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Sample records for member tumbiana formation

  1. Myocardin Family Members Drive Formation of Caveolae

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Katarzyna K.; Yao Mattisson, Ingrid; Ekman, Mari; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Grantinge, Rebecka; Kotowska, Dorota; Olde, Björn; Hansson, Ola; Albinsson, Sebastian; Miano, Joseph M.; Rippe, Catarina; Swärd, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Caveolae are membrane organelles that play roles in glucose and lipid metabolism and in vascular function. Formation of caveolae requires caveolins and cavins. The make-up of caveolae and their density is considered to reflect cell-specific transcriptional control mechanisms for caveolins and cavins, but knowledge regarding regulation of caveolae genes is incomplete. Myocardin (MYOCD) and its relative MRTF-A (MKL1) are transcriptional coactivators that control genes which promote smooth muscle differentiation. MRTF-A communicates changes in actin polymerization to nuclear gene transcription. Here we tested if myocardin family proteins control biogenesis of caveolae via activation of caveolin and cavin transcription. Using human coronary artery smooth muscle cells we found that jasplakinolide and latrunculin B (LatB), substances that promote and inhibit actin polymerization, increased and decreased protein levels of caveolins and cavins, respectively. The effect of LatB was associated with reduced mRNA levels for these genes and this was replicated by the MRTF inhibitor CCG-1423 which was non-additive with LatB. Overexpression of myocardin and MRTF-A caused 5-10-fold induction of caveolins whereas cavin-1 and cavin-2 were induced 2-3-fold. PACSIN2 also increased, establishing positive regulation of caveolae genes from three families. Full regulation of CAV1 was retained in its proximal promoter. Knock down of the serum response factor (SRF), which mediates many of the effects of myocardin, decreased cavin-1 but increased caveolin-1 and -2 mRNAs. Viral transduction of myocardin increased the density of caveolae 5-fold in vitro. A decrease of CAV1 was observed concomitant with a decrease of the smooth muscle marker calponin in aortic aneurysms from mice (C57Bl/6) infused with angiotensin II. Human expression data disclosed correlations of MYOCD with CAV1 in a majority of human tissues and in the heart, correlation with MKL2 (MRTF-B) was observed. The myocardin family

  2. Exercise habit formation in new gym members: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Navin; Rhodes, Ryan E

    2015-08-01

    Reasoned action approaches have primarily been applied to understand exercise behaviour for the past three decades, yet emerging findings in unconscious and Dual Process research show that behavior may also be predicted by automatic processes such as habit. The purpose of this study was to: (1) investigate the behavioral requirements for exercise habit formation, (2) how Dual Process approach predicts behaviour, and (3) what predicts habit by testing a model (Lally and Gardner in Health Psychol Rev 7:S137-S158, 2013). Participants (n = 111) were new gym members who completed surveys across 12 weeks. It was found that exercising for at least four bouts per week for 6 weeks was the minimum requirement to establish an exercise habit. Dual Process analysis using Linear Mixed Models (LMM) revealed habit and intention to be parallel predictors of exercise behavior in the trajectory analysis. Finally, the habit antecedent model in LLM showed that consistency (β = .21), low behavioral complexity (β = .19), environment (β = .17) and affective judgments (β = .13) all significantly (p < .05) predicted changes in habit formation over time. Trainers should keep exercises fun and simple for new clients and focus on consistency which could lead to habit formation in nearly 6 weeks. PMID:25851609

  3. Formative Research on Perceptions of Biobanking: What Community Members Think

    PubMed Central

    Luque, John S.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Montel-Ishino, Francisco A.; Arevalo, Mariana; Bynum, Shalanda A.; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Wells, Kristen J.; Gwede, Clement K.; Meade, Cathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Preparing healthy community members with timely communications prior to engaging them in a request to donate biospecimens promises to improve the experience of biobanking participation. To this end, a qualitative study was conducted to assess community member knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and informational needs about cancer-related biospecimen collection in a large metropolitan area in southwest Florida. The study utilized purposive sampling techniques to recruit a total of 95 participants to participate in 12 focus groups, segmented by race/ethnicity and language preference (mixed race, African American only, and Spanish speaking) and age (18–29, 30–54, and 55 and older). Focus group interviews were analyzed using content analysis to identify emergent themes. Overall, participants in the 30 years and older groups were favorable toward participating in biobanking if their concerns were addressed, such as confidentiality and consent issues, in contrast to participants aged 18–29 who were more skeptical. For all participants, the desire to participate in research that seeks new cancer treatments outweighed mistrust. Moreover, many cited the potential scientific benefit for future generations as a primary motivator. Finally, in some groups a therapeutic misconception was expressed, where participants expressed a willingness to forego confidentiality of their health status in exchange for therapeutic benefit. This study contributes to the literature on community perceptions of the benefits and barriers of biobanking and adds to the development of meaningful education communication priming tools to advance understandings about biobanking. PMID:21927867

  4. Facies and age of the Oso Ridge Member (new), Abo Formation, Zuni Mountains, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, A.K.; Stamm, R.G.; Kottlowski, F.E.; Mamet, B.L.; Dutro, J.T.; Weary, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    The Oso Ridge Member (new), at the base of the Abo Formation, nonconformably overlies Proterozoic rocks. The member consists of some 9m of conglomerate and arkose composed principally of fragments of the underlying Proterozoic metamorphic rocks; thin, fossiliferous limestone lenses are interbedded with the arkose. Biota from the lenses include a phylloid alga, foraminifers, conodonts, brachiopods, and molluscs. The age of the Oso Ridge Member is Virgilian Late Pennsylvanian) to Wolfcampian (Early Permian). -from Authors

  5. Paleobotany and palynology of the Bristol Hill Coal Member (Bond Formation) and Friendsville Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of the Illinois Basin (Upper Pennsylvanian)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Willard, D.A.; Phillips, T.L.

    1993-01-01

    Late Pennsylvanian coal swamps of the Illinois Basin were dominated by Psarnius tree ferns with a spatially heterogeneous distribution of medullosan pteridosperms (subdominant), calamites, sigillarian lycopsids, and cordaites. Miospore and coal-ball plant assemblages from the Missourian-age Bristol Hill Coal Member (Mattoon Formation) of southeastern Illinois were quantified to analyze vegetational patterns in Late Pennsylvanian peat swamps and to compare vegetational composition of the coals. -from Authors

  6. Clay mineral diagenesis in Westwater Canyon sandstone member of Morrison Formation, San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Crossey, L.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member and the Brushy Basin and Recapture Shale Members of the Morrison Formation are examined from core located on the southern flank of the San Juan basin, northwestern New Mexico. Clay mineralogy of fine-grained lithologies of the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member is contrasted with that of coarse-grained lithologies. Two distinct mixed-layer clay populations are present: a high expandable mixed-layer illite/smectite associated with coarse-grained lithologies. Two distinct mixed-layer clay populations are present: a highly expandable mixed-layer illite/smectite associated with coarse-grained units (in addition to chlorite and kaolinite), and an illitic mixed-layer illite/smectite (in some cases ordered and accompanied by traces of chlorite) in the fine-grained units. The expandable component of the mixed-layer clay does not exhibit a trend with depth but is lithology dependent. Coarse-grained samples from the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member contain numerous mudstone intraclasts. The clay mineralogy of selected clasts has been examined. These lithologic characteristics must be taken into account in interpreting clay mineral diagenesis within the Morrison Formation. Framework grain alternation within the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member has been linked to lacustrine facies in the overlying Brushy Basin Shale Member. Authigenic clay minerals within the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member may provide a record of downward-percolating lake fluids. Early diagenetic effects must be recognized in order to interpret the complete diagenetic history of the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member.

  7. Early Visean bryozoans from the Shishtu II Member, Shishtu Formation, central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolokonnikova, Zoya; Yazdi-Moghadam, Mohsen

    2013-12-01

    Four bryozoan species are described from the upper member (Shishtu II) (Visean, Early Carboniferous=Mississippian) of the Shishtu Formation of central Iran: Nikiforovella ulbensis Nekhoroshev, 1956, Nicklesopora elegantulaformis (Nekhoroshev, 1956), Primorella cf. iranica Gorjunova, 2006, and Nikiforopora intermedia (Nikiforova, 1950). This Visean assemblage shows close palaeogeographical affinities of Iran with Kazakhstan and Russia (eastern Transbaikalia, Kurgan region).

  8. New hominid fossils from Member 1 of the Swartkrans formation, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Travis Rayne; Heaton, Jason L; Clarke, Ronald J; Sutton, Morris B; Brain, C K; Kuman, Kathleen

    2012-05-01

    Member 1 of the Swartkrans Formation is comprised of two sedimentary infills, the Lower Bank (LB) and the Hanging Remnant (HR). Together, the LB and HR preserve fossils of early Homo and Paranthropus robustus, Earlier Stone Age lithic artifacts, purported bone digging tools and butchered animal bones. Collectively, this evidence was the first to establish the co-existence of two early Pleistocene hominid species and also led to inferences of plant root harvesting and meat-eating by one or both of those species. P. robustus is the more abundant of the two hominids at Swartrkrans, represented in Member 1 by hundreds of fossils that derive from at least 99 individuals. Thus, Swartkrans Member 1 stands as the world's single largest repository of that extinct species. Here we add to the Member 1 sample of hominid fossils with descriptions of 14 newly discovered specimens. PMID:22440747

  9. A sedimentological model for the Loves Creek Member of the Bitter Springs Formation, northern Amadeus Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southgate, P. N.

    Sediments of the Loves Creek Member of the Bitter Springs Formation comprise the transgressive and highstand systems tracts of a stratigraphic sequence. The member is bounded top and bottom by disconformity surfaces and is divisible into three sedimentary packages referred to as units. Each unit represents a series of depositional environments related to each other by position on a large-scale sea-level cycle. The uppermost redbed and dolomitic limestone/dolostone unit provides evidence for continued regression and progradation as the underlying marine sediments are succeeded by carbonate rocks and redbeds deposited in lacustrine and terrestrial environments respectively.

  10. Comparison of hydrocarbon production trends in Middle and Upper members of Minnelusa formation

    SciTech Connect

    Reel, C.L.; Horne, J.C.; Kelly, A.O.

    1985-05-01

    The main reservoir rocks in the upper and middle members of the Minnelusa Formation consist of wind blown dunal sands in the area surrounding the Lusk embayment. Changes in the local depositional setting, tectonic framework, and eustatic sea level controlled the distribution and reservior quality of these sandstones. The middle member exhibits two production trends. Age-equivalent Tensleep rocks deposited along the western margin of the embayment produce from sandstones accumulated in a sand sea paleoenvironment. Structure is atnececessary for trapping owing to permeability continuity. Along the eastern margin of the embayment, production comes from isolated accumulations of sandstone deposited as dunes on broad coastal sabkhas. Fields in these sandstones define a linear trend due to the coast-parallel alignment of these dunes. Production from the upper member defines four major trends. Upper member sandstones in the southern part of the basin, similar to Leo reservoirs, produce from sediments deposited as coast-parallel dunes in a northwest-southeast alignment. In the northern portion of the basin, production is from sandstones deposited in broad, flat eolian sand seas. Because of the permeability continuity of these sandstones, structural closure is necessary for trapping hydrocarbons. Upper member production has been influenced by the unconformity developed at the top of the Minnelusa. Movement along the Rosebud arch resulted in a southwest-northeast production trend apparent in each sandstone unit reflecting their northwestward erosional limits. The last, and most apparent, production trend, results from the Opeche Shale infilling of northwest-southeast-oriented stream valleys. Most production to date has been from sandstones following this alignment juxta-posed downdip of these impermeable shales.

  11. Geology of the Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.; Nadon, G.; LaFreniere, L.

    1996-06-01

    The Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation has been cored in order to assess the presence/absence and character of microbial communities in the deep subsurface. Geological study of the Molina Member was undertaken in support of the microbiological tasks of this project, for the purposes of characterizing the host strata and of assessing the potential for post-depositional introduction of microbes into the strata. The Molina Member comprises a sandy fluvial unit within a formation dominated by mudstones. Sandy to conglomeratic deposits of braided and meandering fluvial systems are present on the western and eastern margins of the basin respectively, although the physical and temporal equivalence of these systems cannot be proven. Distal braided facies of planar-horizontal bedded sandstones are recognized on the western margin of the basin. Natural fractures are present in all Molina sandstones, commonly as apparent shear pairs. Core from the 1-M-18 well contains natural fractures similar to those found in outcrops, and has sedimentological affinities to the meandering systems of the eastern margin of the basin. The hydrologic framework of the Molina, and thus any potential post-depositional introduction of microbes into the formation, should have been controlled by approximately east-west flow through the natural fracture system, the geometries and extent of the sandstones in which the fractures occur, and hydraulic gradient. Migration to the well site, from outcropping recharge areas at the edge of the basin, could have started as early as 40 million years ago if the cored strata are connected to the eastern sedimentary system.

  12. Paleoclimatology indicators of the Salt Wash member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation near Jensen, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, D.A. . Dept. of Geology); Bilbey, S.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation has yielded one of the richest floras of the so-called transitional conifers'' of the Middle Mesozoic. Recently, a silicified axis of one of these conifers was collected from the Salt Wash member in essentially the same horizon as a previously reported partial Stegosaurus skeleton. In addition, two other axes of conifers were collected in the same immediate vicinity. Paleoecological considerations are extrapolated from the coniferous flora, vertebrate fauna and associated lithologies. Techniques of paleodendrology and relationships of extant/extinct environments are compared. The paleoclimatic conditions of the transitional conifers and associated dinosaurian fossils are postulated.

  13. Carbon-Isotope Chemostratigraphy of the Yellow Cat Member of the Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, C. A.; Hatzell, G.; Suarez, M. B.; Salazar-Verdin, J.; Al-Suwaidi, A. H.; Kirkland, J. I.

    2014-12-01

    Paleosols and lacustrine sediments of the Yellow Cat Member (YCM), Cedar Mountain Formation (CMF), Eastern Utah were collected at the "Lake Madsen" (a dominantly lacustrine section) and Doelling's Bowl (a mixed lacustrine/ palustrine/ paleosol section) and analyzed for bulk organic carbon isotopes (δ13Corg) . The YCM is thought to span the Barremian to Aptian based on dinosaur faunal assemblages. Correlation with distinct carbon isotope excursions (CIE) specifically those associated with the Selli Event or OAE 1a would allow insight into the response of terrestrial ecosystems to C-cycle perturbations during the Aptian, and may improve chronostratigraphy. Lake Madsen data ranges between a minimum of -28.5‰ and a maximum of -21.4‰ with an average of ~ -25‰ and shows a stepped negative isotope excursion of -3‰., with three distinct negative steps starting ~ 7.5 m above the Jurassic Morrison Formation and an intervening large positive excursion ~ 4.5 m from the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone (~119Ma) Member of the CMF. Doelling's Bowl data spans a longer vertical distance and ranges from a minimum of -29.0‰ to a maximum of -25.7‰, averages -27.7‰ and is somewhat cyclic in nature. δ13Corg chemostratigraphic profile for Doelling's Bowl poorly correlates to the Lake Madsen section, likely due to recycling of organic C and wet/dry cycles of the palustrine environment. Correlation of the Lake Madsen section to marine δ13CCO3 curve from Cismon Valley of the southern Alps indicates the lower Aptian C-isotope excursions C1 to C6, with the distinctive C3 negative CIE occur at the top of the Yellow Cat Member, therefore documenting a terrestrial manifestation of the CIE associated with OAE1a - Selli Event. This suggests the age of the majority of the Yellow Cat Member is Barremian to lower Aptian and the Barremian-Aptian boundary occurs at the top of the Member ~ 25cm below the base of the Poison Strip Sandstone. Further isotopic analysis of vertebrate

  14. Petrophysical and petrographic evaluation of Sidri Member of Belayim Formation, Badri field, Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abudeif, A. M.; Attia, M. M.; Radwan, A. E.

    2016-03-01

    Presence of sandstone streaks in Sidri Member within Belayim Formation that lies between two productive zones; Kareem Formation and Hammam Faraun Member, was the main reason to perform this study. It may represent a good hydrocarbon reservoir and will be added to the Egyptian oil production in some wells of Badri field. This Member has high resistivity signature on Electric-logs responses which attracted the attention to investigate its occurrence in the field, to delineate its distribution all-over the area, to evaluate the petrographic and petrophysical characteristics and to evaluate its productivity. Petrographic and petrophysical analyses of these sand zones were undertaken using thin section samples. The electric logs and subsurface geologic data was used to evaluate the main reservoir characteristics of the Sidri sandstone such as lithology, cementation, shale volume, porosity (Φ), effective porosity (Φ eff), estimated permeability (K), fluid saturation, fluid type and Net pay thickness. This study revealed that, Sidri sandstone facies was classified into two mainly sandy facies; blocky sandy facies which located at the northern part of the field and streaky sandy facies at the southern area of the field. These two facies are separated by shaley facies. Some wells were studied to represent the two sandy facies in Sidri Member and these sand intervals have not been tested yet. These sands consist of quartz grains with grey and pink feldspars as accessory minerals, with siliceous and calcareous cementation, with good porosity. Petrophysical evaluation of this sand unit indicated that it is hydrocarbon bearing formation in three wells and water bearing one in other wells. Electrical logs analysis (Resistivity, Density-Neutron, Sonic and Gamma-Ray) revealed that The volume of shale in this sandstone, the effective porosity, the water saturation, the estimated permeability, the hydrocarbon saturation, and the net-pay thickness are varying from 9 to 13%, 19

  15. Diagenetic origin of nodules in the Sheepbed member, Yellowknife Bay formation, Gale crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stack, K. M.; Grotzinger, J. P.; Kah, L. C.; Schmidt, M. E.; Mangold, N.; Edgett, K. S.; Sumner, D. Y.; Siebach, K. L.; Nachon, M.; Lee, R.; Blaney, D. L.; Deflores, L. P.; Edgar, L. A.; Fairén, A. G.; Leshin, L. A.; Maurice, S.; Oehler, D. Z.; Rice, M. S.; Wiens, R. C.

    2014-07-01

    The Sheepbed member of the Yellowknife Bay formation in Gale crater contains millimeter-scale nodules that represent an array of morphologies unlike those previously observed in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Three types of nodules have been identified in the Sheepbed member in order of decreasing abundance: solid nodules, hollow nodules, and filled nodules, a variant of hollow nodules whose voids have been filled with sulfate minerals. This study uses Mast Camera (Mastcam) and Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) images from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover to determine the size, shape, and spatial distribution of the Sheepbed nodules. The Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) and ChemCam instruments provide geochemical data to help interpret nodule origins. Based on their physical characteristics, spatial distribution, and composition, the nodules are interpreted as concretions formed during early diagenesis. Several hypotheses are considered for hollow nodule formation including origins as primary or secondary voids. The occurrence of concretions interpreted in the Sheepbed mudstone and in several other sedimentary sequences on Mars suggests that active groundwater systems play an important role in the diagenesis of Martian sedimentary rocks. When concretions are formed during early diagenetic cementation, as interpreted for the Sheepbed nodules, they have the potential to create a taphonomic window favorable for the preservation of Martian organics.

  16. Lower Cretaceous bentonitic strata in southwestern Montana assigned to Vaughn Member of Mowry Shale (East) and of Blackleaf Formation (West)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tysdal, R.G.; Dyman, T.S.; Nichols, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Vaughn Member, newly assigned to the Mowry Shale in this report, comprises strata that crop out in the Greenhorn, Gravelly, Madison, and Gallatin ranges, and the Centennial and Beartooth mountains of southwestern Montana. Herein the member is correlated with the Vaughn Member of the Blackleaf Formation, which crops out to the west in the Lima Peaks area, Snowcrest Range, and Pioneer Mountains. Strata assigned to the Vaughn Member of the Blackleaf Formation in southwestern Montana exhibit the same contrasting relationships that exist in northwestern Montana. The Vaughn Member of the Mowry is late Albian in age, determined by bracketing with shallow water marine bivalves in the Muddy Sandstone below and palynomorphs in Mowry strata above. Palynomorphs from the Vaughn Member itself are typically mid-Cretaceous, but do not permit a more exact determination of age. -from Authors

  17. Cyclicity in the Irish Valley Member of the Catskill Formation, central Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, J.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Upper Devonian Irish Valley Member of the Catskill Formation was deposited on a muddy coastline along the Catskill Delta margin. The Irish Valley contains cycles of varying duration caused by lateral shifting of facies during fluctuations of relative seal level. Approximately 400m of the Irish Valley Member at a newly exposed highway cut south of Selinsgrove, Pa. were described in terms of depth-diagnostic lithofacies: (A) Red siltstone and mudstone containing pedogenic features and root traces--Exposed coastal margin; (B) Heterolithic sand-dominated facies containing hummocky cross-stratification--Upper shoreface; (C) Wave-generated sand-dominated facies containing predominant flaser bedding--Middle Shoreface; (D) Wave-generated mud-dominated facies containing lenticular to wavy bedding--Lower shoreface; (E) Heterolithic mud-dominated facies containing parallel, thin laminations and thin (< 1 m) sandstone storm beds, which often have HCS--Offshore, between fair weather and storm wave bases--likely an offshore extension of Facies B. Approximately 30 shallowing-upward sequences occur throughout the section, and these sequences may be analyzed for patterns of cyclicity. It appears that smaller-scale (possibly fifth-order) cycles are superimposed on a higher order pattern (possibly fourth-order cycles). The Irish Valley Member was deposited over the course of 2.0--2.5 million years, thus each cycle likely represents 50,000--100,000 years. This figure fits nicely with the idea that the cycles of the Irish Valley Member were formed by eustatic sea-level fluctuations caused by Milankovitch-type orbital variations.

  18. Variations in sulfur mineralization in the Parachute Creek member of Green River Formation, Colorado and Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.L.; Cole, R.D.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation occurs primarily as pyrite, with lesser amounts of marcasite and pyrrhotite. In this study 222 samples were collected from the openlacustrine facies at Rio Blanco, the marginallacustrine facies at Douglas Pass, and a WOSCO oil shale core drilled in the Eastern Uinta Basin. One portion of each sample was crushed and analyzed for total-weight-percent sulfur (TWPS). Polished blocks were prepared from the remaining slabs. Iron-sulfide morphotypes in these blocks were characterized with a reflected light microscope. Total sulfur contents ranged from 0.0 to 4.6 wt %. Open-lacustrine oil shales in the Parachute Creek Member have much higher relative TWPS values than marginal-lacustrine rocks from the same member. In oil shale, increases in kerogen content are mirrored by increases in total-sulfur content. This correlation is most significant for moderate- to rich-grade oil shales which average between 0.42 and 0.98 TWPS. In oil shale with high relative total sulfur contents, megascopic pods and stringers and microscopic blades, compound-blade clusters and bands, and irregular massive blebs of iron sulfide are the most abundant morphotypes. Stratigraphic variations in sulfur mineralization are present at Rio Blanco. High TWPS values (more than 0.5) are found in the Mahogany ledge and R-8 zone. Rocks above and below this interval have TWPS values less than 0.5. Cyclical stratigraphic variations in TWPS values occur in the Mahogany and R-8 zones.

  19. Cobleskill and Akron members of the Rondout formation: late Silurian carbonate shelf sedimentation in the Appalachian Basin, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, R.

    1980-12-01

    The outcrop of the upper Silurian Cobleskill and Akron members of the Rondout formation of New York State extends from Buffalo to E. Schoharie County and is continuous except where the units have been removed by pre-onondaga erosion. Strata included in the Cobleskill, Akron, and Chrysler members of the Rondout formation, underlying Williamsville member of the Bertie formation, and underlying Brayman Shale include several distinct Carbonate facies which have been identified by field characteristics, thin section petrography, insoluble residue analysis, and x-ray diffraction. Subfacies of the Cobleskill include subtidal biomicrites with stromatoporoid biostromes and intertidal fossiliferous micrites, whereas the Akron contains dolomitized analogs of these limestones. The overlying Chrysler is composed of supratidal, laminated, thinly bedded, finely crystalline dolostone. Careful lateral tracing of lithofacies, analysis of vertical lithofacies sequences, and study of key beds within the Cobleskill and Akron have resulted in recognition of the lateral equivalence of these 2 members. 32 references.

  20. Chemical composition of strata of the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, J.R.; Grauch, R.I.; Siems, D.F.; Tysdal, R.G.; Johnson, E.A.; Zielinski, R.A.; Desborough, G.A.; Knudsen, A.; Gunter, M.E.

    2001-01-01

    This study, one in a series, reports bulk chemical composition of rock samples collected from a core, referred to as Measured Section J, drilled at a site that subsequently was developed into the Enoch Valley phosphate mine in southeastern Idaho. The core is continuous and cuts through the entire thickness of the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation. The steeply dipping Meade Peak extends from 182 to 495 feet below the ground surface, which is the greatest below-ground depth of rock that has been sampled to date. The core was drilled before the start of mining, and the rocks consequently have not been exposed to the atmosphere or surficial weathering processes or fractured as a result of mining as are the rocks from other described sections. Hence, this section of the Meade Peak in the core is the least altered section of this member sampled in this series of studies. The channel-sampled rocks from Section J form a set of contiguous intervals across the entire thickness of the Meade Peak. These channel samples characterize?in ascending order?the lower phosphate ore, interlayered middle waste shale, upper phosphate ore, and upper waste shale units of the member. The Section J channel-sample suite includes 3 composite samples of the uppermost 7 feet of the Grandeur Tongue of the Permian Park City Formation, a dolomitic unit that directly underlies the Meade Peak. It also includes an analysis of a 0.1 foot section of chert directly overlying the Meade Peak. The concentrations of the chemical elements in the channel samples are compared with those of Measured Sections Aand B that were obtained from the same mine. In addition to the channel samples, 85 rock samples were selected from the core to address specific geochemical questions that resulted from examination of the core. For example, several of these samples correspond to cored rock that had unusual concentrations of various elements that were determined using a hand-held, x

  1. Stratigraphy of the upper Triassic Petrified Forest Member (Chinle Formation) in Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Murry, P.A. )

    1990-09-01

    The Petrified Forest Member of the Triassic Chinle Formation in a Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona may be divided into a lower and upper unit by means of the Sonsela Sandstone Bed. Analysis of fossil vertebrates indicates that the Sonsela Sandstone Bed and upper Petrified Forest Member are characterized by a fauna distinct from that within the lower portion of the Petrified Forest Member. These faunas are believed to be of Norian and Carnian age respectively. Utilizing fossil vertebrates and certain lithostratigraphic units, especially the Sonsela Sandstone Bed and black forest tuff, exposures may be correlated within and between the Rainbow Forest, Blue Mesa, and Painted Desert areas of Petrified Forest National Park.

  2. Significance of Lockeia and associated trace fossils from the Bada Bagh Member, Jaisalmer Formation, Rajasthan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranjape, Amruta R.; Kulkarni, Kantimati G.; Gurav, Shweta S.

    2013-10-01

    A Lockeia-Protovirgularia ichnofauna representing the Cruziana ichnofacies is reported from a calcareous sandstone horizon of the Callovian Bada Bagh Member, Jaisalmer Formation, Rajasthan. The ichnoassemblage is characterized by Lockeia cunctator, L. siliquaria, Protovirgularia ? bidirectionalis, P. rugosa, Ptychoplasma vagans along with Palaeophycus tubularis, P. striatus, Heliophycus isp. and ? Lophoctenium isp. Use of numerical analysis yielding length to width ratio, slopes and coefficient of determination helps in confirming identification of ichnospecies of Lockeia. Fine morphological details of Lockeia and Protovirgularia, especially sharp and closely spaced chevrons of Protovirgularia, indicate that the substrate in which they were emplaced was stiff, resistant, dewatered and better consolidated. Therefore, it construes that this ichnoassemblage belonging to the classical Cruziana ichnofacies occurs in stiff softground and not a typical softground. Though the ichnofacies of this calcareous sandstone bed indicates low-medium energy condition under subtidal environment of deposition, underlying strata containing Arenicolites, Skolithos and Curvolithus of Skolithos ichnofacies indicate intertidal sandy shore environment with high energy conditions. Thus, it is concluded that this area was undergoing continuous, gradual deepening. However, the percentage of Thalassinoides, Ophiomorpha and Phycodes in the overlying bed is quite high suggesting an increase in the energy conditions resulting from a probable shallowing.

  3. Conceptual model for transport processes in the Culebra Dolomite Member, Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation represents a possible pathway for contaminants from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant underground repository to the accessible environment. The geologic character of the Culebra is consistent with a double-porosity, multiple-rate model for transport in which the medium is conceptualized as consisting of advective porosity, where solutes are carried by the groundwater flow, and fracture-bounded zones of diffusive porosity, where solutes move through slow advection or diffusion. As the advective travel length or travel time increases, the nature of transport within a double-porosity medium changes. This behavior is important for chemical sorption, because the specific surface area per unit mass of the diffusive porosity is much greater than in the advective porosity. Culebra transport experiments conducted at two different length scales show behavior consistent with a multiple-rate, double-porosity conceptual model for Culebra transport. Tracer tests conducted on intact core samples from the Culebra show no evidence of significant diffusion, suggesting that at the core scale the Culebra can be modeled as a single-porosity medium where only the advective porosity participates in transport. Field tracer tests conducted in the Culebra show strong double-porosity behavior that is best explained using a multiple-rate model.

  4. Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E.; Brown, G.O.

    1998-04-01

    Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

  5. Comparison of the pebbles of the Shinarump and Moss Back members of the Chinle formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albee, Howard Franklin

    1956-01-01

    Lithology, color, size, sphericity, and roundness of pebbles from the Shinarurnp and Moss Back members of the Chinle formation were analyzed and compared. The difference in the quartz:quartzite:chert ratios of the pebbles, the presence of limestone and siltstone pebbles, and to a lesser degree,the difference in color of pebbles serve to distinguish the Moss Back from the Shinarump. In areas where both the Moss Back and Shinarump are present, the average ratios of quartz, quartzite, a.nd chert are respectively about 12:37:51 and 82:16:2. Limestone and siltstone pebbles are commonly found in the Moss Back, whereas they are rarely found in the Shinarump. The colors of the Moss Back pebbles are generally darker than those of the Shinarump pebbles. The Moss Back contains more gray to black pebbles and fewer light-colored pebbles, such as red, orange, and white, than the Shinarump. Size, sphericity, and roundness of pebbles do not show a significant difference between the two units. Fossiliferous pebbles in the Moss Back and Shinarump were derived chiefly from sediments of Carboniferous and Permian ages and could have had common sources.

  6. Formation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons exhibiting (5,7)-member ring defects in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öttl, S.; Huber, S. E.; Kimeswenger, S.; Probst, M.

    2014-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are nowadays widely accepted as one of the carriers of the ubiquitous aromatic infrared (IR) bands. The IR spectra of many planetary nebulae (PNe) are dominated by mid-IR emission features, attributed to the IR fluorescence of PAHs. Recent observations of PNe show the simultaneous presence of mid-IR features attributed to neutral fullerene molecules (i.e. C60) and PAHs (García-Hernández et al. 2010). In general, PNe show evidence of mixed chemistry with emission from PAHs, silicate dust, fullerenes and contributions from other molecular components. The still unidentified IR features seen in PNe require further laboratory and observational investigations. We present a theoretical study of the IR spectra of PAHs containing (5,7)-member ring defects. Using density functional theory, we investigate the effects such defects have on the IR spectra of pyrene (C16H10) and coronene (C24H12). In addition, we explore parts of the potential energy surface of the neutral species and discuss alternative formation pathways, especially in the environment of PNe. Coronene and pyrene can be seen as limiting or prototypical cases in various respects. They are among the smallest hydrocarbons that can exhibit (5,7)-ring defects. Previous work (Yu et al. 2012) has raised the suspicion that effects of such defects might be more intriguing with decreasing size of the PAHs. Our investigations represent the limiting cases with respect to the size of the PAHs. To study these small systems is thought to be an important step towards a substantial understanding of the role of (5,7)-ring defects for the IR spectra of PAHs. The formation of these (5,7)-ring defects in PAHs may be well supported in PNe. The environment strongly enables the transition from the ground state to the defect state. Therefore the knowledge of the IR spectra of these molecules will support the investigations in understanding the unidentified IR emission bands in PNe.

  7. Unconformities in the mid-Late Proterozoic Pahrump Group: Stratigraphic evidence from the upper member Crystal Spring Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Mbuyi, K.; Prave, A.R. . Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Deposition of the Pahrump Group rocks (Crystal Spring-Beck Spring-Kingston Peak Formations) in the Death Valley region of California post-dates 1.7 to 1.4 Ga gneissic basement rocks (Wright et al., 1976) and mostly predates the inferred 0.75 Ga glacial deposits of the Kingston Peak Formation. The 1.08 Ga age of the diabase sills in the middle Crystal Spring Formation provides an additional time constraint. Event though this time span is excessive when compared to better dated Phanerozoic successions, the Pahrump Group, nonetheless, has been assumed to be internally conformable. Results from the authors recent work invalidates that assumption. They have carefully measured 15 sections of upper member Crystal Spring Formation rocks and have mapped in detail the belt of exposures in the Saratoga, Saddle Peak, and Ibex Hills, and northern Kingston Range. Their data indicates that an unconformity of significant but unknown duration occurs within the upper member. Evidence for this unconformity includes: (1) local angular discordance of up to 20[degree]; (2) presence of an erosive-based breccia unit (0.10--30 m thick) that consists mostly of hornfelsic clasts derived from immediately subjacent rocks; and (3) erosional beveling and truncation of underlying rocks. In addition, the upward transition to Beck Spring deposition is marked by a disconformity (sequence boundary) that cuts down across and erosionally truncates strata of the upper member Crystal Spring Formation.

  8. Diagenesis and fracture development in the Bakken Formation, Williston Basin; implications for reservoir quality in the middle member

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitman, Janet K.; Price, Leigh C.; LeFever, Julie A.

    2001-01-01

    The middle member of the Bakken Formation is an attractive petroleum exploration target in the deeper part of the Williston Basin because it is favorably positioned with respect to source and seal units. Progressive rates of burial and minor uplift and erosion of this member led to a stable thermal regime and, consequently, minor variations in diagenesis across much of the basin. The simple diagenetic history recorded in sandstones and siltstones in the middle member can, in part, be attributed to the closed, low-permeability nature of the Bakken petroleum system during most of its burial history. Most diagenesis ceased in the middle member when oil entered the sandstones and siltstones in the Late Cretaceous. Most oil in the Bakken Formation resides in open, horizontal fractures in the middle member. Core analysis reveals that sandstones and siltstones associated with thick mature shales typically have a greater density of fractures than sandstones and siltstones associated with thin mature shales. Fractures were caused by superlithostatic pressures that formed in response to increased fluid volumes in the source rocks during hydrocarbon generation

  9. Petrology of Tullock Member, Fort Union Formation, Wyoming and Montana: Evidence for early Paleocene uplift of Bighorn Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.L.; Hansley, P.L. )

    1989-09-01

    New petrologic data collected from sandstones in the Paleocene Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation above the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary in the Powder River basin (PRB) and from the lowermost Paleocene in the Bighorn basin, Wyoming and Montana, compel reevaluation of the timing of the bighorn uplift, formerly thought to be middle Paleocene. The Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary is identified by regionally valid palynological and trace element geochemical criteria. Basin-wide outcrop and subsurface studies of the Tullock Member indicate deposition on a low-gradient alluvial plain extending toward the retreating Cannonball sea. Eastward-flowing, low-sinuosity paleostreams containing small, sandy, stable channels characterized the fluvial systems.

  10. A new species of Pulvinites (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the upper Paleocene Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Virginia ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, L.W.; Waller, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Pulvinites lawrencei n.sp. is described from the upper Paleocene (Landenian Stage) Paspotansa Member of the Aquia Formation in Stafford County, Virginia. This is the first report of a member of the pteriacean family Pulvinitidae in the Tertiary on either side of the Atlantic, the only other post-Mesozoic records of Pulvinites being in the Paleocene of California and the present-day Pacific off southeast Australia. The stratigraphic setting and co-occurring molluscan assemblage of the new species indicate shallow-shelf, open-marine conditions with near normal salinities. -Authors

  11. Cooperation during cultural group formation promotes trust towards members of out-groups

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaofei Sophia; Houser, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    People often cooperate with members of their own group, and discriminate against members of other groups. Previous research establishes that cultural groups can form endogenously, and that these groups demonstrate in-group favouritism. Given the presence of cultural groups, the previous literature argues that cultural evolution selects for groups that exhibit parochial altruism. The source of initial variation in these traits, however, remains uninformed. We show here that a group's economic production environment may substantially influence parochial tendencies, with groups formed around more cooperative production (CP) displaying less parochialism than groups formed around more independent production (IP) processes. Participants randomized into CP and IP production tasks formed cultural groups, and subsequently played hidden-action trust games with in-group and out-group trustees. We found CP to be associated with significantly greater sharing and exchanging behaviours than IP. In trust games, significant parochial altruism (in-group favouritism combined with out-group discrimination) was displayed by members of IP groups. By contrast, members of CP groups did not engage in either in-group favouritism or out-group discrimination. Further, we found the absence of out-group discrimination in CP to persist even following ‘betrayal’. Finally, belief data suggest that members of CP are not more intrinsically generous than IP members, but rather more likely to believe that out-group trustees will positively reciprocate. Our results have important implications for anyone interested in building cooperative teams, and shed new light on connections between culture and cooperation. PMID:23658200

  12. Revised Lithostratigraphy of the Sonsela Member (Chinle Formation, Upper Triassic) in the Southern Part of Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Martz, Jeffrey W.; Parker, William G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent revisions to the Sonsela Member of the Chinle Formation in Petrified Forest National Park have presented a three-part lithostratigraphic model based on unconventional correlations of sandstone beds. As a vertebrate faunal transition is recorded within this stratigraphic interval, these correlations, and the purported existence of a depositional hiatus (the Tr-4 unconformity) at about the same level, must be carefully re-examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Our investigations demonstrate the neglected necessity of walking out contacts and mapping when constructing lithostratigraphic models, and providing UTM coordinates and labeled photographs for all measured sections. We correct correlation errors within the Sonsela Member, demonstrate that there are multiple Flattops One sandstones, all of which are higher than the traditional Sonsela sandstone bed, that the Sonsela sandstone bed and Rainbow Forest Bed are equivalent, that the Rainbow Forest Bed is higher than the sandstones at the base of Blue Mesa and Agate Mesa, that strata formerly assigned to the Jim Camp Wash beds occur at two stratigraphic levels, and that there are multiple persistent silcrete horizons within the Sonsela Member. Conclusions/Significance We present a revised five-part model for the Sonsela Member. The units from lowest to highest are: the Camp Butte beds, Lot's Wife beds, Jasper Forest bed (the Sonsela sandstone)/Rainbow Forest Bed, Jim Camp Wash beds, and Martha's Butte beds (including the Flattops One sandstones). Although there are numerous degradational/aggradational cycles within the Chinle Formation, a single unconformable horizon within or at the base of the Sonsela Member that can be traced across the entire western United States (the “Tr-4 unconformity”) probably does not exist. The shift from relatively humid and poorly-drained to arid and well-drained climatic conditions began during deposition of the Sonsela Member (low in the Jim Camp Wash beds), well

  13. Fractures Patterns of Tight Carbonates of Upper Jurassic Arab-D Member and Upper Jubaila Formation Outcrops, Central Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullatif, Osman; Abdlmutalib, Ammar

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the fracture patterns of the upper Jurassic Arab-D member and upper Jubaila Formation outcropping in central Saudi Arabia. These strata represent the outcrop equivalent for Arab-D reservoir. The upper Jubaila Formation was deposited in the lower to upper slope to ramp crest leading to deposition Stromatoporoid lithofacies association, while Arab-D member deposited under deep to shallow lagoonal settings including skeletal bank and tidal flat lithofacies associations. This study utilized high resolution outcrop scale integrated fracture analysis, sedimentological and stratigraphical approach and methods.The field data included lithofacies, stratigraphic hierarchy, cyclicity and fracture measurements of orientation, length, spacing, intensity, and aperture. The Arab-D member is affected by five fracture patterns: (a) regular large scale fractures NW striking, several meters widely spaced, vertically dipping and cutting through several beds; (b) regular medium scale fractures striking NE and vertically dipping, moderately spaced and extending from two to three meters in length and cut through two or three beds; (c) regular small scale fractures that are arrested near the bed boundary vertically dipping and having less than one meter length and spacing; (d) irregular fractures filled with chemically weathered materials; (e) large scale fractures oriented perpendicular to the first fracture pattern in (a) along the outcrop strike and also cut on the top of the resistive sandy grainstone lithofacies of Arab D member. In contrast, the Upper Jubaila Formation is characterized mostly by medium scale NW and NE striking fractures that near vertically dipping and extended within one or two beds. Irregular small scale fractures also occur within parts of the beds of this group.Fracture formation and development in the Arab D and Jubaila Formation are partially attributed to regional tectonics affected the study area and locally to stratigraphic and

  14. Characterization of DOE reference oil shales: Mahogany Zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation Oil Shale, and Clegg Creek Member, New Albany Shale

    SciTech Connect

    Miknis, F. P.; Robertson, R. E.

    1987-09-01

    Measurements have been made on the chemical and physical properties of two oil shales designated as reference oil shales by the Department of Energy. One oil shale is a Green River Formation, Parachute Creek Member, Mahogany Zone Colorado oil shale from the Exxon Colony mine and the other is a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany shale from Kentucky. Material balance Fischer assays, carbon aromaticities, thermal properties, and bulk mineralogic properties have been determined for the oil shales. Kerogen concentrates were prepared from both shales. The measured properties of the reference shales are comparable to results obtained from previous studies on similar shales. The western reference shale has a low carbon aromaticity, high Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant carbonate mineralogy. The eastern reference shale has a high carbon aromaticity, low Fischer assay conversion to oil, and a dominant silicate mineralogy. Chemical and physical properties, including ASTM distillations, have been determined for shale oils produced from the reference shales. The distillation data were used in conjunction with API correlations to calculate a large number of shale oil properties that are required for computer models such as ASPEN. There was poor agreement between measured and calculated molecular weights for the total shale oil produced from each shale. However, measured and calculated molecular weights agreed reasonably well for true boiling point distillate fractions in the temperature range of 204 to 399/sup 0/C (400 to 750/sup 0/F). Similarly, measured and calculated viscosities of the total shale oils were in disagreement, whereas good agreement was obtained on distillate fractions for a boiling range up to 315/sup 0/C (600/sup 0/F). Thermal and dielectric properties were determined for the shales and shale oils. The dielectric properties of the reference shales and shale oils decreased with increasing frequency of the applied frequency. 42 refs., 34 figs., 24

  15. Silicified sea life - Macrofauna and palaeoecology of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member (Cenomanian to Lower Turonian Wellheim Formation, Bavaria, southern Germany)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Simon; Jager, Manfred; Kroh, Andreas; Mitterer, Agnes; Niebuhr, Birgit; Vodrazka, Radek; Wilmsen, Markus; Wood, Christopher J.; Zagorsk, Kamil

    2013-12-01

    Schneider, S., Jager, M., Kroh, A., Mitterer, A., Niebuhr, B., Vodražka, R., Wilmsen, M., Wood, C.J. and Zagoršek, K. 2013. Silicified sea life - Macrofauna and palaeoecology of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member (Cenomanian to Lower Turonian Wellheim Formation, Bavaria, southern Germany). Acta Geologica Polonica, 63(4), 555-610. Warszawa. With approximately 100 species, the invertebrate macrofauna of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member of the Wellheim Formation (Bavaria, southern Germany) is probably the most diverse fossil assemblage of the Danubian Cretaceous Group. Occurring as erosional relicts in post-depositional karst depressions, both the Cretaceous sediments and fossils have been silicified during diagenesis. The Neuburg Kieselerde Member, safely dated as Early Cenomanian to Early Turonian based on inoceramid bivalve biostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy, preserves a predominantly soft-bottom community, which, however, is biased due to near-complete early diagenetic loss of aragonitic shells. The community is dominated by epifaunal and semi-infaunal bivalves as well as sponges that settled on various (bio-) clasts, and may widely be split into an early bivalve-echinoid assemblage and a succeeding sponge-brachiopod assemblage. In addition to these groups we document ichnofauna, polychaete tubes, nautilids and bryozoans. The fauna provides evidence of a shallow to moderately deep, calm, fully marine environment, which is interpreted as a largescale embayment herein. The fauna of the Neuburg Kieselerde Member is regarded as an important archive of lower Upper Cretaceous sea-life in the surroundings of the Mid-European Island.

  16. Hydrocarbon potential, structural setting and depositional environments of Hammam Faraun Member of the Belayim Formation, Southern Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabawy, Bassem S.; El Sharawy, Mohamed S.

    2015-12-01

    The Middle Miocene Belayim Formation is one of the most prolific formations in the Southern Gulf of Suez. It consists of four members; two members are evaporitic (Baba and Feiran) and the other two members are prospective, mostly clastics (Hammam Faraun and Sidri). The hydrocarbon potential and depositional environment of Hammam Faraun Member, the target of the present study, have been studied in 11 wells distributed in the southern province of the Gulf of Suez. The traditional well log data, as well as the Spectral Gamma-Ray logs 'SGR' and dipmeter data were used to evaluate the petrophysical properties and distribution of the Hammam Faraun Member in the Southern Gulf of Suez. It varies greatly in thickness with the greatest thicknesses in GS 365 (372 ft) and GS 373 (430 ft) fields in the central parts and the thinnest at the basin margins of the studied area at GH376 (65 ft) and Ras El Bahar (67.5 ft) fields. It is composed of clastic rocks, mainly shales and sometimes reef carbonates. The very good petrophysical properties of the studied sequence indicate a good reservoir in some fields with good to very good porosity (13.5 ≤ ∅ ≤ 25.0%). The shale volume of this reservoir sequence is less than 33% and the water saturation is less than 42.3%, while the net-pay thickness is up to 58 ft. The SGR and Pe logs indicate that, the studied rocks were deposited mostly in lagoonal to shallow marine environments, with illite and montmorillonite as dominant clay minerals. The dipmeter data obtained in some wells indicate slightly tilted beds, mostly less than 20° with an overall dip direction towards the SW, which represents the regional dip in the Southern Gulf of Suez. Based on dipmeter data, two major angular unconformities can be detected; one at the top of the sequence, separating it from the overlying South Gharib evaporates, and another one at the base of the sequence, separating it from the underlying Feiran Member.

  17. Two quorum sensing systems control biofilm formation and virulence in members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex

    PubMed Central

    Suppiger, Angela; Schmid, Nadine; Aguilar, Claudio; Pessi, Gabriella; Eberl, Leo

    2013-01-01

    The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) consists of 17 closely related species that are problematic opportunistic bacterial pathogens for cystic fibrosis patients and immunocompromised individuals. These bacteria are capable of utilizing two different chemical languages: N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and cis-2-unsaturated fatty acids. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the underlying molecular architectures of these communication systems, showing how they are interlinked and discussing how they regulate overlapping as well as specific sets of genes. A particular focus is laid on the role of these signaling systems in the formation of biofilms, which are believed to be highly important for chronic infections. We review genes that have been implicated in the sessile lifestyle of this group of bacteria. The new emerging role of the intracellular second messenger cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) as a downstream regulator of the fatty acid signaling cascade and as a key factor in biofilm formation is also discussed. PMID:23799665

  18. Sedimentary regime of Tullock Member of Fort Union Formation, Tullock Creek type locality, South-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.L.

    1986-08-01

    The early Paleocene Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation at its type locality was deposited in a low-gradient riverine system. This interpretation is based on studies of sedimentary structures, geometry, thickness trends, and sand-percent isopach maps. Lithologies consist of interbedded sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin coal beds. Sandstones 10 m (32.8 ft) thick contain fining-upward, fine-grained, structureless units with erosional bases capped by climbing-ripple lamination. Some sandstones have claystone rip-up clasts at their bases. The sandstones are discrete, highly convex bodies with symmetrical cross sections and flat erosional bases. These sandstone bodies are isolated show no stacking or coalescing, and are concentration in the middle of the Tullock Member. Interbedded calcareous siltstones show ripple cross-laminae and contain elongate calcareous nodules 4 to 16 cm (1.6 to 6.3 in.) long, oriented parallel to the bedding plane. They also contain well-preserved, fragmented leaf impressions. Carbonaceous shale predominates in the upper and lower third of the member. These shales show very thin lamination, contain abundant plant fragments, and have a mottled rooted texture. Thin, discontinuous coal beds are found within the lower third of the Tullock.

  19. MISS in Mesoproterozoic Nonstromatolitic Limestones: A Case Study of the Third Member of Gaoyuzhuang Formation at Qiangou Section in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MEI, Mingxiang; Gao, Jinhan; Meng, Qingfen

    The Precambrian carbonate rocks are commonly characteristic of stromatolitic carbonate succession. However, in the western segment of Yanshan area, the third member of the Mesoproterozoic Gaoyuzhuang Formation at the Qiangou section in Yanqing, Beijing, is made up of a set of particular limestone succession with the sparseness of stromatolites. This limestone succession has been defined as the nonstromatolitic carbonate succession, which is a typical example in which three third-order sequences can be discerned according to the cyclicity reflected by successions of sedimentary facies. Within these third-order sequences, there are many subtidal carbonate cycles made up of both the medium- to thin-bedded aphanitic micrites and the thin-bedded marls in the transgressive and the early high-stand system tracts, and many grotesque sedimentary structures are widespread in the bedding planes of aphanitic micrites. These sedimentary structures, including the domal structure, the irregular reticular and chaotic tepee ridges, and the palimpsest ripple, make up an association of the microbial-induced sedimentary structure (MISS). Therefore, both the special MISSs and the particular lithological types make the third member of the Mesoproterozoic Gaoyuzhuang Formation at the Qiangou section to become the representative of the Precambrian nonstromatolitic carbonate succession. More importantly, this succession was formed during the golden age of stromatolite and could provide useful information for the further understanding of the evolving carbonate world of the Precambrian.

  20. Human EML4, a novel member of the EMAP family, is essential for microtubule formation

    SciTech Connect

    Pollmann, Marc; Parwaresch, Reza; Adam-Klages, Sabine; Kruse, Marie-Luise; Buck, Friedrich; Heidebrecht, Hans-Juergen . E-mail: hheidebrecht@path.uni-kiel.de

    2006-10-15

    Human EML4 (EMAP-like protein 4) is a novel microtubule-associated WD-repeat protein of 120 kDa molecular weight, which is classified as belonging to the conserved family of EMAP-like proteins. Cosedimentation assays demonstrated that EML4 associates with in vitro polymerized microtubules. Correspondingly, immunofluorescence stainings and transient expression of EGFP-labeled EML4 revealed a complete colocalization of EML4 with the interphase microtubule array of HeLa cells. We present evidence that the amino-terminal portion of EML4 (amino acids 1-249) is essential for the association with microtubules. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that EML4 is hyperphosphorylated on serine/threonine residues during mitosis. In addition, immunofluorescence stainings demonstrated that hyperphosphorylated EML4 is associated with the mitotic spindle, suggesting that the function of EML4 is regulated by phosphorylation. siRNA-mediated knockdown of EML4 in HeLa cells led to a significant decrease in the number of cells. In no case mitotic figures could be observed in EML4 negative HeLa cells. Additionally, we observed a significant reduction of the proliferation rate and the uptake of radioactive [{sup 3}H]-thymidine as a result of EML4 silencing. Most importantly, EML4 negative cells showed a completely modified microtubule network, indicating that EML4 is necessary for correct microtubule formation.

  1. Vibration based baseline updating method to localize crack formation and propagation in reinforced concrete members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahalathantri, Buddhi L.; Thambiratnam, David P.; Chan, Tommy H. T.; Fawzia, Sabrina

    2015-05-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) schemes are useful for proper management of the performance of structures and for preventing their catastrophic failures. Vibration based SHM schemes has gained popularity during the past two decades resulting in significant research. It is hence evitable that future SHM schemes will include robust and automated vibration based damage assessment techniques (VBDAT) to detect, localize and quantify damage. In this context, the Damage Index (DI) method which is classified as non-model or output based VBDAT, has the ability to automate the damage assessment process without using a computer or numerical model along with actual measurements. Although damage assessment using DI methods have been able to achieve reasonable success for structures made of homogeneous materials such as steel, the same success level has not been reported with respect to Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures. The complexity of flexural cracks is claimed to be the main reason to hinder the applicability of existing DI methods in RC structures. Past research also indicates that use of a constant baseline throughout the damage assessment process undermines the potential of the Modal Strain Energy based Damage Index (MSEDI). To address this situation, this paper presents a novel method that has been developed as part of a comprehensive research project carried out at Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. This novel process, referred to as the baseline updating method, continuously updates the baseline and systematically tracks both crack formation and propagation with the ability to automate the damage assessment process using output only data. The proposed method is illustrated through examples and the results demonstrate the capability of the method to achieve the desired outcomes.

  2. Model for sandstone-carbonate cyclothems based on upper member of Morgan Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) of Northern Utah and Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Driese, S.G.; Dott, R.H. Jr.

    1984-05-01

    The upper member of the 200 m (660 ft) thick Morgan Formation (Middle Pennsylvanian) consists of 5-25 m (16-82 ft) thick, very fine-grained quartz sandstone units that are interbedded repetitively with 0.5-11 m (1.6-36 ft) thick, oolitic, bioclastic, peloidal, and micritic carbonate units. Similar repetitive sequences occur widely in western North America. The quartz sandstone-carbonate cyclothems defined by this study have potential as targets for hydrocarbon exploration. Both eolian dune sandstones and dolomitized shelf carbonate strata are locally important reservoir rocks in the subsurface in parts of the western Overthrust belt in Utah and Wyoming. 84 references, 22 figures, 4 tables.

  3. A new upper jurassic ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaur from the Slottsmøya Member, Agardhfjellet formation of central Spitsbergen.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Aubrey Jane; Druckenmiller, Patrick Scott; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Hurum, Jørn Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abundant new ichthyosaur material has recently been documented in the Slottsmøya Member of the Agardhfjellet Formation from the Svalbard archipelago of Norway. Here we describe a partial skeleton of a new taxon, Janusaurus lundi, that includes much of the skull and representative portions of the postcranium. The new taxon is diagnosed by a suite of cranial character states including a very gracile stapedial shaft, the presence of a dorsal process on the prearticular and autapomorphic postcranial features such as the presence of an interclavicular trough and a conspicuous anterodorsal process of the ilium. The peculiar morphology of the ilia indicates a previously unrecognized degree of morphological variation in the pelvic girdle of ophthalmosaurids. We also present a large species level phylogenetic analysis of ophthalmosaurids including new and undescribed ichthyosaur material from the Upper Jurassic of Svalbard. Our results recover all Svalbard taxa in a single unresolved polytomy nested within Ophthalmosaurinae, which considerably increases the taxonomic composition of this clade. The paleobiogeographical implications of this result suggest the presence of a single clade of Boreal ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs that existed during the latest Jurassic, a pattern also reflected in the high degree of endemicity among some Boreal invertebrates, particularly ammonoids. Recent and ongoing descriptions of marine reptiles from the Slottsmøya Member Lagerstätte provide important new data to test hypotheses of marine amniote faunal turnover at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. PMID:25084533

  4. A New Upper Jurassic Ophthalmosaurid Ichthyosaur from the Slottsmøya Member, Agardhfjellet Formation of Central Spitsbergen

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Aubrey Jane; Druckenmiller, Patrick Scott; Sætre, Glenn-Peter; Hurum, Jørn Harald

    2014-01-01

    Abundant new ichthyosaur material has recently been documented in the Slottsmøya Member of the Agardhfjellet Formation from the Svalbard archipelago of Norway. Here we describe a partial skeleton of a new taxon, Janusaurus lundi, that includes much of the skull and representative portions of the postcranium. The new taxon is diagnosed by a suite of cranial character states including a very gracile stapedial shaft, the presence of a dorsal process on the prearticular and autapomorphic postcranial features such as the presence of an interclavicular trough and a conspicuous anterodorsal process of the ilium. The peculiar morphology of the ilia indicates a previously unrecognized degree of morphological variation in the pelvic girdle of ophthalmosaurids. We also present a large species level phylogenetic analysis of ophthalmosaurids including new and undescribed ichthyosaur material from the Upper Jurassic of Svalbard. Our results recover all Svalbard taxa in a single unresolved polytomy nested within Ophthalmosaurinae, which considerably increases the taxonomic composition of this clade. The paleobiogeographical implications of this result suggest the presence of a single clade of Boreal ophthalmosaurid ichthyosaurs that existed during the latest Jurassic, a pattern also reflected in the high degree of endemicity among some Boreal invertebrates, particularly ammonoids. Recent and ongoing descriptions of marine reptiles from the Slottsmøya Member Lagerstätte provide important new data to test hypotheses of marine amniote faunal turnover at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary. PMID:25084533

  5. Geology and taphonomy of the base of the Taquaral Member, Irati Formation (Permian, Paraná Basin), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chahud, Artur; Petri, Setembrino

    2015-09-01

    The taphonomy of Early Permian vertebrates from a sandy facies at the base of the Taquaral Member, Irati Formation, was surveyed in order to acquire data for the interpretation of the sedimentary processes and paleoenvironment of deposition. Six outcrops from the Rio Claro municipality and surrounding areas, from the Brazilian State of São Paulo, were investigated. The vertebrate groups are Chondrichthyes (Xenacanthiformes, Ctenacanthiformes and Petalodontiformes), Osteichthyes (Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii) and Tetrapodomorpha. They occur as loose teeth, scales, spines and bone remains. The sandy facies is characterized by fining upward deposition. The coarser sandstone immediately above the underlying Tatuí Formation is rich in Chondrichthyes. However, the fine sandstone above, immediately beneath the silty shale facies, is devoid of Chondrichthyes, though Osteichthyes scales, teeth and bones were present. The taphonomy is important for inferring sedimentary processes and then the paleoenvironments. The poor sorting of the sandstone and the presence of fossils that are mostly abraded or worn are indicative of a high energy environment. In contrast, the presence of fossils in a good state of preservation, some without abrasion and breakages are indicative of only limited transport. Differences of fossil spatial density, numbers of specimens and taxa may be explained by the dynamics of deposition, from details of the palaeoenvironment can be obtained.

  6. Eccentricity and precession forced cyclicity in the Upper Silurian Williamsport Sandstone Member of the Wills Creek Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, S.D.; Anderson, E.J. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Williamsport Sandstone Member, located at the base of the Wills Creek Formation, contains a complete 5th order sequence, traceable for more than 100 kilometers. This 5th order sequence is initiated with a massive iron-rich sandstone unit. The upper iron-rich sand of the Williamsport Member marks the beginning of the next 5th order sequence. The first 5th order rock cycle, interpreted as the product of the 100 k.y. Milankovitch eccentricity cycle, is divisible into five meter-scale 6th order precessional cycles (PACs). At Cedar Cliff, Maryland, the lithology of each of the five 6th order cycles is distinct. The first cycle (.8m thick) is a massive iron-rich sandstone. The second cycle (.75m thick) is an argillaceous nodular micrite. The third cycle (.75m thick) consists totally of thin-bedded quartz sandstone. The fourth cycle (2m thick) is represented by bedded limestones that thicken upward. The fifth cycle (.6m thick) is very thin-bedded to nodular limestone. This 5th order sequence and most of its internal cyclic elements can be traced over 100 kilometers to Mount Union, Pennsylvania where its facies are largely non-marine. Detailed correlation of these 6th order cycles reveals that the uppermost PAC is missing at Cumberland and Mount Union. At these localities, the prominent iron bed of the next 5th order sequence rests unconformably on the fourth PAC in the sequence. The fifth 6th order cycle was either not deposited or removed by erosion at these proximal localities. The laterally traceable hierarchic cyclic structure in the Williamsport Sandstone is consistent with the Milankovitch forcing model and provides a detailed stratigraphic basis for analysis of lateral patterns of cyclic accumulation in the late Silurian of the central Appalachians.

  7. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  8. Trace element distribution and oil yield data from the parachute creek member of the green river formation, colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Patrick J.; Donovan, Robert C.

    1987-02-01

    The determination of trace element concentrations in oil shale before mining and retorting is required for proper solid-waste management planning. Using routine Fischer assay oil yield data collected during resource characterization as indicators of potential trace element concentrations could lead to a standard method of identifying strata containing high trace element levels. In order to determine a correlation between trace element concentrations and oil yield, shale samples were selected from four statigraphic zones of the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation for analysis. All samples were analyzed for total elemental concentrations, mineralogy, and Fischer assay oil yield. The results of these analyses demonstrated that the Mahogany zone shales contain significantly greater trace element concentrations (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, lithium, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, and vanadium) than the other three shale zones. These high trace element concentrations have been identified within well-defined interbedded tuff deposits in the Mahogany zone. In addition, all trace elements evaluated, except boron, show either increasing or decreasing concentrations as oil yield increases within all oil shale zones. With an increased number of analyses of existing oil shale cores, oil yield data will be correlated to specific stratigraphic units containing high trace element concentrations.

  9. Trace element distribution and oil yield data from the Parachute Creek member of the Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, P.J.; Donovan, R.C. )

    1987-01-01

    The determination of trace element concentrations in oil shale before mining and retorting is required for proper solid-waste management planning. Using routine Fischer assay oil yield data collected during resource characterization as indicators of potential trace element concentrations could lead to a standard method of identifying strata containing high trace element levels. In order to determine a correlation between trace element concentrations and oil yield, shale samples were selected from four stratigraphic zones of the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation for analysis. All samples were analyzed for total elemental concentrations, mineralogy, and Fischer assay oil yield. The results of these analyses demonstrated that the Mahogany zone shales contain significantly greater trace element concentrations (antimony, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, lithium, mercury, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, silver, and vanadium) than the other three shale zones. These high trace element concentrations have been identified within well-defined interbedded tuff deposits in the Mahogany zone. In addition, all trace elements evaluated, except boron, show either increasing or decreasing concentrations as oil yield increases within all oil shale zones. With an increased number of analyses of existing oil shale cores, oil yield data will be correlated to specific stratigraphic units containing high trace element concentrations.

  10. Mei-1, a Gene Required for Meiotic Spindle Formation in Caenorhabditis Elegans, Is a Member of a Family of ATPases

    PubMed Central

    Clark-Maguire, S.; Mains, P. E.

    1994-01-01

    Meiotic spindle formation in the female germline of Caenorhabditis elegans requires expression of the gene mei-1. We have cloned mei-1 by transformation rescue and found that it resides near a hot spot for recombination, in an area of high gene density. The highest levels of mei-1 mRNA accumulate in the female germline of adult hermaphrodites as well as in fertilized embryos. The message persists for several hours after the protein functions in embryos, implying the need for post-transcriptional regulation. Two alternatively spliced messages are made that would result in proteins that differ internally by three amino acids; the larger of the two mRNAs is preferentially enriched in the female germline. The sequence of mei-1 shows that it is a member of a newly described family of ATPases that share a highly conserved nucleotide-binding site; four dominant-negative mutations of mei-1 are found at or near this region. Divergent roles ascribed to this family include membrane function, proteolysis, transcription and cell cycle regulation. PMID:8150281

  11. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Drosophila Ash2, a Member of the Trithorax Group Required for Imaginal Disc Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, A. L.; Shearn, A.

    1996-01-01

    The ash2 gene is a member of the trithorax group of genes whose products function to maintain active transcription of homeotic selector genes. Mutations in ash2 cause the homeotic transformations expected for a gene in this group but, in addition, cause a variety of pattern formation defects that are not necessarily expected. The ash2 gene is located in cytogenetic region 96A17-19 flanked by slowpoke and tolloid and is included in a cosmid that contains part of slowpoke. The ash2 transcript is 2.0 kb and is present throughout development. The ASH2 protein predicted from the nucleotide sequence of the open reading frame has a putative double zinc-finger domain, called a PHD finger, that is present not only in the products of other trithorax group genes such as TRX and ASH1, but also in the product of a Polycomb group gene, PCL. Polyclonal antibodies directed against ASH2 detect the protein in imaginal discs and in the nuclei of salivary gland and fat body cells. On immunoblots these affinity-purified antibodies detect a 70-kDa protein in larvae and a 53-kDa protein in pupae. PMID:8889525

  12. Reservoir Characterization and Tectonic Settings of Ahwaz Sandstone Member of the Asmari Formation in the Zagros Mountain, SW of Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, M. H.; Sadeghi, A. D.; Hosseini, M.; Moalemi, A.; Lotfpour, A.; Khatibi Mehr, M.; Salehi, M.; Zohdi, A.; Jafarzadeh, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Ahwaz Sandstone Member of the Asmari Formation, the major oil reservoir in Zagros mountain, have been studied to understand the distribution, provenance, tectonic setting and reservoir characteristic of Ahwaz Sandstone intervals as an exploration target. This study was based on petrographic and geochemical analysis of 16 core samples from 13 oilfields in the Dezful Embayment zone, and 2 surface sections (Katula and Khami) in Izeh zone. Petrographic studies of 400 thin sections and geochemical analysis indicated that sandstones consist of quartzarenite (Khami surface section), sublitharenite ( Katula surface section) and subarkose (subsurface sections). The modal analysis of medium size and well sorted samples show a recycled orogen (Katula outcrop) and craton (Khami and subsurface sections) tectonic setting. The parent rocks for Ahwaz Sandstone, based on petrographic point counting suggest a low to medium grade metamorphic and plutonic source. Petrographic and grain size analysis indicate a shallow shoreline to barrier bar environments. Heavy minerals in sandstones have mostly plutonic source and abundance of stable heavy mineral, along with well rounded and high sphericity, support stable cratonic source for subsurface sections and Khami surface section. However, in Katula section, heavy minerals have metamorphic source. Facies map illustrated that siliciclastic sediments in Asmari Formation during Rupelian time comes from south-west and north west of the study area. During Chattian, sand distribution reaches to the maximum level and sediments arrived from south-west, north-west and also north-east of the study area. In Aquitanian, sandstones sourced from two areas of south-west and north-west. In Burdigalian stage, sandstone sourced only from south and south-west. These sandstones have limited distributions. Tectonic settings based on geochemical analysis, plotted on discrimination diagrams, suggest that passive continental margin. These sandstones were

  13. Assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the Uteland Butte Member of the Eocene Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Ronald C.; Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Leathers, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2015-01-01

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered resources of 214 million barrels of oil, 329 billion cubic feet of associated/dissolved natural gas, and 14 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the informal Uteland Butte member of the Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah.

  14. The P-T conditions of garnet inclusion formation in diamond: thermal expansion of synthetic end-member pyrope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Sula; Mazzucchelli, Matteo; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo; Angel, Ross J.; Geiger, Charles A.; Domeneghetti, Chiara

    2013-04-01

    Pyrope, Mg3Al2Si3O12, due to the abundance of garnet in Earths's upper mantle, has been studied many times. A number of different investigations have measured its physical and thermodynamic properties at high temperature or pressure and, even more recently, under simultaneous high P-T conditions (e.g. Zou et al., 2012). This abstract reports thermal expansion results on pyrope, as part of a much wider project on the determination of the physical properties of garnet, in order to obtain geobarometric information on the formation conditions of its inclusion in diamond. Our experimental approach is based on the elastic method (e.g. Izraeli et al., 1999; Howell et al., 2010; Nestola et al., 2011; Howell et al., 2012), which takes into account the thermoelastic properties of both diamond and any tiny solid phase inclusion within it. The method requires accurate and precise knowledge of thermal expansion and compressibility behavior in order to calculate precisely the pressure and temperature formation conditions of the diamond-inclusion pair. Thus, in order to do this, we measured the thermal expansion of an end-member synthetic single crystal of pyrope up to 1100 K at 52 different temperatures. This was done by measuring the ao unit-cell edge with high precision and accuracy under heating and cooling conditions. This allows excellent experimental reproducibility, which is also checked by monitoring any diffraction peak broadening over the entire range of temperatures. Fitting the temperature-volume data to the thermal expansion equation of Berman (1988), we obtained a room temperature volume-thermal expansion coefficient equal to 2.72(2)×10-5K-1. Using the same pyrope crystal, in situ high-pressure measurements are now in progress in order to determine its isothermal bulk modulus. The use of our results, along with the dK/dT data of Zou et al ( 2012), we plan to calculate the pressure of formation of diamonds containing pyrope-rich garnet inclusions. References Berman

  15. Isotopic age of the Black Forest Bed, Petrified Forest Member, Chinle Formation, Arizona: An example of dating a continental sandstone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, N.R.; Ash, S.R.; Barth, A.P.; Gehrels, G.E.; Wooden, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Zircons from the Black Forest Bed, Petrified Forest Member, Chinle Formation, in Petrified Forest National Park, yield ages that range from Late Triassic to Late Archean. Grains were analyzed by multigrain TIMS (thermal-ionization mass spectrometry), single-crystal TIMS, and SHRIMP (sensitive, high-resolution ion-microprobe). Multiple-grain analysis yielded a discordia trajectory with a lower intercept of 207 ?? 2 Ma, which because of the nature of multiple-grain sampling of a detrital bed, is not considered conclusive. Analysis of 29 detrital-zircon grains by TIMS yielded U-PB ages of 2706 ?? 6 Ma to 206 ?? 6 Ma. Eleven of these ages lie between 211 and 216 ?? 6.8 Ma. Our statistical analysis of these grains indicates that the mean of the ages, 213 ?? 1.7 Ma, reflects more analytical error than geologic variability in sources of the grains. Grains with ages of ca. 1400 Ma were derived from the widespread plutons of that age exposed throughout the southwestern Cordillera and central United States. Twelve grains analyzed by SHRIMP provide 206Pb*/238U ages from 214 ?? 2 Ma to 200 ?? 4 Ma. We use these data to infer that cores of inherited material were present in many zircons and that single-crystal analysis provides an accurate estimation of the age of the bed. We further propose that, even if some degree of reworking has occurred, the very strong concentration of ages at ca. 213 Ma provides a maximum age for the Black Forest Bed of 213 ?? 1.7 Ma. The actual age of the bed may be closer to 209 Ma. Dating continental successions is very difficult when distinct ash beds are not clearly identified, as is the case in the Chinle Formation. Detrital zircons in the Black Forest Bed, however, are dominated by an acicular morphology with preserved delicate terminations. The shape of these crystals and their inferred environment of deposition in slow-water settings suggest that the crystals were not far removed from their site of deposition in space and likely not far in time

  16. Petrology and diagenetic history of the upper shale member of the Late Devonian–Early Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neil S. Fishman; Sven O. Egenhoff; Boehlke, Adam; Lowers, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The organic-rich upper shale member of the upper Devonian–lower Mississippian Bakken Formation (Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA) has undergone significant diagenetic alteration, irrespective of catagenesis related to hydrocarbon generation. Alteration includes precipitation of numerous cements, replacement of both detrital and authigenic minerals, multiple episodes of fracturing, and compaction. Quartz authigenesis occurred throughout much of the member, and is represented by multiple generations of microcrystalline quartz. Chalcedonic quartz fills radiolarian microfossils and is present in the matrix. Sulfide minerals include pyrite and sphalerite. Carbonate diagenesis is volumetrically minor and includes thin dolomite overgrowths and calcite cement. At least two generations of fractures are observed. Based on the authigenic minerals and their relative timing of formation, the evolution of pore waters can be postulated. Dolomite and calcite resulted from early postdepositional aerobic oxidation of some of the abundant organic material in the formation. Following aerobic oxidation, conditions became anoxic and sulfide minerals precipitated. Transformation of the originally opaline tests of radiolaria resulted in precipitation of quartz, and quartz authigenesis is most common in more distal parts of the depositional basin where radiolaria were abundant. Because quartz authigenesis is related to the distribution of radiolaria, there is a link between diagenesis and depositional environment. Furthermore, much of the diagenesis in the upper shale member preceded hydrocarbon generation, so early postdepositional processes were responsible for occlusion of significant original porosity in the member. Thus, diagenetic mineral precipitation was at least partly responsible for the limited ability of these mudstones to provide porosity for storage of hydrocarbons.

  17. Petrophysical investigation of porosity distribution in the Geneva Dolomite Member of the Grand Tower Formation in Marion County, Illinois

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Barrett R.

    Porosity distribution, possible mechanisms for dolomitization and secondary porosity development in the Geneva Dolomite Member (Geneva) of the mid-Devonian Grand Tower Formation in Marion County, Illinois, are examined in this study. The Geneva has been an active petroleum reservoir for over sixty years and has recently provided new discoveries. However to date, no systematic study of these strata has been conducted using petrophysical data. Three hypotheses are tested in this investigation. The first was that qualitative porosity could be classified using a sparse petrophysical data set. The second was that porosity development, such as the presence of an inferred subaerial exposure interval, fractures, and karst could be assessed using petrophysical techniques. The third was that dolomitization mechanisms could be inferred from petrophysical methods combined with geologic history, lithologic relationships and structural geology. The petrophysical method developed requires spontaneous potential, resistivity/induction and density, neturon or sonic logs. Three methods---the F-φ-M, bulk volume water crossplot, and shallow resistivity/mud filtrate ratio---were used to evaluate porosity. Porosity type was determined by calculating the numeric average of the scores determined by each method. Porosity classifications showed good correlation to core descriptions of a well in adjacent Fayette County. In addition, porosity classifications appear to correlate well with laboratory permeability measurements from cores. Porosity classifications were mapped across Marion County at four-foot intervals. Low porosity "tight zones" and fractured strata were indicated at the upper contact of the Geneva, and appear to confirm a subaerial exposure. The causal mechanism for fracturing is believed to result from post-depositional tectonic forces. A review of published methods suggests that dolomitization of the Geneva was initiated by the Simm's model. Following a marine regression, the

  18. Petrographic Descriptions of Selected Rock Specimens From the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member, Phosphoria Formation (Permian), Southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Edward A.; Grauch, Richard I.; Herring, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Based on petrographic observations of 135 thin sections, rocks in the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation in southeastern Idaho can be placed into one of four major lithofacies: organic claystone, muddy siltstone, peloidal phosphorite, and dolomitized calclithite-in order of decreasing abundance. Organic claystones are the most common lithofacies in the Meade Peak. Many of these rocks contain sufficient amounts of silt to make silty, organic claystones a common subtype. Organic claystones commonly contain crystals of muscovite and bioclasts as accessory components, and they are typically parallel laminated. Muddy siltstones are composed primarily of quartz silt, but some feldspar and rare carbonate silt are also present; some rocks are parallel laminated. Phosphate peloids are composed of varying amounts of opaque, complex, and translucent material, and observed internal structures are classified as simple, banded, cored, zoned, oolitic, nucleated, and polynucleated. Opaque, complex, and translucent peloids form the framework grains of three peloidal phosphorite rocks: wackestone phosphorite, packstone phosphorite, and grainstone phosphorite. Wackestone phosphorite is phosphatic-mud supported and contains more than 10 percent peloids; it is the most common type of phosphorite. Packstone phosphorite is peloid supported and contains interstitial phosphatic mud; it is also a common type. Grainstone phosphorite is peloid supported but lacks phosphatic mud; it is the least common type. Dolomitized calclithites contain three types of carbonate grains: macrocrystalline, microcrystalline, and crystalline with a microcrystalline nuclei-in order of decreasing abundance. Based on chemical staining and X-ray diffraction analyses, most of the carbonate is dolomite. Sufficient amounts of quartz silt or muddy material allow some rocks to be called silty dolomitized calclithite or muddy dolomitized calclithite, respectively. Sedimentary

  19. The star formation history and accretion-disc fraction among the K-type members of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.

    2016-09-01

    We present results of a spectroscopic survey for new K- and M-type members of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB Association (˜100-200 pc). Using an X-ray, proper motion and colour-magnitude selected sample, we obtained spectra for 361 stars, for which we report spectral classifications and Li and Hα equivalent widths. We identified 156 new members of Sco-Cen, and recovered 51 previously published members. We have combined these with previously known members to form a sample of 493 solar-mass (˜0.7-1.3 M⊙) members of Sco-Cen. We investigated the star formation history of this sample, and re-assessed the ages of the massive main-sequence turn-off and the G-type members in all three subgroups. We performed a census for circumstellar discs in our sample using WISE infrared data and find a protoplanetary disc fraction for K-type stars of 4.4^{+1.6}_{-0.9} per cent for Upper Centaurus-Lupus and Lower Centaurus-Crux at ˜16 Myr and 9.0^{+4.0}_{-2.2} per cent for Upper Scorpius at ˜10 Myr. These data are consistent with a protoplanetary disc e-folding time-scale of ˜4-5 Myr for ˜1 M⊙ stars, twice that previously quoted, but consistent with the Bell et al. revised age scale of young clusters. Finally, we construct an age map of Scorpius-Centaurus which clearly reveals substructure consisting of concentrations of younger and older stars. We find evidence for strong age gradients within all three subgroups. None of the subgroups are consistent with being simple, coeval populations which formed in single bursts, but likely represents a multitude of smaller star formation episodes of hundreds to tens of stars each.

  20. Rhodium(II)-Catalyzed Cycloaddition Reactions of Non-classical 1,5-Dipoles for the Formation of Eight-Membered Heterocycles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Jin; Ko, Donguk; Yoo, Eun Jeong

    2015-11-01

    A new type of intermolecular rhodium(II)-catalyzed [5+3] cycloaddition has been developed. This higher-order cycloaddition between pyridinium zwitterion 1,5-dipole equivalents and enol diazoacetates enables the formation of eight-membered heterocyclic skeletons, which are otherwise difficult to construct. The optimized cycloaddition occurs efficiently under mild conditions with a wide range of pyridinium zwitterions and with high functional-group tolerance. PMID:26376924

  1. Piezometric levels from 1948 through 1950 for wells screened in the Lloyd sand member of the Raritan formation on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lusczynski, Norbert J.

    1950-01-01

    Since 1932, the United States Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York Water Power and Control Commission, the Nassau County Department of Public Works, the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors, and later also with the Suffolk County Water Authority, has been making both general and detailed studied dealing with the occurrence, movement, quantity, quality, and temperature of ground water found in the several water-bearing formations on Long Island. In the first years most of the emphasis was placed on studying the shallow water-table beds of Pleistocene age, although geologic and hydrologic information was obtained for the Lloyd sand member of the Raritan formation of upper Cretaceous age, the deepest water-bearing beds on Long Island, as well as for other artesian formations above the Lloyd.

  2. Chloride content of water from wells screened in the Lloyd sand member of the Raritan formation on Long Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, C.M.

    1950-01-01

    Since 1932 the United States Geological Survey, in cooperation with the New York Power and Control Commission, the Nassau County Department of Public Works, the Suffolk County Board of Supervisors, and later also the Suffolk County Water Authority, has been making general and specific studies dealing with the occurrence, movement, quantity, quality, and temperature of ground water found in several water-bearing formations on Long Island. In the first years most of the emphasis was placed on studying the shallow water-table beds, although geologic and hydrologic information was obtained for the Lloyd sand member of the Raritan formation, the deepest water-bearing beds on Long Island, as well as for other shallower artesian formations.

  3. High-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata: Examples from the Sunnyside Member of the Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation Book Cliffs eastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.; Howell, J.; Boyd, R.; Flint, S.; Diessel, C.

    2006-07-15

    The Sunnyside Member of the Upper Cretaceous Blackhawk Formation in the Book Cliffs of eastern Utah provides an ideal opportunity to investigate high-resolution sequence-stratigraphic correlation between shallow-marine and terrestrial strata in an area of outstanding outcrop exposure. The thick, laterally extensive coal seam that caps the Sunnyside Member is critical for correlating between its shallow-marine and terrestrial components. Petrographic analysis of 281 samples obtained from 7 vertical sections spanning more than 30 km (18 mi) of depositional dip enabled us to recognize a series of transgressive-regressive coal facies trends in the seam. On this basis, we were able to identify a high-resolution record of accommodation change throughout the deposition of the coal, as well as a series of key sequence-stratigraphic surfaces. The stratigraphic relationships between the coal and the siliciclastic components of the Sunnyside Member enable us to correlate this record with that identified in the time-equivalent shallow-marine strata and to demonstrate that the coal spans the formation of two marine parasequences and two high-frequency, fourth-order sequence boundaries. This study has important implications for improving the understanding of sequence-stratigraphic expression in terrestrial strata and for correlating between marine and terrestrial records of base-level change. It may also have implications for improving the predictability of vertical and lateral variations in coal composition for mining and coalbed methane projects.

  4. [Status and ideas of medical sociology research on the formation of relations of elderly citizens to their family members].

    PubMed

    Rieske, B; Michel, M

    1984-01-01

    With regard to the requirements of further medico-sociological research-work on the character of the relationship between elderly persons and their relatives--that is projected to be carried out by international scientific cooperation--the authors define positions concerning function and structure of the family under conditions of the socialist society. They identify several phases following each other, thus realizing the familial cyclus, the family members' respective positions being found appropriately modified or changed. Accordingly interactions-patterns, relationship between the older and younger generations being involved, contain different problems of importance for relevant investigations. PMID:6528632

  5. In-place oil shale resources in the saline-mineral and saline-leached intervals, Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, Piceance Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Johnson, Ronald C.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Dietrich, John D.

    2014-01-01

    A recent U.S. Geological Survey analysis of the Green River Formation of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado shows that about 920 and 352 billion barrels of oil are potentially recoverable from oil shale resources using oil-yield cutoffs of 15 and 25 gallons per ton (GPT), respectively. This represents most of the high-grade oil shale in the United States. Much of this rich oil shale is found in the dolomitic Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation and is associated with the saline minerals nahcolite and halite, or in the interval where these minerals have been leached by groundwater. The remaining high-grade resource is located primarily in the underlying illitic Garden Gulch Member of the Green River Formation. Of the 352 billion barrels of potentially recoverable oil resources in high-grade (≥25 GPT) oil shale, the relative proportions present in the illitic interval, non-saline R-2 zone, saline-mineral interval, leached interval (excluding leached Mahogany zone), and Mahogany zone were 3.1, 4.5, 36.6, 23.9, and 29.9 percent of the total, respectively. Only 2 percent of high-grade oil shale is present in marginal areas where saline minerals were never deposited.

  6. The sidekick gene, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is required for pattern formation in the Drosophila eye.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D N; Liu, Y; Litsky, M L; Reinke, R

    1997-09-01

    In the Drosophila eye imaginal disc the photoreceptor cells (R cells) differentiate according to a precise spatial and temporal order. The sidekick (sdk) gene is necessary to prevent extra R cells from differentiating during eye disc development. The extra cell appears between R3 and R4 early in R cell clusters and is most likely the result of the mystery cell inappropriately differentiating as an R cell. Mosaic analysis shows that sdk is required neither in the R cells nor in the extra cell, suggesting that sdk is necessary in the surrounding undifferentiated cells. The sdk gene codes for a protein that is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, having six immunoglobulin domains, thirteen fibronectin repeats and a transmembrane domain. The protein structure is consistent with its participation in cell-cell interaction during eye development. PMID:9310325

  7. Measured sections and discussion of the main turbidite member, Middle Pennsylvanian Minturn Formation, northern Sangre de Cristo Range, Custer and Saguache counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soulliere, S.J.; DeAngelis, B.L.; Lindsey, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The main turbidite member is the thickest and most extensive of the intervals of prodelta turbidites in the Minturn Formation. Each turbidite interval is part of a coarsening upward sequence interpreted as a prograding fan delta. A typical prograding cycle consists of prodelta marine shale and siltstone, prodelta turbidite sandstones, delta-front sandstone and conglomerate, and deltaic and alluvial-plain sandstone, siltstone, and shale. Fossils of 1and plants (mostly Calamites, including some in growth position) are locally abundant in deltaic and alluvial sediments of the prograding cycles. The turbidites are regarded as having been deposited offshore from alluvial systems.

  8. Paleontology and sedimentology of upper clastic member of Wanakah Formation, Chama basin, New Mexico: Lacustrine paleoenvironmental implications

    SciTech Connect

    Good, S.J.; Ridgley, J.L. )

    1989-09-01

    Lacustrine strata of the upper part of the Jurassic Wanakah Formation were restricted to the Chama basin of north-central New Mexico by mid-Jurassic tectonic activity in the Brazos and Nacimiento uplifts and along the Gallina-Archuleta anticlinorium. Lateral and vertical facies of the upper Wanakah exposed around the southern margin of the Chama basin indicate that the deeper part of the lake was north of the outcrop belt. The upper 3-5 m of the Wanakah consists of thin-bedded rippled sandstone, interbedded mudstone, and limestone containing trace fossils and freshwater mollusks characteristic of marginal lacustrine facies. Taphonomic studies of mollusks in the Wanakah Formation have been combined with application of ecophenotypic variation documented in extant unionid bivalves to produce paleoenvironmental interpretations of these lacustrine rocks.

  9. Modelling the petroleum generation and migration of the third member of the Shahejie Formation (Es3) in the Banqiao Depression of Bohai Bay Basin, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaowen; He, Sheng; Liu, Keyu; Shi, Zhongsheng; Bachir, Sani

    2011-01-01

    The mudstones in the third member of the Shahejie Formation (Es3) are the primary source rocks in the Banqiao Depression of Bohai Bay Basin. They are rich in organic matter with Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content up to 3.5%. The sandstones in the Es3 member are the deepest proven hydrocarbon reservoir rocks with measured porosity and permeability values ranging from 3.6% to 32.4% and from 0.01 md to 3283.7 md, respectively. One, two and three-dimensional basin modelling studies were performed to analyse the petroleum generation and migration history of the Es3 member in the Banqiao Depression based on the reconstruction of the burial, thermal and maturity history in order to evaluate the remaining potential of this petroleum province. The modelling results are calibrated with measured vitrinite reflectance ( R o), borehole temperatures and some drilling results of 63 wells in the study area. Calibration of the model with thermal maturity and borehole temperature data indicates that the present-day heat flow in the Banqiao Depression varies from 59.8 mW/m 2 to 61.7 mW/m 2 and the paleo-heat flow increased from 65 Ma to 50.4 Ma, reached a peak heat-flow values of approximately 75 mW/m 2 at 50.4 Ma and then decreased exponentially from 50.4 Ma to present-day. The source rocks of the Es3 member are presently in a stage of oil and condensate generation with maturity from 0.5% to 1.8% R o and had maturity from 0.5% to 1.25% R o at the end of the Dongying Formation (Ed) deposition (26 Ma). Oil generation (0.5% R o) in the Es3 member began from about 37 Ma to 34 Ma and the peak hydrocarbon generation (1.0% R o) occurred approximately from 30 Ma to 15 Ma. The modelled hydrocarbon expulsion evolution suggested that the timing of hydrocarbon expulsion from the Es3 member source rocks began from 31 Ma to 10 Ma with the peak hydrocarbon expulsion shortly after 26 Ma. Secondary petroleum migration pathways in the Es3 member of the Banqiao Depression are modelled based on the

  10. Union Members Are Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David

    2013-01-01

    Unions serve their members' interests. But union members are also community members, and their interests go well beyond increasing pay and benefits. A local union president has found that his members are best served by participating in a community-wide coalition. Providing eyeglasses to needy students, promoting healthy eating, and increasing…

  11. Sorption coefficients for radionuclides on samples from the water-bearing Magenta and Culebra members of the Rustler Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, A. W.; Dosch, R. G.

    1980-11-01

    The sorbing characteristics of samples from the Magenta and Culebra dolomites of the Rustler Formation (which overlie the proposed site for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico) for various radionuclides have been studied. Core samples extracted from various depths and boreholes within a given formation were selected to provide a cross section of materials which are present in the formations. They varied in composition from pure dolomite to nearly pure anhydrite. The radionuclides used in the sorption coefficient measurements (isotopes of Cs, Sr, Tc, Eu, Am and Pu) were dissolved in a simulated Culebra groundwater at concentrations of 0.1 ..mu..Ci/m1 or less. The results indicate that the sorption coefficients (Kd's) of these water-bearing units may vary widely depending on the borehole area and over several feet in depth in a common borehole. Cesium Kd values from 0.6 to 218 ml/g and 1.2 to 68 on Magenta and Culebra samples, respectively. Strontium Kd values ranged from 1.1 to 30 on Magenta Samples and from 0.6 to 32 on Culebra samples. Variations of Eu, Pu and Am Kd's were generally less than an order of magnitude on both Culebra and Magenta samples. Technetium was not sorbed by any of the samples. With few exceptions, samples with high dolomite contents had higher sorption coefficients than those with high anhydrite concentrations. Clay content may also be a factor for some radionuclides, particularly Cs, which has been shown to sorb preferentially on clay particles in Magenta.

  12. Potential for economic coal development in upper coal member of Menefee Formation, Torreon Wash area, Sandoval County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, E.C.; Roybal, G.H.

    1989-09-01

    In the southeastern part of the San Juan basin, the transgressive La Ventana member of the Cliff House Sandstone represents a near-vertical buildup of barrier-beach sands during a period when sediment supply was in approximate balance with subsidence and shore-marginal environments migrated landward/seaward over a limited horizontal distance. Recognition of these conditions leads to speculation regarding a corresponding back-barrier accumulation of coal-bearing strata. Using logs from both the project-sponsored drill holes and commercial oil and gas tests, the workers have compiled an 8.5-mi stratigraphic cross section oriented normal to the depositional strike. This cross section illustrates the laterally changing relationships between the La Ventana and the upper Menefee. At the north (seaward) end, the interval is principally sandstone with thin tongues of coal-bearing shale and siltstone. Southward the barrier beach sand units split, thin, and give way to increasing numbers of coal-bearing intervals. Five major La Ventana sandstone tongues and a corresponding number of upper Menefee tongues alternate through an interval of about 650 ft. The number of individual coal beds ranges from 3 to 18, and thicknesses range from about 1 to 8 ft.

  13. Hemiacodon engardae, a new species of omomyid primate from the earliest Uintan Turtle Bluff Member of the Bridger Formation, southwestern Wyoming, USA.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Paul C; Dunn, Rachel H

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, we describe a new species of Hemiacodon known only from University of Colorado Museum Loc. 92189 (Donna's Locality) in the Turtle Bluff Member of the Bridger Formation, Green River Basin, southwestern Wyoming. Donna's locality has yielded a diverse mostly small-bodied mammalian assemblage of Bridgerian and first appearance Uintan mammalian taxa, as well as range-through taxa. Together with H. engardae sp. nov., the faunal assemblage from Donna's Locality and more recently discovered localities in the same stratigraphic interval provides the first conclusive paleontological evidence of an earliest Uintan age (Ui1A biochron) for the Turtle Bluff Member of the Bridger Formation. The new species is represented by a sample of 11 specimens consisting of well-preserved upper and lower premolars and lower molars. H. engardae is distinct from H. gracilis on the basis of overall larger size as well as a combination of features of the premolars and molars related to a greater development of shearing crests. This suggests that H. engardae may have incorporated more foliage into its diet than the Bridgerian species, H. gracilis. PMID:19625072

  14. Regional analysis of rhythmic bedding in the Fort Hays limestone member, Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous), US western interior

    SciTech Connect

    Laferriere, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a regional stratigraphic investigation of the rhythmically bedded Fort Hays limestone member of Kansas, Colorado, and New Mexico indicate at least two levels of cyclicity. Regional development of these cycles strongly supports the hypothesis that they are climatic in origin. Departures from simple cyclical patterns resulted from sedimentary effects of Late Cretaceous orogenic activity, erosional events associated with eustatic sea level changes, diagenetic modification, and possibly from interference between orbital parameters having different periodicities. The vulnerability of Milankovitch-type cyclicity to overprinting by tectono-sedimentologic effects makes units such as the Fort Hays useful as indicators of subtle tectonic activity. Regional thickness changes in groups of shale-limestone couplets were identified, correlated, and mapped in the subsurface using geophysical well log information in order to locate subtle structural elements that influenced Fort Hays sedimentation. In the Denver-Julesburg Basin of Colorado and western Kansas, thinning of the section between Fort Hays marker horizons occurs dominantly along northeastwardly trending belts that resulted apparently from Late Cretaceous reactivation of the Transcontinental Arch. Isotopic and petrographic analyses were conducted on pelagic (carbonate matrix) and benthic (inoceramid bivalve) constituents of selected shale/limestone couplets. These data suggest that there was little difference in temperature or salinity between times of terrigenous detrital input and times of nearly pure carbonate deposition. Isotopic information from matrix samples suggests a westward decrease in salinity of surface water in the Western Interior Sea. Isotopic data from largely unaltered inoceramid bivalves indicate bottom-water conditions of near-normal marine salinity.

  15. BCAR3/AND-34 can signal independent of complex formation with CAS family members or the presence of p130Cas

    PubMed Central

    Borre, Pierre Vanden; Near, Richard I.; Makkinje, Anthony; Mostoslavsky, Gustavo; Lerner, Adam

    2011-01-01

    BCAR3 binds to the carboxy-terminus of p130Cas, a focal adhesion adapter protein. Both BCAR3 and p130Cas have been linked to resistance to anti-estrogens in breast cancer, Rac activation and cell motility. Using R743A BCAR3, a point mutant that has lost the ability to bind p130Cas, we find that BCAR3-p130Cas complex formation is not required for BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance, Rac activation or discohesion of epithelial breast cancer cells. Complex formation was also not required for BCAR3-induced lamellipodia formation in BALB/c-3T3 fibroblasts but was required for optimal BCAR3-induced motility. Although both wildtype and R743A BCAR3 induced phosphorylation of p130Cas and the related adapter protein HEF1/NEDD9, chimeric NSP3:BCAR3 experiments demonstrate that such phosphorylation does not correlate with BCAR3-induced anti-estrogen resistance or lamellipodia formation. Wildtype but not R743A BCAR3 induced lamellipodia formation and augmented cell motility in p130Cas-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), suggesting that while p130Cas itself is not strictly required for these endpoints, complex formation with other CAS family members is, at least in cells lacking p130Cas. Overall, our work suggests that many, but not all, BCAR3-mediated signaling events in epithelial and mesenchymal cells are independent of p130Cas association. These studies also indicate that disruption of the BCAR3-p130Cas complex is unlikely to reverse BCAR3-mediated anti-estrogen resistance. PMID:21262352

  16. Eruption sequence of the Otowi Member, Bandelier Tuff Formation, Valles Caldera, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico: lessons from the deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, S.; Wolff, J. A.; Cook, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    Models for caldera collapse are outstripping evidence to support or refute them based on detailed field studies. Continuing study of clast lithology is changing previously suggested ideas for the eruptive sequence of the Otowi Member (1.6 Ma) of the Bandelier Tuff. The eruption produced Plinian and co-ignimbrite fall deposits, outflow and intra-caldera ignimbrite (totaling a maximum of ~ 430 km3 DRE), and heralded the first major collapse of Valles caldera (24 km diameter). Previous work supports magma withdrawal from a high-silica-rhyolite chamber with systematic internal variations in incompatible trace element concentrations. More recent study, including determination of lithic-clast provenance, reveals new insights into the eruption sequence: 1) The first phase produced Guaje fall deposit unit A, after which column collapse produced coeval pyroclastic flows and fall deposits (units B-F) in a complex depositional pattern. In places the ignimbrite is intra-Plinian and in other places only fall units accumulated while pyroclastic flows by-passed the area. Pumice composition data suggests that fallout from vent-derived Plinian columns persisted late into the eruption. 2) Lithic provenance and abundance information from the ignimbrite combined with pumice composition data lead us to reject our previous idea of switching from an initial central vent to vents on caldera ring-fractures, at the time of deposition of co-ignimbrite lag-breccias. Observations are better explained by the central vent persisting longer into the eruption, and thus lag-breccia deposition was not proximal to the central vent. 3) 50 km from vent a preserved Otowi sequence includes a thin ignimbrite veneer, showing that at least some of the late-erupted pyroclastic flows were widespread and energetic. 4) Volumetrically, at least 2/3 of the erupted part of the chamber had been expelled before caldera collapse and possible vent-shift took place. These observations need to be included in a model for

  17. The Lacustrine Upper Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Four Corners Region, Usa: a Lithological and Mineralogical Terrestrial Analog for Gale Crater, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    The upper part of the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation is an iron- and clay-rich volcaniclastic shale deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system. Sedimentary rocks exposed in Gale Crater consist of similar non-acidic clays, possibly of lacustrine origin. Three primary clastic lithofacies are present in both the Brushy Basin Member and at Gale Crater: silt-/claystone, sandstone, and conglomerate. Both the terrestrial and martian silt-/claystone lithofacies are interpreted as lacustrine depositional environments due to features such as parallel laminated and massive sedimentary structures. Vugs are present in the siltstone/claystone facies on both the Colorado Plateau and at Gale Crater. Fluvial features are also observed in both examples such as cross-bedded sandstones and imbricated conglomerates. Concretions are present in both the Colorado Plateau and Gale Crater units. The vugs in the Brushy Basin Member preserve algal forms with cellular elaboration and are interpreted as charophyte molds. Two distinct suites of elements (1. C, Fe, As, P and, 2. C, S, Se, P) are associated with the microbial fossils and may be potential markers for biosignatures. Vugs at Gale Crater are a potential target to investigate the possibility of preserved microbial (algal) life where early analyses show the presence of the elements capable of supporting life. The Brushy Basin Member is composed predominately of quartz, feldspars, zeolites and altered volcanic ash. The abundant clay minerals in both the terrestrial and martian examples are hypothesized to have formed due to partial alteration of volcanic minerals in alkaline fluid. Similarly, concretions present in the terrestrial unit exhibit a diverse range of mineralogies likely due to alkaline fluid chemistries interacting with reactive volcaniclastic sediments. Terrestrial concretion mineralogy is diverse even within an outcrop or stratigraphic horizon which suggests reactants to precipitate

  18. Paleogeography of the Eosahabi River in Libya: New insights into the mineralogy, geochemistry and paleontology of Member U1 of the Sahabi Formation, northeastern Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muftah, A. M.; Pavlakis, P.; Godelitsas, A.; Gamaletsos, P.; Boaz, N.

    2013-02-01

    A large paleo-river of Miocene age traversing Libya from south to north has been previously demonstrated by seismic, stratigraphic, paleontological, and remote sensing data. The depositional environment of As Sahabi Formation in north central Libya is this large and now extinct Eosahabi River. However, the source of this major African river has remained controversial. Dark-colored sedimentary material with magnetic properties suggested a source from the basaltic Haruj as Aswad massif in south central Libya. To test this hypothesis, mineralogical and geochemical study of clayey sediments from three localities, P25, P28 and P96c, from fossiliferous Member U1 of the As Sahabi Formation, were carried out. Results strongly indicate very mature and re-processed sediments of continental origin, and felsic sources with no basaltic contribution. Thus the origin can be traced to an upland area of outcrop of rocks of Precambrian continental origin in northeastern Chad. An alternative scenario is that the Sahabi sediments originated from Precambrian outcrops in Ethiopia through an east-west river connection with the Nile. We consider this hypothesis unlikely, since it is based only on remote sensing data, and lacks any time control or geological supporting evidence. The abundant vertebrate fauna from the Sahabi Formation shows strong similarities with penecontemporaneous fossil faunas in Chad and is supportive of an origin of the Eosahabi River in Neogene mega-Lake Chad.

  19. Microfacies analysis of the Leonardian-Guadalupian lower member of the San Andres Formation in the southern Sacremento Mountains, Otero County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Whitman, C.; Clemons, R.E. )

    1992-04-01

    The Rio Bonito Member of the San Andres Formation records a transgression of the northwestern shelf during the late Leonardian. Late Leonardian to Guadalupian marine carbonates exposed in the Sacramento Mountains relate a marked change from equatorial tidal flat rocks of the middle Leonardian Yeso Formation. These rocks were deposited during a worldwide sea level lowstand. The Yeso-San Andres contact, previously thought to be a gradational boundary, is here interpreted as a flooding surface resulting from the eustatic sea level rise after the lowstand. Inundation of the northwestern shelf led to deposition of the thick Andres Formation marine limestone sequence within a shallow-lagoon or shelf setting. Depositional environments are predominantly subtidal and intertidal. Microfacies include packstones of comminuted bioclasts of normal saline affinities redistributed by light currents. These shoal upward at times to Dasycladacean algal grainstones interpreted as tidal bars prograding across the lagoon or shelf. More restricted wackestones and laminated mudstones occur at the base of the section and indicate a transition from tidal flat to submerged shelf. Aggradation of sediment into the intertidal zone may have occurred cyclically during San Andres deposition. One such cycle is present over the interval exposed in the Sacramento Mountains. Intertidal rocks resemble tidal flat deposits of dolostone, carbonate mudstones, and a thin tongue of quartzarenite interpeted to be Glorieta Sandstone. These rocks were previously attributed to interginguing of the Yeso with the San Andres.

  20. Taphonomic and paleoenvironmental considerations for the concentrations of macroinvertibrate fossils in the Romualdo Member, Santana Formation, Late Aptian - Early Albian, Araripe Basin, Araripina, NE, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Ludmila Alves Cadeira Do; Pereira, Priscilla Albuquerque; Sales, Alexandre Magno Feitosa; Barreto, Alcina Magnólia Franca

    2015-10-01

    Benthic macroinvertebrate fossils can be seen towards to the top of the Romualdo Member of the Santana Formation, in the Araripe Basin, Northeast Brazil, and can provide paleoenvironmental and paleobiogeographical information regarding the Cretaceous marine transgression which reached the interior basins in Northeast Brazil. We analyse taphonomic characteristics of macroinvertebrate concentrations of two outcrops (Torrinha and Torre Grande) within the municipality Araripina, Pernambuco, in order to enhance our understanding of the Cretaceous paleoenvironment in the western portion of the Araripe Basin. At the outcrop Torrinha, proximal tempestitic taphofacies were identified. These predominantly consist of ceritid, cassiopid, and later, naticid gastropods as well as undetermined bivalves. Given this lack of variability it can be deduced that there were no significant paleoenvironmental changes during the successive stages tempestitic sedimentation. In the Torre Grande outcrop distal to proximal tempestitic taphofacies were identified from the base to the top respectively pointing to a decrease in paleodepth. Asides from the macroinvertebrates present in Torrinha, there are also echinoids - unequivocal evidence for marine conditions. These occurrences appear to be restricted to Romualdo Member outcrops in the Araripina municipality (the Southeast portion of the Araripe Basin) confirming a previously published hypothesis suggesting that the Cretaceous marine transgression originated from the neighbouring Parnaíba Basin to the west. This study identified marine molluscs of a similar age to those in the Romualdo Member's equivalent rock units in the Parnaíba and Sergipe-Alagoas (SE-AL) basins suggesting a marine connection between these basins and the Araripe Basin during the Early Cretaceous.

  1. Low functional evenness in a post-extinction Anisian (Middle Triassic) paleocommunity: A case study of the Leidapo Member (Qingyan Formation), south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dineen, Ashley A.; Fraiser, Margaret L.; Tong, Jinnan

    2015-10-01

    Functional diversity, defined as the abundance and distribution of traits present in a community, has important implications for the functioning of ecosystems in the wake of events of major disturbance. Here, we examine the functional diversity of a Middle Triassic paleocommunity in the wake of the largest mass extinction in Earth's history, the Permo-Triassic mass extinction (PTME). Field data was collected and analyzed for a highly diverse invertebrate marine fossil assemblage, the Middle Triassic (Anisian) Leidapo Member (Qingyan Formation) of Qingyan, south China. Previously interpreted to represent a fully restructured paleocommunity in the aftermath of the PTME, our results indicate that the fauna of Leidapo Member had high taxonomic diversity and high functional richness, however was functionally uneven. Despite the presence of 24 different functional groups, the paleocommunity was numerically and ecologically dominated by one functional group consisting of mostly attached epifaunal suspension feeding brachiopods. The overwhelming dominance of this Anisian paleocommunity by one functional group implies that either, 1) resource availability in the community was uneven, and/or 2) strong environmental or niche filtering was in effect. As such, while the Anisian Leidapo Member paleocommunity was deposited in a fairly stable shallow water paleoenvironment, this biotic assemblage would have been very vulnerable to biotic and environmental perturbations. While it is uncertain whether or not this pattern is typical of paleocommunities in the aftermath of the PTME, these results imply that some Anisian paleocommunities may not have been as fully restructured as previously thought, and may have been inherently unstable due to the numerous biotic and environmental changes present in the Triassic.

  2. Petrography and diagenesis of reservoir and non-reservoir sandstones in Shattuck Member of Queen Formation, northwest shelf of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Malicse, A.; Siegel, J.; Mazzullo, J.

    1988-02-01

    The Shattuck Member is a thick (6-20 m) sandstone that defines the top of the Queen Formation (Permian, Guadalupian) and is a major hydrocarbon reservoir on the Northwestern shelf of the Permian basin. The Shattuck was deposited in desert dune and interdune, dry and wet sand sheet, and sandy sabkha environments during a lowstand of sea level. The desert dune, interdune, and dry sand sheet deposits constitute the producing horizons in the Shattuck, whereas the wet sand sheet and sabkha deposits are generally non-productive. The purposes of this study are to examine the petrographic characteristics of the producing and non-producing horizons with petrographic and scanning electron microscopes, and to determine their provenance and diagenetic history.

  3. Deposition and diagenesis of the Brushy Basin and upper Westwater Canyon members of the Morrison Formation in northwest New Mexico and its relationship to uranium mineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, T.E.

    1983-01-01

    Diagenetic facies in the upper Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin Members closely parallel the distribution of lithofacies, just as in the smaller closed basins of late Cenozoic age of western North America. Vitric ash in the sediment has altered to montmorillonite in the fluvial facies. Calcite and montmorillonite are the alteration products where the fluvial and outermost playa facies meet. Vitric ash has altered to clinoptilolite and heulandite along the playa margins. In the center of the playa facies, analcime has replaced clinoptilolite, an early zeolite. Diagenetic zonation of this type is a result of pH and salinity gradients which existed across the basin. These early diagenetic minerals were replaced by albite, quartz, and mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite where the upper Westwater Canyon and Brushy Basin Members have been deeply buried in the San Juan basin. Relatively fresh ground water carrying dissolved organic compounds and uranium mixed with the saline alkaline brine from underlying playa mudstones, result in uranium mineralization of the upper Jurassic Morrison Formation near Laguna New Mexico.

  4. Sedimentology and palaeontology of the Upper Jurassic Puesto Almada Member (Cañadón Asfalto Formation, Fossati sub-basin), Patagonia Argentina: Palaeoenvironmental and climatic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.; Monferran, Mateo D.; Narváez, Paula L.; Volkheimer, Wolfgang; Gallego, Oscar F.; Do Campo, Margarita D.

    2013-10-01

    Six facies associations are described for the Puesto Almada Member at the Cerro Bandera locality (Fossati sub-basin). They correspond to lacustrine, palustrine, and pedogenic deposits (limestones); and subordinated alluvial fan, fluvial, aeolian, and pyroclastic deposits. The lacustrine-palustrine depositional setting consisted of carbonate alkaline shallow lakes surrounded by flooded areas in a low-lying topography. The facies associations constitute four shallowing upward successions defined by local exposure surfaces: 1) a Lacustrine-Palustrine-pedogenic facies association with a 'conchostracan'-ostracod association; 2) a Palustrine facies association representing a wetland subenvironment, and yielding 'conchostracans', body remains of insects, fish scales, ichnofossils, and palynomorphs (cheirolepidiacean species and ferns growing around water bodies, and other gymnosperms in more elevated areas); 3) an Alluvial fan facies association indicating the source of sediment supply; and 4) a Lacustrine facies association representing a second wetland episode, and yielding 'conchostracans', insect ichnofossils, and a palynoflora mainly consisting of planktonic green algae associated with hygrophile elements. The invertebrate fossil assemblage found contains the first record of fossil insect bodies (Insecta-Hemiptera and Coleoptera) for the Cañadón Asfalto Formation. The succession reflects a mainly climatic control over sedimentation. The sedimentary features of the Puesto Almada Member are in accordance with an arid climatic scenario across the Upper Jurassic, and they reflect a strong seasonality with periods of higher humidity represented by wetlands and lacustrine sediments.

  5. K-Ar ages of illite clays of the Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation, Western Phosphate Field, southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, W. Crawford; Ritter, Kristen; Wampler, J.; Grauch, Richard I.; Bauluz, Blanca

    2007-01-01

    The Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale Member of the Phosphoria Formation in the Western Phosphate Field, southeastern Idaho, is composed of carbonaceous mudstone and siltstone with beds of phosphorite and dark bioclastic limestone. An objective of this study has been to understand the timing of diagenetic illite formation in the Meade Peak and whether the Neogene passage of hydrothermal fluids had a significant role in forming diagenetic illite in these shales. Illite-smectite (I-S) is the predominant clay mineral within the shale samples. Smectite, apatite, and kaolinite were also found in some samples. A distinct second generation of diagenetic illite is present as thin, 90% for all samples, and the I-S exhibits a Kalkberg-type stacking order (IISI). The diagenetic conditions inferred from the stacking order and percentage of illite layers in I-S are consistent with published vitrinite reflectance data of the Meade Peak. The K-Ar apparent ages of I-S range from 186 Ma to 292 Ma. A decrease in K-Ar age of I-S with decreasing particle size is observed in clay sub-micron fractions and is consistent with an interpretation that the clay fraction contains a mixture of detrital illite (or I-S) and diagenetic I-S. The measured K-Ar ages of I-S also decrease with increasing stratigraphic distance above the base of the Meade Peak. The K-Ar age of the diagenetic illite rosettes is about 185 Ma. These results indicate that diagenetic illite was formed in the Meade Peak shales during the Jurassic Period, almost certainly in response to progressive burial over a prolonged duration . Additional heating in response to thrust sheet emplacement during the Cretaceous Period may be responsible for the decrease in K-Ar age upward within the member.

  6. A New Centrosaurine Ceratopsid, Machairoceratops cronusi gen et sp. nov., from the Upper Sand Member of the Wahweap Formation (Middle Campanian), Southern Utah

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous (middle-late Campanian) Wahweap Formation of southern Utah contains the oldest diagnostic evidence of ceratopsids (to date, all centrosaurines) in North America, with a number of specimens recovered from throughout a unit that spans between 81 and 77 Ma. Only a single specimen has been formally named, Diabloceratops eatoni, from the lower middle member of the formation. Machairoceratops cronusi gen. et sp. nov., a new centrosaurine ceratopsid from the upper member of the Wahweap Formation, is here described based on cranial material representing a single individual recovered from a calcareous mudstone. The specimen consists of two curved and elongate orbital horncores, a left jugal, a nearly complete, slightly deformed braincase, the left squamosal, and a mostly complete parietal ornamented by posteriorly projected, anterodorsally curved, elongate spikes on either side of a midline embayment. The fan-shaped, stepped-squamosal is diagnostic of Centrosaurinae, however, this element differs from the rectangular squamosal in Diabloceratops. Machairoceratops also differs in the possession of two anterodorsally (rather than laterally) curved epiparietal ornamentations on either side of a midline embayment that are distinguished by a posteromedially-oriented sulcus along the entire length of the epiparietal. Additionally, the parietosquamosal frill is lacking any other epiossifications along its periphery. Machairoceratops shares a triangular (rather than round) frill and spike-like epiparietal loci (p1) ornamentation with the stratigraphically lower Diabloceratops. Both parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses place Machairoceratops as an early-branching centrosaurine. However, the parsimony-based analysis provides little resolution for the position of the new taxon, placing it in an unresolved polytomy with Diabloceratops. The resultant Bayesian topology yielded better resolution, aligning Machairoceratops as the definitive sister taxon to a

  7. A New Centrosaurine Ceratopsid, Machairoceratops cronusi gen et sp. nov., from the Upper Sand Member of the Wahweap Formation (Middle Campanian), Southern Utah.

    PubMed

    Lund, Eric K; O'Connor, Patrick M; Loewen, Mark A; Jinnah, Zubair A

    2016-01-01

    The Upper Cretaceous (middle-late Campanian) Wahweap Formation of southern Utah contains the oldest diagnostic evidence of ceratopsids (to date, all centrosaurines) in North America, with a number of specimens recovered from throughout a unit that spans between 81 and 77 Ma. Only a single specimen has been formally named, Diabloceratops eatoni, from the lower middle member of the formation. Machairoceratops cronusi gen. et sp. nov., a new centrosaurine ceratopsid from the upper member of the Wahweap Formation, is here described based on cranial material representing a single individual recovered from a calcareous mudstone. The specimen consists of two curved and elongate orbital horncores, a left jugal, a nearly complete, slightly deformed braincase, the left squamosal, and a mostly complete parietal ornamented by posteriorly projected, anterodorsally curved, elongate spikes on either side of a midline embayment. The fan-shaped, stepped-squamosal is diagnostic of Centrosaurinae, however, this element differs from the rectangular squamosal in Diabloceratops. Machairoceratops also differs in the possession of two anterodorsally (rather than laterally) curved epiparietal ornamentations on either side of a midline embayment that are distinguished by a posteromedially-oriented sulcus along the entire length of the epiparietal. Additionally, the parietosquamosal frill is lacking any other epiossifications along its periphery. Machairoceratops shares a triangular (rather than round) frill and spike-like epiparietal loci (p1) ornamentation with the stratigraphically lower Diabloceratops. Both parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses place Machairoceratops as an early-branching centrosaurine. However, the parsimony-based analysis provides little resolution for the position of the new taxon, placing it in an unresolved polytomy with Diabloceratops. The resultant Bayesian topology yielded better resolution, aligning Machairoceratops as the definitive sister taxon to a

  8. Early hominid dental remains from Members 4 and 5 of the Sterkfontein Formation (1966-1996 excavations): catalogue, individual associations, morphological descriptions and initial metrical analysis.

    PubMed

    Moggi-Cecchi, Jacopo; Grine, Frederick E; Tobias, Phillip V

    2006-03-01

    The fossils recovered from the Sterkfontein Formation represent, without doubt, the largest collection of early hominid specimens from a single locality. Among the over 600 entries in the catalogue of fossil hominid specimens recovered since 1966, there are 242 dental remains (isolated teeth, jaws with two or more teeth, isolated teeth in association) for a total number of 495 teeth. The aim of this paper is to provide morphological descriptions of all hominid dental specimens recovered between 1968 and 1996 from areas presently known as Members 4 and 5 of the Sterkfontein site. Together with the descriptions, explanatory catalogue information is provided, along with basic measurements and summary statistics. This paper consists of six sections, with descriptive tables: (1) Catalogue of dental remains, arranged numerically. This includes isolated teeth, specimens with teeth still in position within their jaws, and specimens comprised of isolated teeth in association. (2) List of specimens with more complete dentition and the numbers of available teeth per tooth class. (3) List of specimens subdivided in tooth class, with an indication of their preservation, of the wear, if any, and with measurements (mesiodistal and buccolingual diameters) of the individual teeth. (4) List of associations of isolated teeth as individuals i.e. dental remains that can be associated with one another. Some remarks on the relative abundance of maxillary versus mandibular teeth, and on the numbers of available teeth are presented. (5) Morphological descriptions. (6) Summary statistics for the entire Sterkfontein sample (thus including specimens recovered both before and after 1966) and updated descriptive statistics for South African early hominids (A. africanus, A. robustus, South African early Homo). We have compared the coefficients of variation for the MD and BL diameters of the permanent teeth of the Sterkfontein Member 4 hypodigm of A. africanus with the hypodigms of the early

  9. Conjugate fracture pairs in the Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation, Piceance basin, Colorado: Implications for fracture origins and hydrocarbon production/exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    The sandstones of the Molina Member of the Wasatch Formation in the Piceance basin of northwestern Colorado contain a suite of fractures that have a conjugate-pair geometry. The fractures are vertical and intersect at an acute angle of between 20 and 40 degrees. Although direct evidence of shear is rare, the fracture surfaces commonly display small steps. The fracture geometries suggest that the maximum compressive stress during fracturing was in the plane of the acute angle of the conjugate fractures: the steps are interpreted as broken-face manifestations of very low angle en echelon fractures, formed within exceptionally narrow zones of incipient shear. In contrast to the highly anisotropic permeability enhancement created by subparallel vertical extension fractures in the underlying Mesaverde Formation, the conjugate pairs in the Molina sandstones should create a well connected and relatively isotropic mesh of fracture conductivity. Increases in stress magnitudes and anisotropy during production drawdown of reservoir pressures should cause shear offsets along the fractures, initially enhancing permeability.

  10. Characteristics and description of cores from the USGS core hole CRU-1, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation, east-central Uinta Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keighin, C.W.

    1982-01-01

    Oil-yield, lithologic, and mineral distribution data were determined for cores taken from a 497.7-foot drill hole in the upper part of the Parachute Creek Member of the Eocene Green River Formation. The drill hole, 1050 feet FEL, 700 feet FNL, sec. 3, T. 12 S., R. 24 E., Uintah County, Utah, started slightly below the contact between the Uinta Formation, also of Eocene age, and the underlying Green River Formation. It ended 32 feet below the base of the Mahogany bed (the richest oil-shale bed between A groove and B groove--which define the upper and lower boundaries, respectively, of the Mahogany zone). Most of the interval studied is kerogen- or carbonate-rich, commonly tuffaceous, and is very fine grained. Several thin (<3 feet) oil-shale beds which yield as much as 25 gallons of oil per ton occur above the Mahogany zone, but are probably not of economic interest. The cored sequence contains several tuff beds. The thickest of these beds is approximately 2 feet thick; the average thickness is rarely greater than 0.5 feet. Two oil-saturated tuff beds occur approximately 65 feet above the Mahogany oil-shale bed. Although these two tuffs are exposed on nearby surface outcrops, no evidence of oil is seen on outcrop. The Mahogany zone is approximately 69 feet thick at the drill site; the lowermost few feet were not penetrated. At the site cored, the Mahogany zone is overlain by 435 feet of overburden. Fischer assays indicate that 42.3 feet of oil shale within the Mahogany zone could yield at least 25 gallons of oil per ton from beds at least 10 feet thick.

  11. Facies architecture and stratigraphic evolution of aeolian dune and interdune deposits, Permian Caldeirão Member (Santa Brígida Formation), Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Fábio Herbert; Scherer, Claiton Marlon dos Santos; Kuchle, Juliano

    2016-05-01

    The Permian Caldeirão Member (Santa Brígida Formation), located in the Tucano Central Basin, northeast region of Brazil, is characterized by a sandstone succession of aeolian origin that comprises the preserved deposits of dunes and interdunes. Grainflow and translatent wind-ripple strata, and frequent presence of reactivation surface, compose the cross-bedding of crescent aeolian dune deposits. The aeolian cross-strata show a mean dip toward the ENE. In places, interlayered with dune cross-beds, occur interdune units composed of facies indicative of dry, damp and wet condition of the substrate, suggesting spatial and/or temporal variations in the moisture content of the interdune accumulation surface. The presence of NNW current ripple cross-lamination in wet interdune areas indicates streamflows confined to interdune corridors and oriented perpendicular to aeolian transport direction. Lenses of damp and wet interdune strata exhibit mainly interdigitated and transitional relationships with the toe-sets of overlying aeolian dune units in sections parallel to aeolian transport, indicating that dune migration was contemporaneous with accumulation in adjacent interdunes. Lateral variations in the preserved thickness of the interdune units and the associated rare occurrence of abrupt and erosive contacts between interdune and overlying dune sets, suggest temporal variations in the angle of dune and interdune climb that may be related to high-frequency changes in water table position. Four stratigraphic intervals in the Caldeirão Member can be identified, two intervals showing cross-bedding of aeolian dunes without wet interdune areas and two intervals exhibiting aeolian dunes separated by wet interdune areas, marking the transition between dry aeolian systems (Intervals I and III) and wet aeolian systems (Intervals II and IV). The temporal alternations between dry and wet aeolian systems reflect changes in the availability of dry sand and/or the rate in the water

  12. Magnetostratigraphy and Magnetic Mineralogy of the Ludlow Member of the Fort Union Formation (Lower Paleocene) of the Williston Basin in North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peppe, D. J.; Evans, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    A continuous succession of Cretaceous through lowermost Eocene terrestrial sediments contains a nearly complete Paleocene record, in the Little Missouri River Valley of North Dakota, USA. We aim to calibrate the rates of post-Cretaceous ecological recovery from mass extinction, by determining a detailed chronostratigraphy of plant and mammal fossils in the basin. Using the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-T) boundary as the basal datum, we have constructed a ca.300 meter composite section of the Upper Cretaceous Hell Creek Formation and the Lower Paleocene Ludlow Member of the Fort Union Formation. We analyzed paleomagnetic samples from 12 stratigraphic sections using a combined low-AF and thermal demagnetization strategy. Instability of magnetization above 200 °C has been reported in previous studies, which we reproduced when heating in air; however, when the samples were heated in nitrogen the stability field extended to well above 300 °C. The analyzed samples demonstrate a series of geomagnetic reversals that can be correlated from C29n through C27r of the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS). Bulk susceptibility vs. temperature studies on sandstone, siltstone, and carbonaceous shale indicate predominately irreversible curves suggesting titanomaghemite as the magnetic carrier in the Ludlow Member sediments. IRM acquisition in our samples consistently shows non-saturation above 100 mT indicating an additional anti-ferromagnetic component, most likely goethite. The dominant iron oxide in these samples, titanomaghemite, was generated either during weathering of the source terrain during Laramide uplift, or weathered in-situ prior to diagenesis, or during alteration after burial. We infer that the magnetization of the samples is primary because the polarity direction is consistent with that of the Paleocene of North America and the reversal stratigraphy from this section corresponds to the GPTS with reasonable sedimentation rates. Our results imply a temporal restriction

  13. Slope-apron deposition in an ordovician arc-related setting: The Vuelta de Las Tolas Member (Suri Formation), Famatina Basin, northwest Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mangano, M.G.; Buatois, L.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Ordovician Suri Formation is part of the infill of the Famatina Basin of northwest Argentina, which formed in an active setting along the western margin of early Paleozoic Gondwana. The lower part of this formation, the Vuelta de Las Tolas Member, records sedimentation on a slope apron formed in an intra-arc basin situated on a flooded continental arc platform. The coincidence of a thick Arenig-Llanvirn sedimentary succession and volcanic-plutonic arc rocks suggests an extensional or transtensional arc setting, and is consistent with evidence of an extensional regime within the volcanic arc in the northern Puna region. The studied stratigraphic sections consist of volcanic rocks and six sedimentary facies. The facies can be clustered into four facies associations. Association 1, composed of facies A (laminated siltstones and mudstones) and B (massive mudstones and siltstones), is interpreted to have accumulated from silty-muddy high-and low-density turbidity currents and highly fluid, silty debris flows, with subsequent reworking by bottom currents, and to a lesser extent, hemipelagic suspension in an open-slope setting. Facies association 2 is dominated by facies C (current-rippled siltstones) strata. These deposits are interpreted to record overbank sedimentation from fine-grained turbidity currents. Facies E (matrix-supported volcanic breccias) interbedded with andesitic lava units comprises facies association 3. Deposition was contemporaneous with subaqueous volcanic activity, and accumulated from cohesive debris flows in a coarse-grained wedge at the base of slope. Facies association 4 is typified by facies D (vitric fine-grained sandstones and siltstones) and F (channelized and graded volcanic conglomerates and breccias) deposits. These strata commonly display thinning-and fining-upward trends, indicating sedimentation from highly-concentrated volcaniclastic turbidity currents in a channelized system. The general characteristics of these deposits of fresh

  14. Diagenetic Iron Cycling in Ancient Alkaline Saline Lacustrine Sedimentary Rocks: A Case Study on the Jurassic Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter-McIntyre, S. L.; Chan, M. A.; McPherson, B. J. O. L.

    2014-12-01

    The upper part of the Brushy Basin Member in the Four Corners region of the U.S. was deposited in an ephemeral alkaline saline lake system with copious input of volcanic ash. The variegated shale formation provides a setting for the study of early diagenetic iron cycling that records the action of alkaline saline fluid chemistries reacting with volcaniclastic sediments in the presence of microbes. A bull's-eye pattern of authigenic minerals with increasing alteration towards the basinal center similar to modern alkaline saline lakes provides evidence for an extreme paleoenvironmental interpretation. The purpose of this research is to document specific factors, such as reactive sediments, microbial influences, and grain size that affect concretion formation and iron cycling in an ancient extreme environment. Three broad diagenetic facies are interpreted by color and associated bioturbation features: red, green and intermediate. Diagenetic facies reflect meter-scale paleotopography: red facies represent shallow water to subaerial, oxidizing conditions; green facies reflect saturated conditions and reducing pore water chemistry shortly after deposition, and intermediate facies represent a combination of the previous two conditions. Evidence of biotic influence is abundant and trace fossils exhibit patterns associated with the diagenetic facies. Red diagenetic facies typically contain burrows and root traces and green diagenetic facies exhibit restricted biotic diversity typically limited to algal molds (vugs). Microbial fossils are well-preserved and are in close proximity to specific iron mineral textures suggesting biotic influence on the crystal morphology. Three categories of concretions are characterized based on mineralogy: carbonate, iron (oxyhydr)oxide and phosphate concretions. Concretion mineralogy and size vary within an outcrop and even within a stratigraphic horizon such that more than one main category is typically present in an outcrop. Variation in

  15. Fishes and tetrapods in the upper pennsylvanian (kasimovian) cohn coal member of the mattoon formation of illinois, United States: Systematics, paleoecology, and paleoenvironments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, D.; Falcon-Lang, H. J.; Benton, M.J.; Nelson, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A newly discovered vertebrate assemblage is reported from the Upper Pennsylvanian (mid-to upper Kasimovian) Cohn Coal Member of the Mattoon Formation of southeast Illinois, United States. Teeth, scales, and spines of xenacanth (Dicentrodus, Orthacanthus, Triodus, Xenacanthus) and euselachian (Sphenacanthus) sharks dominate the assemblage. Less common are the teeth, scales, and centra of holocephalan (Helodus) and actinopterygian fishes, together with rare tetrapod (mainly pelycosaur) phalanges and centra. The assemblage occurs within a broad, shallow channel incised into a prominent Vertisol. The channel is interpreted as having been cut during a seasonally dry glacial phase when sea level was low, but filled during a subsequent transgression triggered by deglaciation. We interpret this as a brackish water (estuarine) assemblage, based on the co-occurrence of the vertebrate material with spirorbids (putative microconchids) and paleoecological inferences gleaned from a critical analysis of the literature dealing with Pennsylvanian fish ecology. This interpretation is broadly consistent with taphonomic data and the results of 87Sr/86Sr isotope analysis of shark material. The pelycosaur material may have been reworked from the lowstand Vertisol, however, and these animals occupied dryland niches that developed during glacial phases. ?? 2011 SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  16. Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

  17. The Star-formation History and Accretion Disk Fraction Among the Low-Mass Members of the Scorpius-Centaurus OB Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecaut, Mark; Mamajek, E. E.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a long-term observing program to elucidate the membership, star-formation history, and substructure of the nearest OB association (Sco-Cen; d = 100-150 pc; ages 10-20 Myr), we present results from a low-resolution optical spectroscopy survey of 363 G/K/M-type candidates of Sco-Cen selected via X-ray activity, proper-motions, and 2MASS photometry consistent with membership. Using low-resolution spectra over red ( 5700A-6800A) wavelengths obtained using the SMARTS 1.5-m telescope, we measured Li equivalent widths, determined accurate MK spectral classifications and searched for evidence of accretion among these low-mass stars ( 0.6-1.1 Msun). Using Li as a youth indicator, we evaluate membership and place each confirmed member on the H-R diagram. Combining these results with previously published results for the higher- and lower-mass stars, we discuss the substructure, age distribution, and kinematics of the Sco-Cen OB association, as well as the accretion disk fraction amongst young G/K/M-type stars in the 10-20 Myr range. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-1008908.

  18. A REVISED AGE FOR UPPER SCORPIUS AND THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY AMONG THE F-TYPE MEMBERS OF THE SCORPIUS-CENTAURUS OB ASSOCIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pecaut, Mark J.; Mamajek, Eric E.; Bubar, Eric J.

    2012-02-20

    We present an analysis of the ages and star formation history of the F-type stars in the Upper Scorpius (US), Upper Centaurus-Lupus (UCL), and Lower Centaurus-Crux (LCC) subgroups of Scorpius-Centaurus (Sco-Cen), the nearest OB association. Our parent sample is the kinematically selected Hipparcos sample of de Zeeuw et al., restricted to the 138 F-type members. We have obtained classification-resolution optical spectra and have also determined the spectroscopic accretion disk fraction. With Hipparcos and 2MASS photometry, we estimate the reddening and extinction for each star and place the candidate members on a theoretical H-R diagram. For each subgroup we construct empirical isochrones and compare to published evolutionary tracks. We find that (1) our empirical isochrones are consistent with the previously published age-rank of the Sco-Cen subgroups; (2) subgroups LCC and UCL appear to reach the main-sequence turn-on at spectral types {approx}F4 and {approx}F2, respectively. An analysis of the A-type stars shows US reaching the main sequence at about spectral type {approx}A3. (3) The median ages for the pre-main-sequence members of UCL and LCC are 16 Myr and 17 Myr, respectively, in agreement with previous studies, however we find that (4) Upper Sco is much older than previously thought. The luminosities of the F-type stars in US are typically a factor of {approx}2.5 less luminous than predicted for a 5 Myr old population for four sets of evolutionary tracks. We re-examine the evolutionary state and isochronal ages for the B-, A-, and G-type Upper Sco members, as well as the evolved M supergiant Antares, and estimate a revised mean age for Upper Sco of 11 {+-} 1 {+-} 2 Myr (statistical, systematic). Using radial velocities and Hipparcos parallaxes we calculate a lower limit on the kinematic expansion age for Upper Sco of >10.5 Myr (99% confidence). However, the data are statistically consistent with no expansion. We reevaluate the inferred masses for the known

  19. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  20. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-07-30

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond there between. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  1. Provenance of the Tullock member of the Fort Union formation, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: Evidence for early Paleocene Laramide uplift

    SciTech Connect

    Hansley, P.L.; Brown, J.L. )

    1993-01-01

    A petrologic and provenance study of the lower Paleocene Tullock Member of the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin (PRB) indicates that Laramide uplifts to the west and south of the PRB were emergent and shedding detritus by early Paleocene time. This conclusion is based largely on the presence of abundant first-cycle carbonate clasts in the northwestern PRB and metamorphic and igneous clasts and labile heavy-mineral grains in the Tullock throughout the basin. The proximity and composition of the north end of the Bighorn uplift strongly suggest that is was the source for carbonate, igneous, and metamorphic rock fragments in northwestern Tullock outcrops. Lack of conglomeratic material in northwestern outcrops, however, indicates that the Bighorn uplift was not yet well developed and perhaps the Pryor Mountains uplift farther to the west was contributing some detritus. In the southern PRB, abundant labile heavy minerals and igneous rock fragments in the Tullock indicate that other uplifts to the west and south (i.e. Granite Mountains, Washakie, Owl Creek, and Laramie uplifts) had also started to rise by early Paleocene time. Paleocurrent directions show that Tullock streams flowed generally east-northeast across a gently sloping alluvial plain toward the retreating Cannonball sea, suggesting that the Black Hills were not yet emergent and, as a result, the basin had not fully developed. Our conclusions are supported by recent fission-track, palynological, and sedimentological studies that indicate that Laramide-style forland deformation in southwestern Montana began in late Cenomanian to Turonian time and migrated through central Wyoming to the Colorado Front Range by late Maastrichtian time. 37 refs., 8 figs., 3 tab.

  2. Sequence stratigraphy, sedimentary systems and petroleum plays in a low-accommodation basin: Middle to upper members of the Lower Jurassic Sangonghe Formation, Central Junggar Basin, Northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Youliang; Jiang, Shu; Wang, Chunfang

    2015-06-01

    The Lower Jurassic Junggar Basin is a low-accommodation basin in northwestern China. Because of low subsidence rates and a warm, wet climate, deposits of the Central subbasin of the Junggar Basin formed from fluvial, deltaic, shallow lake facies. Sequence stratigraphy and sedimentary systems of the Lower Jurassic members of the Sangonghe Formation (J1s) were evaluated by observing cores, interpreting wireline logs and examining seismic profiles. Two third-order sequences were recognized in the strata. The distribution of the sedimentary systems in the systems tracts shows that tectonic movement, paleorelief, paleoclimate and changes in lake level controlled the architecture of individual sequences. During the development of the lowstand systems tract (LST), the intense structural movement of the basin resulted in a significant fall in the water level in the lake, accompanied by rapid accommodation decrease. Braided rivers and their deltaic systems were also developed in the Central Junggar Basin. Sediments carried by braided rivers were deposited on upward slopes of the paleorelief, and braid-delta fronts were deposited on downward slopes. During the transgressive systems tract (TST), the tectonic movement of the basin was quiescent and the climate was warm and humid. Lake levels rose and accommodation increased quickly, shoal lines moved landward, and shore- to shallow-lake deposits, sublacustrine fans and deep-lake facies were deposited in shallow- to deep-lake environments. During the highstand systems tract (HST), the accommodation no longer increased but sediment supply continued, far exceeding accommodation. HST deposits slowly formed in shallow-lake to meandering river delta-front environments. Relatively low rates of structural subsidence and low accommodation resulted in coarse-grained successions that were fining upward. Deposits were controlled by structural movement and paleorelief within the LST to TST deposits in the Central subbasin. Fine- to medium

  3. Maps showing coal-split boundaries, isopachs of coal splits, coal resources, and coal quality; Mammoth coal bed, Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, Bull Mountain coal field, south-central Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Connor, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    A U.S. Geological Survey Maps are presented showing coal-split boundaries, isopachs of coal splits, coal resources, and coal quality; mammoth coal bed, Paleocene Tongue River Member of the Fort Union Formation, Bull Mountain coal field, south-central Montana.

  4. Supporting members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  5. Virgilian (Upper Pennsylvanian) paleosols in the upper Lawrence Formation (Douglas Group) and in the Snyderville Shale member (Oread Formation, Shawnee Group) of the northern Midcontinent, USA: Pedologic contrasts in a cyclothem sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Joeckel, R.M. . Dept. of Geology)

    1994-10-03

    Paleosols in the upper Lawrence Formation and in the Snyderville Shale Member (Virgilian) extend over an estimated area of over 14,000 km[sup 2] in Nebraska, Iowa, Missouri, and Kansas. These paleosols, both within cyclothems, are: (1) critical indicators of nearly basin wide emergence (peak regression of the Midcontinent seaway) and geomorphic stability, and (2) useful stratigraphic markers. Both paleosols appear to be analogous to modern Vertisols: they have nested, synformal-antiformal sets ([approximately]4--10 m wide) of very large, intersecting slickensides. The upper Lawrence shows a single paleosol across the study area. The paleosol is thickest and best-developed shelfward (northward) and shows topohydrosequence variation at two basinward localities in northeastern Kansas. Stratigraphic trends suggest an appreciable time differential in the south-to-north migration of the toronto transgression. The Snyderville shows two welded paleosols in southeastern Nebraska and a single one elsewhere in the study area. Elsewhere in the Snyderville, there is local evidence for lowstand incision of streams and small lows that underwent little or no subaerial exposure. Snyderville paleogeography and pedogenesis, however, were markedly different from upper Lawrence paleogeography and pedogenesis. Contrasts between the two paleosols are likely to be related to intercycle changes in geomorphic conditions (driven by patterns of sedimentation, eustasy, and tectonics) and climate.

  6. The Formation of Seven-Membered Heterocycles under Mild Pictet-Spengler Conditions: A Route to Pyrazolo[3,4]benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Katte, Timothy A; Reekie, Tristan A; Jorgensen, William T; Kassiou, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Reported is a method for the synthesis of seven-membered heterocycles via a Pictet-Spengler condensation reaction under very mild conditions. High substrate scope allows for use of aldehydes using catalytic amounts of acetic acid yielding 39-90% and ketones using catalytic amounts of trifluoroacetic acid yielding 25-83%. PMID:27159074

  7. Imaging the Ferron Member of the Mancos Shale formation using reprocessed high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data: Emery County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    Late in 1982 and early in 1983, Arco Exploration contracted with Rocky Mountain Geophysical to acquired four high-resolution 2-D multichannel seismic reflection lines in Emery County, Utah. The primary goal in acquiring this data was an attempt to image the Ferron Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale. Design of the high-resolution 2-D seismic reflection data acquisition used both a short geophone group interval and a short sample interval. An explosive energy source was used which provided an input pulse with broad frequency content and higher frequencies than typical non-explosive Vibroseis?? sources. Reflections produced by using this high-frequency energy source when sampled at a short interval are usually able to resolve shallow horizons that are relatively thin compared to those that can be resolved using more typical oil and gas exploration seismic reflection methods.The U.S. Geological Survey-Energy Resources Program, Geophysical Processing Group used the processing sequence originally applied by Arco in 1984 as a guide and experimented with processing steps applied in a different order using slightly different parameters in an effort to improve imaging the Ferron Member horizon. As with the Arco processed data there are sections along all four seismic lines where the data quality cannot be improved upon, and in fact the data quality is so poor that the Ferron horizon cannot be imaged at all.Interpretation of the seismic and core hole data indicates that the Ferron Member in the study area represent a deltaic sequence including delta front, lower delta plain, and upper delta plain environments. Correlating the depositional environments for the Ferron Member as indicated in the core holes with the thickness of Ferron Member suggests the presence of a delta lobe running from the northwest to the southeast through the study area. The presence of a deltaic channel system within the delta lobe complex might prove to be an interesting conventional

  8. Hydrostatic pressure and fluid-density distribution of the Culebra Dolomite member of the Rustler Formation near the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, southeastern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Crawley, M.E.

    1988-05-01

    The primary objectives of the Pressure - Density Survey were to obtain the middle-of-formation pressures, determine well-bore fluid densities, define well-bore fluid density stratification, and to provide, where possible, formation water density values for wells where little or no information on densities exists. The survey collected ground-water pressure and density data during three field testing periods during the years 1986 and 1987. Data were collected from 33 individual wells located in the vicinity of the WIPP Site. 18 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  9. Foraminiferal biofacies in the San José Calcareous Silt Member (Manzanilla Formation, Upper Miocene to Lower Pliocene) in the Manzanilla Bay area, north-east Trinidad, and their environmental significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brent

    2013-10-01

    The Miocene-Pliocene Manzanilla Formation of northern Trinidad marks the arrival of the east-west flowing Orinoco River. Foraminifera were examined quantitatively in samples obtained at ˜5 m intervals from the lowest member of the formation, the San José Calcareous Silt Member, where exposed at eastern Manzanilla Bay and Point Noir. Recovery of Globorotalia merotumida indicates an age within the Globorotalia acostaensis Zone through Globorotalia margaritae evoluta Subzone, (N16-N19). Values of the information function (H) and the percentage of the total assemblage as planktonic foraminifera (%P), both traditionally used as palaeodepth indicators, were uncorrelated. The low values of H are indicative of freshwater influence. Cluster analysis revealed two major biofacies dominated by Pseudononion atlanticum and Hanzawaia carstensi respectively, for which similar values of mean H and mean %P suggest similar, inner to middle neritic palaeodepths, the P. atlanticum Biofacies indicating times of hypoxia. Entrained within these were rarer samples from a biofacies indicative of shallowing and increased freshwater input (Ammonia parkinsonia gr. Biofacies). An Amphistegina gibbosa Biofacies marked an interval in which water because sufficiently clear to support foraminifera symbiotic with algae, while a sample containing only Haplophragmoides wilberti was indicative of intertidal conditions. Some samples containing reddened foraminifera showed that deposition occasionally became very slow, but these were not limited to any one biofacies. The range of palaeodepths in which the San José Calcareous Silt Member was deposited is far less than in the underlying Brasso Formation, indicating that tectonic induction of transgressive-regressive cycles was slighter during San José times.

  10. Preliminary mineralogical characterization of weathered and less-weathered strata of the Meade Peak phosphatic shale member of the Permian Phosphoria Formation: measured sections C and D, Dry Valley, Caribou County, Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knudsen, Andrew C.; Gunter, Mickey E.; Herring, James R.

    2001-01-01

    The Permian Phosphoria Formation of southeastern Idaho is one of the largest phosphate producing deposits in the world. Despite the economic significance of this Formation, the finegrained nature of this phosphorite deposit has discouraged detailed mineralogical characterization and quantification studies. Recently Se and other potentially hazardous trace elements in mine wastes have drawn increased attention to this formation, and motivated more extensive study. Part of this effort has focused on a more detailed geological, including a mineralogical, characterization of the area. Past research identified the major minerals in the Formation, including carbonatefluorapatite, quartz, and dolomite, and a variety of sheet silicates and feldspars. Minor phases such as pyrite and sphalerite have also been identified in the deposit and may be sources of Se. This study used powder X-ray diffraction, with Rietveld quantification software to quantify and characterize the mineralogy of the 83 samples collected from two stratigraphic sections measured by the U.S. Geological Survey at the Dry Valley mine in the Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation. Analyses show extensive variability of carbonate substitution in the fluorapatite structure, determined by measuring the apatite a-cell dimension, as well as patterns of correlation between mineralogy and the stratigraphy.

  11. A Member of the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE Family of ATP Binding Cassette Transporters Is Required for the Formation of a Functional Cuticle in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Bessire, Michael; Borel, Sandra; Fabre, Guillaume; Carraça, Luis; Efremova, Nadia; Yephremov, Alexander; Cao, Yan; Jetter, Reinhard; Jacquat, Anne-Claude; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Nawrath, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    Although the multilayered structure of the plant cuticle was discovered many years ago, the molecular basis of its formation and the functional relevance of the layers are not understood. Here, we present the permeable cuticle1 (pec1) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, which displays features associated with a highly permeable cuticle in several organs. In pec1 flowers, typical cutin monomers, such as ω-hydroxylated fatty acids and 10,16-dihydroxypalmitate, are reduced to 40% of wild-type levels and are accompanied by the appearance of lipidic inclusions within the epidermal cell. The cuticular layer of the cell wall, rather than the cuticle proper, is structurally altered in pec1 petals. Therefore, a significant role for the formation of the diffusion barrier in petals can be attributed to this layer. Thus, pec1 defines a new class of mutants. The phenotypes of the pec1 mutant are caused by the knockout of ATP BINDING CASSETTEG32 (ABCG32), an ABC transporter from the PLEIOTROPIC DRUG RESISTANCE family that is localized at the plasma membrane of epidermal cells in a polar manner toward the surface of the organs. Our results suggest that ABCG32 is involved in the formation of the cuticular layer of the cell wall, most likely by exporting particular cutin precursors from the epidermal cell. PMID:21628525

  12. The PCH family member MAYP/PSTPIP2 directly regulates F-actin bundling and enhances filopodia formation and motility in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chitu, Violeta; Pixley, Fiona J; Macaluso, Frank; Larson, Daniel R; Condeelis, John; Yeung, Yee-Guide; Stanley, E Richard

    2005-06-01

    Macrophage actin-associated tyrosine phosphorylated protein (MAYP) belongs to the Pombe Cdc15 homology (PCH) family of proteins involved in the regulation of actin-based functions including cell adhesion and motility. In mouse macrophages, MAYP is tyrosine phosphorylated after activation of the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF-1R), which also induces actin reorganization, membrane ruffling, cell spreading, polarization, and migration. Because MAYP associates with F-actin, we investigated the function of MAYP in regulating actin organization in macrophages. Overexpression of MAYP decreased CSF-1-induced membrane ruffling and increased filopodia formation, motility and CSF-1-mediated chemotaxis. The opposite phenotype was observed with reduced expression of MAYP, indicating that MAYP is a negative regulator of CSF-1-induced membrane ruffling and positively regulates formation of filopodia and directional migration. Overexpression of MAYP led to a reduction in total macrophage F-actin content but was associated with increased actin bundling. Consistent with this, purified MAYP bundled F-actin and regulated its turnover in vitro. In addition, MAYP colocalized with cortical and filopodial F-actin in vivo. Because filopodia are postulated to increase directional motility by acting as environmental sensors, the MAYP-stimulated increase in directional movement may be at least partly explained by enhancement of filopodia formation. PMID:15788569

  13. A new method for recovering paleoporosity of sandstone: case study of middle Es3 member of Paleogene formation in Niuzhuang Sag, Dongying Depression, Bohai Bay Basin in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mingjie; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Biao; Sun, Xiaoming; Guo, Jigang

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new method for recovering paleoporosity of sandstone reservoirs and quantitatively defines the evolution process of porosity. This method is based on the principle that the present is the key to the past. We take the middle Es3 member in Niuzhuang Sag, Dongying Depression, and Bohai Bay Basin as an example. The method used in this study considers the present porosity as a constraint condition, and the influences of both constructive diagenesis and destructive diagenesis to divide the porosity evolution process into two independent processes, namely porosity increase and porosity decrease. An evolution model of sandstone porosity can be established by combining both the pore increase and pore decrease effects. Our study reveals that the porosity decrease model is a continuous function of burial depth and burial time, whereas the porosity increase model mainly occurs in an acidified window for paleotemperature of 70°C to 90°C. The porosity evolution process can be divided into the following phases: normal compaction, acidification and pore increase, and post-acidification compaction. Thus, the porosity evolution model becomes a piecewise function of three subsections. Examples show that the method can be applied effectively in recovering the paleoporosity of sandstone reservoirs and simulating the porosity evolution process.

  14. CotM of Bacillus subtilis, a member of the alpha-crystallin family of stress proteins, is induced during development and participates in spore outer coat formation.

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, A O; Beall, B W; Moran, C P

    1997-01-01

    We cloned and characterized a gene, cotM, that resides in the 173 degrees region of the Bacillus subtilis chromosome and is involved in spore outer coat assembly. We found that expression of the cotM gene is induced during development under sigma K control and is negatively regulated by the GerE transcription factor. Disruption of the cotM gene resulted in spores with an abnormal pattern of coat proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the outer coat in cotM mutant spores had lost its multilayered type of organization, presenting a diffuse appearance. In particular, significant amounts of material were absent from the outer coat layers, which in some areas had a lamellar structure more typical of the inner coat. Occasionally, a pattern of closely spaced ridges protruding from its surface was observed. No deficiency associated with the inner coat or any other spore structure was found. CotM is related to the alpha-crystallin family of low-molecular-weight heat shock proteins, members of which can be substrates for transglutaminase-mediated protein cross-linking. CotM was not detected among the extractable spore coat proteins. These observations are consistent with a model according to which CotM is part of a cross-linked insoluble skeleton that surrounds the spore, serves as a matrix for the assembly of additional outer coat material, and confers structural stability to the final structure. PMID:9068633

  15. New Potassium-Argon Ages for Georgiaites and the Upper Eocene Dry Branch Formation (Twiggs Clay Member): Inferences About Tektite Stratigraphic Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albin, E. F.; Wampler, J. M.

    1996-03-01

    The tektites of east-central Georgia, called "georgiaites," are a subset of the larger North American tektite strewn field. Previous studies have reported the potassium-argon age of Georgia tektites at 32.0 Ma, 33.7 Ma, and 34.0 Ma, respectively. Glass et al., using the 40Ar-39Ar method, obtained a 34.5 Ma age for a single Muong Nong type georgiaite. Corrected fission track ages given by Storzer et al. have a range between 1.0 and 35.8 Ma with the lower dates accounted for by post-depositional thermal alteration. However, isotopic dating of North American microtektites from Barbados suggests that the strewn field was produced at 35.4 (+/- 0.6) Ma. In addition to the lack of consistently reliable age data for Georgia tektites, their stratigraphic occurrence has yet to be satisfactorily resolved. Although the North American strewn field was deposited in the late Eocene, georgiaites have been found only on formations ranging in age from Oligocene to Pleistocene so are thought to have been transported from their original site of deposition. In this investigation we present new potassium-argon ages for the Georgia tektites and an upper Eocene formation in an effort to resolve tektite stratigraphic location in coastal main deposits of east-central Georgia.

  16. Systematic analysis of O-methyltransferase gene family and identification of potential members involved in the formation of O-methylated flavonoids in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Luo, Yan; Wu, Hongkun; Xi, Wanpeng; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Qiuyun; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2016-01-10

    The O-methylation of various secondary metabolites is mainly catalyzed by S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferase (OMT) proteins that are encoded by the O-methyltransferase gene family. Citrus fruits are a rich source of O-methylated flavonoids that have a broad spectrum of biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, anticarcinogenic, and antiatherogenic properties. However, little is known about this gene family and its members that are involved in the O-methylation of flavonoids and their regulation in Citrus. In this study, 58 OMT genes were identified from the entire Citrus sinensis genome and compared with those from 3 other representative dicot plants. A comprehensive analysis was performed, including functional/substrate predictions, identification of chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, and conserved motifs. Distribution mapping revealed that the 58 OMT genes were unevenly distributed on the 9 citrus chromosomes. Phylogenetic analysis of 164 OMT proteins from C.sinensis, Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, and Vitis vinifera showed that these proteins were categorized into group I (COMT subfamily) and group II (CCoAOMT subfamily), which were further divided into 10 and 2 subgroups, respectively. Finally, digital gene expression and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that citrus OMT genes had distinct temporal and spatial expression patterns in different tissues and developmental stages. Interestingly, 18 and 11 of the 27 genes predicted to be involved in O-methylation of flavonoids had higher expression in the peel and pulp during fruit development, respectively. The citrus OMT gene family identified in this study might help in the selection of appropriate candidate genes and facilitate functional studies in Citrus. PMID:26407870

  17. Hyperresistance to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide cytotoxicity and reduced DNA damage formation in dermal fibroblast strains derived from five members of a cancer-prone family.

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, R.; Sabour, M.; Rauth, A. M.; Paterson, M. C.

    1993-01-01

    Dermal fibroblasts cultured from members of a family presenting multiple polyps and sarcomas were compared with fibroblast strains from unrelated healthy donors for sensitivity to killing by four genotoxic agents. Cells from the sister of the male proband (strain 3437T), mother (strain 3703T), two of his paternal aunts (3701T and 3704T) and one paternal uncle (3702T) displayed marked resistance (1.8 to 4.3 times greater than the normal mean) to 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO), a procarcinogen whose DNA-damaging properties encompass those of both far (254 nm) ultraviolet (UV) light and ionising radiation. These same 4NQO-resistant cells, however, responded normally to reproductive inactivation by UV light, 60Co gamma radiation or the alkylating agent methylnitrosourea, signifying that the abnormal resistance of these cells to 4NQO is not associated with aberrant DNA metabolism. In keeping with this conclusion, exposure to a given dose of 4NQO produced decreased amounts of DNA damage and stimulated lower levels of repair DNA synthesis in all five 4NQO-resistant strains than in normal controls. Moreover, exogenous radiolabelled 4NQO accumulated to a lesser extent in the 4NQO-resistant than in the normal fibroblasts. Cell sonicates of strains 3437T, 3701T and 3702T exhibited reduced capacities (40-60% of normal) to catalise the conversion of 4NQO to the proximate carcinogen 4-hydroxyaminoquinoline 1-oxide. However, the 4NQO-resistant strains 3703T and 3704T carried out 4NQO bioreduction at normal rates. Our data therefore indicate that enhanced resistance to 4NQO cytotoxicity in 3437T, 3701T and 3702T is a consequence of anomalies in both intracellular accumulation and enzymatic reduction of 4NQO, whereas 4NQO resistance in 3703T and 3704T appears to result solely from reduced intracellular drug accumulation. PMID:8217598

  18. Taphonomy and depositional environment of a Lower Cretaceous monospecific dinosaur bone assemblage (Puesto Quiroga Member, Lohan Cura Formation), Neuquén Province, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, Alberto Carlos; Salgado, Leonardo

    2015-08-01

    The Puesto Díaz Quarry (Lohan Cura Formation, Lower Cretaceous of Neuquén Basin, Argentina) consists of a monospecific dinosaur bone assemblage that includes 126 specimens from, at least, three individuals of the rebbachisaurid sauropod Comahuesaurus windhauseni. The bonebed was originated as a debris flow of an ephemeral-river bed, in distal areas of low relief. Bones are disarticulated, three-dimensionally distributed through the host facies, showing a normal grading arrangement, which can be correlated with the size, shape and hydraulic behavior inferred for each specimen. Taphonomic evidence suggests that the bones did not experience a prolonged transport, and that these were quickly buried by the debris flow event. The fact that there are more than one individual of the same species suggests a mass mortality by a catastrophic event. Scattered skeletal elements would indicate that the corpses must have been subaerially exposed, long enough to allow disarticulation by scavenging, decay, and defleshing.

  19. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  20. The structure of the deacetylase domain of Escherichia coli PgaB, an enzyme required for biofilm formation: a circularly permuted member of the carbohydrate esterase 4 family.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Takashi; Noguchi, Hiroki; Yoshida, Hisashi; Park, Sam Yong; Tame, Jeremy R H

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is an extremely widespread phenomenon involving the secretion of a protective exopolysaccharide matrix which helps the bacteria to attach to surfaces and to overcome a variety of stresses in different environments. This matrix may also include proteins, lipids, DNA and metal ions. Its composition depends on the bacterial species and growth conditions, but one of the most widely found components is polymeric β-1,6-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA). Several studies have suggested that PGA is an essential component of biofilm and it is produced by numerous bacteria, including Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Yersinia pestis, Bordetella spp. and Actinobacillus spp. In E. coli, PGA production and export are dependent on four genes that form a single operon, pgaABCD, which appears to have been transferred between various species. Biofilms themselves are recognized as environments in which such horizontal gene transfer may occur. The pga operon of E. coli, which is even found in innocuous laboratory strains, is highly homologous to that from the plague bacterium Yersinia pestis, and biofilm is believed to play an important role in the transmission of Yersinia. The crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of PgaB, which has deacetylase activity, is described and compared with models of other deacetylases. PMID:23275162

  1. 3-D sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Janok P. Bhattacharya; George A. McMechan

    2007-02-16

    This project examined the internal architecture of delta front sandstones at two locations within the Turonian-age Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in Wyoming. The project involved traditional outcrop field work integrated with core-data, and 2D and 3D ground penetrating radar (GPR) imaging from behind the outcrops. The fluid-flow engineering work, handled through a collaborative grant given to PI Chris White at LSU, focused on effects on fluid flow of late-stage calcite cement nodules in 3D. In addition to the extensive field component, the work funded 2 PhD students (Gani and Lee) and resulted in publication of 10 technical papers, 17 abstracts, and 4 internal field guides. PI Bhattacharya also funded an additional 3 PhD students that worked on the Wall Creek sandstone funded separately through an industrial consortium, two of whom graduated in the fall 2006 ((Sadeque and Vakarelov). These additional funds provided significant leverage to expand the work to include a regional stratigraphic synthesis of the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation, in addition to the reservoir-scale studies that DOE directly funded. Awards given to PI Bhattacharya included the prestigious AAPG Distinguished Lecture Award, which involved a tour of about 25 Universities and Geological Societies in the US and Canada in the fall of 2005 and Spring of 2006. Bhattacharya gave two talks, one entitled “Applying Deltaic and Shallow Marine Outcrop Analogs to the Subsurface”, which highlighted the DOE sponsored work and the other titled “Martian River Deltas and the Origin of Life”. The outcrop analog talk was given at about 1/2 of the venues visited.

  2. Plio-Pleistocene facies environments from the KBS Member, Koobi Fora Formation: implications for climate controls on the development of lake-margin hominin habitats in the northeast Turkana Basin (northwest Kenya).

    PubMed

    Lepre, Christopher J; Quinn, Rhonda L; Joordens, Josephine C A; Swisher, Carl C; Feibel, Craig S

    2007-11-01

    Climate change is hypothesized as a cause of major events of Plio-Pleistocene East African hominin evolution, but the vertically discontinuous and laterally confined nature of the relevant geological records has led to difficulties with assessing probable links between the two. High-resolution sedimentary sequences from lacustrine settings can provide comprehensive data of environmental changes and detailed correlations with well-established orbital and marine records of climate. Hominin-bearing deposits from Koobi Fora Ridge localities in the northeast Turkana Basin of Kenya are an archive of Plio-Pleistocene lake-margin sedimentation though significant developmental junctures of northern African climates, East African environments, and hominin evolution. This study examines alluvial channel and floodplain, nearshore lacustrine, and offshore lacustrine facies environments for the approximately 136-m-thick KBS Member (Koobi Fora Formation) exposed at the Koobi Fora Ridge. Aspects of the facies environments record information on the changing hydrosedimentary dynamics of the lake margin and give insights into potential climatic controls. Seasonal/yearly climate changes are represented by the varve-like laminations in offshore mudstones and the slickensides, dish-shaped fractures, and other paleosol features overprinted on floodplain strata. Vertical shifts between facies environments, however, are interpreted to indicate lake-level fluctuations deriving from longer-term, dry-wet periods in monsoonal rainfall. Recurrence periods for the inferred lake-level changes range from about 10,000 to 50,000 years, and several are consistent with the average estimated timescales of orbital precession ( approximately 20,000 years) and obliquity ( approximately 40,000 years). KBS Member facies environments from the Koobi Fora Ridge document the development of lake-margin hominin habitats in the northeast Turkana Basin. Environmental changes in these habitats may be a result of

  3. The archaeal COG1901/DUF358 SPOUT-methyltransferase members, together with pseudouridine synthase Pus10, catalyze the formation of 1-methylpseudouridine at position 54 of tRNA.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Kunal; Blaby, Ian K; Thiaville, Patrick C; Majumder, Mrinmoyee; Grosjean, Henri; Yuan, Y Adam; Gupta, Ramesh; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2012-03-01

    The methylation of pseudouridine (Ψ) at position 54 of tRNA, producing m(1)Ψ, is a hallmark of many archaeal species, but the specific methylase involved in the formation of this modification had yet to be characterized. A comparative genomics analysis had previously identified COG1901 (DUF358), part of the SPOUT superfamily, as a candidate for this missing methylase family. To test this prediction, the COG1901 encoding gene, HVO_1989, was deleted from the Haloferax volcanii genome. Analyses of modified base contents indicated that while m(1)Ψ was present in tRNA extracted from the wild-type strain, it was absent from tRNA extracted from the mutant strain. Expression of the gene encoding COG1901 from Halobacterium sp. NRC-1, VNG1980C, complemented the m(1)Ψ minus phenotype of the ΔHVO_1989 strain. This in vivo validation was extended with in vitro tests. Using the COG1901 recombinant enzyme from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (Mj1640), purified enzyme Pus10 from M. jannaschii and full-size tRNA transcripts or TΨ-arm (17-mer) fragments as substrates, the sequential pathway of m(1)Ψ54 formation in Archaea was reconstituted. The methylation reaction is AdoMet dependent. The efficiency of the methylase reaction depended on the identity of the residue at position 55 of the TΨ-loop. The presence of Ψ55 allowed the efficient conversion of Ψ54 to m(1)Ψ54, whereas in the presence of C55, the reaction was rather inefficient and no methylation reaction occurred if a purine was present at this position. These results led to renaming the Archaeal COG1901 members as TrmY proteins. PMID:22274953

  4. Traces in the dark: sedimentary processes and facies gradients in the upper shale member of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Egenhoff, Sven O.; Fishman, Neil S.

    2013-01-01

    Black, organic-rich rocks of the upper shale member of the Upper Devonian–Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, a world-class petroleum source rock in the Williston Basin of the United States and Canada, contain a diverse suite of mudstone lithofacies that were deposited in distinct facies belts. The succession consists of three discrete facies associations (FAs). These comprise: 1) siliceous mudstones; 2) quartz- and carbonate-bearing, laminated mudstones; and 3) macrofossil-debris-bearing massive mudstones. These FAs were deposited in three facies belts that reflect proximal to distal relationships in this mudstone system. The macrofossil-debris-bearing massive mudstones (FA 3) occur in the proximal facies belt and contain erosion surfaces, some with overlying conodont and phosphate–lithoclast lag deposits, mudstones with abundant millimeter-scale siltstone laminae showing irregular lateral thickness changes, and shell debris. In the medial facies belt, quartz- and carbonate-bearing, laminated mudstones dominate, exhibiting sub-millimeter-thick siltstone layers with variable lateral thicknesses and localized mudstone ripples. In the distal siliceous mudstone facies belt, radiolarites, radiolarian-bearing mudstones, and quartz- and carbonate-bearing, laminated mudstones dominate. Overall, total organic carbon (TOC) contents range between about 3 and 10 wt %, with a general proximal to distal decrease in TOC content. Abundant evidence of bioturbation exists in all FAs, and the lithological and TOC variations are paralleled by changes in burrowing style and trace-fossil abundance. While two horizontal traces and two types of fecal strings are recognized in the proximal facies belt, only a single horizontal trace fossil and one type of fecal string characterize mudstones in the distal facies belt. Radiolarites intercalated into the most distal mudstones are devoid of traces and fecal strings. Bedload transport processes, likely caused by storm-induced turbidity

  5. Collapsable seal member

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  6. Collapsable seal member

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrell, D.L.

    1983-12-08

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  7. AGU lost members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mail to the following members has been returned, and we are unable to locate forwarding addresses. If you have information on any of them, please contact AGU by mail or call toll free at 800-424-2488.

  8. Intensifying the Group Member's Experience Using the Group Log.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valine, Warren J.

    1983-01-01

    Presents the use of a group log in which members analyze the content and process of each session using a suggested format. The log promotes dialogue between the leader and each group member and involves members more fully in the group process. Feedback indicates the log is valuable. (JAC)

  9. 3D Sedimentological and geophysical studies of clastic reservoir analogs: Facies architecture, reservoir properties, and flow behavior within delta front facies elements of the Cretaceous Wall Creek Member, Frontier Formation, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher D. White

    2009-12-21

    rock types (\\Eg sandstones and mudstones) and the variation of transport properties (\\Eg permeability and porosity) within bodies of a particular rock type. Both basin-wide processes such as sea-level change and the autocyclicity of deltaic processes commonly cause deltaic reservoirs to have large variability in rock properties; in particular, alternations between mudstones and sandstones may form baffles and trends in rock body permeability can influence productivity and recovery efficiency. In addition, diagenetic processes such as compaction, dissolution, and cementation can alter the spatial pattern of flow properties. A better understanding of these properties, and improved methods to model the properties and their effects, will allow improved reservoir development planning and increased recovery of oil and gas from deltaic reservoirs. Surface exposures of ancient deltaic rocks provide a high resolution, low uncertainty view of subsurface variability. Patterns and insights gleaned from these exposures can be used to model analogous reservoirs, for which data is much sparser. This approach is particularly attractive when reservoir formations are exposed at the surface. The Frontier Formation in central Wyoming provides an opportunity for high resolution characterization. The same rocks exposed in the vicinity of the Tisdale anticline are productive in nearby oil fields, including Salt Creek. Many kilometers of good-quality exposure are accessible, and the common bedding-plane exposures allow use of shallow-penetration, high-resolution electromagnetic methods known as ground-penetrating radar. This study combined geologic interpretations, maps, vertical sections, core data, and ground-penetrating radar to construct high-resolution geostatistical and flow models for the Wall Creek Member of the Frontier Formation. Stratal-conforming grids were use to reproduce the progradational and aggradational geometries observed in outcrop and radar data. A new, Bayesian method

  10. Stress in service members.

    PubMed

    Lande, R Gregory

    2014-12-01

    Military service differs from civilian jobs in the stressors that service members experience, including frequent deployments (eg, to an area of combat operations), obedience, regimentation, subordination of self to the group, integrity, and flexibility. The military culture emphasizes teamwork and peer support. In some cases, service members cannot adapt to military life, become overwhelmed by stress, or cannot overcome a traumatic experience. Clinicians should conduct a thorough evaluation guided by an understanding of the military culture. Every effort should be made to identify the stress and the maladaptive response and provide early clinical interventions to prevent progression. PMID:25455065

  11. Mistakes Board Members Make.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Nicholas D., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Board members should avoid 10 common errors: losing patience, behaving badly, challenging the board after a vote, acting like inspectors, micromanaging school administrators, springing surprise questions at meetings, putting politics before children, representing special interests, violating executive session, and putting the board before family…

  12. New for member subscribers in 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    All member subscribers to AGU print journals can now view articles from 1997 through 1999 in PDF format. Over the next two weeks, 1994 through 1996 also will be online. Going forward, concurrent with mailing of the print issue, it will be published online.

  13. Policymaking: A Challenge for School Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Ellen, Ed.

    This booklet consists of seven articles intended to introduce new school board members in Texas to the formation and implementation of educational policy, with particular emphasis on the legal requirements governing policy-making and other school board activities. The articles include the following: "Policy Development: An Overview," by Richard L.…

  14. NACA Member Legislative Reference Guide, 2001. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Tracey L.

    Calling for action on a wide range of children's issues, this guide of the National Association of Child Advocates (NACA) delineates the state legislative agendas of 41 of its members from 33 states. The reference guide is presented in three sections. Section 1 contains the legislative priorities by topic area in a chart format indicating the…

  15. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  16. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Thank you! Over the past 20 months AGU has received a record 22,159 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from four federal agencies (NASA, NOAA, EPA, and USGS). Together their generosity has benefited AGU non-revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000+) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($250-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$249). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are recognized as our most loyal Supporters.

  17. AGU members win Fulbrights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six AGU members have been awarded Fulbright grants to lecture or conduct research abroad during the current (1985-1986) academic year, according to the Council for International Exchange of Scholars, which helps to administer the Fulbright Scholar Program.James R. Barcus, a professor of physics at the University of Denver, is lecturing and doing research in thunderstorm coupling in global electricity at Catholic University in Lima, Peru, from January through June 1986.

  18. [Comment on] BOSP members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  19. Cryogenic support member

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.; Nicol, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is comprised of a non-metallic rod having a depression in at least one end and a metallic end connection assembled to the rod. The metallic end connection comprises a metallic plug which conforms to the shape and is disposed in the depression and a metallic sleeve is disposed over the rod and plug. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod to form a connection good in compression, tension and bending.

  20. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein participating in hemocyte nodule formation in the silkworm Bombyx mori is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with two different tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, N; Imamura, M; Kadotani, T; Yaoi, K; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-25

    We recently isolated and characterized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, BmLBP, from the larval hemolymph of the silkworm Bombyx mori. BmLBP is a pattern recognition molecule that recognizes the lipid A portion of LPS and participates in a cellular defense reaction. This paper describes the cDNA cloning of BmLBP. The deduced amino acid sequence of BmLBP revealed that BmLBP is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with a unique structural feature that consists of two different carbohydrate-recognition domains in tandem, a short and a long form. PMID:9989592

  1. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  2. Preliminary lithostratigraphic correlation study in OAPEC member countries

    SciTech Connect

    Lababidi, M.M.; Hamdan, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    This book examines a study correlating rock units in the Middle Eastern and North African member countries, based on direct information from the members. It comprises Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic correlation charts for each region and a lexicon giving the definition, age, lithology, and equivalents of each formation.

  3. School Board Members' Training Needs: A Determinative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, J. Rex; Johnson, M. Claradine

    Although school board members are not always viewed as part of a school's administrative team, their role in policy formation and in other aspects of school administration requires attention to their competency levels. This research examined training needs for school board members, superintendents, and principals. The present report covers Kansas…

  4. Increasing the Brønsted acidity of Ph2PO2H by the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3. Formation of an eight-membered boraphosphinate ring [Ph2POB(C6F5)2O]2.

    PubMed

    Kather, Ralf; Rychagova, Elena; Sanz Camacho, Paula; Ashbrook, Sharon E; Woollins, J Derek; Robben, Lars; Lork, Enno; Ketkov, Sergey; Beckmann, Jens

    2016-09-21

    Autoprotolysis of the metastable acid (C6F5)3BOPPh2OH, prepared in situ by the reaction of the rather weak Brønsted acid Ph2PO2H with the strong Lewis acid B(C6F5)3, gave rise to the formation of the eight-membered ring [Ph2POB(C6F5)2O]2 and C6F5H. The conjugate base was isolated as stable sodium crown ether salt [Na(15-crown-5)][Ph2PO2B(C6F5)3]. PMID:27538254

  5. RUPTURED POLLEN GRAIN1, a Member of the MtN3/saliva Gene Family, Is Crucial for Exine Pattern Formation and Cell Integrity of Microspores in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yue-Feng; Huang, Xue-Yong; Zhu, Jun; Gao, Ju-Fang; Zhang, Hong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2008-01-01

    During microsporogenesis, the microsporocyte (or microspore) plasma membrane plays multiple roles in pollen wall development, including callose secretion, primexine deposition, and exine pattern determination. However, plasma membrane proteins that participate in these processes are still not well known. Here, we report that a new gene, RUPTURED POLLEN GRAIN1 (RPG1), encodes a plasma membrane protein and is required for exine pattern formation of microspores in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The rpg1 mutant exhibits severely reduced male fertility with an otherwise normal phenotype, which is largely due to the postmeiotic abortion of microspores. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed that exine pattern formation in the mutant is impaired, as sporopollenin is randomly deposited on the pollen surface. Transmission electron microscopy examination further revealed that the primexine formation of mutant microspores is aberrant at the tetrad stage, which leads to defective sporopollenin deposition on microspores and the locule wall. In addition, microspore rupture and cytoplasmic leakage were evident in the rpg1 mutant, which indicates impaired cell integrity of the mutant microspores. RPG1 encodes an MtN3/saliva family protein that is integral to the plasma membrane. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that RPG1 is strongly expressed in microsporocyte (or microspores) and tapetum during male meiosis. The possible role of RPG1 in microsporogenesis is discussed. PMID:18434608

  6. Taphonomy and paleoecology of nonmarine mollusca: indicators of alluvial plain lacustrine sedimentation, upper part of the Tongue River Member, Fort Union Formation ( Paleocene), Northern Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana ( USA).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanley, J.H.; Flores, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The composition, species abundances, and spatial and temporal distributions of mollusc assemblages were controlled by the environments in which they lived and the depositional processes that affected the molluscs after death and before final burial. Post-mortem transport, reworking and concentration of shells, and mixing of faunal elements from discrete habitats produced a taphonomic 'overprint' on assemblage characteristics that directly reflects the processes of alluvial plain and floodbasin lacustrine sedimentation. The 'overprint' can be interpreted from outcrop analysis of molluscan biofabric, which consists of: 1) orientation, fragmentation, size-sorting, abrasion, density, and dispersion of shells, 2) the nature and extent of shell-infilling, and 3) ratio of articulated to disarticulated bivalves. Taphonomic characteristics were used with sedimentological properties to differentiate in-place, reworked, transported, and ecologically mixed mollusc assemblages. This study also defines the paleoecology of habitat preferences of mollusc species as a basis for recognition of the environments in which these assemblages were deposited: 1) large floodbasin lakes, 2) small floodbasin lakes, and 3) crevasse deltas and splays. Integration of sedimentology and paleoecology provides an interdisciplinary approach to the interpretation of alluvial environments through time in the Tongue River Member. -Authors

  7. Cytochrome P450 family member CYP704B2 catalyzes the {omega}-hydroxylation of fatty acids and is required for anther cutin biosynthesis and pollen exine formation in rice.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Pinot, Franck; Sauveplane, Vincent; Werck-Reichhart, Danièle; Diehl, Patrik; Schreiber, Lukas; Franke, Rochus; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Liang; Gao, Yawei; Liang, Wanqi; Zhang, Dabing

    2010-01-01

    The anther cuticle and microspore exine act as protective barriers for the male gametophyte and pollen grain, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying the biosynthesis of the monomers of which they are composed. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male sterile mutant, cyp704B2, which exhibits a swollen sporophytic tapetal layer, aborted pollen grains without detectable exine, and undeveloped anther cuticle. In addition, chemical composition analysis indicated that cutin monomers were hardly detectable in the cyp704B2 anthers. These defects are caused by a mutation in a cytochrome P450 family gene, CYP704B2. The CYP704B2 transcript is specifically detected in the tapetum and the microspore from stage 8 of anther development to stage 10. Heterologous expression of CYP704B2 in yeast demonstrated that CYP704B2 catalyzes the production of omega -hydroxylated fatty acids with 16 and 18 carbon chains. Our results provide insights into the biosynthesis of the two biopolymers sporopollenin and cutin. Specifically, our study indicates that the omega -hydroxylation pathway of fatty acids relying on this ancient CYP704B family, conserved from moss to angiosperms, is essential for the formation of both cuticle and exine during plant male reproductive and spore development. PMID:20086189

  8. Study of nsLTPs in Lotus japonicus genome reveal a specific epidermal cell member (LjLTP10) regulated by drought stress in aerial organs with a putative role in cutin formation.

    PubMed

    Tapia, G; Morales-Quintana, L; Parra, C; Berbel, A; Alcorta, M

    2013-07-01

    The cuticle is the first defense against pathogens and the second way water is lost in plants. Hydrophobic layers covering aerial plant organs from primary stages of development form cuticle, including major classes of aliphatic wax components and cutin. Extensive research has been conducted to understand cuticle formation mechanisms in plants. However, many questions remain unresolved in the transport of lipid components to form cuticle. Database studies of the Lotus japonicus genome have revealed the presence of 24 sequences classified as putative non-specific lipid transfer proteins (nsLTPs), which were classified in seven groups; four groups were selected because of their expression in aerial organs. LjLTP8 forms a cluster with DIR1 in Arabidopsis thaliana while LjLTP6, LjLTP9, and LjLTP10 were grouped as type I LTPs. In silico studies showed a high level of structural conservation, and substrate affinity studies revealed palmitoyl-CoA as the most likely ligand for these LTPs, although the Lyso-Myristoyl Phosphatidyl Choline, Lyso-myristoyl phosphatidyl glycerol, and Lyso-stearyl phosphatidyl choline ligands also showed a high affinity with the proteins. The LjLTP6 and LjLTP10 genes were expressed in both the stems and the leaves under normal conditions and were highly induced during drought stress. LjLTP10 was the most induced gene in shoots during drought. The gene was only expressed in the epidermal cells of stems, primordial leaves, and young leaflets. LjLTP10 was positively regulated by MeJA but repressed by abscisic acid (ABA), ethylene, and H2O2, while LjLTP6 was weakly induced by MeJA, repressed by H2O2, and not affected by ABA and ethylene. We suggest that LjLTP10 is involved in plant development of stem and leaf cuticle, but also in acclimation to tolerate drought stress in L. japonicus. PMID:23733601

  9. Latch ring for connecting tubular member

    SciTech Connect

    Milberger, L.J.

    1991-06-04

    This patent describes a device for releasably locking an inner member well bore of a tubular outer member, comprising a combination of a grooved inner member profile formed on the exterior of the inner member; a grooved outer member profile formed in the bore of the outer member; a split ring carried by the inner member the ring having a grooved outer profile on its exterior mates with the outer member profile; and the inner member being axially movable.

  10. Life Expectancy of Kibbutz Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Uri; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations.…

  11. Administrative Support for Board Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the need of administrative support for board members. An effective board services office can help a lot in attracting and retaining community leaders. Board members need administrative support to help them manage events, records, communications, scheduling, correspondence and constituent service. In small to…

  12. Personality characteristics of Wikipedia members.

    PubMed

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair; Lamdan, Naama; Madiel, Rinat; Hayat, Tsahi

    2008-12-01

    Wikipedia is an online, free access, volunteer-contributed encyclopedia. This article focuses on the Wikipedians' (Wikipedia users) personality characteristics, studying Wikipedians' conceptions of Real-Me and BFI dimensions. To survey these aspects, we posted links to two online web questionnaires; one was targeted at Wikipedians and the second to non-Wikipedia users. One hundred and thirty-nine subjects participated in the study, of which 69 were active Wikipedia members. It was found that Wikipedia members locate their real me on the Internet more frequently as compared to non-Wikipedia members. Variance analysis revealed significant differences between Wikipedia members and non-Wikipedia members in agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness, which were lower for the Wikipedia members. An interaction was found between Wikipedia membership and gender: introverted women were more likely to be Wikipedia members as compared with extroverted women. The results of this study are discussed with special emphasis on the understanding of the motivators of Wikipedia members. PMID:18954273

  13. AGU members elected to Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six AGU members are among the sixty new members and fifteen foreign associates elected on April 27 to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.AGU members elected were AGU Past-President G. Brent Dalrymple of USGS, Menlo Park, Calif.; Donald J . DePaolo, University of California, Berkeley; Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Carnegie Institution, Washington, D.C.; Mario J . Molina, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; and Alexandra Navrotsky, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. Elected as foreign associates were Nikolai V. Sobolev, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, and Friedrich H. Busse, University of Bayreuth, Germany.

  14. Become an AGU Supporting Member

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You can extend your commitment to the continuing vitality .of geophysics by helping AGU to build funds that will provide for new initiatives and assist in funding some of the nonrevenue programs of AGU, such as the congressional science fellowship, minority student scholarships, and student travel grants. The AGU Development Committee is seeking gifts and contributions toward building the endowment of the Union: The vitality of AGU and the vitality of geophysics march hand in hand.Four categories of supporting membership are offered by the Union: Individual Supporting Member ($80 per year), Life Supporting Member ($1500), Sustaining Member ($5000), Benefactor ($10,000). Benefactors, Sustaining, and Life Supporting Members pay no further dues.

  15. AGU Members Visit Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Von Holle, Kate

    2007-06-01

    More than 200 scientists and engineers from around the United States convened in Washington, D.C., on 1-2 May 2007 to participate in the annual Science Engineering and Technology (SET) Congressional Visits Day (CVD). The AGU Office of Public Affairs frequently helps to arrange for members' visits to their congressional delegations, but CVD is a unique event during which AGU members can team up with a larger group of scientists and engineers to promote federal funding of scientific research.

  16. 17 CFR 190.09 - Member property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Member property. 190.09... Member property. (a) Member property. “Member property” means, in connection with a clearing organization bankruptcy, the property which may be used to pay that portion of the net equity claim of a member which...

  17. Member Takes Action Against Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertholf, Deedrick

    1999-01-01

    An ASBO member and chair of New York's School Emergency Response to Violent Events (SERVE) explains how this program tackles violence and teen suicide. SERVE teaches the basic principles of hostage situations, uses a confidential reporting system, and advocates safety audits and risk-reduction strategies. (MLH)

  18. Kentucky Hispanic School Board Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballestero, Victor; Wright, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The study was designed to provide information on Kentucky Hispanic school board members. The data was obtained from Kentucky school superintendents or their designees in the 174 public school districts through a survey mailed in the spring, 2009. The survey was mailed to Kentucky Superintendents on March 12, 2009. The follow-up survey was mailed…

  19. Staff Members as Lifelong Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Joanne V.

    Based on the assumption that all community college staff members should be lifelong learners, this paper outlines the purposes and principles underlying a quality staff development program and enumerates the elements, activities, incentives, and other considerations that are necessary for the program to be successful. First, the purposes of staff…

  20. Idiopathic hypersomnia in an aircrew member.

    PubMed

    Withers, B G; Loube, D I; Husak, J P

    1999-08-01

    In aviation, it is essential that all aircrew members remain alert and contribute, by their observations and actions, to flight safety. Especially in helicopter operations, crewmembers riding in the rear of the aircraft play an integral role in many aspects of flight, such as take-offs, landings, turns, formation flights, hazard avoidance, situational awareness, military operations, and crew coordination. We present the case of a helicopter crew chief with idiopathic hypersomnia, briefly review the disorder, and give the recent U.S. military aviation experience with sleep disorders. Flight surgeons and aeromedical examiners should be active in considering and diagnosing sleep-related disorders as the aviator or crewmember may not be aware of the disease or may not volunteer the history. A directed history is important in making the diagnosis, as are reports from family and other aircrew members. Referral to a sleep specialist is required in performing objective sleep studies, establishing the diagnosis, recommending treatment, and providing a prognosis. Many sleep disorders are treatable and aeromedically waiverable. PMID:10447054

  1. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  2. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  3. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  4. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  5. 29 CFR 401.15 - Member or member in good standing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Member or member in good standing. 401.15 Section 401.15...-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.15 Member or member in good standing. Member or member in good standing, when used in reference to a labor organization, includes any...

  6. 7 CFR 1205.328 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.328 Alternate members. An alternate member of the... member from the same cotton-producing state or region to serve in such member's place and stead of...

  7. 7 CFR 1205.328 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.328 Alternate members. An alternate member of the... member from the same cotton-producing state or region to serve in such member's place and stead of...

  8. 7 CFR 1205.328 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COTTON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION Cotton Research and Promotion Order Cotton Board § 1205.328 Alternate members. An alternate member of the... member from the same cotton-producing state or region to serve in such member's place and stead of...

  9. 7 CFR 946.23 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... such member's absence. In the event of the death, removal, resignation, or disqualification of a member... the event that both a member and his or her alternate are unable to attend a Committee meeting, the... alternate of the same classification (handler or producer) to serve in such member's place and stead....

  10. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  11. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  12. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  13. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  14. 7 CFR 1400.208 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 1400.208 Section 1400.208 Agriculture... SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS Payment Eligibility § 1400.208 Family members. (a) Notwithstanding... persons, a majority of whom are family members, an adult family member who makes a...

  15. Device for inserting tubular members together

    SciTech Connect

    Milberger, L.J.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a well, a lower tubular member with a sealing surface located in the well, an upper tubular member which inserts into engagement with the lower tubular member during running in, the upper and lower tubular members being exposed to well fluid pressure, an improved means for sliding the upper tubular member into engagement with the lower tubular member. It comprises the upper tubular member having a first side and a second side, the second side having a sealing section which mates with the sealing surface of the lower tubular sidewall; axially spaced apart seal means located on the running tool sidewall for sealingly engaging the first side of the upper tubular member above and below the sealing section during running in, for defining a low pressure area between the running tool and the first side which is isolated from the well fluid pressure; the sealing section of the upper tubular member being exposed to well fluid pressure during running in, resulting in a pressure difference across the upper tubular member between the first side of the tubular member and the sealing section, means for eliminating the pressure difference across the upper tubular member between the first side and the sealing section after the upper tubular member has reached its engaged position with the lower tubular member, allowing the sealing section to move radially into engagement with the sealing surface. This patent also describes a method for sliding an upper tubular member into engagement with a sealing surface of a lower tubular member in a well having well fluid pressure, comprising in combination: providing the upper tubular member with a first side and a second side and providing the second side with a sealing section for mating with the sealing surface of the lower tubular member.

  16. How minority members' perceptions of majority members' acculturation preferences shape minority members' own acculturation preferences: evidence from Chile.

    PubMed

    Zagefka, Hanna; González, Roberto; Brown, Rupert

    2011-06-01

    Two survey studies were conducted in Chile with members of the indigenous minority group Mapuche (Ns = 566; 394). The aim was to find predictors of minority members' acculturation preferences, especially integration. It was hypothesized that minority members' preferences would depend on their perceptions of what majority members want. Specifically, it was predicted that a perception that majority members want minority members to maintain their original culture would be associated with a greater desire for culture maintenance among minority participants. Further, it was predicted that a perception that majority members want intergroup contact would be associated with a greater desire for contact among minority participants. Finally, it was predicted that a perception that majority members are in favour of both culture maintenance and contact (i.e., integration) would be associated with more support for integration among minority participants. Results bore out these predictions. Theoretical and policy implications are discussed. PMID:21545455

  17. 20 CFR 653.104 - Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Services to MSFW family members, farm labor... Farmworkers (MSFWs) § 653.104 Services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors, and crew members. (a... for services to MSFW family members, farm labor contractors and crew members. Except as provided...

  18. Graphene Layer Growth: Collision of Migrating Five-MemberRings

    SciTech Connect

    Whitesides, Russell; Kollias, Alexander C.; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

    2005-12-02

    A reaction pathway is explored in which two cyclopenta groups combine on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. The process is initiated by H addition to a five-membered ring, followed by opening of that ring and the formation of a six-membered ring adjacent to another five-membered ring. The elementary steps of the migration pathway are analyzed using density functional theory to examine the region of the potential energy surface associated with the pathway. The calculations are performed on a substrate modeled by the zigzag edge of tetracene. Based on the obtained energetics, the dynamics of the system are analyzed by solving the energy transfer master equations. The results indicate energetic and reaction-rate similarity between the cyclopenta combination and migration reactions. Also examined in the present study are desorption rates of migrating cyclopenta rings which are found to be comparable to cyclopenta ring migration.

  19. New low-mass member candidates of Taurus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perger, M.; Lodieu, N.; Martín, E. L.; Barrado, D.

    A widely used tool to characterise the formation of stars is the initial mass function (IMF). It has been suggested that it departs significantly from the universal form in Taurus. To bring them into agreement, about 330 new low-mass members need to be identified. We aim to find those objects in an area located 5 deg to the north of the main clouds. We analysed the already known Taurus members and found in our UKIDSS GCS-based data sample 253 objects showing similar characteristics. 43 of those new member candidates were observed spectroscopically. 11 of them show strong signs for membership to the region. Since we observed only 17% of our selection, we would expect up to 65 objects in our hunting ground. Those numbers indicate a possible unknown population of Taurus away from the main clouds. The answer to whether the IMF of Taurus is different might be located in its off-cloud parts.

  20. 7 CFR 930.28 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MICHIGAN, NEW YORK, PENNSYLVANIA, OREGON, UTAH, WASHINGTON, AND WISCONSIN Order Regulating Handling Administrative Body § 930.28 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of...

  1. 7 CFR 1208.44 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROCESSED RASPBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Processed Raspberry Council § 1208.44 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Council, during...

  2. 7 CFR 1208.44 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROCESSED RASPBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Processed Raspberry Council § 1208.44 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Council, during...

  3. Chapter VIII: New Members and Deceased Members at the General Assemby

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montmerle, Thierry

    2015-08-01

    The following lists give the names of the 1008 new Individual Members admitted at the XVIIIth General Assembly, ordered by National Member. New National Members are indicated by an asterisk (Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea).

  4. High-level ab initio predictions for the ionization energies and heats of formation of five-membered-ring molecules: thiophene, furan, pyrrole, 1,3-cyclopentadiene, and borole, C4H4X/C4H4X+ (X = S, O, NH, CH2, and BH).

    PubMed

    Lo, Po-Kam; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2011-02-10

    The ionization energies (IEs) and heats of formation (ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298)) for thiophene (C(4)H(4)S), furan (C(4)H(4)O), pyrrole (C(4)H(4)NH), 1,3-cyclopentadiene (C(4)H(4)CH(2)), and borole (C(4)H(4)BH) have been calculated by the wave function-based ab initio CCSD(T)/CBS approach, which involves the approximation to the complete basis set (CBS) limit at the coupled-cluster level with single and double excitations plus a quasi-perturbative triple excitation [CCSD(T)]. Where appropriate, the zero-point vibrational energy correction (ZPVE), the core-valence electronic correction (CV), and the scalar relativistic effect (SR) are included in these calculations. The respective CCSD(T)/CBS predictions for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2), being 8.888, 8.897, 8.222, and 8.582 eV, are in excellent agreement with the experimental values obtained from previous photoelectron and photoion measurements. The ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) values for the aforementioned molecules and their corresponding cations have also been predicted by the CCSD(T)/CBS method, and the results are compared with the available experimental data. The comparisons between the CCSD(T)/CBS predictions and the experimental values for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2) suggest that the CCSD(T)/CBS procedure is capable of predicting reliable IE values for five-membered-ring molecules with an uncertainty of ±13 meV. In view of the excellent agreements between the CCSD(T)/CBS predictions and the experimental values for C(4)H(4)S, C(4)H(4)O, C(4)H(4)NH, and C(4)H(4)CH(2), the similar CCSD(T)/CBS IE and ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) predictions for C(4)H(4)BH, whose thermochemical data are not readily available due to its reactive nature, should constitute a reliable data set. The CCSD(T)/CBS IE(C(4)H(4)BH) value is 8.868 eV, and ΔH°(f0)/ΔH°(f298) values for C(4)H(4)BH and C(4)H(4)BH(+) are 269.5/258.6 and 1125.1/1114.6 kJ/mol, respectively. The highest occupied molecular orbitals

  5. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary...

  6. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary...

  7. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary...

  8. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary...

  9. 7 CFR 1216.45 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order National Peanut Board § 1216.45 Alternate members. An alternate member of the Board, during the absence of the member for the primary...

  10. 7 CFR 906.27 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the event both a member and his alternate are unable to attend a committee meeting, the committee members present may designate another alternate of the same classification (handler or producer, and to the extent practical, independent, or co-op) to serve in such member's place and stead. In the...

  11. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  12. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  13. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  14. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  15. 7 CFR 795.4 - Family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Family members. 795.4 Section 795.4 Agriculture... PROVISIONS COMMON TO MORE THAN ONE PROGRAM PAYMENT LIMITATION General § 795.4 Family members. Effective for... was a “person” solely on the basis that: (a) A family member cosigns for, or makes a loan to,...

  16. 78 FR 69093 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Performance Review Board Members AGENCY... Health and Human Services (HHS) is publishing the names of the Performance Review Board Members who are... of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members...

  17. International Focus: Highlighting APPA Members Worldwide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glazner, Steve, Comp.

    2011-01-01

    While most APPA member institutions are located in the United States and Canada, there are also 45 of member institutions located internationally--from Australia and New Zealand to Southeast Asia to the Middle East to Europe. This article focuses on four of its international members: (1) American University of Kuwait (AUK); (2) American University…

  18. Understanding the roles of NHS trust board members.

    PubMed

    Deffenbaugh, J

    1996-01-01

    The establishment of NHS trust boards on a business format was a recent innovation resulting from the NHS reforms. In order to realize benefits for patients, it is essential that boards operate effectively. Explores within the framework of corporate governance, the practical implications of board member roles. Drawing on experience of strategy formulation at board level, analyses and clarifies the roles, and presents recommendations to increase board effectiveness. PMID:10162758

  19. Preserving performance of concrete members under seismic loading conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn M.; Unzicker, Jacob

    1998-06-01

    Normal reinforced concrete lacks the ability to directly respond to the formation of cracking within its own cross section during dynamic loading. A way to introduce this ability is to apply self-healing concepts in the design of reinforced concrete members. Such members could then 'intelligently' react in the event of damaging forces -- by deriving the means of repair from within themselves. Self- healing involves the timed release of adhesive into the member at the time of cracking. Chemically inert encapsulations are filled with adhesive and cast within the cross section of the member. At the onset of cracking, the wall fractures, allowing adhesive to exit and penetrate the developing crack. With this method, adhesives with different characteristics could be applied to different areas of a monolithic, reinforced concrete structural system, in order to accomplish specific results. For example, high strength adhesive could be used in areas where increased stiffness was desired, and more flexible adhesive could be potentially be used to improve energy dissipation or damping. The method would be most appropriate for highly indeterminate structures, where moment redistribution between members tends to 'refocus' stress temporarily. This gives the adhesive time to repair the cracked section and improve local capacity against further damage.

  20. SEALING MEANS FOR RELATIVELY ROTATABLE MEMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Skarstrom, C.S.

    1960-10-25

    A sealing means is offered for maintaining a seal between a pair of relatively rotatable members, panticularly between a rotating shaft and a stationary member surrounding the shaft. The sealing is accomplished by means of a flange extending outward radially on each of a plurality of sealing rings mounted on the rotating member which fit into annular grooves in the stationary member and are held in sealing relation therewith by means of spring rings. In addition, means are provided for passing a sealing gas through the seal sunfaces to prevent accumulation of lubricant and for scavenging any gas which may have leaked from the internal member into the seal area.

  1. 12 CFR 701.21 - Loans to members and lines of credit to members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Loans to members and lines of credit to members. 701.21 Section 701.21 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION OF FEDERAL CREDIT UNIONS § 701.21 Loans to members and lines of credit to members. (a) Statement of...

  2. 2004 NAI-ADP Deep Diamond Drill Cores: Transects Through Archean Time in the Pilbara Craton, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buick, R.; Dunlop, J. S.; Bonser, L. C.

    2004-12-01

    In July-August 2004, the NASA Astrobiology Drilling Program sponsored the coring of 3 deep diamond-drill holes in the Pilbara Craton of northwest Australia. The holes targeted the lowest grade and least deformed sedimentary sections of 4 stratigraphic units: the 2.4-2.6 Ga Hamersley Group, the 2.7 Ga Tumbiana Formation of the Fortescue Group, the 3.4 Ga Warrawoona Group, and the 3.5 Ga Coonterunah Group. ABDP 8 cored the unconformity between the Warrawoona and Coonterunah Groups to a depth of 330 metres, intersecting it at 155 metres. Because of syn-depositional erosion, the Strelley Pool Chert was attenuated and the alteration zone beneath the unconformity was scoured and filled to a depth of 10 metres by quartz arenite. As a result, no definitive lithological determination on its status as a potential paleosol could be made. Secondary oxidative alteration was present in Coonterunah cherts to depths of at least 220 metres down-hole. ABDP 9 cored 984 metres of the lower Hamersley Group, from the Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation into the Paraburdoo Member of the Wittenoom Formation. Though the hole was intended to penetrate the uppermost Fortescue Group, drilling was terminated early because of equipment damage by fractured rock, loss of water circulation clogging the hole with cuttings and unanticipated thickening of the Paraburdoo Member by dilational fracturing, expansive brecciation and cavity formation. 79 samples for organic geochemical analysis of biomarker syngenesis were collected under clean conditions immediately the core surfaced. A horizon of impact spherules was intersected in the Bee Gorge Member of the Wittenoom Formation; unlike surface exposures, it was markedly silicified and chloritized in drill-core. ABDP 10 cored 210 metres of the Tumbiana Formation, intersecting the entire Meentheena Carbonate Member, the upper Mingah Tuff Member and terminating just below 4 scoriaceous basalt flows. Large and complex calcareous stromatolites

  3. Quantum oblivious set-member decision protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Zhang, Shun

    2015-08-01

    We present and define a privacy-preserving problem called the oblivious set-member decision problem, which allows a server to decide whether a private secret of a user is a member of his private set in an oblivious manner. Namely, if the secret belongs to his private set, he does not know which member it is. We propose a quantum solution to the oblivious set-member decision problem. Compared to classical solutions, the proposed quantum protocol achieves an exponential reduction in communication complexity, since it only needs O (1 ) communication cost.

  4. A code of professional conduct for members.

    PubMed

    2006-09-01

    In light of new legislation and changing practice, together with the impending legal status of members who practise clinical photography and/or clinical videography, the Institute of Medical Illustrators (IMI) has revised and brought together A Code of Responsible Practice and its Code of Conduct. The new document, A Code of Professional Conduct for Members, details the standards required to maintain professional practice. Within the text, the Code refers to members, and where specifically appropriate, to clinical photographers. The title, 'clinical photographer', is used where the code applies to members practising clinical photography and/or videography. PMID:17162339

  5. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Raisin Administrative Committee § 989.33 Alternate members....

  6. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Raisin Administrative Committee § 989.33 Alternate members....

  7. 7 CFR 989.33 - Alternate members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RAISINS PRODUCED FROM GRAPES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Raisin Administrative Committee § 989.33 Alternate members....

  8. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business....

  9. 33 CFR 5.25 - Honorary members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Honorary members. 5.25 Section 5.25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.25 Honorary members. For conspicuous service to or active interest in the Auxiliary,...

  10. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  11. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  12. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  13. Methods of Assessment for Affected Family Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orford, Jim; Templeton, Lorna; Velleman, Richard; Copello, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The article begins by making the point that a good assessment of the needs and circumstances of family members is important if previous neglect of affected family members is to be reversed. The methods we have used in research studies are then described. They include a lengthy semi-structured interview covering seven topic areas and standard…

  14. Board Members' Views on Training and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Liz; Inglis, Sue

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 22 agency directors and 219 volunteer board members showed that 40% of members received 1-5 hours of training in the last 6 months, 47% none. Training needs included board roles and responsibilities, strategic planning, understanding the agency, and fundraising. Preferred methods were facilitated workshop/retreat or board-led training…

  15. State School Board Members and Educational Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sroufe, Gerald E.

    1970-01-01

    Research evidence suggests that changes in selection criteria for State board members would increase their effectiveness, more so than changes in either the selection criteria for school board members or in the relationship between the chief school officer and the State board. (Author/LR)

  16. Teacher Quality: The Perspectives of NCTE Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley-Marling, Curt; Abt-Perkins, Dawn; Sato, Kyoko; Selfe, Richard (Dickie)

    2006-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study examining the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) members' perceptions of what is required to become and to remain a highly-qualified teacher of the English language arts. An online survey was conducted to ten NCTE members: five teachers, and five university-based teacher educators. Findings…

  17. Educational Faculty Members' Perceptions on Multicultural Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Günay, Rafet; Aslan, Dolgun

    2016-01-01

    This purpose of this study is to determine how the perceptions of teaching personnel members were conceptualized through use of metaphorical images with regard to the multicultural teacher. In this study, a phenomenological design, a type of qualitative research design was used. A total of 323 teaching personnel members employed at 71 educational…

  18. Getting Good Board Members and Holding Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Nick

    Although serving on a school board is frequently a thankless and difficult task, good board members must be recruited, since the elected school board is a cornerstone of our representative form of government and is a central element of local control. A recent increase in board member turnover is assignable to the large amount of time it takes to…

  19. 12 CFR 267.3 - Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Members. 267.3 Section 267.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM RULES OF ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURE OF THE CONSUMER ADVISORY COUNCIL § 267.3 Members. (a) The Council shall consist of...

  20. 12 CFR 267.3 - Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Members. 267.3 Section 267.3 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) RULES OF ORGANIZATION AND PROCEDURE OF THE CONSUMER ADVISORY COUNCIL § 267.3 Members. (a) The Council shall consist...

  1. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business....

  2. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business....

  3. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business....

  4. 7 CFR 1425.14 - Member business.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Member business. 1425.14 Section 1425.14 Agriculture... business. (a) At least 50 percent of a crop of an authorized commodity acquired by, or delivered to, a CMA... not be considered in determining the volume of member or nonmember business....

  5. 77 FR 61755 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Performance Review Board Members Title 5 U.S.C. 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members be published in the Federal Register. The following persons may be named to serve on the Performance...

  6. 77 FR 71873 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-04

    ... AFFAIRS Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: Corporate Senior Executive Management Office, Department... are required to publish a notice in the Federal Register of the appointment of ] Performance Review Board (PRB) members. This notice announces the appointment of persons to serve on the Performance...

  7. 75 FR 60126 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Performance Review Board Members Title 5, U.S.C. Section 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members... Review Boards or Panels, which oversee the evaluation of performance appraisals of Senior...

  8. 78 FR 69097 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Performance Review Board Members Title 5, U.S.C. Section 4314(c)(4) of the Civil Service Reform Act of 1978, Public Law 95-454, requires that the appointment of Performance Review Board Members... Review Boards or Panels, which oversee the evaluation of performance appraisals of Senior...

  9. 75 FR 72872 - Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... AFFAIRS Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Register of the appointment of Performance Review Board (PRB) members. This notice updates the VA Performance Review Board of the Department of Veterans Affairs that was published in the Federal Register...

  10. Ruminations of a Former School Board Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    The author describes his initial introduction to school board service. The historical context in which the author became a school board member is described as a means of highlighting the challenges that he faced as a new board member as well as the challenges that public education faced in the early and mid 1980s in a southern state. Stories and…

  11. 43 CFR 1784.3 - Member service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Member service. 1784.3 Section 1784.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL MANAGEMENT (1000) COOPERATIVE RELATIONS Advisory Committees § 1784.3 Member service. (a) Appointments to...

  12. Communication Handbook for School Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowson, Joseph P.

    This booklet is aimed at helping school board members better understand the public relations process and build stronger support for public education. The public expects board of education members to be responsible, energetic communicators who are genuinely responsive to issues raised by the public. The author advocates identifying the various…

  13. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  14. 18 CFR 701.55 - Associate Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Associate Members. 701.55 Section 701.55 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.55 Associate Members. (a) The Chairman, with concurrence of...

  15. School Board Member Recruitment in Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cistone, Peter J.

    Employing a process model of political recruitment, this study investigated the relative impact of a school district's social, economic, and political structure on school board member recruitment. The process data were collected by means of structured interviews with neophyte school board members in a stratified sample of school boards in the…

  16. Managing Non-Productive University Faculty Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, John; Muir, Walter

    1994-01-01

    Examines how chairpersons of physical education departments in North American universities identify and manage their marginal faculty members, in the context of an exploratory model suggested by O'Reilly and Wietz (1980). Up to 15% of faculty members are perceived as being nonproductive or marginal, but very few are ever dismissed. Proposes some…

  17. Hispanic Faculty Members in Texas Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Anthony; Joyner, Sheila; Slate, John

    2010-01-01

    The extent to which Hispanic faculty members employed at all Texas community colleges had changed from 2000 to 2008 is examined. Both the number and percentage of Hispanic faculty members employed full-time at Texas community colleges had increased from 2000 to the 2008 school year. Though a statistically significant increase was present, the…

  18. Composition and method of stimulating subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.; Walker, M.L.; Ford, G.F.

    1987-07-14

    This patent describes a method of treating a subterranean formation containing iron comprising contacting a subterranean formation with an aqueous fluid containing a compound consisting essentially of at least one member selected from the group consisting of: dihydroxymaleic acid, salts of dihydroxymaleic acid, glucono-deltalactone present in an amount sufficient to prevent the precipitation of ferric iron during contact with the subterranean formation.

  19. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) receiving the second highest number of votes shall be the alternate member nominee(s). In case of a tie vote... representing handler volume shall be the alternate member nominee. In case of a tie vote, the nominee shall...

  20. How Not to Be a Terrible School Board Member: Lessons for School Administrators and Board Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Veteran school board member, Richard E. Mayer, takes a humorous but substantive approach to the serious relationship between school administrators and board members. While the overwhelming majority of school board members have good motives, even people who mean well can make bad moves. This book shows how to prevent good intentions from creating…

  1. 7 CFR 932.130 - Public member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... alternate public member. (3) A majority vote is required in Committee actions concerning the nomination of... requirements and nomination procedures. 932.130 Section 932.130 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... member and alternate public member eligibility requirements and nomination procedures. (a)...

  2. Active-member control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, J. L.; Blackwood, G. H.; Chu, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure. These experiments are directed toward the development of high performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction program at JPL. Order of magnitude reductions in dynamic response are achieved with relatively simple control techniques. The practical implementation of high stiffness, high bandwidth active-members in a precision structure highlights specific issues of importance relating to the modelling and implementation of active-member control.

  3. Two member subdivision of the Bima Sandstone, Upper Benue Trough, Nigeria: Based on sedimentological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tukur, A.; Samaila, N. K.; Grimes, S. T.; Kariya, I. I.; Chaanda, M. S.

    2015-04-01

    The Early Cretaceous Bima Sandstone is a continental succession in the Upper Benue Trough, Nigeria formally divided into the Lower, Middle and Upper Bima Members. Sedimentological data presented here indicates a two member model (Lower and Upper Members) is more appropriate for the formation. The boundary separating the two proposed members is exposed at the Bollere River, Bima Hill, Wuyo II, and Kaltungo Fault sections. The lithological differences between the two members are perhaps to a large extent a reflection of the sediments sources. The Lower Bima Sandstone Member was deposited in aggradational braided alluvial systems and contains well preserved overbank fines, avulsive and crevasse splay sandstones, and channel deposits. Pedogenic carbonates are also common features of these alluvial deposits in the Bima Hill. The Kaltungo Fault section exposes sediments of brief lacustrine setting within the Lower Bima Sandstone Member. The Upper Bima Sandstone Member was deposited in fully matured braided river with well-developed accommodation space in both shallow and deep fluvial channels. Sedimentation in this braided river was mostly on braid bars and with scarce channels. Preliminary δ13CTOC data along the Bollere River lithosection shows lack of any significant carbon isotope excursion suggesting climate, especially changes in aridity was not a major contributor in differences between the two members of the Bima Sandstone.

  4. A Pan-STARRS-1 Search for Substellar Young Moving Group Members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Kimberly Mei; Liu, Michael C.

    2015-08-01

    Young moving groups (YMGs) provide a valuable evolutionary link between ongoing star formation in molecular clouds (~1 Myr) and old field stars (>1 Gyr). Previous searches for YMG members based on optical surveys such as Hipparcos and the Palomar Sky Survey were insensitive to the lowest mass members (<0.5 MSun). However, recent surveys have begun to reveal the low-mass stellar and substellar members. These substellar YMG members are valuable benchmarks to empirically define brown dwarf evolution with age and to study the lowest mass end of the initial mass function. We have combined Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) proper motions with optical—IR photometry from PS1, 2MASS and WISE to perform a systematic search for substellar members down to ~30 MJup. PS1 is a unique resource because of its large area coverage (30,000 degrees2) and its far-red sensitivity. Also, PS1 provides high quality multi-epoch astrometry essential for distinguishing candidate YMG members from old field stars. We have spectroscopically confirmed the youth of several candidate substellar members of the AB Dor Moving Group. These new candidate members bridge the gap between the known low-mass stellar and planetary-mass members and provide valuable insight into the spectral characteristics and evolution of young brown dwarfs.

  5. Strip antenna figure errors due to support truss member length imperfections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greschik, Gyula; Mikular, Martin M.; Helms, Richard G.; Freeland, Robert E.

    2004-01-01

    The dependence of strip antenna steadyy state geometric errors on member length uncertainties in the supporting truss beam is studied with the Monte carlo analysis of a representative truss design. The results, presented in a format streamlined for practical use, can guide the specification for hardware fabrication of required error tolerances (for structural properties as well as member lengths), or they can aid the prediction of antenna performance if component statistics are available.

  6. Elastomeric member for energy storage device

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.; Chute, Richard

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16), disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, transition end sections, and is attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). During manufacture, woven wire mesh sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle. Each sleeve (26, 28) contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween.

  7. What Motivates Member Donations to the Union?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, James A.; Grove, Timothy L.

    2008-04-01

    In the fall of 2007, the AGU Development Board commissioned the development staff to survey the approximately 1200 AGU supporting members to learn why these members give $100 to AGU each year- many give much more-to fund activities in education, public affairs, public information, the sections, and the focus groups. (A recent list of supporting members was published in Eos, 88(49), 544-545, 2007.) With supporting membership having more than doubled since 2003, the development staff and the Development Board wanted to find out more about the individual motivations underlying this trend. We also were trying to identify new incentives for members to support the Union's special projects and programs.

  8. New Crew Members Arrive at Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Expedition 28 crew expanded to six members with the arrival of Flight Engineers Mike Fossum, Sergei Volkov and Satoshi Furukawa. The new trio docked to the International Space Station in the So...

  9. 12 CFR 267.3 - Members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... persons to fill vacancies on the Council. (b) Resignation. Any member may resign at any time by giving notice to the Board. Any such resignation shall take effect upon its acceptance by the Board....

  10. Apparatus for fabricating composite ceramic members

    DOEpatents

    Roy, P.; Simpson, J.L.; Aitken, E.A.

    1975-10-28

    Methods and apparatus for fabrication of composite ceramic members having particular application for measuring oxygen activities in liquid sodium are described. The method involves the simultaneous deposition of ThO$sub 2$: 15 percent Y$sub 2$O$sub 3$ on a sintered stabilized zirconia member by decomposition of gaseous ThCl$sub 4$ and YCl$sub 3$ and by reacting with oxygen gas. Means are provided for establishing an electrical potential gradient across the zirconia member whereby oxygen ions, from a source on one side of the member portion to be coated, are migrated to the opposite side where a reaction and said decomposition and deposition are effected.