Jay S.; Maor, Moshe H.; Moots, Paul L.; Morrison, Tara; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Newton, Herbert B.; Portnow, Jana; Raizer, Jeffrey J.; Recht, Lawrence; Shrieve, Dennis C.; Sills, Allen K.; Tran, David; Tran, Nam; Vrionis, Frank D.; Wen, Patrick Y.; McMillian, Nicole; Ho, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Primary and metastatic tumors of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with varied outcomes and management strategies. Recently, improved survival observed in 2 randomized clinical trials established combined chemotherapy and radiation as the new standard for treating patients with pure or mixed anaplastic oligodendroglioma harboring the 1p/19q codeletion. For metastatic disease, increasing evidence supports the efficacy of stereotactic radiosurgery in treating patients with multiple metastatic lesions but low overall tumor volume. These guidelines provide recommendations on the diagnosis and management of this group of diseases based on clinical evidence and panel consensus. This version includes expert advice on the management of low-grade infiltrative astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, anaplastic gliomas, glioblastomas, medulloblastomas, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and brain metastases. The full online version, available at NCCN.org, contains recommendations on additional subtypes. PMID:24029126

  6. Traumatic central serous chorioretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Steeples, Laura; Sharma, Vinod; Mercieca, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSR) is well described in the literature, with recognized associations such as systemic steroid therapy and stress; the association of blunt trauma with CSR is highly unusual. A 44-year-old male developed CSR rapidly after blunt trauma to his left eye with a significant reduction in visual acuity to hand movements. Serial optical coherence tomography and fundus fluorescein angiography images are presented. The patient was managed conservatively and spontaneous resolution occurred by 2 months with an excellent visual outcome. There was no evidence of an alternative underlying pathology for the presentation and particularly no signs of posterior uveitis. Investigations for an underlying vascular, inflammatory or infectious cause were all negative. The patient had previously had CSR in his other eye, and this may indicate a potential predisposition to developing the condition, triggered by blunt trauma. PMID:26265647

  7. Future Flight Central

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    NASA 'Future Flight Central,' the world's first full-scale virtual airport control tower, opened December 13, 1999 at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. Constructed at a cost of $10 million, the two story facility was jointly funded by NASA and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The facility is designed to test ways to solve potential air and ground traffic problems at commercial airports under realistic airport conditions and configurations. The facility provides an opportunity for airlines and airports to mitigate passenger delays by fine tuning airport hub operations, gate management, ramp movement procedures, and various other airport improvements. Twelve rear projection screens provide a seamless 360 degree high- resolution view of the airport or other screens being depicted. The imaging system, powered by supercomputers, provides a realistic view of weather conditions, enviromental and seasonal effects and the movement of up to 200 active aircraft and ground vehicles.

  8. Sucker rod centralizer

    SciTech Connect

    Rivas, O.; Newski, A.

    1989-10-03

    This patent describes a device for centralizing at least one sucker rod within a production pipe downhole in a well and for reducing frictional forces between the pipe and at least one sucker rod. It comprises an elongate, substantially cylindrical body member having a longitudinal axis, a plurality of slots within the member and a rotatable member mounted within each slot, each of the plurality of slots has its major dimension along a first axis parallel to the longitudinal axis of the body member and is oriented with respect to the other seats so as to form a helicoidal array for maximizing the total surface contact area between the rotatable members and the pipe and for decreasing the forces acting on each rotatable member.

  9. Central basin pipeline completed

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, J.

    1986-01-01

    A colorless, odorless gas - carbon dioxide - is providing a way for oil producers to wring additional millions of barrels of crude oil out of formations that have held them tightly for millions and millions of years. A recently completed pipeline, Northern Natural Resource Co.'s central basin pipeline, will keep oil fields in the Permian Basin of west Texas and New Mexico productive many years after their expected economic life would have been over. The central basin line is one of the first of the second generation CO/sub 2/ lines, delivering the gas to enhanced oil recovery efforts throughout the southern Permian Basin from the main CO/sub 2/ transmission lines bringing the gas from natural deposits in the northern New Mexico and southern Colorado area. The line stretches from Denver City to McCamey. Carbon dioxide flooding is one of the fastest growing methods of enhanced oil recovery in the U.S. Huge, almost pure deposits of the gas has been found, totaling more than 15 tcf. The oil fields in the Permian Basin of west Texas and New Mexico are prime candidates for CO/sub 2/ flooding for a variety of technical reasons, including the gravity of the oil and the depth of the wells. A study by the National Petroleum Council says miscible CO/sub 2/ flooding in the Permian Basin could produce an additional 3.1 billion bbl. The NPC study says total U.S. miscible EOR production could reach 500,000 b/d by 2004 (assuming $30/bbl) and will exceed thermal EOR production at some time beyond 2005.

  10. Central America's shrinking forests.

    PubMed

    1992-01-01

    This news brief reports that 66% of deforestation in Central America has happened in the past 40 years, based on World Conservation Union (WCU) data. Deforestation is expected to continue. The population of Central America and Mexico grew by 28% between 1977 and 1987. Growth is decreasing but remains high at 2.5% in all countries of the region except Panama. 29 million was the regional population in 1990; the projection is for 63 million by 2025. Population is migrating to urban centers. Forests declined by 13% and croplands increased from 4% to 13% of total land area and pasture land from 2% to 37%. There was an increase in unproductive land from 145 to 24%, i.e., 50% of El Salvador's land had soil degradation as does 30% of Guatemala's. In addition to deforestation and soil degradation, there has been soil erosion leading to sedimentation buildup near dam sites and in rivers, which diminishes hydroelectric power capability. Silting also affects groundwater resources, which impact on a safe drinking water supply. Population growth results in increased demand for fuelwood, urban land, and agricultural land. New techniques practiced widely are needed in order to meet the region's needs or demands. Slowing population growth buys time for adjusting to the necessary changes needed for sustaining the region's population. WCU urges conservation organizations to raise awareness about the role population plays in environmental degradation, and to support efforts to reduce birth rates. Women's status needs to be improved through income-generating projects, for instance, and cooperation is needed between conservation groups and organizations involved with improving maternal and child health. PMID:12285833

  11. Localization and centrality in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Travis; Zhang, Xiao; Newman, M. E. J.

    2014-11-01

    Eigenvector centrality is a common measure of the importance of nodes in a network. Here we show that under common conditions the eigenvector centrality displays a localization transition that causes most of the weight of the centrality to concentrate on a small number of nodes in the network. In this regime the measure is no longer useful for distinguishing among the remaining nodes and its efficacy as a network metric is impaired. As a remedy, we propose an alternative centrality measure based on the nonbacktracking matrix, which gives results closely similar to the standard eigenvector centrality in dense networks where the latter is well behaved but avoids localization and gives useful results in regimes where the standard centrality fails.

  12. Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ramanantsoa, N; Gallego, J

    2013-11-01

    Congenital central hypoventilation syndrome (CCHS) is characterized by hypoventilation during sleep and impaired ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxemia. Most cases are sporadic and caused by de novo PHOX2B gene mutations, which are usually polyalanine repeat expansions. Physiological and neuroanatomical studies of genetically engineered mice and analyses of cellular responses to mutated Phox2b have shed light on the pathophysiological mechanisms of CCHS. Findings in Phox2b(27Ala/+) knock-in mice consisted of unstable breathing with apneas, absence of the ventilatory response to hypercapnia, death within a few hours after birth, and absence of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). Conditional mouse mutants in which Phox2b(27Ala) was targeted to the RTN also lacked the ventilatory response to hypercapnia at birth but survived to adulthood and developed a partial hypercapnia response. The therapeutic effects of desogestrel are being evaluated in clinical trials, and recent analyses of cellular responses to polyAla Phox2b aggregates have suggested new pharmacological approaches designed to counteract the toxic effects of mutated Phox2b. PMID:23692929

  13. Central and southern Africa

    SciTech Connect

    McGrew, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    Exploration in central and southern Africa continued to expand during 1980. The greatest concentration of activity was in Nigeria. However, there was considerable increase in the level of exploratory work in Cameroon and Congo. Significant new finds have been made in Ivory Coast. Geological and geophysical activity was carried out in 18 of the countries, with those in the western part having the largest share. Seismic work involved 225 party months of operation. Most of this time was spent on land, but marine operations accounted for 73,389 km of new control. Gravity and magnetic data were recorded during the marine surveys, and several large aeromagnetic projects were undertaken to obtain a total of 164,498 line km of data. Exploratory and development drilling accounted for a total of 304 wells and 2,605,044 ft (794,212 m) of hole. The 92 exploratory wells that were drilled resulted in 47 oil and gas discoveries. In development drilling 89% of the 212 wells were successful. At the end of the year, 27 exploratory wells were underway, and 34 development wells were being drilled for a total of 61. Oil production from the countries that this review covers was 918,747,009 bbl in 1980, a drop of about 9% from the previous year. Countries showing a decline in production were Nigeria, Gabon, Cabinda, and Zaire. Increases were recorded in Cameroon, Congo, and Ghana. A new country was added to the list of producers when production from the Belier field in Ivory Coast came on stream. 33 figures, 15 tables.

  14. Central African Republic.

    PubMed

    1989-11-01

    The Central African Republic contains 242,000 square miles, which rolling terrain almost 2000 feet above sea level. The climate is tropical, and it has a population of 2.8 million people with a 2.5% growth rate. There are more than 80 ethnic groups including Baya 34%, Banda 28%, Sara 10%, Mandja 9%, Mboum 9%, and M'Baka 7%. The religions are traditional African 35%, protestant 25%, Roman Catholic 25%, and Muslim 15%, and the languages are French and Sangho. The infant mortality rate is 143/1000, with expectancy at 49 years and a 40% literacy rate. The work force of 1 million is 70% agricultural, industry 6% and commerce and service 6% and government 3%. The government consists of a president assisted by cabinet ministers and a single party. Natural resources include diamonds, uranium, timber, gold, and oil, and major industries are beverages, textiles, and soap. Agricultural products feature coffee, cotton, peanuts, tobacco, food crops and livestock. Most of the population live in rural areas and most of the 80 ethnic groups have their own language. This is one of the world's least developed countries, with a per capita income of $375/year. The main problems with development are the poor transportation infrastructure, and the weak internal and international marketing systems. The US and various international organizations have aided in agriculture development, health programs, and family planning. US investment is mainly in diamond and gold mining, and although oil drilling has been successful it is not economically feasible at current prices. PMID:12178020

  15. North Central Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This radar image shows the dramatic landscape in the Phang Hoei Range of north central Thailand, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northeast of the city of Lom Sak. The plateau, shown in green to the left of center, is the area of Phu Kradung National Park. This plateau is a remnant of a once larger plateau, another portion of which is seen along the right side of the image. The plateaus have been dissected by water erosion over thousands of years. Forest areas appear green on the image; agricultural areas and settlements appear as red and blue. North is toward the lower right. The area shown is 38 by 50 kilometers (24 by 31 miles) and is centered at 16.96 degrees north latitude, 101.67 degrees east longitude. Colors are assigned to different radar frequencies and polarizations as follows: red is L-band horizontally transmitted and horizontally received; green is L-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received; blue is C-band horizontally transmitted and vertically received. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture (SIR-C/X-SAR) imaging radar on October 3, 1994, when it flew aboard the space shuttle Endeavour. SIR-C/X-SAR is a joint mission of the U.S./German and Italian space agencies.

    Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm) and X-band (3 cm). The multi-frequency data will be used by the international scientific community to better understand the global environment and how it is changing. The SIR-C/X-SAR data, complemented by aircraft and ground studies, will give scientists clearer insights into those environmental changes which are caused by nature and those changes which are induced by human activity. SIR-C was developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. X-SAR was developed by the Dornier and Alenia Spazio companies for the German space agency, Deutsche Agentur fuer Raumfahrtangelegenheiten (DARA), and the Italian space agency, Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft und Raumfahrt e.v.(DLR), the major partner in science, operations, and data processing of X-SAR.

  16. Central Chemoreceptors: Locations and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Nattie, Eugene; Li, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Central chemoreception traditionally refers to a change in ventilation attributable to changes in CO2/H+ detected within the brain. Interest in central chemoreception has grown substantially since the previous Handbook of Physiology published in 1986. Initially, central chemoreception was localized to areas on the ventral medullary surface, a hypothesis complemented by the recent identification of neurons with specific phenotypes near one of these areas as putative chemoreceptor cells. However, there is substantial evidence that many sites participate in central chemoreception some located at a distance from the ventral medulla. Functionally, central chemoreception, via the sensing of brain interstitial fluid H+, serves to detect and integrate information on 1) alveolar ventilation (arterial PCO2), 2) brain blood flow and metabolism and 3) acid-base balance, and, in response, can affect breathing, airway resistance, blood pressure (sympathetic tone) and arousal. In addition, central chemoreception provides a tonic ‘drive’ (source of excitation) at the normal, baseline PCO2 level that maintains a degree of functional connectivity among brainstem respiratory neurons necessary to produce eupneic breathing. Central chemoreception responds to small variations in PCO2 to regulate normal gas exchange and to large changes in PCO2 to minimize acid-base changes. Central chemoreceptor sites vary in function with sex and with development. From an evolutionary perspective, central chemoreception grew out of the demands posed by air vs. water breathing, homeothermy, sleep, optimization of the work of breathing with the ‘ideal’ arterial PCO2, and the maintenance of the appropriate pH at 37°C for optimal protein structure and function. PMID:23728974

  17. Centralized digital control of accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Melen, R.E.

    1983-09-01

    In contrasting the title of this paper with a second paper to be presented at this conference entitled Distributed Digital Control of Accelerators, a potential reader might be led to believe that this paper will focus on systems whose computing intelligence is centered in one or more computers in a centralized location. Instead, this paper will describe the architectural evolution of SLAC's computer based accelerator control systems with respect to the distribution of their intelligence. However, the use of the word centralized in the title is appropriate because these systems are based on the use of centralized large and computationally powerful processors that are typically supported by networks of smaller distributed processors.

  18. Demographic tensions in Central America.

    PubMed

    1986-08-01

    This discussion of Central America focuses on the rapid growth of its population, its stagnating economy, and those countries that are socioeconomically advanced. Between 1950-85 the population of Central America tripled, from 9.1 million to 26. 4 million, due to marked mortality declines and the absence of off-setting fertility declines. The distribution of Central Americas's growing populations sets its population growth apart from that of other developing regions. Currently, almost half of all Central Americans live in cities. Although the average growth rate for Central American countries has fallen and is expected to drop further, the decline does not counterbalance the effect of the absolute rise in population numbers. The average annual growth rate of more than 3% annually in the 1960s fell to about 2.6% in recent years, but this decline is due primarily to socioeconomically advanced Costa Rica and Panama. Central America's age structure further complicates the population crisis. About 43% of Central Americans are under the age of 15. When the increasingly larger young population group enters it reproductive years, the potential for future growth (albeit the falling rate of population increase) is unparalleled. UN population projections show the region's population at 40 million by the year 2000. The 1973 oil crisis began a downward spiral for the buoyant post World War II Central American economy. Between 1950-79, real per capita income growth in Central America doubled, with Central American economies growing an average of 5.3% annually. By the early 1980s, overseas markets of the trade-dependent countries of Central America had dried up due to protectionism abroad and slumping basic commodity prices. These and other factors plunged Central America into its current economic malaise of falling real per capita income, rising unemployment, curtailed export led economic growth, and a rising cost of living. In general, economic growth in Central America disproportionately benefits high and middle income groups, thereby widening the already large gap between rich and poor. Average per capita income for the poorest 20% of Central Americans is $90 a year (in 1970 US dollars); over half subsist on an average of $200 a year. Central America's economic crisis is further intensified by the marked increase in the economically active population. Doubling in size from about 2.1 million in 1970 to 4.2 million in 1985, the labor force increasingly pressures an economy already weakened by high unemployment and underemployment. Socioeconomically advanced Costa Rica and Panama are Central America's notable exceptions. Life expectancy at birth and infant mortality rates for these better off countries, e.g., are comparable to those of developed countries. Costa Ricans enjoy the most equitable distributional income of all Central Americans. Panama's income differential is 1 of the widest in the world, but its relative wealth affords more for each of its citizens. PMID:12268221

  19. Super Kitchen Centralizes Food Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1975

    1975-01-01

    To centralize food service within the entire Pittsburgh school district, a 90,000-square-foot food service preparation building contains cranes and monorails to move 500-pound capacity vats throughout the kitchen. (Author/MLF)

  20. Central-Office Real Estate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardini, Priscilla

    2003-01-01

    Describes how to upgrade a school district's central-office facilities without incurring taxpayer enmity. Includes case studies from Harford County, Maryland; Orange and Broward Counties, Florida; South Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Mt. Baker, Washington; Chicago, Illinois; and Rochester, New Hampshire. (PKP)

  1. Central Fan Integrated Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-12

    This information sheet describes one example of a ventilation system design, a central fan integrated supply (CFIS) system, a mechanical ventilation and pollutant source control to ensure that there is reasonable indoor air quality inside the house.

  2. CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    BERGMAN, T. B.; STEFANSKI, L. D.; SEELEY, P. N.; ZINSLI, L. C.; CUSACK, L. J.

    2012-09-19

    THE CENTRAL PLATEAU REMEDIATION OPTIMIZATION STUDY WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN OPTIMAL SEQUENCE OF REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES IMPLEMENTING THE CERCLA DECISION ON THE CENTRAL PLATEAU. THE STUDY DEFINES A SEQUENCE OF ACTIVITIES THAT RESULT IN AN EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FROM A STRATEGIC PERSPECTIVE WHEN CONSIDERING EQUIPMENT PROCUREMENT AND STAGING, WORKFORCE MOBILIZATION/DEMOBILIZATION, WORKFORCE LEVELING, WORKFORCE SKILL-MIX, AND OTHER REMEDIATION/DISPOSITION PROJECT EXECUTION PARAMETERS.

  3. Attribute centrality and imaginative thought.

    PubMed

    Ward, T B; Dodds, R A; Saunders, K N; Sifonis, C M

    2000-12-01

    Participants' representations of the concept human were examined to differentiate three types of associations between concepts and their component attributes: the capacity of concepts to cue attributes (attribute accessibility), the capacity of attributes to cue concepts (instance accessibility), and the extent to which attributes are thought of as central to concepts (attribute centrality). The findings provide information about the concept human itself and, more generally, about the functionally distinct roles those different attribute-concept associations play in guiding imaginative thought. College students listed attributes that differentiate humans from other animals, rated the centrality of those attributes, and listed animals that possess those attributes. Other students drew and described extraterrestrials that possessed some of the attributes that were found to vary across those listing and rating tasks. Rated centrality was the most important determinant of an attribute's impact on imaginative generation. When the imagined extraterrestrials were supposed to possess attributes that had been rated as central to humans (intelligence, emotional complexity, or opposable thumbs), participants projected more aspects of human form onto them than when the creatures were supposed to possess less central attributes or when attributes were unspecified. PMID:11219966

  4. 20 CFR 346.1 - Central register.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RAILROAD HIRING § 346.1 Central register. (a) The Board shall maintain a central register of railroad... central register and selected on the basis of job experience, location of residence, claimed...

  5. Coverage centralities for temporal networks*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Yano, Yosuke; Yoshida, Yuichi

    2016-02-01

    Structure of real networked systems, such as social relationship, can be modeled as temporal networks in which each edge appears only at the prescribed time. Understanding the structure of temporal networks requires quantifying the importance of a temporal vertex, which is a pair of vertex index and time. In this paper, we define two centrality measures of a temporal vertex based on the fastest temporal paths which use the temporal vertex. The definition is free from parameters and robust against the change in time scale on which we focus. In addition, we can efficiently compute these centrality values for all temporal vertices. Using the two centrality measures, we reveal that distributions of these centrality values of real-world temporal networks are heterogeneous. For various datasets, we also demonstrate that a majority of the highly central temporal vertices are located within a narrow time window around a particular time. In other words, there is a bottleneck time at which most information sent in the temporal network passes through a small number of temporal vertices, which suggests an important role of these temporal vertices in spreading phenomena. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Temporal Network Theory and Applications", edited by Petter Holme.Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-60498-7

  6. CENTRAL NEUROENDOCRINE MECHANISMS OF GASTROPROTECTION.

    PubMed

    Gyires, Klára

    2014-03-30

    Selye recognized the importance of activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during stress and the connection between central nervous system and neuroendocrine regulation. This concept basically contributed to initiation of the studies, which revealed the importance of brain gut axis in regulation of gastric mucosal integrity. Several neuropeptides, such as thyreotrop releasing hormones, adrenomedullin, peptide YY, amylin, opioid peptides, nociceptin, nocisatin, substance P, ghrelin, leptin, orexin-A, angiotensin II were shown to induce gastroprotective effect injected centrally. Though the involvement of dorsal vagal complex and vagal nerves in conveying the central action to the periphery has been well documented, additional mechanisms have also been raised. The interaction between neuropeptides further component that may modify the gastric mucosal resistance to noxious stimulus. PMID:26118250

  7. Lignite resources of Central Otago

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, B.J.

    1986-01-01

    Dunstan Formation lignite bearing strata within the 1,000m thick Miocene Manuherikia Group of Central Otago represents an important coal resource. Three principal coalfields, Blackstone, Roxburgh and Nevis are identified. Detailed stratigraphic and sedimentologic data from outcrop and over 120 boreholes were assessed to evaluate Central Otago coalfield stratigraphy and the paleoenvironmental controls governing peat deposition on a broad alluvial plain surrounding a large freshwater basin (Lake Manuherikia). The study emphasizes the significance of detailed observations and analyses of coal-bearing strata, demonstrating the potential role of paleoenvironmental modeling in coal exploration and mining activities.

  8. Geothermal activities in Central America

    SciTech Connect

    Whetten, J.T.; Hanold, R.J.

    1985-09-11

    The Agency for International Development is funding a new program in energy and minerals for Central America. Geothermal energy is an important component. A country-wide geothermal assessment has started in Honduras, and other assessment activities are in progress or planned for Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Panama. Instrumentation for well logging has been provided to Costa Rica, and a self-contained logging truck will be made available for use throughout Central America. An important objective of this program is to involve the private sector in resource development. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  9. MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station

    SciTech Connect

    2012-09-12

    The MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station(MRDIS-CAS} is a software system for receiving, storing, and reviewing radiation data collected by the Mobile Radiation Detection and Identification System (MRDIS}, a mobile radiation scanning system developed for use in foreign ports for the DOE Megaports Initiative. It is designed to run on one of the on board computers in the MRDIS cab. It will collect, store, and display data from the MRDIS without the need for wireless communications or centralized server technology. It is intended to be a lightweight replacement for a distributed Megaports communication system in ports where the necessary communications infrastructure does not exist for a full Megaports communications system.

  10. Earth Works Central. [Educational Packet].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids for Saving Earth Worldwide, Minneapolis, MN.

    Earth Works Central is an educational curriculum tool designed to provide environmental education support for the classroom. It features environmental materials for science, geography, history, art, music, dramatics, and physical education. It includes information on creating an environmental center where kids can learn and become empowered to…

  11. The Centrality of Vocational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, John

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the concept of the "vocational" in contemporary educational discourses, and argues for the centrality of vocational aspects of learning in making meaning. The existing tensions are seen to lie between discourses that place the vocational at the bottom of a hierarchy of knowledge and value, and discourses concerning…

  12. The Centrality of Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrich, Lisa C.; Harris, Jessica; Klenowski, Val; Smeed, Judy; Spina, Nerida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The central argument in this paper is that ethical school leadership is imperative in a context of increasing performance-driven accountability. The purpose of this paper is to focus on school principals' perceptions of how they understand ethical leadership and how they lead the ethical use of data. Design/Methodology/Approach: This…

  13. The Centrality of Ethical Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrich, Lisa C.; Harris, Jessica; Klenowski, Val; Smeed, Judy; Spina, Nerida

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The central argument in this paper is that ethical school leadership is imperative in a context of increasing performance-driven accountability. The purpose of this paper is to focus on school principals' perceptions of how they understand ethical leadership and how they lead the ethical use of data. Design/Methodology/Approach: This…

  14. Earth Works Central. [Educational Packet].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kids for Saving Earth Worldwide, Minneapolis, MN.

    Earth Works Central is an educational curriculum tool designed to provide environmental education support for the classroom. It features environmental materials for science, geography, history, art, music, dramatics, and physical education. It includes information on creating an environmental center where kids can learn and become empowered to…

  15. Central New York's New Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for an Urban Future, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Conducted in late 2008 in partnership with the Greater Syracuse Chamber of Commerce and the Mohawk Valley Chamber of Commerce, this is the largest survey ever taken of Central New York businesses regarding the English language skills of the area workforce. The online survey was emailed to several hundred local businesses; 126 responses were…

  16. Pathology of Central American Refugees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molesky, Jean

    1986-01-01

    The rapidly increasing numbers of Central American refugees in the United States include many whose sufferings have led to severe psychological problems. The article attempts to lay a foundation for assisting them by discussing the following: (1) origins of disorders; (2) culture shock and stress; (3) prevalence of symptoms; and (4) suggestions…

  17. Georgiaites: Tektites in Central Georgia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albin, Edward F.

    1991-01-01

    Information is provided about the origin, the features, and the availability of tektites which are odd and very rare types of transparent glass theorized to be from a common, yet unknown, origin. The basis for this article is the Howard collection of tektites found in a small region of central Georgia. (seven references) (JJK)

  18. Readability of Central Florida Newspapers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmstead, Phyllis M.

    A study analyzed the readability of seven central Florida newspapers (one of which is a college newspaper) and "USA Today.""Rightwriter," a grammar checker and readability computer program, was used to evaluate front page articles for each of the eight newspapers. The readability formulas invoked in the readability program included the…

  19. Central Bureau Status and Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilan, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The Central Bureau continues to promote the IGS organization, data and data products as setting the world standard for GPS/GNSS geodetic applications as outlined in the IGS Strategic Plan. The Central Bureau was responsible for the organization of the strategic planning process, preparation of all documents, and the editing and publication of the plan. This was a major activity and the Board s consensus on the plan is a significant milestone in the evolution of the IGS. The Central Bureau is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Service. With 200 organizations in over 80 countries and a ground network of approx. 350 stations, this requires daily interfaces on many different levels globally. The separate summary of the IGS Network Coordinator is included in this annual report and demonstrates the vital technical tasks of the Central Bureau. The CB is also responsible to arrange and organize all Board activities and is involved in the supporting the planning and logistics of all IGS workshops and meetings.

  20. Investing in the Central Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking against similar districts, ideally higher-performing ones, can be a valuable tool for determining the appropriate level of central-office investment. Unfortunately, reliable benchmarks on district spending in teaching and learning support are not readily available. This should not preclude districts from using this valuable method to…

  1. Investing in the Central Office

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Regis Anne

    2010-01-01

    Benchmarking against similar districts, ideally higher-performing ones, can be a valuable tool for determining the appropriate level of central-office investment. Unfortunately, reliable benchmarks on district spending in teaching and learning support are not readily available. This should not preclude districts from using this valuable method to…

  2. Central Corneal Thickness in Children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective To report the central corneal thickness (CCT) in healthy white, African-American, and Hispanic children from birth to 17 years of age. Design Prospective observational multicenter study. Central corneal thickness was measured with a hand-held contact pachymeter. Results Two thousand seventy-nine children were included in the study, with ages ranging from day of birth to 17 years. Included were 807 white, 494 Hispanic, and 474 African-American individuals, in addition to Asian, unknown and mixed race individuals. African-American children had thinner corneas on average than that of both white (p< .001) and Hispanic children (p< .001) by approximately 20 micrometers. Thicker median CCT was observed with each successive year of age from age 1 to 11 years, with year-to-year differences steadily decreasing and reaching a plateau after age 11 at 573 micrometers in white and Hispanic children and 551 micrometers in African-American children. For every 100 micrometers of thicker CCT measured, the intraocular pressure was 1.5 mmHg higher on average (p< 0.001). For every diopter of increased myopic refractive error (p< 0.001) CCT was 1 micrometer thinner on average. Conclusions Median CCT increases with age from 1 to 11 years with the greatest increase present in the youngest age groups. African-American children on average have thinner central corneas than white and Hispanic children, while white and Hispanic children demonstrate similar central corneal thickness. PMID:21911662

  3. Central America: A Regional Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowry, George; Lacy, Ann

    This lesson is a series of activities and multi-media presentations designed to enable students to understand the historic and geographic roots of some of the problems that Central American nations have faced. Geography, history, writing, and storytelling are used as ways of understanding a multicultural world. Creative thinking and participation…

  4. Central American geologic map project

    SciTech Connect

    Dengo, G.

    1986-07-01

    During the Northeast Quadrant Panel meeting of the Circum-Pacific Map Project held in Mexico City, February 1985, Central American panel members proposed and adopted plans for compiling a geologic map of Central America, probably at a scale of 1:500,000. A local group with participants from each country was organized and coordinated by Rolando Castillo, director, Central American School of Geology, University of Costa Rica, for the geologic aspects, and Fernando Rudin, director, Geographic Institute of Costa Rica, for the topographic base. In 1956, the US Geological Survey published a geologic map of the region at a scale of 1:1 million. Subsequent topographic and geologic mapping projects have provided a large amount of new data. The entire area is now covered by topographic maps at a scale of 1:50,000, and these maps have been used in several countries as a base for geologic mapping. Another regional map, the Metallogenic Map of Central America (scale = 1:2 million), was published in 1969 by the Central American Research Institute for Industry (ICAITI) with a generalized but updated geologic base map. Between 1969 and 1980, maps for each country were published by local institutions: Guatemala-Belize at 1:500,000, Honduras at 1:500,000, El Salvador at 1:100,000, Nicaragua at 1:1 million, Costa Rica at 1:200,000, and Panama at 1:1 million. This information, in addition to that of newly mapped areas, served as the base for the Central American part of the Geologic-Tectonic Map of the Caribbean Region (scale = 1:2.5 million), published by the US Geological Survey in 1980, and also fro the Northeast Quadrant Maps of the Circum-Pacific Region. The new project also involves bathymetric and geologic mapping of the Pacific and Caribbean margins of the Central American Isthmus. A substantial amount of new information of the Middle America Trench has been acquired through DSDP Legs 67 and 84.

  5. 49 CFR 71.6 - Central zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Central zone. 71.6 Section 71.6 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.6 Central zone. (a) Central... change from central to mountain time and vice versa; the Colorado Southern and Fort Worth and Denver...

  6. Eta Carinae: The Central Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, D. J.; Davidson, K.; Kazunori Ishibashi, K.; Gull, T.

    1999-12-01

    Recent HST STIS observations have revealed the spectrum of the central star in Eta Carinae for the first time. These observations clearly show that the optical spectrum of the central star is dominated by emission lines of H, He 1, and Fe 2. Its spectrum is qualitatively similar to the extreme P Cygni star HDE 316285. Using the non-LTE atmosphere code of Hillier and Miller (1998) we have performed a spectroscopic investigation of the central star. Previously measured IR fluxes indicate that the luminosity of the system is approximately 5x 106 Lsun (for a distance of d=2.5 kpc), which we adopt as the luminosity of the central star. An excellent fit is obtained to the emission line spectrum using a mass loss rate of 10-3Msun yr-1, a terminal wind velocity of 500 kms-1, and a solar Fe abundance (by mass). Due to degeneracies in the model it is difficult to constrain both the effective temperature and the H/He abundance ratio. The most significant discrepancy is that the strength of the P Cygni absorption components is overestimated, particularly on the Fe 2\\ emission lines. These discrepancies may be due to asymmetries in the stellar wind and/or time variability. There may also be a problem for our models in matching the UV spectrum shortward of 1600 Angstroms, but STIS observations of the central star are not yet available, while earlier GHRS observations may be contaminated by nebula emission and/or a companion star. We discuss the implications of our results for the current evolutionary status of ? Car, and for the binary model of Damineli et al. (1997). This research was supported in part by NASA through a grant from the STScI, which is operated by AURA, under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Additional support was provided by NASA grant NAG5-8211.

  7. The Central Valley Hydrologic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faunt, C.; Belitz, K.; Hanson, R. T.

    2009-12-01

    Historically, California’s Central Valley has been one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. The Central Valley also is rapidly becoming an important area for California’s expanding urban population. In response to this competition for water, a number of water-related issues have gained prominence: conjunctive use, artificial recharge, hydrologic implications of land-use change, subsidence, and effects of climate variability. To provide information to stakeholders addressing these issues, the USGS made a detailed assessment of the Central Valley aquifer system that includes the present status of water resources and how these resources have changed over time. The principal product of this assessment is a tool, referred to as the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM), that simulates surface-water flows, groundwater flows, and land subsidence in response to stresses from human uses and from climate variability throughout the entire Central Valley. The CVHM utilizes MODFLOW combined with a new tool called “Farm Process” to simulate groundwater and surface-water flow, irrigated agriculture, land subsidence, and other key processes in the Central Valley on a monthly basis. This model was discretized horizontally into 20,000 1-mi2 cells and vertically into 10 layers ranging in thickness from 50 feet at the land surface to 750 feet at depth. A texture model constructed by using data from more than 8,500 drillers’ logs was used to estimate hydraulic properties. Unmetered pumpage and surface-water deliveries for 21 water-balance regions were simulated with the Farm Process. Model results indicate that human activities, predominately surface-water deliveries and groundwater pumping for irrigated agriculture, have dramatically influenced the hydrology of the Central Valley. These human activities have increased flow though the aquifer system by about a factor of six compared to pre-development conditions. The simulated hydrology reflects spatial and temporal variability in climate, land-use changes, and available surface-water deliveries. For example, the droughts of 1976-77 and 1987-92 led to reduced streamflow and surface-water deliveries and increased evapotranspiration and groundwater pumpage throughout most of the valley, resulting in a decrease in groundwater storage. Since the mid-1990s, annual surface-water deliveries generally have exceeded groundwater pumpage, resulting in an increase or no change in groundwater storage throughout most of the valley. However, groundwater is still being removed from storage during most years in the southern part of the Central Valley. The CVHM is designed to be coupled with Global Climate Models to forecast the potential supply of surface-water deliveries, demand for groundwater pumpage, potential subsidence, and changes in groundwater storage in response to different climate-change scenarios. The detailed database on texture properties coupled with CVHM's ability to simulate the combined effects of recharge and discharge make CVHM particularly useful for assessing water-management plans, such as conjunctive water use, conservation of agriculture land, and land-use change. In the future, the CVHM could be used in conjunction with optimization models to help evaluate water-management alternatives to effectively utilize the available water resources.

  8. A centralized audio presentation manager

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, A.L. III; Blattner, M.M.

    1994-05-16

    The centralized audio presentation manager addresses the problems which occur when multiple programs running simultaneously attempt to use the audio output of a computer system. Time dependence of sound means that certain auditory messages must be scheduled simultaneously, which can lead to perceptual problems due to psychoacoustic phenomena. Furthermore, the combination of speech and nonspeech audio is examined; each presents its own problems of perceptibility in an acoustic environment composed of multiple auditory streams. The centralized audio presentation manager receives abstract parameterized message requests from the currently running programs, and attempts to create and present a sonic representation in the most perceptible manner through the use of a theoretically and empirically designed rule set.

  9. Central exclusive production at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, Leszek; Guryn, Włodek; Turnau, Jacek

    2014-11-10

    The present status and future plans of the physics program of Central Exclusive Production (CEP) at RHIC are described. The measurements are based on the detection of the forward protons from the Double Pomeron Exchange (DPE) process in the Roman Pot system and of the recoil system of charged particles from the DPE process measured in the STAR experiment’s Time Projection Chamber (TPC). The data described here were taken using polarized proton-proton collisions at ps = 200 GeV. The preliminary spectra of two pion and four pion invariant mass reconstructed by STAR TPC in central region of pseudo-rapidity |#17;| < 1, are presented. Near future plans to take data with the current system at center-of-mass energy ps = 200 GeV and plans to upgrade the forward proton tagging sys- tem are presented. Also a possible addition of the Roman Pots to the sPHENIX detector is discussed.

  10. MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-12

    The MRDIS Standalone Central Alarm Station(MRDIS-CAS} is a software system for receiving, storing, and reviewing radiation data collected by the Mobile Radiation Detection and Identification System (MRDIS}, a mobile radiation scanning system developed for use in foreign ports for the DOE Megaports Initiative. It is designed to run on one of the on board computers in the MRDIS cab. It will collect, store, and display data from the MRDIS without the need for wireless communicationsmore » or centralized server technology. It is intended to be a lightweight replacement for a distributed Megaports communication system in ports where the necessary communications infrastructure does not exist for a full Megaports communications system.« less

  11. Central Asia Active Fault Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohadjer, Solmaz; Ehlers, Todd A.; Kakar, Najibullah

    2014-05-01

    The ongoing collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia controls active tectonics and seismicity in Central Asia. This motion is accommodated by faults that have historically caused devastating earthquakes and continue to pose serious threats to the population at risk. Despite international and regional efforts to assess seismic hazards in Central Asia, little attention has been given to development of a comprehensive database for active faults in the region. To address this issue and to better understand the distribution and level of seismic hazard in Central Asia, we are developing a publically available database for active faults of Central Asia (including but not limited to Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, northern Pakistan and western China) using ArcGIS. The database is designed to allow users to store, map and query important fault parameters such as fault location, displacement history, rate of movement, and other data relevant to seismic hazard studies including fault trench locations, geochronology constraints, and seismic studies. Data sources integrated into the database include previously published maps and scientific investigations as well as strain rate measurements and historic and recent seismicity. In addition, high resolution Quickbird, Spot, and Aster imagery are used for selected features to locate and measure offset of landforms associated with Quaternary faulting. These features are individually digitized and linked to attribute tables that provide a description for each feature. Preliminary observations include inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate information for faults documented in different studies. For example, the Darvaz-Karakul fault which roughly defines the western margin of the Pamir, has been mapped with differences in location of up to 12 kilometers. The sense of motion for this fault ranges from unknown to thrust and strike-slip in three different studies despite documented left-lateral displacements of Holocene and late Pleistocene landforms observed near the fault trace.

  12. Central Cascadia subduction zone creep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalzle, Gina M.; McCaffrey, Robert; Creager, Kenneth C.

    2014-04-01

    Cascadia between 43°N and 46°N has reduced interseismic uplift observed in geodetic data and coseismic subsidence seen in multiple thrust earthquakes, suggesting elevated persistent fault creep in this section of the subduction zone. We estimate subduction thrust "decade-scale" locking and crustal block rotations from three-component continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) time series from 1997 to 2013, as well as 80 year tide gauge and leveling-derived uplift rates. Geodetic observations indicate coastal central Oregon is rising at a slower rate than coastal Washington, southern Oregon and northern California. Modeled locking distributions suggest a wide locking transition zone that extends inland under central Oregon. Paleoseismic records of multiple great earthquakes along Cascadia indicate less subsidence in central Oregon. The Cascade thrust under central Oregon may be partially creeping for at least 6500 years (the length of the paleoseismic record) reducing interseismic uplift and resulting in reduced coseismic subsidence. Large accretions of Eocene age basalt (Siletzia terrane) between 43°N and 46°N may be less permeable compared to surrounding terranes, potentially increasing pore fluid pressures along the fault interface resulting in a wide zone of persistent fault creep. In a separate inversion, three-component GPS time series from 1 July 2005 to 1 January 2011 are used to estimate upper plate deformation, locking between slow-slip events (SSEs), slip from 16 SSEs and an earthquake mechanism. Cumulative SSEs and tectonic tremor are weakest between 43°N and 46°N where partial fault creep is increased and Siletzia terrane is thick, suggesting that surrounding rock properties may influence the mode of slip.

  13. Central dazzle. A thalamic syndrome?

    PubMed

    Cummings, J L; Gittinger, J W

    1981-06-01

    A patient who experienced painless intolerance to light (dazzle) three months after a right posterior cerebral artery occlusion was shown by computerized tomography to have right occipital and right thalamic infarctions. His symptoms improved with amitriptyline hydrochloride and perphenazine therapy. The sensitivity to light, delayed onset, response to therapy, and presence of a thalamic lesion are analogous to the thalamic pain syndrome and suggest that central dazzle is a variant of the thalamic syndrome. PMID:7236068

  14. The CDF Central Analysis Farm

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T.H.; Neubauer, M.; Sfiligoi, I.; Weems, L.; Wurthwein, F.; /UC, San Diego

    2004-01-01

    With Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron well underway, many computing challenges inherent to analyzing large volumes of data produced in particle physics research need to be met. We present the computing model within CDF designed to address the physics needs of the collaboration. Particular emphasis is placed on current development of a large O(1000) processor PC cluster at Fermilab serving as the Central Analysis Farm for CDF. Future plans leading toward distributed computing and GRID within CDF are also discussed.

  15. Tectonics of the central Andes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloom, Arthur L.; Isacks, Bryan L.; Fielding, Eric J.; Fox, Andrew N.; Gubbels, Timothy L.

    1989-01-01

    Acquisition of nearly complete coverage of Thematic Mapper data for the central Andes between about 15 to 34 degrees S has stimulated a comprehensive and unprecedented study of the interaction of tectonics and climate in a young and actively developing major continental mountain belt. The current state of the synoptic mapping of key physiographic, tectonic, and climatic indicators of the dynamics of the mountain/climate system are briefly reviewed.

  16. Specimen processing: centralized or decentralized?

    PubMed

    Cortizas, M E; Shea, M

    1996-01-01

    Specimen processing for the clinical laboratories of a large pediatric teaching hospital laboratory was centralized in 1991. A highly efficient service area evolved through reengineering and renovations and effected a 20% reduction in operating costs. Work flow analysis identified areas for improvements, renovations created a more efficient use of space, and staffing decreased from 18.4 to 8.5 FTEs without compromising service. PMID:10158398

  17. Central collisions of heavy ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Sun-yiu.

    1992-10-01

    This report describes the activities of the Heavy Ion Physics Group at the University of California, Riverside from October 1, 1991 to September 30, 1992. During this period, the program focused on particle production at AGS energies, and correlation studies at the Bevalac in nucleus-nucleus central collisions. As part of the PHENIX collaboration, contributions were made to the Preliminary Conceptual Design Report (pCDR), and work on a RHIC silicon microstrip detector R D project was performed.

  18. Central hypoventilation and brainstem dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Armangue, Thais; Macaya, Alfons; Vazquez, Elida; Jurado, Maria José; Roig-Quilis, Manuel

    2012-04-01

    We report on a newborn with congenital hypotonia, unilateral facial palsy, sucking and swallowing difficulties, velopalatine incoordination, and unilateral impairment of the auditory brainstem responses, attributable to brainstem dysgenesis. On follow-up, the child manifested developmental delay and central hypoventilation syndrome during sleep. The ventilation abnormality during sleep with insensitivity to hypercapnia, associated with unilateral facial paralysis, indicates a pontine lesion, including the parafacial respiratory group. PMID:22490775

  19. Central hypersensitivity in chronic musculoskeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Curatolo, Michele; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-05-01

    Clinical research has consistently detected alteration in central pain processing leading to hypersensitivity. Most methods used in humans are reliable and have face validity to detect widespread central hypersensitivity. However, construct validity is difficult to investigate due to lack of gold standards. Reference values in the pain-free population have been generated, but need replication. Research on pain biomarkers that reflect specific central hypersensitivity processes is warranted. Few studies have analyzed the prognostic value of central hypersensitivity. Most medications acting at central level and some non-pharmacological approaches, including psychological interventions, are likely to attenuate central hypersensitivity. PMID:25952059

  20. Evidence for Central Regulation of Glucose Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michelle; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Hawkins, Meredith

    2013-01-01

    Evidence for central regulation of glucose homeostasis is accumulating from both animal and human studies. Central nutrient and hormone sensing in the hypothalamus appears to coordinate regulation of whole body metabolism. Central signals activate ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, thereby down-regulating glucose production, likely through vagal efferent signals. Recent human studies are consistent with this hypothesis. The contributions of direct and central inputs to metabolic regulation are likely of comparable magnitude, with somewhat delayed central effects and more rapid peripheral effects. Understanding central regulation of glucose metabolism could promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches for such metabolic conditions as diabetes mellitus. PMID:24142701