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Sample records for melt-extracted amorphous yag

  1. Fabrication and Characterization of Melt-Extracted Co-Based Amorphous Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huan; Xing, Dawei; Wang, Xiaodong; Sun, Jianfei

    2011-04-01

    Amorphous Co68.15Fe4.35Si12.25B15.25 wires with smooth surface and circular cross section were fabricated by melt extraction technology using a copper wheel with a knife-edge cross section angle of 60 deg. The effect of some process parameters such as wheel circumference velocity, molten alloy feed rate, and temperature on the geometry and weight, i.e., melt extracted layer thickness, of wire was examined carefully. An optimum process parameter to produce high-quality circular wires was presented. A high resolution CCD video camera recorder was used to monitor the changing of the surface shape of molten alloy contacting the wheel tip under different conditions. It was found that the mechanism of the wire formation during the optimum process condition was controlled by the momentum mechanism, while in the low wheel speed region, heat transfer turned out to be a dominant factor. Some characteristics of the circular wires such as amorphous nature and tensile strength were also studied.

  2. Enhanced High-Frequency Magnetoresistance Responses of Melt-Extracted Co-Rich Soft Ferromagnetic Microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, D. S.; Devkota, J.; Huong, N. T.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2016-05-01

    We present the relationships between the structure, magnetic properties and high-frequency magnetoresistance (MR) effect in melt-extracted Co68.2Fe4.3B15Si12.5 microwires subject to thermal annealing. In order to release residual stresses to improve the magnetic softness while retaining the good mechanical property of an amorphous material, microwire samples were annealed at different temperatures of 100°C, 200°C, 350°C, 400°C, and 450°C for 15 min. We have shown that relative to an as-cast amorphous microwire, annealing microwires at T a = 100°C, 200°C, and 350°C improved both the magnetic softness and the MR effect, while an opposite trend was observed for the microwires annealed at T a = 400°C and 450°C. We have observed a distinct difference in the frequency dependence of MR response ( ξ) for dc applied magnetic fields below and above the effective anisotropy field of the microwires. While the microwire annealed at 200°C shows the largest MR ratio (~580%) at 100 MHz, the highest value of ξ (~34%/Oe) has been achieved at 400 MHz for the microwire annealed at 350°C. These results indicate that the optimally annealed Co68.2Fe4.3B15Si12.5 microwires are attractive candidates for high-frequency sensor applications.

  3. The importance of melt extraction for tracing mantle heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stracke, Andreas; Bourdon, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Numerous isotope and trace element studies of mantle rocks and oceanic basalts show that the Earth's mantle is heterogeneous. The isotopic variability in oceanic basalts indicates that most mantle sources consist of complex assemblages of two or more components with isolated long-term chemical evolution, on both global and local scales. The range in isotope and highly incompatible element ratios observed in oceanic basalts is commonly assumed to directly reflect that of their mantle sources. Accordingly, the end-points of isotope arrays are taken to represent the isotopic composition of the different components in the underlying mantle, which is then used to deduce the origin of mantle heterogeneity. Here, a melting model for heterogeneous mantle sources is presented that investigates how and to what extent isotope and trace element signatures are conveyed from source to melt. We model melting of a pyroxenite-bearing peridotite using recent experimental constrains for melting and partitioning of pyroxenite and peridotite. Identification of specific pyroxenite melting signatures allows finger-printing of pyroxenite melts and confirm the importance of lithological heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle. The model results and the comparison of the calculated and observed trace element-isotope systematics in selected MORB and OIB suites (e.g. from the East Pacific Rise, Iceland, Tristan da Cunha, Gough and St.Helena) further show that factors such as the relative abundance of different source components, their difference in solidus temperature, and especially the extent, style and depth range of melt aggregation fundamentally influence the relationship between key trace element and isotope ratios (e.g. Ba/Th, La/Nb, Sr/Nd, La/Sm, Sm/Yb, 143Nd/ 144Nd). The reason for this is that any heterogeneity present in the mantle is averaged or, depending on the effectiveness of the melt mixing process, even homogenized during melting and melt extraction. Hence to what degree mantle

  4. Study on feasibility of producing an amorphous surface layer of Fe49Cr18Mo7B16C4Nb3 by pulsed Nd:YAG laser surface melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojaver, Reza; Mojtahedi, Faezeh; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza; Torkamany, Mohammad Javad

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to investigate whether an amorphous surface layer can be obtained when as-cast Fe49Cr18Mo7B16C4Nb3 alloy is submitted to pulsed Nd:YAG laser surface melting. The experiments were conducted in the various laser scanning speeds. The microstructures of laser treated zones were investigated by X-ray diffraction XRD and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) and their microhardness were measured, too. The chemical composition of different points of each sample was analyzed by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy EDS. Although the estimated cooling rates in surface layers were higher than the required cooling rate to achieve full amorphization, but the present experiments were unable to retain complete glassy microstructure on surface and a mixture of amorphous (low volume fraction) and ultrafine grained phases were produced in surface of samples. Based on the findings, it was understood that the overlapping of successive pulses and element redistributions occurred in pulsed laser melting could severely restrict amorphization. The influence of laser scan speed and laser power on heat input, melting ratio, compositional changes and cracking in laser treated zone were discussed separately. It is suggested that the limited range of laser variables in pulsed Nd:YAG laser melting may help to produce a sound amorphous phase of as-cast Fe49Cr18Mo7B16C4Nb3 alloy.

  5. A model of episodic melt extraction for plumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmeling, H.

    2006-03-01

    A model of melt segregation and extraction within rising plumes is proposed. It is based on two-phase porous flow within the partially molten region, combined with only three extraction parameters. The conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy are solved for a two-phase melt matrix system. As a rising hot mantle region (plume) reaches the asthenosphere, decompression melting occurs, and the melt begins to percolate with respect to the matrix. Accumulation layers form, which might be the locus for the formation of buoyancy-driven propagating dikes. As dike propagation requires a minimum dike length, melt extraction is parameterized by dex, ϕ1, and ϕ2. Here dex is the critical thickness of the partially molten layer in which a critical melt fraction ϕ2 is exceeded. If this condition is met within a certain region of the melt source region, melt might be extracted from that region in the form of one or several propagating dikes, leaving behind a region of residual melt fraction ϕ1. This simple extraction model is tested in one dimension for rising hot mantle flow. Depending on the chosen extraction parameters, multiple extraction events may be observed with a characteristic episodicity and a saw-tooth-like depth distribution. Exploring the parameter space shows that for values of dex and ϕ2 of a few kilometers and a few melt percent, respectively, typical extraction cycles have the order of 103-104 years, and they extract melt volumes per surface area of 50 to several hundred meters each. Tentatively assuming that eruptions are tied to mantle ascent at depth, the model is applied to observed eruption frequencies and multiple extraction depths, and values for ϕ2 of about 2% and dex of 3-5 km are derived.

  6. Superelasticity of Cu-Ni-Al shape-memory fibers prepared by melt extraction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dong-yue; Zhang, Shu-ling; Liao, Wei-bing; Geng, Gui-hong; Zhang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    In the paper, a melt extraction method was used to fabricate Cu-4Ni-14Al (wt%) fiber materials with diameters between 50 and 200 μm. The fibers exhibited superelasticity and temperature-induced martensitic transformation. The microstructures and superelasticity behavior of the fibers were studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA), respectively. Appropriate heat treatment further improves the plasticity of Cu-based alloys. The serration behavior observed during the loading process is due to the multiple martensite phase transformation.

  7. Depth of Melt Extraction at Mid-Ocean Ridges and Transform Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, H.; Montesi, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    Crustal thickness variations at oceanic transform faults are closely related to melt migration and extraction processes beneath mid-ocean ridges. Gregg et al. (2007) have shown that at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges, transform faults exhibit more positive gravity anomalies than the adjacent spreading centers, indicating relatively thin crust in the transform domain, whereas at intermediate- and fast-spreading ridges, transform faults are characterized by more negative gravity anomalies than the adjacent spreading centers, indicating thick crust in the transform domain. We present numerical models reproducing these observations and infer that melt can be extracted from a depth of 30×5km at fast-slipping transforms. At mid-ocean ridges, melt is generated by decompression of the mantle that rises in response to the divergence of the plates. Subsequent extraction of melt that forms the oceanic crust may be modeled as a three-step process (Montési et al., 2011). 1) Melt moves vertically through buoyancy-driven porous flow enhanced by sub-vertical dissolution channels. 2) Melt accumulates in and travels along a decompaction channel lining a low-permeability barrier at the base of the thermal boundary layer. 3) Melt is extracted to the surface when it enters a melt extraction zone. The melt extraction zone probably reflects structural damage of the lithosphere related to tectonic activity at the plate boundary. Therefore, it may be present at both ridge and transform segments of oceanic spreading centers. This three-step melt extraction process was implemented in Matlab to predict crustal thickness variations associated with three-dimensional models of segmented mid-ocean ridges. Mantle flow and thermal structure are solved in the commercial finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics. Model results demonstrate that the lengths of offset affect the crustal thickness in the transform domain. At short (<50 km) offset, time is limited for crust to accumulate, while at

  8. Numerical models of mantle lithosphere weakening, erosion and delamination induced by melt extraction and emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2016-06-01

    Continental rifting caused by extension and heating from below affects the lithosphere or cratons in various ways. Volcanism and melt intrusions often occur along with thinning, weakening and even breaking lithosphere. Although mechanical necking models of the lithosphere are often applied, the aspects of melting and the implications due to melt transport and emplacement at shallower depths are not well understood. A two-phase flow approach employing melt extraction and shallow emplacement associated with thermal weakening is developed and compared with observations. The results of this comparison indicate the importance of partial melts and an asthenospheric magma source for increasing the rising rate of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary during extension. Thermo-mechanical physics of visco-plastic flow is approximated using the Finite Difference method with Eulerian formulation in 2D. The conservation of mass, momentum and energy equations are solved for a multi-component (crust-mantle) and two-phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature- and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. Melt is extracted and emplaced in predefined depth regions (emplacement zones) in the lithospheric mantle and crust. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation was applied; its validity was tested against the Full Compaction formulation and found fully satisfactory for the case of sublithospheric melting models. A simple model guided by the geodynamic situation of the Rwenzori region typically results in updoming asthenosphere with melt-assisted erosion of the lithosphere's base. Even with a conservative approach for a temperature anomaly melting alone doubles the lithospheric erosion rate in comparison with a model without melting. With melt extraction and intrusion lithospheric erosion and upwelling of the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary speeds up by a

  9. Can compaction, caused by melt extraction and intrusion, generate tectonically effective stresses in the lithosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2016-04-01

    Aim of our study is to deepen understanding the role of melt processes while the lithospheric evolution by means of numerical modeling. In the sense of plate tectonics, on the one hand, stresses are transferred by stiff lithospheric plates, on the other, lithosphere is deformed, broken, or modified in various ways. Melting often plays an important role but is not easy to model numerically due to all the interactions of physics, phase changes, non-linearities, time scales, petrology, heterogeneities and chemical reactions. Here we restrict on a thermo-mechanical model of visco-plastic two phase flow with partial melting. Viscosity is temperature-, stress- and depth-dependent. Freezing and melting are determined by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. The fast melt transport through and into the lithosphere, acting on a short time scale, is replaced by melt extraction and intrusion in a given emplacement level. Numerical approximation is done in 2D with Finite Differences with markers in an Eulerian formulation. A scenario of continental rifting serves for a model of lithosphere above asthenosphere under extensional conditions. An anomaly of increased temperature at the bottom produces a low fraction of melt initially in the asthenosphere. Above a porosity limit melt is extracted and leads to compaction at its origin which induces under-pressure attracting ambient melt and contracting the depleted matrix. In a higher, colder lithospheric level the emplaced melt extends the matrix, immediately freezes; an increase of enrichment and heating takes place. The dilatation of the rock matrix generates relative high compaction pressures if it's viscosity is high as in the uppermost mantle lithosphere. Local and temporary varying stresses provide deviatoric components which sometimes may be the origin of tectonic activity in nature. Divergence terms of the full compaction formulation, responsible for viscous stress, are tested and reviewed. Quality and stability

  10. Spreading-rate dependence of melt extraction at mid-ocean ridges from mantle seismic refraction data.

    PubMed

    Lizarralde, Daniel; Gaherty, James B; Collins, John A; Hirth, Greg; Kim, Sangmyung D

    2004-12-01

    A variety of observations indicate that mid-ocean ridges produce less crust at spreading rates below 20 mm yr(-1) (refs 1-3), reflecting changes in fundamental ridge processes with decreasing spreading rate. The nature of these changes, however, remains uncertain, with end-member explanations being decreasing shallow melting or incomplete melt extraction, each due to the influence of a thicker thermal lid. Here we present results of a seismic refraction experiment designed to study mid-ocean ridge processes by imaging residual mantle structure. Our results reveal an abrupt lateral change in bulk mantle seismic properties associated with a change from slow to ultraslow palaeo-spreading rate. Changes in mantle velocity gradient, basement topography and crustal thickness all correlate with this spreading-rate change. These observations can be explained by variations in melt extraction at the ridge, with a gabbroic phase preferentially retained in the mantle at slower spreading rates. The estimated volume of retained melt balances the approximately 1.5-km difference in crustal thickness, suggesting that changes in spreading rate affect melt-extraction processes rather than total melting. PMID:15592410

  11. Paradise Lost: Uncertainties in melting and melt extraction processes beneath oceanic spreading ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelemen, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    In many ways, decompression melting and focused melt transport beneath oceanic spreading ridges is the best understood igneous process on Earth. However, there are remaining - increasing - uncertainties in interpreting residual mantle peridotites. Indicators of degree of melting in residual peridotite are questionable. Yb concentration and spinel Cr# are affected by (a) small scale variations in reactive melt transport, (b) variable extents of melt extraction, and (c) "impregnation", i.e. partial crystallization of cooling melt in pore space. Roughly 75% of abyssal peridotites have undergone major element refertilization. Many may have undergone several melting events. The following three statements are inconsistent: (1) Peridotite melt productivity beyond cpx exhaustion is > 0.1%/GPa. (2) Crustal thickness is independent of spreading rate at rates > 2 cm/yr full rate (excluding ultra-slow spreading ridges). (3) Thermal models predict, and observations confirm, thick thermal boundary layers beneath slow spreading ridges. If (a) melt productivity is << 0.1%/GPa beyond cpx-out, and (b) cpx-out occurs > 15 km below the seafloor beneath most ridges, then the independence of crustal thickness with spreading rate can be understood. Most sampled peridotites from ridges melted beyond cpx-out. Cpx in these rocks formed via impregnation and/or exsolution during cooling. Most peridotites beneath ridges may undergo cpx exhaustion during decompression melting. This would entail an upward modification of potential temperature estimates. Alternatively, perhaps oceanic crustal thickness does vary with spreading rate but this is masked by complicated tectonics and serpentinization at slow-spreading ridges. Dissolution channels (dunites) are predicted to coalesce downstream, but numerical models of these have not shown why > 95% of oceanic crust forms in a zone < 5 km wide. There may be permeability barriers guiding deeper melt toward the ridge, but field studies have not identified

  12. Depths and Temperatures of Mantle Melt Extraction in the Southern Cascadia Subduction Zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Till, C.; Grove, T. L.; Donnelly-Nolan, J. M.; Carlson, R. W.

    2013-12-01

    Plagioclase and spinel lherzolite thermometry and barometry applied to an extensive suite of <10.5 Ma primitive basaltic lavas (most Mg#>0.70) containing variable H2O contents (<<1 to ~4 wt%) suggests these melts were extracted from the mantle at 40-58 km below Oregon's High Lava Plains, 41-51 km below California's Modoc Plateau, and 37-60 km below the central-southern Cascades volcanic arc. Of the 155 basalt samples investigated, 33 are calc-alkaline basalts (CAB) and the remainder are high alumina olivine tholeiites (HAOT) or mildly alkaline basalts (MAB). All 33 of the CAB are from the subduction-influenced volcanic centers of Lassen, Mt. Shasta, Three Sisters, Medicine Lake, and Newberry in the present-day Cascades arc or rear arc. All of these volcanic centers also erupted HAOT or MAB. Olivine-plagioclase hygrometry for a representative subset of the 20 CAB from Newberry indicates they contained ~4 wt% H2O prior to eruption. Water contents for the remaining CAB were approximated using the H2O-melt composition scaling relationship developed by Ruscitto et al. [2010, EPSL 298(1-2), 153-161] yielding ≤1-3 wt% H2O. The calculated pressures and temperatures of last equilibration with mantle lherzolite for all 33 CAB were adjusted for the effects of H2O following Till et al. [2012, JGR 117(B06206)] and are on average 50×15°C (1s) cooler and 1.65×0.27 km deeper than their calculated temperatures and depths for anhydrous conditions. The minimum depths of melt extraction calculated for all basalts considered (including the CAB) are close to the Moho, as determined by regional geophysical studies. Thus, our results suggest that the geophysical Moho and lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary are located in close proximity to one another (within 5-10 km). The basalts originated at 1185-1383°C and the presence of both wet and dry basalts that were generated at such different temperatures at similar times, depths, and geographic locations in the Cascades arc and rear arc

  13. Lithological, Chemical and Chronological Constraints on Melt Extraction from the Mantle Section of the ~492 Ma Shetland Ophiolite Complex, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, B.; Walker, R. J.; Clay, P. L.; Day, J. M.; Ash, R. D.; Daly, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    The mantle sections of ophiolites offer a means of studying the composition and structure of the oceanic mantle. In particular, the relations between different lithologies can be established in the field, permitting an assessment of the relative timing of processes such as melt extraction and melt-rock reaction. The Shetland Ophiolite Complex (SOC) contains a well-preserved mantle section that is dominated by harzburgite (≥70 vol.%), with dominantly chondritic present-day 187Os/188Os compositions1. Melt extraction and melt-rock reaction is evident in the form of dunite and chromitite layers and lenses, with thicknesses ranging from millimetres-to-metres. These lithologies are characteristic of supra-subduction zone processing and are considered to relate to closure of the Iapetus Ocean at ~492 Ma1. However, evidence of much earlier melt extraction has been suggested for some SOC harzburgites, which have relatively unradiogenic 187Os/188Os compositions that yield TRD model ages as old as ~1.4 Ga1. In order to assess the scales at which such compositional heterogeneities are preserved in the mantle, a small (45 m2) area of the SOC mantle section was selected for detailed lithological mapping and sampling. A selection of harzburgites (n=8), dunites (n=6) and pyroxenites (n=2) from this area has been analysed for their Os isotope and highly-siderophile element (HSE) compositions. Six of the harzburgites and four of the dunites have relative HSE abundances and gOs values that are approximately chondritic, with gOs ranging only from -0.6 to +2.7 (n=10). Two dunites have more radiogenic gOs (up to +7.5), that is correlated with enhanced concentrations of accessory base-metal sulphides, suggesting formation via melt percolation and melt-rock reaction. The two remaining harzburgites have less radiogenic gOs (-3.5 and -4), yielding Mesoproterozoic TRD ages. The new data indicate that a comparable range of Os isotope compositions to that previously measured across the

  14. Melt extraction in mush zones: The case of crystal-rich enclaves at the Sabatini Volcanic District (central Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Mollo, S.; Gaeta, M.; Freda, C.

    2016-04-01

    A peculiar feature of the Sabatini Volcanic District (SVD, central Italy) is the occurrence of crystal-poor pumices and crystal-rich enclaves within the same eruptive host-deposit. The stratigraphic sequence of pumices and enclaves indicates the tapping of a stratified magma chamber, where a crystal-poor phonolitic magma lay on top of a more primitive crystal-rich magma. The crystal-rich enclaves are genetically related to the pumices and record the evolution of a solidification front, in which a more differentiated melt was produced, extracted and eventually erupted. We collected and analyzed crystal-rich enclaves from one of the largest phonolitic eruptions at the SVD and used their petrological and geochemical features to reconstruct magma differentiation and crystal-melt separation in the solidification front. On this basis, three groups of enclaves have been identified: porphyritic enclaves, holocrystalline enclaves and sanidinites. The mineralogical variability faithfully reproduces the spatial and temporal evolution expected of a solidification front, from early-to-intermediate crystallization conditions (porphyritic and holocrystalline type) to the late stage of solidification (sanidinites), in which the percolation of a more differentiated melt through the crystal mush triggered the instability of the solidification front. Results from numerical models indicate that gravitational instability is the most efficient mechanism to explain melt extraction in mush zones of medium-sized (~ 10 km3), short-lived (~ 104 years) magma chambers.

  15. Rates and Mechanisms of Solidification in Large Magma Bodies: Implications for Melt Extraction in all Tectonic Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VanTongeren, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    As is observed in both experiment and theory, in the absence of hydrothermal convection, the majority of magma chamber heat loss occurs via conduction through the roof of the intrusion and into the cold country rock above. The formation of an upper solidification front (or Upper Border Series, UBS), recorded in the rocks both geochemically and texturally, is a natural outcome of the progression of the solidification front from the cold roof to the hot center of the magma chamber. There are, however, a few unique layered mafic intrusions for which little or no UBS exists. In this study, I examine the thermal evolution and crystallization rates of several classic layered intrusions as it is recorded in the extent of the preserved UBS. For those intrusions that have experienced crystallization at the roof, such as the Skaergaard Intrusion, the development of a UBS reduces the temperature gradient at the roof and effectively slows the rate of heat loss from the main magma body. However, for those intrusions that do not have an UBS, such as the Bushveld Complex, the cooling rate is controlled only by the maximum rate of conductive heat loss through the overlying roof rocks, which decreases with time. The implications are two-fold: (1) The relative thickness of the UBS in large intrusions may be the key to quantifying their cooling and solidification rates; and (2) The nature of the magma mush zone near the roof of an intrusion may depend principally on the long-term thermal evolution of the magma body. Particularly at the end stages of crystallization, when the liquids are likely to be highly evolved and high viscosities may inhibit convection, intrusions lacking a well-defined UBS may provide important insights into the mechanics of crystal-liquid separation, melt extraction, and compaction in felsic plutons as well as mafic intrusions. These results are important for long-lived (>500 kyr) or repeatedly replenished magma chambers in all tectonic settings.

  16. Zircon Record of the Plutonic-Volcanic Connection and Protracted Rhyolite Melt Extraction at Turkey Creek Caldera, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deering, C. D.; Schoene, B.; Keller, C. B.; Bachmann, O.; Beane, R. J.; Ovtcharova, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Turkey Creek caldera of Southeastern Arizona formed as the result of the catastrophic eruption of more than 500 km3 of high-silica rhyolite (Rhyolite Canyon Tuff). This event occurred ~27 Ma and was coincident with the early phases of Basin and Range extension. The emplacement of the ignimbrite was immediately followed by a resurgent intrusion of dacite/monzonite porphyry (DPI), some of which reached the surface as crystal-rich dacite lavas (DPL) along the ring fault. Due to uplift and erosion, the intracaldera and outflow facies of the Rhyolite Canyon Tuff (RCT) and resurgent intrusion are well-exposed, which renders this an ideal laboratory for examining the plutonic-volcanic connection in a mid- to upper-crustal environment. We examined the potential petrogenetic link between the crystal-poor rhyolite and the crystal-rich intermediate intrusion and lavas through zircon CA-TIMS geochronology and ICP-MS trace element analyses. CA-TIMS U-Pb dates indicate that the RCT and DPI/DPL were coeval, forming over a protracted period of time (>300 kyrs.) prior to the catastrophic event. The trace element data (e.g. Lu/Sc, Y/Hf, Dy/Y) for the individual zircons in the dacitic/monzonitic units and erupted rhyolite record a continuous trend that is interpreted to reflect crystal fractionation. The combination of zircon U-Pb dating and trace element analyses also allows us to trace the apparent timing and duration of the rhyolite melt extraction from the intermediate mush, as the trace element ratios for the rhyolite diverge from those of the DPI approx. 100-150 kyrs. before eruption. This protracted timescale for building an intermediate mush large enough to hold 500 km3 of rhyolite is consistent with that observed for other large ignimbrites in arc settings.

  17. Melt extraction from crystal mushes: Numerical model of texture evolution and calibration of crystallinity-ordering relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Špillar, Václav; Dolejš, David

    2015-12-01

    sparse crystal suspensions. Illustrative quantitative evaluation of the crystallinity-clustering relationships to representative porphyritic granites from a single intrusive unit of the Krkonoše-Jizera pluton (central Europe) reveals a single crystal accumulation path starting at low initial crystallinity (5-7 vol.% K-feldspar phenocrysts), with 24-84% melt extracted leading to the observed crystallinity of 9-26 vol.%. By contrast, a camptonite dyke from the České středohoří volcanic province has experienced the onset of crystal accumulation later (18 vol.% amphibole crystals) and lost 23% interstitial melt only. The combination of modal and clustering analysis offers a sensitive tool for identifying differentiation processes in natural magma chambers, and here it illustrates examples of mechanically dominated open-system vs. in situ nearly closed-system crystallization from two contrasting magmatic settings.

  18. Probing depth dependencies of melt emplacement on time dependent quantities in a continental rift scenario with melting and melt extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2014-05-01

    Since some years seismological observations provide increasing evidence of a discontinuity near the mid of older mantle lithosphere. Explanation may be a melt infiltration front (MIF) as upper margin of an evolving network of veins. These are formed by crystallized melt supplied by episodic melting events in the asthenosphere. To test this concept geodynamically we performed numerical modelling applying melting, extraction of melt and emplacement in a viscous matrix. Thereupon, we were faced to the problem defining an intrusion level for the melt. Findings of prior studies led to the need of movable, process dependent boundaries of the emplacement zone additionally making the process probably more self-consistent. Here we present a preliminary study exploring several empirical attempts to relate time dependent states to an upward moving boundary for intrusion. Modeled physics is based on thermo-mechanics of visco-plastic flow. The equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy are solved for a multi component (crust-mantle) and two phase (melt-matrix) system. Rheology is temperature-, pressure-, and stress-dependent. In consideration of depletion and enrichment melting and solidification are controlled by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. The Compaction Boussinesq Approximation and the high Prandtl number approximation are used, elasticity is neglected and geometry is restricted to 2D. Approximation is done with the Finite Difference Method with markers in an Eulerian formulation (FDCON). Model guiding scenario is a extending thick lithosphere associated to by updoming asthenosphere probably additionally heated by a plume nearby. As the P-T conditions in the asthenosphere are near the solidus caused changes may increase melting and generate partial melt. Against conventional expectations on permeability at lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) depth a fast melt transport into and sometimes through the lithosphere often is observed. The

  19. Melt extraction and mantle source at a Southwest Indian Ridge Dragon Bone amagmatic segment on the Marion Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changgui; Dick, Henry J. B.; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Huaiyang

    2016-03-01

    This paper works on the trace and major element compositions of spatially associated basalts and peridotites from the Dragon Bone amagmatic ridge segment at the eastern flank of the Marion Platform on the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge. The rare earth element compositions of basalts do not match the pre-alteration Dragon Bone peridotite compositions, but can be modeled by about 5 to 10% non-modal batch equilibrium melting from a DMM source. The Dragon Bone peridotites are clinopyroxene-poor harzburgite with average spinel Cr# ~ 27.7. The spinel Cr# indicates a moderate degree of melting. However, CaO and Al2O3 of the peridotites are lower than other abyssal peridotites at the same Mg# and extent of melting. This requires a pyroxene-poor initial mantle source composition compared to either hypothetical primitive upper mantle or depleted MORB mantle sources. We suggest a hydrous melting of the initial Dragon Bone mantle source, as wet melting depletes pyroxene faster than dry. According to the rare earth element patterns, the Dragon Bone peridotites are divided into two groups. Heavy REE in Group 1 are extremely fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 7% fractional melting in the garnet stability field and another ~ 12.5 to 13.5% in the spinel stability field from depleted and primitive upper mantle sources, respectively. Heavy REE in Group 2 are slightly fractionated from middle REE, which can be modeled by ~ 15 to 20% fractional melting in the spinel stability field from a depleted mantle source. Both groups show similar melting degree to other abyssal peridotites. If all the melt extraction occurred at the middle oceanic ridge where the peridotites were dredged, a normal ~ 6 km thick oceanic crust is expected at the Dragon Bone segment. However, the Dragon Bone peridotites are exposed in an amagmatic ridge segment where only scattered pillow basalts lie on a partially serpentinized mantle pavement. Thus their depletion requires an

  20. YAG laser therapy in opthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorosmarthy, Daniel

    1994-02-01

    The author gives first a short report about the history of light application as a therapeutic method in medicine and about the xenon- and sunlight-photocoagulators first used. He commemorates Prof. Gerd Meyer-Schwickerath, who was not only the inventor of this new method, but also a leading person in ophthalmology in the post-war years. The first YAG- LASER instrument for ophthalmology in Hungary was set up in 1986 in the Saint Roch Hospital. Up to the end laser year 2762 YAG-LASEr treatments have been performed. The form and the effectiveness of the YAG-LASER treatment will be discussed and evaluated.

  1. Holmium:YAG surgical lasers.

    PubMed

    1995-03-01

    "Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG)" is the shorthand name for a family of solid-state lasers that use the doping element holmium in a laser crystal (e.g., YAG [yttrium-aluminum-garnet]) and that emit energy at approximately 2.1 microns. This wavelength is relatively new to medicine and has been used in laser surgery for only about the last six years. Like the carbon dioxide (CO2) laser when it was first used clinically, the Ho:YAG laser is poised for rapid and wide-spread use. Ho:YAG lasers, like CO2 lasers, offer precise cutting with minimal damage to adjacent tissue; however, unlike CO2 lasers, they also offer fiberoptic delivery (which is ideal for endoscopic use) and the ability to treat tissue in a liquid-filled environment (e.g., saline, blood). The initial specialty for which the Ho:YAG laser was used was arthroscopic surgery, especially diskectomy. Today, it is effectively used in many surgical specialties, including general surgery, urology, laparoscopy, neurosurgery, lithotripsy, angioplasty, orthopedic surgery (which includes procedures such as meniscectomy, bone sculpting [may also be performed in plastic surgery], and some experimental surgery, such as cartilage shrinking to tighten loose joints), and dentistry. Because of its broad range of potential applications, it has been called the "Swiss Army Knife" of lasers. High-powered Ho:YAG lasers, which enable surgeons to work more quickly and cut more smoothly, have been made available only within the last three years (units offering > 20 W) to 18 months (units offering > 60 W). Because of this rapid increase, high-powered units are still relatively expensive, and it is not yet clear whether maximum power outputs will continue to increase or whether the cost of higher-power units will begin to come down. Although low-power and high-power Ho:YAG lasers can be used for the same procedures, their different ranges of possible clinical techniques make them better suited to different applications: low-power units are

  2. YAG aerosol lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R.

    1988-01-01

    The Global Atmospheric Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Mission, using the NASA DC-8 aircraft platform, is designed to provide the magnitude and statistical distribution of atmospheric backscatter cross section at lidar operating wavelengths. This is a fundamental parameter required for the Doppler lidar proposed to be used on a spacecraft platform for global wind field measurements. The prime measurements will be made by a CO2 lidar instrument in the 9 to 10 micron range. These measurements will be complemented with the Goddard YAG Aerosol Lidar (YAL) data in two wavelengths, 0.532 and 1.06 micron, in the visible and near-infrared. The YAL, is being designed to utilize as much existing hardware, as feasible, to minimize cost and reduce implementation time. The laser, energy monitor, telescope and detector package will be mounted on an optical breadboard. The optical breadboard is mounted through isolation mounts between two low boy racks. The detector package will utilize a photomultiplier tube for the 0.532 micron channel and a silicon avalanche photo detector (APD) for the 1.06 micron channel.

  3. Amorphic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, G.; Gröger, M.; Jäger, T.

    2016-02-01

    We introduce amorphic complexity as a new topological invariant that measures the complexity of dynamical systems in the regime of zero entropy. Its main purpose is to detect the very onset of disorder in the asymptotic behaviour. For instance, it gives positive value to Denjoy examples on the circle and Sturmian subshifts, while being zero for all isometries and Morse-Smale systems. After discussing basic properties and examples, we show that amorphic complexity and the underlying asymptotic separation numbers can be used to distinguish almost automorphic minimal systems from equicontinuous ones. For symbolic systems, amorphic complexity equals the box dimension of the associated Besicovitch space. In this context, we concentrate on regular Toeplitz flows and give a detailed description of the relation to the scaling behaviour of the densities of the p-skeletons. Finally, we take a look at strange non-chaotic attractors appearing in so-called pinched skew product systems. Continuous-time systems, more general group actions and the application to cut and project quasicrystals will be treated in subsequent work.

  4. Partial melting of garnet lherzolite with water and carbon dioxide at 3 GPa using a new melt extraction technique: implications for intraplate magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baasner, Amrei; Médard, Etienne; Laporte, Didier; Hoffer, Géraldine

    2016-05-01

    The origin and source rocks of alkali-rich and SiO2-undersatured magmas in the Earth's upper mantle are still under debate. The garnet signature in rare earth element patterns of such magmas suggests a garnet-bearing source rock, which could be garnet lherzolite or garnet pyroxenite. Partial melting experiments were performed at 2.8 GPa and 1345-1445 °C in a piston-cylinder using mixtures of natural lherzolite with either 0.4 wt% H2O and 0.4 wt% CO2 or 0.7 wt% H2O and 0.7 wt% CO2. Different designs of AuPd capsules were used for melt extraction. The most successful design included a pentagonally shaped disc placed in the top part of the capsule for sufficient melt extraction. The degrees of partial melting range from 0.2 to 0.04 and decrease with decreasing temperature and volatile content. All samples contain olivine and orthopyroxene. The amounts of garnet and clinopyroxene decrease with increasing degree of partial melting until both minerals disappear from the residue. Depending on the capsule design, the melts quenched to a mixture of quench crystals and residual glass or to glass, allowing measurement of the volatile concentrations by Raman spectroscopy. The compositions of the partial melts range from basalts through picrobasalts to foidites. Compared to literature data for melting of dry lherzolites, the presence of H2O and CO2 reduces the SiO2 concentration and increases the MgO concentration of partial melts, but it has no observable effect on the enrichment of Na2O in the partial melts. The partial melts have compositions similar to natural melilitites from intraplate settings, which shows that SiO2-undersaturated intraplate magmas can be generated by melting of garnet lherzolite in the Earth's upper mantle in the presence of H2O and CO2.

  5. Ceramic planar waveguide laser of non-aqueous tape casting fabricated YAG/Yb:YAG/YAG

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Li, Wenxue; Yang, Chao; Bai, Dongbi; Li, Jiang; Ge, Lin; Pan, Yubai; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic YAG/Yb:YAG/YAG planar waveguide lasers were realized on continuous-wave and mode-locked operations. The straight waveguide, fabricated by non-aqueous tape casting and solid state reactive sintering, enabled highly efficient diode-pumped waveguide continuous-wave laser with the slope efficiency of 66% and average output power of more than 3 W. The influence of the waveguide structure on the wavelength tunability was also experimentally investiccgated with a dispersive prism. Passively mode-locked operation of the ceramic waveguide laser was achieved by using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), output 2.95 ps pulses with maximum power of 385 mW at the central wavelength of 1030 nm. PMID:27535577

  6. Ceramic planar waveguide laser of non-aqueous tape casting fabricated YAG/Yb:YAG/YAG.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Wenxue; Yang, Chao; Bai, Dongbi; Li, Jiang; Ge, Lin; Pan, Yubai; Zeng, Heping

    2016-01-01

    Ceramic YAG/Yb:YAG/YAG planar waveguide lasers were realized on continuous-wave and mode-locked operations. The straight waveguide, fabricated by non-aqueous tape casting and solid state reactive sintering, enabled highly efficient diode-pumped waveguide continuous-wave laser with the slope efficiency of 66% and average output power of more than 3 W. The influence of the waveguide structure on the wavelength tunability was also experimentally investiccgated with a dispersive prism. Passively mode-locked operation of the ceramic waveguide laser was achieved by using a semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), output 2.95 ps pulses with maximum power of 385 mW at the central wavelength of 1030 nm. PMID:27535577

  7. Enhanced refrigerant capacity in Gd-Al-Co microwires with a biphase nanocrystalline/amorphous structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, H. X.; Xing, D. W.; Sánchez Llamazares, J. L.; Sánchez-Valdés, C. F.; Belliveau, H.; Wang, H.; Qin, F. X.; Liu, Y. F.; Sun, J. F.; Srikanth, H.; Phan, M. H.

    2016-02-01

    A class of biphase nanocrystalline/amorphous Gd(50+5x)Al(30-5x)Co20 (x = 0, 1, 2) microwires fabricated directly by melt-extraction is reported. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and Fourier function transform based analysis indicate the presence of a volume fraction (˜20%) of ˜10 nm sized nanocrystallities uniformly embedded in an amorphous matrix. The microwires possess excellent magnetocaloric properties, with large values of the isothermal entropy change (-ΔSM ˜ 9.7 J kg-1 K-1), the adiabatic temperature change (ΔTad ˜ 5.2 K), and the refrigerant capacity (RC ˜ 654 J kg-1) for a field change of 5 T. The addition of Gd significantly alters TC while preserving large values of the ΔSM and RC. The nanocrystallites allow for enhanced RC as well as a broader operating temperature span of a magnetic bed for energy-efficient magnetic refrigeration.

  8. Erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser root resection of extracted human teeth.

    PubMed

    Komori, T; Yokoyama, K; Matsumoto, Y; Matsumoto, K

    1997-02-01

    Root resection of extracted human teeth was performed using the erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) and holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser to investigate the clinical application of lasers on hard tissue. The CO2 laser and the mechanical drill were also used for comparison. After resection using these technologies, the morphological changes of the cut surface were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscope. Er:YAG laser irradiation produced smooth, clean resected surfaces without signs of thermal damages. Complete obturation of the root canal was maintained after Er:YAG laser irradiation. Ho:YAG laser irradiation, however, produced some signs of thermal damage. Relatively large voids between the gutta-percha and the canal walls were revealed after Ho:YAG laser irradiation. The sealing of the dentinal tubules was not completely attained as stipulated by original conditions of this study. PMID:9467336

  9. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  10. Optical refrigeration of Yb3+:YAG nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemova, Galina; Kashyap, Raman

    2015-03-01

    We have theoretically investigated the laser cooling process in Yb3+:YAG nanocrystals. We have developed an approach, which permits not only estimate the cooling process in Yb3+:YAG nanocrystals but compare this process with the laser cooling of the Yb3+:YAG bulk samples. The temperature dependences of all parameters of the system are taken into account. The cooperative effects such as re-absorption, the energy migration and cooperative luminescence have been considered.

  11. Comparison of urinary calculus fragmentation during Ho:YAG and Er:YAG lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ho; Teichman, Joel H.; Welch, A. J.

    2005-04-01

    We compared urinary calculus fragmentation with long pulsed Ho:YAG (λ= 2.12 μm) versus Er:YAG (λ = 2.94 μm) lasers. We measured the ablation width, depth, volume and efficiency as a function of pulse energy from calculus threshold energy to clinical energy typically used for Ho:YAG laser lithotripsy. Ablation effects were evaluated for three types of urinary calculi (calcium oxalate monohydrate, cystine, and uric acid), for single and multiple pulses applied at various optical energy levels. By means of comparing laser-induced crater topography and ablation volume for each stone type, the feasibility of Er:YAG laser lithotripsy was appraised. The Er:YAG laser pulse energy generated deeper and narrower crater shapes with relatively smooth contours whereas the Ho:YAG laser produced shallower and wider craters with irregular shapes. In terms of multiple pulses ablation, the Er:YAG produced larger ablation volume than Ho:YAG. The deeper crater induced by the Er:YAG was attributed to the higher absorption coefficient of stones at the 2.94 μm wavelength, and widening of crater by Ho:YAG was perhaps caused by lateral expansion of ablated material. Comparing the ablation efficiency, Er:YAG was superior to Ho:YAG for both single and five-pulses.

  12. Amorphous Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sussman, Gerald

    2002-03-01

    agents constructed by engineered cells, but we have few ideas for programming them effectively: How can one engineer prespecified, coherent behavior from the cooperation of immense numbers of unreliable parts that are interconnected in unknown, irregular, and time-varying ways? This is the challenge of Amorphous Computing.

  13. Environmentally benign processing of YAG transparent wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yan; Wu, Yiquan

    2015-12-01

    Transparent yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) wafers were successfully produced via aqueous tape casting and vacuum sintering techniques using a new environmentally friendly binder, a copolymer of isobutylene and maleic anhydride with the commercial name ISOBAM (noted as ISOBAM). Aqueous YAG slurries were mixed by ball-milling, which was followed by de-gassing and tape casting of wafers. The final YAG green tapes were homogenous and flexible, and could be bent freely without cracking. After the drying and sintering processes, transparent YAG wafers were achieved. The microstructures of both the green tape and vacuum-sintered YAG ceramic were observed by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). Phase compositions were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Optical transmittance was measured in UV-VIS regions with the result that the transmittance is 82.6% at a wavelength of 800 nm.

  14. Fabrication and photoluminescence properties of Cr:YAG and Yb,Cr:YAG transparent ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingtao; Lu, Tiecheng; Wei, Nian; Lu, Zhongwen; Chen, Lijia; Zhang, Qinghua; Cheng, Gang; Qi, Jianqi

    2015-11-01

    Cr:YAG and Yb/Cr:YAG transparent ceramics containing Ca as charge counter element were fabricated by vacuum sintering technique using the co-precipitation synthesis of raw powders. Their spectral and luminescence properties as well as the influence of Cr3+ concentration on the optical properties of Yb,Cr:YAG ceramic were investigated. Results show the transmittance of 10 at.% Yb, 0.25 at.% Cr:YAG and 0.25 at.% Cr:YAG reaches 83% at 1200 nm and 81% at 1400 nm, respectively. And the Yb,Cr:YAG ceramics exhibit a pore free structure with an average grain size of about 5 μm. After annealing, most of Cr3+ ions transform into Cr4+. In the case of excitation wavelength of 440 nm, a sharp emission peak of 694 nm appeared in the Yb,Cr:YAG ceramic before annealing and the band enhanced with the increase of the Cr3+ concentration, which is attributed to the 4T2g-4A2g fluorescence transition. The emission spectrums and fluorescence decays manifest that both the luminescent intensity and the lifetimes of Yb,Cr:YAG are lower than Yb:YAG ceramic and the lifetimes of Yb,Cr:YAG and Yb:YAG are 0.93 and 2.38 ms, respectively. This results demonstrate the existence of the ground state absorption of Cr4+ in the Yb,Cr:YAG ceramic. Experimental evidence proved that Yb,Cr:YAG transparent ceramics could be a potential material for passive self-Q-switched solid-state laser.

  15. Healing of bone in the rat following surgery with the erbium-YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickinson, Mark R.; Devlin, Hugh; El Montaser, Monsour A.; Sloan, Philip

    1996-12-01

    Background and objectives: the aim of this study was to examine the pattern of healing in rat calvarial defects prepared with the erbium-YAG laser, using the 'guided tissue regeneration' technique. Materials and method: PTFE membranes were placed over lased skull defects, and the skin wounds sutured. Rats were killed humanely at intervals after surgery, and the skulls processed for paraffin wax histology. A further group of mature rats were also killed humanely and the calvariae removed. Slots were prepared using the erbium-YAG laser and immediately examined under the environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) in hydrated conditions, which avoided drying artifacts. Results: An amorphous, mineral-rich carbon layer surrounds the lased bone defect, which in the in vivo experiments was seen as a basophilic zone which was resistant to resorption.

  16. Novel synthesis of YAG by solvothermal method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xudong; Liu, Hong; He, Wen; Wang, Jiyang; Li, Xia; Boughton, Robert I.

    2005-02-01

    Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) powder was synthesized by a mixed solvothermal method under moderate conditions ( 260-290C, 2-4 h) with inexpensive aluminum and yttrium hydroxides as the precursors, and a low-cost ethanol-water solution (the volume ratio of ethanol to water ⩾2:1) as the solvent. The presence of ethanol in mixed solvent is beneficial to the formation of YAG. The synthesized powder consists of well-dispersed and nearly spherical fine grains (80 nm on average) with a relatively narrow grain size distribution. The powder form is the most desirable for the compacting and sintering of YAG ceramics.

  17. Is simulated amorphous'' silica really amorphous

    SciTech Connect

    Binggeli, N. , PHB Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne ); Chelikowsky, J.R. )

    1994-07-10

    We have carried out extensive molecular dynamics simulations for the pressure induced amorphization of quartz by means of a classical force-field model. In agreement with earlier simulations, we find that a phase transition occurs within the experimental pressure range of the amorphization. However, in contrast to the interpretation of previous simulations, we demonstrate that the new phase is [ital not] amorphous, since the correlation functions for the equilibrated structure can be shown to be consistent with those of a crystalline phase. In addition, two transformations to ordered structures are found to occur sequentially during the simulations. The first transformation is likely to be related to the recently discovered transition of quartz to an intermediate crystalline phase before its amorphization. The second transformation, instead, yields a compact, octahedrally coordinated Si sublattice. The latter may be an artifact of the pair-potential simulation. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

  18. The 280 ka Matahina Eruption, Okataina Volcanic Centre, New Zealand: A Protracted Rhyolite Magma Assembly by Fractional Crystallization, Melt Extraction, Rhyolite-Rhyolite Mixing, and Magmatic Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deering, C. D.; Cole, J. W.

    2007-12-01

    The 280 ka Matahina eruption from the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand, produced voluminous pyroclastic deposits representing >220 km3 of andesitic to rhyolitic magma and the climax of magmatic/volcanic activity from ca. 340 ka to 280 ka within the Okataina Volcanic Centre. The Murupara subgroup of eruptions preceding this large, caldera-forming event is used to document the progressive growth of a large volume magma body in the mid- to upper-crust over 103 or 104 years. The dominant magma composition of the caldera-forming eruption was rhyodacite/rhyolite (70.8 to 78.1 wt % SiO2), with a subordinate volume of andesitic to rhyolitic (58.5 to 77.6 wt % SiO2) juvenile pyroclastics erupted following the caldera collapse. Phenocrysts (plagioclase+quartz+opx±amph+Fe-Ti oxides) from the pumice clasts define two distinct compositional populations that evolved independent of one another following rhyolite melt extraction from a fractionating andesitic parent magma body. We interpret these phenocryst populations to represent two phase assemblages that evolved in a slightly stratified rhyolitic magma chamber overlying a less-evolved basal mush layer. Oxide geothermometry and phase equilibria suggest a 740- 783°C magma storage temperature at 7-10 km depth. Most of the bulk-rock, melt, and phenocryst compositional variations are consistent with fractional crystallization (FC) of an andesitic parent magma body. However, trace element variation in pumice clasts, distinct rhyolitic glass major element compositions, and plagioclase disequilibrium accompanied by complex zoning are not consistent with closed-system FC alone, but are consistent with both FC and mixing in characterizing the magmatic diversity. In addition, the application of Polytopic Vector Analysis (PVA), a multivariate statistical treatment of the bulk-rock geochemistry, provides a mixing solution with a robust platform for accurately defining the timing and nature of the mixing event. Hence, the subtle

  19. Nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perepezko, John H. (Inventor); Allen, Donald R. (Inventor); Foley, James C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Compositions and methods for obtaining nanocrystal dispersed amorphous alloys are described. A composition includes an amorphous matrix forming element (e.g., Al or Fe); at least one transition metal element; and at least one crystallizing agent that is insoluble in the resulting amorphous matrix. During devitrification, the crystallizing agent causes the formation of a high density nanocrystal dispersion. The compositions and methods provide advantages in that materials with superior properties are provided.

  20. Study of structural and optical properties of YAG and Nd:YAG single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kostić, S.; Lazarević, Z.Ž.; Radojević, V.; Milutinović, A.; Romčević, M.; Romčević, N.Ž.; Valčić, A.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Transparent YAG and pale pink Nd:YAG single crystals were produced by the Czochralski technique. • Growth mechanisms and shape of the liquid/solid interface and incorporation of Nd{sup 3+} were studied. • The structure of the crystals was investigated by X-ray diffraction, Raman and IR spectroscopy. • The 15 Raman and 17 IR modes were observed. • The obtained YAG and Nd:YAG single crystals were without core and of good optical quality. - Abstract: Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and yttrium aluminum garnet doped with neodymium (Nd:YAG) single crystals were grown by the Czochralski technique. The critical diameter and the critical rate of rotation were calculated. Suitable polishing and etching solutions were determined. As a result of our experiments, the transparent YAG and pale pink Nd:YAG single crystals were produced. The obtained crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman and IR spectroscopy. The crystal structure was confirmed by XRD. The 15 Raman and 17 IR modes were observed. The Raman and IR spectroscopy results are in accordance with X-ray diffraction analysis. The obtained YAG and Nd:YAG single crystals were without core and of good optical quality. The absence of a core was confirmed by viewing polished crystal slices. Also, it is important to emphasize that the obtained Nd:YAG single crystal has a concentration of 0.8 wt.% Nd{sup 3+} that is characteristic for laser materials.

  1. Tunable single-longitudinal-mode operation of a sandwich-type YAG/Ho:YAG/YAG ceramic laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Ju, Lin; Yao, Baoquan; Li, Jiang; Ge, Lin; Zhang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Ye; Xu, Liwei; Dai, Tongyu; Ju, Youlun

    2016-09-01

    We present a 2.09 μm single-longitudinal-mode sandwich-type YAG/Ho:YAG/YAG ceramic laser pumped by a Tm-doped fiber laser for the first time. A pair of F-P etalons was used to achieve tunable single-longitudinal-mode operation. The maximum single-longitudinal-mode output power of 530 mW at 2091.4 nm was obtained with an absorbed pump power of 8.06 W, corresponding to an optical conversion efficiency of 6.6% and a slope efficiency of 12.7%. Wavelength tunable was achieved by tuning the angle of etalons and the wavelength could be tuned from 2091.1 nm to 2092.1 nm, corresponding to a tuning frequency of 68 GHz. The M2 factor was measured to be 1.23.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of YAG:Ce phosphors for white LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucureanu, V.; Matei, A.; Avram, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Worldwide commercial interest in the production of cerium doped yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG:Ce) phosphors is reflected in the widespread use of white light emitting devices. Despite of the fact that YAG:Ce is considered a "cool phosphor" it is the most important in white LED technology. This article reviews the developed techniques for producing phosphors with superior photoluminescence efficiency, including solid-state reaction, sol-gel and (co)precipitation methods. Also, by co-doping with rare earth elements, a red/blue shift is reached in the spectrum. The characteristics of YAG:Ce phosphors are investigated because the properties of the phosphors are strongly influenced by the synthesis routes and the sintering temperature treatment. After the phase analysis, morphology and emission studies of the phosphors there may be seen the conditions when the transition from the amorphous phase to the crystalline phase appears, when luminescent properties are influenced by the crystalline form, purity, average size of the particles, co-doping and so on.

  3. Enhanced performance of Cr,Yb:YAG microchip laser by bonding Yb:YAG crystal.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ying; Dong, Jun; Ren, Yingying

    2012-10-22

    Highly efficient, laser-diode pumped Yb:YAG/Cr,Yb:YAG self-Q-switched microchip lasers by bonding Yb:YAG crystal have been demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge. The effect of transmission of output coupler (T(oc)) on the enhanced performance of Yb:YAG/Cr,Yb:YAG microchip lasers has been investigated and found that the best laser performance was achieved with T(oc) = 50%. Slope efficiency of over 38% was achieved. Average output power of 0.8 W was obtained at absorbed pump power of 2.5 W; corresponding optical-to-optical efficiency of 32% was obtained. Laser pulses with pulse width of 1.68 ns, pulse energy of 12.4 μJ, and peak power of 7.4 kW were obtained. The lasers oscillated in multi-longitudinal modes. The wide separation of longitudinal modes was attributed to the mode selection by combined etalon effect of Cr,Yb:YAG, Yb:YAG thin plates and output coupler. Stable periodical pulse trains at different pump power levels have been observed owing to the longitudinal modes coupling and competition. PMID:23187245

  4. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  5. Clinical development of holmium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser vaporization and resection of the prostate offers advantages in immediate tissue removal compared to the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser. Ongoing development of appropriate operative techniques and Ho:YAG laser delivery systems suitable for endoscopic prostate surgery, including side-firing optical delivery fibers, have facilitated this approach. We performed Ho:YAG laser prostatectomy in 20 human subjects, including 2 men treated immediately prior to radical prostatectomy to assess Ho:YAG laser effects in the prostate. A total of 18 men were treated in an initial clinical trial of Ho:YAG prostatectomy. Estimated excess hyperplastic prostate tissue averaged 24 g (range 5 - 50 g). A mean of 129 kj Ho:YAG laser energy was delivered, combined with a mean of 11 kj Nd:YAG energy to provide supplemental coagulation for hemostasis. We have observed no significant perioperative or late complications. No significant intraoperative changes in hematocrit or serum electrolytes were documented. In addition to providing acute removal of obstructing prostate tissue, Ho:YAG laser resection allowed tissue specimen to be obtained for histologic examination. A total of 16 of 18 patients (90%) underwent successful removal of their urinary catheter and voiding trial within 24 hours following surgery. Immediate improvement in voiding, comparable to classic transurethral electrocautery resection of the prostate (TURP), was reported by all patients. Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate appears to be a viable surgical technique associated with minimal morbidity and immediate improvement in voiding.

  6. Holmium: YAG laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Bukala, B; Denstedt, J D

    1999-04-01

    The holmium laser is a relatively new multipurpose medical laser that recently became available for use in urology. There has been considerable interest in this device, as it seems to combine the cutting properties of the carbon dioxide laser with the coagulating properties of the neodymium:YAG laser, making it particularly appealing for many surgical applications. The last decade has seen enthusiasm for the use of laser energy for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. In this article, we review the technique of Ho:YAG laser resection of the prostate, including the essential equipment and perioperative patient care. PMID:10360503

  7. In Vitro Effects of Two Topical Varnish Materials and Er:YAG Laser Irradiation on Enamel Demineralization around Orthodontic Brackets

    PubMed Central

    Sungurtekin Ekçi, Elif; Sandalli, Nuket

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro was to evaluate the effects of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) containing varnish materials and Er:YAG laser irradiation on enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Forty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into four treatment groups (i.e., 10 in each group): (1) 5% NaF-ACP varnish, (2) 5% NaF-TCP varnish, (3) Er:YAG laser, and (4) control (no treatment). Er:YAG laser was operated at a wavelength of 2.94 μm and the energy output was 80 mJ per pulse; a pulse duration of 200 μsec and and a frequency of 2 Hz were used with water cooling. All samples were then put into pH cycles. Surface microhardness values and representative SEM images were assessed. Surface microhardness values were evaluated using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The results revealed that demineralization was significantly lower in the TCP and ACP varnish groups, whereas mean surface microhardness values of the TCP varnish were found higher than the ACP (P < 0.05). TCP and ACP varnish materials were found effective for reducing enamel demineralization around orthodontic brackets. Use of Er:YAG laser irradiation as described in this study for inhibition of demineralization was found not satisfactory. PMID:24987734

  8. Amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1998-06-09

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  9. Amorphous metal alloy

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Merz, M.D.

    1980-04-09

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  10. Passively Q-switched microchip lasers based on Yb:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yingying; Dong, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Efficient passively Q-switched microchip laser based on Yb:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal has been demonstrated under high brightness single-emitter laser-diode pumping. Maximum average output power of 1.5 W was obtained when the absorbed pump power was 3.65 W, the corresponding optical-to-optical efficiency was over 41%. The slope efficiency was 52.3%. The effect of the cavity length on the performance of Yb:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal passively Q-switched microchip lasers was investigated. Laser pulses at 1030 nm with pulse width of 466 ps and peak power of 91 kW were achieved with cavity length of 1.7 mm, while laser pulses with pulse width of 665 ps and peak power of 79 kW were obtained with cavity length of 3.7 mm.

  11. YAG:Dy and YAG:Tm Fluorescence Above 1400 C.

    SciTech Connect

    Cates, M.R.

    2003-08-01

    Fluorescence from three samples of YAG:Tm, and three samples of YAG:Dy, with different activator concentrations, was measured for a wide temperature range, extending from room temperature to about 1700 C. Fluorescence lifetimes were measured for emissions at 460 nm from the YAG:Tm and at 453, 480, and 575 nm from YAG:Dy. The measurement system is described, including techniques for accommodating the high background blackbody radiation encountered at these very high temperatures. Data compilations are shown, including the fluorescence lifetimes over the temperature range of the measurement. This study has extended the high-temperature range of phosphor thermometry by approximately 200 C and shown the feasibility of using phosphor materials for very high temperature noncontact thermometry, opening up further applications for engines, materials, high-temperature processing, and related areas.

  12. Thin-disk laser based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. I.; Mukhin, I. B.; Vadimova, O. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2015-03-01

    A thin-disk laser module based on an Yb:YAG / YAG composite active element is developed with a small-signal gain of 1.25 and a stored energy of 400 mJ under cw pumping. The gain and thermally induced phase distortions in the module are studied experimentally. Based on this module, a thin-disk laser with an average power of 300 W and a slope efficiency of 42% is designed.

  13. Microchip laser based on Yb:YAG/V:YAG monolith crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejezchleb, Karel; Šulc, Jan; Jelínková, Helena; Škoda, Václav

    2016-03-01

    V:YAG crystal was investigated as a passive Q-switch of longitudinally diode-pumped microchip laser, emitting radiation at wavelength 1030.5 nm. This laser was based on diffusion bonded monolith crystal (diameter 3 mm) which combines in one piece an active laser part (Yb:YAG crystal, 10 at.% Yb/Y, 3 mm long) and saturable absorber (V:YAG crystal, 2 mm long, initial transmission 86 % @ 1031 nm). The microchip resonator consisted of dielectric mirrors directly deposited on the monolith surfaces (pump mirror HT @ 968 nm and HR @ 1031 nm on Yb:YAG part, output coupler with reflection 55 % @ 1031 nm on the V:YAG part). For longitudinal CW pumping of Yb:YAG part, a fibre coupled (core diameter 100 μm, NA = 0.22, emission @ 968 nm) laser diode was used. The laser threshold was 3.8W. The laser slope efficiency for output mean in respect to incident pumping was 16 %. The linearly polarized generated transversal intensity beam profile was close to the fundamental Gaussian mode. The generated pulse length, stable and mostly independent on pumping power, was equal to 1.3 ns (FWHM). The single pulse energy was increasing with the pumping power and for the maximum pumping 9.7W it was 78 μJ which corresponds to the pulse peak-power 56 kW. The maximum Yb:YAG/V:YAG microchip laser mean output power of 1W was reached without observable thermal roll-over. The corresponding Q-switched pulses repetition rate was 13.1 kHz.

  14. Erbium:YAG laser for cataract extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Robert W.; Jani, Mahendra G.; Yarborough, Mike; Marcellino, George R.; Noecker, Robert J.; Kramer, Theresa R.; Vidaurri, Jesus

    1998-06-01

    The Erbium:YAG laser may be an effective laser for use in cataract surgery. At 2.94 mm the energy is maximally absorbed by water thereby efficiently disrupting tissue with minimal surrounding thermal damage. The laser may be safer to use in the eye than conventional ultrasonic emulsifiers. Preliminary clinical studies of the safety and efficacy have begun.

  15. Formation of amorphous materials

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, William L.; Schwarz, Ricardo B.

    1986-01-01

    Metastable amorphous or fine crystalline materials are formed by solid state reactions by diffusion of a metallic component into a solid compound or by diffusion of a gas into an intermetallic compound. The invention can be practiced on layers of metals deposited on an amorphous substrate or by intermixing powders with nucleating seed granules. All that is required is that the diffusion of the first component into the second component be much faster than the self-diffusion of the first component. The method is practiced at a temperature below the temperature at which the amorphous phase transforms into one or more crystalline phases and near or below the temperature at which the ratio of the rate of diffusion of the first component to the rate of self-diffusion is at least 10.sup.4. This anomalous diffusion criteria is found in many binary, tertiary and higher ordered systems of alloys and appears to be found in all alloy systems that form amorphous materials by rapid quenching. The method of the invention can totally convert much larger dimensional materials to amorphous materials in practical periods of several hours or less.

  16. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  17. A protected annealing strategy to enhanced light emission and photostability of YAG:Ce nanoparticle-based films.

    PubMed

    Revaux, Amelie; Dantelle, Geraldine; George, Nathan; Seshadri, Ram; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    2011-05-01

    A significant obstacle in the development of YAG:Ce nanoparticles as light converters in white LEDs and as biological labels is associated with the difficulty of finding preparative conditions that allow simultaneous control of structure, particle size and size distribution, while maintaining the optical properties of bulk samples. Preparation conditions frequently involve high-temperature treatments of precursors (up to 1400 °C), which result in increased particle size and aggregation, and lead to oxidation of Ce(iii) to Ce(iv). We report here a process that we term protected annealing, that allows the thermal treatment of preformed precursor particles at temperatures up to 1000 °C while preserving their small size and state of dispersion. In a first step, pristine nanoparticles are prepared by a glycothermal reaction, leading to a mixture of YAG and boehmite crystalline phases. The preformed nanoparticles are then dispersed in a porous silica. Annealing of the composite material at 1000 °C is followed by dissolution of the amorphous silica by hydrofluoric acid to recover the annealed particles as a colloidal dispersion. This simple process allows completion of YAG crystallization while preserving their small size. The redox state of Ce ions can be controlled through the annealing atmosphere. The obtained particles of YAG:Ce (60 ± 10 nm in size) can be dispersed as nearly transparent aqueous suspensions, with a luminescence quantum yield of 60%. Transparent YAG:Ce nanoparticle-based films of micron thickness can be deposited on glass substrates using aerosol spraying. Films formed from particles prepared by the protected annealing strategy display significantly improved photostability over particles that have not been subject to such annealing. PMID:21384045

  18. MAST YAG Thomson scattering upgrade alignment system

    SciTech Connect

    Figueiredo, J.; Serra, F.; Naylor, G.; Walsh, M.; Dunstan, M.; Scannell, R.

    2010-10-15

    The recent upgrade to the MAST YAG Thomson scattering while enhancing the diagnostic capabilities increased the complexity of the system. There are eight YAG lasers now operational, doubling the number from the previous setup. This means alignment between each laser individually and reference points is essential to guarantee data quality and diagnostic reliability. To address this issue an alignment system was recently installed. It mimics the beams alignment in MAST by sampling 1% of the laser beam that is sent into a telescope which demagnifies by a factor of 8. The demagnified beam is viewed with a CCD camera. By scanning the camera the profile and position of the beams in the scattering zone and in a range of several meters inside MAST can be determined. Therefore alignment is checked along the beam path without having to sample it inside the vessel. The experimental apparatus and test procedures are described.

  19. 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser nucleotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Shi, Wei-Qiang; Snyder, Wendy J.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1993-07-01

    The high incidence of patients with clinical and neurological symptoms of lumbar disc herniation has spurred the development of less invasive and more cost efficient methods to treat patients. In this study we evaluated pulsed and continuous wave (cw) 1064 nm Nd:YAG laser ablation and induced thermal damage in sheep intervertebral disc. We used the Heraeus LaserSonics Hercules 5040 (Nd:YAG) laser system and 400 micrometers bare and 600 micrometers ball-tipped fibers in cw and pulsed mode. For the laser parameters and fibers used in this study, ablation of the intervertebral disc was successful and thermal damage did not exceed 0.5 mm. Varying beam diameters and focusing abilities (i.e., bare and ball) did not produce any difference in the coagulation thermal effect.

  20. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Dalal, Vikram L.

    1981-01-01

    A solar cell comprising a back electrical contact, amorphous silicon semiconductor base and junction layers and a top electrical contact includes in its manufacture the step of heat treating the physical junction between the base layer and junction layer to diffuse the dopant species at the physical junction into the base layer.

  1. Disorder-induced amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Li, Mo

    1997-03-01

    Many crystalline materials undergo a crystalline-to-amorphous (c-a) phase transition when subjected to energetic particle irradiation at low temperatures. By focusing on the mean-square static atomic displacement as a generic measure of chemical and topological disorder, we are led quite naturally to a generalized version of the Lindemann melting criterion as a conceptual framework for a unified thermodynamic approach to solid-state amorphizing transformations. In its simplest form, the generalized Lindemann criterion assumes that the sum of the static and dynamic mean-square atomic displacements is constant along the polymorphous melting curve so that c-a transformations can be understood simply as melting of a critically-disordered crystal at temperatures below the glass transition temperature where the supercooled liquid can persist indefinitely in a configurationally-frozen state. Evidence in support of the generalized Lindemann melting criterion for amorphization is provided by a large variety of experimental observations and by molecular dynamics simulations of heat-induced melting and of defect-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds.

  2. Amorphous silicon photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, David E.; Lin, Guang H.; Ganguly, Gautam

    2004-08-31

    This invention is a photovoltaic device comprising an intrinsic or i-layer of amorphous silicon and where the photovoltaic device is more efficient at converting light energy to electric energy at high operating temperatures than at low operating temperatures. The photovoltaic devices of this invention are suitable for use in high temperature operating environments.

  3. Holmium:YAG laser stapedotomy: preliminary evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stubig, Ingrid M.; Reder, Paul A.; Facer, G. W.; Rylander, Henry G.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1993-07-01

    This study investigated the use of a pulsed Holmium:YAG ((lambda) equals 2.09 micrometers ) laser- fiber microsurgical system for laser stapedotomy. This system ablates human stapes bones effectively with minimal thermal damage. The study was designed to determine the effectiveness of the Ho:YAG laser (Schwartz Electro Optics, Inc., Orlando, FL) for stapedotomy and to evaluate temperature changes within the cochlea during the ablation process. Human cadaveric temporal bones were obtained and the stapes portion of the ossicular chain was removed. A 200 micrometers diameter low OH quartz fiber was used to irradiate these stapes bones in an air environment. The laser was pulsed at 2 Hz, 250 microsecond(s) ec pulse width and an irradiance range of 100 - 240 J/cm2 was used to ablate holes in the stapes footplate. The resultant stapedotomies created had smooth 300 micrometers diameter holes with a minimum of circumferential charring. Animal studies in-vivo were carried out in chinchillas to determine the caloric spread within the cochlea. A 0.075 mm Type T thermocouple was placed in the round window. Average temperature change during irradiation of the stapes footplate recorded in the round window was 3.6 degree(s)C. The data suggest that stapedotomy using the Ho:YAG laser can result in a controlled ablation of the stapes footplate with minimal thermal damage to the surrounding stapes. Optical coupling using fiberoptic silica fibers is an ideal method for delivering laser energy to the stapes during stapedotomy.

  4. Cervical microleakage in root canals treated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponchiado, Emilio C., Jr.; Azevedo, Lidiany K.; Marchesan, Melissa; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Silva-Sousa, Yara T.; Alfredo, Edson; Sousa Neto, Manoel D.

    2005-03-01

    Cervical microleakage was evaluated in sealed root canals previously treated with Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers. Ninety-two single-rooted maxillary human canines were prepared with the crown-down technique and irrigated with distilled and deionized water. The samples were distributed randomly into 9 groups of 10 teeth each. One tooth was used as a positive control and one as a negative control. In group I, 1.2 ml of EDTAC was applied during 5 min. In groups II to V, radicular dentine was irradiated with Er:YAG laser (Opus 20, Opus Dent, Israel) at the following parameters: 200 mJ and 8 Hz, 200 mJ and 16 Hz, 400 mJ and 8 Hz, or 400 mJ and 16Hz, respectively, for 60 s. In groups VI to IX, radicular dentine was irradiated with Nd:YAG laser (Fotona Medical Lasers, Slovenia) at 10 Hz and 1 W, 10 Hz and 2 W, 15 Hz and 1 W, or 15 Hz and 2 W, respectively, for 60 s. The canals were then sealed by the lateral condensation technique with an epoxy resin-based sealer. The roots were immersed in India ink for 15 days and then cleared to visualize the level of cervical microleakage with a measurement microscope. The results were evaluated by the Kruskal-Wallis test, which showed no statistical significance (p>0.01) for parameter variations of the Er:YAG laser when compared to the control group. However, the increase in frequency and potency for Nd:YAG laser decreased the microleakage when compared to the control group.

  5. An Overview of Nd:YAG Laser Capsulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Eyyup; Er, Duygu; Kaynak, Suleyman

    2014-01-01

    It has been revealed that posterior capsule opacification (PCO) is the most common delayed complication of cataract surgery. On the other hand, Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy is accepted as standard treatment for PCO. Although, Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy is a noninvasive and safe treatment it carries risk of some complications. Using less total energy and performing smaller capsulotomies are effective choices to decrease complications after Nd:YAG capsulotomy. The purpose of this review is to look through the complications associated with Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy, and the effect of capsulotomy size and used total energy on such complications. PMID:25738159

  6. Efficient, low threshold, cryogenic Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Ganija, Miftar; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Haub, John; Veitch, Peter; Munch, Jesper

    2016-05-30

    We report the development of an efficient, liquid-nitrogen conduction cooled Ho:YAG slab laser with good beam quality. Detailed measurements resolving the structure of the 1900-1911 nm absorption band in Ho:YAG at 77 K are presented. Stress-free conduction cooled mounting of the Ho:YAG slab was demonstrated and the resulting laser operated with a large mode volume of 42 mm3, a slope efficiency of 75% and a threshold of 0.84 W. To our knowledge this corresponds to the lowest reported threshold intensity for a Ho:YAG laser. PMID:27410084

  7. Laboratory and clinical experience with neodymium:YAG laser prostatectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabalin, John N.

    1996-05-01

    Since 1991, we have undertaken extensive laboratory and clinical studies of the Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) laser for surgical treatment of bladder outlet obstruction due to prostatic enlargement or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Side-firing optical fibers which emit a divergent, relatively low energy density Nd:YAG laser beam produce coagulation necrosis of obstructing periurethral prostate tissue, followed by gradual dissolution and slough in the urinary stream. Laser-tissue interactions and Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for prostatectomy have been studied in canine and human prostate model systems, enhancing clinical application. Ongoing studies examine comparative Nd:YAG laser dosimetry for various beam configurations produced by available side-firing optical fibers and continue to refine operative technique. We have documented clinical outcomes of Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy in 230 consecutive patients treated with the UrolaseTM side-firing optical fiber. Nd:YAG laser coagulation the prostate produces a remarkably low acute morbidity profile, with no significant bleeding or fluid absorption. No postoperative incontinence has been produced. Serial assessments of voiding outcomes over more than 3 years of followup show objective and symptomatic improvement following Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy which is comparable to older but more morbid electrosurgical approaches. Nd:YAG laser prostatectomy is a safe, efficacious, durable and cost-effective treatment for BPH.

  8. Zig-zag active-mirror laser with cryogenic Yb3+:YAG/YAG composite ceramics.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Saiki, Taku; Imasaki, Kazuo; Fujita, Masayuki; Takeshita, Kenji; Ishii, Shinya; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2011-01-31

    We report on a novel amplifier configuration concept for a 10 kW laser system using a zig-zag optical path based on a cryogenic Yb:YAG Total-Reflection Active-Mirror (TRAM) laser. The laser material is a compact composite ceramic, in which three Yb:YAG TRAMs are combined in series to increase the output power. Output powers of up to 214 W with a slope efficiency of 63% have been demonstrated for CW operation, even at a quite low pump intensity of less than 170 W/cm2. Further scaling could achieve output powers of more than 10 kW. PMID:21369064

  9. Improvement of thermal management in the composite Yb:YAG/YAG thin-disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I. I.; Mukhin, I. B.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    To improve the thermal management in the composite Yb:YAG/YAG thin-disk laser a new design of laser head is developed. Thermal-induced phase distortions, small signal gain and lasing in the upgraded laser head are investigated and compared with previously published results. A substantial decrease of the thermal lens optical power and phase aberrations and increase of the laser slope efficiency are observed. A continuous-wave laser with 440 W average power and 44% slope efficiency is constructed.

  10. YAG-derived fiber for high-power narrow-linewidth fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragic, Peter D.; Liu, Yuh-Shiuan; Ballato, John; Hawkins, Thomas; Foy, Paul

    2012-02-01

    We present experimental and modeling results investigating rare earth-doped (Er and Yb) YAG-derived silica fibers (RYDF) as candidates for use in high-power narrow-linewidth fiber lasers. Fabrication of the RYDFs via a rod-in-tube method, starting from crystalline YAG, and its transformation to the amorphous state is described. Stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) suppression results from material properties that cooperate to yield a low Brillouin gain coefficient (BGC), namely reduced photoelastic constant and increased acoustic velocity, mass density, and Brillouin spectral width relative to silica. We find typical BGC values for large-mode-area RYDFs to be around 0.5×10-11 m/W. Utilizing a materials model, these results are extrapolated to compositionally-design further reductions to the BGC, including introducing other co-dopants to the mixture. Finally, we focus on the Yb-doped RYDF (YYDF) and show that it is a good candidate for use in kW-class narrow-linewidth fiber lasers via spectroscopy and amplifier experiments. The RYDFs are found to be very similar to conventional aluminosilicate fibers. We also find that YYDFs offer improved compatibility with phase modulating the laser for further increases in the SBS threshold. Using novel fiber fabrication methods with less-common and low-silica materials can lead to promising glass recipes with ultra-low intrinsic BGCs.

  11. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  12. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  13. The possibility of clinical application of the solid state lasers: Nd:YAG, Ho:YAG, and Er:YAG in otolaryngology - head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewska, M.; Kukwa, A.; Tulibacki, M.; Wójtowicz, P.; Olędzka, I.; Jeżewska, E.

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to summarize our experiences in clinical application of Nd:YAG, Ho:YAG and Er:YAG in otolaryngology- head and neck surgery. Choosing the laser type and parameters for the particular procedures was based on our previous research on tissue effects of those lasers. During the period of 1993-2006 we performed 3988 surgical procedures with the Nd:YAG laser. Over 87% of those were made for the nasal cavity pathologies as polyps, hyperplasia of inferior nasal turbinate, granulation tissue, postoperative adhesions, vascular malformations, under the local anesthesia conditions. In our experience Nd:YAG laser gives the possibility of good clinical control and low risk of side effects for disorders of high recurrence and frequent interventions necessity, as nasal polyps or respiratory papillomatosis. Nd:YAG assisted uvulopalatoplasty gives an interesting alternative for surgical procedures for snoring and slight/mild OSA-recognized patients. Due to its good hemostatic properties, it is a perfect tool for removal of the chemodectoma from meddle ear. During the period of 1995-2006 we performed 229 surgical procedures with the Ho:YAG laser, mostly for larynx pathologies (adhesion and scar tissue removal). In our experience Ho:YAG laser can serve as a precise laser knife for both soft and bony tissue. The ER:YAG laser still remain under clinical trial. Since 2001 year we performed 24 procedures of removing stone deposits from salivary glands. We believe it may become a promising method to cope with sialolithiasis which allows for glandule function preservation. All of the laser types mentioned above, can be easily coupled with endoscopes, what makes them available for all of the head and necklocalized disorders.

  14. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V

    2014-05-30

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ∼10{sup 8}. (lasers)

  15. Nd: YAG photodisruptors. American Academy of Ophthalmology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    Nd: YAG laser surgery can cut lens capsule, vitreous and capsular membranes, strands, and adhesions, and the iris within the surgically unopened eye, thereby avoiding infection, wound leaks, and other complications of conventional intraocular surgery. The technique has found its most widespread use in performing posterior capsulotomies after extracapsular cataract surgery. It has an extremely low complication rate when used in the anterior segment and is a preferred alternative to surgical discission. The uncertainties regarding its safety in creating iridotomies in phakic eyes have lessened with its extensive use in patients with pupillary-block glaucoma. However, caution is urged in other applications in phakic eyes. Following each Nd: YAG laser procedure, the eye should be monitored for elevation of intraocular pressure during the first two hours, and for retinal tears, retinal detachment, or cystoid macular edema during the first month after the procedure. Uncertainties persist regarding the circumstances under which the laser in its current configuration should be used in the vitreous cavity.

  16. Diode pumped Nd:YAG laser development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reno, C. W.; Herzog, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    A low power Nd:YAG laser was constructed which employs GaAs injection lasers as a pump source. Power outputs of 125 mW TEM CW with the rod at 250 K and the pump at 180 K were achieved for 45 W input power to the pump source. Operation of the laser, with array and laser at a common heat sink temperature of 250 K, was inhibited by difficulties in constructing long-life GaAs LOC laser arrays. Tests verified pumping with output power of 20 to 30 mW with rod and pump at 250 K. Although life tests with single LOC GaAs diodes were somewhat encouraging (with single diodes operating as long as 9000 hours without degradation), failures of single diodes in arrays continue to occur, and 50 percent power is lost in a few hundred hours at 1 percent duty factor. Because of the large recent advances in the state of the art of CW room temperature AlGaAs diodes, their demonstrated lifetimes of greater than 5,000 hours, and their inherent advantages for this task, it is recommended that these sources be used for further CW YAG injection laser pumping work.

  17. Evaluation of Er:YAG, CO2, and Nd:YAG lasers on apical dentine permeability after apicoectomies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careli de Castro, Fabiana; Gariba Silva, Ricardo; Marchesan, Melissa A.; Zanin, Fatima; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2004-05-01

    Apicoectomy is a surgical procedure that consists of radicular apex resection, eliminating periapical lesion. This study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on root dentine permeability after apicoectomy with Er:YAG laser. Forty-four single-rooted teeth, obtained from the Endodontic Laboratory stock from the Faculty of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, were used. The teeth were instrumented with the step-back technique, irrigated with 1.0% sodium hypochlorite and sealed with Sealer 26 (Dentsply, Brazil; lateral condensation. The samples were divided into four groups of 11 teeth each that had the root sectioned 2mm from the apex: G1 - roots were sectioned with a 4138 diamond bur with cooling; G2 - roots were sectioned with pulsed Er:YAG laser at the following parameters: 15 Hz and 250 mJ; G3 - roots were sectioned with pulsed Er:YAG laser and Nd:YAG laser (10 Hz, 100 mJ, and 1 W) was app0lied on the sectioned surface; G4 - roots were sectioned with pulsed Er:YAG laser and CO2 laser (5 W, 10 seconds ON and 20 seconds OFF) was applied to the sectioned surface. The teeth were then impermeabilized with cyanoacrylate and placed in 0.5% methylene blue for 7 days. The proximal surface of the samples was removed for exposure of the sealed root canal and dye penetration was measured by means of microscopic evaluation. The results showed a statistically significant difference at the level of 1%. We conclude that all treatments presented microleakage and can placed in increasing order: Er:YAG (G2), Bur (G1), Er:YAG + Nd:YAG (G3); Er:YAG laser presented the lowest microleakage values, showing its viability for clinical use in apicoectomies.

  18. 21 CFR 886.4392 - Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... optical breakdown. A visible aiming system is utilized to target the invisible Nd:YAG laser radiation on... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and...:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy. (a) Identification. The Nd:YAG laser...

  19. 21 CFR 886.4392 - Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... optical breakdown. A visible aiming system is utilized to target the invisible Nd:YAG laser radiation on... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and...:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy. (a) Identification. The Nd:YAG laser...

  20. Nanomoulding with amorphous metals.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Golden; Tang, Hong X; Schroers, Jan

    2009-02-12

    Nanoimprinting promises low-cost fabrication of micro- and nano-devices by embossing features from a hard mould onto thermoplastic materials, typically polymers with low glass transition temperature. The success and proliferation of such methods critically rely on the manufacturing of robust and durable master moulds. Silicon-based moulds are brittle and have limited longevity. Metal moulds are stronger than semiconductors, but patterning of metals on the nanometre scale is limited by their finite grain size. Amorphous metals (metallic glasses) exhibit superior mechanical properties and are intrinsically free from grain size limitations. Here we demonstrate direct nanopatterning of metallic glasses by hot embossing, generating feature sizes as small as 13 nm. After subsequently crystallizing the as-formed metallic glass mould, we show that another amorphous sample of the same alloy can be formed on the crystallized mould. In addition, metallic glass replicas can also be used as moulds for polymers or other metallic glasses with lower softening temperatures. Using this 'spawning' process, we can massively replicate patterned surfaces through direct moulding without using conventional lithography. We anticipate that our findings will catalyse the development of micro- and nanoscale metallic glass applications that capitalize on the outstanding mechanical properties, microstructural homogeneity and isotropy, and ease of thermoplastic forming exhibited by these materials. PMID:19212407

  1. A tunable corner-pumped Nd:YAG/YAG composite slab CW laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huan; Gong, Ma-Li

    2012-10-01

    A corner-pumped Nd:YAG/YAG composite slab continuous-wave laser operating at 1064 nm, 1074 nm, 1112 nm, 1116 nm, and 1123 nm simultaneously and a laser that is tunable at these wavelengths are reported for the first time. The maximum output power of the five-wavelength laser is 5.66 W with an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 11.3%. After a birefringent filter is inserted in the cavity, the five wavelengths can be separated successfully by rotating the filter. The maximum output powers of the 1064 nm, 1074 nm, 1112 nm, 1116 nm, and 1123 nm lasers are 1.51 W, 1.3 W, 1.27 W, 0.86 W, and 0.72 W, respectively.

  2. Ion diffusion at the bonding interface of undoped YAG/Yb:YAG composite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujioka, Kana; Sugiyama, Akira; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki

    2015-08-01

    Cation diffusion across a boundary between ytterbium (Yb)-doped and undoped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramics was examined by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA). Polished Yb:YAG and undoped YAG ceramics were bonded by surface treatment with argon fast atom beam, and then heat-treated at 1400 or 1600 °C for 50 h or at 1400 °C for 10 h under vacuum. We obtained EPMA mapping images of the bonded samples that clearly showed the bulk and grain-boundary diffusion of Y and Yb ions. The number density profiles showed that the total diffusion distances of Yb and Y ions were almost equal and approximately 2 and 15 μm at 1400 and 1600 °C, respectively, and the dependence of diffusion distance on heating time was weak. The diffusion curves were well modeled by Harrison type B kinetics including bulk and grain-boundary diffusion. In addition, it was found that Si ions added to the samples as a sintering aid might be segregated at the grain boundary by heat treatment, and diffused only along grain boundaries.

  3. Histologic comparison of needle, holmium:YAG, and erbium:YAG endoscopic goniotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Rivera, Brian K.; Hernandez, Eleut; Shetlar, Debra J.

    1995-05-01

    An endoscope allows visualization of the anterior chamber angle in porcine eyes despite the presence of cloudy corneas. The pectinate ligaments in the anterior chamber angle are a surgical model for primary infantile glaucoma. This study investigated the histologic results, one month after treating the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy needle, the holmium:YAG laser, or the erbium:YAG laser coupled to a small endoscope. The anterior chambers were deepened with a viscoelastic material in one-month-old anesthetized pigs. An Olympus 0.8 mm diameter flexible endoscope was externally coupled to a 23 gauge needle or a 300 micron diameter fiber. The angle was treated for 120 degrees by one of the three methods, and the probe was removed. During the acute study, all three methods cut the pectinate ligaments. The histologic findings one month after healing demonstrated minimal surrounding tissue damage following goniotomy with a needle and the most surrounding tissue damage following treatment with the holmium:YAG laser.

  4. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Mendez, V.P.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1988-11-15

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. 15 figs.

  5. Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Mendez, Victor P.; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon ionizing particle detectors having a hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a--Si:H) thin film deposited via plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition techniques are utilized to detect the presence, position and counting of high energy ionizing particles, such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation.

  6. Myosis in the operation of the YAG laser anterior capsulotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Nian; Ni, Xiao-Wu; Lu, Jian; He, Anzhi

    1992-08-01

    In this paper, 30 cases of extracapsular cataract extractions with a Nd:YAG laser are reported. Myosis phenomenon in laser operation is observed and its producing mechanism is discussed. Laser ophthalmology was the earliest field in laser application research, and pulse Nd:YAG laser ophthalmic instruments have been developed rapidly because of unique advantages in the anterior and posterior capsulotomy and trabecula shaping method. Thirty cases of extracapsular cataract extractions with the assistance of a Nd:YAG laser are reported in this paper. In laser operation, myosis phenomenon is observed, and its production mechanism is discussed.

  7. Thermally induced birefringence in Nd:YAG slab lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Ostermeyer, Martin; Mudge, Damien; Veitch, Peter J.; Munch, Jesper

    2006-07-20

    We study thermally induced birefringence in crystalline Nd:YAG zigzag slab lasers and the associated depolarization losses. The optimum crystallographic orientation of the zigzag slab within the Nd:YAG boule and photoelastic effects in crystalline Nd:YAG slabs are briefly discussed. The depolarization is evaluated using the temperature and stress distributions, calculated using a finite element model, for realistically pumped and cooled slabs of finite dimensions. Jones matrices are then used to calculate the depolarization of the zigzag laser mode. We compare the predictions with measurements of depolarization, and suggest useful criteria for the design of the gain media for such lasers.

  8. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in Tm{sup 3+}:YAG

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, A. L.; Lauro, R.; Louchet, A.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Tm{sup 3+}:YAG crystal. Tm{sup 3+}:YAG is a promising material for use in quantum information processing applications, but as yet there are few experimental investigations of coherent Raman processes in this material. We investigate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening and Rabi frequency on the transfer efficiency and the width of the two-photon spectrum. Simulations of the complete Tm{sup 3+}:YAG system are presented along with the corresponding experimental results.

  9. Yb:YAG enhanced Cr,Yb:YAG self-Q-switched microchip laser under QCW laser-diode pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangyu; Chen, Dimeng; Cheng, Ying; Dong, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Enhanced Cr,Yb:YAG self-Q-switched microchip lasers by bonding Yb:YAG crystal have been studied under quasi-continuous-wave (QCW) laser-diode pumping for the first time to our best knowledge. The effects of the pump pulse duration and pump power of the QCW laser-diode on the performance of Yb:YAG/Cr,Yb:YAG microchip lasers have been investigated. The optical efficiency, pulse energy and peak power of the Yb:YAG/Cr,Yb:YAG self-Q-switched laser increase with the pump pulse duration and pump power, and tend to be constant when the pump pulse duration is longer than 1 ms, which is comparable to the fluorescence lifetime of Yb:YAG crystal. Output energy of over 11.7 mJ was obtained at input pump energy of 48.2 mJ; corresponding optical-to-optical efficiency of 24.3% was obtained. Laser pulses with pulse energy of 31 μJ and peak power of 13.3 kW were obtained. The multi-longitudinal modes oscillation around 1030 nm was dominant within the available input pump energy.

  10. Efficient ASE control in cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifiers with Cr4+:YAG interlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Kaibo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Yan, Xiongwei; Li, Min; Jiang, Xinying; Wang, Zhenguo; Li, Mingzhong; Zheng, Wanguo; Zheng, Jiangang

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach based on Cr4+:YAG interlayers to break the transmission paths of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) in a cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier geometry was presented for the suppression of ASE in the power scaling of high energy, high average power laser systems. The benefits of Cr4+:YAG interlayers for the overall performance of an amplifier were illustrated with respect to energy storage capacity, heat generation and amplification of the seed pulses based on the theory of quasi-three-level Yb3+ ions and Cr4+:YAG saturable absorption, the Monte Carlo and ray-tracing methods. For the amplifier with optimized Cr4+:YAG interlayers, it was found that the energy storage efficiency was increased from 39.12% to 47.38% in comparison with the amplifier without interlayers. The maximum output energy of 1119.53 J with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 28.91% in the amplifier with interlayers was obtained, while it reduced to 810.61 J with an optical-to-optical efficiency of 20.94% in the amplifier without interlayers. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative characterization of the performance of a cryogenic gas cooled Yb:YAG multislab amplifier with Cr4+:YAG interlayers.

  11. Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Devaud, Genevieve

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

  12. Demining with Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothacher, Thomas; Lüthy, Willy; Weber, Heinz P.

    2004-04-01

    Laser neutralization of antipersonnel (AP) mines offers the enormous advantage to work from a safe distance. In this article the interaction of Nd:YAG laser radiation and four different types of blast AP mines is investigated. For this purpose, a very compact laser system for mine neutralization is developed. The incident power on the mine surfaces is varied from 20 to 70 W. Neutralization of all mines is achieved from a safe distance up to 50 m. The mines burn and finally detonate after an irradiation time of a few minutes. Detonation of the irradiated burning mines is considerably weaker compared to fully functional mines. Therefore, expected damage in the surrounding area is significantly reduced.

  13. Crystallography of Alumina-YAG-Eutectic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Serene C.; Sayir, Ali; Dickerson, Robert M.; Matson, Lawrence E.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple descriptions of the alumina-YAG eutectic crystallography appear in the ceramic literature. The orientation between two phases in a eutectic system has direct impact on residual stress, morphology, microstructural stability, and high temperature mechanical properties. A study to demonstrate that the different crystallographic relationships can be correlated with different growth constraints was undertaken. Fibers produced by Laser-Heated Float Zone (LHFZ) and Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) were examined. A map of the orientation relationship between Al2O3 and Y3Al5O12 and their relationship to the fiber growth axis as a function of pull rate are presented. Regions in which a single orientation predominates are identified.

  14. Pulsed Nd-YAG laser in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragot-Roy, Brigitte; Severin, Claude; Maquin, Michel

    1994-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an operative method in endodontics. The effect of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on root canal dentin has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Our first experimentation was to observe the impacts carried out perpendicularly to root canal surface with a 200 micrometers fiber optic in the presence of dye. Secondarily, the optical fiber was used as an endodontic instrument with black dye. The irradiation was performed after root canal preparation (15/100 file or 40/100 file) or directly into the canal. Adverse effects are observed. The results show that laser irradiation on root canal dentin surfaces induces a nonhomogeneous modified dentin layer, melted and resolidified dentin closed partially dentinal tubules. The removal of debris is not efficient enough. The laser treatment seems to be indicated only for endodontic and periapical spaces sterilization after conventional root canal preparation.

  15. Bulk amorphous materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, R.B.; Archuleta, J.I.; Sickafus, K.E.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report for a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this work was to develop the competency for the synthesis of novel bulk amorphous alloys. The authors researched their synthesis methods and alloy properties, including thermal stability, mechanical, and transport properties. The project also addressed the development of vanadium-spinel alloys for structural applications in hostile environments, the measurement of elastic constants and thermal expansion in single-crystal TiAl from 300 to 750 K, the measurement of elastic constants in gallium nitride, and a study of the shock-induced martensitic transformations in NiTi alloys.

  16. Amorphous and Cellular Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelson, Harold; Sussman, Gerald J.; Knight, Thomas F., Jr

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this research is to create the architectural, algorithmic, and technological foundations for exploiting programmable materials. These are materials that incorporate vast numbers of programmable elements that react to each other and to their environment. Such materials can be fabricated economically, provided that the computing elements are amassed in bulk without arranging for precision interconnect and testing. In order to exploit programmable materials we must identify engineering principles for organizing and instructing myriad programmable entities to cooperate to robustly achieve pre-established goals, even though the individual entities are unreliable and interconnected in unknown, irregular, and time-varying ways. Progress in microfabrication and in bioengineering will make it possible to assemble such amorphous systems at almost no cost, provided that (1) the units need not all work correctly; (2) the units are identically programmed; and (3) there is no need to manufacture precise geometrical arrangements of the units or precise interconnections among them.

  17. Crystal structure and luminescent properties of nanocrystalline YAG and YAG:Nd synthesized by sol-gel method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhydachevskii, Ya.; Syvorotka, I. I.; Vasylechko, L.; Sugak, D.; Borshchyshyn, I. D.; Luchechko, A. P.; Vakhula, Ya. I.; Ubizskii, S. B.; Vakiv, M. M.; Suchocki, A.

    2012-10-01

    The work describes results of synthesis of undoped and Nd-doped YAG nanopowders by sol-gel method using different complexing agents (ethylene glycol and citric acid) and characterization of the material by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, photoluminescence and thermoluminescence techniques. Utilization of citrate sol-gel procedure using yttrium and aluminum nitrate nonahydrates as starting substances allowed to obtain highly stoichiometric and non-defected YAG and YAG:Nd nanocrystalline samples with good luminescence performance and low radiation storage efficiency.

  18. Neodymium-YAG laser vitreolysis in sickle cell retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Hrisomalos, N.F.; Jampol, L.M.; Moriarty, B.J.; Serjeant, G.; Acheson, R.; Goldberg, M.F.

    1987-08-01

    Six patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy and vitreous bands were treated with the neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser to accomplish lysis of avascular traction bands or to clear the media in front of the macula. Transection of bands was possible in five of the six cases but in two of these the effect was only partial. Three cases were satisfactorily treated with the Nd-YAG laser application alone, two eventually required conventional vitreoretinal surgery, and one patient's condition stabilized despite failure of the treatment. Complications from the treatment occurred in three cases and included subretinal (choroidal) hemorrhage, preretinal hemorrhage, microperforation of a retinal vein, and focal areas of damage to the retinal pigment epithelium. Neodymium-YAG vitreolysis may be a useful modality in carefully selected patients with proliferative sickle cell retinopathy, but potentially sight-threatening complications may occur.

  19. [Spectroscopy performances of Yb3+ doped YAG crystal].

    PubMed

    Yang, P; Deng, P; Huang, G; Wu, G; Yin, Z

    2000-06-01

    The absorption and emission properties of Yb:YAG with different Yb3+ doped concentration have been studied systematically. The emission cross section has been evaluated using the absorption cross section and principle of reciprocity, which was consistent with previous reports. The absorption spectra of Yb2+ and color center were observed in as-grown Yb:YAG boules, which are removed by annealing the boules in oxygen at 1,300 degrees C for 24 h. The photon excited and X-ray excited optical luminescence of Yb:YAG were first discussed. The results indicated that Yb:YAG crystal was favourable for high-power diode-pumping. PMID:12958933

  20. Optical properties of epitaxial YAG:Yb films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubizskii, S. B.; Matkovskii, A. O.; Melnyk, S. S.; Syvorotka, I. M.; Müller, V.; Peters, V.; Petermann, K.; Beyertt, A.; Giesen, A.

    2004-03-01

    This work deals with the investigation of the optical properties of epitaxial YAG:Yb films and their suitability as gain media for thin disk lasers. Epitaxial films of YAG:Yb were grown by the liquid phase epitaxy method in air on the (111)-oriented YAG substrates. The thickness of the grown layers was from 30 to 260 m. The melt composition was varied to obtain the desired doping level from 10 to 15% and to optimize the optical properties. The best epitaxial films were colourless and had an Yb3+ luminescence lifetime of more than 950 s, which is very close to the intrinsic lifetime of the Yb ions in the bulk YAG single crystals. These films were tested in a thin disk laser setup with 24 absorption passes of the 940 nm pumping beam. The maximum output power at 1.03 m wavelength in CW operation reached more than 60 W and the optical efficiency was close to 30%.

  1. Growth and characterization of YAG:Cr4+epitaxial films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubizskii, Sergii B.; Syvorotka, Igor M.; Melnyk, Sergii S.; Matkovskii, Andrej O.; Kopczynski, Krzysztof; Mierczyk, Zygmunt; Frukacz, Zygmunt

    1999-03-01

    Epitaxial films with thickness of 10 - 250 micrometers of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with Cr were grown by liquid phase epitaxy technique on YAG:Nd substrates. Co-doping with Mg2+ is used to force the Cr4+ valent state formation. Dependence of absorption spectra of obtained films on melt-solution composition, growth conditions and thermal treatment in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres is studied. A very intensive absorption band in UV region with maximum at 275 nm was found both in co-doped and YAG:Mg2+ epifilms caused probably by oxygen vacancies compensating the excess charge of Mg2+. Its intensity correlates with Cr4+ content in the film in that way: it decreases with Cr4+ entering in the film. The absorption being characteristic for YAG:Cr4+ crystals is found in co-doped films grown at higher temperatures (1000 - 1100 degree(s)C). The processes occurring during annealing are discussed.

  2. NdYag Laser for Acne Keloidalis Nuchae

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-27

    Acne Keloidalis Nuchae; NdYag Laser; AKN; Acne Keloidalis; AK; Dermatitis Papillaris Capillitii; Folliculitis Keloidalis Nuchae; Sycosis Nuchae; Acne Keloid; Keloidal Folliculitis; Lichen Keloidalis Nuchae; Folliculitis Nuchae Scleroticans; Sycosis Framboesiformis

  3. Compact and efficient passively Q-switched laser at 473  nm with an Nd:YAG/YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG multifunctional composite crystal.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siqi; Zhou, Haiqiong; Jiang, Wei; Li, Zhen; Yin, Hao; Zhang, Ge; Chen, Zhenqiang

    2016-05-20

    An Nd:YAG/YAG/Cr4+:YAG/YAG composite crystal and an LBO crystal were used to generate a passively Q-switched frequency-doubling 473 nm blue laser for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The result demonstrated that the slope efficiency of this system reaches 18%, which is the highest in all the passively Q-switched 473 nm laser systems reported, to the best of our knowledge. Under the pumped power of 8.64 W, the maximum average output power of 0.93 W was obtained with a pulsewidth of 78 ns, and the repetition rate of 18.5 kHz. PMID:27411146

  4. Effect of surface morphology on laser-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lu; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guohua; Shi, Weimin; Yang, Weiguang; Yuan, Zhijun; Cao, Zechun; Zhou, Jun; Lou, Qihong; Liu, Jin; Wei, Guangpu

    2013-12-01

    The effect of surface morphology on laser-induced crystallization of hydrogenated intrinsic amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films deposited by PECVD is studied in this paper. The thin films are irritated by a frequency-doubled (λ=532 nm) Nd:YAG pulsed nanosecond laser. An effective melting model is built to identify the variation of melting regime influenced by laser crystallization. Based on the experimental results, the established correlation between the grain growth characterized by AFM and the crystalline fraction (Xc) obtained from Raman spectroscopy suggests that the crystallized process form amorphous phase to polycrystalline phase. Therefore, the highest crystalline fraction (Xc) is obtained by a optimized laser energy density.

  5. Application of Yb:YAG short pulse laser system

    DOEpatents

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Crane, John K.; Telford, Steve; Perry, Michael D.

    2004-07-06

    A diode pumped, high power (at least 20W), short pulse (up to 2 ps), chirped pulse amplified laser using Yb:YAG as the gain material is employed for material processing. Yb:YAG is used as the gain medium for both a regenerative amplifier and a high power 4-pass amplifier. A single common reflective grating optical device is used to both stretch pulses for amplification purposes and to recompress amplified pulses before being directed to a workpiece.

  6. Treatment of patients with OSAS using Nd-YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwa, Andrzej; Tulibacki, Marek P.; Zajac, Andrzej; Dudziec, Katarzyna

    2000-06-01

    The authors present their clinical experience regarding the possibilities of application of Nd:YAG and Ho:YAG lasers for the treatment of disorders in the are of the upper respiratory tract. The patients with symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Aphnoe Syndrom need a various operations techniques. Lasers techniques makes it possible to perform a number of procedures in local anesthesia which considerably improves the economic effectiveness of the treatment. The surgeries performed using laser beam enabled very good effect of treatment.

  7. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B.

    1992-05-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for US products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon US government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United State, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the US Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W{sub p} for plants with 10 MW/year capacities. 10 refs.

  8. Perspective on photovoltaic amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Luft, W.; Stafford, B.; von Roedern, B. )

    1992-12-01

    Amorphous silicon is a thin film option that has the potential for a cost-effective product for large-scale utility photovoltaics application. The initial efficiencies for single-junction and multijunction amorphous silicon cells and modules have increased significantly over the past 10 years. The emphasis of research and development has changed to stabilized efficiency, especially that of multijunction modules. NREL has measured 6.3%--7.2% stabilized amorphous silicon module efficiencies for U.S. products, and 8.1% stable efficiencies have been reported by Fuji Electric. This represents a significant increase over the stabilized efficiencies of modules manufactured only a few years ago. An increasing portion of the amorphous silicon U.S. government funding is now for manufacturing technology development to reduce cost. The funding for amorphous silicon for photovoltaics by Japan over the last 5 years has been about 50% greater than that in the United States, and by Germany in the last 2--3 years more than twice that of the U.S. Amorphous silicon is the only thin-film technology that is selling large-area commercial modules. The cost for amorphous silicon modules is now in the $4.50 range; it is a strong function of plant production capacity and is expected to be reduced to $1.00--1.50/W[sub [ital p

  9. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  10. Photoluminescence properties of thermographic phosphors YAG:Dy and YAG:Dy, Er doped with boron and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chepyga, Liudmyla M.; Jovicic, Gordana; Vetter, Andreas; Osvet, Andres; Brabec, Christoph J.; Batentschuk, Miroslaw

    2016-08-01

    This paper investigates Dy3+-doped and Dy3+, Er3+-co-doped yttrium aluminum garnets (YAG) with the admixture of boron nitride with the aim of using them as efficient thermographic phosphors at high temperatures. The phosphors were synthesized using a conventional high-temperature solid-state method. The influence of two fluxes, B2O3 and LiF/NH4F, and the effect of activator and coactivator concentrations were investigated. Additionally, the effect of B3+ and N3- substituting for Al3+ and O2- ions, respectively, in the YAG:Dy3+ co-doped with Er3+ was studied for the first time. The changes in the host lattice led to a much stronger photoluminescence compared with the samples without B3+ and N3- substitution. The admixture of BN also improves the thermal sensitivity of the YAG:Dy and YAG:Dy, Er thermographic phosphors.

  11. Erb:YAG and Hol:YAG laser osteotomy: the effect of laser ablation on bone healing.

    PubMed

    Buchelt, M; Kutschera, H P; Katterschafka, T; Kiss, H; Lang, S; Beer, R; Losert, U

    1994-01-01

    Sixty-nine male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups of 23 animals each and osteotomies were performed in group 1 with a power saw, in group 2 with the Erb:Yag laser, and in group 3 with the Hol:YAG laser. Two animals of each group were sacrificed 1 week, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after operation for histologic investigation, and five animals of each group at 4, 8, and 12 weeks after osteotomy for torque testing. Anterior-posterior (AP) radiographs were taken at the same time points and investigated for callus formation and development of pseudoarthrosis. All tibiae osteotomied with the Hol:YAG laser (group 3) developed pseudoarthrosis within 12 weeks and, therefore, torque testing could not be performed for this group. Biomechanical measurements of bone treated by power saw or Erb:YAG laser osteotomies, respectively, showed no significant statistical difference in the stability of bone between the two groups. Histologic examination after 1 week exhibited fibrous tissue at the site of osteotomy in rats of all three groups and additionally carbonization in rats of group 3. Saw osteotomies resulted in more callus formation than Erb:YAG osteotomies, but both techniques provoked a certain reunion within 8 weeks. Hol:YAG laser-treated osteotomies, however, exhibited formation of dense fibrous tissue, carbonization and no callus formation within 12 weeks. Radiographic pictures showed more callus formation for saw osteotomies as compared to those performed with the Erb:YAG laser. For Hol:YAG laser osteotomies pseudoarthrosis was identified also radiologically. PMID:7885171

  12. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. PMID:27460160

  13. Fabrication of amorphous diamond films

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-12-12

    Amorphous diamond films having a significant reduction in intrinsic stress are prepared by biasing a substrate to be coated and depositing carbon ions thereon under controlled temperature conditions. 1 fig.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy of Amorphous Carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Tallant, D.R.; Friedmann, T.A.; Missert, N.A.; Siegal, M.P.; Sullivan, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Amorphous carbon is an elemental form of carbon with low hydrogen content, which may be deposited in thin films by the impact of high energy carbon atoms or ions. It is structurally distinct from the more well-known elemental forms of carbon, diamond and graphite. It is distinct in physical and chemical properties from the material known as diamond-like carbon, a form which is also amorphous but which has a higher hydrogen content, typically near 40 atomic percent. Amorphous carbon also has distinctive Raman spectra, whose patterns depend, through resonance enhancement effects, not only on deposition conditions but also on the wavelength selected for Raman excitation. This paper provides an overview of the Raman spectroscopy of amorphous carbon and describes how Raman spectral patterns correlate to film deposition conditions, physical properties and molecular level structure.

  15. Amorphous metal alloy and composite

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Rong; Merz, Martin D.

    1985-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloys of the iron-chromium and nickel-chromium type have excellent corrosion resistance and high temperature stability and are suitable for use as a protective coating on less corrosion resistant substrates. The alloys are stabilized in the amorphous state by one or more elements of titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, tantalum, molybdenum, and tungsten. The alloy is preferably prepared by sputter deposition.

  16. Nd:YAG breech mounted laser igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Christopher R.; Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.; Gadson, Robert L.; Leone, Joseph; Fay, Josiah W.; Boyd, Kevin

    2005-09-01

    Nd:YAG lasers have been successfully used to demonstrate laser ignition of howitzer propellant charges including bag, stick, and the Modular Artillery Charge System (MACS). Breech Mount Laser Ignition Systems (BMLIS) have been designed, installed and tested on many artillery systems, including the US Army's M109A6 Paladin, M198, M777 Light Weight, Crusader, and Non-Line-of-Sight Cannon (NLOS-C). The NLOS-C incorporates advanced weapon technologies, to include a BMLIS. United Defense's Armament Systems Division has recently designed and built a NLOS-C System Demonstrator that uses a BMLIS that incorporates Kigre's patented square pulse technology. NLOS-C is one of the weapon systems being developed for use with the US Army's "systems of systems" Future Combat System (FCS), Manned Ground Vehicles (MGV) program, and is currently undergoing development testing at Yuma Proving Grounds. In this paper we discuss many technical aspects of an artillery laser ignition system and present BMLIS test data obtained from actual gun firings conducted with a number of different US Army howitzer platforms.

  17. Sulcular debridement with pulsed Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David M.; Gregg, Robert H., II; McCarthy, Delwin K.; Colby, Leigh E.; Tilt, Lloyd V.

    2002-06-01

    We present data supporting the efficacy of the procedure, laser sulcular debridement (laser curettage), as an important component in the treatment of inflammatory periodontal disease. Laser Assisted New Attachment Procedure (LANAP) is a detailed protocol for the private practice treatment of gum disease that incorporates use of the PerioLase pulsed Nd:YAG Dental Laser for laser curettage. Laser curettage is the removal of diseased or inflamed soft tissue from the periodontal pocket with a surgical dental laser. The clinical trial conducted at The University of Texas HSC at San Antonio, Texas, evaluated laser curettage as an adjunct to scaling and root planing. They measured traditional periodontal clinical indices and used a questionnaire to evaluate patient comfort and acceptance. The Texas data (N=10 patients) are compared with pocket depth changes following LANAP. LANAP data were obtained from a retrospective review of patient records at three private practices (N=65). No significant differences in post treatment probe depth changes were found among the four centers indicating that the procedure produced consistent, favorable outcomes, and that results from controlled scientific clinical trials can be replicated in private practices. Reduction in pocket depths following laser treatment compare well with results obtained with scalpel surgery. The use of the laser offers additional benefits. We also present quantitative evidence from digitized radiographs of increased bone density in affected areas following LANAP.

  18. Cr4+ : YAG chirped-pulse oscillator

    PubMed Central

    Sorokin, Evgeni; Kalashnikov, Vladimir L; Mandon, Julien; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqué, Nathalie; Sorokina, Irina T

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate chirped-pulse operation of a Cr : YAG passively mode-locked laser. Different operation regimes of the laser are extensively investigated in the vicinity of zero dispersion both experimentally and numerically. It is shown that for a given laser configuration, transition to the positive dispersion regime allows a 5-fold increase in the output pulse energy, which is otherwise limited by the onset of the multipulsing or ‘chaotic’ mode-locking. The output pulses have 1.4 ps duration and are compressible down to 120 fs in a 3 m piece of silica fiber, enabling supercontinuum generation in a nonlinear fiber. The spectrum shape and operation stability of the chirped-pulse regime depend strongly on the amount and shape of the intracavity dispersion. The numerical model predicts the existence of the minimum amount of the positive dispersion, above which the chirped-pulse regime can be realized. Once located, the chirped-pulse regime can be reliably reproduced and is sufficiently stable for applications. PMID:21151831

  19. Structural Relaxation and Nanocrystallization-Induced Laser Surface Hardening of Fe-Based Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashish K.; Alavi, S. Habib; Paital, Sameer R.; Dahotre, Narendra B.; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2014-06-01

    Amorphous metallic alloys or bulk metallic glasses are emerging as promising materials for a range of structural, microelectromechanical systems, and biomedical applications. With the recent developments in spark plasma sintering and superplastic forming of the amorphous alloys, it is likely that the amorphous alloys will find a place in new applications. In this article, surface hardening of spark plasma sintered Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B6 bulk amorphous alloys using a continuous-wave Nd:YAG laser is reported. Depending on the processing parameters, the laser surface irradiation causes structural relaxation (enhanced medium-range ordering and/or annihilation of excess free volume) and nanocrystallization of hard carbides (M23C6 and M7C3), resulting in surface hardening. Detailed investigations on the thermal effects, microstructural modifications, and hardness improvements due to laser surface irradiation with laser fluence in the range of 1.77-2.36 J/mm2 are presented. An increase in hardness in the range of 1360-1560 HV for laser surface-treated alloys compared to 1200 HV for as-sintered alloys over a hardening depth of about 50-80 µm is observed.

  20. Lamp pumped Nd:YAG laser. Space-qualifiable Nd:YAG laser for optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, K. B.

    1973-01-01

    Results are given of a program concerned with the design, fabrication, and evaluation of alkali pump lamps for eventual use in a space qualified Nd:YAG laser system. The study included evaluation of 2mm through 6mm bore devices. Primary emphasis was placed upon the optimization of the 4mm bore lamp and later on the 6mm bore lamp. As part of this effort, reference was made to the Sylvania work concerned with the theoretical modeling of the Nd:YAG laser. With the knowledge gained, a projection of laser performance was made based upon realistic lamp parameters which should easily be achieved during following developmental efforts. Measurements were made on the lamp performance both in and out of the cavity configuration. One significant observation was that for a constant vapor pressure device, the spectral and fluorescent output did not vary for vacuum or argon environment. Therefore, the laser can be operated in an inert environment (eg. argon) with no degradation in output. Laser output of 3.26 watts at 430 watts input was obtained for an optimized 4mm bore lamp.

  1. Development of monolith Nd:YAG /Cr+4:YAG passively Q-switched microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izhnin, Ihor; Vakiv, Mykola; Izhnin, Aleksandr; Syvorotka, Igor; Ubizskii, Sergii; Syvorotka, Ihor, Jr.

    2005-09-01

    The main features of passively Q-switched microchip lasers development are considered. The active medium of laser is an epitaxial structure combining an epitaxial layer of saturable absorber Cr4+:Y3Al5O12 (Cr:YAG) grown on substrate of generating crystal Nd:YAG by liquid phase epitaxy. The modulator layer has an initial optical absorption of 36 cm-1 at wavelength of lasing (1064 nm). The epitaxial layer grown on unworking side was mechanically removed and this substrate side was optically polished. The other one was processed precisely to needed thickness. The cavity's mirrors were deposited by electron beam technique directly on each side of the structure to form a rugged, monolithic resonator. Diode laser Model ATC-C4000 with lasing wavelength 808 nm provided the CW end pumping. The output pulses parameters were investigated by means of test bench consisting of photoelectric transducer FEK-15 and Digital Phosphor Oscilloscope TDS 5052B. The obtained laser parameter are as follows: pulse width (FWHM) about 1.3 ns, repetition rate 5.5 kHz, average output power about 10 mW, pulse energy 1.0 μJ, pick power 1.2 kW. The possible solutions for laser parameter improving and optimization are discussed.

  2. Efficient corner-pumped Nd:YAG/YAG composite slab 1.1 µm laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Liu, Qiang; Gong, Mali

    2010-09-13

    Corner pumping is a new pumping scheme for diode-pumped solid-state lasers, which has the advantages of high pump efficiency and favorable pump uniformity. A continuous-wave corner-pumped Nd:YAG/ YAG composite slab multi-wavelength laser at around 1.1 µm is demonstrated. The maximal output power is up to 12.06 W with an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 24%. At an output power of 10.3 W, the M(2) factors of beam quality at width and thickness directions are 7.71 and 2.44, respectively. With a LBO crystal inserted in the cavity, continuous-wave yellow-green laser with an output power of 841 mW is obtained. The experimental results show that a corner-pumping is a feasible scheme in the design of diode-pumped solid-state 1.1 µm lasers and their frequency-doubling to the yellow-green with low or medium output powers. PMID:20940856

  3. Amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2015-03-01

    All-carbon solar cells have attracted attention as candidates for innovative photovoltaic devices. Carbon-based materials such as graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and amorphous carbon (aC) have the potential to present physical properties comparable to those of silicon-based materials with advantages such as low cost and higher thermal stability.In particular a-C structures are promising systems in which both sp2 and sp3 hybridization coordination are present in different proportions depending on the specific density, providing the possibility of tuning their optoelectronic properties and achieving comparable sunlight absorption to aSi. In this work we employ density functional theory to design suitable device architectures, such as bulk heterojunctions (BHJ) or pn junctions, consisting of a-C as the active layer material.Regarding BHJ, we study interfaces between aC and C nanostructures (such as CNT and fullerene) to relate their optoelectronic properties to the stoichiometry of aC. We demonstrate that the energy alignment between the a-C mobility edges and the occupied and unoccupied states of the CNT or C60 can be widely tuned by varying the aC density to obtain a type II interface.To employ aC in pn junctions we analyze the p- and n-type doping of a-C focusingon an evaluation of the Fermi level and work function dependence on doping.Our results highlight promising features of aC as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  4. Er:YAG laser debonding of porcelain veneers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buu, Natalie; Morford, Cynthia; Finzen, Frederick; Sharma, Arun; Rechmann, Peter

    2010-02-01

    The removal of porcelain veneers using Er:YAG lasers has not been previously described in the scientific literature. This study was designed to systematically investigate the efficacy of an Er:YAG laser on veneer debonding without damaging the underlying tooth structure, as well as preserving a new or misplaced veneer. Initially, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used on flat porcelain veneer samples (IPS Empress Esthetic; Ivoclar Vivadent, Amherst, NY) to assess which infrared laser wavelengths are transmitted through the veneer. Additionally, FTIR spectra from a veneer bonding cement (RelyX Veneer Cement A1; 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN) were obtained. While the veneer material showed no characteristic water absorption bands in the FTIR, the bonding cement has a broad H2O/OH absorption band coinciding with the ER:YAG laser emission wavelength. Consequently Er:YAG laser energy transmission through different veneer thicknesses was measured. The porcelain veneers transmitted 11 - 18 % of the incident Er:YAG laser energy depending on their thicknesses (Er:YAG laser: LiteTouch by Syneron; wavelength 2,940 nm, 10 Hz repetition rate, pulse duration 100 μs at 133 mJ/pulse; straight sapphire tip 1,100 μm diameter; Syneron, Yokneam, Israel). Initial signs of cement ablation occurred at approximately 1.8 - 4.0 J/cm2. This can be achieved by irradiating through the veneer with the fiber tip positioned at a distance of 3-6 mm from the veneer surface, and operating the Er:YAG laser with 133 mJ output energy. All eleven veneers bonded on extracted anterior incisor teeth were easily removed using the Er:YAG laser. The removal occurred without damaging underlying tooth structure as verified by light microscopic investigation (Incident Light Microscope Olympus B 50, Micropublisher RTV 3.3 MP, Image Pro software, Olympus). The debonding mainly occurred at the cement/veneer interface. When the samples were stored in saline solution for 5 days and/or an air-waterspray was

  5. Performance and spectroscopic characterization of irradiated Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Todd S.; Fincher, Curtis L.; Fields, Renny A.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of longitudinally pumped Nd:YAG was evaluated before and after exposure to 60Co gamma radiation. For comparison, other Nd-doped materials, Cr:GSGG and YLF, were also included in this study. The cw unirradiated optical-to-optical slope efficiencies for Nd:YAG and Nd:YLF were 63% and degraded to 48% and 36%, respectively, after 600 kRads of irradiation. Nd:Cr:GSGG performed significantly worse, exhibiting a slope efficiency of 42%, but was not affected by irradiation (a result that is in agreement with previous reports). Electron paramagnetic resonance studies of the Nd:YAG samples indicated that there was no modification of the Nd3+ sites resulting from exposure to the radiation. It is concluded from the performance and spectroscopic analysis that the degradation in Nd:YAG is primarily due to an induced passive optical loss of approximately 0.02 cm-1. Furthermore, this effect was observed to saturate at exposure levels of 50 kRad. The relatively low induced loss indicates that Nd:YAG systems employing pulsed diode pumping in the longitudinal configuration, should be resistant to ambient space environment radiation damage. This point was experimentally verified with respect to the effect of gamma rays on performance.

  6. Highly efficient solar-pumped Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana

    2011-12-19

    The recent progress in solar-pumped laser with Fresnel lens and Cr:Nd:YAG ceramic medium has revitalized solar laser researches, revealing a promising future for renewable reduction of magnesium from magnesium oxide. Here we show a big advance in solar laser collection efficiency by utilizing an economical Fresnel lens and a most widely used Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. The incoming solar radiation from the sun is focused by a 0.9 m diameter Fresnel lens. A dielectric totally internally reflecting secondary concentrator is employed to couple the concentrated solar radiation from the focal zone to a 4 mm diameter Nd:YAG rod within a conical pumping cavity. 12.3 W cw laser power is produced, corresponding to 19.3 W/m(2) collection efficiency, which is 2.9 times larger than the previous results with Nd:YAG single-crystal medium. Record-high slope efficiency of 3.9% is also registered. Laser beam quality is considerably improved by pumping a 3 mm diameter Nd:YAG rod. PMID:22274224

  7. Efficient Q-switched Tm:YAG ceramic slab laser.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaiyi; Wang, Mingjian; Xu, Lin; Wang, Yan; Tang, Yulong; Cheng, Xiaojin; Chen, Weibiao; Xu, Jianqiu; Jiang, Benxue; Pan, Yubai

    2011-01-17

    Characteristics of Tm:YAG ceramic for high efficient 2-μm lasers are analyzed. Efficient diode end-pumped continuous-wave and Q-switched Tm:YAG ceramic lasers are demonstrated. At the absorbed pump power of 53.2W, the maximum continuous wave (cw) output power of 17.2 W around 2016 nm was obtained with the output transmission of 5%. The optical conversion efficiency is 32.3%, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 36.5%. For Q-switched operation, the shortest width of 69 ns was achieved with the pulse repetition frequency of 500 Hz and single pulse energy of 20.4 mJ, which indicates excellent energy storage capability of the Tm:YAG ceramic. PMID:21263612

  8. Er:YAG laser metal and ceramic bracket debonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, Tat'jana; Remeš, Marek; Jelínková, Helena; Å ulc, Jan; Němec, Michal; Vyhlídal, David

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the study was investigation of Er:YAG radiation (wavelength 2.94 μm) interaction with various metal and ceramic brackets and adhesive materials. The source of radiation was a free-running Er: YAG laser generating pulses with energy 280 mJ, 250 μs long and repetition rate 6 Hz (mean power 1.7 W). During the treatment lasting 140 s, water cooling was implemented and only the brackets were irradiated. It has been observed that the brackets were removed easily after the Er:YAG laser irradiation, and temperature rise was limited also for metal brackets. SEM investigation has confirmed less damage of enamel in comparison with non-irradiated samples.

  9. Prominent 946 lines induced from flashlamp pumped Nd: YAG rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidin, Noriah; Zainal, Roslinda; Daud, Yaacob Mat; Pourmand, Seyed Ebrahim; Bakhtiar, Hazri

    2012-06-01

    Spectroscopic properties of Nd:YAG laser rod pumped by a new developed flashlamp is investigated. A new power supply is constructed to power xenon flashlamp. A 1 at.% Nd:YAG laser rod is transversely pumped by the flashlamp and stabilized by a water cooling system operated at ambient temperature of 20°C. The absorption and emission spectrum of the flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG rod is analyzed via spectroscopy technique. The peak absorption line is identified to be at 882 nm. The dominant emission line obtained from transition 4F3/2→4I9/2 comprised of quasi three level laser at 938.5 and 946 nm with the corresponding cross section of 2.42×10-19cm2 and 3.04×10-19cm2 respectively. This cross section is found almost ten times greater than the usual one.

  10. Yb:YAG Lasers for Space Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, J.J.; Fan, T. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Diode pumped solid state lasers will play a prominent role in future remote sensing missions because of their intrinsic high efficiency and low mass. Applications including altimetry, cloud and aerosol measurement, wind velocity measurement by both coherent and incoherent methods, and species measurements, with appropriate frequency converters, all will benefit from a diode pumped primary laser. To date the "gold standard" diode pumped Nd laser has been the laser of choice for most of these concepts. This paper discusses an alternate 1 micron laser, the YB:YAG laser, and its potential relevance for lidar applications. Conceptual design analysis and, to the extent possible at the time of the conference, preliminary experimental data on the performance of a bread board YB:YAG oscillator will be presented. The paper centers on application of YB:YAG for altimetry, but extension to other applications will be discussed.

  11. Q-Switched Nd: YAG Laser Micro-Machining System

    SciTech Connect

    Messaoud, S.; Allam, A.; Siserir, F.; Bouceta, Y.; Kerdja, T.; Ouadjaout, D.

    2008-09-23

    In this paper, we present the design of a low cost Q-switched Nd: YAG laser micro-machining system for photo masks fabrication. It consists of: Nd:YAG laser source, beam delivery system, X-Y table, PC, The CCD camera and TV monitor. The synchronization between the laser source and the X-Y table is realised by NI PCI-7342, the two axis MID-7602 and LabVIEW based program. The first step of this work consists of engraving continuous and discontinuous lines on a thin film metal with a 100 {mu}m resolution by using the YG 980 Quantel Q-switched Nd:YAG laser.

  12. Growth of single-crystal YAG fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Nie, Craig D; Bera, Subhabrata; Harrington, James A

    2016-07-11

    Single-crystal YAG (Y3Al5O12) fibers have been grown by the laser heated pedestal growth technique with losses as low as 0.3 dB/m at 1.06 μm. These YAG fibers are as long as about 60 cm with diameters around 330 μm. The early fibers were grown from unoriented YAG seed fibers and these fibers exhibited facet steps or ridges on the surface of the fiber. However, recently we have grown fibers using an oriented seed to grow step-free fibers. Scattering losses made on the fibers indicate that the scattering losses are equal to about 30% of the total loss. PMID:27410826

  13. Application of YAG laser welding to gas turbine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Shuho; Mega, Masahiko; Takahashi, Koji; Uemura, Yoshitaka; Hirota, Norihide; Yamaguchi, Kengo

    2003-03-01

    An investigation to apply YAG laser welding to gas turbine components was carried out. The materials of gas turbine such as Ni base alloy are difficult to weld by conventional arc welding methods because of large heat affection. But laser welding can reduce heat input compared with conventional methods and keeps the good repeatability. The welding parameter survey was carried out to satisfy the designing requirements. The YAG laser welding under appropriate conditions enables to prevent welding defects such as HAZ cracks and improves the weld joints quality and performance. Tensile test and low cycle fatigue test were carried out. Tensile strength and fatigue life of laser weld joints are same or higher than that of conventional manual TIG weld joints. The Automatic YAG laser welding system was also developed and put into practical use.

  14. Pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chao-yu; Dong, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The incident pump beam waist-dependent pulse energy generation in Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal passively Q-switched microchip laser has been investigated experimentally and theoretically by moving the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction. Highest pulse energy of 0.4 mJ has been generated when the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal is moved about 6 mm away from the focused pump beam waist. Laser pulses with pulse width of 1.7 ns and peak power of over 235 kW have been achieved. The theoretically calculated effective laser beam area at different positions of Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal along the pump beam direction is in good agreement with the experimental results. The highest peak power can be generated by adjusting the pump beam waist incident on the Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG composite crystal to optimize the effective laser beam area in passively Q-switched microchip laser.

  15. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  16. 21 CFR 886.4392 - Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and...:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy. (a) Identification. The Nd:YAG laser for... laser intended for disruption of the posterior capsule or the iris via optical breakdown. The...

  17. 21 CFR 886.4392 - Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and...:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy. (a) Identification. The Nd:YAG laser for... laser intended for disruption of the posterior capsule or the iris via optical breakdown. The...

  18. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  19. Generalized melting criterion for amorphization

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, R. |; Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Meshii, M.

    1992-12-01

    We present a thermodynamic model of solid-state amorphization based on a generalization of the well-known Lindemann criterion. The original Lindemann criterion proposes that melting occurs when the root-mean-square amplitude of thermal displacement exceeds a critical value. This criterion can be generalized to include solid-state amorphization by taking into account the static displacements. In an effort to verify the generalized melting criterion, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of radiation-induced amorphization in NiZr, NiZr{sub 2}, NiTi and FeTi using embedded-atom potentials. The average shear elastic constant G was calculated as a function of the total mean-square atomic displacement following random atom-exchanges and introduction of Frenkel pairs. Results provide strong support for the generalized melting criterion.

  20. Next generation Er:YAG fractional ablative laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, A.; Vizhanyo, A.; Krammer, P.; Summer, S.; Gross, S.; Bragagna, T.; Böhler, C.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Biosolutions AG presents a portable fractional ablative laser system based on a miniaturized diode pumped Er:YAG laser. The system can operate at repetition rates up to 500 Hz and has an incorporated beam deflection unit. It is smaller, lighter and cost efficient compared to systems based on lamp pumped Er:YAG lasers and incorporates a skin layer detection to guarantee precise control of the microporation process. The pulse parameters enable a variety of applications in dermatology and in general medicine, as demonstrated by first results on transdermal drug delivery of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone).

  1. Holmium:YAG laser coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On; Luxenberg, Michael; Schumacher, Audrey

    1994-07-01

    Patients who sustain complicated acute myocardial infarction in whom thrombolytic agents either fail or are contraindicated often need mechanical revascularization other than PTCA. In 24 patients with acute infarction complicated by continuous chest pain and ischemia who either received lytics or with contraindication to lytics, a holmium:YAG laser (Eclipse Surgical Technologies, Palo Alto, CA) was utilized for thrombolysis and plaque ablation. Clinical success was achieved in 23/24 patients, with 23 patients (94%) surviving the acute infarction. Holmium:YAG laser is very effective and safe in thrombolysis and revascularization in this complicated clinical setting.

  2. Perendoscopic Nd:YAG laser therapy of colorectal neoplasms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberto, Lorenzo; Ranzato, R.; Marino, S.; Erroi, F.; Angriman, I.; Donadi, M.; Paratore, S.; Scuderi, G.; D'Amico, D. F.

    1996-01-01

    The range of application of Nd:YAG laser is now wide and of particular interest in the treatment of neoplastic lesions of the large bowel, both benign and malignant, which, besides the debilitating of vegetative lesions, may also provide a good hemostasis of the bleeding ones. Yag laser treatment of malignancies is indicated in patients not suitable for surgery due to the extent of the disease or to the high anesthesiologic/surgical risk. The treatment of choice for benign neoplasms is represented by endoscopic polypectomy, being Yag laser therapy reserved to patients with very large polyps and with a high anesthesiologic risk. Yag laser therapy is also recommended in teleangiectasies with active or previous bleeding, since it allows the complete ablation of such lesions with subsequent outstanding hemostasis. Furthermore this treatment may be advantageously associated to other operative endoscopic procedures, such as diatermotherapy, dilatation and injection therapy. It is also to be outlined that Yag laser therapy is currently used to cure benign diseases and for the palliation of advanced cancer in inoperable patients. Our laser instrument is an Nd:Yag laser MBB Medilas 2 with maximum power of 100 watts at the tip, with 'non-contact' laser fibers. We use flexible optic fiberendoscopes of several sizes, according to the type of lesion to be treated. Moreover we have employed both Savary dilators of progressive caliber from 5 to 15 mm and Rigiflex pneumatic balloons. Adequate bowel preparation by means of isosmotic solution was achieved in patients with non stenotic neoplasm, or evacuative enemas and fluid diet in patients with bowel neoplastic stenoses. The patients were premedicated with benzodiazepines. Stenotic malignant lesions have been treated with endoscopic dilatation before laser treatment. At each session 4,000 - 8,000 joules of energy were administered; all patients received an average of 5 - 6 laser sessions. Followup laser sessions have then been

  3. High power, diode pumped Er:YAG for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, C.; Heinrich, A.; Nussbaumer, B.

    2011-03-01

    Pantec Medical Laser presents a diode pumped Er:YAG laser for dental and hard tissue applications. The diode pumped laser is practically maintenance free and ensures reliable operation over several thousand hours. The high repetition rate with up to 15 W average output power, allows treatments otherwise not feasible with low repetition rate, lamp pumped Er:YAG systems. The variable pulse duration of 10 to 200 μs combined with the good beam quality ensures precise and fast treatment. First results on enamel ablation as well as the power scalability of the technology to 200 mJ and 30 W average power are also shown.

  4. Nd:YAG laser treatment of tumors of the oropharynx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, Burkard M.; Folz, Benedikt J.; Werner, Jochen A.

    1998-01-01

    The laser surgical treatment of carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract has become an established treatment modality at many otolaryngology departments throughout the laser years. The oncologic results that can be achieved with this surgical technique are quite as good as the results that can be achieved by conventional surgery, the functional results on the other hand often seem to be superior to conventional surgery. The Nd:YAG laser has so far rarely been used as a cutting device in the head and neck region. The fibertom mode is a new technique, which has been developed to make the employment of the Nd:YAG laser as a laser scalpel feasible. Between December 1995 and May 1997 thirty-five patients with squamous cell carinomas of the oral cavity were treated at the Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery of the University of Kiel with the Nd:YAG laser in fibertom mode (30 - 50 Watt, cw-mode, 600 m bare fiber). The operative approach, intra- and postoperative complications, duration of the operation and of the healing process, as well as functional and oncologic results were documented and compared to the retrospectively raised data of a group of patients (n equals 25), that was treated by CO2 laser surgery. When working with the Nd:YAG laser in fibertom mode fewer hemorrhages during the actual dissection could be observed as opposed to dissection with the CO2 laser. By laser dissection with the Nd:YAG laser in fibertom mode the operation had to be interrupted to a much lesser extent for bipolar cautery, thus resulting in a reduced operation time. Until a complete reepithelialization of the laser wound was achieved an interval of 3 - 4 weeks went by. Following Nd:YAG laser excision the healing process was 7 - 10 days delayed when compared to CO2 laser surgery. The functional and oncologic results were quite satisfactory in both groups and no major difference between the two laser systems could be observed. The fibertom mode renders the use of the Nd:YAG

  5. Simple method to join YAG ceramics and crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Kaminskii, A. A.; Kopylov, Yu. L.; Kotelyanskii, I. M.; Kravchenko, V. B.

    2012-04-01

    Method to join samples of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramics and crystals together includes deposition of thin SiOx layer(s) on flat polished surfaces of the samples to be joined and heating the samples with the contacting surfaces above 1700 °C. There is no visible border between the crystal samples bonded. YAG single crystal solid state growth takes place on the bonded crystal-ceramics border, and crystal growth velocity is much higher when intermediate SiOx layer is used.

  6. Urethral strictures treatment with neodymium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Silber, N

    1992-04-01

    A total of 14 patients with stricture of the urethra underwent treatment with Nd:YAG (neodymium:YAG) laser irradiation. A new 800-micron hemispherical optical quartz fiber was used in contact technique to produce linear incisions in the scarred tissue. Within 11.2 months, median of follow up, there was improvement in the obstructive voiding symptoms in all the patients. One patient who still had mild stricture in the first follow-up cystoscopy was managed successfully with second treatment. Endoscopic application of laser energy in the contact mode facilitates the immediate vaporization and disintegration of the fibrous area and secondary reepithelization of the urethra without scarring. PMID:10171965

  7. Nonlinear optical responses of erbium-doped YAG ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wangliang; Yi, Jun; Miao, Lili; Li, Jiang; Xie, Tengfei; Zhao, Chujun; Pan, Yubai; Wen, Shuangchun

    2016-07-01

    By performing the Z-scan measurements with ultrafast femtosecond laser centered at 800 nm wavelength, we can unambiguously distinguish the real and imaginary part of the third-order optical nonlinearity of the erbium-doped YAG ceramics. The reverse saturable absorption of the erbium-doped YAG ceramics has been observed experimentally, and the nonlinear refractive index of the ceramics is estimated to be about 10-21 m2/W. The experimental results may provide design guidelines for the high power laser design and its applications.

  8. Ice formation in amorphous cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czihak, C.; Müller, M.; Schober, H.; Vogl, G.

    2000-03-01

    We investigate the formation of ice in wet amorphous cellulose in the temperature range of 190 K⩽T⩽280 K. Due to voids and pores in the cellulose film, water molecules are able to form crystalline aggregates. Beyond that, water is able to penetrate between cellulose chains where it can adsorb to hydroxyl side groups. From diffraction data we suggest an aggregation of low-density amorphous (lda) ice at cellulose surfaces. The formation of lda ice shows a clear temperature dependence which will be discussed together with recent inelastic neutron scattering results.

  9. Cr{sup 4+}:YAG as passive Q-switch and Brewster plate in a pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shimony, Y.; Burshtein, Z.; Kalisky, Y.

    1995-10-01

    The authors demonstrate the performance of a Nd:YAG laser, passively Q-switched with a Cr{sup 4+}:YAG plate, which plays the double role of a passive Q-switch ad a Brewster plate. The Brewster plate configuration contributes an intracavity loss of approximately 3.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} cm{sup {minus}1} along the cavity length. Losses contributed by the active Cr{sup 4+} ions in the plate relate to their excited state absorption. A freshly measured transmission saturation curve of Cr{sup 4+}:YAG suggests a ground state absorption cross section {sigma}{sub gs} = (8.7 {+-} 0.8) {times} 10{sup {minus}19} cm{sup 2}, and an excited state absorption cross section {sigma}{sub es} = (2.2 {+-} 0.2) {times} 10{sup {minus}19} cm{sup 2} of the Cr{sup 4+} ions at {lambda} = 1,064 nm.

  10. Histological study of frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser trabeculoplasty on monkey eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zi-kui; Wang, Kang-sun; Shi, Hai-yun

    1998-11-01

    Two eyes of a rhesus monkey subject to frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser LTP were examined by light and electron microscopy twenty-four hours and four weeks postoperatively. Light microscopy demonstrated trabecular meshwork edema, acute inflammatory changes such as the presence of polymorphonuclears and amorphous eosinphilous substance of the Schlemm's canal in the specimen 24 hours after surgery, otherwise, membrane-like extension over the surface of uveal meshwork was found in the tissue four weeks after surgery. Scanning electron microscopy of the specimens excited at earlier stage after irradiation revealed evidences of disruption, coalescence of the trabecular beams and the exudation of deformed erythrocytes among intertrabecular spaces; the specimens excited at later stage showed partial or total occlusion of intertrabecular spaces at laser burn site by a membrane like layer which probably originate from so called trabecular stem cell near the Schwalbe's line. Transmission electron microscopy of the tissue excited at 24 hours post laser showed necrosis of the trabecular cells, collagen fibrils edema, as well a macrophages and pigment cells among intertrabecular spaces; the tissues excited at 4 weeks post laser showed degenerated collagen fibrils and denuded collagen core without superficial trabecular cells.

  11. Amorphous-silicon cell reliability testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    The work on reliability testing of solar cells is discussed. Results are given on initial temperature and humidity tests of amorphous silicon devices. Calibration and measurement procedures for amorphous and crystalline cells are given. Temperature stress levels are diagrammed.

  12. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.

  13. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  14. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T; Lograsso, Thomas A; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-01-01

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the ability of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. Our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment. PMID:26563908

  15. Repetitive Q-switching of a CW Nd:YAG laser using Cr{sup 4+}:YAG saturable absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Shimony, Y.; Burshtein, Z.; Ben-Amar Baranga, A.; Kalisky, Y.; Strauss, M.

    1996-02-01

    Repetitive Q-switching of a CW pumped Nd:YAG laser using a Cr{sup 4+}:YAG saturable absorber was achieved for the first time, providing pulses 80--300 ns wide (FWHM) with repetition rates ranging between 2 and 29 kHz. Different ranges of repetition rates and pulse widths are obtained by using absorbers of different optical densities. Satisfactory quantitative description of the experimental results is obtained by a full numerical solution of the system rate equations according to the theory of Powell and Wolga. These equations involve the dynamics of the laser population inversion, the absorber state population, and the photon density in the laser cavity.

  16. Thermal analysis on grad-doped active-mirror Yb:YAG ceramic lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaojin; Wang, Jianlei; Jiang, Benxue

    2015-11-01

    Heat conduction, temperature distribution, thermal stress, and thermally induced refractive index of a diode-pumped active-mirror grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser are analyzed and compared to a uniform-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser. It is found that a rationally designed grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic has a smaller temperature gradient than a uniform-doped Yb:YAG ceramic with the same absorption pump power, which results in higher output energy in the grad-doped Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

  17. Amorphous rare earth magnet powders

    SciTech Connect

    Sellers, C.H.; Branagan, D.J.; Hyde, T.A.; Lewis, L.H.; Panchanathan, V.

    1996-08-01

    Gas atomization (GA) processing does not generally have a high enough cooling rate to produce the initial amorphous microstructure needed to obtain optimal magnetic properties in RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B alloys. Phase separation and an underquenched microstructure result from detrimental {alpha}-Fe precipitation, and the resulting magnetic domain structure is very coarse. Additionally, there is a dramatic dependence of the magnetic properties on the cooling rate (and therefore the particle size) and the powders can be sensitive to environmental degradation. Alloy compositions designed just for GA (as opposed to melt spinning) are necessary to produce an amorphous structure that can be crystallized to result in a fine structure with magnetic properties which are independent of particle size. The addition of titanium and carbon to the melt has been found to change the solidification process sufficiently to result in an ``overquenched`` state in which most of the powder size fractions have an amorphous component. Crystallization with a brief heat treatment produces a structure which has improved magnetic properties, in part due to the ability to use compositions with higher Fe contents without {alpha}-Fe precipitation. Results from magnetometry, magnetic force microscopy, and x-ray analyses will be used to contrast the microstructure, domain structure, and magnetic properties of this new generation of amorphous powders with their multiphase predecessors.

  18. Model for amorphous aggregation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranks, Samuel D.; Ecroyd, Heath; van Sluyter, Steven; Waters, Elizabeth J.; Carver, John A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2009-11-01

    The amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with many phenomena, ranging from the formation of protein wine haze to the development of cataract in the eye lens and the precipitation of recombinant proteins during their expression and purification. While much literature exists describing models for linear protein aggregation, such as amyloid fibril formation, there are few reports of models which address amorphous aggregation. Here, we propose a model to describe the amorphous aggregation of proteins which is also more widely applicable to other situations where a similar process occurs, such as in the formation of colloids and nanoclusters. As first applications of the model, we have tested it against experimental turbidimetry data of three proteins relevant to the wine industry and biochemistry, namely, thaumatin, a thaumatinlike protein, and α -lactalbumin. The model is very robust and describes amorphous experimental data to a high degree of accuracy. Details about the aggregation process, such as shape parameters of the aggregates and rate constants, can also be extracted.

  19. Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1981-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

  20. Minimally invasive scoliosis treatment with a Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, Christian G.; Lang, Robert D.; Goetz, Marcus H.

    2000-11-01

    Today most surgical treatment of spinal deformations is concentrated on invasive mechanical techniques with long operation times and major effects on the patient's mobility. The proposed minimally invasive technique using laser light for tissue ablation offers a possibility of gentle scoliosis treatment. It is thought that an early removal of the epiphysial growth zone on the convex side over several vertebrae results in a straightening of the spine. In a first evaluation, four different laser systems including argon ion, Nd:YAG (Q-switched), Nd:YAG (cw), and Ho:YAG laser were compared with respect to thermal damage to adjacent tissue, ablation rates, efficiency and laser handling. For in-vivo investigation, fresh lamb spine was used. Comparison showed that the Ho:YAG laser is the most appropriate laser for the given goal, providing efficient photoablation with moderate thermal effects on the adjacent tissue. In a second step the proposed minimally invasive operation technique was performed in in-vivo experiments on young foxhounds using 3D- thoracoscopic operation techniques. During these operations temperature mapping was done using fiber-optic fluorescent probes. After 12 months of normal growth the animals were sacrificed and x-ray as well as MRI was performed on the spine. First results show a positive effect of scoliotic growth in two cases. Being able to produce a scoliosis by hemiepiphysiodesis on the vertebra, It is thought that this technique is successful for a straightening of the spine on patients with scoliosis.

  1. Performance of Ho:YAG as a function of temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Gettemy, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    The performance of two multiply doped Ho:YAG lasers has been characterized as a function of the laser rod temperature. From the experimental results, the dependence of the slope efficiency and threshold on temperature has been extracted. Threshold can be correlated with the occupation of the lower laser level. Implications on the optimum operating temperature are discussed.

  2. Er:YAG laser dentistry in special needs patients

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Clini, Fabio; Fontana, Matteo; Cella, Luigi; Oppici, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Between a quarter and a third of adults with intellectual disability is estimated to have dental anxiety. Unpleasant stimuli, such as the injection of local anaesthesia or the noise and vibration of rotary instruments, may provoke anxiety and subsequent low compliance until the opposition to the treatment. The use of Er:YAG laser in conservative dentistry had a great development in these last years thank to new devices and also to their advantages when compared to the conventional instruments. The aim of this clinical study was to show the advantages of the Er:YAG laser in the conservative treatment of Special Care patients. Methods: Four cases are here described to show the Er:YAG laser use in our Unit on special needs patients. Results and conclusions: Based on the experience gained on conservative laser-assisted treatments performed in a time of 5 years at our Dentistry, Special Needs and Maxillo-Facial Surgery Unit we may affirm that Er:YAG laser may be considered as a good way to improve the cooperation, to reduce anxiety related to rotating instruments and to reach better results with equal or shorter operating times. PMID:26557733

  3. Effect of solubility YAG:Nd nanocrystals in glass matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Szysiak, A.; Stepien, R.; Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Solarz, P.; Mirkowska, M.; Lipinska, L.; Pajaczkowska, A.

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The mixture of borate glass powder and YAG:5%Nd{sup 3+} nanocrystals was prepared. {yields} The samples were formed into pallets and annealed at different temperatures. {yields} The luminescence properties of composites depends crucially on annealing temperature. -- Abstract: The nanocomposites of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Nd{sup 3+} (YAG:Nd) incorporated in borate glass were obtained. The single phase of YAG:Nd nanocrystals were obtained by sol-gel method. The borate glass was melted first and ground up then mixed with the nanocrystals. The samples were formed into pellets under pressure and were annealed in temperatures from the range 550-800 {sup o}C. The X-ray diffraction patterns show that together with increasing the temperature the contribution of Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} phase decreases and the new YBa{sub 3}B{sub 9}O{sub 19} phase is observed. The luminescence measurements indicates that the band structures and distribution of band intensities of glass-YAG:Nd nanocrystal composites depends crucially on annealing temperature.

  4. Saturable absorber mode-locked femtosecond Cr4+:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayduk, Michael J.; Johns, Steven T.; Krol, Mark F.

    1997-07-01

    We have demonstrated self-starting passive mode-locking of a chromium-doped:YAG (Cr4+:YAG) laser using a saturable absorber mirror (SAM) structure. Highly stable femtosecond pulses tunable from 1488 to 1535 nm were generated. Average TEM00 output powers ranged from 40 to 80 mW with a minimum pulse width of 120 fs measured at 1488 nm. The generation of ultrashort pulses in solid-state lasers using the Kerr lens modelocking (KLM) technique has been the center of much attention in recent years. Sub 100 fs pulses have been produced using many different laser systems. However, the KLM process is very sensitive to cavity alignment and is easily perturbed by mechanical vibrations and pump power fluctuations. A more reliable process makes use of a saturable absorber to start and stabilize the soliton formation process. The saturable absorber eliminates the need for critical cavity alignment. The femtosecond pulse train produced by the SAM structure in the Cr4+:YAG laser system is highly stable over very long periods of time. The wide tunability of the Cr4+:YAG laser throughout the 1.5 micrometer transmission window of optical fiber makes it an ideal spectroscopic source for the characterization and development of novel materials and devices for ultrafast optical interconnects.

  5. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er: YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Charles E.; Furu, Laurence H.

    1997-01-01

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 .mu.m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 .mu.m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 .mu.m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 .mu.m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems.

  6. Percutaneous laser disc decompression with the holmium: YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Casper, G D; Hartman, V L; Mullins, L L

    1995-06-01

    This article discusses the evolution of the percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) method using a holmium:YAG laser. Advantages of using this wavelength and several techniques for its use in PLDD are reviewed. The article also discusses the current devices and delivery systems available for this application. PMID:10150646

  7. Tunable, diode side-pumped Er:YAG laser

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, C.E.; Furu, L.H.

    1997-04-22

    A discrete-element Er:YAG laser, side pumped by a 220 Watt peak-power InGaAs diode array, generates >500 mWatts at 2.94 {micro}m, and is tunable over a 6 nm range near about 2.936 {micro}m. The oscillator is a plano-concave resonator consisting of a concave high reflector, a flat output coupler, a Er:YAG crystal and a YAG intracavity etalon, which serves as the tuning element. The cavity length is variable from 3 cm to 4 cm. The oscillator uses total internal reflection in the Er:YAG crystal to allow efficient coupling of the diode emission into the resonating modes of the oscillator. With the tuning element removed, the oscillator produces up to 1.3 Watts of average power at 2.94 {micro}m. The duty factor of the laser is 6.5% and the repetition rate is variable up to 1 kHz. This laser is useful for tuning to an atmospheric transmission window at 2.935 {micro}m (air wavelength). The laser is also useful as a spectroscopic tool because it can access several infrared water vapor transitions, as well as transitions in organic compounds. Other uses include medical applications (e.g., for tissue ablation and uses with fiber optic laser scalpels) and as part of industrial effluent monitoring systems. 4 figs.

  8. YAG lasers in restorative dentistry: a histological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koort, Hans J.; Frentzen, Matthias

    1992-06-01

    An important indicator to prove the effectiveness of laser radiation and to control the side effects are histological studies of dental hard tissues. In our study, different pulsed, rare earth doped YAG-laser systems in the range from 1 micrometers to 3 micrometers were investigated. An improved plastic embedding technique based on a penetrating uv-activated PMMA-medium was developed to cut undecalcified sections of 15 micrometers thickness. The Nd:YAG laser showed wide zones of necrosis but little carbonization. The radiation of Holmium and Thullium-doped YAG lasers causes strong but well-defined zones of carbonization comparable to those of pulsed (ms) CO2 lasers. The Erbium-doped YAG-laser was the most effective system. As predominant side effects, residual zones of debris and microcracks were observed. In deeper cavities, the zones of damages increase. The side effects of the pulsed infrared laser types seem to be mainly influenced by the physical or chemical properties of the dental tissues and not by the selected laser parameters.

  9. Contact versus non-contact ablation of the artificial enamel caries by Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostálová, Tat'jana; Jelínková, Helena; Å ulc, Jan; Němec, Michal; Bučková, Michaela; Kašparová, Magdalena; Miyagi, Mitsunobu

    The aim of study is to compare the ablation effect of contact and non-contact interaction of Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation with artificial enamel caries lesion. The artificial caries was prepared in intact teeth to simulate demineralized surface and the laser radiation was applied. Contact and non-contact ablation was compared. Two laser systems Er:YAG 2.94 μm and CTH:YAG 2.1 μm were used. The enamel artificial caries were gently removed by laser radiation and flow Sonic fill composite resin was inserted. Scanning electron microscope was use to evaluate the enamel surface.

  10. Effect of Er: YAG or Nd:YAG Laser Exposure on Fluorosed and Non-Fluorosed Root Surfaces: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Saubhik; Dhingra, Kunaal; Patil, Roopa

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims: Fluorosis affects tooth mineralization. The therapeutic benefit provided by lasers on fluorosed and non fluorosed cementum requires studying and comparing. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the root surface changes following Er:YAG or Nd:YAG laser irradiation on periodontally healthy fluorosed versus non-fluorosed teeth by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and methods: A total of 76 periodontally healthy fluorosed (FH) and non-fluorosed (NFH) teeth specimens were included in this study. In one group, the experimental root specimens were irradiated using Er:YAG or with Nd:YAG laser in the other. A SEM evaluation was performed to assess the laser induced ultra structural changes in the root surface followed by statistical analysis using Fisher's exact test. Results: It was observed that both FH and NFH groups were similarly affected by Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser. However, the former caused more surface changes than the latter on melting of surface (p=0.12 for FH and p=0.08 for NFH), and Er:YAG laser caused more smear layer formation (p=0.51 for FH and p=0.16 for NFH). Conclusion: Results suggest that undesirable morphological changes were observed almost similarly in FH and NFH groups using Er:YAG or Nd:YAG laser. Hence further in-vitro studies at lower energy settings followed by clinical trials are required in this aspect. PMID:26246689

  11. Bright YAG:Ce Nanorod Phosphors Prepared via a Partial Wet Chemical Route and Biolabeling Applications.

    PubMed

    Guo, Daidong; Ma, Baojin; Zhao, Lili; Qiu, Jichuan; Liu, Wei; Sang, Yuanhua; Claverie, Jerome; Liu, Hong

    2016-05-18

    Cerium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG:Ce) nanorods were prepared via a partial wet chemical route followed by a calcination process by using Al2O3 nanorods as both templates and the reactant. These novel well-crystallized YAG:Ce phosphors with a 200-300 nm diameter and a 2-3 μm length have a high specific surface area while being virtually devoid of surface defects. The YAG:Ce nanorod phosphors possess good luminescent properties compared with granular YAG:Ce phosphors. Photoluminescence quantum yields of YAG:Ce nanorod phosphors are higher than those of granular ones. The YAG:Ce nanorod phosphors exhibit two luminescent decay times due to their unique morphology. The YAG:Ce nanorods exhibited good cytocompatibility with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and can be used as biolabel nanoparticles in bioimaging. PMID:27117763

  12. Fe-Based Amorphous Coatings on AISI 4130 Structural Steel for Corrosion Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana; Santhanakrishnan, S.; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2012-06-01

    The current study focuses on synthesizing a novel functional coating for corrosion resistance applications, via laser surface alloying. The iron-based (Fe48Cr15Mo14Y2C15B) amorphous precursor powder is used for laser surface alloying on AISI 4130 steel substrate, with a continuous wave ytterbium Nd-YAG fiber laser. The corrosion resistance of the coatings is evaluated for different processing conditions. The microstructural evolution and the response of the microstructure to the corrosive environment is studied using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural studies indicate the presence of face-centered cubic Fe-based dendrites intermixed within an amorphous matrix along with fine crystalline precipitates. The corrosion resistance of the coatings decrease with an increase in laser energy density, which is attributed to the precipitation and growth of chromium carbide. The enhanced corrosion resistance of the coatings processed with low energy density is attributed to the self-healing mechanism of this amorphous system.

  13. Influence of samarium filter on the performance of Nd:YAG, Cr:Nd:GSGG, and Er:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greve, Peter; Metz, Bodo

    1989-10-01

    Since solid state laser, especially Nd:YAG laser, find more and more applications in the medical and industrial field, methods to improve the efficiencies of these systems are under discussion again. Among these, cavities and flow-tubes made of so called "fluorescence-converting" materials face some special attraction. They can be used without a major redesign or reconstruction of the laser head, just replacing the corresponding parts. In our work the performance of Samarium doped glass is evaluated, which has absorption bands in the UV spectral region and fluorescence bands in the visible region, close by or at the absorption bands of Nd:YAG laser crystals. In this way unused or even harmfull UV radiation could be transferred and should intensify the pumping. By measuring the relevant spectra of flashlamps and arclamps with and without the Samarium doped filter glass in a laser cavity we try to clarify this process. We examine the thermal lensing of the different laser rods (Nd:YAG, Cr:Nd:GSGG and Er:YAG) under both conditions and determine the output power or energy for different pump powers or energies respectively.

  14. Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser in treatment of patients with contraindications of conventional dental and maxillofacial surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smucler, Roman; Mazanek, Jiri

    2000-03-01

    In clinical praxis we must treat patients with some relative or absolute contraindications every day. Need of hospitalization, antibiotics, hemostyptics and complex examinations makes dentoalveolar and maxillofacial surgery in those cases quite expensive. Combination of Nd:YAG and Er:YAG laser gives us new possibilities. We can help some untreatable patients or transfer care from hospital to dental office. We have been trying to solve contraindications for laser therapy five years. In the center of our work are disorders of blood coagulation, immunity and metabolism. Nd:YAG laser is very useful in coagulation and vaporization of dental gum hypertrophies, benign and malign tumors in case of chronic anticoagulation therapy and immunosupress / in combination for example- after heart transplantation /. Special chapter is the care of patients with disseminated tumors. Er:YAG laser large solve big lesions because of minimal invasivity of course but for small benign tumors are recidives is ideal. Better and quicker healing make new standard of patients' cooperation. Generally fashionable and more comfortable laser treatment minimize need of general anesthesia. After five years we use complex laser therapy in our routine. Aim of our new work is to find ideal combination of cutting lasers to minimize classical complications of laser surgery / carbonization, long and secondary healing /.

  15. Energy transfer and upconversion in Yb:YAG and Yb:Er:YAG

    SciTech Connect

    Lacovara, P.

    1992-01-01

    Energy transfer and upconversion have been studied in ytterbium, and ytterbium-erbium doped YAG (yttrium-aluminum garnet Y[sub 2]Al[sub 5]O[sub 12]). The energy-transfer probabilities were calculated for Yb-Yb, Yb-Er, and Er-Yb interactions, as well as for Er-Er and Yb-Er upconversion. The transfer of excitation from ytterbium to erbium was found experimentally to be efficient at Er concentrations above about 1%, with an Yb concentration of 6.5%. The Burshtein hopping model for donor migration-assisted transfer was applied to the Yb-Er system for different Er concentrations. Fitting the decay predicted by the Burshtein model to the Yb fluorescence gave a value for the Yb-Er dipole-dipole interaction strength which was in very close agreement with the calculated value, but discrepancies were noted for the donor-donor interaction. Upconversion was observed during pulsed measurements, and studies in detail with intense CW pumping. The Yb-Er upconversion was observed to dominate the Er-Er upconversion in the Yb-Er samples. Values for the Yb-Er and Er-Er ([sup 4]I[sub 1 1/2]) upconversion coefficients were determined from quantitative measurements of the [sup 4]S[sub 3/2] fluorescence which these processes generate, and measurements of the change in [sup 4]I[sub 1 1/2] population with increasing pump density. The quenching of nominally pure Yb:YAG by trace rare-earth impurities was also studied. The time dependence of the Yb fluorescence decay in some high-concentration samples suggested a fast quenching process active at high excited-ion densities, and a slower one at lower excited-ion densities. Study of the cooperative luminescence emitted by excited Yb pairs suggested a quenching mechanism acting preferentially on pairs. Sensitive Ar[sup +]-ion laser-pumped fluorescence measurements showed the presence of high ppm levels of several impurities, including Er, Tm and Cr. Pumping the ytterbium at 940 nm using pulsed and CW lasers revealed Er and Tm upconversion.

  16. Tissue damage by laser radiation: an in vitro comparison between Tm:YAG and Ho:YAG laser on a porcine kidney model.

    PubMed

    Huusmann, Stephan; Wolters, Mathias; Kramer, Mario W; Bach, Thorsten; Teichmann, Heinrich-Otto; Eing, Andreas; Bardosi, Sebastian; Herrmann, Thomas R W

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of tissue damage by laser radiation is very important for the safety in the application of surgical lasers. The objective of this study is to evaluate cutting, vaporization and coagulation properties of the 2 µm Tm:YAG laser (LISA Laser Products OHG, GER) in comparison to the 2.1 µm Ho:YAG laser (Coherent Medical Group, USA) at different laser power settings in an in vitro model of freshly harvested porcine kidneys. Laser radiation of both laser generators was delivered by using a laser fiber with an optical core diameter of 550 µm (RigiFib, LISA Laser GER). Freshly harvested porcine kidneys were used as tissue model. Experiments were either performed in ambient air or in aqueous saline. The Tm:YAG laser was adjusted to 5 W for low and 120 W for the high power setting. The Ho:YAG laser was adjusted to 0.5 J and 10 Hz (5 W average power) for low power setting and to 2.0 J and 40 Hz (80 W average power) for high power setting, accordingly. The specimens of the cutting experiments were fixed in 4 % formalin, embedded in paraffin and stained with Toluidin blue. The laser damage zone was measured under microscope as the main evaluation criteria. Laser damage zone consists of an outer coagulation zone plus a further necrotic zone. In the ambient air experiments the laser damage zone for the low power setting was 745 ± 119 µm for the Tm:YAG and 614 ± 187 µm for the Ho:YAG laser. On the high power setting, the damage zone was 760 ± 167 µm for Tm:YAG and 715 ± 142 µm for Ho:YAG. The incision depth in ambient air on the low power setting was 346 ± 199 µm for Tm:YAG, 118 ± 119 µm for Ho:YAG. On the high power setting incision depth was 5083 ± 144 µm (Tm:YAG) and 1126 ± 383 µm (Ho:YAG) respectively. In the saline solution experiments, the laser damage zone was 550 ± 137 µm (Tm:YAG) versus 447 ± 65 µm (Ho:YAG), on the low power setting and 653 ± 137 µm (Tm:YAG) versus 677 ± 134 µm (Ho:YAG

  17. Generation of 1.6 ns Q-switched pulses based on Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG microchip laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šulc, Jan; Jelínková, Helena; Nejezchleb, Karel; Škoda, Václav

    2015-05-01

    The highly-stable Q-switched longitudinally diode-pumped microchip laser, emitting radiation at wavelength 1031 nm, was designed and realized. This laser was based on monolith crystal which combines in one piece an active laser part (YAG crystal doped with Yb3+ ions, 10 at.% Yb/Y, 3mm long) and saturable absorber (YAG crystal doped with Cr3+ ions, 1.36mm long). The diameter of the diffusion bonded monolith was 3 mm. The initial transmission of the Cr:YAG part was 90% @ 1031 nm. The microchip resonator consisted of dielectric mirrors directly deposited on the monolith surfaces. The pump mirror (HT for pump radiation, HR for generated radiation) was placed on the Yb:YAG part. The output coupler with reflection 55% for the generated wavelength was placed on the Cr3+-doped part. Q-switched microchip laser was tested under CW diode pumping. For longitudinal pumping of Yb:YAG part, a fibre coupled (core diameter 100 μm, NA= 0.22) laser diode, operating at wavelength 968 nm, was used. The laser threshold was 3.3W. The laser slope efficiency calculated for output mean power in respect to incident CW pumping was 17%. The wavelength of linearly polarized laser emission was fixed to 1031 nm. The generated transversal intensity beam profile was close to the fundamental Gaussian mode. The generated pulse length was equal to 1.6 ns (FWHM). This value was mostly stable and independent on investigated pumping powers in the range from the threshold up to 9.3W. The single pulse energy was linearly increasing with the pumping power. Close to the laser threshold the generated pulse energy was 45 μJ. For maximum investigated CW pumping 9.3W the pulse energy was stabilized to 74 μJ which corresponds to the Q-switched pulse peak power 46 kW. The corresponding Q-switched pulses repetition rate was 13.6 kHz. The maximum Yb:YAG/Cr:YAG microchip laser mean output power of 1W was reached without observable thermal roll-over.

  18. Effects of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser irradiation on the permeability of instrumented root canal walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Barbin, Eduardo L.; Emboava Spano, Julio C.; Santana da Silva, Reginaldo; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG laser on radicular dentine permeability when using distilled and deionized water and 1% sodium hypochlorite as irrigating solutions. Thirty human maxillary canines obtained from laboratory stock and conserved in 0.1% thymol until use were divided randomly into six groups of five teeth each. The root canals were instrumented with K files and the step-back technique. The surgical diameter was achieved 4 files above the original anatomical diameter. Group I, the teeth were irrigated with distilled and deionized water; Group II, the teeth were irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite, Group II the teeth were irrigated with distilled and deionized water and then Er:YAG laser was applied with 140mJ, 15Hz, 300 pulses and 42J; group 4 the teeth were irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite and Er:YAG laser was applied in the same parameters as Group III, Group V, the teeth received irrigation with distilled and deionized water and Nd:YAG laser application with 150mJ, 15Hz, 2,25W and Group VI the teeth were irrigated with 1% sodium hypochlorite and Nd:YAG laser was applied with the same parameters as Group V. During laser application the teeth were always filled with irrigating solution. The fiber optic tip was introduced until the apex and the laser was activated. The tip was withdrawn gently with helicoidally movement from the apex until the pulp chamber. After preparation the teeth were immersed in 10% copper sulfate for 30 minutes, in vacuum for the first 5 minutes. The teeth were then placed in a 1% rubianic acid alcohol solution for the same periodsin solution and in vacuum as above. Upon completion of this reaction the teeth were sectioned transversally, in 150micrometers slices, and sanded, washed, dehydrated, cleared and mounted on glass slides for microscopic examination. The quantification of the penetration of copper ions was done by morphmetric analysis with a 400-point grid. The data was submitted

  19. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Thomas D; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-05-20

    Crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are porous frameworks comprising an infinite array of metal nodes connected by organic linkers. The number of novel MOF structures reported per year is now in excess of 6000, despite significant increases in the complexity of both component units and molecular networks. Their regularly repeating structures give rise to chemically variable porous architectures, which have been studied extensively due to their sorption and separation potential. More recently, catalytic applications have been proposed that make use of their chemical tunability, while reports of negative linear compressibility and negative thermal expansion have further expanded interest in the field. Amorphous metal-organic frameworks (aMOFs) retain the basic building blocks and connectivity of their crystalline counterparts, though they lack any long-range periodic order. Aperiodic arrangements of atoms result in their X-ray diffraction patterns being dominated by broad "humps" caused by diffuse scattering and thus they are largely indistinguishable from one another. Amorphous MOFs offer many exciting opportunities for practical application, either as novel functional materials themselves or facilitating other processes, though the domain is largely unexplored (total aMOF reported structures amounting to under 30). Specifically, the use of crystalline MOFs to detect harmful guest species before subsequent stress-induced collapse and guest immobilization is of considerable interest, while functional luminescent and optically active glass-like materials may also be prepared in this manner. The ion transporting capacity of crystalline MOFs might be improved during partial structural collapse, while there are possibilities of preparing superstrong glasses and hybrid liquids during thermal amorphization. The tuning of release times of MOF drug delivery vehicles by partial structural collapse may be possible, and aMOFs are often more mechanically robust than

  20. The effects of CO2, Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers with and without surface coolant on tooth root surfaces. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Israel, M; Cobb, C M; Rossmann, J A; Spencer, P

    1997-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare and contrast the morphologic changes in tooth root surfaces treated in vitro by scaling and root planing followed by irradiation with the Er:YAG laser using air/water surface cooling and the CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, both with and without surface coolant. The experimental unit consisted of 42 freshly extracted teeth which were divided equally and randomly assigned to the following 7 treatment groups: untreated control, S/RP only, CO2 laser with and without air/water surface cooling, Nd:YAG laser with and without/air water surface cooling, and Er:YAG laser with air/water surface coolant. Specimens treated with CO2 laser irradiation were subjected to energy densities ranging from 100 to 400 J/cm2; those treated with the Nd:YAG from 286 to 1857 J/cm2; and the Er:YAG was used within a range of 20 to 120 J/cm2. The degree of morphologic change following CO2 and Nd:YAG irradiation appeared directly related to energy density but unrelated to the use of surface coolant. Laser induced surface changes included cavitation, globules of melted and resolidified mineral, surface crazing, and production of a superficial char layer. In contrast, the Er:YAG laser produced root surface changes that might be expected from acid etching, i.e., removal of the smear layer and exposure of the collagen matrix. In addition, sharply defined microfractures of the mineralized structure were noted and unlike the CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, there was no evidence of melting or surface char. Given the parameters of this study, it appears that both the CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers alter the root surface in an undesirable manner. The Er:YAG laser, however, when used at low energy densities shows sufficient potential for root surface modification to warrant further investigation. PMID:9378829

  1. Exoelectron analysis of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekhtyar, Yu. D.; Vinyarskaya, Yu. A.

    1994-04-01

    The method based on registration of photothermostimulated exoelectron emission (PTSE) is used in the proposed new field of investigating the structural defects in amorphous silicon (a-Si). This method can be achieved if the sample under investigation is simultaneously heated and illuminated by ultraviolet light. The mechanism of PTSE from a-Si has been studied in the case of a hydrogenized amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) film grown by glow discharge method. The electronic properties and annealing of defects were analyzed in the study. It has been shown from the results that the PTSE from a-Si:H takes place as a prethreshold single-photon external photoeffect. The exoemission spectroscopy of a-Si:H was shown to be capable in the study of thermally and optically stimulated changes in the electronic structure of defects, their annealing, as well as diffusion of atomic particles, such as hydrogen.

  2. Uranium incorporation into amorphous silica.

    PubMed

    Massey, Michael S; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S; Nelson, Joey M; Fendorf, Scott; Maher, Kate

    2014-01-01

    High concentrations of uranium are commonly observed in naturally occurring amorphous silica (including opal) deposits, suggesting that incorporation of U into amorphous silica may represent a natural attenuation mechanism and promising strategy for U remediation. However, the stability of uranium in opaline silicates, determined in part by the binding mechanism for U, is an important factor in its long-term fate. U may bind directly to the opaline silicate matrix, or to materials such as iron (hydr)oxides that are subsequently occluded within the opal. Here, we examine the coordination environment of U within opaline silica to elucidate incorporation mechanisms. Precipitates (with and without ferrihydrite inclusions) were synthesized from U-bearing sodium metasilicate solutions, buffered at pH ∼ 5.6. Natural and synthetic solids were analyzed with X-ray absorption spectroscopy and a suite of other techniques. In synthetic amorphous silica, U was coordinated by silicate in a double corner-sharing coordination geometry (Si at ∼ 3.8-3.9 Å) and a small amount of uranyl and silicate in a bidentate, mononuclear (edge-sharing) coordination (Si at ∼ 3.1-3.2 Å, U at ∼ 3.8-3.9 Å). In iron-bearing synthetic solids, U was adsorbed to iron (hydr)oxide, but the coordination environment also contained silicate in both edge-sharing and corner-sharing coordination. Uranium local coordination in synthetic solids is similar to that of natural U-bearing opals that retain U for millions of years. The stability and extent of U incorporation into opaline and amorphous silica represents a long-term repository for U that may provide an alternative strategy for remediation of U contamination. PMID:24984107

  3. Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki

    2002-07-01

    It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater

  4. [Critical evaluation of indications for the holmium:YAG laser and the neodymium:YAG laser in orthopedic surgery based on an in vitro study].

    PubMed

    Anders, J O; Pietsch, S; Staupendahl, G

    1999-04-01

    This is an in vitro study of the biophysical effects of holmium:YAG and neodymium-YAG lasers that was prompted by the poor clinical results obtained with lumbar percutaneous laser discus decompression (PLDD). In the absence of adequate cooling, ablation of tissue with the holmium:YAG laser causes thermal damage to the surrounding tissues. Utilizing the immediate colour-independent laser coupling effect, the holmium:YAG laser removes soft and hard tissue immediately. The low tissue penetrating power (max. 0.32 mm), together with the use of irrigation, avoids thermal problems, and this laser type with its high pulse energy and frequency is to be recommended for arthroscopic surgery. In contrast, the effects of the neodymium:YAG laser are highly dependent on tissue colour. Using this laser on light-coloured tissue only diffuse warming but no ablation of soft tissue was often seen. The depth of tissue penetration seen in our study was 0.58 mm, but is greatly dependent on the duration of application, and is much larger with long application times. In conclusion, we believe that the neodymium:YAG laser is more suitable for percutaneous intradiscal procedures than the holmium:YAG laser. For arthroscopic surgery, the holmium:YAG laser will be the better choice. The effect of each type of laser depends not only on its physical properties, but also on tissue properties (light or dark-coloured, thermal conductivity) and duration of application. PMID:10379068

  5. Visual Observations of the Amorphous-Amorphous Transition in H2O Under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Mishima, O; Takemura, K; Aoki, K

    1991-10-18

    The vapor-deposited low-density amorphous phase of H(2)O was directly compressed at 77 kelvin with a diamond-anvil cell, and the boundary between the low-density amorphous phase and the high-density amorphous phase was observed while the sample was warmed under compression. The transition from the low-density amorphous phase to the high-density amorphous phase was distinct and reversible in an apparently narrow pressure range at approximately 130 to approximately 150 kelvin, which provided experimental evidence for polymorphism in amorphous H(2)O. PMID:17742228

  6. Endobronchial occlusive disease: Nd:YAG or PDT?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regal, Anne-Marie; Takita, Hiroshi

    1991-06-01

    Patients with endobronchial occlusion commonly experience dyspnea, cough, hemoptysis, pneumonitis, and atelectasis. If luminal patency is not re-established, obstructive symptoms may progress to sepsis and death. Although the overall survival of patients with lung cancer may not be altered by relief of airway obstruction, the prognosis for this subset of patients may be improved by eliminating the septic complications of bronchial occlusion. Techniques to treat occluded bronchi include electro-fulguration, cryotherapy, brachytherapy, laser (CO2, Nd-YAG) therapy, and photodynamic therapy (PDT). These represent local forms of treatment and are intended to be palliative. Nd-YAG and PDT are the modalities more frequently utilized in this setting. Comparison of the two treatment forms may furnish insight regarding the appropriate role for each as individual therapies and as part of the armamentarium of cancer therapies.

  7. Er:YAG and adhesion in conservative dentistry : clinical overview

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The notion of utilizing laser technology in conservative dentistry was proposed in 1990 by Hibst and Keller, who introduced the possibility of using an Er:YAG laser as alternative to conventional instruments such as the turbine and micro-motor. In subsequent years a continuing effort has been made by clinicians, researchers and commercial companies to improve the technology. The aim of this clinical study is to demonstrate, by the description of different clinical cases, the possibilities and the advantages of using Er:YAG lasers in conservative dentistry and to show that better results may be achieved in terms of stronger adhesion, less invasiveness, reduced pain as well as greater comfort and satisfaction of patients. PMID:24155547

  8. High-power dual-rod Yb:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Honea, E C; Beach, R J; Mitchell, S C; Skidmore, J A; Emanuel, M A; Sutton, S B; Payne, S A; Avizonis, P V; Monroe, R S; Harris, D G

    2000-06-01

    We describe a diode-pumped Yb:YAG laser that produces 1080 W of power cw with 27.5% optical optical efficiency and 532 W Q-switched with M(2)=2.2 and 17% optical-optical efficiency. The laser uses two composite Yb:YAG rods separated by a 90 degrees quartz rotator for bifocusing compensation. A microlensed diode array end pumps each rod, using a hollow lens duct for pump delivery. By changing resonator parameters we can adjust the fundamental mode size and the output beam quality. Using a flattened Gaussian intensity profile to calculate the mode-fill efficiency and clipping losses, we compare experimental data with modeled output power versus beam quality. PMID:18064190

  9. Photoluminescence and laser behavior of Yb:YAG ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Fei; Huang, Jiquan; Guo, Wang; Wang, Wenchao; Fei, Binjie; Cao, Yongge

    2012-03-01

    Yb:YAG transparent ceramics with different doping concentration were fabricated by the traditional solid-state diffusion route, and their fluorescence properties and laser behavior were investigated. It is found that both the fluorescence intensity and lifetime depend deeply on both the doping concentration of Yb ions and the annealing treatment. The continuous wavelength (C.W.) laser performance for 10 at.% Yb:YAG ceramic suggests that both the threshold pump power and slope efficiency increase with increasing transmittance of the output couple (Toc). For Toc = 15%, the threshold pump power is about 6.1 W, the slope efficiency is 25%, and the maximum output power of 2.2 W is achieved when pumped by 14.9 W.

  10. High efficiency Yb:YAG crystalline fiber-waveguide lasers.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaodong; Meissner, Stephanie; Meissner, Helmuth; Yu, Anthony W

    2014-11-01

    A laser diode (LD) cladding pumped single-mode 1030 nm laser has been demonstrated, in an adhesive-free bonded 40 μm core Yb:YAG crystalline fiber waveguide (CFW). A laser output power of 13.2 W at a wavelength of 1.03 μm has been achieved, for an input pump power of 39.5 W. The corresponded laser efficiency is 33.4%. The laser beam quality is confirmed to be near diffraction-limited, with a measured M2 = 1.02. A LD core pumped single-clad Yb:YAG CFW laser has also been demonstrated with a top-hat laser beam profile, with a laser output power of 28 W and a slope efficiency of 78%. PMID:25361347

  11. Nd:YAG development for spaceborne laser ranging system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, L. L.; Logan, K. E.; Williams, R. H.; Stevens, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of the development of a unique modelocked laser device to be utilized in future NASA space-based, ultraprecision laser ranger systems are summarized. The engineering breadboard constructed proved the feasibility of the pump-pulsed, actively modelocked, PTM Q-switched Nd:YAG laser concept for the generation of subnanosecond pulses suitable for ultra-precision ranging. The laser breadboard also included a double-pass Nd:YAG amplifier and provision for a Type II KD*P frequency doubler. The specific technical accomplishment was the generation of single 150 psec, 20-mJ pulses at 10 pps at a wavelength of 1.064 micrometers with 25 dB suppression of pre-and post-pulses.

  12. Tunable eye-safe Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Němec, M.; Šulc, J.; Indra, L.; Fibrich, M.; Jelínková, H.

    2015-01-01

    Er:YAG crystal was investigated as the gain medium in a diode (1452 nm) pumped tunable laser. The tunability was reached in an eye-safe region by an intracavity birefringent filter. The four tuning bands were obtained peaking at wavelengths 1616, 1632, 1645, and 1656 nm. The broadest continuous tunability was 6 nm wide peaking at 1616 nm. The laser was operating in a pulsed regime (10 ms pulse length, 10 Hz repetition rate). The maximum mean output power was 26.5 mW at 1645 nm. The constructed system demonstrated the tunability of a resonantly diode-pumped Er:YAG laser which could be useful in the development of compact diode-pumped lasers for spectroscopic applications.

  13. Nd:YAG laser side pumped by diode laser arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hua; Huang, Weiling; Zhou, Zhouyou; Wang, Hailin; Cao, Hongbing; Wang, Ying

    1999-09-01

    The major limitation of flashlamp-pumped solid-state lasers is the low overall efficiency. Replacing flashlamps with high power laser diodes allows an increase of system efficiency by over an order of magnitude. Because of the thermally induced stress fracture of the laser materials, power-scaling possibilities of end-pumped configurations are limited. Therefore side pump geometry has to be used for high power laser. The theory and the design of high power diode side-pumped Nd:YAG laser system is described. The Nd:YAG rod is side-pumped by diode laser arrays with wavelength at 808 nm. We analyze the result of our experiments and make some conclusions about the design of side-pumped laser.

  14. High power Nd:YAG spinning disk laser.

    PubMed

    Ongstad, Andrew P; Guy, Matthew; Chavez, Joeseph R

    2016-01-11

    We report on a high power Nd:YAG spinning disk laser. The eight cm diameter disk generated 200 W CW output with 323 W of absorbed pump in a near diffraction-limited beam. The power conversion efficiency was 64%. The pulsed result, 5 ms pulses at 10 Hz PRF, was nearly identical to the CW result indicating good thermal management. Rotated at 1200-1800 RPM with He impingement cooling the disk temperature increased by only 17 °C reaching a maximum temperature of ~31 °C. The thermal dissipation per unit of output power was 0.61 watt of heat generated per watt of laser output, which is below the typical range of 0.8-1.1 for 808 nm diode pumped Nd:YAG lasers. PMID:26832242

  15. Picosecond and nanosecond laser annealing and simulation of amorphous silicon thin films for solar cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodorakos, I.; Zergioti, I.; Vamvakas, V.; Tsoukalas, D.; Raptis, Y. S.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a picosecond diode pumped solid state laser and a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser have been used for the annealing and the partial nano-crystallization of an amorphous silicon layer. These experiments were conducted as an alternative/complementary to plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method for fabrication of micromorph tandem solar cell. The laser experimental work was combined with simulations of the annealing process, in terms of temperature distribution evolution, in order to predetermine the optimum annealing conditions. The annealed material was studied, as a function of several annealing parameters (wavelength, pulse duration, fluence), as far as it concerns its structural properties, by X-ray diffraction, SEM, and micro-Raman techniques.

  16. Yb:YAG single crystal fiber image amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Peng; Liu, Jian; Yang, Lih-Mei; Bai, Shuang

    2014-02-01

    In the paper, a Yb:YAG single crystal fiber is used for the first time to amplify week image signal. It was longitudinally pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode with a maximum power of 150W at 940 nm. The image amplifier provided low noise and high gain amplification. A spatially uniform amplification gain of up to 10.2 dB at wavelength of 1030 nm was obtained.

  17. 250 W single-crystal fiber Yb:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Délen, Xavier; Piehler, Stefan; Didierjean, Julien; Aubry, Nicolas; Voss, Andreas; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Graf, Thomas; Balembois, Francois; Georges, Patrick

    2012-07-15

    We demonstrate an Yb:YAG single-crystal fiber laser with 251 W output power in continuous-wave and an optical efficiency of 44%. This performance can be explained by the high overlap between pump and signal beams brought by the pump guiding and by the good thermal management provided by the single-crystal fiber geometry. The oscillator performance with a reflectivity of the output coupler as low as 20% also shows high potential for power amplification. PMID:22825171

  18. Nd:YAG Laser Damage of Graphene-Nickel Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuppella, Paola; Gerlin, Francesca; Corso, Alain Jody; Nardello, Marco; Tessarolo, Enrico; Bacco, Davide; Scarpa, Daniele; Andrighetto, Alberto; Pelizzo, Maria G.

    2016-06-01

    In this work we investigate the damage induced on a graphene-nickel interface after the exposure to Nd:YAG infrared laser radiation. The damage threshold has been experimentally determined. We observe that once the fluence exceeds the threshold value, both the morphology and the physical-chemical properties of the samples change. This has been verified by scanning probe microscopes measurements and near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy analysis.

  19. Holmium YAG laser treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hossain, M Z; Khan, S A; Salam, M A; Hossain, S; Islam, R

    2005-01-01

    Holmium YAG laser is one of the new modalities of treatment of urinary bladder tumor. Thirty patients of superficial bladder carcinoma were selected from the Urology out patient department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital from January 2004 to July 2004. Among thirty cases, 18 were recurrent and 12 were primary superficial bladder carcinoma. Out of thirty patients, 24 were male and six were female. Patients were treated with Holmium YAG laser under spinal anesthesia. Before resection, cold cup biopsy were taken from the apex and after resection of the tumor, another cold cup biopsy were taken from the base of the tumor. Holmium YAG laser therapy was given with a 550 micron end firing quartz laser fiber through the working element of resectoscope. Small tumors (< 1 cm) were ablated and large tumors (1-4 cm) were resected. The initial laser setting was 0.5 to 0.8 J and 10 Hz. For resection of the tumor, a slightly higher energy of 1 to 1.2 J was used at 10 to 12 Hz. After resection, bleeding vessels were coagulated. The resected tumor was evacuated by Elik's evacuator. All cases were followed for 6 to 12 months by history, physical examination, urine analysis, sonogram and cystoscopy three monthly. Bleeding was minimum during the procedure and no transfusion was required. Complications like obturator jerk, clot retention or perforation were not developed. No recurrence was found during the 6 to 12 months follow up period. The procedure was found safe, effective, and acceptable. The study was conducted to evaluate the initial result of Holmium YAG laser for the treatment of superficial bladder carcinoma. We warrants further studies in this regard. PMID:15695945

  20. Bactericidal effect of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in endodontics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aun, Carlos E.; Barberini, Alexandre F.; Camargo, Selma C. C.; Silva Kfouri, Luciana; Lorenzetti Simionato, Maria R.

    1999-05-01

    The success of endodontic therapy is based on the elimination of bacterial colonization from the endodontic system and periapical tissues. Recent studies have been showing the bactericidal effect of laser in root canal treatment. The propose of the study is to evaluate the effect of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in contaminated root canal treatment. The propose of the study is to evaluate the effect of Nd:YAG laser irradiation in contaminated root canals from upper central incisor. For the experiment 12 teeth were selected, respect at the apical third, sterilized, and 10 μm Streptococcus sanguis liquid culture were inoculated in the root canals. The laser test groups were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser at standard setting of 15Hz, 100mj and 1,5 W for 10, 20 and 30 seconds each in slow helicoidal movements from the apex to the top using a 300 micrometers fiber. After the procedure the specimens were placed in Tryptic Soy Agar, the number of colony forming units was evaluated. The experiment showed a significant reduction on viability of Streptococcus sanguis at the respective time of 20 and 30 seconds.

  1. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  2. High Average Power Nd:YAG Slab Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Takeshi; Sindo, Yoshihiko; Haga, Keiji

    1989-07-01

    A slab geometry Nd:YAG laser with a zigzag optical path is described. The dimensions of the Nd:YAG slab are 5.6 x 18.4 x 153.9 mm, and Nei' ion concentration is 1.1 at.%. Two krypton flashlamps, one located on each side of the YAG slab, are used for pumping. The conditions for normal pulsed operation were as follows: the repetition rate was from 5 to 27 pps, and the pulse durations were 4 and 9.9 ms. With the above conditions, a maximum average output power of 500 W was obtained with an efficiency of 2 %, the slope efficiency being 2.4 %. The beam divergence was estimated to be 10x25 mrad. The stability of the laser output power was about +/-1.5 %. Another oscillator that includes intra-cavity cylindrical lenses, was also designed. Using this resonator configuration reduced the beam divergence to about 7.6 x8.2 mrad. The preliminary laser processing experiment was attemped using this laser oscillator.

  3. Ce, Gd codoped YAG nanopowder for white light emitting device.

    PubMed

    Schiopu, Vasilica; Matei, Alina; Dinescu, Adrian; Danila, Mihai; Cernica, Ileana

    2012-11-01

    In the last years white light emitting devices have received increased attention and have been used in a wide range of applications due to their long lifetime, high luminescence efficiency, low power consumption and environment friendliness, compared to conventional light sources. The discovery and improvement of inorganic phosphors that can be excited by a GaN chip in the wavelength range 370-470 nm is essential for the efficiency and quality of the emitted light. In the white light emitting device technology, the phosphor preparation step is the most important and it's quality defines the "whiteness". The tunable yellow emission property of YAG:Ce phosphor may be improved by the incorporation of an additional codoping element. Ce, Gd codoped YAG phosphor nanopowder with an average grain size of 40 nm has been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Well-crystallized fine nanoparticles and the formation of the garnet phase have been obtained at 1000 degrees C. The chemical structure and morphology of YAG:Ce, Gd was studied. PMID:23421297

  4. Multifrequency Nd:YAG laser application for tumor fluorescence diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yova, Dido M.; Halkiotis, Konstantinos N.; Manolopoulos, Athanassios; Ouzounoglou, Nikolaos K.; Hovhannisyan, Vladimir A.; Avanessian, Lia A.

    1999-12-01

    A computerized fiber-optic spectrofluorometer based on a multifrequency Nd:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 355, 440, 532 and 660 nm, f equals 25 Hz, E equals 1 - 10 mJ, (tau) equals 12 ns) for tissue fluorescence registration in vivo and ex vivo has been developed. The less intensive fluorescence from a tumor of Sarcoma-45 bearing animal model in comparison with the surrounding normal tissue was observed at the spectral region around 450 nm. The influence of reabsorption, energy transfer and other physical factors on tumor fluorescence, sensitized by Photohem (hematoporphyrin derivative), disodium salt of fluorescein (FL) and chlorin e6 (Chl) was investigated. The pharmacokinetic behavior of Chl in different organs and tumors of the animal models has been estimated. The most intensive Chl fluorescence of tumor tissue was observed at 18 hours after photosensitizer injection. The maximum of the tumor-to-healthy tissue ratio of fluorescence was reached 10 at 27 hours after pigment injection. The fluorescence spectra from different types of human tumors after i/v injection with FL or topical application of ALA were studied. A simple model of Nd:YAG laser system for tumor fluorescence diagnosis has been elaborated. Advantages of the laser fluorescence diagnosis of malignant tumors by solid state multifrequency Nd:YAG laser and the increase in accuracy and specificity of this method is discussed.

  5. Microwave sintering of Yb:YAG transparent laser ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Laura; Piancastelli, Andreana; Bykov, Yury; Egorov, Sergei; Eremeev, Anatolii

    2013-02-01

    Reactive sintering of YAG based ceramics is generally performed under high vacuum in graphite-free furnaces in order to guarantee the elimination of pores and absence of any contamination. An alternative densification technique is the field assisted process such as spark plasma sintering and microwave sintering. Both of these methods are characterized by very fast heating rates, low sintering temperatures and short sintering times. The microwave sintering process is different from electric resistance heating since heat is generated in the bulk of the powder compact through electromagnetic radiation absorption and creates within its body uniform temperature distribution. Microwave sintering of laser ceramics is advantageously distinguished by the absence of any elements having high temperature such as electric heaters or dies which materials can contaminate the sintered parts. In addition, the inverse temperature distribution that exists within the body under volumetric microwave heating is favorable for elimination of porosity. Microwave sintering of Yb:YAG samples were tested and the obtained results are presented. The samples were sintered on a gyrotron-based system operating at a frequency of 24 GHz with microwave power up to 6 kW. Reactive sintering of YAG doped with 1.0, 5.0, and 9.8 at.% Yb2O3 was performed in different temperature-time regimes. The microstructure and the optical transmittance of the obtained samples were compared to those of samples obtained by conventional high vacuum sintering.

  6. Structural Modelling of Two Dimensional Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avishek

    The continuous random network (CRN) model of network glasses is widely accepted as a model for materials such as vitreous silica and amorphous silicon. Although it has been more than eighty years since the proposal of the CRN, there has not been conclusive experimental evidence of the structure of glasses and amorphous materials. This has now changed with the advent of two-dimensional amorphous materials. Now, not only the distribution of rings but the actual atomic ring structure can be imaged in real space, allowing for greater charicterization of these types of networks. This dissertation reports the first work done on the modelling of amorphous graphene and vitreous silica bilayers. Models of amorphous graphene have been created using a Monte Carlo bond-switching method and MD method. Vitreous silica bilayers have been constructed using models of amorphous graphene and the ring statistics of silica bilayers has been studied.

  7. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  8. Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

  9. Amorphous powders for inhalation drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lan; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Lu, Xiang-Yun; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2016-05-01

    For inhalation drug delivery, amorphous powder formulations offer the benefits of increased bioavailability for poorly soluble drugs, improved biochemical stability for biologics, and expanded options of using various drugs and their combinations. However, amorphous formulations usually have poor physicochemical stability. This review focuses on inhalable amorphous powders, including the production methods, the active pharmaceutical ingredients and the excipients with a highlight on stabilization of the particles. PMID:26780404

  10. Treatment of benign urethral strictures using a sapphire tipped neodymium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A

    1989-11-01

    Sapphire tips increase the energy density and cutting effect of a neodymium:YAG laser. Sapphire tipped neodymium:YAG laser fibers were used to perform urethrotomy in 24 men with benign urethral strictures. The cutting effect was inadequate in 10 patients. Of the 24 patients 16 (67%) had a recurrent stricture within 1 year. Sapphire tipped neodymium:YAG laser fibers offer no apparent advantage over cold knife urethrotomy for treatment of benign urethral strictures. PMID:2810498

  11. A compact, widely tunable intracavity PPLN optical parameter oscillator driven by an Nd:YAG/Cr:YAG composite crystal laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.-Q.; Yang, J.-F.; Zhang, B.-T.; Liu, S.-D.

    2012-03-01

    Based on periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN), a mini intracavity optical parameter oscillator (IOPO) driven by an diode-end-pumped composite Nd3+:YAG/Cr4+:YAG laser was demonstrated. The PPLN wafer has 20 domain reversal periods from 27.8 to 31.6 μm with a step of 0.2 μm between the neighbor periods. The output signal laser of OPO can be widely tunable in the range of 1402-1676 nm by changing the period at a certain temperature of 50°C. Under the diode pump power of 14 W, the maximum average output power of 600 mW at 1534 nm with pulse width of 2.0 ns and repetition rate of 16 kHz was obtained, corresponding to a peak power of 18.7 kW and a single pulse energy of 37.5 μJ, respectively.

  12. Reattachment of a Fractured Anterior Tooth Segment With Pulp Exposure via Er:YAG and Nd:YAG Lasers

    PubMed Central

    Fornaini, Carlo; Rocca, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The reattachment of a dental fragment may be performed for treatment of traumatized anterior teeth, both in cases of simple coronal fracture (enamel and superficial dentin) and in those with complicated coronal fracture (deep dentin with pulp exposure). A major part of this procedure is the adhesion technique, which was described for the first time by Buonocore in 1955. This clinical case demonstrates the use of Er:YAG and Nd:YAG lasers in fragment reattachment of a traumatically fractured anterior tooth with pulp exposure, describes their advantages and highlights the steps involved in their use. Case Presentation: A 14-year-old patient who came to our clinic with a traumatic crown fracture of the permanent, right central incisor is described. The patient had preserved the fragment that had broken off into his mouth and it was rebonded to the tooth using lasers (LightWalker device; Fotona, Ljubljana, Slovenia) with the following parameters: Er:YAG, SSP mode; 200 mJ; 10 Hz; quasi-contact tipless handpiece; Nd:YAG, SP mode; 4 W; 40 Hz; 300 μm contact fiber. The whole procedure was performed without the need for anesthesia. Conclusions: The patient reported that he did not feel pain or discomfort throughout the intervention. Follow-up visits performed after one, three, six, twelve, and sixteen months demonstrated vitality of the tooth the absence of complications, as well as good esthetic results. Laser technology may be used in the treatment of traumatic anterior teeth injury with advantages in terms of quality of the restoration, esthetic results, and patient comfort. PMID:26839857

  13. 551 nm Generation by sum-frequency mixing of intracavity pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Y.; Li, S. T.; Zhang, X. H.

    2012-02-01

    We present for the first time a Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1319 nm intracavity pumped by a 946 nm diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser. A 809 nm laser diode is used to pump the first Nd:YAG crystal emitting at 946 nm, and the second Nd:YAG laser emitting at 1319 nm intracavity pumped at 946 nm. Intracavity sumfrequency mixing at 946 and 1319 nm was then realized in a LBO crystal to reach the yellow range. We obtained a continuous-wave output power of 158 mW at 551 nm with a pump laser diode emitting 18.7 W at 809 nm.

  14. Amalgam Surface Treatment by Different Output Powers of Er:YAG Laser:SEM Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohammad Hashem; Hassanpour, Mehdi; Etemadi, Ardavan; Ranjbar Omrani, Ladan; Darvishpour, Hojat; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Methods: Twenty-one amalgam blocks (8 mm × 8 mm, 3 mm thickness) were prepared by condensing silver amalgam (into putty impression material. After keeping them for 24 hours in distilled water, they were divided into 7 groups as follow: G1: Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G2: Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ), G3: Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ), G4: Sandblast, G5: Sandblast + Er:YAG laser (1 W, 50 mJ), G6: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (2 W, 100 mJ) and G7: Sandblast +Er:YAG laser (3 W, 150 mJ). Then after preparation of all samples, they were examined by SEM. Results: The SEM results of amalgam surfaces treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser showed some pitting areas with non-homogenous irregularities Conclusion: It seems that the application of sandblasting accompanied by Er:YAG laser irradiation can provide proper surface for bonding of orthodontic brackets. PMID:26705463

  15. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calcote, H. F.

    1982-01-01

    Strongly adhering films of silicon are deposited directly on such materials as Pyrex and Vycor (or equivalent materials) and aluminum by a non-equilibrium plasma jet. Amorphous silicon films are formed by decomposition of silicon tetrachloride or trichlorosilane in the plasma. Plasma-jet technique can also be used to deposit an adherent silicon film on aluminum from silane and to dope such films with phosphorus. Ability to deposit silicon films on such readily available, inexpensive substrates could eventually lead to lower cost photovoltaic cells.

  16. Preparation of amorphous sulfide sieves

    DOEpatents

    Siadati, Mohammad H.; Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.

    2006-11-07

    The present invention involves methods and compositions for synthesizing catalysts/porous materials. In some embodiments, the resulting materials are amorphous sulfide sieves that can be mass-produced for a variety of uses. In some embodiments, methods of the invention concern any suitable precursor (such as thiomolybdate salt) that is exposed to a high pressure pre-compaction, if need be. For instance, in some cases the final bulk shape (but highly porous) may be same as the original bulk shape. The compacted/uncompacted precursor is then subjected to an open-flow hot isostatic pressing, which causes the precursor to decompose and convert to a highly porous material/catalyst.

  17. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  18. Studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, S G; Carlos, W E

    1984-07-01

    This report discusses the results of probing the defect structure and bonding of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films using both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron spin resonance (ESR). The doping efficiency of boron in a-Si:H was found to be less than 1%, with 90% of the boron in a threefold coordinated state. On the other hand, phosphorus NMR chemical shift measurements yielded a ration of threefold to fourfold P sites of roughly 4 to 1. Various resonance lines were observed in heavily boron- and phosphorus-doped films and a-SiC:H alloys. These lines were attributed to band tail states on twofold coordinated silicon. In a-SiC:H films, a strong resonance was attributed to dangling bonds on carbon atoms. ESR measurements on low-pressure chemical-vapor-deposited (LPCVD) a-Si:H were performed on samples. The defect density in the bulk of the films was 10/sup 17//cc with a factor of 3 increase at the surface of the sample. The ESR spectrum of LPCVD-prepared films was not affected by prolonged exposure to strong light. Microcrystalline silicon samples were also examined. The phosphorus-doped films showed a strong signal from the crystalline material and no resonance from the amorphous matrix. This shows that phosphorus is incorporated in the crystals and is active as a dopant. No signal was recorded from the boron-doped films.

  19. Ductile crystalline-amorphous nanolaminates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V; Barbee, Troy W

    2007-07-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper-zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline-amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 +/- 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 +/- 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline-crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous-crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  20. Nanostructuring of GeTiO amorphous films by pulsed laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Teodorescu, Valentin Serban; Ghica, Cornel; Maraloiu, Adrian Valentin; Vlaicu, Mihai; Kuncser, Andrei; Ciurea, Magdalena Lidia; Stavarache, Ionel; Lepadatu, Ana M; Scarisoreanu, Nicu Doinel; Andrei, Andreea; Ion, Valentin; Dinescu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Laser pulse processing of surfaces and thin films is a useful tool for amorphous thin films crystallization, surface nanostructuring, phase transformation and modification of physical properties of thin films. Here we show the effects of nanostructuring produced at the surface and under the surface of amorphous GeTiO films through laser pulses using fluences of 10-30 mJ/cm(2). The GeTiO films were obtained by RF magnetron sputtering with 50:50 initial atomic ratio of Ge:TiO2. Laser irradiation was performed by using the fourth harmonic (266 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser-induced nanostructuring results in two effects, the first one is the appearance of a wave-like topography at the film surface, with a periodicity of 200 nm and the second one is the structure modification of a layer under the film surface, at a depth that is related to the absorption length of the laser radiation. The periodicity of the wave-like relief is smaller than the laser wavelength. In the modified layer, the Ge atoms are segregated in spherical amorphous nanoparticles as a result of the fast diffusion of Ge atoms in the amorphous GeTiO matrix. The temperature estimation of the film surface during the laser pulses shows a maximum of about 500 °C, which is much lower than the melting temperature of the GeTiO matrix. GeO gas is formed at laser fluences higher than 20 mJ/cm(2) and produces nanovoids in the laser-modified layer at the film surface. A glass transition at low temperatures could happen in the amorphous GeTiO film, which explains the formation of the wave-like topography. The very high Ge diffusivity during the laser pulse action, which is characteristic for liquids, cannot be reached in a viscous matrix. Our experiments show that the diffusivity of atomic and molecular species such as Ge and GeO is very much enhanced in the presence of the laser pulse field. Consequently, the fast diffusion drives the formation of amorphous Ge nanoparticles through the segregation of Ge atoms

  1. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  2. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Raoul B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  3. Method of making amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1982-01-01

    The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a low molecular weight (e.g., 1000-5000) thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  4. Electron tunnelling into amorphous germanium and silicon.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. W.; Clark, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of tunnel conductance versus bias, capacitance versus bias, and internal photoemission were made in the systems aluminum-oxide-amorphous germanium and aluminium-oxide-amorphous silicon. A function was extracted which expresses the deviation of these systems from the aluminium-oxide-aluminium system.

  5. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  6. Imprinting bulk amorphous alloy at room temperature

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Song-Yi; Park, Eun-Soo; Ott, Ryan T.; Lograsso, Thomas A.; Huh, Moo-Young; Kim, Do-Hyang; Eckert, Jürgen; Lee, Min-Ha

    2015-11-13

    We present investigations on the plastic deformation behavior of a brittle bulk amorphous alloy by simple uniaxial compressive loading at room temperature. A patterning is possible by cold-plastic forming of the typically brittle Hf-based bulk amorphous alloy through controlling homogenous flow without the need for thermal energy or shaping at elevated temperatures. The experimental evidence suggests that there is an inconsistency between macroscopic plasticity and deformability of an amorphous alloy. Moreover, imprinting of specific geometrical features on Cu foil and Zr-based metallic glass is represented by using the patterned bulk amorphous alloy as a die. These results demonstrate the abilitymore » of amorphous alloys or metallic glasses to precisely replicate patterning features onto both conventional metals and the other amorphous alloys. In conclusion, our work presents an avenue for avoiding the embrittlement of amorphous alloys associated with thermoplastic forming and yields new insight the forming application of bulk amorphous alloys at room temperature without using heat treatment.« less

  7. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO2. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  8. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K.; Zarkadoula, E.; Todorov, I. T.; Geisler, T.; Brazhkin, V. V.

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also find that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.

  9. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  10. Structure, thermodynamics, and crystallization of amorphous hafnia

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Xuhui; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-09-28

    We investigate theoretically amorphous hafnia using the first principles melt and quench method. We identify two types of amorphous structures of hafnia. Type I and type II are related to tetragonal and monoclinic hafnia, respectively. We find type II structure to show stronger disorder than type I. Using the phonon density of states, we calculate the specific heat capacity for type II amorphous hafnia. Using the nudged elastic band method, we show that the averaged transition barrier between the type II amorphous hafnia and monoclinic phase is approximately 0.09 eV/HfO{sub 2}. The crystallization temperature is estimated to be 421 K. The calculations suggest an explanation for the low thermal stability of amorphous hafnia.

  11. Amorphization of Ti1- x Mn x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, B.-L.; Chen, C.-C.; Perng, T.-P.

    1992-08-01

    Three amorphous Ti1- x Mn x alloy powders, with x = 0.4, 0.5, and 0.6, were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) of the elemental powders in a high-energy ball mill. The amorphous powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission elec- tron microscopy (HRTEM). The crystallization temperatures for these alloys detected by dif- ferential scanning calorimetry (DSC) varied from 769 to 830 K. The calculated enthalpies of mixing in these amorphous phases are relatively small compared with those for other Ti-base binary alloys. The criteria for solid-state amorphization reaction are examined. It is suggested that the kinetics of nucleation and growth favors the formation of the amorphous phases and the supply of atoms for nucleation and growth is predominantly through the defective regions induced by MA.

  12. Intracorporeal lithotripsy with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denstedt, John D.; Razvi, Hassan A.; Chun, Samuel S.; Sales, Jack L.

    1995-05-01

    A variety of devices are currently available for intracorporeal stone fragmentation. Recently a new wavelength of laser, the Holmium:YAG, has demonstrated a variety of potential urologic applications including ablation of soft tissue lesions as well as stone fragmentation. This laser has a wavelength of 2100 nm and operates in a pulsed mode. Energy is delivered through a 400 um quartz end-firing fiber. In this presentation we review our clinical experience with the Holmium:YAG laser for the treatment of renal and ureteral calculi. Over a 23 month period, 63 patients underwent 67 procedures. Seven procedures consisted of percutaneous nephrolithotripsy for large or staghorn renal calculi. Sixty procedures were performed for ureteral stones. Procedures for proximal ureteral stones (6) employed a retrograde approach using flexible ureteroscopes (8.5 or 9.8). Stones in the mid ureter (12) and distal ureter (42) were approached transurethrally using a 6.9 rigid ureteroscope. Complete stone fragmentation without the need for additional procedures was achieved in 82% of cases. Treatment failures included 1 stone migration into the renal pelvis during laser activation, 6 patients who had incomplete fragmentation and 3 patients in which laser malfunction precluded complete fragmentation. Stone analysis available in 23 patients revealed calcium oxalate monohydrate (15), calcium oxalate dihydrate (2), cystine (2), uric acid (3) and calcium phosphate (1). A single complication of ureteral perforation occurred when the laser was fired without direct visual guidance. Radiographic follow-up at an average of 16 weeks is available in 22 patients and has identified 2 patients with ureteral strictures that are not believed to be related to laser lithotripsy. In summary, we have found the Holmium:YAG laser to be a reliable and versatile device for intracorporeal lithotripsy. Its safety and efficacy make it a suitable alternative for performing intracorporeal lithotripsy of urinary

  13. Vitreous humor rheology after Nd:YAG laser photo disruption.

    PubMed

    Abdelkawi, Salwa A; Abdel-Salam, Ahmed M; Ghoniem, Dina F; Ghaly, Sally K

    2014-03-01

    This work aimed to consider the hazardous side effect of eye floaters treatment with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser on the protein and viscoelastic properties of the vitreous humor, and evaluate the protective role of vitamin C against laser photo disruption. Five groups of New Zealand rabbits were divided as follows: control group for (n = 3) without any treatment, the second group (n = 9) treated with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser energy of 5 mJ × 100 pulse delivered to the anterior, middle, and posterior vitreous, respectively (n = 3 for each). The third group (n = 9) received a daily dose of 25 mg/kg body weight vitamin C for 2 weeks, and then treated with laser as the previous group. The fourth group (n = 9) treated with 10 mJ 9 50 pulse delivered to the anterior, middle, and posterior vitreous, respectively (n = 3 rabbits each). The fifth group (n = 9) received a daily dose of 25 mg/kg body weight vitamin C for 2 weeks, and then treated with laser as the previous group. After 2 weeks of laser treatment, the protein content, refractive index (RI), and the rheological properties of vitreous humor, such as consistency, shear stress, and viscosity, were determined. The results showed that, the anterior vitreous group exposed to of 5 mJ × 100 pulse and/or supplemented with vitamin C, showed no obvious change. Furthermore, all other treated groups especially for mid-vitreous and posterior vitreous humor showed increase in the protein content, RI and the viscosity of vitreous humor. The flow index remained below unity indicating the non-Newtonian behavior of the vitreous humor. Application of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser should be restricted to the anterior vitreous humor to prevent the deleterious effect of laser on the gel state of the vitreous humor. PMID:23797611

  14. Urological applications of Ho/Nd:Yag laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grifoni, Riccardo; Pierangeli, Tiziana; Gioacchini, Andrea; Muraro, Giovanni B.

    2001-10-01

    The introduction of Ho:Yag laser has brought many advantages in urology. By this work we want show you our experience with this technology. Between April 1998 and May 2000 we treated 137 patients. Of these 28 had urinary lithiasis (18 bladder and 10 ureteral stones 3 in the upper, 2 in the middle and 5 in the distal tract), 40 were affected by enlargement of prostatic gland: 32 had B.P.H., 8 P.C.; 36 had T.C.C. and 33 strictures of urethra (27) or bladder neck (6). For ureteral lithiasis we used 200 micrometer fiber, energy of 0.5 - 1.4 J with 10 Hz of frequency. In case of bladder stones a 550 or 1000 micrometer using a power of 80 W. The prostatic gland were resected by a 550 micrometer fiber, 2.2 - 2.8 J, 25 - 30 Hz and 70 -80 W. The superficial bladder tumors were removed by 1.4 J with 10 - 15 Hz and 10 - 14 W. In the large tumors we completed the procedure by Nd:YAG at the base of the tumor. Urethra and bladder neck strictures were treated by 1.2 - 1.8 J and 10 - 30 Hz. We successful treated 26 patients with urinary lithiasis obtained the complete vaporization of the stones, 2 had endoscopic ancillary procedures. Out of 32 patients with B.P.H. 41% had the complete resection of the gland the others the resection of the 3d lobe. We removed 114 superficial bladder tumors and only 4 patients had a local recurrence. Of the patients with the strictures 4 had more than one treatment and about 87% had good result. From our experience the use of Holmium:Yag laser has been very efficacy to treat different urological diseases, also in patients with important comorbid disorders and its use reduce the stay in hospital and so the costs.

  15. Optical and laser characterization of Nd:YAG ceramics elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Librant, Zdzisław; Węglarz, Helena; Wajler, Anna; Tomaszewski, Henryk; Łukasiewicz, Tadeusz; Jabczyński, Jan K.; Zendzian, Waldemar; Kwiatkowski, Jacek

    2008-12-01

    The Nd:YAG ceramics of nominal 1% and 2% Nd dopant were produced by a solid-state reaction of high-purity (4N) nanometric oxides powders i.e. Al2O3, Y2O3 and Nd2O3. Yttrium oxide nanopowder (XRD crystallite size of 79 nm) was produced by precipitation from water solution of high-purity hydrated nitrate, by means of ammonia hydro-carbonate. The cold isostatic pressing method was applied to densify granulated powder. Further the sintering and annealing processes were deployed to produce the final Nd:YAG ceramic samples. Mean grain sizes of about 20 µm and grain boundaries less than 10 nm of elaborated Nd:YAG ceramic samples were evaluated in SEM and TEM measurements. Thus, in microscale the quality of obtained ceramic was quite satisfactory. However, in macroscale, the samples had unacceptable level of voids and pores observed in visual inspection, which resulted in low 76% transmission, corresponding to extinction coefficient of 0.32 cm-1 at 1064-nm wavelength. The sizes of defects, pores and inclusions were of several dozens of micrometer. The active elements of rod and slab shape were fabricated and characterized in two diode pumping laser set ups. In end pumping configuration as a pump source 20-W fiber coupled laser diode was deployed. For the low duty cycle pumping (1 ms/20 Hz) above 30% slope efficiency was achieved. In the best case, 3.7 W of output power for 18 W of pump power, with M2 <1.4 were demonstrated for uncoated ceramics rod of φ4x3mm size. We have used uncoated elements, thus we can expect increase in laser parameters for optimized pumping conditions and samples with anti-reflective coatings. The parameters of elaborated ceramic material at this stage of work are unsatisfactory for laser application. However, the results of TEM measurements and laser characterizations seems to be quite promising..

  16. New technique for prostatectomy using Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daidoh, Yuichiro; Arai, Tsunenori; Murai, Masaru; Nakajima, Akio; Tsuji, Akira; Odajima, Kunio; Nakajima, Fumio; Kikuchi, Makoto; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    1994-05-01

    To develop a new transperineal laser prostatectomy through a biopsy needle, we determined the efficiency of a pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation for canine prostate. The Ho:YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.1 micrometers ) may induced stress-wave to destroy the small vessels in prostate. After the exposure of the canine prostate, it was punctured by the needle. A quartz fiber of which core-diameter was 200 or 400 micrometers was inserted into the 18 G needle. The irradiation fluence was set to 150 - 600 J/cm2 and repetition rate was kept at 2 Hz. The cross-section of the irradiated portion of the prostate extracted immediately after the irradiation showed dark-colored hemorrhage layer around the ablation tract with 1 - 2 mm thickness. Some hemorrhage was histologically seen in stoma and gland in the irradiated prostate. In the case of 150 - 175 J/cm2 in the irradiation fluence, the irradiated portion of the prostate was found in the wedge-shaped area with brown color at one week after the irradiation. The lymphocytes infiltrating into the wedge-shaped zone were found. The wedge- shaped zone spread over the prostate and the change of urethral mucosa was minimum at one month after the irradiation. In the case of 500 - 600 J/cm2 irradiation, the paraurethral cavity was made at one month after the irradiation. The histological examination showed that the hemorrhage and subsequent histological changes may be caused by the laser induced stress-wave rather than thermal effect. Our results suggest that transperineal irradiation of pulsed Ho:YAG might offer an effective treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia with the minimal damage to the urethral mucosa.

  17. Optical Fiber Multiplexer For Industrial Nd:YAG Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goethals, Walther A.

    1989-03-01

    A lot of industrial Nd:YAG lasers are now being equipped with fiber optics for application in flexible manufacturing. One laser can be supplied with several fibers so different processing positions can receive laser power according to the time-and/or energy sharing principle. Most of the time-sharing devices (multiplexers) are based on a galvanometer mirror that couples a converging laser beam into different fibers respectively. From the industry several questions have risen to make these multiplexers faster, more reliable and suitable for smaller diameter fibers. The current designs are limited by the positioning accuracy of the galvanometer mirror and by their sensitiveness to variations in the parameters of the laser beam due to thermal lensing effects. In the patented design of the multiplexer presented here, based on a telescopic image relay and a precision fiber positioning unit, these problems were solved. A prototype has been built which addresses five fibers with 200 μm cores at a switching rate higher than 100 times per second. The fibers have special termination connectors and can be exchanged easily without losing the alignment of the optical system. For spot welding applications with pulsed Nd:YAG lasers this means that this type of multiplexer could be used to take advantage of the high laser pulse rates and the pulse shape and energy programming possibilities that manufacturers of these types of lasers offer nowadays. Another application that has been shown now is the use of several remote laser engraving units served by a single CW/Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser and a fiber multiplexer.

  18. Comparison of fluoride and sapphire optical fibers for Er: YAG laser lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinze; Teichman, Joel; Wang, Tianyi; Elmaanaoui, Badr; Gamez, David; Milner, Thomas E

    2010-06-01

    The long-pulse (200-350 micros) Holmium: YAG (Ho: YAG) laser (lambda = 2.12 microm) is used extensively in urology for laser lithotripsy. The long-pulse Erbium: YAG (Er: YAG) laser (lambda = 2.94 microm) fragments urinary calculi up to 5 times more efficiently than the Ho: YAG laser, however, no optical fibers are available to transmit efficiently 2.94 microm laser light for laser lithotripsy. We report results of a study evaluating a fluoride glass fiber to transmit Er: YAG laser light for laser lithotripsy and compare to a sapphire fiber that provides good transmission of Er: YAG light at low irradiance. The fluoride fiber provides superior light transmission efficiency over the sapphire fiber at an Er: YAG wavelength (2.94 microm). The sapphire fiber provides a more durable and robust delivery waveguide than the fluoride fiber when ablating urinary calculi in contact mode. Results of our study suggest that further development to improve performance of fluoride fibers for laser lithotripsy is warranted. PMID:20414904

  19. Two-Pass, Diode-Pumped Nd:YAG Slab Laser Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, D. Barry

    1992-01-01

    Neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) ring-laser head designed for compactness, simplicity, and increased efficiency for side pumping by diode lasers. Laser head includes two linear arrays of diode lasers, two fused-silica collimating rods, and Nd:YAG slab. Slab mounted on finned copper block, providing good thermal dissipation.

  20. 21 CFR 886.4392 - Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy and peripheral iridotomy. 886.4392 Section 886.4392 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4392 Nd:YAG laser for posterior capsulotomy...

  1. Design and Performance of the Compact YAG Imaging System for Diagnostics at GMCA Beamlines at APS

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Shenglan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Benn, Richard; Corcoran, Stephen

    2007-01-19

    A compact YAG (Chromium Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet - Cr4+:YAG) imaging system has been designed as a diagnostic tool for monochromatic x-rays emanating from the first 'Hard' x-ray dual-canted undulator at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This imaging system consists of a flat YAG crystal, right angle prism/mirror, video camera and monitor. A flat YAG crystal with a diameter of 10 mm has been installed in vacuum and positioned downstream of the monochromator of the insertion device beamline. Another 20 mm diameter YAG crystal has been installed in vacuum after the horizontal deflecting mirrors of the second insertion device beamline. CCD cameras are mounted in air close to the window of the vacuum ports to image the fluorescence of the YAG crystals. An additional 25 mm diameter YAG crystal has been used for K-B (Kirkpatrick-Baez) mirror focusing and beamline alignment. These YAG imaging systems have greatly facilitated beamline commissioning as well as sample alignment to the x-ray beam in the macromolecular crystallography endstation. An overview of the optics design, mechanical design and the performance of these devices will be presented in the paper.

  2. Endophthalmitis following Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy.

    PubMed

    Carlson, A N; Koch, D D

    1988-03-01

    We report the development of Propionibacterium acnes endophthalmitis following Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy. The patient previously underwent uncomplicated extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens insertion and was free of inflammation prior to laser capsulotomy. Diagnostic vitrectomy and aqueous tap were performed, and P. acnes was isolated from the aqueous in thiol broth media after nine days of incubation under anaerobic conditions. The patient was managed with topical and systemic antibiotics and steroids. Complete resolution of inflammation with return of vision to 20/25 was achieved without removal of the intraocular lens or lenticular remnants. PMID:3258419

  3. Possibilities of Nd: YAG laser utilization in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Frank

    The thermic effect caused by the shrinkage and the drying of the tissues is used for cutting, denaturation, and coagulation of tissues with simultaneous filling of the blood and lymphatic vessels. The surgical Nd:YAG lasers, whose utilization is based on photothermic effects, have 120 W power and are used in neurosurgery, dermatology, gastroenterology, gynecology, urology, lung sickness, and jaw and vessel surgery. The treatment of tumors is particularly interesting because of the total destruction of the ill tissue, the homogeneity of the necrose and the obturation of the blood and lymphatic vessels. In all cases, the laser is a better solution for the patients and allows a shorter stay in hospital.

  4. A portable lidar using a diode-pumped YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Okumura, H.; Sugita, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Yamaguchi, S.

    1992-01-01

    A Mie lidar system is technically established and is used for monitoring air pollution, stratospheric and boundary layer aerosol distribution, plume dispersion, visibility, and the study of atmospheric structure and cloud physics. However, a lidar system is not widely used because of its cumbersome handling and unwieldy portability. Although the author developed a laser diode lidar system based on RM-CW technique, it has a limit of measurement distance. Here we report the development of an all solid Mie lidar system using a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and a Si-APD detector. This was constructed as a prototype of a handy lidar system.

  5. Front-end system for Yb : YAG cryogenic disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevezentsev, E. A.; Mukhin, I. B.; Kuznetsov, I. I.; Vadimova, O. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2015-05-01

    A new front-end system for a cryogenic Yb : YAG laser is designed. The system consists of a femtosecond source, a stretcher and a regenerative amplifier with an output energy of 25 μJ at a pulse repetition rate of 49 kHz, a pulse duration of ~2 ns and a bandwidth of ~1.5 nm. After increasing the pump power of the regenerative amplifier, it is expected to achieve a pulse energy of ~1 mJ at the input to cryogenic amplification stages, which will allow one to obtain laser pulses with a duration of several picoseconds at the output of the cryogenic laser after compression.

  6. 165-W cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Ripin, Daniel J; Ochoa, Juan R; Aggarwal, R L; Fan, Tso Yee

    2004-09-15

    Thermo-optic distortions often limit the beam quality and power scaling of high-average-power lasers. Cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG is used to efficiently generate 165 W of near-diffraction-limited beam from a power oscillator with negligible thermo-optic effects. End pumped with 215 W of incident pump power from two diode modules, the laser has an optical-optical efficiency of 76%, a slope efficiency of 85%, and an M2 value of 1.02. PMID:15460887

  7. Thin-rod Yb:YAG regenerative laser amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruko, A.; Nishio, M.; Matsubara, S.; Tanaka, M.; Takama, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kyomoto, K.; Okunishi, H.; Kato, K.; Shimabayashi, K.; Morioka, M.; Inayoshi, S.; Yamagata, S.; Kawato, S.

    2014-09-01

    High-average-power, high-repetition-rates picosecond-pulsed regenerative ytterbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Yb:YAG) laser amplifiers were developed. The architecture used in the amplifiers, which are named as thin-rod, has a unique cooling scheme like slab lasers and also has a unique pumping scheme like photonic crystal fiber lasers, is suitable for high-average power Ytterbium lasers. This architecture also has high gain characteristics which is appropriate for the regenerative spectral and pulse shaping on high-repetition-rate, ultrashort-pulse amplifications.

  8. Fluorescence losses from Yb:YAG slab lasers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Rapaport, Alexandra; Chung, Te-yuan; Chen, Bin; Bass, Michael

    2003-12-20

    We report on the distribution of fluorescence that can be emitted through the surfaces of a ytterbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Yb:YAG) slab-shaped high-power solid-state laser. Slab shapes considered include parallel or antiparallel Brewster endfaced slabs and rectangular parallelepiped slabs. We treat cases in which all the faces of these slabs are in air, or with water or another coating on the largest faces. The fraction of the fluorescence emitted through each face, its distribution over that face, and the directions in which it travels are shown to be important to the design of high-power slab lasers. PMID:14717292

  9. Lasing characteristics of Ho:YAG single crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Miller, Keith; Johnson, Eric G; Nie, Craig D; Bera, Subhabrata; Harrington, James A; Shori, Ramesh

    2016-05-01

    Lasing was demonstrated for the first time at 2.09 μm in 0.5% Holmium (Ho) doped YAG single crystal fiber (SCF) fabricated using the Laser Heated Pedestal Growth (LHPG) method. Output power of 23.5 W with 67.5% optical-to-optical slope efficiency is, to the best of our knowledge, the highest output power achieved at 2 µm from a SCF fabricated using LHPG. With continued improvement in the quality of the SCF and better thermal management, output power of few 100s W and higher, especially in the 2 µm spectral region, is realizable in the very near future. PMID:27137589

  10. Pyogenic Granuloma: Surgical Treatment with Er:YAG Laser

    PubMed Central

    Fekrazad, Reza; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Khoei, Farzaneh; Kalhori, Katayoun AM

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Pyogenic granuloma (PG) is a common tumor-like growth of the oral cavity, considered to be of non-neoplastic nature, often caused by constant low-grade trauma as well as poor oral hygiene and maybe due to hormonal disturbances. Surgical excision, and removal of underlying cause in some cases, is the preferred method of treatment as it is only a benign lesion.In order to remove this lesion, scalpel, cryosurgery and laser are used. Currently different lasers, with adequate parameters, are used for the surgery of PG, which include CO2 (Carbon Dioxide Laser), Nd:YAG (Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet), Diode and Er Family amongst others. In this present case, due to the proximity of the lesion with dental hard tissue, Er:YAG (Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet) laser appears to be the more appropriate laser. The application of Laser is also a newly recommended technique. The aim of this study is to assess the stages of treatment, recovery and recurrence of PG when the Er:YAG laser is used. Furthermore this study aims to also evaluate the friendliness of this method with regards to the surgeon (therapist). Case report: A 24-year-old female was referred to the Laser Research Center of Dentistry of Tehran University of Medical Sciences with a complaint of gingival overgrowth and bleeding. This lesion was in the buccal and palatal side of the 5 and 6 maxillary teeth. Treatment plan included an excisional biopsy of the lesion using Er:YAG laser (3W, 300mJ, 10Hz, Short pulse, with contact headpiece). The bones were then cleaned of soft tissue before being smoothed using a curette. The excised specimen was preserved and sent for histopathological examination. Results: The patient reported no pain after surgery and did not use any systemic antibiotics. The patient was satisfied after the surgery. Chlorhexidine mouthwash was given to the patient. Pathology results confirmed Pyogenic granuloma.After 2 weeks, complete healing was observed. The 9-month

  11. Effect of transscleral neodymium: YAG cyclophotocoagulation on intraocular lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Blomquist, P.H.; Gross, R.L.; Koch, D.D. )

    1990-03-01

    A neodymium: YAG laser operating in the thermal mode was used to irradiate isolated intraocular lenses (IOLs) and to perform transscleral cyclophotocoagulation on pseudophakic autopsy eyes to investigate the potential damage to IOL haptics such irradiation may cause. In the isolated IOLs, 70 mJ of energy deformed and partially melted both polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polypropylene haptics. One of the capsular-fixated PC-IOL haptics in an autopsy eye partially melted when irradiated with the maximum energy level (8.8 J), with the aiming beam focused 1 mm posterior to the limbus and maximal posterior focus offset.

  12. Thulium YAG laser operation at 2.01 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storm, Mark E.; Gettemy, Donald J.; Barnes, Norman P.; Cross, Patricia L.; Kokta, Milan R.

    1989-01-01

    Variable temperature laser experiments were performed with two compositions of Tm:Cr:YAG (5.0:1.0 and 1.5:2.0 percent substitutions), with special attention given to the spectroscopic details of energy transfer and quasi-3 level lasing. Differences in laser threshold and flashlamp degradation were found in lasing the two compositions, and it is suggested that the difference is due to the 1.5:2.0 rod having much less efficient energy transfer than the 5.0:1.0 Tm:Cr crystals. To first order, the thermal occupation factor is found to dominate laser threshold determination at temperatures betwen 120 and 240 K.

  13. GaAs laser diode pumped Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conant, L. C.; Reno, C. W.

    1974-01-01

    A 1.5-mm by 3-cm neodymium-ion doped YAG laser rod has been side pumped using a GaAs laser diode array tuned to the 8680-A absorption line, achieving a multimode average output power of 120 mW for a total input power of 20 W to the final-stage laser diode drivers. The pumped arrangement was designed to take advantage of the high brightness of a conventional GaAs array as a linear source by introducing the pump light through a slit into a close-wrapped gold coated pump cavity. This cavity forms an integrating chamber for the pump light.

  14. Space qualified Nd:YAG laser (phase 1 - design)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. D.; Kirk, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a design study and preliminary design of a space qualified Nd:YAG laser are presented. A theoretical model of the laser was developed to allow the evaluation of the effects of various parameters on its performance. Various pump lamps were evaluated and sum pumping was considered. Cooling requirements were examined and cooling methods such as radiation, cryogenic and conductive were analysed. Power outputs and efficiences of various configurations and the pump and laser lifetime are discussed. Also considered were modulation and modulating methods.

  15. Treatment of pulmonary diseases with Holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei-Jue; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Hui-Guo; Wang, Fu-Juan; Ke, Lin; Ma, Wei; Luo, Qun-Hua; Zhang, Yue-E.

    1998-11-01

    We report 5 cases of pulmonary disease treated with Holmium:YAG laser through fibrous bronchoscope. 1 inflammatory granuloma was cured after three times of treatment. Compared with conventional methods such as electrocautery and microwave treatment, laser has the merit of good hemostasis effect and quick recovery of the operation area. The other 4 patients who were suffered late lung cancer received 3-7 times of palliative treatment. After the treatment, the tumor tissues become smaller variably, and tact were unobstructed, symptoms of tract- obstructed obviously alleviated. We think that laser treatment has some practical significance in alleviating tract blocking of pulmonary diseases of late stage, and therefore raise the life quality.

  16. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  17. Locomotion of Amorphous Surface Robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An amorphous robot includes a compartmented bladder containing fluid, a valve assembly, and an outer layer encapsulating the bladder and valve assembly. The valve assembly draws fluid from a compartment(s) and discharges the drawn fluid into a designated compartment to displace the designated compartment with respect to the surface. Another embodiment includes elements each having a variable property, an outer layer that encapsulates the elements, and a control unit. The control unit energizes a designated element to change its variable property, thereby moving the designated element. The elements may be electromagnetic spheres with a variable polarity or shape memory polymers with changing shape and/or size. Yet another embodiment includes an elongated flexible tube filled with ferrofluid, a moveable electromagnet, an actuator, and a control unit. The control unit energizes the electromagnet and moves the electromagnet via the actuator to magnetize the ferrofluid and lengthen the flexible tube.

  18. Efficient 2122  nm Ho:YAG laser intra-cavity pumped by a narrowband-diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haizhou; Huang, Jianhong; Liu, Huagang; Li, Jinhui; Dai, Shutao; Weng, Wen; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-09-01

    We first demonstrate an efficient Ho:YAG laser intra-cavity pumped by a narrowband-diode-pumped Tm:YAG laser. The pump wavelength of the laser diode was selected according to the excitation peak which is also one of the absorption peaks of a 3.5 at. % Tm:YAG crystal and was locked by volume Bragg gratings. In the Tm laser experiment, a maximum output power of 11.12 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 51.6%, was obtained. In the Ho laser experiment, a maximum output power of 8.03 W at 2122 nm with a slope efficiency of 38% was obtained for 24.96 W of diode pump power incident on the Tm:YAG rod. PMID:27607945

  19. Ignition of an automobile engine by high-peak power Nd:YAG/Cr⁴⁺:YAG laser-spark devices.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Nicolaie; Dascalu, Traian; Salamu, Gabriela; Dinca, Mihai; Boicea, Niculae; Birtas, Adrian

    2015-12-28

    Laser sparks that were built with high-peak power passively Q-switched Nd:YAG/Cr(4+):YAG lasers have been used to operate a Renault automobile engine. The design of such a laser spark igniter is discussed. The Nd:YAG/Cr(4+):YAG laser delivered pulses with energy of 4 mJ and 0.8-ns duration, corresponding to pulse peak power of 5 MW. The coefficients of variability of maximum pressure (COV(Pmax)) and of indicated mean effective pressure (COV(IMEP)) and specific emissions like hydrocarbons (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and carbon dioxide (CO2) were measured at various engine speeds and high loads. Improved engine stability in terms of COV(Pmax) and COV(Pmax) and decreased emissions of CO and HC were obtained for the engine that was run by laser sparks in comparison with classical ignition by electrical spark plugs. PMID:26831972

  20. High atomic diffusivity during pulsed laser irradiation of TiON quasi-amorphous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, V. S.; Maraloiu, A. V.; Negrea, R. F.; Ghica, D.; Scarisoreanu, N. D.; Dinescu, M.; Gartner, M.; Blanchin, M.-G.

    2016-06-01

    Quasi-amorphous titanium oxynitride (TiON) films were obtained by annealing sol-gel anatase TiO2 films in NH3 atmosphere at 600 °C. These films were irradiated with 50 laser pulses using the fourth harmonic (266 nm) radiation of the Nd-YAG laser, with an average fluence of 20 mJ/cm2. HRTEM observations of the pulsed laser irradiated films evidenced the rutile TiO2 nanocrystallites formation. The rutile structure was not present either in the TiON films before the laser irradiation, or in the initial sol-gel anatase TiO2 films. During the laser irradiation, the film structure remains in the solid state phase, as it results from the temperature estimation and microscopic observations. For the rutile nanocrystals formation, the atomic diffusion length of the oxygen and titanium atoms should be in the nanometric range during the laser pulse action, which implies a diffusivity close to the values observed in the liquid phase. We consider that the rutile phase formation is a proof of the fast atomic diffusion in the solid amorphous matrix, during the laser irradiation.

  1. Cryogenic disk Yb : YAG laser with 120-mJ energy at 500-Hz pulse repetition rate

    SciTech Connect

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Palashov, O V; Khazanov, Efim A

    2013-03-31

    A repetitively pulsed laser system based on cryogenically cooled Yb : YAG disks is developed. The creation of Yb : YAG/YAG composites and the use of an active liquid nitrogen cooling system made it possible to significantly decrease the effect of amplified spontaneous emission. The average output power of the system is 60 W. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  2. Effect of CO2, Nd:YAG and Er:YAG Lasers on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite to Bleached-Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Basir, Mahshid Mohammadi; Rezvani, Mohammad Bagher; Chiniforush, Nasim; Moradi, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tooth restoration immediately after bleaching is challenging due to the potential problems in achieving adequate bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatment with ER:YAG, ND:YAG, CO2 lasers and 10% sodium ascorbate solution on immediate microtensile bond strength of composite resin to recently bleached enamel. Materials & Methods: Ninety sound molar teeth were randomly divided into three main groups (n:30) : NB (without bleaching), HB (bleached with 38% carbamide peroxide) and OB (bleached with Heydent bleaching gel assisted by diode laser). Each group was divided into five subgroups (n:6) : Si (without surface treatment), Er (Er:YAG laser), CO2 (CO2 laser), Nd (Nd:YAG laser) and As (Immersion in 10% sodium ascorbate solution). The bonding system was then applied and composite build-ups were constructed. The teeth were sectioned by low speed saw to obtain enamel- resin sticks and submitted to microtensile bond testing. Statistical analyses were done using two- way ANOVA, Tukey and Tamhane tests. Results: µTBS of bleached teeth irradiated with ND:YAG laser was not significantly different from NB-Nd group. Microtensile bond strength of OB-Er group was higher than NB-Er and HB-Er groups. The mean µTBS of HB-CO2 group was higher than NB-CO2 group; the average µTBS of HB-As and OB-As groups was also higher than NB-As group. Conclusion: Use of Nd:YAG, CO2 lasers and 10% sodium ascorbate solution could improve the bond strength in home-bleached specimens. Application of ND:YAG laser on nonbleached specimens and Er:YAG laser on office-bleached specimens led to the highest µTBS in comparison to other surface treatments in each main group. PMID:27385998

  3. Output characteristics of high power cryogenic Yb:YAG TRAM laser oscillator.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Hiroaki; Kawanaka, Junji; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Chosrowjan, Haik; Fujita, Masayuki; Takeshita, Kenji; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2012-09-10

    We analyzed the output power characteristics of a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG total-reflection active-mirror (TRAM) laser oscillator including the temperature dependence of the emission cross section and the reabsorption loss of the Yb:YAG TRAM. A CW multi-transverse mode oscillation of a 9.8 at.% doped 0.6 mm thick Yb:YAG ceramic TRAM was investigated for various pump spot sizes and compared with theoretical results. The Yb:YAG temperatures were inferred from the ratio between fluorescence intensities at 1022 nm and 1027 nm which varied significantly with temperature below 200 K. Output power calculations using evaluated temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data measured between 77 and 200 K, and the output power suppression due to the temperature rise observed above ~140 K. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evaluation of output power for a cryogenically cooled Yb:YAG TRAM laser. PMID:23037293

  4. One Step Combustion Synthesis Of YAG:Ce Phosphor For Solid State Lighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Pooja; Gupta, K. Vijay Kumar; Muley, Aarti; Joshi, C. P.; Moharil, S. V.

    2011-10-01

    YAG:Ce is an important phosphor having applications in various fields ranging from solid state lighting to scintillation detectors. YAG phosphors doped with activators are mainly synthesized by solid state reaction techniques that require high sintering temperatures (above 1500°C) to eliminate YAM and YAP phases. Though several soft chemical routes have been explored for synthesis of YAG, most of these methods are complex and phase pure materials are not obtained in one step, but prolonged annealing at temperatures around 1000 C or above becomes necessary. One step combustion synthesis of YAG:Ce3+ and related phosphors carried out at 500 C furnace temperature is reported here. Activation with Ce3+ could be achieved during the synthesis without taking recourse to any post-combustion thermal treatment. LEDs prepared from the combustion synthesized YAG:Ce3+, exhibited properties comparable to those produced from the commercial phosphor.

  5. Study of optical phase conjugation in amorphous Zn(x)-S(y)-Se(100-x-y) chalcogenide thin films using degenerate four-wave mixing.

    PubMed

    Rani, Sunita; Mohan, Devendra; Kishore, Nawal

    2014-01-24

    Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) experiment is performed to obtain light wavefront inversion (phase conjugation) in semiconducting chalcogenide thin films. Third order nonlinearity of amorphous Zn(x)-S(y)-Se(100-x-y) chalcogenide thin films using DFWM technique is studied at second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser. Influence of total input irradiance on phase conjugate signal is deliberated using log-log plot that has a slope of three and hence implies third order nonlinearity. The dependence of phase conjugate signal on forward beam and backward beam is also studied. The period of the grating formed by interference of forward and probe beam is determined. As the temporal overlapping and sample thickness conditions are satisfied, the third order nonlinear susceptibility, figure of merit and nonlinear refractive index of amorphous films are estimated. The nonlinear behavior is analyzed in terms of decrease in band gap with increasing Zinc and decreasing Sulfur content. PMID:24121601

  6. Study of optical phase conjugation in amorphous Znx-Sy-Se100-x-y chalcogenide thin films using degenerate four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Sunita; Mohan, Devendra; Kishore, Nawal

    2014-01-01

    Degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM) experiment is performed to obtain light wavefront inversion (phase conjugation) in semiconducting chalcogenide thin films. Third order nonlinearity of amorphous Znx-Sy-Se100-x-y chalcogenide thin films using DFWM technique is studied at second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser. Influence of total input irradiance on phase conjugate signal is deliberated using log-log plot that has a slope of three and hence implies third order nonlinearity. The dependence of phase conjugate signal on forward beam and backward beam is also studied. The period of the grating formed by interference of forward and probe beam is determined. As the temporal overlapping and sample thickness conditions are satisfied, the third order nonlinear susceptibility, figure of merit and nonlinear refractive index of amorphous films are estimated. The nonlinear behavior is analyzed in terms of decrease in band gap with increasing Zinc and decreasing Sulfur content.

  7. Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation: contact versus non-contact enamel ablation and sonic-activated bulk composite placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckova, M.; Kasparova, M.; Dostalova, T.; Jelinkova, H.; Sulc, J.; Nemec, M.; Fibrich, M.; Bradna, P.; Miyagi, M.

    2013-05-01

    Laser radiation can be used for effective caries removal and cavity preparation without significant thermal effects, collateral damage of tooth structure, or patient discomfort. The aim of this study was to compare the quality of tissue after contact or non-contact Er:YAG and CTH:YAG laser radiation ablation. The second goal was to increase the sealing ability of hard dental tissues using sonic-activated bulk filling material with change in viscosity during processing. The artificial caries was prepared in intact teeth to simulate a demineralized surface and then the Er:YAG or CTH:YAG laser radiation was applied. The enamel artificial caries was gently removed by the laser radiation and sonic-activated composite fillings were inserted. A stereomicroscope and then a scanning electron microscope were used to evaluate the enamel surface. Er:YAG contact mode ablation in enamel was quick and precise; the cavity was smooth with a keyhole shaped prism and rod relief arrangement without a smear layer. The sonic-activated filling material was consistently regularly distributed; no cracks or microleakage in the enamel were observed. CTH:YAG irradiation was able to clean but not ablate the enamel surface; in contact and also in non-contact mode there was evidence of melting and fusing of the enamel.

  8. Quantification of surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy: the concept of effective amorphous surface area.

    PubMed

    Brum, Jeffrey; Burnett, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the use of dispersive surface energy in quantifying surface amorphous content, and the concept of effective amorphous surface area is introduced. An equation is introduced employing the linear combination of surface area normalized square root dispersive surface energy terms. This equation is effective in generating calibration curves when crystalline and amorphous references are used. Inverse gas chromatography is used to generate dispersive surface energy values. Two systems are investigated, and in both cases surface energy data collected for physical mixture samples comprised of amorphous and crystalline references fits the predicted response with good accuracy. Surface amorphous content of processed lactose samples is quantified using the calibration curve, and interpreted within the context of effective amorphous surface area. Data for bulk amorphous content is also utilized to generate a thorough picture of how disorder is distributed throughout the particle. An approach to quantifying surface amorphous content using dispersive surface energy is presented. Quantification is achieved by equating results to an effective amorphous surface area based on reference crystalline, and amorphous materials. PMID:21725707

  9. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.; Kattelus, H.; So, F.

    1984-01-01

    The general objective was to determine the potential of amorphous metallic thin films as a means of improving the stability of metallic contacts to a silicon substrate. The specific objective pursued was to determine the role of nitrogen in the formation and the resulting properties of amorphous thin-film diffusion barriers. Amorphous metallic films are attractive as diffusion barriers because of the low atomic diffusivity in these materials. Previous investigations revealed that in meeting this condition alone, good diffusion barriers are not necessarily obtained, because amorphous films can react with an adjacent medium (e.g., Si, Al) before they recrystallize. In the case of a silicon single-crystalline substrate, correlation exists between the temperature at which an amorphous metallic binary thin film reacts and the temperatures at which the films made of the same two metallic elements react individually. Amorphous binary films made of Zr and W were investigated. Both react with Si individually only at elevated temperatures. It was confirmed that such films react with Si only above 700 C when annealed in vacuum for 30 min. Amorphous W-N films were also investigated. They are more stable as barriers between Al and Si than polycrystalline W. Nitrogen effectively prevents the W-Al reaction that sets in at 500 C with polycrystalline W.

  10. Crystalline to amorphous transformation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheruvu, S.M.

    1982-09-01

    In the present investigation, an attempt was made to understand the fundamental mechanism of crystalline-to-amorphous transformation in arsenic implanted silicon using high resolution electron microscopy. A comparison of the gradual disappearance of simulated lattice fringes with increasing Frenkel pair concentration with the experimental observation of sharp interfaces between crystalline and amorphous regions was carried out leading to the conclusion that when the defect concentration reaches a critical value, the crystal does relax to an amorphous state. Optical diffraction experiments using atomic models also supported this hypothesis. Both crystalline and amorphous zones were found to co-exist with sharp interfaces at the atomic level. Growth of the amorphous fraction depends on the temperature, dose rate and the mass of the implanted ion. Preliminary results of high energy electron irradiation experiments at 1.2 MeV also suggested that clustering of point defects occurs near room temperature. An observation in a high resolution image of a small amorphous zone centered at the core of a dislocation is presented as evidence that the nucleation of an amorphous phase is heterogeneous in nature involving clustering or segregation of point defects near existing defects.

  11. Holmium:YAG laser angioplasty: treatment of acute myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topaz, On

    1993-06-01

    We report our clinical experience with a group of 14 patients who presented with acute myocardial infarction. A holmium:YAG laser was applied to the infarct-related artery. This laser emits 250 - 600 mJ per pulse, with a pulse length of 250 microseconds and repetition rate of 5 Hz. Potential benefits of acute thrombolysis by lasers include the absence of systemic lytic state; a shortened thrombus clearing time relative to using thrombolytics; safe removal of the intracoronary thrombus and facilitation of adjunct balloon angioplasty. Potential clinical difficulties include targeting the obstructive clot and plaque, creation of debris and distal emboli and laser-tissue damage. It is conceivable that holmium:YAG laser can be a successful thrombolytic device as its wave length (2.1 microns) coincides with strong water absorption peaks. Since it is common to find an atherosclerotic plaque located under or distal to the thrombotic occlusion, this laser can also be applied for plaque ablation, and the patient presenting with acute myocardial infarction can clearly benefit from the combined function of this laser system.

  12. Neutralisation of antipersonnel mines with an Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luethy, Willy A.; Rothacher, Thomas

    2004-12-01

    We report on the possibility to use lasers as a demining tool to dispose mines from a safe distance. Most anti personnel (AP) mines consist of 10 g to 500 g of an explosive, a fuse and a plastic case which makes them very difficult to detect. In 90% of all AP mines trinitrotoluene (TNT) or a combination of TNT and other explosives is used. The interaction of laser radiation with TNT and possible mine wrapping materials is investigated based on spectroscopy and practical considerations. With a CW Nd:YAG laser the desired burning of the explosive is achieved. The interaction is rather based on the absorption of the mine case than on the weak absorption of the explosive. A portable CW Nd:YAG laser is described and experiments with real AP mines are performed. We have investigated the behavior of four different representative blast AP mines under laser irradiation at Bofors test centre in Sweden. Disposal of all available mines from a safe distance up to 50 meters is achieved. Laser incident power was in the range from 20 W to 60 W. Due to partial burning of the explosive charge the resulting detonation of mines is considerably reduced.

  13. Hollow waveguide for giant Er:YAG laser pulses transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Michal; Jelinkova, Helena; Koranda, Petr; Cech, Miroslav; Sulc, Jan; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Shi, Yi-Wei; Matsuura, Yuji

    2004-06-01

    Short Er:YAG laser pulses were delivered by a cyclic olefin polymer coated silver hollow glass (COP/Ag) waveguide specially designed for a high power radiation. Er:YAG laser was Q-switched by an electro-optic shutter - LiNbO3 Pockels cell with Brewster angle cut input/output faces. The maximum energy output obtained from this system was 29 mJ with the length of pulse 69 ns corresponding to 420 kW output peak power. The system was working with the repetition rate of 1.5 Hz. A delivery system composed of a lens (f = 40 mm), protector and waveguide with the 700/850 μm diameter and 50 cm or 1 m length. The measured maximum delivered intensity was 86 MW/cm2 what corresponds to the transmission of 78.6 % for whole delivery system. Using of a sealed cap, this delivery system gives a possibility of the contact surgical treatment in many medicine branches, for example ophthalmology, urology or dentistry.

  14. Preliminary investigation of CTH:YAG laser for cochlear implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Udayan K.; Pawel, Bruce R.; Potsic, William P.

    2000-05-01

    Cochlear implantation is a treatment for deafness that requires the surgical placement of electrodes within the cochlea, using a high-speed drill. While the drill is effective, the tip of the drill or the drill shaft may damage critical adjacent structures, such as the facial nerve. In addition, the narrow working spaces involved in this surgery make the drill a relatively cumbersome tool for such delicate work. The use of a flexible fiber to deliver the laser energy may make the surgery easier by allowing a more maneuverable instrument to access the region, while reducing the risk of injuring adjacent structures. We report our preliminary investigation of fiber delivery of CTH:YAG energy ((lambda) equals 2091 nm) for the purpose of bony ablation. A 550 micron diameter low-OH silica fiber was used to drill through up to 2.5 mm thick human temporal bone specimens. An average of 14 pulses was required for 1 mm thick bones, and an average of 33 pulses required to ablate 2 mm of bone. The holes drilled were precise, and showed limited adjacent tissue effect by gross and histopathologic evaluation. This work demonstrates the effective fiberoptic delivery of CTH:YAG energy for bone ablation. Further work is warranted to explore the clinical possibilities offered by this technique for precise bony ablation with limited adjacent tissue effect.

  15. Efficient 750-nm LED-pumped Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Yan; Su, Cheng-Kuo; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chiu, Yu-Chung; Huang, Yen-Chieh

    2016-05-30

    We report an Nd:YAG laser pumped by light emission diodes (LEDs) at 750 nm. With 1% output coupling from a linear cavity containing a 2-cm long Nd:YAG crystal, the laser generated 37.5 μJ pulse energy at 1064 nm with M2 = 1.1 when pumped by 2.73-mJ LED energy in a 1-ms pulse at a 10 Hz rate. The measured optical and slope efficiencies for this linear-cavity laser are 1.36, and 9%, respectively. With 1 and 5% output couplings from a Z-cavity containing the same laser crystal, the lasers generated 346 and 288 μJ pulse energy with an optical efficiency of 3.4 and 2.8% and slope efficiency of 6.6 and 14%, respectively, for the same 1-ms pump pulse repeating at a 10 Hz rate. At the highest output from the Z-cavity, the measured M2 for the beam is 3.6. PMID:27410125

  16. Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Bierschenk, Thomas; Giulian, Raquel; Afra, Boshra; Rodriguez, Matias D; Schauries, D; Mudie, Stephen; Pakarinen, Olli H; Djurabekova, Flyura; Nordlund, Kai; Osmani, Orkhan; Medvedev, Nikita; Rethfield, Baerbel; Ridgway, Mark C; Kluth, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

  17. Method of producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon film

    DOEpatents

    Wiesmann, Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH.sub.4) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a tungsten or carbon foil heated to a temperature of about 1400.degree.-1600.degree. C., in a vacuum of about 10.sup.-6 to 19.sup.-4 torr, to form a gaseous mixture of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon, and depositing said gaseos mixture onto a substrate independent of and outside said source of thermal decomposition, to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  18. Peculiarities of Vibration Characteristics of Amorphous Ices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, Kirill V.; Subbotin, Oleg S.; Belosludov, Vladimir R.

    2012-03-01

    Dynamic properties of low (LDA), high (HDA) and very high (VHDA) density amorphous ices were investigated within the approach based on Lattice Dynamics simulations. In this approach, we assume that the short-range molecular order mainly determines the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of amorphous ices. Simulation cell of 512 water molecules with periodical boundary conditions and disordering allows us to study dynamical properties and dispersion curves in the Brillouin zone of pseudo-crystal. Existence of collective phenomena in amorphous ices which is usual for crystals but anomalous for disordered phase was confirmed in our simulations. Molecule amplitudes of delocalized (collective) as well as localized vibrations have been considered.

  19. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  20. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2009-11-17

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  1. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    DOEpatents

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  2. High-power Yb:YAG/YAG microchip laser using octagonal-shape waveguide with uniform absorbed power distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radmard, S.; Haghparast, A.; Arabgari, S.; Mehrabani, M. T.

    2013-06-01

    An innovative architecture for edge-pumped high power microchip laser is introduced. This geometry consists of a Yb:YAG thin disk gain media surrounded by an irregular octagonal undoped YAG cap as pumping light waveguide. The main advantages of the new geometry are high uniform absorption distribution, high absorption efficiency and simple construction to fabricate. Using the Monte Carlo ray tracing method, the pumping process and absorption profile in active medium are simulated. In addition, considering the impact of Yb+3 doping concentration and temperature on thermal conductivity, and based on the finite-difference method the conduction equation was solved and the temperature distribution in the gain media calculated. Based on these simulations, influence of active medium parameters such as core diameter, doping concentration and octagon side sizes ratio on absorption profile and efficiency as well as maximum temperature in gain medium is investigated. High absorption efficiency (over 94%) with perfect top-hat absorption profile has been predicted to be obtained from the designed microchip with optimized parameters. This microchip has a core diameter of 4 or 5 mm, 9 at% Yb3+ doping concentration and 300 μm thickness. An estimation based on laser rate equations shows that with 960 W pumping power, more than 600 W output power (optical efficiency of 66%) can be extracted from the designed system.

  3. Amorphization of Silicon Carbide by Carbon Displacement

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram; Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-05-10

    We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine the possibility of amorphizing silicon carbide (SiC) by exclusively displacing C atoms. At a defect generation corresponding to 0.2 displacements per atom, the enthalpy surpasses the level of melt-quenched SiC, the density decreases by about 15%, and the radial distribution function shows a lack of long-range order. Prior to amorphization, the surviving defects are mainly C Frenkel pairs (67%), but Si Frenkel pairs (18%) and anti-site defects (15%) are also present. The results indicate that SiC can be amorphized by C sublattice displacements. Chemical short-range disorder, arising mainly from interstitial production, plays a significant role in the amorphization.

  4. Amorphous Semiconductor Thin Films, an Introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Peter M.

    2003-12-01

    The field of amorphous semiconductors is so large that I cannot do it justice, but I hope this short column gives you some insight into the properties and materials available, and the issues involved.

  5. Ion-beam amorphization of semiconductors: A physical model based on the amorphous pocket population

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K.R.C.; Jaraiz, M.; Martin-Bragado, I.; Rubio, J.E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Barbolla, J.; Srinivasan, M.P.

    2005-08-15

    We introduce a model for damage accumulation up to amorphization, based on the ion-implant damage structures commonly known as amorphous pockets. The model is able to reproduce the silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature for C, Si, and Ge ion implants. Its use as an analysis tool reveals an unexpected bimodal distribution of the defect population around a characteristic size, which is larger for heavier ions. The defect population is split in both size and composition, with small, pure interstitial and vacancy clusters below the characteristic size, and amorphous pockets with a balanced mixture of interstitials and vacancies beyond that size.

  6. In situ observation of amorphous-amorphous apparently first-order phase transition in zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovsyuk, Nikolay; Goryainov, Sergei

    2006-09-01

    In this letter, the authors present the observation of the phase transition between low-density amorphous (LDA) and high-density amorphous (HDA) zeolites using a high pressure Raman spectroscopy. It is found that this transition is apparently of the first order and occurs with a silicon coordination rise. It is shown that the Raman spectra of the LDA-HDA phase transitions in zeolites and in silicon are almost identical, suggesting a generality of amorphous-amorphous transformations both in simple substances and in complex polyatomic materials with tetrahedral configurations.

  7. Amorphous Phases on the Surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampe, E. B.; Morris, R. V.; Ruff, S. W.; Horgan, B.; Dehouck, E.; Achilles, C. N.; Ming, D. W.; Bish, D. L.; Chipera, S. J.

    2014-01-01

    Both primary (volcanic/impact glasses) and secondary (opal/silica, allophane, hisingerite, npOx, S-bearing) amorphous phases appear to be major components of martian surface materials based on orbital and in-situ measurements. A key observation is that whereas regional/global scale amorphous components include altered glass and npOx, local scale amorphous phases include hydrated silica/opal. This suggests widespread alteration at low water-to-rock ratios, perhaps due to snow/ice melt with variable pH, and localized alteration at high water-to-rock ratios. Orbital and in-situ measurements of the regional/global amorphous component on Mars suggests that it is made up of at least three phases: npOx, amorphous silicate (likely altered glass), and an amorphous S-bearing phase. Fundamental questions regarding the composition and the formation of the regional/global amorphous component(s) still remain: Do the phases form locally or have they been homogenized through aeolian activity and derived from the global dust? Is the parent glass volcanic, impact, or both? Are the phases separate or intimately mixed (e.g., as in palagonite)? When did the amorphous phases form? To address the question of source (local and/or global), we need to look for variations in the different phases within the amorphous component through continued modeling of the chemical composition of the amorphous phases in samples from Gale using CheMin and APXS data. If we find variations (e.g., a lack of or enrichment in amorphous silicate in some samples), this may imply a local source for some phases. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the weathering products may give insight into the formation mechanisms of the parent glass (e.g., impact glasses contain higher Al and lower Si [30], so we might expect allophane as a weathering product of impact glass). To address the question of whether these phases are separate or intimately mixed, we need to do laboratory studies of naturally altered samples made

  8. Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shufflebotham, P. K.; Card, H. C.; Kao, K. C.; Thanailakis, A.

    1986-09-01

    Amorphous silicon-tellurium alloy thin films were fabricated by coevaporation over the composition range of 0-82 at. % Te. The electronic and optical properties of these films were systematically investigated over this same range of composition. The optical gap of these films was found to decrease monotonically with increasing Te content. Conduction near room temperature was due to extended state conduction, while variable range hopping dominated below 250 K. The incorporation of Te in concentrations of less than 1 at. % was found to produce an increase in the density of localized states at the Fermi level and a decrease in the activation energy. This was attributed to the Te being incorporated as a substitutional, fourfold coordinated, double donor in a-Si. At approximately 60 at. % Te, a decrease in the density of localized states at the Fermi level, and an increase in the activation energy and photoresponse was indicated. This was attributed to the possible formation of a less defective a-Si:Te compound.

  9. Ductile crystalline–amorphous nanolaminates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinmin; Li, Ju; Hamza, Alex V.; Barbee, Troy W.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that the room-temperature plastic deformation of bulk metallic glasses is compromised by strain softening and shear localization, resulting in near-zero tensile ductility. The incorporation of metallic glasses into engineering materials, therefore, is often accompanied by complete brittleness or an apparent loss of useful tensile ductility. Here we report the observation of an exceptional tensile ductility in crystalline copper/copper–zirconium glass nanolaminates. These nanocrystalline–amorphous nanolaminates exhibit a high flow stress of 1.09 ± 0.02 GPa, a nearly elastic-perfectly plastic behavior without necking, and a tensile elongation to failure of 13.8 ± 1.7%, which is six to eight times higher than that typically observed in conventional crystalline–crystalline nanolaminates (<2%) and most other nanocrystalline materials. Transmission electron microscopy and atomistic simulations demonstrate that shear banding instability no longer afflicts the 5- to 10-nm-thick nanolaminate glassy layers during tensile deformation, which also act as high-capacity sinks for dislocations, enabling absorption of free volume and free energy transported by the dislocations; the amorphous–crystal interfaces exhibit unique inelastic shear (slip) transfer characteristics, fundamentally different from those of grain boundaries. Nanoscale metallic glass layers therefore may offer great benefits in engineering the plasticity of crystalline materials and opening new avenues for improving their strength and ductility. PMID:17592136

  10. Structure of Amorphous Titania Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Chen, B.; Banfield, J. F.; Waychunas, G. A.

    2008-12-01

    Ultrafine (2 - 3 nm) titania (TiO2) nanoparticles show only diffuse scattering by both conventional powder x-ray diffraction and electron diffraction. We used synchrotron wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) to probe the atomic correlations in this amorphous material. The atomic pair-distribution function (PDF) derived from Fourier transform of the WAXS data was used for reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) simulations of the atomic structure of the small nanoparticles. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate input structures for the RMC. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) simulations were used to screen candidate structures obtained from the RMC. The structure model that best describes both the WAXS and XAS data consists of particles with a highly distorted shell and a small strained anatase-like crystalline core. The average coordination number of Ti is 5.3 and the Ti-O bond length peaks at 1.940 Å. Relative to bulk titania, the reduction of the coordination number is primarily due to the truncation of the Ti-O octahedra at the titania nanoparticle surface, and the shortening of the Ti-O bond length is due to bond contraction in the distorted shell. Core-shell structures in ultrafine nanoparticles may be common in many materials (e.g. ZnS).

  11. [Preparation and optical properties of MgAl2O4/Ce:YAG transparent ceramics].

    PubMed

    He, Long-Fei; Fan, Guang-Han; Lei, Mu-Yun; Lou, Zai-Liang; Chen, Zhi-Wu; Xiao, Yao; Zheng, Shu-Wen; Zhang, Tao

    2013-05-01

    High-purity ultrafine MgAl2O4 powder was synthesized by metal-alkoxide method and calcining for 2-4 h. And then MgAl2O4/Ce:YAG transparent ceramics were fabricated by hot-pressed sintering and hot isostatic pressed sintering technique with YAG:Ce powder and MgAl2O4 powder. The transparent ceramics were characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS and fluorescence spectrometer, respectively. The results show that the crystal phase of the transparent ceramic was composed of MgAl2O4 and YAG,and the YAG phase dispersed well in the matrix of MgAl2O4. The excitation spectra had a weak band at 345 nm and a strong band at 475 nm. The broad emission peaks at about 533 nm were attributed to 5d-->4f transition of Ce3+ ions. Decay curves for the fluorescence of MgAl2O4/Ce:YAG transparent ceramic test show that the lifetime of the Ce:YAG glass ceramic was 59.74 ns. All results show that MgAl2O4/Ce:YAG transparent ceramic may be a promising fluorescent material for white LED applications. PMID:23905313

  12. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongfeng; Shiwa, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/√Hz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor. PMID:24940865

  13. Tests Of Amorphous-Silicon Photovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Ronald G., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Progress in identification of strengths and weaknesses of amorphous-silicon technology detailed. Report describes achievements in testing reliability of solar-power modules made of amorphous-silicon photovoltaic cells. Based on investigation of modules made by U.S. manufacturers. Modules subjected to field tests, to accelerated-aging tests in laboratory, and to standard sequence of qualification tests developed for modules of crystalline-silicon cells.

  14. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  15. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Steel Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Branagan, Daniel James; Swank, William David; Haggard, Delon C; Fincke, James Russell; Sordelet, D.

    2001-10-01

    In this article, amorphous and nanocomposite thermally deposited steel coatings have been formed by using both plasma and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying techniques. This was accomplished by developing a specialized iron-based composition with a low critical cooling rate (?104 K/s) for metallic glass formation, processing the alloy by inert gas atomization to form micron-sized amorphous spherical powders, and then spraying the classified powder to form coatings. A primarily amorphous structure was formed in the as-sprayed coatings, independent of coating thickness. After a heat treatment above the crystallization temperature (568°C), the structure of the coatings self-assembled (i.e., devitrified) into a multiphase nanocomposite microstructure with 75 to 125 nm grains containing a distribution of 20 nm second-phase grain-boundary precipitates. Vickers microhardness testing revealed that the amorphous coatings were very hard (10.2 to 10.7 GPa), with further increases in hardness after devitrification (11.4 to 12.8 GPa). The wear characteristics of the amorphous and nanocomposite coatings were determined using both two-body pin-on-disk and three-body rubber wheel wet-slurry sand tests. The results indicate that the amorphous and nanocomposite steel coatings are candidates for a wide variety of wear-resistant applications.

  16. Amorphous boron nitride at high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durandurdu, Murat

    2016-06-01

    The pressure-induced phase transformation in hexagonal boron nitrite and amorphous boron nitrite is studied using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The hexagonal-to-wurtzite phase transformation is successfully reproduced in the simulation with a transformation mechanism similar to one suggested in experiment. Amorphous boron nitrite, on the other hand, gradually transforms to a high-density amorphous phase with the application of pressure. This phase transformation is irreversible because a densified amorphous state having both sp3 and sp2 bonds is recovered upon pressure release. The high-density amorphous state mainly consists of sp3 bonds and its local structure is quite similar to recently proposed intermediate boron nitrite phases, in particular tetragonal structure (P42/mnm), rather than the known the wurtzite or cubic boron nitrite due to the existence of four membered rings and edge sharing connectivity. On the basis of this finding we propose that amorphous boron nitrite might be best candidate as a starting structure to synthesize the intermediate phase(s) at high pressure and temperature (probably below 800 °C) conditions.

  17. Development of YAG:Dy Thermographic Phosphor Coatings for Turbine Engine Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Jenkins, T. P.; Allison, S. W.; Wolfe, D. E.; Jordan, E. H.

    2012-01-01

    The selection and development of thermographic phosphor coatings were pursued to meet the objective of demonstrating luminescence-decay-based temperature measurements up to 1300C on the surface of a vane in an operating demonstrator turbine engine. To meet this objective, YAG:Dy was selected based on the desirable luminescence performance observed for YAG:Dy powder: (1) excellent temperature sensitivity and intensity at operating turbine engine temperatures, (2) an emission peak at the relatively short wavelength of 456 nm, where the interference from background blackbody radiation is fairly low, and (3) its nearly single exponential decay which makes for a simple, reliable temperature calibration. However, implementation of YAG:Dy for surface temperature measurements required application of YAG:Dy as a coating onto the surface of a superalloy component with a preexisting yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coating (TBC). An inherent dilemma in producing a YAG:Dy coating is that coating processing is constrained to be performed at temperatures below (less than 1200C) what is considered safe for the superalloy component, much lower than temperatures used to produce the high quality crystalline powder. Therefore, YAG:Dy coatings tend to exhibit lower luminescence performance compared to well prepared YAG:Dy powder, and the luminescence performance of the coating will depend on the method of coating deposition. In this presentation, the luminescence performance of YAG:Dy coatings prepared by the different methods of (1) application of a binder-based YAG:Dy-containing paint, (2) solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS), and (3) electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) and the effect of post-deposition heat treatments will be discussed.

  18. Treatment of high myopia using a passively Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabu, Razvan V.; Carstocea, Benone D.; Burcea, M.

    1992-08-01

    A method of lens extraction after Nd:YAG laser capsulonucleolysis in the eyes with high myopia is described. The scheme and performance specifications of the Nd:YAG laser used for preparing the extracapsular lens extraction are presented. The treatment begins a few months before lens extraction by scleroplasty associated with cryoprofilaxy or Argon laser endocerclage. Twenty-four to forty-eight hours before the operation Nd:YAG laser pulses are applied on the exterior capsule, first in the periphery and then just in the middle of the pupila. A capsulonucleolysis is obtained and the extraction of the transparent lens is performed in extracapsular extraction of the cataract.

  19. YAG:Ce3+ Nanophosphor Synthesized with the Salted Sol-Gel Method

    SciTech Connect

    D. Jia; C. V. Shaffer; J. E. Weyant; A. Goonewardene; X. Guo; Y. Wang; X. Z. Guo; K. K. Li; Y. K. Zou; W. Jia

    2006-05-01

    Nano-phosphors of Y3Al5O12:Ce3+ (YAG:Ce) were synthesized with a novel salted sol-gel method, in which aqueous solution of inorganic salts (yttrium/cerium nitrates) were used along with the metal alkoxide precursor, aluminum sec-butoxide, Al(OC4H9)3. YAG single phase was formed at temperature as low as 800 C. Luminescence of YAG:Ce reached the maximum intensity when calcined above 1350C. The SEM image reveals that the grain sizes of the nano-phosphors calcined at 1100 C are in a range of 50-150 nm.

  20. Improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiao-qing; Zhu, Jing; Shi, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To observe and study the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser and evaluate the effective rate. Methods: 60 patients of internal hemorrhoids were treated with Nd:YAG laser (10-15mw) irradiating on the mucosa of the lesions. Results: Among 60 patients, 57 patients were primarily cured with one treatment, 3 patients were primarily cured with two treatments. The effective rate was 95% with one treatment, and it reached to 100% with two treatments. Conclusions: the improvement of the technique in treatment of internal hemorrhoids with Nd:YAG laser is effective and easy to operate.

  1. High-power LD end-pumped Tm:YAG ceramic slab laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Haitao; Shen, Deyuan; Fan, Xuliang; Yao, Weichao; Zhu, Heyuan; Zhang, Jian; Tang, Dingyuan

    2015-03-01

    A high-power Tm:YAG ceramic slab laser is reported. Deliberate thermal management was made to dissipate the heat effectively and release the stress in ceramics. The influence of pump wavelength on laser performance was investigated. A maximum of 52 W output power was achieved, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 27.8 % with respect to the incident pump power. As to our knowledge, this is the highest 2-μm laser output power reported in Tm:YAG ceramic lasers. This result proves that Tm:YAG laser ceramic is a promising candidate for 2-μm high-power laser applications.

  2. Experimental studies on the usage possibilities of the Nd:YAG laser in the cataract surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaomin; Ma, Nina; Li, Jiaze

    2005-01-01

    The investigations of used pulsed Q-switched neodymium:YAG laser induced plasma and shock wave during experimental lenses emulsification were presented. The formation and propagation of plasma and shock wave created by the high powered Nd:YAG laser pulses with a titanium target were imaged through optical multiple analysis, and the pressure of shock wave was calculated. The results of shock wave interacting with the lenses material were observed. The lenses, simulated at different hardness, were placed in containers filled with Ringer's solution. The experimental results are promising and show that the Nd:YAG laser can be used for human lens emulsification.

  3. Development of kW class Nd:YAG composite ceramic thin disc laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyama, K.; Bhushan, R.; Furukawa, H.; Tsubakimoto, K.; Yoshida, H.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, M.; Miyanaga, N.; Tamaoki, Y.; Kato, Y.; Kawashima, T.

    2013-03-01

    We are developing a high-repetition and high-average-power Nd:YAG laser amplifier pumped by fiber coupled LDs in order to apply to laser machining of carbon composite materials such as CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic). Final target is 1.5 kW output at wavelength of 1064 nm by 8 kW LD pumping. The amplifier consists of several Nd:YAG ceramic thin discs on a non-doped ceramic YAG block. At first, we measured wave-front distortion and small-signal gain of a prototype amplifier whose target is more than 500 W output.

  4. Laser dyes excited by high PRR Nd:YAG laser second-harmonic radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatov, A. N.; Donin, V. I.; Jakovin, D. V.; Reimer, I. V.

    2008-01-01

    The lasing characteristics of red-emitting dyes in ethanol excited by Nd:YAG laser second-harmonic radiation are examined. The Nd:YAG laser was pumped by a diode matrix. The pump pulse repetition rates (PRRs) were 2.5 - 10 kHz and the pulse duration was 60 - 300 ns. The following dyes were evaluated: oxazine 17, DCM, DCM sp, and pyridine 1. The conversion efficiency for oxazine was 25 % without wavelength selection and 15 % with wavelength selection over the tuning range from 630 to 700 nm. The Nd:YAG and dye laser designs used are described elsewhere [1,2].

  5. Resonantly pumped high efficiency Ho:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying-Jie; Yao, Bao-Quan; Duan, Xiao-Ming; Dai, Tong-Yu; Ju, You-Lun; Wang, Yue-Zhu

    2012-11-20

    High-efficient CW and Q-switched Ho:YAG lasers resonantly dual-end-pumped by two diode-pumped Tm:YLF lasers at 1908 nm were investigated. A maximum slope efficiency of 74.8% in CW operation as well as a maximum output power of 58.7 W at 83.2 W incident pump power was achieved, which corresponded to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 70.6%. The maximum pulse energy of 2.94 mJ was achieved, with a 31 ns FWHM pulse width and a peak power of approximately 94.7 kW. PMID:23207298

  6. Precise curvature measurement of Yb:YAG thin disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzik, Jiri; Chyla, Michal; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Miura, Taisuke; Mann, Klaus; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We are developing an Yb:YAG thin disk regenerative amplifier operating at 1 kHz repetition rate which should deliver output of 100 W of average power which corresponds to the pulse energy of 100 mJ. In order to achieve such high output energy, large size mode matching on a thin-disk is required to avoid optical damage but on the other hand, larger mode area is more susceptible to the influence of optical phase distortions (OPD's) thus limits achievable pulse energy and beam quality. We developed a compact setup allowing precise measurement of the thin-disk deformations by implementation of a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and a single mode probe laser diode. In comparison to the interferometric measurement methods, our approach brings a number of advantages like simplicity of alignment, compactness and robustness, at the same time keeping the high precision of measurement in a range of few nanometers.

  7. A new contact neodymium: YAG laser for cyclophotocoagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Iwach, A.G.; Drake, M.V.; Hoskins, H.D. Jr.; Schuster, B.L.; Vassiliadis, A.; Crawford, J.B.; Hennings, D.R. )

    1991-06-01

    A newly developed compact (40 kg), self-contained contact Neodymium:YAG laser produces high-peak, high-energy (800 mJ/pulse), short (1.0 millisecond) pulses with 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy is delivered via a 320-microns cleaved quartz fiber optic probe. Cyclophotocoagulation was performed in five eyes of three medium-sized Dutch-pigmented rabbits. The eyes received exposures of 1 to 3 pulses/exposure. Energy delivered ranged from 100 to 800 mJ/pulse. Histopathology revealed ciliary body disruption and hemorrhage with no damage to overlying sclera. When used for transscleral cyclodiathermy in the rabbit, the laser created significant ciliary body disruption with minimal scleral injury.

  8. Segmental irradiation of the bladder with neodymium YAG laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    McPhee, M.S.; Mador, D.R.; Tulip, J.; Ritchie, B.; Moore, R.; Lakey, W.H.

    1982-11-01

    The Neodymium YAG laser energy source can be readily adapted for cystoscopic use by some simple modifications of existing urologic equipment. Both the fiberoptic resectoscope and a deflecting cystourethroscope have been adapted for this purpose. Fixation of the fiber tip 1 cm. from the target and use of a divergent beam of 36 degrees allows the delivery of standardized dosage to a relatively large bladder tissue volume. Animal experiments involving 35 mongrel dogs established that repetitive overlapping doses of 200 joules ech can successfully treat a large area of bladder resulting in a full thickness bladder wall injury. This technique has been used in 4 high risk patients with infiltrating bladder cancer without adverse sequelae. The ability to reliably produce a full thickness lesion may give this modality a therapeutic advantage over conventional cautery techniques especially for the treatment of residual infiltrative carcinoma.

  9. Ho:YAG laser arthroscopy of the knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sisto, Domenick J.; Blazina, Martin E.; Hirsh, Linda C.

    1994-09-01

    The HO:YAG laser is a near-contact laser with a capacity to ablate or cut tissues. The ablation function allows the surgeon to remove meniscal tissue, lyse and resect adhesions, melt loose bodies, and dissolve inflamed synovium. The cutting function of the laser is utilized to perform a lateral release or resect torn menisci. The laser can also be utilized to drill holes in Grade IV chondromalacic lesions to initiate a healing response. The laser has been embraced by orthopaedic surgeons because of its shape and versatility. The tip is only 2 mm wide and can be delivered into the tight posterior compartments of the knee with no damaging contact with the articular surfaces. The laser coagulates as it works and bleeding is minimized. The laser can function both as a cutting and ablating tool. The laser can also drill holes into subchondral bone to, hopefully, initiate a healing response.

  10. Solar-pumped Er,Tm,Ho:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Benmair, R.M.J.; Kagan, J.; Kalisky, Y.; Noter, Y.; Oron, M.; Shimony, Y.; Yogev, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Direct solar illumination was used to pump a 5-mm-diameter 62-mm exposed-length rod of Er,Tm,Ho:YAG to achieve a quasi-cw lasing of the Ho ion at an average power of 12 W. The solar radiation was chopped at a 20% duty cycle to avoid overloading of the cooling system. The peak power output was more than 65 W during the chopper's open times. The slope efficiency is 3.8%, and the threshold input energy is approximately 100 W. The laser was operated for long times (up to hours) while maintaining its performance. This is, to our knowledge, the first directly solar-pumped laser operating at 77 K.

  11. Er:YAG laser for endodontics: efficiency and safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Stock, Karl; Gall, Robert; Keller, Ulrich

    1997-12-01

    Recently it has been shown that bacterias can be sterilized by Er:YAG laser irradiation. By optical fiber transmission the bactericidal effect can also be used in endodontics. In order to explore potential laser parameters, we further investigated sterilization of caries and measured temperatures in models simulating endodontic treatment. It was found out that the bactericidal effect is cumulative, with single pulses being active. This offers to choose all laser parameters except pulse energy (radiant exposure) from technical, practical or safety considerations. For clinical studies the following parameter set is proposed for efficient and safe application (teeth with a root wall thickness > 1 mm, and prepared up to ISO 50): pulse energy: 50 mJ, repetition rate: 15 Hz, fiber withdrawal velocity: 2 mm/s. With these settings 4 passes must be performed to accumulate the total dose for sterilization.

  12. Adiabatic passage with spin locking in Tm3+:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Winter, M. F.; Tongning, R. C.; Lauro, R.; Louchet-Chauvet, A.; Chanelière, T.; Le Gouët, J.-L.

    2012-08-01

    In low-concentration Tm3+:YAG, we observe efficient adiabatic rapid passage (ARP) of thulium nuclear spin over flipping times much longer than T2. Efficient ARP with long flipping time has been observed in monoatomic solids for decades and has been analyzed in terms of spin temperature and of the thermodynamic equilibrium of a coupled spin ensemble. In low-concentration impurity-doped crystals the spin temperature concept may be questioned. A single spin model should be preferred since the impurity ions are weakly coupled together but interact with the numerous off-resonant matrix ions that originate the spin-spin relaxation. The experiment takes place in the context of quantum information investigation, involving impurity-doped crystals, spin hyperpolarization by optical pumping, and optical detection of the spin evolution.

  13. Diode - Pumped Nd:YAG Lidar for Airborne Cloud Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehnert, A.; Halldorsson, TH.; Herrmann, H.; Haering, R.; Krichbaumer, W.; Streicher, J.; Werner, CH.

    1992-01-01

    This work is concerned with the experimental method used to separate scattering and to use it for the determination of cloud microphysical parameters. It is also the first airborne test of a lidar version related to the ATLID Program - ESA's scheduled spaceborne lidar. The already tested DLR microlidar was modified with the new diode-pumped laser and a faster data recording system was added. The system was used during the CLEOPATRA campaign in the DLR research aircraft Falcon 20 to measure cloud parameters. The diode pumped Nd:YAG laser we developed for the microlidar is a modification of the laser we introduced at the Lidar Congress at 'Laser 1991' in Munich. Various aspects of this work are discussed.

  14. Multifrequency YAG:Nd laser for diagnosis of malignant tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalayan, Asatur A.; Aydinyan, Lusine; Harutyunyan, Ishkhan G.; Galstian, Hayro M.

    1999-01-01

    The spectral peculiarities of normal and tumor human tissues of different localization after sensitization by sodium fluorescein has been studied with help of multifrequency YAG:Nd laser. Fluorescence spectra of normal human tissue and breast, stomach, intestine, skin cancer at 355, 440 nm laser excitation were registered. The pharmacokinetic behavior of sodium fluorescein in normal and different tumor tissues has been investigated. The optimal time for diagnosis (12 - 18 hours after drug injection) was determined. The intensification of tumor tissue autofluorescence decreasing after sensitization of organisms by tumor seeking dye was observed. The electron excitation energy transfer from NAD(P)H to endogen chromophores or dyes localized in tumor has been discussed as possible reason of the observed phenomenon.

  15. 400W Yb:YAG Innoslab fs-Amplifier.

    PubMed

    Russbueldt, P; Mans, T; Rotarius, G; Weitenberg, J; Hoffmann, H D; Poprawe, R

    2009-07-20

    The Innoslab design, already established for neodymium doped laser crystals, was applied to ytterbium doped laser materials. Recent progresses in brightness of high power diode lasers facilitate efficient pumping of quasi-three-level laser materials. Innoslab amplifiers are compared to competing thin-disk and fiber fs-amplifiers. A compact diode-pumped Yb:YAG Innoslab fs-oscillator-amplifier system, scalable to the kilowatt range, was realized. Numerical simulations result in conditions for high efficiency and beam quality. Nearly transform and diffraction limited 680 fs pulses at 400 W average output power and 76 MHz repetition rate without using CPA technology have been achieved at room temperature so far. PMID:19654625

  16. Preparation and characterization of Yb-doped YAG ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostaša, Jan; Esposito, Laura; Alderighi, Daniele; Pirri, Angela

    2013-02-01

    This work presents the results of the preparation of polycrystalline Yb:YAG ceramics for laser sources with dopant concentration from 0 up to 20 at.% via solid state reactive sintering. Samples were prepared via cold isostatic pressing of spray dried mixture of pure oxide powders with TEOS as a sintering aid. Sintering was conducted under high vacuum and clean atmosphere. Various sintering cycles were tested, so that optimum conditions could be selected in dependence on Yb concentration. Samples with optical transmittance higher than 80% were prepared and their laser performance was examined. Slope efficiency as high as 73% and a maximum output power of 6 W were obtained for the sample doped with 10% Yb. Final microstructure of prepared samples was analyzed via optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and EDS.

  17. Single, composite, and ceramic Nd:YAG 946-nm lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Rui-Jun; Yang, Guang; Zheng-Ping, Wang

    2015-06-01

    Single, composite crystal and ceramic continuous wave (CW) 946-nm Nd:YAG lasers are demonstrated, respectively. The ceramic laser behaves better than the crystal laser. With 5-mm long ceramic, a CW output power of 1.46 W is generated with an optical conversion efficiency of 13.9%, while the slope efficiency is 17.9%. The optimal ceramic length for a 946-nm laser is also calculated. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61405171), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2012FQ014), and the Science and Technology Program of the Shandong Higher Education Institutions of China (Grant No. J13LJ05).

  18. Mode-locked frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brookman, J. S.

    1976-01-01

    The design, fabrication, test, and delivery of two mode-locked, frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser systems are described. Each system was comprised of two units, the laser head and optics on an Invar plate and the electronics control unit in a relay rack chassis panel. Laser number one operated at a repetition rate of 400 MHz and was designed for use in an optical communication system. Laser number two operated at 200 MHz repetition rate and was designed for optical ranging and target signature experiments. Both lasers had a pulse width of 200 ps at the 10% amplitude points at 1.064 micrometer wavelength (150 ps at 0.532 micrometers) with an amplitude stability of + or - 4%. Output power exceeded the design goals.

  19. Q-switched Nd:YAG optical vortex lasers.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Kim, J W; Clarkson, W A

    2013-12-01

    Q-switched operation of a high-quality Nd:YAG optical vortex laser with the first order Laguerre-Gaussian mode and well-determined helical wavefronts using a fiber-based pump beam conditioning scheme is reported. A simple two-mirror resonator incorporating an acousto-optic Q-switch was employed, along with an etalon and a Brewster plate to enforce the particular helicity of the output. The laser yielded Q-switched pulses with ~250 μJ pulse energy and ~33 ns pulse duration (FWHM) at a 0.1 kHz repetition rate for 5.1 W of absorbed pump power. The handedness of the helical wavefronts was preserved regardless of the repetition rates. The prospects of further power scaling and improved laser performance are discussed. PMID:24514499

  20. Use of the holmium:YAG laser in urology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattioli, Stefano

    1997-12-01

    The Holmium-YAG is a versatile laser with multiple soft- tissue applications including tissue incision and vaporization, and pulsed-laser applications such as lithotripsy. At 2140 nanometers, the wavelength is highly absorbed by tissue water. Further, like CO2 laser, the Holmium produces immediate tissue vaporization while minimizing deep thermal damage to surrounding tissues. It is an excellent instrument for endopyelotomy, internal urethrotomy, bladder neck incisions and it can be used to resect the prostate. The Holmium creates an acute TUR defect which gives immediate results like the TURP. More than 50 patients were treated from Jan. 1996 to Jan. 1997 for obstructive symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, bladder neck stricture, urethral stenosis, and superficial bladder tumors.

  1. Mode-locked Cr4+: YAG laser: model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theimer, J.; Hayduk, M.; Krol, M. F.; Haus, J. W.

    1997-02-01

    A mode-locked Cr 4+:YAG laser was simulated using a complex Landau-Ginzburg equation. The pulse widths and spectrum were determined as a function of laser tuning over a range from 1470 nm to 1550 nm. Simulations exhibit the same trend as the experimental data and the magnitudes are in reasonable agreement, as well. We are able to analytically estimate the pulse width, which is controlled by the cavity dispersion and the pulse energy. We find that the absorber saturation is responsible for determining the pulse energies. The experimentally observed pulse widths widen for long wavelengths; our simulations attribute this to dispersion and to a wavelength-dependent reduction of the saturable absorber modulation combined with the effect of gain saturation.

  2. Numerical simulation of a battlefield Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksson, Markus; Sjoqvist, Lars; Uhrwing, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A numeric model has been developed to identify the critical components and parameters in improving the output beam quality of a flashlamp pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with a folded Porro-prism resonator and polarization output coupling. The heating of the laser material and accompanying thermo-optical effects are calculated using the finite element partial differential equations package FEMLAB allowing arbitrary geometries and time distributions. The laser gain and the cavity are modeled with the physical optics simulation code GLAD including effects such as gain profile, thermal lensing and stress-induced birefringence, the Pockels cell rise-time and component aberrations. The model is intended to optimize the pumping process of an OPO providing radiation to be used for ranging, imaging or optical countermeasures.

  3. Pulse-burst operation of standard Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Den Hartog, D. J.; Ambuel, J. R.; Borchardt, M. T.; Reusch, J. A.; Robl, P. E.; Yang, Y. M.

    2010-05-01

    Two standard commercial flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG lasers have been upgraded to "pulse-burst" capability. Each laser produces a burst of up to fifteen 2 J Q-switched pulses (1064 nm) at repetition rates 1-12.5 kHz. Variable pulse-width drive (0.15-0.39 ms) of the flashlamps is accomplished by IGBT (insulated gate bipolar transistor) switching of electrolytic capacitor banks. Direct control of the laser Pockels cell drive enables optimal pulse energy extraction, and up to four 2 J laser pulses during one flashlamp pulse. These lasers are used in the Thomson scattering plasma diagnostic system on the MST reversed-field pinch to study the dynamic evolution of the electron temperature.

  4. Amalgam ablation with the Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-04-01

    Any laser that will be used by dentist to replace the dental drill (handpiece) must remove dental hard tissues safely. These lasers must also have the ability to ablate the restorative dental materials which are present in the teeth being treated. Prior to any laser being used to treat humans a thorough knowledge of the effects of the laser treatment on dental materials must be understood. Cores of dental amalgam were created and sliced into thin wafers for this experiment. Ablation efficiency and thermal changes were evaluated with and without water. It appears as if the Er:YAG laser can effectively ablate amalgam dental material with and without water. The water prevents the temperature from increasing much above baseline and does not reduce efficiency of ablation.

  5. LED pumped Nd:YAG laser development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, G. I.; Kiang, Y. C.; Lynch, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The results of a development program for light emitting diode (LED) pumped Nd:YAG lasers are described. An index matching method to increase the coupling efficiency of the laser is described. A solid glass half-cylinder of 5.0 by 5.6 centimeters was used for index matching and also as a pumping cavity reflector. The laser rods were 1.5 by 56 millimeters with dielectric coatings on both end surfaces. The interfaces between the diode array, glass cylinder, and laser rod were filled with viscous fluid of refractive index n = 1.55. Experiments performed with both the glass cylinder and a gold coated stainless steel reflector of the same dimensions under the same operating conditions indicate that the index matching cylinder gave 159 to 200 percent improvement of coupling efficiency over the metal reflector at various operating temperatures.

  6. Characterization and FDTD simulation analysis on light trapping structures of amorphous silicon thin films by laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lu; Jin, Jing; Yuan, Zhijun; Yang, Weiguang; Wang, Linjun; Shi, Weimin; Zhou, Jun; Lou, Qihong

    2016-05-01

    The effect of laser energy density on the light-trapping structures of amorphous silicon (α-Si) thin films is studied both theoretically and experimentally. The thin films are irradiated by a frequency-doubled (λ = 532 nm) Nd:YAG pulsed nanosecond laser. An effective finite difference time domain (FDTD) model is built to find the optimized laser energy density (EL) for the light trapping structures of α-Si. Based on the simulation analysis, it shows the variation of reflection spectra with laser energy density. The optimized reflection spectra at EL = 1000 mJ/cm2 measured by UV-visible spectroscopy confirms to agree well with that corresponding to the depth to diameter ratio (h/D) in the FDTD simulation. The surface morphology characterization by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) accords fairly well to of light-trapping modeling in the simulation.

  7. SEM investigation of Er:YAG laser apical preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bǎlǎbuc, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Locovei, Cosmin; RǎduÅ£ǎ, Aurel

    2016-03-01

    Endodontic surgery involves the incision and flap elevation, the access to the root tip, its resection, the cavity retrograde preparation and filling it with biocompatible material that provides a good seal of the apex[1]. Apicoectomy is compulsory in endodontic surgery. The final stage involves the root retropreparation and the carrying out of the retrograde obturation. In order to perform the retrograde preparation the endodontist can use various tools such as lowspeed conventional handpieces, sonic and ultrasonic equipment. The ideal depth of the preparation should be 3 mm, exceeding this value may affect the long-term success of the obturation [2]. Resection at the depth of 3 mm reduces apical ramifications by 98% and lateral root canals by 93%. The ultrasonic retropreparation has numerous advantages compared to the dental drill. Firstly, the cavity will be in the axis of the tooth which implies a minimum destruction of the root canal morphology. The preparations are precise, and the cutting pattern is perpendicular to the long axis of the root, the advantage being the reduction in the number of dentinal tubules exposed at the resected area [3]. Therefore, the retrograde filling is the procedure when an inert and non-toxic material is compacted in the apically created cavity.[4,5]. The Er:YAG laser is the most common wavelength indicated for dental hard tissue preparation. Its natural selectivity offers a significant advantage compared to the conventional hard tissue preparation [6-9].The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the quality of Er:YAG laser apical third preparation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), in comparison with the conventional ultrasonic method.

  8. Design of Er:YAG laser blood-sampling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhi-chao; Jin, Guang-yong; Tan, Xue-chun; Ling, Ming; Liang, Zhu

    2009-07-01

    Laser blood-sampling device is one of the foremost tasks in medicine domain. It has a lot of merits such as un-touching, avoiding infection, indolence, and fast healing etc. The Er:YAG laser with wavelength of 2.94μm which is just close to the absorbency peak of water can be strongly absorbed by water molecular, so it has very wide application value in clinical medicine. In the paper, based on the mutual action characters of the laser with 2.94μm wave length on biological tissues, such as high absorption, acting on surface, the design of a new type of laser blood-sampling device is introduced. According to the needs of practice, the main component of the blood-sampling device is the laser, which includes optical resonator, optical collector, pumping source, optical guidance and focusing system. All of them are designed in the paper, and the reflection index of output coupling mirror of laser is optimized, the laser threshold is reduced, and pumping efficiency is improved. Moreover, thermal effect of Er:YAG solid-state laser is analyzed and a reasonable cooling method is designed. As a result, an excellent laser blood- sampling is obtained, the maximum output power is about 1J, the optical to optical conversion efficiency is 1.2%. For the better production-grade, the cuprum-based conduction is adopt to eliminate heat, the precision modulation and fixing of the optical resonance is achieved by the special adjusting structure that not only improve the stability and reliability, but also reduce the size of laser bloodsampling device. The size is 110×190×320mm, the weight is about 5.8kg, and the laser blood- sampling efficiency is 100%.

  9. High-average-power diode-pumped Yb: YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Avizonis, P V; Beach, R; Bibeau, C M; Emanuel, M A; Harris, D G; Honea, E C; Monroe, R S; Payne, S A; Skidmore, J A; Sutton, S B

    1999-10-01

    A scaleable diode end-pumping technology for high-average-power slab and rod lasers has been under development for the past several years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This technology has particular application to high average power Yb:YAG lasers that utilize a rod configured gain element. Previously, this rod configured approach has achieved average output powers in a single 5 cm long by 2 mm diameter Yb:YAG rod of 430 W cw and 280 W q-switched. High beam quality (M{sup 2} = 2.4) q-switched operation has also been demonstrated at over 180 W of average output power. More recently, using a dual rod configuration consisting of two, 5 cm long by 2 mm diameter laser rods with birefringence compensation, we have achieved 1080 W of cw output with an M{sup 2} value of 13.5 at an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 27.5%. With the same dual rod laser operated in a q-switched mode, we have also demonstrated 532 W of average power with an M{sup 2} < 2.5 at 17% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. These q-switched results were obtained at a 10 kHz repetition rate and resulted in 77 nsec pulse durations. These improved levels of operational performance have been achieved as a result of technology advancements made in several areas that will be covered in this manuscript. These enhancements to our architecture include: (1) Hollow lens ducts that enable the use of advanced cavity architectures permitting birefringence compensation and the ability to run in large aperture-filling near-diffraction-limited modes. (2) Compound laser rods with flanged-nonabsorbing-endcaps fabricated by diffusion bonding. (3) Techniques for suppressing amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) and parasitics in the polished barrel rods.

  10. Treatment of urethral diseases with neodymium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Bloiso, G; Warner, R; Cohen, M

    1988-08-01

    Over a thirty-month period, a wide variety of common urethral problems were treated on an ambulatory basis, with the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. When used discriminately, laser treatment appears to be an effective modality for the management of selected urethral strictures. Thus far, excellent results have been obtained in 30 of 31 cases of short strictures where laser urethrotomy was performed as the first stricture procedure (average follow-up 10 months). Furthermore, in a series of 36 cases of secondary bladder neck contractures, all of the evaluated patients responded well (average follow-up 7 months). Good results were obtained in only 11 of 48 complicated strictures (average follow-up 14 months). However, while most of these extensive strictures were not eradicated, laser therapy generally produced a documented clinical improvement, comparable to urethrotomy or dilatation, in 15 of these cases. A series of 24 condylomata involving the urethra were treated satisfactorily, with no recurrences (average follow-up 13 months). Laser treatment also has been used successfully for the management of several urethral caruncles, urethral polyps, two meatal hemangiomas, one urethral carcinoma, and a distal duplicated urethra. Recently, the Nd:YAG laser has been applied to the prostatic urethra with vaporization of obstructing median bar hyperplasia. Favorable results have been achieved in 5 of 6 cases treated with a newly developed technique that utilizes direct laser contact. Retrograde ejaculation has not been encountered in these patients (average follow-up 6 months). All of these procedures have been accomplished in the office, largely without urethral catheterization. Lidocaine jelly occasionally supplemented with intravenous sedation provided satisfactory anesthesia. PMID:3400132

  11. Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Akaishi, Satoshi; Koike, Sachiko; Dohi, Teruyuki; Kobe, Kyoko; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cutaneous scars such as keloids and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are characterized by a diffuse redness that is caused by the overgrowth of capillary vessels due to chronic inflammation. Our group has been using long-pulsed, 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser in noncontact mode with low fluence and a submillisecond pulse duration to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars since 2006 with satisfactory results. The present study examined the efficacy of this approach in 22 Japanese patients with keloids (n = 16) or hypertrophic scars (n = 6) who were treated every 3 to 4 weeks. Treatment settings were as follows: 5 mm spot size diameter; 14 J/cm2 energy density; 300 μs exposure time per pulse; and 10 Hz repetition rate. The responses of the pathological scars to the treatment were assessed by measuring their erythema, hypertrophy, hardness, itching, and pain or tenderness. Moreover, skin samples from 3 volunteer patients were subjected to histological evaluation and 5 patients underwent thermography during therapy. The average total scar assessment score dropped from 9.86 to 6.34. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Elastica Masson-Goldner staining showed that laser treatment structurally changed the tissue collagen. This influence reached a depth of 0.5 to 1 mm. Electron microscopy revealed plasma protein leakage, proteoglycan particles, and a change in the collagen fiber fascicles. Further analyses revealed that noncontact mode Nd:YAG laser treatment is highly effective for keloids and hypertrophic scars regardless of patient age, the origin and multiplicity of scarring, the location of the scar(s), or the tension on the scar. PMID:22259645

  12. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser welding of titanium ear implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gedopt, Jan; Delarbre, Erwin

    2000-11-01

    Three different prototypes of ear implants have been successfully produced using Nd-YAG laser welding. The prototypes differ in use and dimensions. This presentation will deal with the latest developed ear implant, i.e. a box containing special electronics inside. The implant has to be He leak tight, the weld penetration should be between 50 and 65% of the cover in order to be sure to avoid damage of the electronics in the box and the temperature should not exceed 100 degree(s)C during welding. Furthermore no sharp edges and no surface contamination or oxidation is allowed. Pulsed Nd-YAG welding proved to be a fabrication technique who allowed satisfying those conditions. Through an appropriate choice of pulse energy, pulse time, pulse frequency, overlap and an external cooling device we succeeded to fulfil all those requirements. Special devices have been developed and are used to position the boxes adequately in front of the laser beam. During the welding a copper heat sink was used to eliminate the developed heat, and at the same time this was used to keep a good contact between the cover and the rest of the box. In the development phase the internal temperature during the welding cycle has been measured. With an appropriate choice of pulse frequency, pulse time, the internal temperature could be limited to about 80 degree(s)C. XPS measurements have also been performed on dummies in order to control the eventual formation of a titanium deposit during welding. Finally 30 implants have been welded successfully, and they will now be used for further medical tests, first on animals and later on human beings.

  13. Comparison between the perfomance of Nd:YAG, Nd/Cr:GSGG and Nd/Cr:YAG ceramic lasers with quasi-solar pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouadjemine, R.; Louhibi, D.; Kellou, A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in laser materials, such as Nd/Cr:YAG ceramic with a broad absorption spectrum in the visible, have been applied to achieve highly-efficient and low-cost optical pumping by conventional sources. Our simulator based on the implementation of a mathematical model under Matlab Simulink allowed us to show the correlation between the characteristics of the laser mode of operation (such as Relaxation, Quasi-continuous wave (QCW), Continuous wave, Burst, Q-switched) and the various physical parameters of the oscillator. This model was applied to the Nd:YAG crystal, Nd/Cr:GSGG crystal and Nd/Cr:YAG ceramic. The simulation results demonstrated that Nd/Cr:YAG ceramic is an excellent candidate for solar and quasi-solar pumping, as its pumping efficiency exceeds by a factor of four that of the Nd:YAG crystal medium, and by a factor of two that of Nd/Cr:GSGG crystal. A pumping by a light guide was considered in this simulation.

  14. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn–Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer–Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo–Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann–Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  15. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    DOEpatents

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  16. Fabrication and thermal effects of highly transparent polycrystalline Nd:YAG ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yuelong; Li, Jiang; Liu, Yang; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Lei; Zhao, Hong; Pan, Yubai

    2015-11-01

    Highly transparent polycrystalline 2.0 at.% Nd:YAG ceramics were fabricated by a solid-state reactive sintering method using commercial α-Al2O3, Y2O3 and Nd2O3 powders as starting materials. The in-line transmittances of the Nd:YAG ceramics vacuum sintered at 1750 °C for 50 h with the thickness of 5.8 mm are 83.9% at 1064 nm and 82.5% at 400 nm. The thermal effects in the Nd:YAG ceramics were mainly investigated in detail. It is found that the thermal focal length decreases with the increase of pump power. The experimental results of thermal focal lengths are in accordance with the theoretical calculations. The observed depolarized beam patterns and depolarization phenomena illustrate the detailed change of thermally induced birefringence in Nd:YAG ceramics. The depolarization shows a obvious nonlinear change tendency at low pump power.

  17. Transpupillary CW YAG laser coagulation. A comparison with argon green and krypton red lasers.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B

    1983-08-01

    The authors have developed a CW YAG laser for transpupillary coagulation. The effects of CW YAG coagulation on the retina, retinal vessels, and fovea were compared with those produced by the krypton red and argon green lasers. To produce threshold coagulative lesions in monkeys and rabbits, we needed five to ten times more energy with the CW YAG than with the krypton red or argon green lasers. Nerve fiber damage was observed only when coagulating retinal vessels with the argon green laser. At the parameters used, none of the lasers damaged the sensory retina of the fovea. The CW YAG may be used as a new mode of laser coagulation in the treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:6688868

  18. Different cooling configurations for a high average power longitudinally diode-pumped Yb:YAG amplifier.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haiwu; Bourdet, Gilbert

    2006-08-20

    We analyze the temperature distribution in several Yb:YAG longitudinally pumped amplifier crystals by using various cooling configurations. The crystal designs are (i) a composite crystal made of a thin sheet of high-doped Yb:YAG bonded on a bulk piece of undoped YAG and (ii) a thick piece of low-doped Yb:YAG crystal. The cooling configurations investigated here include those both from the rear face or from the rear and side faces together. In every case we determine the average temperature rise, the longitudinal and radial temperature gradient, and the resulting crystal bending and optical phase distortion. We optimize the best cooling configuration and crystal design by compromising the average temperature, thermodeformation, and optical phase distortion. The experimental results also indicate that a thin sheet of gain medium (1.6 mm thick at 10 at. % doping) suffers from a notable bending deformation, which results in an unexpected decrease of the output energy. PMID:16892125

  19. Injection-seeded operation of a Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Sammy W.; Hale, Charley P.; Magee, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Single-frequency Tm,Ho:YAG lasers operating near 2 microns are attractive sources for several applications including eye-safe laser radar (lidar) and pumping of AgGaSe2 parametric oscillators for efficient generation of longer wavelengths. As part of a program to develop a coherent lidar system using Tm,Ho:YAG lasers, a diode laser-pumped tunable CW single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser and a flashlamp-pumped single-transverse-mode Q-switched Cr,Tm,Ho:YAG laser were developed. The CW laser was used to injection-seed the flashlamp-pumped laser, resulting in SLM Q-switched output. Operational characteristics of the CW and Q-switched lasers and injection-seeding results are reported.

  20. Flashlamp Pumped, Room Temperature, Nd:YAG Laser Operating at 0.946 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Murray, Keith E.; Walsh, Brian M.

    1998-01-01

    Room temperature operation of flashlamp pumped Nd:YAG at 0.946 micrometers was achieved with a laser rod having undoped ends. Performance was characterized and compared with 1.064 micrometer operation and other quasi four level lasers.

  1. Charge transfer processes and ultraviolet induced absorption in Yb:YAG single crystal laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydberg, S.; Engholm, M.

    2013-06-01

    Charge transfer (CT) transitions and UV induced color centers in Yb:YAG single crystals have been investigated. A simultaneous pair formation of a stable Yb2+ ion and a hole related (O-) color center (hole polaron) are observed through a CT-process. Slightly different types of hole related color centers are formed in Yb:YAG crystals containing small levels of iron impurities. Furthermore, excitation spectroscopy on the UV irradiated Yb:YAG samples could confirm an energy transfer process between Yb3+ and Yb2+ ions. The findings are important for an increased knowledge of the physical loss mechanisms observed in Yb-doped laser materials, such as the nonlinear decay process in Yb:YAG crystals as well as the photodarkening phenomenon in Yb-doped fiber lasers.

  2. Analysis on the effect of urethra caruncle treated by Ho:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Mei-Jue; Zhu, Jing; Shi, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of Ho:YAG laser in treatment of urethra cauncle. Methods: The patients suffering from urethra cauncle were treated by Ho:YAG laser, the energy of per pulse is 0.5J. The frequency of pulse is 5~15Hz, and the average power of the laser is 2.5~7.5W. Results: Among the patients 188 cases of urethra cauncle were only cured for one time, twice for12 cases. No stricture on the peristome of urethra or urethrovaginal fistula was observed. Conclusions: The technique of treatment of urethra cauncle with Ho:YAG laser is an effect and safe therapeutics with the merit of excellent homeostasis, improved visualization, minimal thermal damage to surrounding tissue, shorter period of recovery and easy to operate. It is better than CO2 laser and Nd:YAG laser.

  3. Passively Q-switched Nd:YAG ceramic microchip laser with azimuthally polarized output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.-L.; Lin, D.; Zhong, L.-X.; Ueda, K.; Shirakawa, A.; Musha, M.; Chen, W.-B.

    2009-10-01

    A passively-Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) ceramic microchip laser was demonstrated to emit azimuthally polarized beam bus using a chromium-doped YAG (Cr4+:YAG) crystal as saturable absorber and a multilayer concentric subwavelength grating as polarization-selective output coupler. The laser's output power reached 512 mW with an initial slope efficiency of nearly 60%, and the pulse had 1.15-kW peak power with 40-ns duration and 11-kHz repetition rate at 3.9-W absorbed pump power. The laser beam's polarization degree was 97.6%. The thermal lensing effect in Nd:YAG microchip remained as a problem to be solved.

  4. Up Conversion Measurements in Er:YAG; Comparison with 1.6 Micrometer Laser Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Walsh, Brian M.; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Reichle, Donald J.; Busch, George E.; Carrion, William A.

    2011-01-01

    Up conversion significantly affects Er:YAG lasers. Measurements performed here for low Er concentration are significantly different than reported high Er concentration. The results obtained here are used to predict laser performance and are compared with experimental results.

  5. All solid-state picosecond flashlamp pumped oscillator-amplifier Nd:YAG laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Cech, Miroslav; Kubecek, Vaclav; Dombrovsky, Andrej; Diels, Jean-Claude M.; Stintz, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    Flashlamp pumped oscillator - three amplifiers Nd:YAG picosecond laser system mode-locked with multiple quantum well (MQW) saturable absorber was developed and investigated. 80 ps long pulses with the energy of 120 mJ were generated.

  6. Use of the Q-switch Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kecik, Dariusz

    1997-10-01

    The most frequent uses of the Nd:YAG laser in the surgical treatment for cataract are presented. Preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative applications are discussed together with the most frequency complications.

  7. Scattering effect and laser performance for the Nd:YAG transparent ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Liu, W.; Gao, H.; Jiang, B.; Wang, Y.; Kou, H.; Shen, Y.; Pan, Y.; Bo, Y.; Peng, Q.; Cui, D.; Jiang, D.; Xu, Z.

    2011-09-01

    The scattering is the critical loss mechanism in transparent laser ceramic materials. We present a method to determine the scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient of laser material based on an integrating sphere technique. Here, the neodymium ceramic Nd:YAG samples with Nd3+ ions doping concentration of 1.0 at% are used. For a comparison, a Nd:YAG single crystal with identical concentration is also employed. The measured scattering coefficient and absorption coefficient at 1064 nm for high quality ceramic Nd:YAG were 0.004 cm-1 and 0.001 cm-1, which were very close to that of single crystal. The optical uniformity and wave-front distortion properties were also investigated by means of a Hartmann wavefront analyzer. The following laser performance tests demonstrate a maximum output power of 425 W in a short plano-plano configuration for the high quality Nd:YAG ceramic, which was nearly same with that of single crystal.

  8. Reduction of timing jitter in a Q-Switched Nd:YAG laser by direct bleaching of a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brian; Goldberg, Lew; Trussell, C Ward; Hays, Alan; Schilling, Bradley W; McIntosh, Chris

    2009-02-01

    A method for optical triggering of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser by direct bleaching of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber is described. This method involves the bleaching of a thin sheet of the saturable absorber from a direction orthogonal to the lasing axis using a single laser diode bar, where the Cr:YAG transmission increased from a non-bleached value of 47% to a bleached value of 63%. For steady state operation of a passively Q-switched laser (PRF=10 Hz), the pulse-to-pulse timing jitter showed approximately 12X reduction in standard deviation, from 241 nsec for free running operation to 20 nsec with optical triggering. PMID:19189006

  9. Slow dissolution behaviour of amorphous capecitabine.

    PubMed

    Meulenaar, Jelte; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2013-01-30

    In this article, we report the anomalous dissolution behaviour of amorphous capecitabine. In contrast to what is expected from thermodynamic theory, amorphous capecitabine dissolves significantly slower compared to its crystalline counterpart. Our experiments show that this is due to the "gelling" properties of amorphous capecitabine in an aqueous environment. The "gel", which is immediately formed upon contact with water, entraps the capecitabine and significantly slows down its dissolution. This "gelling" property is hypothesized to be related to the low glass transition temperature (Tg 19°C) of amorphous capecitabine, resulting in an instant collapse ("gelling") in an aqueous environment. From IR and DSC analysis it is shown that this collapsed capecitabine is remarkably stable and does not recrystallize upon an increased water content or temperature. This highly reproducible dissolution behaviour can be applied in the development of a sustained release dosage form as substantially less sustained release excipient is required in order to attain the desired release profile. As capecitabine is a high-dosed drug, this is highly favourable in view of the size and thus clinical feasibility of the final dosage form. Currently, we are developing and clinically testing a sustained release formulation making use of amorphous capecitabine and its remarkable dissolution behaviour. PMID:23219704

  10. SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS

    SciTech Connect

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie

    2012-10-01

    Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

  11. Amorphous silicon detectors in positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Conti, M. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Perez-Mendez, V. )

    1989-12-01

    The physics of the detection process is studied and the performances of different Positron Emission Tomography (PET) system are evaluated by theoretical calculation and/or Monte Carlo Simulation (using the EGS code) in this paper, whose table of contents can be summarized as follows: a brief introduction to amorphous silicon detectors and some useful equation is presented; a Tantalum/Amorphous Silicon PET project is studied and the efficiency of the systems is studied by Monte Carlo Simulation; two similar CsI/Amorphous Silicon PET projects are presented and their efficiency and spatial resolution are studied by Monte Carlo Simulation, light yield and time characteristics of the scintillation light are discussed for different scintillators; some experimental result on light yield measurements are presented; a Xenon/Amorphous Silicon PET is presented, the physical mechanism of scintillation in Xenon is explained, a theoretical estimation of total light yield in Xenon and the resulting efficiency is discussed altogether with some consideration of the time resolution of the system; the amorphous silicon integrated electronics is presented, total noise and time resolution are evaluated in each of our applications; the merit parameters {epsilon}{sup 2}{tau}'s are evaluated and compared with other PET systems and conclusions are drawn; and a complete reference list for Xenon scintillation light physics and its applications is presented altogether with the listing of the developed simulation programs.

  12. Crystallization of amorphous Zr-Be alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovkova, E. A.; Surkov, A. V.; Syrykh, G. F.

    2015-02-01

    The thermal stability and structure of binary amorphous Zr100 - x Be x alloys have been studied using differential scanning calorimetry and neutron diffraction over a wide concentration range (30 ≤ x ≤ 65). The amorphous alloys have been prepared by rapid quenching from melt. The studied amorphous system involves the composition range around the eutectic composition with boundary phases α-Zr and ZrBe2. It has been found that the crystallization of alloys with low beryllium contents ("hypoeutectic" alloys with x ≤ 40) proceeds in two stages. Neutron diffraction has demonstrated that, at the first stage, α-Zr crystallizes and the remaining amorphous phase is enriched to the eutectic composition; at the second stage, the alloy crystallizes in the α-Zr and ZrBe2 phases. At higher beryllium contents ("hypereutectic" alloys), one phase transition of the amorphous phase to a mixture of the α-Zr and ZrBe2 phases has been observed. The concentration dependences of the crystallization temperature and activation energy have been revealed.

  13. Micro-machining workstation for a diode pumped Nd:YAG high-brightness laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleijhorst, R. A.; Offerhaus, H. L.; Bant, P.

    1998-05-01

    A Nd:YAG micro-machining workstation that allows cutting on a scale of a few microns has been developed and operated. The system incorporates a telescope viewing system that allows control during the work and a software interface to translate AutoCad files. Some examples of the performance are given. With this setup we demonstrate the possibility of machining within a few microns with a Nd:YAG laser.

  14. Nd: YAG laser therapy of rectosigmoid bleeding due to radiation injury

    SciTech Connect

    Leuchter, R.S.; Petrilli, E.S.; Dwyer, R.M.; Hacker, N.F.; Castaldo, T.W.; Lagasse, L.D.

    1982-06-01

    The Nd:YAG laser was used to treat a patient bleeding from the rectosigmoid as a result of radiation injury related to therapy for cervical carcinoma. Successful laser therapy was performed after a diverting colostomy failed to control persistent bleeding. Further surgical procedures were not required. Characteristics of Nd:YAG laser as compared with those of the carbon dioxide and argon lasers are considered.

  15. Er:YAG laser for the surgical treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, Detlef; Ebinger, Thomas; Illich, Wolfgang; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    2003-10-01

    We developed a new surgical procedure to improve the recurrence rate using an Er:YAG laser as dissection tool for the carpal ligament with the objective to ablate a small amount of the carpal ligament and to denaturate its ends. The Er:YAG Laser was transmitted to the applicator via a GeO fiber. With this system we proceeded 10 carpal ligament dissections without any complications in the follow-up period. All patients were free of pain and recurrence.

  16. Study of myosis in operation of the Nd:YAG laser anterior capsulotomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Nian; Ni, Xiao-Wu; Lu, Jian; He, Anzhi

    1993-03-01

    In this paper, 30 cases of extracapsular cataract extractions with the assistance of an Nd:YAG laser are reported. Myosis phenomenon in laser operation is observed and its producing mechanism is discussed. Laser ophthalmology was the earliest field in laser application research, and pulse Nd:YAG laser ophthalmic instruments have been developed rapidly because of unique advantages in the anterior and posterior capsulotomy and trabecula shaping method.

  17. Holographic interferometry with an injection seeded Nd:YAG laser and two reference beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.

    1989-01-01

    The performance of twin injection seeded Nd:YAG lasers is compared with the performance of an argon-ion laser for recording dual-reference-beam holograms in AGFA 8E56 emulsion. Optical heterodyning is used to measure interference, and the results are expressed in terms of heterodyning signal level and intensity signal-to-noise. The Nd:YAG laser system is to be used for optical inspections of structures for cracks, defects, gas leaks, and structural changes.

  18. Features of YAG crystal growth under Ar+CO reducing atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhipov, P.; Tkachenko, S.; Vasiukov, S.; Hubenko, K.; Gerasymov, Ia.; Baumer, V.; Puzan, A.; Mateychenko, P.; Lebbou, K.; Sidletskiy, O.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of the reducing Ar+CO atmosphere on the stages of starting raw material preparation, growth and post-growth annealing of yttrium aluminum garnet, Y3Al5O12 (YAG) crystals was studied. The chemical reactions involving CO atmosphere and its impact on the raw material, melt, and crystal composition are determined. Modification of YAG optical properties under the reducing annealing is discussed.

  19. Holmium:YAG laser-assisted otolaryngologic surgery: Lahey Clinic experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapshay, Stanley M.; Rebeiz, Elie E.; Pankratov, Michail M.

    1993-07-01

    The Holmium:YAG laser was used to assist in 36 rhinologic procedures including surgery for chronic sinus disease, chronic dacryocystitis, recurrent choanal stenosis, and a sphenoid sinus mucocele. There were no laser related complications. The laser permitted controlled ablation of bone and soft tissue in all cases with satisfactory results. The Ho:YAG laser can be used in otolaryngology to assist in cases where surgical access is difficult or when controlled, precise bone and soft tissue ablation is necessary.

  20. Nd:YAG end pumped by semiconductor laser arrays for free space optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sipes, D. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary experimental results are reported for a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser employing a tightly focused end-pump geometry. The resonator configuration is planoconcave, with the pumped end of the Nd:YAG rod being coated for high reflection at 1.06 microns. This geometry rectifies nearly all the inefficiencies plaguing side-pumped schemes. This laser is further considered as a candidate for optical communication over the deep space channel.

  1. Diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser injection seeding system

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.L.; Rahn, L.A.

    1986-03-01

    We have designed and tested a compact injection seeding system consisting of a diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator and a permanent-magnet Faraday isolator. With active resonator frequency stabilization, this system permits highly reliable single-axial-mode operation of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser over a period of hours. The system is capable of injection seeding both stable and unstable resonator designs and is suitable for injection seeding commercial lasers with only minor modifications.

  2. The growth of Ho:YAG single crystals by Czochralski method and investigating the formed cores

    SciTech Connect

    Hasani Barbaran, J. Ghani Aragi, M. R.; Javaheri, I.; Baharvand, B.; Tabasi, M.; Layegh Ahan, R.; Jangjo, E.

    2015-12-15

    Ho:YAG single crystals were grown by Czochralski technique, and investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical methods. The crystals were cut and polished in order to observe and analyze their cores. It was found that the deviation of the cores formed in the Czochralski grown Ho:YAG single crystals are resulted from non-symmetrical status of thermal insulation around the Iridium crucible.

  3. Amorphous Silicon Based Neutron Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Liwei

    2004-12-12

    Various large-scale neutron sources already build or to be constructed, are important for materials research and life science research. For all these neutron sources, neutron detectors are very important aspect. However, there is a lack of a high-performance and low-cost neutron beam monitor that provides time and temporal resolution. The objective of this SBIR Phase I research, collaboratively performed by Midwest Optoelectronics, LLC (MWOE), the University of Toledo (UT) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is to demonstrate the feasibility for amorphous silicon based neutron beam monitors that are pixilated, reliable, durable, fully packaged, and fabricated with high yield using low-cost method. During the Phase I effort, work as been focused in the following areas: 1) Deposition of high quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films using very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (VHF PECVD) at high deposition rate and with low device shunting; 2) Fabrication of Si/SiO2/metal/p/i/n/metal/n/i/p/metal/SiO2/ device for the detection of alpha particles which are daughter particles of neutrons through appropriate nuclear reactions; and 3) Testing of various devices fabricated for alpha and neutron detection; As the main results: · High quality, low-defect-density, low-stress a-Si films have been successfully deposited using VHF PECVD on various low-cost substrates; · Various single-junction and double junction detector devices have been fabricated; · The detector devices fabricated have been systematically tested and analyzed. · Some of the fabricated devices are found to successfully detect alpha particles. Further research is required to bring this Phase I work beyond the feasibility demonstration toward the final prototype devices. The success of this project will lead to a high-performance, low-cost, X-Y pixilated neutron beam monitor that could be used in all of the neutron facilities worldwide. In addition, the technologies

  4. Diode radial pumped composite microchip Yb:YAG laser: output performances and thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dascalu, Traian; Pavel, Nicolaie A.; Taira, Takunori

    2004-10-01

    A diode radial pumped microchip Yb:YAG laser that consists of a Yb-doped core surrounded by undoped YAG of slab shape is presented. Quasi-continuous wave pumping of an 800-μm thick 10-at.% Yb doped core of 2 x 2 mm2 square shape with pulses of 5-Hz repetition rate and 2.5% duty cycle delivers 66-W output peak power at 220-W input pump power with 49% slope efficiency. 112-W peak power with 63% slope efficiency and 38% optical-to-optical efficiency, were obtained from a of 1.2 x 1.2 mm2 square 15-at.% Yb:YAG core of 800-μm thickness. Continuous-wave operation with up to 90 W were obtained from a 400-μm thick Yb:YAG/YAG structure with a 10-at.% Yb:YAG square core of 2x2-mm2 area; the slope efficiency and optical-to-optical efficiency with respect to the pump power were 40% and 28%, respectively. Measurements of the optical phase distortions induced by pumping gives focus shift bellow 0.05 m and shows the absence of astigmatic effects, indicating the axial heat flow in this pumping configuration.

  5. Comparison of spectroscopic properties of Tm and Ho in YAG and YLF crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armagan, G.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Inge, A. T.; Di Bartolo, B.

    1991-01-01

    The paper compares the cross-relaxation, energy transfer and loss processes in Tm- and Ho-doped YAG and YLF as a function of temperature, Tm concentration, and excitation power. Significant differences in the behavior of Tm and Tm,Ho in YAG and YLF crystals were found. The cross-relaxation rates of Tm(6 pct) are faster in YLF (about 5 microsec) than YAG (about 10 microsec). The energy transfer rates between Tm and Ho are faster in YLF than YAG. The time it takes for the maximum intensity of 1.7-micron emission to drop 10 percent is 25 microsec for YLF:Tm(6 pct),Ho(0.6 pct) and 65 microsec YAG:Tm(6 pct),Ho(0.5 pct). The losses occurring with increasing pump power for 2.1-micron emission of the above samples are 30 percent less in YLF than YAG. These qualitative differences point to YLF as a valuable 2-micron laser host material.

  6. Er:YAG Laser Dental Treatment of Patients Affected by Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Angela; D'Antò, Vincenzo; Gentile, Tina; Giancristoforo, Simona; Romeo, Umberto

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Er:YAG laser used for treating hard dental tissue in patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB). Methods. We report two cases of EB in which an Er:YAG laser was used for conservative treatments. In the first case, the Er:YAG laser (2,940 μm, 265 mJ, 25 Hz) was used to treat caries on a deciduous maxillary canine in an 8-year-old male patient affected by dystrophic EB. In the second case, we treated a 26-year-old female patient, affected by junctional EB, with generalized enamel hypoplasia, and an Er:YAG laser (2,940 μm, 265 mJ, 25 Hz) was used to remove the damaged enamel on maxillary incisors. Results. The use of the Er:YAG laser, with the appropriate energy, was effective in the selective removal of carious tissue and enamel hypoplasia. During dental treatment with the Er:YAG laser, patients required only a few interruptions due to the absence of pain, vibration, and noise. Conclusions. Laser treatment of hard dental tissues is a valuable choice for patients affected by EB since it is less invasive compared to conventional treatment, resulting in improved patient compliance. PMID:25431688

  7. Endoscopic management of post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic strictures using Neodymium-YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Ghulam; Dogra, Prem Nath

    2002-12-01

    We assessed the feasibility, efficacy and long-term results of endoscopic management using Neodymium-YAG (Nd-YAG) laser as a day care procedure in patients with post-traumatic supraprostatic and prostatic strictures. Three patients with post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic obliterative strictures underwent Nd-YAG laser core through urethrotomy as a day care procedure. Patient age ranged between 12 and 14 years. Mean duration of injury was 16 months. The length of stricture was assessed by bi-directional endoscopy prior to the procedure in all cases. Core through procedure was carried out using Nd-YAG laser under the guidance of a cystoscope placed antegradely. Patients were discharged on the same day with urethral catheter. Foley catheters were removed at 6 weeks. Nd-YAG laser core through procedure was carried out successfully in all cases with negligible blood loss in a mean time of 48 min. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. Patients were discharged on the same day. Follow-up cystogram was conducted at 6 weeks and urethroscopy at months. At a mean follow-up of 23 months, patients were asymptomatic and voiding well. Nd-YAG laser core through urethrotomy is a safe and effective procedure. It is a less invasive alternative to more complex urethroplasty procedures for patients with post-traumatic prostatic and supraprostatic strictures. It can be carried out as a day care procedure in carefully selected patients and has no complications. PMID:12492959

  8. Laser-assisted hair transplantation: histologic comparison between holmium:YAG and CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Eugene A.; Rabinov, C. Rose; Wong, Brian J.; Krugman, Mark E.

    1999-06-01

    The histological effects of flash-scanned CO2 (λ=10.6μm) and pulsed Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG, λ=2.12μm) lasers were evaluated in human scalp following the creation of hair transplant recipient channels. Ho:YAG laser irradiation created larger zones of thermal injury adjacent to the laser channels than irradiation with the CO2 laser device. When the two lasers created recipient sites of nearly equal depth, the Holmium:YAG laser caused a larger region of lateral thermal damage (589.30μm) than the CO2 laser (118.07μm). In addition, Holmium:YAG irradiated specimens exhibited fractures or discontinuities beyond the region of clear thermal injury. This shearing effect is consistent with the photoacoustic mechanism of ablation associated with pulsed mid-IR laser irradiation. In contrast, channels created with the CO2 exhibited minimal epithelial disruption and significantly less lateral thermal damage. While the Holmium:YAG laser is a useful tool for ablation soft tissue with minimal char in select applications (sinus surgery, arthroscopic surgery), this study suggests that the use of the CO2 laser for the creation of transplantation recipient channels result in significantly less lateral thermal injury for the laser parameters employed.

  9. 1 mJ, 500 kHz Nd:YAG/Nd:YVO4 MOPA laser with a Nd:YAG cavity-dumping seed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Liu, Q.; Yan, X.; Cui, J.; Gong, M.

    2010-08-01

    We report a high-repetition-rate, high-pulse-energy master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser system, in which the seed laser from the Nd:YAG rod-based oscillator cavity dumped at 500 kHz, was scaled up consecutively by a four-stage Nd:YVO4 preamplifier and a two-stage Nd:YAG zigzag slab main amplifier. The laser pulsed output with the average power of 510 W was achieved, with the efficiency extraction of 26.6% at the main amplifier stage and the single-pulse energy of 1.02 mJ.

  10. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic laser at 946 nm passively Q-switched with a Cr 4+:YAG saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Huanian; Chen, Xiaohan; Wang, Qingpu

    2012-04-01

    We demonstrate a diode-pumped Nd:YAG ceramic laser with emission at 946 nm that is passively Q-switched by single-crystal Cr 4+:YAG saturable absorber. An average output power of 1.7 W is measured under 18.4 W of incident power using an output mirror with transmission T=4%. The corresponding optical-to-optical efficiency is 9.2%. The laser runs at a pulse repetition rate of 120 kHz and delivers pulses with energy of 14 μJ and duration of 80 ns, which corresponds to a peak power of 175 W.

  11. Generation of high-peak power 532-nm green pulses from composite, all-ceramics, passively Q-switched Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamu, Gabriela; Ionescu, Alina; Brandus, Catalina; Grigore, Oana; Pavel, Nicolaie; Dascalu, Traian

    2013-06-01

    Laser pulses at 1.06 μm with 2.5-mJ energy and 3.1-MW peak power have been obtained from a composite, all polycrystalline ceramics, passively Q-switched 1.1-at.% Nd:YAG/Cr4+:YAG laser that was quasi-continuous-wave pumped with diode lasers. Single-pass frequency doubling with LiB3O5 nonlinear crystal at room temperature yielded green laser pulses at 532 nm with energy of 0.36-mJ and 0.45-MW peak power; the infrared-to-green conversion efficiency was 0.27.

  12. Longitudinally diode-pumped planar waveguide YAG/Yb:LuAG/YAG ceramic laser at 1030.7  nm.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chaoyang; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Liu, Kai; Tang, Fei; Long, Jiaqi; Wen, Zicheng; Ma, Ran; Yuan, Xuanyi; Guo, Wang; Li, Junting; Cao, Yongge

    2016-07-15

    Composite YAG/15 at. % Yb:LuAG/YAG transparent ceramic planar waveguide was fabricated by a tape casting method and vacuum sintering technology. Under a 970 nm diode laser pumping, the absorbed efficiency of 85.4% was achieved, and efficient CW laser operation at 1030.7 nm was accomplished with a good beam quality with Gaussian spatial profile. A maximum output power of 288 mW was obtained under a pump power of 4.69 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 9% and an O-O conversion efficiency of 5%. PMID:27420524

  13. Amorphous metallic films in silicon metallization systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    So, F.; Kolawa, E.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusion barrier research was focussed on lowering the chemical reactivity of amorphous thin films on silicon. An additional area of concern is the reaction with metal overlays such as aluminum, silver, and gold. Gold was included to allow for technology transfer to gallium arsenide PV cells. Amorphous tungsten nitride films have shown much promise. Stability to annealing temperatures of 700, 800, and 550 C were achieved for overlays of silver, gold, and aluminum, respectively. The lower results for aluminum were not surprising because there is an eutectic that can form at a lower temperature. It seems that titanium and zirconium will remove the nitrogen from a tungsten nitride amorphous film and render it unstable. Other variables of research interest were substrate bias and base pressure during sputtering.

  14. Transverse and longitudinal vibrations in amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltukov, Y. M.; Fusco, C.; Tanguy, A.; Parshin, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    We show that harmonic vibrations in amorphous silicon can be decomposed to transverse and longitudinal components in all frequency range even in the absence of the well defined wave vector q. For this purpose we define the transverse component of the eigenvector with given ω as a component, which does not change the volumes of Voronoi cells around atoms. The longitudinal component is the remaining orthogonal component. We have found the longitudinal and transverse components of the vibrational density of states for numerical model of amorphous silicon. The vibrations are mostly transverse below 7 THz and above 15 THz. In the frequency interval in between the vibrations have a longitudinal nature. Just this sudden transformation of vibrations at 7 THz from almost transverse to almost longitudinal ones explains the prominent peak in the diffusivity of the amorphous silicon just above 7 THz.

  15. Amorphous/epitaxial superlattice for thermoelectric application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Akihiro; Thao, Hoang Thi Xuan; Shibata, Mamoru; Nakashima, Seisuke; Tatsuoka, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Hidenari; Kinoshita, Yohei; Ishikiriyama, Mamoru; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    2016-08-01

    An amorphous/epitaxial superlattice system is proposed for application to thermoelectric devices, and the superlattice based on a PbGeTeS system was prepared by the alternate deposition of PbS and GeTe using a hot wall epitaxy technique. The structure was analyzed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray analysis, and it was found that the superlattice consists of an epitaxial PbTe-based layer and a GeS-based amorphous layer by the reconstruction of the constituents. A reduction in thermal conductivity due to the amorphous/epitaxial system was confirmed by a 2ω method. Electrical and thermoelectric properties were measured for the samples.

  16. Measuring strain distributions in amorphous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulsen, Henning F.; Wert, John A.; Neuefeind, Jörg; Honkimäki, Veijo; Daymond, Mark

    2005-01-01

    A number of properties of amorphous materials including fatigue, fracture and component performance are governed by the magnitude of strain fields around inhomogeneities such as inclusions, voids and cracks. At present, localized strain information is only available from surface probes such as optical or electron microscopy. This is unfortunate because surface and bulk characteristics in general differ. Hence, to a large extent, the assessment of strain distributions relies on untested models. Here we present a universal diffraction method for characterizing bulk stress and strain fields in amorphous materials and demonstrate its efficacy by work on a material of current interest in materials engineering: a bulk metallic glass. The macroscopic response is shown to be less stiff than the atomic next-neighbour bonds because of structural rearrangements at the scale of 4-10 Å. The method is also applicable to composites comprising an amorphous matrix and crystalline inclusions.

  17. IUE observations of amorphous hot galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, S. A.; Hjellming, M. S.; Gallagher, J. S., III; Hunter, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Blue amorphous galaxies are star-forming, irregularlike systems which lack the spatially distinct OB stellar groups that are characteristic of most late-type galaxies. In order to better understand the nature of star-formation processes in these unusual galaxies, short-wavelength IUE spectra of the amorphous galaxies NGC 1705 and NGC 1800 have been obtained. It is found that NGC 1705 contains a normal mix of OB stars, which is consistent with the nearly constant recent star-formation rate inferred from new optical data. NGC 1800 is likely to have similar properties, and blue galaxies with amorphous structures thus do not show evidence for anomalies in stellar populations. The UV spectra of these galaxies and a variety of other hot extragalactic stellar systems in fact have similar characteristics, which suggests OB stellar populations are often homogeneous in their properties.

  18. Enthalpy of crystallization of amorphous yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Reznitskii, L.A.

    1988-02-01

    Measurements have been made on the enthalpies of crystallization of amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 3/Fe/sub 5/O/sub 12/ from amorphous Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as determined by the DSC method. The heat of crystallization for Y/sub 2/O/sub 3am/ does not make itself felt on the heating thermogram, in contrast to that for Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, evidently because it is spread out over a wide temperature range, so it is difficult to measure. One can combine thermochemical equations to calculate the enthalpy of crystallization for amorphous yttrium oxide as ..delta..H = -24.9 kJ/mole.

  19. The Phagocytosis and Toxicity of Amorphous Silica

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Knecht, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Inhalation of crystalline silica is known to cause an inflammatory reaction and chronic exposure leads to lung fibrosis and can progress into the disease, silicosis. Cultured macrophages bind crystalline silica particles, phagocytose them, and rapidly undergo apoptotic and necrotic death. The mechanism by which particles are bound and internalized and the reason particles are toxic is unclear. Amorphous silica has been considered to be a less toxic form, but this view is controversial. We compared the uptake and toxicity of amorphous silica to crystalline silica. Methodology/Principal Findings Amorphous silica particles are phagocytosed by macrophage cells and a single internalized particle is capable of killing a cell. Fluorescent dextran is released from endo-lysosomes within two hours after silica treatment and Caspase-3 activation occurs within 4 hours. Interestingly, toxicity is specific to macrophage cell lines. Other cell types are resistant to silica particle toxicity even though they internalize the particles. The large and uniform size of the spherical, amorphous silica particles allowed us to monitor them during the uptake process. In mCherry-actin transfected macrophages, actin rings began to form 1-3 minutes after silica binding and the actin coat disassembled rapidly following particle internalization. Pre-loading cells with fluorescent dextran allowed us to visualize the fusion of phagosomes with endosomes during internalization. These markers provided two new ways to visualize and quantify particle internalization. At 37°C the rate of amorphous silica internalization was very rapid regardless of particle coating. However, at room temperature, opsonized silica is internalized much faster than non-opsonized silica. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that amorphous and crystalline silica are both phagocytosed and both toxic to mouse alveolar macrophage (MH-S) cells. The pathway leading to apoptosis appears to be similar in both

  20. Cooling of hot electrons in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaghen, R.; Hulin, D.; Cuzeau, S.; White, J.O.

    1997-07-01

    Measurements of the cooling rate of hot carriers in amorphous silicon are made with a two-pump, one-probe technique. The experiment is simulated with a rate-equation model describing the energy transfer between a population of hot carriers and the lattice. An energy transfer rate proportional to the temperature difference is found to be consistent with the experimental data while an energy transfer independent of the temperature difference is not. This contrasts with the situation in crystalline silicon. The measured cooling rates are sufficient to explain the difficulty in observing avalanche effects in amorphous silicon.

  1. Ion bombardment and disorder in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Sidhu, L.S.; Gaspari, F.; Zukotynski, S.

    1997-07-01

    The effect of ion bombardment during growth on the structural and optical properties of amorphous silicon are presented. Two series of films were deposited under electrically grounded and positively biased substrate conditions. The biased samples displayed lower growth rates and increased hydrogen content relative to grounded counterparts. The film structure was examined using Raman spectroscopy. The transverse optic like phonon band position was used as a parameter to characterize network order. Biased samples displayed an increased order of the amorphous network relative to grounded samples. Furthermore, biased samples exhibited a larger optical gap. These results are correlated and attributed to reduced ion bombardment effects.

  2. Amorphous Insulator Films With Controllable Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alterovitz, Samuel A.; Warner, Joseph D.; Liu, David C.; Pouch, John J.

    1987-01-01

    In experiments described in report, amorphous hydrogenated carbon films grown at room temperature by low-frequency plasma deposition, using methane or butane gas. Films have unique array of useful properties; (a) adhere to wide variety of materials; (b) contain only carbon and hydrogen; (c) smooth and free of pinholes; (d) resistant to attack by moisture and chemicals; and (e) have high electric-breakdown strength and electrical resistivity. Two of optical properties and hardness of this film controlled by deposition conditions. Amorphous a-C:H and BN films used for hermetic sealing and protection of optical, electronic, magnetic, or delicate mechanical systems, and for semiconductor field dielectrics.

  3. Short range order in amorphous polycondensates

    SciTech Connect

    Lamers, C.; Richter, D.; Schweika, W.; Batoulis, J.; Sommer, K.; Cable, J.W.; Shapiro, S.M.

    1992-12-01

    The static coherent structure factors S(Q) of the polymer glass Bisphenol-A-Polycarbonate and its chemical variation Bisphenol-A- Polyctherkctone- both in differently deuterated versions- have been measured by spin polarized neutron scattering. The method of spin polarization analysis provided an experimental separation of coherent and incoherent scattering and a reliable intensity calibration. Results are compared to structure factors calculated for model structures which were obtained by ``amorphous cell`` computer simulations. In general reasonable agreement is found between experiment and simulation; however, certain discrepancies hint at an insufficient structural relaxation in the amorphous cell method. 15 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab.

  4. Superhydrophobic amorphous carbon/carbon nanotube nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Z. J.; Tay, B. K.; Shakerzadeh, M.; Ostrikov, K.

    2009-06-01

    Superhydrophobic amorphous carbon/carbon nanotube nanocomposites are fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation with carbon nanotube forests as a template. The microstructure of the fabricated nanocomposites shows arrays of carbon nanotubes capped with amorphous carbon nanoparticles. Contact angle measurements show that both advancing and receding angles close to 180° can be achieved on the nanocomposites. The fabrication here does not require patterning of carbon nanotubes or deposition of conformal coatings with low surface energy, which are usually involved in conventional approaches for superhydrophobic surfaces. The relationship between the observed superhydrophobicity and the unique microstructure of the nanocomposites is discussed.

  5. Production feature of soft magnetic amorphous alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagunov, A. G.; Baryshev, E. E.; Shmakova, K. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Methods for making nanocrystalline alloys have been discussed. Temperature dependences of the surface tension (σ), electric resistivity (ρ), magnetic susceptibility (χ) and kinematic viscosity (ν) have been obtained. Comparison of the properties of amorphous ribbons obtained by the pilot and serial technologies has been conducted. Science-based technology of multi-component alloy smelting makes it possible to prepare equilibrium smelt, the structure of which has a significant effect on the properties of the amorphous ribbon before spinning and kinetics of its crystallization has been offered.

  6. Nanoindentation-induced amorphization in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlufarska, Izabela; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2004-07-01

    The nanoindentation-induced amorphization in SiC is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. The load-displacement response shows an elastic shoulder followed by a plastic regime consisting of a series of load drops. Analyses of bond angles, local pressure, and shear stress, and shortest-path rings show that these drops are related to dislocation activities under the indenter. We show that amorphization is driven by coalescence of dislocation loops and that there is a strong correlation between load-displacement response and ring distribution.

  7. EXAFS Studies of Amorphous MoGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyce, J. B.; Carter, W. L.; Geballe, T. H.; Claeson, T.

    1982-06-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure of amorphous and crystalline Mo-Ge samples sputter deposited on glass or kapton substrates was studied. Small local distortions were found in a substitutional b.c.c. Mo rich sample. A coordination in the range 5-7 and Ge-Mo distance of 2.65 A were estimated for an amorphous, intermediate composition Mo-Ge sample. The lack of superconductivity of some samples deposited on kapton was correlated to the presence of oxygen in the material.

  8. Thermal conductivity of sputtered amorphous Ge films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, Tianzhuo; Xu, Yibin; Goto, Masahiro; Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Kato, Ryozo; Sasaki, Michiko; Kagawa, Yutaka

    2014-02-15

    We measured the thermal conductivity of amorphous Ge films prepared by magnetron sputtering. The thermal conductivity was significantly higher than the value predicted by the minimum thermal conductivity model and increased with deposition temperature. We found that variations in sound velocity and Ge film density were not the main factors in the high thermal conductivity. Fast Fourier transform patterns of transmission electron micrographs revealed that short-range order in the Ge films was responsible for their high thermal conductivity. The results provide experimental evidences to understand the underlying nature of the variation of phonon mean free path in amorphous solids.

  9. New Amorphous Silicon Alloy Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, Mridula N.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) have been modified by alloying with Al, Ga and S respectively. The Al and Ga alloys are in effect quaternary alloys as they were fabricated in a carbon-rich discharge. The alloys were prepared by the plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) method. This method has several advantages, the major one being the relatively low defect densities of the resulting materials. The PACVD system used to grow the alloy films was designed and constructed in the laboratory. It was first tested with known (a-Si:H and a-Si:As:H) materials. Thus, it was established that device quality alloy films could be grown with the home-made PACVD setup. The chemical composition of the alloys was characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The homogeneous nature of hydrogen distribution in the alloys was established by SIMS depth profile analysis. A quantitative analysis of the bulk elemental content was carried out by EPMA. The analysis indicated that the alloying element was incorporated in the films more efficiently at low input gas concentrations than at the higher concentrations. A topological model was proposed to explain the observed behavior. The optical energy gap of the alloys could be varied in the 0.90 to 1.92 eV range. The Al and Ga alloys were low band gap materials, whereas alloying with S had the effect of widening the energy gap. It was observed that although the Si-Al and Si-Ga alloys contained significant amounts of C and H, the magnitude of the energy gap was determined by the metallic component. The various trends in optical properties could be related to the binding characteristics of the respective alloy systems. A quantitative explanation of the results was provided by White's tight binding model. The dark conductivity-temperature dependence of the alloys was examined. A linear dependence was observed for the Al and Ga systems. Electronic conduction in

  10. Two species/nonideal solution model for amorphous/amorphous phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Moynihan, C.T.

    1997-12-31

    A simple macroscopic thermodynamic model for first order transitions between two amorphous phases in a one component liquid is reviewed, augmented and evaluated. The model presumes the existence in the liquid of two species, whose concentrations are temperature and pressure dependent and which form a solution with large, positive deviations from ideality. Application of the model to recent data indicates that water can undergo an amorphous/amorphous phase transition below a critical temperature T{sub c} of 217K and above a critical pressure P{sub c} of 380 atm.

  11. Ho:YAG laser irradiation in blood vessel as a vasodilator: ex vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, E.; Iwasaki, T.; Kaneko, K.; Shimazaki, N.; Arai, T.

    2007-02-01

    We studied Ho:YAG laser irradiation in blood vessel as a vasodilator ex vivo. We thought that the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble expansion might be able to dilate the vessel because we found the vessel wall expansion after the Ho:YAG laser irradiation, that is steady deformation, in the vessel ex vivo. There have been many reports regarding to the Ho:YAG laser irradiation in the vessel. Most of studies concentrated on the interaction between Ho:YAG laser irradiation and vessel wall to investigate side effect on Ho:YAG laser angioplasty. We proposed to use the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble expansion as a vasodilator. We studied vasodilation effect of the Ho:YAG laser-induced bubble ex vivo. The flash lamp excited Ho:YAG laser surgical unit (IH102, NIIC, Japan) (λ=2.1μm) was used. The laser energy was delivered by a silica glass fiber (outer diameter: 1000μm, core diameter: 600μm). The laser-induced bubble was generated in the extracted fresh porcine carotid artery with the warmed saline perfusion. The laser energy at the fiber tip was ranging from 170-1300mJ per pulse. Number of the laser irradiation was ranged from 20pulses to 100pulses. The outer diameter of the vessel was observed. To examine the change in mechanical properties of the vessel wall, the stress-strain curve of the laser-irradiated vessel was measured. Birefringence observation and microscopic observation of staining specimen were performed. When the laser energy was set to 1300mJ per pulse, the outer diameter of the vessel after the laser irradiation was expanded by 1.4 times comparing with that of before the laser irradiation and the dilatation effect was kept even at 10minutes after the irradiation. The elasticity modulus of the artery by collagen was changed by the laser irradiation. In the polarized microscopic observation, the brightness of the intimal side of the vessel is increased comparing with that of the normal. We think this brightness increasing may be attributed to birefringence change

  12. Amorphization and nanocrystallization of silcon under shock compression

    SciTech Connect

    Remington, B. A.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Zhao, S.; Hahn, E. N.; Kad, B.; Bringa, E. M.; Meyers, M. A.

    2015-11-06

    High-power, short-duration, laser-driven, shock compression and recovery experiments on [001] silicon unveiled remarkable structural changes above a pressure threshold. Two distinct amorphous regions were identified: (a) a bulk amorphous layer close to the surface and (b) amorphous bands initially aligned with {111} slip planes. Further increase of the laser energy leads to the re-crystallization of amorphous silicon into nanocrystals with high concentration of nano-twins. This amorphization is produced by the combined effect of high magnitude hydrostatic and shear stresses under dynamic shock compression. Shock-induced defects play a very important role in the onset of amorphization. Calculations of the free energy changes with pressure and shear, using the Patel-Cohen methodology, are in agreement with the experimental results. Molecular dynamics simulation corroborates the amorphization, showing that it is initiated by the nucleation and propagation of partial dislocations. As a result, the nucleation of amorphization is analyzed qualitatively by classical nucleation theory.

  13. Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

  14. Single-frequency, injection-seeded Er:YAG laser based on a bow-tie ring slave resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. Q.; Deng, Yu; Dai, T. Y.; Duan, X. M.; You-Lun, Ju; Wang, Y. Z.

    2015-08-01

    A diode pumped, injection-seeded Q-switched Er:YAG laser at 1645.2 nm is demonstrated. A single frequency Er:YAG monolithic nonplanar ring oscillator (NPRO) laser emitting at 1645.24 nm with a maximum output power of 500 mW is used as a seed laser. The seed laser output is injected into a bow-tie slave laser, obtaining stable single-frequency Q-switched operation of the Er:YAG laser. The maximum single-frequency Q-switched Er:YAG laser output energy is 2.9 mJ at 100 Hz with a pulse duration of 160 ns.

  15. Palliation of malignant dysphagia using the Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Carter, R; Smith, J S; Anderson, J R

    1993-01-01

    A group of 141 patients with biopsy-proved malignant dysphagia, treated with neodymium YAG laser between April 1985 and November 1988, have been prospectively evaluated. Patients treated since November 1988 have not been included to allow minimum follow-up of 18 months. The success of treatment has been assessed in terms of survival, relief of dysphagia, complications, and length of inpatient stay. One- and two-year survival rates were 12.6% and 3.5%, respectively (mean survival 24.7 weeks). Ninety-two percent of patients were returned to a semisolid diet or better. In 4% recanalization was impossible, and 4% swallowed only liquids despite an adequate channel. Tumor histology, site of tumor, and length of previous treatment had no significant influence on outcome. The presence of metastases significantly influenced survival (p = 0.007). The principal complications were perforation (6.4%) and tracheoesophageal fistula (2.8%). Laser recanalization provides effective palliation for malignant dysphagia. PMID:7505991

  16. A new technique for Nd:YAG laser posterior capsulotomy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Jung Kee; An, Jae Hwan; Yim, Jin Ho

    2014-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of a new opening pattern in neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser posterior capsulotomy on visual function. METHODS This technique was conducted along a circular pattern. The energy ranged between 0.8 and 1.2 mJ/pulse was consumed and mean total energy levels were 74±21 mJ (mean±standard deviation: SD, from 40 to 167) and laser shots aimed at 150 µm away behind a datum point and went along an imaginary line which extends 0.5 mm inside from optic margin and into the circular en bloc pattern. Vitreous stands were attached with fragment and then they were cut off by the laser after circular application. The circular fragment was completely separated from vitreous, and then this fragment was quickly sunk in intravitreal space. RESULTS The follow-up period ranges from at least a week to 40mo, making 15.8mo on average. The procedural outcome showed 96% (74 eyes out of the 77 eyes) enhancement in patients' visual acuity. Cystoid macular edema or retinal detachment was not observed in any of the patients during follow-up periods. CONCLUSION This new technique is expected to improve the weaknesses that the conventional procedures have by adding the process to cut off vitreous stands attached with the fragment by the laser to the circular application. PMID:24790883

  17. Pulsed Nd:YAG laser beam profile analyse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelickova, Hana; Lapsanska, Hana; Ctvrtlik, Radim

    2005-06-01

    Pulsed laser system LASAG with maximal average power 150 W is used in our laboratory for experiments with various kinds of materials, process parameters optimisation for cutting, welding, drilling and surface treatment. Alignment of optical elements and good laser beam quality is critical parameter for successful result of laser treatment. Active medium - crystal in solid state laser is warmed up during laser action, because only some percent of input electrical power is turn to optical energy. Warm crystal has properties like a thick lens, which optical power is dependent on process parameters and kind of resonator. Also some defects in optical system - dirty or damaged mirrors or lens must be detect. Properties of non-visible near infrared beam can be tested by means of laser beam analyzer SPIRICON. In our system there are movable and changeable end mirrors and diaphragms to obtain five different types of resonators - basic one for welding and fibre applications and four ones for fine cutting and drilling. Measurements of beam profile for all these resonators were made with safety values of pulse length, energy and frequency. Control of losses in optical system was made to inspect quality of optical elements. Also measurement of laser beam outputting from three different fibre processing heads was realised. Control measurements on continual industrial Nd:YAG laser system were made. All data and capture pictures are stored and practical lessons for students in next school years were prepared.

  18. Microsoldering using a YAG laser: on lead-free solder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Sumio; Kamata, Tatsuya; Yoneda, Noriyuki; Hisada, Shigeyoshi; Fujita, Takeyoshi

    2000-11-01

    Solderability of conventional Sn-37Pb solder pastes and Pb- free alloys (Sn-43Bi and Sn-2Ag-5Bi-0.5Cu) were examined on micro soldering using a YAG laser. Experiments were performed in order to determine the range of soldering parameters of a laser power density and an irradiation time for obtaining an appropriate wettability based on a visual inspection by a Japanese Industrial Standard. And the laser soldering processes were monitored by measuring temperature change inside solder joint (solder and Cu pad) and on a surface of a chip component. Next joining strength of chip components for surface mounting soldered on printed circuit board (glass epoxy) was tested on application thickness of solder paste (0.2, 0.3, and 0.4 mm). In addition, joining strength characteristics at different power density and materials were examined around thermal shock test by the gas phase method. As a result, characteristics of Sn-Ag-Bi-Cu (Pb-free) solder paste are equivalent to that of Sn-Pb solder paste.

  19. Nd:YAG laser therapy in bronchogenic tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benov, Emil; Kostadinov, D.; Mitchev, K.; Vlasov, V.

    1993-03-01

    In 2 years 53 patients with tumors of the tracheobronchial tree have been treated by photocoagulation therapy. Forty cases of them were with different types of cancer and 13 cases with benign lesions of the trachea or bronchi. As a laser source we used an Nd:YAG laser, MBB, Germany. At first the tumor was irradiated with a power of 25 - 30 W, following power up to 90 W. The median energy dose was 3,500 J/sq cm for each patient. The treatment was executed under local anesthesia with a rigid or flexible bronchoscope. In all of the cases with benign tumors we obtained a stable positive effect. In 15 cases of carcinoma we attained a recanalization and restoration of the ventilation to the treated area -- 37.5%. The only complication due to the procedure was the death of one patient with a tracheal cancer and myasthenia gravis. Photocoagulation therapy is an effective method for benign tumors. In cases with carcinoma this therapy is used with palliative purpose -- recanalization of the bronchus. Laser endobronchial therapy shows an immediate positive effect in the treatment of airway obstruction.

  20. Endoscopic goniotomy probe for holmium:YAG laser delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Shen, Jin-Hui; Ren, Qiushi

    1994-06-01

    Goniotomy is an effective treatment for primary infantile glaucoma. Because a cloudy cornea may prevent a clear view of the anterior chamber angle through the operating microscope, we investigated whether an endoscope can be combined with a cutting laser to perform laser goniotomy in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. The anterior chambers of cadaver procine eyes were deepened with a viscoelastic material. A 300-micron-diameter silica fiber coupled to an Olympus 0.8-mm-diameter flexible fiber optic endoscope entered the anterior chambers through 4-mm corneal incisions. The anterior chamber angles were clearly observed on a videoscreen as the endoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel approached the pectinate ligaments. With the guidance of a He-Ne aiming beam, the anterior chamber angle pectinate ligaments were cut over a 160 degree arc with a pulsed Ho:YAG laser (2.1 micrometers wavelength, 50 mJ, 5 Hz repetition). The specimens were fixed in glutaraldehyde and processed for scanning electron microscopy, or fixed in formalin and processed for light microscopy. The treated area demonstrated incision of the pectinate ligaments with opening of the underlying trabecular meshwork. The edoscopic fiber optic laser scalpel is capable of cutting the pectinate ligaments in a surgical model of primary infantile glaucoma. Therefore, it may be a useful instrument for performing goniotomy when a cloudy cornea in primary infantile glaucoma prevents visualization of the anterior chamber angle with a goniotomy lens.

  1. A multiple work mode YAG laser in derma surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Yu; Zhang, Guizhong; Ye, Zhisheng; Yu, Lin

    2006-06-01

    It has been very common that a pulse laser is used in derma surgery based on the theory of "Selective Photothermolysis". This method has also been accepted as the best way to treat the pigments by the medical textbook. A kind of double-pulsed laser which gets the name by two pulse output at one pumping process is developed for derma surgery lately, and this kind of laser has been proved more effective and safe than single-pulse laser. We also develop a multiple work mode YAG laser including two double-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, two single-pulsed modes at 1064nm and 532nm, and one free-running mode at 1064nm. Considering availability, security and reliability of the laser as a surgery machine, some important subsystems of the laser are optimized carefully, such as Q-switch driver, wavelength-switching system, power supply, and control system etc. At last we get a prototype laser which can run for longer than 30 minutes continuously, and output Max10 pulse per second (pps) with Max800mJ energy at 1064nm double Q-Switch mode, or Max400mJ at 532nm. Using double pulse mode of the laser we do some removal experiments of tattoos and other pigments, and obtain good effect.

  2. Endoscopic Nd-YAG Laser Therapy for Gastric Polyp

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Sun Moon; Sun, Duk Jhae; Rim, Kyu Sung

    1986-01-01

    With the development of a special quartz fiberoptic transmission system, the application of laser energy through an endoscope became possible. Now, endoscopic laser therapy is widely used for gastrointestinal bleeding, and gastrointestinal neoplasm, and we have removed broad-based gastric polyps using an endoscopic Nd:YAG laser in 12 patients between January and December 1985. The size of the polyps ranged from 0.2 cm to 1.0 cm in diameter. The most frequent location for the polyp was in the antrum (7 cases) and followed by the fundus (5 cases). The application number of laser energy was from 6 to 58 and the small lesions of the 10 patients were completely ablated by the first endoscopic laser therapy. Follow-up endoscopy in all patients revealed no new polyp formation, but all patients had a residual ulcer at the end of the first week post polypectomy, and ulcers were healed by the fifth week of follow up. PMID:3154618

  3. Endoscopic Nd:YAG laser treatment of rectosigmoid cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Loizou, L A; Grigg, D; Boulos, P B; Bown, S G

    1990-01-01

    Forty nine patients with rectosigmoid carcinoma considered unsuitable for surgery underwent endoscopic Nd:YAG laser treatment for palliation of symptoms and tumour eradication, if feasible. Altogether 25 (51%) of the lesions had distal margins less than 7 cm from the anus and 36 (73%) extended above the peritoneal reflection. In seven patients with tumours less than 3 cm in diameter, symptomatic improvement was achieved in all (mean follow up 16 months) and complete tumour eradication in three. In the remaining 42 patients with larger tumours (34 greater than 2/3 circumferential, mean length 5.5 cm), symptomatic improvement was achieved with repeated treatments (average 3.4) in 31 (74%) over a mean follow up of 19 weeks. Of the parameters assessed, only circumferential tumour extent proved significant in predicting functional outcome after treatment. All treatment failures (eight initial, three late) occurred in patients with extensive tumours, and only seven of these patients were considered fit for colostomy. Bowel perforation occurred in two patients (5%) but there was no treatment-related mortality. Mean stay in hospital for all laser treatments was nine days (30% were outpatient attendances). These results suggest that laser therapy may be the palliative treatment of choice in patients with rectal carcinoma unsuitable for surgery. PMID:1695161

  4. Amorphization of embedded Cu nanocrystals by ion irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, B.; Kluth, P.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Foran, G. J.; Cookson, D. J.; Ridgway, M. C.

    2007-02-01

    While bulk crystalline elemental metals cannot be amorphized by ion irradiation in the absence of chemical impurities, the authors demonstrate that finite-size effects enable the amorphization of embedded Cu nanocrystals. The authors form and compare the atomic-scale structure of the polycrystalline, nanocrystalline, and amorphous phases, present an explanation for the extreme sensitivity to irradiation exhibited by nanocrystals, and show that low-temperature annealing is sufficient to return amorphized material to the crystalline form.

  5. Optical triggering of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser via transverse bleaching of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brian; Lei, Jonathan; DiLazaro, Tom; Schilling, Bradley; Goldberg, Lew

    2009-11-01

    Optical triggering via direct bleaching of a Cr:YAG saturable absorber was applied to a monolithic Nd:YAG/Cr:YAG laser crystal. The method uses a single laser diode bar to bleach a thin sheet within the saturable absorber from a direction orthogonal to the lasing axis. By placing the Q-switch at the time corresponding to the steepest slope (dT/dt) for change in transmission during bleaching, the pulse-to-pulse timing jitter showed a 13.2x reduction in standard deviation, from 132 ns for free-running operation to 10 ns with optical triggering. We measured that a fluence of 60 kW/cm(2) was sufficient to enable optical triggering, where a diode appropriately sized for the length of the Cr:YAG (approximately 3 mm) would then require only approximately 150 W of optical power over a 1-2 micros duration to enable effective jitter reduction. Additionally, we measured an increase in optical-to-optical efficiency with optical triggering, where the efficiency improved from 12% to 13.5%. PMID:19881668

  6. Power scaling estimate of crystalline fiber waveguides with rare earth doped YAG cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Hong, Pengda; Meissner, Stephanie K.; Meissner, Helmuth E.

    2016-03-01

    Power scaling analysis based on the model by Dawson et al. [1,2] for circular core fibers has been applied to estimating power scaling of crystalline fiber waveguides (CFWs) with RE3+ doped single crystalline or ceramic YAG (RE=rare earth: Yb, Er, Tm and Ho). Power scaling limits include stimulated Brillouin scattering, thermal lensing effect, and limits to coupling of pump light into CFWs. The CFW designs we have considered consist, in general, of a square doped RE3+:YAG core, an inner cladding of either undoped or laser-inactive-ion-doped YAG and an outer cladding of sapphire. The presented data have been developed for the structures fabricated using the Adhesive-Free Bonding (AFB®) technique, but the results should be essentially independent of fabrication technique, assuming perfect core/inner cladding/outer cladding interfaces. Hard power scaling limits exist for a specific CFW design and are strongly based on the physical constants of the material and its spectroscopic specifics. For example, power scaling limit was determined as ~16 kW for 2.5% ceramic Yb:YAG/YAG (core material/inner cladding material) at fiber length of 1.7 m and core diameter of 69 μm. Considering the present manufacturing limit for CFW length to be, e.g., 0.5 m, the actual maximum output power will be limited to ~4.4 kW for a Yb:YAG/YAG CFW. Power limit estimates have also been computed for Er3+, Tm3+ and Ho3+doped core based CFWs.

  7. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, A.K.

    1979-07-18

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  8. Plasma deposition of amorphous metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Hays, Auda K.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal alloy coatings are plasma-deposited by dissociation of vapors of organometallic compounds and metalloid hydrides in the presence of a reducing gas, using a glow discharge. Tetracarbonylnickel, phosphine, and hydrogen constitute a typical reaction mixture of the invention, yielding a NiPC alloy.

  9. Ion-assisted recrystallization of amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priolo, F.; Spinella, C.; La Ferla, A.; Rimini, E.; Ferla, G.

    1989-12-01

    Our recent work on ion-beam-assisted epitaxial growth of amorphous Si layers on single crystal substrates is reviewed. The planar motion of the crystal-amorphous interface was monitored in situ, during irradiations, by transient reflectivity measurements. This technique allows the measurement of the ion-induced growth rate with a very high precision. We have observed that this growth rate scales linearly with the number of displacements produced at the crystal-amorphous interface by the impinging ions. Moreover the regrowth onto <100> oriented substrates is a factor of ≈ 4 faster with respect to that on <111> substrates. Impurities dissolved in the amorphous layer influence the kinetics of recrystallization. For instance, dopants such as As, B and P enhance the ion-induced growth rate while oxygen has the opposite effect. The dependence of the rate on impurity concentration is however less strong with respect to pure thermal annealing. For instance, an oxygen concentration of 1 × 1021 / cm3 decreases the ion-induced growth rate by a factor of ≈ 3; this same concentration would have decreased the rate of pure thermal annealing by more than 4 orders of magnitude. The reduced effects of oxygen during ion-beam crystallization allow the regrowth of deposited Si layers despite the presence of a high interfacial oxygen content. The process is investigated in detail and its possible application to the microelectronic technology is discussed.

  10. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place. PMID:20866874

  11. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place.

  12. Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard

    1983-01-01

    An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

  13. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, R.A.; Kaplan, S.N.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1992-05-26

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n-type, intrinsic, p-type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography. 18 figs.

  14. High resolution amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOEpatents

    Street, Robert A.; Kaplan, Selig N.; Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1992-01-01

    A radiation detector employing amorphous Si:H cells in an array with each detector cell having at least three contiguous layers (n type, intrinsic, p type), positioned between two electrodes to which a bias voltage is applied. An energy conversion layer atop the silicon cells intercepts incident radiation and converts radiation energy to light energy of a wavelength to which the silicon cells are responsive. A read-out device, positioned proximate to each detector element in an array allows each such element to be interrogated independently to determine whether radiation has been detected in that cell. The energy conversion material may be a layer of luminescent material having a columnar structure. In one embodiment a column of luminescent material detects the passage therethrough of radiation to be detected and directs a light beam signal to an adjacent a-Si:H film so that detection may be confined to one or more such cells in the array. One or both electrodes may have a comb structure, and the teeth of each electrode comb may be interdigitated for capacitance reduction. The amorphous Si:H film may be replaced by an amorphous Si:Ge:H film in which up to 40 percent of the amorphous material is Ge. Two dimensional arrays may be used in X-ray imaging, CT scanning, crystallography, high energy physics beam tracking, nuclear medicine cameras and autoradiography.

  15. The Electronic Structure of Amorphous Carbon Nanodots.

    PubMed

    Margraf, Johannes T; Strauss, Volker; Guldi, Dirk M; Clark, Timothy

    2015-06-18

    We have studied hydrogen-passivated amorphous carbon nanostructures with semiempirical molecular orbital theory in order to provide an understanding of the factors that affect their electronic properties. Amorphous structures were first constructed using periodic calculations in a melt/quench protocol. Pure periodic amorphous carbon structures and their counterparts doped with nitrogen and/or oxygen feature large electronic band gaps. Surprisingly, descriptors such as the elemental composition and the number of sp(3)-atoms only influence the electronic structure weakly. Instead, the exact topology of the sp(2)-network in terms of effective conjugation defines the band gap. Amorphous carbon nanodots of different structures and sizes were cut out of the periodic structures. Our calculations predict the occurrence of localized electronic surface states, which give rise to interesting effects such as amphoteric reactivity and predicted optical band gaps in the near-UV/visible range. Optical and electronic gaps display a dependence on particle size similar to that of inorganic colloidal quantum dots. PMID:25731776

  16. Effect of continuous wave laser irradiation on structural relaxation and mechanical properties of Iron-Silicon-Boron amorphous ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Md Farhadul

    The thermal treatment of amorphous alloys results in change in their properties due to structural relaxation and crystallization. Laser irradiation permits very high control in site-specific thermal treatment of material. The present study was aimed at investigating structural relaxation and resulting change in mechanical properties of Fe-Si-B amorphous ribbon under laser irradiation. The alloy was irradiated by a continuous wave Nd:YAG laser. Three different scanning speeds (500, 600, and 700 mm/s) were chosen with constant laser power at 100 W. No crystallization was observed from microstructural and XRD analyses. Thermal simulation revealed that the maximum temperature was 357 °C, which was below crystallization temperature of the alloy. DSC analysis revealed structural relaxation for all the scanning speeds. Thermal embrittlement, microhardness and structural distortion were measured and related with relaxation and laser scanning speed. Reduction in fracture stress and strain were more than 50% for 500 mm/s. Microhardness was increased by 4-5%. Structural distortion was enhanced at lower laser scanning speed. Thermal stress was found to be tensile in nature at the middle of the irradiated area and as high as 350 MPa. Since there was no other than thermal load acting on the material during irradiation, it seems that the thermal stress was responsible for the structural distortion.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulation of amorphous indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been conducted using an assembly consisting of 105 indomethacin (IMC) molecules and 12 water molecules to investigate the underlying dynamic (e.g., rotational and translational diffusivities and conformation relaxation rates) and structural properties (e.g., conformation, hydrogen-bonding distributions, and interactions of water with IMC) of amorphous IMC. These properties may be important in predicting physical stability of this metastable material. The IMC model was constructed using X-ray diffraction data with the force-field parameters mostly assigned by analogy with similar groups in Amber-ff03 and atomic charges calculated with the B3LYP/ccpVTZ30, IEFPCM, and RESP models. The assemblies were initially equilibrated in their molten state and cooled through the glass transition temperature to form amorphous solids. Constant temperature dynamic runs were then carried out above and below the T(g) (i.e., at 600 K (10 ns), 400 K (350 ns), and 298 K (240 ns)). The density (1.312 ± 0.003 g/cm(3)) of the simulated amorphous solid at 298 K was close to the experimental value (1.32 g/cm(3)) while the estimated T(g) (384 K) was ~64 degrees higher than the experimental value (320 K) due to the faster cooling rate. Due to the hindered rotation of its amide bond, IMC can exist in different diastereomeric states. Different IMC conformations were sufficiently sampled in the IMC melt or vapor, but transitions occurred rarely in the glass. The hydrogen-bonding patterns in amorphous IMC are more complex in the amorphous state than in the crystalline polymorphs. Carboxylic dimers that are dominant in α- and γ-crystals were found to occur at a much lower probability in the simulated IMC glasses while hydrogen-bonded IMC chains were more easily identified patterns in the simulated amorphous solids. To determine molecular diffusivity, a novel analytical method is proposed to deal with the non-Einsteinian behavior, in which the temporal

  18. 885-nm Pumped Ceramic Nd:YAG Master Oscillator Power Amplifier Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a traditional diode pumped solid-state laser that is typically pumped with 808-nm laser diode array (LDA) and crystalline Nd:YAG was improved by using 885-nm LDAs and ceramic Nd:YAG. The advantage is lower quantum defect, which will improve the thermal loading on laser gain medium, resulting in a higher-performance laser. The use of ceramic Nd:YAG allows a higher Nd dopant level that will make up the lower absorption at the 885-nm wavelength on Nd:YAG. When compared to traditional 808-nm pump, 885-nm diodes will have 30% less thermal load (or wasted heat) and will thus see a similar percentage improvement in the overall laser efficiency. In order to provide a more efficient laser system for future flight missions that require the use of low-repetition- rate (YAG laser crystal. This pumping scheme has many potential advantages for improved reliability, efficiency, thermal management, contamination control, and mechanical flexibility. The advantages of using 885-nm pump diodes in Nd:YAG laser systems are numerous. The epitaxial structures of these 885-nm diodes are aluminum-free. There is a significant reduction in the thermal load generated from the Stokes shift or quantum defects. A Stokes shift is the energetic difference between the pump and laser photons. Pumping at a wavelength band closer to the lasing wavelength can reduce the thermal load by .30% compared to traditional pumping at 808 nm, and increase the optical- to-optical efficiency by the same factor. The slope efficiency is expected to increase with a reduction in the thermal load. The typical crystalline Nd:YAG can be difficult to produce with doping level >1% Nd. To make certain that the absorption at 885 nm is on the same par as the 808-nm diode, the Nd:YAG material needs to be doped with higher concentration of Nd. Ceramic Nd:YAG is the only material that can be tailored

  19. Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, David E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

  20. Modification of the amorphous carbon films by the ns-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigonis, Alfonsas; Marcinauskas, Liutauras; Vinciunaite, Vinga; Raciukaitis, Gediminas

    2011-10-01

    The effect of a nanosecond laser irradiation of thin (60 and 145 nm) amorphous, diamond-like carbon films deposited on Si substrate by an ion beam deposition (IBD) from pure acetylene and acetylene/hydrogen (1:2) gas mixture was analyzed in this work. The films were irradiated with the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation of the nanosecond Nd:YAG lasers working at the first (1.16 eV) and the third (3.48 eV) harmonics, using a multi-shot regime. The IR laser irradiation stimulated a minor increase in the fraction of sp2 bonds, causing a slight decrease in the hardness of the films and initiated SiC formation. Irradiation with the UV laser caused the formation of carbides and increased hydrogenization of the Si substrate and the fraction of sp2 sites. Spalliation and ablation were observed at a higher energy density and with a large number of laser pulses per spot.

  1. Dynamic response of laser ablative shock waves from coated and uncoated amorphous Boron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Chelikani, Leela; Pinnoju, Venkateshwarlu; Verma, Pankaj; Singh, Raja V.; Acrhem Collaboration; Hemrl Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticles (NP) improve the performance of solid rocket motors with increased burning rate and lower ignition threshold owing to their larger surface area. We present spatio-temporal evolution of laser ablative shock waves (LASWs) from compacted amorphous Boron (B) and Lithium Fluoride coated Boron (LiF-B) of 70-110nm sizes that were compacted to form pellets. Thickness of the LiF coating is 5.5 +/- 1 nm in LiF-B. Laser pulses from second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 7 ns) are used to generate LASWs expanding in ambient air. The precise time of energy release from the pellets under extreme ablative pressures is studied using shadowgraphy with a temporal resolution of 1.5 ns. Different nature of the shock front (SF) following Sedov-Taylor theory, before and after detachment, indicated two specific time dependent stages of energy release. From the position of SF, velocity behind the SF, similar to that of exhaust velocity is measured. Specific impulse of 241 +/- 5 and 201 +/- 4 sec for LiF-B and B, respectively, at a delay of 0.8 μs from shock inducing laser pulse makes them potential candidates for laser based micro thruster applications. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  2. Underwater annealing and texturing for enhancing electrical characteristics of n-aSi/p-cSi using Nd3+:YAG laser beam-overlap technique with a wavelength of 532 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidhya, Y. Esther Blesso; Vasa, Nilesh J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the laser beam profile on simultaneous wide-area crystallization and texturing of amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films in water ambience is investigated by using a pulsed laser-beam-overlap technique. A Q-switched Nd3+:YAG laser with the second harmonic wavelength of 532 nm and different beam profiles, namely Gaussian and flat-top, was used for the annealing of 1-μm thick a-Si films deposited on crystalline silicon (c-Si) substrates. High density and smaller-sized conical spikes with an increase in grain size of around 25% and improved photoconductivity characteristics (9% to 17%) were observed after laser treatment was carried out in water when compared with that in air. Further, crystalline characteristics were also improved with the flat-top beam profile as compared with that of the Gaussian beam profile. The necessary laser fluence range based on the thermal modeling in the underwater ambience is in good agreement with the experimentally measured values between 150 and 600 mJ/cm2. The improvement in morphological, crystalline, and electrical characteristics of a-Si films clearly show that underwater annealing and texturing with the Nd3+:YAG laser beam-overlap of 30% to 50% is suitable for photovoltaic applications.

  3. On the Nd:YAG pulsed laser processing of rigid PVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, L. C.; Arronte, M.; Ponce, L.; Flores, T.; Guerrero, J.; de Posada, E.; Rodríguez, E.

    2009-09-01

    The potential of Nd:YAG pulsed laser to processing PVC sheets minimizing HCl gases emission is investigated. We studied the gas emission when the PVC is cut by either CO2 or Nd:YAG pulsed laser by using FTIR Spectroscopy. Optical microscopy of laser treated PVC samples was performed in order to demonstrate the carbonization. On the other hand, LIBS spectroscopy for two different ranges of pulse duration was employed in order to investigate the plume composition during the Nd:YAG pulsed laser ablation process. The experiments shows that Cl atoms are emitted during the Nd:YAG pulsed laser ablation although the HCl gases are produced at low levels. In order to explain the sub-surface irregularities detected for Nd:YAG laser irradiation, a one-dimensional model is developed to study the temperature evolution inside the sample. We demonstrate that the ablation mechanisms prevail on thermally drive emission until 70 μm, afterwards the thermal expansion process is already observed.

  4. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems to Er:YAG-laser-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Brulat, Nathalie; Rocca, Jean-Paul; Leforestier, Eric; Fiorucci, Gilbert; Nammour, Samir; Bertrand, Marie-France

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the shear bond strengths of composite resin bonded to Er:YAG laser or bur-prepared dentin surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems. The occlusal surfaces of 120 human third molars were ground flat to expose dentin. The dentin was prepared using either a carbide bur or an Er:YAG laser at 350 mJ/pulse and 10 Hz (fluence, 44.5 J/cm(2)). Three different self-etching adhesive systems were applied: iBond, Xeno III and Clearfil SE Bond. Rods of composite resin were bonded to dentin surfaces and shear bond tests were carried out. Both dentin surfaces after debonding and resin rods were observed using a scanning electron microscope. When the Xeno III was used, no difference was observed on shear bond strength values when bur and Er:YAG laser were compared. When using iBond and Clearfil SE Bond, bond strength values measured on Er:YAG-laser-prepared surfaces were lower than those observed on bur-prepared surfaces. The absence of smear layer formation during the preparation of the dentin by the Er:YAG laser did not improve the adhesion values of self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:18034284

  5. Scatter properties of polycrystalline YAG in the visible and near-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, R. M.; Thomas, M. E.; Brown, A. M.

    2014-05-01

    Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) is an important laser host material. Ideal host materials have low loss at the laser transition frequency. This becomes more important as the gain length increases or a low gain transition is of interest. Unfortunately, single crystal YAG suffers from relatively high scatter caused by strain induced index of refraction variations generated by the growth method. For this reason polycrystalline YAG has been developed with virtually no strain. Furthermore, this material can be doped with concentrations that vary spatially. This can provide a tremendous advantage in matching the gain volume to the mode volume in a laser. However, because of the grain boundaries and porosity, polycrystalline materials have scatter loss. Angle resolved, in-plane scatter measurements of polycrystalline YAG and Nd:YAG are reported from 405 to 1064 nm. This covers the range of interest for laser operation but also with enough bandwidth to derive a physical understanding of the scatter mechanisms. A model is also applied to provide physical insight and interpolation and meaningful extrapolation of the experimental results.

  6. The choice: Welding with CO{sub 2} or Nd:YAG lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    The recent commercial availability of multi-kilowatt Nd:YAG lasers has opened new avenues for rapid laser processing as well as intensified the competition (cost effectiveness) between CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG laser systems. Vendors offering Nd:YAG laser systems may claim lower operating costs (than CO{sub 2}) and fiberoptic beam delivery flexibility while CO{sub 2} systems vendors may emphasize lower capital cost and well established processing requirements and experience. The capital and operating costs of a laser system are impacted by demand and supply economics and technological advances. Frequently the total cost of a workcell using a laser for processing has to be considered rather than the laser system alone. Consequently it is not very practical to approach the selection of a laser system based on its capital cost and estimated operating cost only. This presentation describes a more pragmatic approach to aid the user in the selection of the optimal multi-kilowatt laser system for a particular processing requirement with emphasis on welding. CO{sub 2} laser systems are well established on the factory floor. Consequently, emphasis is given to the comparative application of Nd:YAG lasers, process requirements and performance. Requirements for the laser welding of different metals are examined in the context of hardware (laser system and beam delivery) selection and examples of welding speeds that can be achieved using CO{sub 2} and Nd:YAG lasers are examined.

  7. Recurrent closure of neodymium: YAG laser iridotomies requiring multiple treatments in pseudophakic pupillary block.

    PubMed

    Melamed, S; Wagoner, M D

    1988-03-01

    We present a rare case of repeated closure of Nd:YAG laser iridotomies and recurrent iris bombe configuration with angle-closure attacks in a pseudophakic eye. Until recently, patent Nd:YAG laser iridotomies were considered incapable of being closed, and the only reported closure was in an eye with concomitant iritis. Our patient developed iris bombe five times following extracapsular extraction, anterior vitrectomy, and anterior-chamber intraocular lens implantation. The first occurred following closure of the surgical iridectomy; the next three times, following closure of previously patent Nd:YAG iridotomies; and the final episode occurred despite patent iridotomies. This last time one drop of pilocarpine 2% was administered and resulted in immediate iris flattening and reopening of the third iridotomy. Possible mechanisms for closure of the Nd:YAG iridotomies in this case are discussed. We suggest the combination of Nd:YAG laser iridotomies and the stretching of the iris by pilocarpine might have liberated the trapped aqueous humor behind the iris, maintaining the patency of the iridotomies and the depth of the anterior chamber. PMID:3400953

  8. Application of the Nd:YAG laser to intracranial tumor operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopera, Marek; Majchrzak, Henryk

    1996-03-01

    From January 1989 to December 1993, in the Neurosurgery Department of Mine Hospital in Sosnowiec, a Nd:YAG mediLas 4060 N (MBB) laser with the radiation wavelength of 1.064 micrometer was used for operation of 104 patients with intracranial neoplasm. Fifty-five patients were operated on without any use of the Nd:YAG laser. The coagulation capabilities of the Nd:YAG made it possible to achieve the hemostasis sooner and more certainly that brought an opportunity operate in a dry field. The shrinkage of a tumor, especially in the cases of meningioma and metastases, facilitated their preparation to a great extent. Removal of a lesion took place with negligible mechanical damage of the surrounding cerebral tissue. The Nd:YAG laser is particularly useful in the cases of well vascularized brain meningiomas; in this way larger tumors can be removed radically with milder postoperational course and good results of therapy were achieved significantly more frequently than in the control group. It was clearly demonstrated with significantly less frequent bouts of consciousness disturbance and pareses. The application of this Nd:YAG laser does not influence upon the postoperational course, the tumor regrowth and the number of persons with the expanding process recurrence in the glioma cases.

  9. Crystallization kinetics and densification of YAG nanoparticles from various chelating agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, J.G.; Kumar, R.V.; Qu, Y.F.; Krsmanovic, Dalibor

    2009-08-05

    Yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG, Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) nanoparticles were prepared using sonochemical sol-gel method with three different chelating agents and the effect of crystallization kinetics was investigated with differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetry (DSC-TG). The activation energy values of crystallization for the as-synthesized YAG nanoparticles using citric acid (CA), glycine (G) or a mixture of citric acid-glycine (CA-G), as chelating agents were found to be 160.5, 142.2 and 140.4 kJ mol{sup -1} and the corresponding Avarami constants were 2.2, 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. Samples produced with the mixed chelating agent under sonification, could be crystallized to single phase YAG nanoparticles (10-65 nm) after annealing at 1100 deg. C. Pellets made from the annealed YAG particles could be sintered to a relative density greater than 99% at 1500 deg. C with a grain size of 4.5 {mu}m, made up of secondary particles formed from primary nano-crystals within the grains. Grain size and relative density increased with different chelating agents from CA to G and CA-G in the increasing order when YAG samples were sintered. Grain growth and densification occurred at a relatively low temperature of 1500 deg. C as compared to over 1800 deg. C in solid-state reactions.

  10. Er:YAG delamination of immersed biological membranes using sealed flexible hollow waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi-Dolev, A. M.; Dror, Jacob; Inberg, Alexandra; Ferencz, J. R.; Croitoru, Nathan I.

    1996-04-01

    The radiation of Er-YAG laser ((lambda) equals 2.94 micrometer) gives selective interaction with tissues. The extinction in soft tissues is only a few micrometers and in hard tissues is of the order of hundreds of micrometers. This makes this type of laser very suitable for treatments in dentistry, orthopedy, or ophthalmology. Because the usual silica fibers are not transmitting the radiation at lambda equals 2.94 micrometer of this laser, many applications cannot be presently performed. Fused silica hollow fibers for Er-YAG radiation were developed in our laboratory and several possible applications in dentistry, orthopedy and ophthalmology were indicated. Hole opening and implantation preparation of teeth were experimented, using Er-YAG laser and hollow plastic waveguide delivery systems. Hole drilling in cow bones was demonstrated for applications in orthopedy. A new procedure of delivering Er-YAG radiation on fibrotic membranes of inner eggshell as a model of the membranes in eyes was developed employing silica hollow waveguides of 0.5 and 0.7 mm ID or a plastic waveguide of 1.0 mm ID. For this purpose waveguides with sealed distal tip were employed to enable us to approach the delivery system through liquid media near to the membrane. This experiment demonstrates the possibility of surgical applications in vitectomy in ophthalmology using Er-YAG laser and silica hollow waveguides.

  11. Chemical Changes Associated with Increased Acid Resistance of Er:YAG Laser Irradiated Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Olea-Mejía, Oscar Fernando; García-Fabila, María Magdalena; Rodríguez-Vilchis, Laura Emma; Sánchez-Flores, Ignacio; Centeno-Pedraza, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Background. An increase in the acid resistance of dental enamel, as well as morphological and structural changes produced by Er:YAG laser irradiation, has been reported. Purpose. To evaluate the chemical changes associated with acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser. Methods. Forty-eight enamel samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 12). Group I (control); Groups II, III, and IV were irradiated with Er:YAG at 100 mJ (12.7 J/cm2), 200 mJ (25.5 J/cm2), and 300 mJ (38.2 J/cm2), respectively. Results. There were significant differences in composition of irradiated groups (with the exception of chlorine) and in the amount of calcium released. Conclusions. Chemical changes associated with an increase in acid resistance of enamel treated with Er:YAG laser showed a clear postirradiation pattern characterized by a decrease in C at.% and an increase in O, P, and Ca at.% and no changes in Cl at.%. An increased Ca/P ratio after Er:YAG laser irradiation was associated with the use of higher laser energy densities. Chemical changes produced by acid dissolution showed a similar trend among experimental groups. Stable or increased Ca/P ratio after acid dissolution was observed in the irradiated groups, with reduction of Ca released into the acid solution. PMID:24600327

  12. UV by the fourth harmonic generation of compact side-pumped Yb:YAG laser emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Brian; McIntosh, Chris; Hays, Alan; Dilazaro, Tom; Goldberg, Lew

    2016-03-01

    We present a compact, side pumped passively Q-switched Yb:YAG laser that was operated in a burst mode with pump durations of 2-4 ms at low duty cycles. Intra-pump pulse Q-switched pulse repetition frequencies varied from 5-20 kHz depending on the transmission of the Cr:YAG saturable absorber, which was varied from 70% to 94%. Pump duration, pulse repetition frequency and output coupler reflectivity were optimized to yield maximum Yb:YAG laser average power and laser efficiency, while providing sufficient peak intensity, typically 0.3-1 MW, to enable efficient forth harmonic generation (FHG). Pulse energies and durations were in ranges of 0.3-1.8 mJ and 1.5-7ns, respectively, dependent on the unbleached transmission of the Cr:YAG saturable absorber. We achieved an optical efficiency of greater than 15% for the Yb:YAG laser. Extra-cavity 515 nm second harmonic generation (SHG) was achieved using a 5mm long KTP crystal. The 515 nm light was then frequency doubled by focusing it into a 7mm long BBO crystal, resulting in a 15% conversion efficiency from 1030nm to 257.5 nm, with an average UV power greater than 100 mW.

  13. Effect of B³⁺-N³⁻ on YAG:Dy thermographic phosphor luminescence.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Wing Yin; Steinberg, Adam; Chin, Ya Huei

    2014-11-01

    The use of thermographic phosphors for high-temperature (>1000  K) thermometry currently is limited by loss of signal due to thermal quenching. This work demonstrates a new phosphor generated by substituting tetrahedral site Al(3+)-O(2-) in YAG:Dy with B(3+)-N(3-) to produce YABNG:Dy. Conventional YAG:Dy and YABNG:Dy phosphors were synthesized using identical solgel synthesis techniques. X-ray diffraction measurements showed that both had nearly pure crystalline phases, with a minor secondary yttrium-aluminum-monoclinic (YAM) phase present in the YABNG:Dy. The YABNG:Dy sample had a larger and more spherical primary grain than did the YAG:Dy in scanning electron microscopy images. Tests of the thermal response showed that the YABNG:Dy had much stronger phosphorescence emissions than did YAG:Dy, likely due to the morphological differences. Furthermore, the onset of thermal quenching was delayed by approximately 100 K for YABGN:Dy compared to YAG:Dy, and the rate of signal decrease with temperature was reduced. This resulted in greater signal-to-noise ratios and less uncertainty in the temperature measurements, particularly at high temperatures. PMID:25361305

  14. Defect-induced solid state amorphization of molecular crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Lei; Carvajal, Teresa; Koslowski, Marisol

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the process of mechanically induced amorphization in small molecule organic crystals under extensive deformation. In this work, we develop a model that describes the amorphization of molecular crystals, in which the plastic response is calculated with a phase field dislocation dynamics theory in four materials: acetaminophen, sucrose, γ-indomethacin, and aspirin. The model is able to predict the fraction of amorphous material generated in single crystals for a given applied stress. Our results show that γ-indomethacin and sucrose demonstrate large volume fractions of amorphous material after sufficient plastic deformation, while smaller amorphous volume fractions are predicted in acetaminophen and aspirin, in agreement with experimental observation.

  15. Xintec Optica 120 Nd:YAG surgical laser.

    PubMed

    1992-09-01

    This update to our recent Evaluation "Surgical Lasers" (Health Devices 20[7-8], July-August 1991) provides information about the Xintec Optica 120 Nd:YAG surgical laser, which was not available at the time of our original study and which has several unique features. Xintec also offers a 50 W, 120 VAC version of this laser, the Optica 60, which we did not evaluate; the manufacturer states that these models share many of the same features. The criteria and test methods used to evaluate the Optica 120 can be found on pages 252 to 260 in the 1991 issue. Below, we briefly describe the unit in the Characteristics section, and we provide an overall rating for the unit, as well as an individual rating for each major test, in the Significant Test Results and Ratings section. Under each of these tests, we report on features that are unique to this laser or that surpassed our criteria and would likely be considered by hospitals during the selection process. We also report on limitations and deficiencies that failed to meet our criteria, that are hazardous, or that played a significant role in our rating for both the test category and the unit, as well as any modifications that the manufacturer has made to the unit to address our concerns. Some reliability problems that we encountered during testing are also discussed to provide users with some indication of the laser's performance and service requirements; however, this information was not used in determining the unit's rating. Also see the "Laser Technology Planning" and "Laser Use and Safety" Guidance Articles in this issue. PMID:1428902

  16. Treatment of dentinal tubules by Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelíčkova, Hana; Zapletalova, Zdeňka; Peřina, Jan, Jr.; Novotný, Radko; Kubínek, Roman; Stranyánek, Martin

    2005-08-01

    Symptom of cervical dentine hypersensitivity attacks from 10% to 15% of population and causes an uncomfortable pain during contact with any matter. Sealing of open dentinal tubules is one of the methods to reach insensibility. Laser as a source of coherent radiation is used to melt dentine surface layers. Melted dentine turns to hard mass with a smooth, non-porous surface. Simulation of this therapy was made in vitro by means of LASAG Nd:YAG pulsed laser system KLS 246-102. Eighty human extracted teeth were cut horizontally to obtain samples from 2 mm to 3 mm thick. First experiments were done on cross section surfaces to find an optimal range of laser parameters. A wide range of energies from 30 mJ to 210 mJ embedded in 0,3 ms long pulse was tested. Motion in X and Y axes was ensured by a CNC driven table and the pulse frequency 15 Hz was chosen to have a suitable overlap of laser spots. Some color agents were examined with the aim to improve surface absorption. Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to evaluate all samples and provided optimal values of energies around 50 J.cm-2. Next experiments were done with the beam oriented perpendicularly to a root surface, close to the real situation. Optical fibers with the diameter of 0,6 mm and 0,2 mm were used to guide a laser beam to teeth surfaces. Laser processing heads with lens F = 100 mm and F = 50 mm were used. The best samples were investigated by means of the Atomic Force Microscopy.

  17. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  18. The Structure and Properties of Amorphous Indium Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of In2O3 thin films, ranging from X-ray diffraction amorphous to highly crystalline, were grown on amorphous silica substrates using pulsed laser deposition by varying the film growth temperature. The amorphous-to-crystalline transition and the structure of amorphous In2O3 were investigated by grazing angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), Hall transport measurement, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) liquid-quench simulation. On the basis of excellent agreement between the EXAFS and MD results, a model of the amorphous oxide structure as a network of InOx polyhedra was constructed. Mechanisms for the transport properties observed in the crystalline, amorphous-to-crystalline, and amorphous deposition regions are presented, highlighting a unique structure–property relationship. PMID:25678743

  19. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-01-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material. PMID:27172815

  20. Atomic-scale disproportionation in amorphous silicon monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Akihiko; Kohara, Shinji; Asada, Toshihiro; Arao, Masazumi; Yogi, Chihiro; Imai, Hideto; Tan, Yongwen; Fujita, Takeshi; Chen, Mingwei

    2016-05-01

    Solid silicon monoxide is an amorphous material which has been commercialized for many functional applications. However, the amorphous structure of silicon monoxide is a long-standing question because of the uncommon valence state of silicon in the oxide. It has been deduced that amorphous silicon monoxide undergoes an unusual disproportionation by forming silicon- and silicon-dioxide-like regions. Nevertheless, the direct experimental observation is still missing. Here we report the amorphous structure characterized by angstrom-beam electron diffraction, supplemented by synchrotron X-ray scattering and computer simulations. In addition to the theoretically predicted amorphous silicon and silicon-dioxide clusters, suboxide-type tetrahedral coordinates are detected by angstrom-beam electron diffraction at silicon/silicon-dioxide interfaces, which provides compelling experimental evidence on the atomic-scale disproportionation of amorphous silicon monoxide. Eventually we develop a heterostructure model of the disproportionated silicon monoxide which well explains the distinctive structure and properties of the amorphous material.

  1. Characterization of Poly-Amorphous Indomethacin by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi; Fukura, Naomi; Sasaki, Tetsuo

    2012-09-01

    Since the stability of amorphous solids of pharmaceuticals differs depending on the method of preparation, there are several solid-state chemical structures in amorphous solids, which like poly-amorphous solids might have different characteristics the same as in crystalline solids. However, it is not easy to identify the differences in solid-state characteristics between amorphous solids using conventional analytical methods, such as powder X-ray diffraction analysis, since all of the poly-amorphous solids had similar halo X-ray diffraction patterns. However, terahertz spectroscopy can distinguish the amorphous solids of indomethacin with different physicochemical properties, and is expected to provide a rapid and non-destructive qualitative analysis for the solid materials, it would be useful for the qualitative evaluation of amorphous solids in the pharmaceutical industry.

  2. Characterization of Poly-Amorphous Indomethacin by Terahertz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Makoto; Nishizawa, Jun-ichi; Fukura, Naomi; Sasaki, Tetsuo

    2012-05-01

    Since the stability of amorphous solids of pharmaceuticals differs depending on the method of preparation, there are several solid-state chemical structures in amorphous solids, which like poly-amorphous solids might have different characteristics the same as in crystalline solids. However, it is not easy to identify the differences in solid-state characteristics between amorphous solids using conventional analytical methods, such as powder X-ray diffraction analysis, since all of the poly-amorphous solids had similar halo X-ray diffraction patterns. However, terahertz spectroscopy can distinguish the amorphous solids of indomethacin with different physicochemical properties, and is expected to provide a rapid and non-destructive qualitative analysis for the solid materials, it would be useful for the qualitative evaluation of amorphous solids in the pharmaceutical industry.

  3. A high-power picosecond Nd:YAG/CO{sub 2} laser system for electron guns, laser acceleration and FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Fisher, A.S.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.V.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.

    1994-12-31

    Fourth-harmonic Nd:YAG pulses illuminating a microwave linear accelerator`s photoinjector generates electron bunches in trains for FEL experiments, or in a single pulse for laser acceleration. A multi-gigawatt CO{sub 2} laser switched by the ND:YAG fundamental delivers 50-ps pulses for Inverse Cherenkov, Inverse FEL, or Grating Linac electron acceleration experiments.

  4. TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser by side-pumping a grooved rod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vistas, Cláudia R.; Liang, Dawei; Almeida, Joana; Guillot, Emmanuel

    2016-05-01

    A simple TEM00 mode solar laser system with a grooved Nd:YAG rod pumped through a heliostat-parabolic mirror system is reported here. The radiation coupling capacity of a fused silica tube lens was combined with the multipass pumping ability of a 2 V-shaped cavity to provide efficient side-pumping along a 4.0 mm diameter grooved Nd:YAG single-crystal rod. TEM00 mode solar laser power of 3.4 W was measured by adopting an asymmetric large-mode laser resonant cavity. Record TEM00 mode solar laser collection efficiency of 3.4 W/m2and slope efficiency of 1.9% was achieved, which corresponds to 1.8 and 2.4 times more than the previous TEM00 mode Nd:YAG solar laser using the PROMES-CNRS heliostat-parabolic mirror system, respectively.

  5. Optimizing treatment parameters for the vascular malformations using 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wei; Lin, He; Xie, Shusen

    2010-02-01

    Near infrared Nd:YAG pulsed laser treatment had been proved to be an efficient method to treat large-sized vascular malformations like leg telangiectasia for deep penetrating depth into skin and uniform light distribution in vessel. However, optimal clinical outcome was achieved by various laser irradiation parameters and the key factor governing the treatment efficacy was still unclear. A mathematical model in combination with Monte Carlo algorithm and finite difference method was developed to estimate the light distribution, temperature profile and thermal damage in epidermis, dermis and vessel during and after 1064 nm pulsed Nd:YAG laser irradiation. Simulation results showed that epidermal protection could be achieved during 1064 nm Nd:YAG pulsed laser irradiation in conjunction with cryogen spray cooling. However, optimal vessel closure and blood coagulation depend on a compromise between laser spot size and pulse duration.

  6. Fractured Anterior Chamber Intraocular Lens (ACIOL) Complicating Nd: YAG Laser for Peripheral Iridotomy

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Edgard; Koutsandrea, Chryssanthi; Papaefthimiou, Ioannis; Papaconstantinou, Dimitris; Georgalas, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    Laser peripheral iridotomy is the procedure of choice for the treatment of angle-closure glaucoma caused by relative or absolute pupillary block. Nd: YAG laser iridotomy has been reported to have several complications such as Iris bleeding, hyphema, transient IOP elevation, intraocular inflammation, choroidal, retinal detachment and vitreous hemorrhage. We report a case of a 74 year old lady on anticoagulant treatment who developed pupillary block and angle closure glaucoma after cataract surgery and anterior chamber intraocular lens (ACIOL) insertion complicated with intraoperative bleeding. The patient was treated with Nd: YAG laser iridotomy , however, the ACIOL was inadvertently fractured after a single shot of laser and it had to be replaced. Although the incidence is rare. Ophthalmologists and Opticians should be aware that an ACIOL may be fractured even after a single Nd:YAG laser shot and avoid to perform it close to the ACIOL. Pretreatment counseling should include this rare complication. PMID:24600484

  7. In vitro investigation on Ho:YAG laser-assisted bone ablation underwater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianzeng; Chen, Chuanguo; Chen, Faner; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen; Ye, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Liquid-assisted hard tissue ablation by infrared lasers has extensive clinical application. However, detailed studies are still needed to explore the underlying mechanism. In the present study, the dynamic process of bubble evolution induced by Ho:YAG laser under water without and with bone tissue at different thickness layer were studied, as well as its effects on hard tissue ablation. The results showed that the Ho:YAG laser was capable of ablating hard bone tissue effectively in underwater conditions. The penetration of Ho:YAG laser can be significantly increased up to about 4 mm with the assistance of bubble. The hydrokinetic forces associated with the bubble not only contributed to reducing the thermal injury to peripheral tissue, but also enhanced the ablation efficiency and improve the ablation crater morphology. The data also presented some clues to optimal selection of irradiation parameters and provided additional knowledge of the bubble-assisted hard tissue ablation mechanism. PMID:27056700

  8. Beam quality improvement of pulsed Nd:YAG lasers using Brillouin phase conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, Hans J.; Haase, Andreas; Hermann, S.; Menzel, Ralf; Schumann, D.

    1993-04-01

    Using phaseconjugating mirrors (PCMs) the beam quality of solid state lasers can be improved by compensating the thermal lens of the rods at high average powers. Oscillators with one PCM as a highly reflecting mirror and double-pass amplifiers with PCMs have been investigated. PCMs are realized by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Nd:YAG and Nd,Cr:GSGG oscillators have been built with pulse repetition rates up to 45 Hz. Stable TEM00-mode operation has been obtained. Average output powers of 10 watts for 15 ns Q-switched pulses of a Nd:YAG laser and 7 watts for Nd,Cr:GSGG have been achieved. In a double pass Nd:YAG amplifier the thermal lens was compensated leading to a nearly diffraction limited beam with a maximum output power of 40 watts.

  9. Valence state change and defect centers induced by infrared femtosecond laser in Yb:YAG crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinshun; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Panjuan; Guo, Zhongyi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shiliang

    2015-04-01

    The broad band upconversion luminescence in Yb3+:YAG crystal has been observed in experiments under the irradiation of focused infrared femtosecond laser. The dependence of the fluorescence intensity on the pump power shows that the upconversion luminescence is due to simultaneous two-photon absorption process, which indicates that the broad emission bands at 365 and 463 nm could be assigned to the 5d → 4f transitions of Yb2+ ions and the one at 692 nm could be attributed to the electron-hole recombination process on (Yb2+-F+) centers. The absorption spectra of the Yb:YAG crystal samples before and after femtosecond laser irradiation, and after further annealing reveal that permanent valence state change of Yb ions from Yb3+ to Yb2+ and (Yb2+-F+) centers have been induced by infrared femtosecond laser irradiation in Yb3+:YAG crystal.

  10. Suppression of nonlinear phonon relaxation in Yb:YAG thin disk via zero phonon line pumping.

    PubMed

    Smrž, Martin; Miura, Taisuke; Chyla, Michal; Nagisetty, Siva; Novák, Ondřej; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2014-08-15

    A quantitative comparison of conventional absorption line (940 nm) pumping and zero phonon line (ZPL) (969 nm) pumping of a Yb:YAG thin disk laser is reported. Characteristics of an output beam profile, surface temperature, and deformation of a thin disk under the different pump wavelengths are evaluated. We found that a nonlinear phonon relaxation (NPR) of the excited state in Yb:YAG, which induces nonlinear temperature rise and large aspheric deformation, did not appear in the case of a ZPL pumped Yb:YAG thin disk. This means that the advantage of ZPL pumping is not only the reduction of quantum defect but also the suppression of NPR. The latter effect is more important for high power lasers. PMID:25121908

  11. Waveguiding properties in Yb:YAG crystals implanted with protons and carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, G V; Ramírez, D; Márquez, H; Flores-Romero, E; Rickards, J; Trejo-Luna, R

    2012-08-01

    We report the fabrication and analysis of optical waveguides in Yb:YAG crystals using either proton or carbon ion implantation. Planar waveguides were obtained by implanting the whole surface of the crystals. Channel waveguides were defined using an electroformed mask with apertures of 10, 15, and 20 micrometers in width. The waveguiding properties of the structures were analyzed, showing good light confinement based on the transversal mode distribution and optical transmission measurements. The spectroscopic properties of the Yb ions in the YAG host are preserved after the implantation process, which demonstrates the potential of this technique for tailoring microcomponents for integrated optics applications. In particular, the Yb:YAG waveguides have the potential to operate as miniature lasers. PMID:22859050

  12. Laser-diode pumped 40-W Yb:YAG ceramic laser.

    PubMed

    Hao, Qiang; Li, Wenxue; Pan, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Jiang, Benxue; Pan, Yubai; Zeng, Heping

    2009-09-28

    We demonstrated a high-power continuous-wave (CW) polycrystalline Yb:YAG ceramic laser pumped by fiber-pigtailed laser diode at 968 nm with 400 mum fiber core. The Yb:YAG ceramic laser performance was compared for different Yb(3+) ion concentrations in the ceramics by using a conventional end-pump laser cavity consisting of two flat mirrors with output couplers of different transmissions. A CW laser output of 40 W average power with M(2) factor of 5.8 was obtained with 5 mol% Yb concentration under 120 W incident pump power. This is to the best of our knowledge the highest output power in end-pumped bulk Yb:YAG ceramic laser. PMID:19907559

  13. 520-W continuous-wave diode corner-pumped composite Yb:YAG slab laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Gong, Mali; Lu, Fuyuan; Gong, Wupeng; Li, Chen

    2005-04-01

    We present a pumping scheme for a quasi-three-level solid-state laser. The scheme uses a slab laser configuration with the pump light incident from the slab corners. A diode-corner-pumped composite Yb:YAG-YAG slab laser operating in high-power cw mode was designed to prove the scheme. As much as 520 W of output power was obtained from a single 1-mm-thick composite slab with 0.5-at. %-doped Yb:YAG. The slope efficiency and the optical-to-optical efficiency with respect to the pump power were 32% and 25%, respectively. This result shows the validity of the corner-pumping concept and its feasibility in the development of high-power solid-state lasers. PMID:15832919

  14. High power VCSEL array pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yihan; Van Leeuwen, Robert; Watkins, Laurence S.; Seurin, Jean-Francois; Xu, Guoyang; Miglo, Alexander; Wang, Qing; Ghosh, Chuni

    2012-03-01

    Solid-state lasers pumped by high-power two-dimensional arrays of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) were investigated. Both end-pumping and side-pumping schemes of Nd:YAG lasers with high power kW-class 808 nm VCSEL pump modules were implemented. For one application 10 mJ blue laser pulses were obtained from a frequencydoubled actively Q-switched VCSEL-array dual side-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at 946 nm. For another application 10 mJ green laser pulses were obtained from a frequency-doubled passively Q-switched VCSEL-array endpumped Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. Both QCW and CW pumping schemes were investigated to achieve high average Q-switched power.

  15. Properties of continuous-wave 1123 nm laser with diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, F.; Wang, Q. P.; Liu, Z. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Sun, W. J.

    2010-11-01

    Laser properties of diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at 1123 nm are demonstrated. A 1.0 at % Nd-doped Nd:YAG rod with a size of Ø3 × 63 mm2 is used as the active medium. Both radial and tangential thermal focal lengths of this side-pumped Nd:YAG rod are determined under lasing condition. The results show that the bifocusing strength of 1123 nm laser is larger than that of 1164 nm laser, and 1123-nm thermal focal lengths are shorter than those of 1064-nm laser due to higher quantum defect. Laser output performances of 1123 nm in terms of stability, output power and beam quality influenced by pump power at different cavity lengths are also discussed with a convex-piano cavity.

  16. Erbium:YAG laser incision of urethral strictures: early clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, John A.; Riemer, Jennifer D.; Hayes, Gary B.; Negus, Dan; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2007-02-01

    Two cases involving Erbium:YAG laser incision of proximal bulbar urethral strictures are described. Erbium:YAG laser radiation with a wavelength of 2.94 μm, pulse energy of 10 mJ, and a pulse repetition rate of 15 Hz, was delivered through a 2-m-long, 250-μm-core sapphire optical fiber in contact with tissue. Total laser irradiation time was 5 min. The first patient suffering from a virgin urethral stricture was treated and is stricture-free. The second patient suffering from a recurrent urethral stricture required further treatment. This case report describes the first clinical application of the Er:YAG laser in urology.

  17. Advances in bone surgery: the Er:YAG laser in oral surgery and implant dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Stübinger, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    The erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG) laser has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional methods of bone ablation because of its wavelength of 2.94 μm, which coincides with the absorption peak of water. Over the last decades in several experimental and clinical studies, the widespread initial assumption that light amplification for stimulated emission of radiation (laser) osteotomy inevitably provokes profound tissue damage and delayed wound healing has been refuted. In addition, the supposed disadvantage of prolonged osteotomy times could be overcome by modern short-pulsed Er:YAG laser systems. Currently, the limiting factors for a routine application of lasers for bone ablation are mainly technical drawbacks such as missing depth control and a difficult and safe guidance of the laser beam. This article gives a short overview of the development process and current possibilities of noncontact Er:YAG laser osteotomy in oral and implant surgery. PMID:23662082

  18. Design and development of a high-power LED-pumped Ce:Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Villars, Brenden; Steven Hill, E; Durfee, Charles G

    2015-07-01

    By studying quasi-continuous wave (QCW) operation of a Ce:Nd:YAG solid-state laser directly pumped by LED arrays, we demonstrate the feasibility of direct-LED pumping as an alternative to direct-diode or flashlamp pumping. LEDs emitting either at 460 or 810 nm were used to pump an uncooled Ce:Nd:YAG laser rod (at 30-Hz repetition rate for tens of seconds). Pumping at 460 nm was made possible by the Ce(3+) co-dopant that enables transfer of excitations near to Nd(3+) ions in the YAG lattice. Comparison of these two pumping schemes has allowed for a thorough analysis of the performance and efficiency of this laser system. QCW output energies as high as 18 mJ/pulse are reported, which to the best of our knowledge is the highest output pulse energy achieved by an LED-pumped solid-state laser to date. PMID:26125364

  19. Spectral and lasing characteristics of 1% Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Bagayev, S N; Vatnik, S M; Vedin, I A; Kurbatov, P F; Osipov, V V; Shitov, V A; Maksimov, R N; Luk'yashin, K E; Pavlyuk, A A

    2015-01-31

    High-transparency 1% Ho:YAG ceramics with the transmission coefficient of 82% in the IR range at the sample thickness of 1 mm are synthesised from a mixture of the Ho:Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders obtained by the laser method. Results of investigations of spectral and lasing characteristics of 1 % Ho:YAG ceramics under intracavity pumping by radiation of a 5% Tm:KLuW disk element are presented. Based on spectral intensity analysis of generation in the 1.8 – 2.1 mm range and on cavity parameters, the estimated lasing slope efficiency for 1% Ho:YAG ceramics is about 40%. (lasers)

  20. Quality of the beam produced a pulsed Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamuri, A. R.; Bidin, N.; Daud, Y. M.

    2008-01-01

    The quality of the beam produced by a Nd:YAG laser was investigated. A hemispherical Nd:YAG laser resonator was developed. A flashlamp driver was designed to pump a Nd:YAG laser crystal. The output of the laser was characterized via the variation of the capacitor voltage. A phosphor card was used to detect the invisible of the infrared beam. Exposed photographic paper was utilized to examine the energetic beam after interaction. The brightness and strength of the beams were analyzed using the Matrox Inspector and VideoTest 5 software packages. The intensity of the beam produced and the volume loss after interaction were found to linearly increase with respect to the input energy.

  1. Variable square pulse vs conventional PFN pumping of Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemeš, K.; Lukač, M.; Možina, J.

    2012-04-01

    The influence of the flashlamp pump current pulse shape on Er:YAG laser efficiency and laser rod thermal focusing was studied theoretically and experimentally. Two pulse shapes, PFN (Pulse Forming Network) and VSP (Variable Square Pulse), were considered. Theoretical modeling and experimental measurements show that the pump pulse shape itself does not have a significant influence on the Er:YAG laser efficiency or thermal focusing. Instead, the major parameter influencing Er:YAG laser efficiency and thermal focusing was found to be the overall pulse duration. For PFN pulses, rise and fall times directly define the overall pulse duration, and therefore do have influence on thermal focusing. By contrast, VSP pulse duration is defined by the externally controlled on-time of the switching transistor. For square shaped pulses, short rise and fall times do not have a direct beneficial influence on thermal lensing.

  2. Er:YAG Laser Applications on Marble and Limestone Sculptures with Polychrome and Patina Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    deCruz, A.; Wolbarsht, M. L.; Palmer, R. A.; Pierce, S. E.; Adamkiewicz, E.

    The Er:YAG laser (2.94 µm) has been used safely and effectively to ablate contaminants from polychrome surfaces of marble and limestone sculptures. The pieces studied were 13th, 14th and 15th century polychromes and a patina surface of a Roman marble sculpture from the 2nd Century AD. The surface encrustations removed included calcite, gypsum, whewellite, soluble salts, atmospheric deposits, organic films, lichen and other fungal growths that cover the sculptures. The laser removal of organic deposits with the Er:YAG laser was especially effective. A microscopic study of the polychrome surfaces before and after removal of the encrustations showed preservation of the polychrome pigments. Infrared absorption and x-ray fluorescence spectral analyses of the ablated materials and of the surfaces before and after laser ablation were used for evaluation of the mechanism of the laser action and for comparison of the results of Er:YAG laser treatment with traditional conservation methods.

  3. [A Case of Holmium: YAG Laser Resection of Superficial Bladder Tumor (HoLRBT)].

    PubMed

    Sugita, Yoshiko; Shitara, Toshiya; Hirayama, Takahiro; Fujita, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Kubo, Seiichi; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2015-10-01

    We present a case of holmium : YAG laser resection of superficial bladder tumor (HoLRBT). A 73-year-old male was referred to our hospital with elevated prostatic specific antigen. Due to difficulty of urination, holmium : YAG laser enucleation of the prostate was performed under the diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia. During the surgery, superficial bladder tumor was incidentally identified, and HoLRBT was performed. After the operation, histopathological examination revealed urothelial carcinoma, G2 > G1, pTa. The patient has been subsequently followed up for 9 months, and there areno evidence of recurrence. Changing the holmium : YAG laser energy setting can potentially be effective and safe to approach a superficial bladder tumor. PMID:26563623

  4. Removal of dental filling materials by Er:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1991-05-01

    In previous reports it could be shown that pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation is effective for the removal of dental enamel, dentin, and caries. Damage to the adjacent hard substances is minimal. Temperature measurements and animal studies revealed that thermal pulp damage can be avoided. The experimental results make the Er:YAG laser promising for the preparation of dental cavities. In many cases patients already have fillings which have to be removed. In the present work, investigation is made of the effect of Er:YAG laser radiation on various restorative filling materials. The experiments demonstrate that removal is possible for all tested cements, composites and amalgam. Ablation efficiency is comparable to that of enamel and dentin, and thus sufficient for practical applications. Morphology of crater walls indicates greater thermal side effects than for natural dental hard substances.

  5. Laser performance, thermal focusing and depolarization effects in Nd:Cr:GSGG and Nd:YAG

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams-Byrd, Julie A.; Barnes, Norman P.

    1990-01-01

    The laser performance of Nd:Cr:GSGG and Nd:YAG was investigated and compared for laser efficiency, thermal focusing, and depolarization effects. Laser efficiency was studied for Nd:Cr:GSGG and Nd:YAG under similar conditions. Laser efficiency was measured as a function of electrical energy and output mirror reflectivity. Maximum laser efficiency was calculated by determining the losses in the laser cavity. Thermal focusing and birefringence loss of Nd:Cr:GSGG and Nd:YAG have been examined by varying the average pump power. The average pump power changed by adjusting both the energy per pulse and the pulse-repetition frequency. Substantial thermal focusing differences for Nd:Cr:GSGG are explained.

  6. In vitro application of optical transmission systems in erbium:YAG laser temporomandibular joint surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Niederdellmann, Herbert; Deuerling, Christian; Dammer, Ralf

    1995-05-01

    The experimental setup of this study is focused on the changes in temporomandibular joint tissue after irradiation with an Erbium:YAG laser. Initially, the free-running beam from the laser was focused onto freshly excised porcine tissue samples, indicating an optimum average energy density and pulse duration for the purpose of temporomandibular joint surgery of about 15 - 60 J/cm2 and 120 microsecond(s) - 240 microsecond(s) , respectively. Consecutively, an attempt was made to couple the Erbium:YAG laser beam on the one hand to optical fibers made of infrared-transmitting glasses (fluoride- and chalcogenide-based), on the other hand to a recently developed sapphire and liquid core fiber, respectively. From the preliminary observations of this investigation it appears that both the liquid core and the sapphire fiber are the most promising candidates for delivery of Erbium-YAG laser radiation in arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation.

  7. Low-current-density LED-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a solid cylindrical reflector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, G. I.; Kiang, Y. C.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of Nd:YAG lasers is theoretically analyzed. In experiments, an array of twenty GaAlAs diodes was used as the pumping light source for a Nd:YAG laser. An index-matching glass half-cylinder was used instead of the conventional hollow metal reflector. The refractive index of the half-cylinder was 1.8, which matched the refractive index of the Nd:YAG rod. A maximum CW output power of 27 mW at a current density of 207 A/sq cm was achieved using this glass half-cylinder, while 6.7 mW were obtained when a hollow metal reflector was used.

  8. Improvements of welding characteristics of aluminum alloys with YAG laser and TIG arc hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujinaga, Shigeki; Ohashi, Ryoji; Katayama, Seiji; Matsunawa, Akira

    2003-03-01

    In high power YAG laser welding of steels, a rectangularly modulated beam with high peak power is usually used to get deep penetration. On the other hand, many spatters and solidification cracks are generated when some aluminum alloys are welded with a rectangularly modulated beam because of its high heat conductivity, high reflectivity, low surface tension, large contraction, wide solidification temperature range, etc. Therefore, a properly modulated beam or a continuous beam is usually used in aluminum alloy welding, although the penetration depth is shallow. In this research, sinusoidal wave or rectangularly modulated wave of YAG laser combined with TIG arc was tried to improve the weldability of A6061 aluminum alloy. As a result, when TIG arc was superimposed behind the YAG laser beam, deeply penetrated weld beads with good surface appearances were produced without spatter losses and cracks.

  9. Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation of benign oral vascular lesions: a case series.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Rui; Silva, Igor Henrique; Carvalho, Alessandra Tavares; Leão, Jair Carneiro; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino

    2015-11-01

    Vascular anomalies of the head and neck are common lesions usually associated with functional and/or aesthetic limitations. The aim of the present paper was to report a case series of oral vascular malformations treated with Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation, highlighting the clinical evolution and post-surgical complications. Fifteen patients diagnosed with oral vascular malformations were treated with Nd:YAG laser followed by three sessions of biostimulation. None of the patients presented post-surgical pain, but 6 of 15 patients (40%) experienced minimal post-surgical complications. All cases presented complete resolution of the lesions after laser treatment. More importantly, 12 out of 15 (80%) resolved after a single session. Low morbidity, minimal patient discomfort, and satisfactory aesthetic results point Nd:YAG laser photocoagulation as a promising option for the management of benign oral vascular lesions. PMID:25962368

  10. Spectroscopic investigation of the Cr to Tm energy transfer in Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibartolo, B.

    1988-01-01

    New and interesting schemes have recently been considered for the efficient operation of solid-state ionic laser systems. Often the available data on these systems were obtained only because they seemed directly related to the laser performance and provide no insight into the physical processes. A more systematic approach is desirable, where more attention is devoted to the elementary basic processes and to the nature of the mechanisms at work. It is with this aim that we have undertaken the present study. Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Y4Al5O12), called YAG, has two desirable properties as host for rare earth impurities: (1) trivalent rare earth ions can replace the yttrium without any charge compensation problem, and (2) YAG crystals have high cutoff energies. The results of measurements and calculations indicate that the Cr(3+) ion in YAG can be used to sensitize efficiently the Tm(3+) ion.

  11. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    PubMed Central

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning' transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. These findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched. PMID:26564783

  12. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids.

    PubMed

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A; Lookman, Turab

    2015-01-01

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a 'front depinning' transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. These findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched. PMID:26564783

  13. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaotic behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.

  14. Reversibility and criticality in amorphous solids

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Regev, Ido; Weber, John; Reichhardt, Charles; Dahmen, Karin A.; Lookman, Turab

    2015-11-13

    The physical processes governing the onset of yield, where a material changes its shape permanently under external deformation, are not yet understood for amorphous solids that are intrinsically disordered. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and mean-field theory, we show that at a critical strain amplitude the sizes of clusters of atoms undergoing cooperative rearrangements of displacements (avalanches) diverges. We compare this non-equilibrium critical behaviour to the prevailing concept of a ‘front depinning’ transition that has been used to describe steady-state avalanche behaviour in different materials. We explain why a depinning-like process can result in a transition from periodic to chaoticmore » behaviour and why chaotic motion is not possible in pinned systems. As a result, these findings suggest that, at least for highly jammed amorphous systems, the irreversibility transition may be a side effect of depinning that occurs in systems where the disorder is not quenched.« less

  15. Application of amorphous brush-plated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Zhu, Y.; Zheng, Z.

    1994-02-01

    The results obtained during industrial trials have shown that the service life of hot work dies can be increased by 33 to 180% using the brush plating technique to prepare amorphous coatings. The coatings possess a much higher hardness, lower friction coefficient at room and elevated temperatures, good scale resistance in addition to higher surface finish, compared to uncoated dies, and thus improve the tribological performance of the dies. In this work, a study of the crystallization process, its kinetics, and the hardness variations of the coatings has been made. According to the data obtained, it can be considered that the main reason for the success of amorphous brush-plated coatings is that, during the operation, crystallization and precipitation takes place instantaneously, which results in a strong secondary hardening effect, thus leading to an increase in the red hardness of the surface layers of dies, therefore ensuring higher thermal wear resistance of the dies.

  16. Amorphous wires in displacement sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Niarchos, D.

    1992-10-01

    In this paper, a new displacement sensor is proposed which is based on the magnetostrictive delay line technique (MDL). Due to this technique, the displacement of a moving magnet at either the acoustic stress point of origin or the detecting coil can be sensed, due to the change of the peak value of the output voltage. This sensor uses the recently developed FeSiB and FeCoCrSiB amorphous wires. Reported results show a linear response for defined regions of displacement, and a monotonic one for the case of the 125 μm FeSiB wires. It is also shown that this sensor arrangement can be used for fabrication of displacement distribution integrated sensors. Finally, it is shown that use of amorphous wires makes the repeatability of the response of the sensor as accurate as 0.6% without using hardware or software calibration.

  17. Surface modified amorphous ribbon based magnetoimpedance biosensor.

    PubMed

    Kurlyandskaya, Galina V; Fal Miyar, Vanessa

    2007-04-15

    Magnetoimpedance (MI) changes due to surface modification of the sensitive element caused by human urine, were studied with the aim of creating a robust biosensor working on a principle of electrochemical magnetoimpedance spectroscopy. A biosensor prototype with an as-quenched amorphous ribbon sensitive element was designed and calibrated for a frequency range of 0.5-10 MHz at a current intensity of 60 mA. Measurements as a function of the exposure time were made both in a regime where chemical surface modification and MI measurements were separated as well as in a regime where they were done simultaneously. The MI variation was explained by the change of the surface magnetic anisotropy. It was shown that the magnetoimpedance effect can be successfully employed as a new option to probe the electric features of the Fe(5)Co(70)Si(15)B(10) amorphous ribbon magnetic electrode surface modified by human urine. PMID:16914305

  18. New transformations between crystalline and amorphous ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemley, R. J.; Chen, L. C.; Mao, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    High-pressure optical and spectroscopic techniques were used to obtain directly the ice I(h) - hda-ice transformation in a diamond-anvil cell, and the stability of the amorphous form is examined as functions of pressure and temperature. It is demonstrated that hda-ice transforms abruptly at 4 GPa and 77 K to a crystalline phase close in structure to orientationally disordered ice-VII and to a more highly ordered, ice-VIII-like structure at higher temperatures. This is the first time that an amorphous solid is observed to convert to a crystalline solid at low temperatures by compression alone. Phase transitions of this type may be relevant on icy planetary satellites, and there may also be implications for the high-pressure behavior of silica.

  19. Annealing behavior of high permeability amorphous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenberg, L.

    1980-06-01

    Effects of low temperature annealing on the magnetic properties of the amorphous alloy Co/sub 71/ /sub 4/Fe/sub 4/ /sub 6/Si/sub 9/ /sub 6/B/sub 14/ /sub 4/ were investigated. Annealing this alloy below 400/sup 0/C results in magnetic hardening; annealing above 400/sup 0/C but below the crystallization temperature results in magnetic softening. Above the crystallization temperature the alloy hardens drastically and irreversibly. Conventional and high resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to show that the magnetic property changes at low temperatures occur while the alloy is truly amorphous. By imaging the magnetic microstructures, Lorentz electron microscopy has been able to detect the presence of microscopic inhomogeneities in this alloy. The low temperature annealing behavior of this alloy has been explained in terms of atomic pair ordering in the presence of the internal molecular field. Lorentz electron microscopy has been used to confirm this explanation.

  20. Wear Resistant Amorphous and Nanocomposite Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Racek, O

    2008-03-26

    Glass forming materials (critical cooling rate <10{sup 4}K.s{sup -1}) are promising for their high corrosion and wear resistance. During rapid cooling, the materials form an amorphous structure that transforms to nanocrystalline during a process of devitrification. High hardness (HV 1690) can be achieved through a controlled crystallization. Thermal spray process has been used to apply coatings, which preserves the amorphous/nanocomposite structure due to a high cooling rate of the feedstock particles during the impact on a substrate. Wear properties have been studied with respect to process conditions and feedstock material properties. Application specific properties such as sliding wear resistance have been correlated with laboratory tests based on instrumented indentation and scratch tests.

  1. Thermoluminescence characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalvo, T. R.; Tenorio, L. O.; Nieto, J. A.; Salgado, M. B.; Estrada, A. M. S.; Furetta, C.

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports the experimental results concerning the thermoluminescent (TL) characteristics of hydrogenated amorphous zirconium oxide (a-Zr:H) powder prepared by the sol-gel method. The advantages of this method are the homogeneity and the purity of the gels associated with a relatively low sintering temperature. Hydrogenated amorphous powder was characterized by thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction. The main TL characteristics investigated were the TL response as a function of the absorbed dose, the reproducibility of the TL readings and the fading. The undoped a-Zr:H powder presents a TL glow curve with two peaks centered at 150 and 260 degrees C, respectively, after beta irradiation. The TL response a-Zr:H as a function of the absorbed dose showed a linear behavior over a wide range. The results presented open the possibility to use this material as a good TL dosimeter.

  2. Low-temperature relaxations in amorphous polyolefins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiltner, A.; Baer, E.; Martin, J. R.; Gillham, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamic mechanical relaxation behavior of two series of amorphous polyolefins, was investigated from 4.2 K to the glass transition. Most of the polymers show a damping maximum or plateau in the 40 to 50 K region. Various mechanisms which have been suggested for cryogenic relaxations in amorphous polymers are considered as they might relate to the polyolefins. Two secondary relaxation processes above 80 K are distinguished. A relaxation at about 160 K (beta) in the second and third member of each series is associated with restricted blackbone motion. This process requires a certain degree of chain flexibility since it is not observed in the first member of each series. A lower temperature process (gamma) is observed in each member of the second series and is attributed to motion of the ethyl side group.

  3. Chromic Mechanism in Amorphous WO3 Films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J. G.; Benson, D. K.; Tracy, C. E.; Deb, S. K.; Czanderna, A. W.

    1997-06-01

    We propose a new model for the chromic mechanism in amorphous tungsten oxide films (WO3-y .cntdot. nH2O). This model not only explains a variety of seemingly conflicting experimental results reported in the literature that cannot be explained by existing models, it also has practical implications with respect to improving the coloring efficiency and durability of electrochromic devices. According to this model, a typical as-deposited tungsten oxide film has tungsten mainly in W6+ and W4+ states and can be represented as W6+(1-y) W4+(y)O(3-y) .cntdot. nH2O. The proposed chromic mechanism is based on the small polaron transition between the charge-induced W5+ state and the orignial W4+ state insteasd of the W5+ and W6+ states as suggested in previous models. The correlation between the electrochromic and photochromic behavior in amorphous tungsten oxide films is also discussed.

  4. Insulating behavior of an amorphous graphene membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tuan, Dinh; Kumar, Avishek; Roche, Stephan; Ortmann, Frank; Thorpe, M. F.; Ordejon, Pablo

    2012-09-01

    We investigate the charge transport properties of planar amorphous graphene that is fully topologically disordered, in the form of sp2 threefold coordinated networks consisting of hexagonal rings but also including many pentagons and heptagons distributed in a random fashion. Using the Kubo transport methodology and the Lanczos method, the density of states, mean free paths, and semiclassical conductivities of such amorphous graphene membranes are computed. Despite a large increase in the density of states close to the charge neutrality point, all electronic properties are dramatically degraded, evidencing an Anderson insulating state caused by topological disorder alone. These results are supported by Landauer-Büttiker conductance calculations, which show a localization length as short as 5 nm.

  5. Germanium detector passivated with hydrogenated amorphous germanium

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, William L.; Haller, Eugene E.

    1986-01-01

    Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices (12) is provided for by a surface coating (21) of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating (21) of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface (11) in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices (12), which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating (21) compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device (12) against future impregnation with impurities.

  6. Dynamical models of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Normand; Lewis, Laurent J.

    1991-04-01

    The results of our molecular-dynamics simulation of bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon using empirical potentials are presented. More specifically, we discuss a dynamical procedure for incorporating hydrogen into a pure amorphous silicon matrix, which is derived from the concept of floating bonds put forward by Pantelides [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57, 2979 (1986)]. The structures resulting from this model are compared with those obtained with use of a static approach recently developed by us. This method exhibits considerable improvement over the previous one and, in particular, unambiguously reveals the strain-relieving role of hydrogen. While the former model leads to substantial overcoordination, the present one results in almost perfect tetrahedral bonding, with an average coordination number Z=4.03, the lowest value ever achieved using a Stillinger-Weber potential. The simulations are also used to calculate the vibrational densities of states, which are found to be in good accord with corresponding neutron-scattering measurements.

  7. Characterization of Amorphous Zinc Tin Oxide Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Rajachidambaram, Jaana Saranya; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Shutthanandan, V.; Varga, Tamas; Flynn, Brendan T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Herman, Gregory S.

    2012-06-12

    Amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO) was investigated to determine the effect of deposition and post annealing conditions on film structure, composition, surface contamination, and thin film transistor (TFT) device performance. X-ray diffraction results indicated that the ZTO films remain amorphous even after annealing to 600 °C. We found that the bulk Zn:Sn ratio of the sputter deposited films were slightly tin rich compared to the composition of the ceramic sputter target, and there was a significant depletion of zinc at the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also indicated that residual surface contamination depended strongly on the sample post-annealing conditions where water, carbonate and hydroxyl species were absorbed to the surface. Electrical characterization of ZTO films, using TFT test structures, indicated that mobilities as high as 17 cm2/Vs could be obtained for depletion mode devices.

  8. Multiple minimally invasive Erbium:YAG laser mini-peels for skin rejuvenation: An objective assessment

    PubMed Central

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; El-Ammawi, Tarek S.; Medhat, Walid; Moawad, Osama; Mahoney, Mỹ G.; Uitto, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background As the demand for minimally invasive rejuvenation is increasing, micro-peel resurfacing using Erbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Er:YAG ) laser 2940 nm has been reported for the treatment of photoaged skin without ablation of the epidermis. However, little is known about the efficacy and underlying histologic changes associated with this type of treatment. Aims The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes in response to multiple sessions of Er:YAG laser 2940 nm mini-peels. Patients and methods Six female volunteers of Fitzpatrick skin type III-IV and Glogau’s class I-III wrinkles were subjected to six microresurfacing peels at 2-week intervals using Er:YAG 2940 nm laser at sub-ablative fluences of 2 - 3 J/cm2 to treat periorbital rhytides. Quantitative evaluation of collagen types I, III and VII, newly synthesized collagen, total elastin and tropoelastin was performed by histochemistry and immunohistochemistry coupled with computerized morphometric analysis at base line, end of treatment, and three months post treatment. Results Compared to the base line, evaluation of volunteers revealed obvious clinical improvement in response to Er:YAG mini-peels. Collagen types I, III, and VII, as well as newly synthesized collagen, together with tropoelastin showed a statistically significant increase in response to treatment, while the mean level of total elastin was significantly decreased in response to treatment. However, this was followed by regression of improvement at 3 months post treatment, but was still better than baseline. Conclusions The present study revealed that multiple Er:YAG mini-peels is a promising treatment option for photoaging as it reverses the signs of photoaged skin with little downtime and side effects. However, to maintain the short term improvement achieved after treatment, continued Er:YAG 2940 nm laser mini-peels is required. PMID:22672276

  9. KTP and Er:YAG laser dental bleaching comparison: a spectrophotometric, thermal and morphologic analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, C; Augros, C; Rocca, J P; Lagori, G; Fornaini, C

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the results, in terms of temperature, colour change and morphology, of two different laser wavelengths with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP). The lasers used were KTP (potassium-titanyl-phosphate) laser (λ = 532 nm (PD = 1.98 W/cm2)) and Er:YAG laser (λ = 2940 nm (PD = 2.54 W/cm2)). The bleaching gels used were PolaOffice 35% HP gel and PolaOffice+ 6% HP gel (SDI, Australia). Thirty-six extracted human teeth were selected and divided into two groups. For the 35% HP treatment, 18 teeth were randomly assigned to three subgroups: (1) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + KTP laser irradiation; (2) HP gel without laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation; and (3) HP gel + KTP laser irradiation vs. HP gel + Er:YAG irradiation. The same protocol was used for the 6% HP bleaching treatment. The bleaching results were analysed by a spectrophotometer, the thermal elevation by K thermocouples and the enamel surface by a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann-Whitney test were performed, and the data were analysed using the software StatView and the free Web statistics tool BiostaTGV. The thermal elevation of the Er:YAG groups was higher than KTP, while only the group 35% HP gel vs. 35% HP gel + Er:YAG showed significant colour differences (p < 0.05). SEM photographs showed slight enamel surface morphologic alterations after bleaching treatment. The Er:YAG laser may improve the bleaching results of 35% HP even if it increases the gel temperature, when compared to the KTP laser. PMID:26100002

  10. Wound healing after irradiation of bone tissues by Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hisashi; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Aoki, Akira; Ishikawa, Isao

    1997-05-01

    Clinical applications of Er:YAG laser are now developing in periodontics and restorative dentistry. To date, there have been few studies indicating safety criteria for intraoral usage of the Er:YAG laser. The present study examined the effects of the Er:YAG laser on bone tissues, supposing mis- irradiation in the oral cavity during dental application, especially periodontal surgery. The experiments were performed using the newly-developed Er:YAG laser apparatus equipped with a contact probe. In experiment 1, 10 pulses of laser irradiation were administered to the parietal bone of a rat at 50, 150 and 300 mJ/pulse with and without water irrigation, changing the irradiation distance to 0, 5, 10 and 20 mm, respectively. As a control, electric knife was employed. Macroscopic and SEM observations of the wound surface were performed. In experiment 2, laser irradiation in a straight line was performed at 150 mJ/pulse, 1- pps and 0,5, 10 mm irradiation distance without water irrigation. Wound healing was observed histologically at 0, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days after laser irradiation and compared with that of the control. Non-contact irradiation by Er:YAG laser did not cause severe damage to the parietal bone tissue under water irrigation. Contact irradiation induced a limited wound, however, new bone formation was observed 28 days after laser irradiation, while osseous defect with thermal degenerative tissue remained at the control site. In conclusion, irradiation with an Er:YAG laser would not cause severe damage to surrounding bone tissues in the oral cavity when used within the usual power settings for dental treatment. Furthermore, this laser may be applicable for osseous surgery because of its high ablation efficiency and good wound healing after irradiation.

  11. Optical performance of Ho:YLF Q-switched Tm:YAG laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yi-An; Kuo, Yen-Kuang

    2002-09-01

    The absorption cross-section of the Ho:YLF crystal is close to the emission cross-section of the Tm:YAG laser. According to the passive Q-switching theory, a giant laser pulse cannot be generated from the Ho:YLF Q-switched Tm:YAG laser system unless an internal focusing lens is utilized. In a previous work we experimentally demonstrated that passive Q-switching of the 2017-nm, flashlamp pumped Tm,Cr:YAG laser with a Ho:YLF saturable absorber could be obtained with an internal focusing lens. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the optical performance of the Ho:YLF Q-switched Tm:YAG laser system by solving the coupled rate equations. The simulation results indicate that the results obtained numerically are in good agreement with that obtained experimentally. Moreover, we study the passive Q-switching performance of the Ho:YLF Q-switched Tm:YAG laser system as functions of the reflectivity of the output coupler, the initial population of the saturable absorber ground state, the laser pumping rate, and the loss inside the laser resonator. On the other hand, assuming that a polarizer is utilized inside the laser cavity, we explore the passive Q-switching performance of the Ho:YLF Q-switched Tm:YAG laser system when the polarization of the laser light is along different direction between the two saturable absorber principal axes. Effect of the relative position between the saturable absorber and the output coupler is also investigated.

  12. SEM evaluation of smear layer removal by Er:YAG laser in root canals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Roe, Iain M.; Guerisoli, Danilo M.; Barbizam, Joao Vicente B.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2002-06-01

    The effects of two endodontic irrigants associated or not with Er:YAG laser on a smear layer created by hand instrumentation were evaluated in vitro in the middle and apical thirds of root canals. Twenty five human maxillary canines with a single root were distributed randomly into five groups of five teeth each. Group 1 was irrigated with sodium hypochlorite 1.0%, Group 2 received EDTAC 15% as irrigating solution and Group 3 received both NaClO 1.0% and EDTAC 15%. Group 4 was irrigated with distilled water and irradiated with Er:YAG laser. Group 5 received NaClO 1.0% as irrigating solution and was irradiated with Er:YAG laser. Teeth were split longitudinally and prepared for examination under scanning electron microscopy. The teeth irrigated with NaClO (Group 1) showed the higher amount of smear layer, with statistically significant differences (p<0.05) from the teeth irrigated with distilled water and irradiated with Er:YAG laser (Group 4), which showed intermediate amounts of smear layer. The teeth irrigated with EDTAC 15%, NaClO 1.0% associated with EDTAC 15% and NaClO 1.0% with Er:YAG laser (Groups 2,3 and 5) showed the lowest amounts of smear layer, being statistically similar between them and different (p<0.05) from Groups 1 and 4. There were no differences between the radicular thirds. It can be concluded that irradiation with Er:YAG laser can be as effective as EDTAC 15% when used associated with 1.0% sodium hypochlorite, but not as effective when used together with distilled water.

  13. A neutron diffraction study of amorphous boron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaplane, R. G.; Lundström, T.; Dahlborg, U.; Howells, W. S.

    1991-07-01

    The structure of amorphous boron has been studied with pulsed neutron diffraction techniques using the ISIS facilities at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The experimental static structure factor S(Q) and radial distribution function support a structural model based on units of B12 icosahedra resembling those found in crystalline β-rhombohedral boron, but with a certain degree of disorder occurring in the linking between these subunits.

  14. Design Requirements for Amorphous Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ounaies, Z.; Young, J. A.; Harrison, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    An overview of the piezoelectric activity in amorphous piezoelectric polymers is presented. The criteria required to render a polymer piezoelectric are discussed. Although piezoelectricity is a coupling between mechanical and electrical properties, most research has concentrated on the electrical properties of potentially piezoelectric polymers. In this work, we present comparative mechanical data as a function of temperature and offer a summary of polarization and electromechanical properties for each of the polymers considered.

  15. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  16. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  17. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, R.C.

    1985-02-11

    Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  18. Superconducting state parameters of amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vora, Aditya M.

    2007-07-01

    The theoretical computation of the superconducting state parameters (SSP) viz; electron-phonon coupling strength λ, Coulomb pseudopotential μ∗, transition temperature TC, isotope effect exponent α and effective interaction strength N0V of some monovalent (Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs), divalent (Mg, Zn, Be, Cd and Hg) and polyvalent (In, Tl, Ga, Al, La, Sn, Pb, Ti, Zr, Th, Bi, Nb and W) amorphous metals have been carried out by well known Ashcroft’s empty core (EMC) model pseudopotential. We have employed here five different types of local field correction functions proposed by Hartree (H), Taylor (T), Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU), Farid et al. (F) and Sarkar et al. (S) to study the exchange and correlation effects on the present investigations. The SSP for Be, Cd, Ga, Al, La, Ti, Zr, Th, Nb and W amorphous metals are reported first time in the present study. A very strong influence of all the exchange and correlation functions is found in the present study. Our results are in fair agreement with other available theoretical as well as experimental data. A strong dependency of the SSP of amorphous metals on the valency Z is found.

  19. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  20. Multiple cell photoresponsive amorphous alloys and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Adler, D.

    1990-01-02

    This patent describes an improved photoresponsive tandem multiple solar cell device. The device comprising: at least a first and second superimposed cell of various materials. The first cell being formed of a silicon alloy material. The second cell including an amorphous silicon alloy semiconductor cell body having an active photoresponsive region in which radiation can impinge to produce charge carriers, the amorphous cell body including at least one density of states reducing element. The element being fluorine. The amorphous cell body further including a band gap adjusting element therein at least in the photoresponsive region to enhance the radiation absorption thereof, the adjusting element being germanium: the second cell being a multi-layer body having deposited semiconductor layers of opposite (p and n) conductivity type; and the first cell being formed with the second cell in substantially direct Junction contact therebetween. The first and second cells designed to generate substantially matched currents from each cell from a light source directed through the first cell and into the second cell.