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Sample records for membrane components localize

  1. Actomyosin dynamics drive local membrane component organization in an in vitro active composite layer.

    PubMed

    Köster, Darius Vasco; Husain, Kabir; Iljazi, Elda; Bhat, Abrar; Bieling, Peter; Mullins, R Dyche; Rao, Madan; Mayor, Satyajit

    2016-03-22

    The surface of a living cell provides a platform for receptor signaling, protein sorting, transport, and endocytosis, whose regulation requires the local control of membrane organization. Previous work has revealed a role for dynamic actomyosin in membrane protein and lipid organization, suggesting that the cell surface behaves as an active composite composed of a fluid bilayer and a thin film of active actomyosin. We reconstitute an analogous system in vitro that consists of a fluid lipid bilayer coupled via membrane-associated actin-binding proteins to dynamic actin filaments and myosin motors. Upon complete consumption of ATP, this system settles into distinct phases of actin organization, namely bundled filaments, linked apolar asters, and a lattice of polar asters. These depend on actin concentration, filament length, and actin/myosin ratio. During formation of the polar aster phase, advection of the self-organizing actomyosin network drives transient clustering of actin-associated membrane components. Regeneration of ATP supports a constitutively remodeling actomyosin state, which in turn drives active fluctuations of coupled membrane components, resembling those observed at the cell surface. In a multicomponent membrane bilayer, this remodeling actomyosin layer contributes to changes in the extent and dynamics of phase-segregating domains. These results show how local membrane composition can be driven by active processes arising from actomyosin, highlighting the fundamental basis of the active composite model of the cell surface, and indicate its relevance to the study of membrane organization. PMID:26929326

  2. A Visual Screen of Protein Localization during Sporulation Identifies New Components of Prospore Membrane-Associated Complexes in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Chien; Santore, Ethan; Lavoie, Elizabeth; Needleman, Leor; Fiacco, Nicholas; Kim, Carey

    2014-01-01

    During ascospore formation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the secretory pathway is reorganized to create new intracellular compartments, termed prospore membranes. Prospore membranes engulf the nuclei produced by the meiotic divisions, giving rise to individual spores. The shape and growth of prospore membranes are constrained by cytoskeletal structures, such as septin proteins, that associate with the membranes. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions to various proteins that associate with septins at the bud neck during vegetative growth as well as to proteins encoded by genes that are transcriptionally induced during sporulation were examined for their cellular localization during prospore membrane growth. We report localizations for over 100 different GFP fusions, including over 30 proteins localized to the prospore membrane compartment. In particular, the screen identified IRC10 as a new component of the leading-edge protein complex (LEP), a ring structure localized to the lip of the prospore membrane. Localization of Irc10 to the leading edge is dependent on SSP1, but not ADY3. Loss of IRC10 caused no obvious phenotype, but an ady3 irc10 mutant was completely defective in sporulation and displayed prospore membrane morphologies similar to those of an ssp1 strain. These results reveal the architecture of the LEP and provide insight into the evolution of this membrane-organizing complex. PMID:24390141

  3. Gramicidin Induce Local Non-Uniform Distribution of Lipids in Multi-Component Membrane Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yu; Hussain, Fazle; Huang, Juyang

    2015-03-01

    In lipid membranes, gramicidin form trans-membrane channels that are specific for monovalent cations. We performed Molecular Dynamics simulations of gramicidin in coexisting liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains using GROMACS. The lipid compositions of Lo and Ld domains are DOPC/DSPC/Cholesterol = 6.5/52.6/40.9 and 74.4/10.6/15, respectively. In the Ld domain, the membrane thickness matches the hydrophobic length of gramicidin quite well, and water molecules can diffuse through the gramicidin channels. However, in the Lo lipid domain, the bilayer thickness is far greater than the hydrophobic length of gramicidin and majority of gramicidin do not form conducting channel. The simulation result explained our experimental finding that gramicidin partition favorably into the Ld domains. The calculated radial distribution functions of lipids indicate that gramicidin recruit a layer of short DOPC surrounding each protein and keep cholesterol and taller DSPC away from the protein-bilayer interface. Our result indicates that membrane proteins are capable of inducing non-uniform distributions of lipids and creating a local bilayer environment, which favors protein function.

  4. Diffusion mediated localization on membrane surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Using the model of a cell membrane of a spherical surface in which membrane components may diffuse, the rate of localization due to trapping under diffusion control has been estimated by computing an analytical expression for the mean trapping time including the possibilities of a trapping probability less than one and/or the establishment of an equilibrium at the trap boundary.

  5. Dynamics of two-component membranes surrounded by viscoelastic media.

    PubMed

    Komura, Shigeyuki; Yasuda, Kento; Okamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-11-01

    We discuss the dynamics of two-component fluid membranes which are surrounded by viscoelastic media. We assume that membrane-embedded proteins can diffuse laterally and induce a local membrane curvature. The mean squared displacement of a tagged membrane segment is obtained as a generalized Einstein relation. When the elasticity of the surrounding media obeys a power-law behavior in frequency, an anomalous diffusion of the membrane segment is predicted. We also consider the situation where the proteins generate active non-equilibrium forces. The generalized Einstein relation is further modified by an effective temperature that depends on the force dipole energy. The obtained generalized Einstein relations are useful for membrane microrheology experiments. PMID:26448393

  6. Polyphophoinositides components of plant nuclear membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrix, K.W.; Boss, W.F.

    1987-04-01

    The polyphosphoinositides, phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP/sub 2/), have been shown to be important components in signal transduction in many animal cells. Recently, these lipids have been found to be associated with plasma membrane but not microsomal membrane isolated from fusogenic wild carrot cells; however, in that study the lipids of the nuclear membrane were not analyzed. Since polyphosphoinositides had been shown to be associated with the nuclear membranes as well as the plasma membrane in some animal cells, it was important to determine whether they were associated with plant nuclear membranes as well. Cells were labeled for 18h with (/sup 3/H) inositol and the nuclei were isolated by a modification of the procedure of Saxena et al. Preliminary lipid analyses indicate lower amount of PIP and PIP/sub 2/ in nuclear membranes compared to whole protoplasts. This suggests that the nuclear membranes of carrot cells are not enriched in PIP and PIP/sub 2/; however, the Triton X-100 used during the nuclear isolation procedure may have affected the recovery of the lipids. Experiments are in progress to determine the effects of Triton X-100 on lipid extraction.

  7. Protein-Induced Membrane Curvature Alters Local Membrane Tension

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Mandadap, Kranthi K.; Oster, George

    2014-01-01

    Adsorption of proteins onto membranes can alter the local membrane curvature. This phenomenon has been observed in biological processes such as endocytosis, tubulation, and vesiculation. However, it is not clear how the local surface properties of the membrane, such as membrane tension, change in response to protein adsorption. In this article, we show that the partial differential equations arising from classical elastic model of lipid membranes, which account for simultaneous changes in shape and membrane tension due to protein adsorption in a local region, cannot be solved for nonaxisymmetric geometries using straightforward numerical techniques; instead, a viscous-elastic formulation is necessary to fully describe the system. Therefore, we develop a viscous-elastic model for inhomogeneous membranes of the Helfrich type. Using the newly available viscous-elastic model, we find that the lipids flow to accommodate changes in membrane curvature during protein adsorption. We show that, at the end of protein adsorption process, the system sustains a residual local tension to balance the difference between the actual mean curvature and the imposed spontaneous curvature. We also show that this change in membrane tension can have a functional impact such as altered response to pulling forces in the presence of proteins. PMID:25099814

  8. Nanoscale Membrane Curvature detected by Polarized Localization Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Christopher; Maarouf, Abir; Woodward, Xinxin

    Nanoscale membrane curvature is a necessary component of countless cellular processes. Here we present Polarized Localization Microscopy (PLM), a super-resolution optical imaging technique that enables the detection of nanoscale membrane curvature with order-of-magnitude improvements over comparable optical techniques. PLM combines the advantages of polarized total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence localization microscopy to reveal single-fluorophore locations and orientations without reducing localization precision by point spread function manipulation. PLM resolved nanoscale membrane curvature of a supported lipid bilayer draped over polystyrene nanoparticles on a glass coverslip, thus creating a model membrane with coexisting flat and curved regions and membrane radii of curvature as small as 20 nm. Further, PLM provides single-molecule trajectories and the aggregation of curvature-inducing proteins with super-resolution to reveal the correlated effects of membrane curvature, dynamics, and molecular sorting. For example, cholera toxin subunit B has been observed to induce nanoscale membrane budding and concentrate at the bud neck. PLM reveals a previously hidden and critical information of membrane topology.

  9. Oocytes Isolated from Dairy Cows with Reduced Ovarian Reserve Have a High Frequency of Aneuploidy and Alterations in the Localization of Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 and Aurora Kinase B1

    PubMed Central

    Luciano, Alberto Maria; Franciosi, Federica; Lodde, Valentina; Tessaro, Irene; Corbani, Davide; Modina, Silvia Clotilde; Peluso, John J.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oocytes isolated from cows of reproductive age with reduced antral follicle counts (AFC) have a diminished capacity of embryonic development, which may be related to alterations in the mechanism that directs the proper segregation of chromosomes. Because we demonstrated that progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is involved in chromosome congression and metaphase II (MII) plate formation, the present study was designed to determine 1) if the decrease in oocyte developmental competence observed in dairy cows with a reduced AFC is due to a higher incidence of aneuploidy and 2) whether alterations in PGRMC1 contributes to the incidence of aneuploidy. Oocytes from ovaries with reduced AFC and age-matched controls were matured in vitro and the occurrence of aneuploidy determined as well as the mRNA level and localization of PGRMC1. Although oocytes from ovaries with reduced AFC were capable of undergoing meiosis in vitro, these oocytes showed a 3-fold increase in aneuploidy compared to oocytes isolated from control ovaries (P < 0.05). Although Pgrmc1 mRNA levels were not altered, PGRMC1 and aurora kinase B (AURKB) failed to localize to precise focal points on MII chromosomes of oocytes from ovaries with reduced AFC. Furthermore, when oocytes of control ovaries were cultured with an inhibitor of AURKB activity, their MII plate was disrupted and PGRMC1 was not properly localized to the chromosomes. These results suggest that alterations in PGRMC1 and/or AURKB localization account in part for the increased aneuploidy and low development competence of oocytes from ovaries with reduced AFC. PMID:23325810

  10. Membrane raft association is a determinant of plasma membrane localization

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Rohrer, Blanca B.; Levental, Kandice R.; Simons, Kai; Levental, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    The lipid raft hypothesis proposes lateral domains driven by preferential interactions between sterols, sphingolipids, and specific proteins as a central mechanism for the regulation of membrane structure and function; however, experimental limitations in defining raft composition and properties have prevented unequivocal demonstration of their functional relevance. Here, we establish a quantitative, functional relationship between raft association and subcellular protein sorting. By systematic mutation of the transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains of a model transmembrane protein, linker for activation of T-cells (LAT), we generated a panel of variants possessing a range of raft affinities. These mutations revealed palmitoylation, transmembrane domain length, and transmembrane sequence to be critical determinants of membrane raft association. Moreover, plasma membrane (PM) localization was strictly dependent on raft partitioning across the entire panel of unrelated mutants, suggesting that raft association is necessary and sufficient for PM sorting of LAT. Abrogation of raft partitioning led to mistargeting to late endosomes/lysosomes because of a failure to recycle from early endosomes. These findings identify structural determinants of raft association and validate lipid-driven domain formation as a mechanism for endosomal protein sorting. PMID:24912166

  11. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein-protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  12. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein–protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  13. Cyclical components of local rainfall data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentz, R. P.; D'Urso, M. A.; Jarma, N. M.; Mentz, G. B.

    2000-02-01

    This paper reports on the use of a comparatively simple statistical methodology to study local short time series rainfall data. The objective is to help in agricultural planning, by diminishing the risks associated with some uncertainties affecting this business activity.The analysis starts by assuming a model of unobservable components, trend, cycle, seasonal and irregular, that is well known in many areas of application. When series are in the realm of business and economics, the statistical methods popularized by the US Census Bureau US National Bureau of Economic Research are used for seasonal and cyclical estimation, respectively. The flexibility of these methods makes them good candidates to be applied in the meteorological context, and this is done in this paper for a selection of monthly rainfall time series.Use of the results to help in analysing and forecasting cyclical components is emphasized. The results are interesting. An agricultural entrepreneur, or a group of them located in a single geographical region, will profit by systematically collecting information (monthly in our work) about rainfall, and adopting the scheme of analysis described in this paper.

  14. Dual Protein Localization to the Envelope and Thylakoid Membranes Within the Chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Klasek, Laura; Inoue, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast houses various metabolic processes essential for plant viability. This organelle originated from an ancestral cyanobacterium via endosymbiosis and maintains the three membranes of its progenitor. Among them, the outer envelope membrane functions mainly in communication with cytoplasmic components while the inner envelope membrane houses selective transport of various metabolites and the biosynthesis of several compounds, including membrane lipids. These two envelope membranes also play essential roles in import of nuclear-encoded proteins and in organelle division. The third membrane, the internal membrane system known as the thylakoid, houses photosynthetic electron transport and chemiosmotic phosphorylation. The inner envelope and thylakoid membranes share similar lipid composition. Specific targeting pathways determine their defined proteomes and, thus, their distinct functions. Nonetheless, several proteins have been shown to exist in both the envelope and thylakoid membranes. These proteins include those that play roles in protein transport, tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, membrane dynamics, or transport of nucleotides or inorganic phosphate. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about proteins localized to both the envelope and thylakoid membranes in the chloroplast, discussing their roles in each membrane and potential mechanisms of their dual localization. Addressing the unanswered questions about these dual-localized proteins should help advance our understanding of chloroplast development, protein transport, and metabolic regulation. PMID:26944623

  15. Composition and Localization of Treponema denticola Outer Membrane Complexes ▿

    PubMed Central

    Godovikova, Valentina; Goetting-Minesky, M. Paula; Fenno, J. Christopher

    2011-01-01

    The Treponema denticola outer membrane lipoprotein-protease complex (dentilisin) contributes to periodontal disease by degrading extracellular matrix components and disrupting intercellular host signaling pathways. We recently demonstrated that prcB, located upstream of and cotranscribed with prcA and prtP, encodes a 22-kDa lipoprotein that interacts with PrtP and is required for its activity. Here we further characterize products of the protease locus and their roles in expression, formation, and localization of outer membrane complexes. PrcB migrates in native gels as part of a >400-kDa complex that includes PrtP and PrcA, as well as the major outer sheath protein Msp. PrcB is detectable as a minor constituent of the purified active protease complex, which was previously reported to consist of only PrtP and auxiliary polypeptides PrcA1 and PrcA2. Though it lacks the canonical ribosome binding site present upstream of both prcA and prtP, PrcB is present at levels similar to those of PrtP in whole-cell extracts. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated cell surface exposure of the mature forms of PrtP, PrcA1, PrcB, and Msp. The 16-kDa N-terminal acylated fragment of PrtP (predicted to be released during activation of PrtP) was present in cell extracts but was detected neither in the purified active protease complex nor on the cell surface. PrcA2, detectable on the surface of Msp-deficient cells but not that of wild-type cells, coimmunoprecipitated with Msp. Our results indicate that PrcB is a component of the outer membrane lipoprotein protease complex and that Msp and PrcA2 interaction may mediate formation of a very-high-molecular-weight outer membrane complex. PMID:21986628

  16. Stress and fold localization in thin elastic membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Pocivavsek, Luka; Dellsy, Robert; Kern, Andrew; Johnson, Sebastián; Lin, Binhua; Lee, Ka Yee C.; Cerda, Enrique

    2010-11-08

    Thin elastic membranes supported on a much softer elastic solid or a fluid deviate from their flat geometries upon compression. We demonstrate that periodic wrinkling is only one possible solution for such strained membranes. Folds, which involve highly localized curvature, appear whenever the membrane is compressed beyond a third of its initial wrinkle wavelength. Eventually the surface transforms into a symmetry-broken state with flat regions of membrane coexisting with locally folded points, reminiscent of a crumpled, unsupported membrane. We provide general scaling laws for the wrinkled and folded states and proved the transition with numerical and experimental supported membranes. Our work provides insight into the interfacial stability of such diverse systems as biological membranes such as lung surfactant and nanoparticle thin films.

  17. Extracellular Protease Digestion to Evaluate Membrane Protein Cell Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Besingi, Richard N.; Clark, Patricia L.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins play crucial roles in signaling and as anchors for cell surface display. Proper secretion of a membrane protein can be evaluated by its susceptibility to digestion by an extracellular protease, but this requires a crucial control to confirm membrane integrity during digestion. This protocol describes how to use this approach to determine how efficiently a protein is secreted to the outer surface of Gram-negative bacteria. Its success relies upon careful selection of an appropriate intracellular reporter protein that will remain undigested if the membrane barrier remains intact, but is rapidly digested when cells are lysed prior to evaluation. Reporter proteins that are resistant to proteases (e.g. maltose-binding protein) do not return accurate results; in contrast, proteins that are more readily digested (e.g. SurA) serve as more sensitive reporters of membrane integrity, yielding more accurate measurements of membrane protein localization. Similar considerations apply when evaluating membrane protein localization in other contexts, including eukaryotic cells and organelle membranes. Evaluating membrane protein localization using this approach requires only standard biochemistry laboratory equipment for cell lysis, gel electrophoresis and western blotting. After expression of the protein of interest, this procedure can be completed in 4 h. PMID:26584447

  18. Localization of Sublexical Speech Perception Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Coslett, H. Branch

    2010-01-01

    Models of speech perception are in general agreement with respect to the major cortical regions involved, but lack precision with regard to localization and lateralization of processing units. To refine these models we conducted two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analyses of the neuroimaging literature on sublexical speech perception.…

  19. Localization of Sublexical Speech Perception Components

    PubMed Central

    Turkeltaub, Peter E; Coslett, H. Branch

    2010-01-01

    Models of speech perception are in general agreement with respect to the major cortical regions involved, but lack precision with regard to localization and lateralization of processing units. To refine these models we conducted two Activation Likelihood Estimation (ALE) meta-analyses of the neuroimaging literature on sublexical speech perception. Based on foci reported in 23 fMRI experiments, we identified significant activation likelihoods in left and right superior temporal cortex and the left posterior middle frontal gyrus. Subanalyses examining phonetic and phonological processes revealed only left mid-posterior superior temporal sulcus activation likelihood. A lateralization analysis demonstrated temporal lobe left lateralization in terms of magnitude, extent, and consistency of activity. Experiments requiring explicit attention to phonology drove this lateralization. An ALE analysis of eight fMRI studies on categorical phoneme perception revealed significant activation likelihood in the left supramarginal gyrus and angular gyrus. These results are consistent with a speech processing network in which the bilateral superior temporal cortices perform acoustic analysis of speech and nonspeech auditory stimuli, the left mid-posterior superior temporal sulcus performs phonetic and phonological analysis, and the left inferior parietal lobule is involved in detection of differences between phoneme categories. These results modify current speech perception models in three ways: 1) specifying the most likely locations of dorsal stream processing units, 2) clarifying that phonetic and phonological superior temporal sulcus processing is left lateralized and localized to the mid-posterior portion, and 3) suggesting that both the supramarginal gyrus and angular gyrus may be involved in phoneme discrimination. PMID:20413149

  20. Determining the Orientation and Localization of Membrane-Bound Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Hohlweg, Walter; Kosol, Simone; Zangger, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Many naturally occurring bioactive peptides bind to biological membranes. Studying and elucidating the mode of interaction is often an essential step to understand their molecular and biological functions. To obtain the complete orientation and immersion depth of such compounds in the membrane or a membrane-mimetic system, a number of methods are available, which are separated in this review into four main classes: solution NMR, solid-state NMR, EPR and other methods. Solution NMR methods include the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) between peptide and membrane signals, residual dipolar couplings and the use of paramagnetic probes, either within the membrane-mimetic or in the solvent. The vast array of solid state NMR methods to study membrane-bound peptide orientation and localization includes the anisotropic chemical shift, PISA wheels, dipolar waves, the GALA, MAOS and REDOR methods and again the use of paramagnetic additives on relaxation rates. Paramagnetic additives, with their effect on spectral linewidths, have also been used in EPR spectroscopy. Additionally, the orientation of a peptide within a membrane can be obtained by the anisotropic hyperfine tensor of a rigidly attached nitroxide label. Besides these magnetic resonance techniques a series of other methods to probe the orientation of peptides in membranes has been developed, consisting of fluorescence-, infrared- and oriented circular dichroism spectroscopy, colorimetry, interface-sensitive X-ray and neutron scattering and Quartz crystal microbalance. PMID:22044140

  1. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as Plausible Prebiotic Membrane Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W.; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the membranes of fatty acid vesicles. The goal was to determine whether PAH could function as a stabilizing agent, similar to the role that cholesterol plays in membranes today. We studied vesicle size distribution, critical vesicle concentration and permeability of the bilayers using C6-C10 fatty acids mixed with amphiphilic PAH derivatives such as 1-hydroxypyrene, 9-anthracene carboxylic acid and 1,4 chrysene quinone. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) spectroscopy was used to measure the size distribution of vesicles and incorporation of PAH species was established by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. We employed conductimetric titration to determine the minimal concentration at which fatty acids could form stable vesicles in the presence of PAHs. We found that oxidized PAH derivatives can be incorporated into decanoic acid (DA) vesicle bilayers in mole ratios up to 1:10 (PAH:DA). Vesicle size distribution and critical vesicle concentration were largely unaffected by PAH incorporation, but 1-hydroxypyrene and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid lowered the permeability of fatty acid bilayers to small solutes up to 4-fold. These data represent the first indication of a cholesterol-like stabilizing effect of oxidized PAH derivatives in a simulated prebiotic membrane.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as plausible prebiotic membrane components.

    PubMed

    Groen, Joost; Deamer, David W; Kros, Alexander; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2012-08-01

    Aromatic molecules delivered to the young Earth during the heavy bombardment phase in the early history of our solar system were likely to be among the most abundant and stable organic compounds available. The Aromatic World hypothesis suggests that aromatic molecules might function as container elements, energy transduction elements and templating genetic components for early life forms. To investigate the possible role of aromatic molecules as container elements, we incorporated different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the membranes of fatty acid vesicles. The goal was to determine whether PAH could function as a stabilizing agent, similar to the role that cholesterol plays in membranes today. We studied vesicle size distribution, critical vesicle concentration and permeability of the bilayers using C(6)-C(10) fatty acids mixed with amphiphilic PAH derivatives such as 1-hydroxypyrene, 9-anthracene carboxylic acid and 1,4 chrysene quinone. Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) spectroscopy was used to measure the size distribution of vesicles and incorporation of PAH species was established by phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy. We employed conductimetric titration to determine the minimal concentration at which fatty acids could form stable vesicles in the presence of PAHs. We found that oxidized PAH derivatives can be incorporated into decanoic acid (DA) vesicle bilayers in mole ratios up to 1:10 (PAH:DA). Vesicle size distribution and critical vesicle concentration were largely unaffected by PAH incorporation, but 1-hydroxypyrene and 9-anthracene carboxylic acid lowered the permeability of fatty acid bilayers to small solutes up to 4-fold. These data represent the first indication of a cholesterol-like stabilizing effect of oxidized PAH derivatives in a simulated prebiotic membrane. PMID:22798228

  3. WASP localizes to the membrane skeleton of platelets.

    PubMed

    Lutskiy, Maxim I; Shcherbina, Anna; Bachli, Eric T; Cooley, Jessica; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen

    2007-10-01

    Patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS), an X-linked blood cell disease, suffer from severe thrombocytopenia due to accelerated loss of defective platelets. The affected gene encodes WASP, an actin regulatory protein thought to reside in the cytoplasm of resting leucocytes. In contrast, this study showed that, for platelets, one-quarter of WASP molecules fractionate in the detergent-insoluble high speed pellet characterized as the membrane skeleton, the scaffold structure that underlies the lipid bilayer and stabilizes the surface membrane. Following treatment of platelets with thrombin and stirring, which induces cytoarchitectural remodelling, WASP and other membrane skeletal components sedimented at lower g force and partitioned in the low-speed pellet. Thrombin and stirring also induced WASP tyrosine phosphorylation, a rapid activating reaction, and proteolytic inactivation by cysteine protease calpain. Both the alteration of the sedimentation profile and the proteolytic inactivation were specific for the membrane skeletal pool of WASP and were abrogated in alphaIIb beta3 integrin-deficient platelets and in normal platelets treated with an integrin antagonist. The findings demonstrate that WASP is a component of the resting platelet membrane skeleton and participates in membrane skeletal rearrangements downstream of integrin outside-in signalling. The possible implications for the platelet defect in WAS are discussed. PMID:17854313

  4. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 regulates hepcidin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Rhee, David K.; Malhotra, Rajeev; Mayeur, Claire; Hurst, Liam A.; Ager, Emily; Shelton, Georgia; Kramer, Yael; McCulloh, David; Keefe, David; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Bloch, Donald B.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2015-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated by the membrane iron exporter ferroportin and its regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin. The hepcidin/ferroportin axis is considered a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases of iron overload or deficiency. Here, we conducted a chemical screen in zebrafish to identify small molecules that decrease ferroportin protein levels. The chemical screen led to the identification of 3 steroid molecules, epitiostanol, progesterone, and mifepristone, which decrease ferroportin levels by increasing the biosynthesis of hepcidin. These hepcidin-inducing steroids (HISs) did not activate known hepcidin-inducing pathways, including the BMP and JAK/STAT3 pathways. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1) was required for HIS-dependent increases in hepcidin biosynthesis, as PGRMC1 depletion in cultured hepatoma cells and zebrafish blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Neutralizing antibodies directed against PGRMC1 attenuated the ability of HISs to induce hepcidin gene expression. Inhibiting the kinases of the SRC family, which are downstream of PGRMC1, blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Furthermore, HIS treatment increased hepcidin biosynthesis in mice and humans. Together, these data indicate that PGRMC1 regulates hepcidin gene expression through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. These studies have identified drug candidates and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases of abnormal iron metabolism. PMID:26657863

  5. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 regulates hepcidin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Rhee, David K; Malhotra, Rajeev; Mayeur, Claire; Hurst, Liam A; Ager, Emily; Shelton, Georgia; Kramer, Yael; McCulloh, David; Keefe, David; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B; Peterson, Randall T

    2016-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated by the membrane iron exporter ferroportin and its regulatory peptide hormone hepcidin. The hepcidin/ferroportin axis is considered a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of diseases of iron overload or deficiency. Here, we conducted a chemical screen in zebrafish to identify small molecules that decrease ferroportin protein levels. The chemical screen led to the identification of 3 steroid molecules, epitiostanol, progesterone, and mifepristone, which decrease ferroportin levels by increasing the biosynthesis of hepcidin. These hepcidin-inducing steroids (HISs) did not activate known hepcidin-inducing pathways, including the BMP and JAK/STAT3 pathways. Progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1) was required for HIS-dependent increases in hepcidin biosynthesis, as PGRMC1 depletion in cultured hepatoma cells and zebrafish blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Neutralizing antibodies directed against PGRMC1 attenuated the ability of HISs to induce hepcidin gene expression. Inhibiting the kinases of the SRC family, which are downstream of PGRMC1, blocked the ability of HISs to increase hepcidin mRNA levels. Furthermore, HIS treatment increased hepcidin biosynthesis in mice and humans. Together, these data indicate that PGRMC1 regulates hepcidin gene expression through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. These studies have identified drug candidates and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases of abnormal iron metabolism. PMID:26657863

  6. Interactions of lauryl gallate with phospholipid components of biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Małgorzata; Miñones, José

    2016-08-01

    The effect of different amounts of lauryl gallate (LG) on properties of the model membranes of phosphatidylcholines (PC), differing in the presence of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chains, and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) was described in terms of phase behaviour of mixtures, interactions between both components, monolayers stability and their organization. The Langmuir monolayer technique was used to monitor the surface thermodynamics (i.e. the excess area and excess Gibbs energy of mixing) on the basis of surface pressure-area per molecule (π-A) isotherms. Simultaneously, morphology of the studied monolayers was visualized by the Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). This allowed evaluating the kind and magnitude of interactions which influence on the phase behaviour and structural properties of the monolayers. The obtained results can be helpful to reveal the mechanism of phospholipid antioxidant protection and important pharmacological (antimicrobial) role of lauryl gallate for production of effective therapeutic substances. PMID:27117642

  7. STIM1 Is a Novel Component of ER-Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Membrane Contact Sites

    PubMed Central

    Agaisse, Hervé; Derré, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Productive developmental cycle of the obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis depends on the interaction of the replicative vacuole, named the inclusion, with cellular organelles. We have recently reported the formation of ER-Inclusion membrane contact sites (MCSs), where the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is in apposition to the inclusion membrane. These platforms contain the C. trachomatis inclusion membrane protein IncD, the mammalian ceramide transfer protein CERT and the ER resident proteins VAPA/B and were proposed to play a role in the non-vesicular trafficking of lipids to the inclusion. Here, we identify STIM1 as a novel component of ER-Inclusion MCSs. STIM1, an ER calcium (Ca2+) sensor that relocate to ER-Plasma Membrane (PM) MCSs upon Ca2+ store depletion, associated with C. trachomatis inclusion. STIM1, but not the general ER markers Rtn3C and Sec61ß, was enriched at the inclusion membrane. Ultra-structural studies demonstrated that STIM1 localized to ER-Inclusion MCSs. Time-course experiments showed that STIM1, CERT and VAPB co-localized throughout the developmental cycle. By contrast, Orai1, the PM Ca2+ channel that interacts with STIM1 at ER-PM MCSs, did not associate with C. trachomatis inclusion. Upon ER Ca2+ store depletion, a pool of STIM1 relocated to ER-PM MCSs, while the existing ER-Inclusion MCSs remained enriched in STIM1. Finally, we have identified the CAD domain, which mediates STIM1-Orai1 interaction, as the minimal domain required for STIM1 enrichment at ER-Inclusion MCSs. Altogether this study identifies STIM1 as a novel component of ER-C. trachomatis inclusion MCSs. We discuss the potential role(s) of STIM1 during the infection process. PMID:25915399

  8. Dlg5 maintains apical polarity by promoting membrane localization of Crumbs during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Heng; Kang, Di; Guo, Xuan; Wan, Ping; Wang, Dou; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Apical-basal polarity plays critical roles in the functions of epithelial tissues. However, the mechanisms of epithelial polarity establishment and maintenance remain to be fully elucidated. Here we show that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family protein Dlg5 is required for the maintenance of apical polarity of follicle epithelium during Drosophila oogenesis. Dlg5 localizes at the apical membrane and adherens junction (AJ) of follicle epithelium in early stage egg chambers. Specifically, we demonstrate that the major function of Dlg5 is to promote apical membrane localization of Crumbs, since overexpression of Crumbs but not other major apical or AJ components could rescue epithelial polarity defects resulted from loss of Dlg5. Furthermore, we performed a structure-function analysis of Dlg5 and found that the C-terminal PDZ3 and PDZ4 domains are required for all Dlg5’s functions as well as its ability to localize to apical membrane. The N-terminal coiled-coil motif could be individually targeted to the apical membrane, while the central linker region could be targeted to AJ. Lastly, the MAGUK core domains of PDZ4-SH3-GUK could be individually targeted to apical, AJ and basolateral membranes. PMID:27211898

  9. Dlg5 maintains apical polarity by promoting membrane localization of Crumbs during Drosophila oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Heng; Kang, Di; Guo, Xuan; Wan, Ping; Wang, Dou; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Apical-basal polarity plays critical roles in the functions of epithelial tissues. However, the mechanisms of epithelial polarity establishment and maintenance remain to be fully elucidated. Here we show that the membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) family protein Dlg5 is required for the maintenance of apical polarity of follicle epithelium during Drosophila oogenesis. Dlg5 localizes at the apical membrane and adherens junction (AJ) of follicle epithelium in early stage egg chambers. Specifically, we demonstrate that the major function of Dlg5 is to promote apical membrane localization of Crumbs, since overexpression of Crumbs but not other major apical or AJ components could rescue epithelial polarity defects resulted from loss of Dlg5. Furthermore, we performed a structure-function analysis of Dlg5 and found that the C-terminal PDZ3 and PDZ4 domains are required for all Dlg5's functions as well as its ability to localize to apical membrane. The N-terminal coiled-coil motif could be individually targeted to the apical membrane, while the central linker region could be targeted to AJ. Lastly, the MAGUK core domains of PDZ4-SH3-GUK could be individually targeted to apical, AJ and basolateral membranes. PMID:27211898

  10. Local membrane mechanics of pore-spanning bilayers.

    PubMed

    Mey, Ingo; Stephan, Milena; Schmitt, Eva K; Müller, Martin Michael; Ben Amar, Martine; Steinem, Claudia; Janshoff, Andreas

    2009-05-27

    The mechanical behavior of lipid bilayers spanning the pores of highly ordered porous silicon substrates was scrutinized by local indentation experiments as a function of surface functionalization, lipid composition, solvent content, indentation velocity, and pore radius. Solvent-containing nano black lipid membranes (nano-BLMs) as well as solvent-free pore-spanning bilayers were imaged by fluorescence and atomic force microscopy prior to force curve acquisition, which allows distinguishing between membrane-covered and uncovered pores. Force indentation curves on pore-spanning bilayers attached to functionalized hydrophobic porous silicon substrates reveal a predominately linear response that is mainly attributed to prestress in the membranes. This is in agreement with the observation that indentation leads to membrane lysis well below 5% area dilatation. However, membrane bending and lateral tension dominate over prestress and stretching if solvent-free supported membranes obtained from spreading giant liposomes on hydrophilic porous silicon are indented. An elastic regime diagram is presented that readily allows determining the dominant contribution to the mechanical response upon indentation as a function of load and pore radius. PMID:19453196

  11. Local measurements of phase transitions in Bacteriorhodopsin membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proksch, R.; Nikiforov, M. P.; Hohlbauch, S.; King, W. P.; Antoraz Contera, S.; Voïtchovsky, K.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2010-03-01

    Phase transitions play an important role in biology. Specifically the thermodynamic stability of internal membrane proteins is an important issue of biophysics. Purple membrane from Halobacterium halobium contain bacteriorhodopsin (bR), an integral protein 70-80% of whole mass is intramembraneous. There are heated debates in the field about the parameters of thermal denaturation of bR, such as the denaturation temperature, enthalpy etc. Recently, bR was proposed as a component of biomolecular electronics. Thus, reliable information about the phase transitions of supported samples of bR membranes is necessary. Phase transitions in polymer/biopolymer materials are associated with the large changes in mechanical properties of the samples. We developed the technique for the measurements of the temperature dependence of the mechanical properties with high spatial resolution. This technique is based on the measurements of the contact stiffness of the atomic force microscopy tip -- sample system as a function of temperature.

  12. Dynamic membrane patterning, signal localization and polarity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zamparo, M; Chianale, F; Tebaldi, C; Cosentino-Lagomarsino, M; Nicodemi, M; Gamba, A

    2015-02-01

    We review the molecular and physical aspects of the dynamic localization of signaling molecules on the plasma membranes of living cells. At the nanoscale, clusters of receptors and signaling proteins play an essential role in the processing of extracellular signals. At the microscale, "soft" and highly dynamic signaling domains control the interaction of individual cells with their environment. At the multicellular scale, individual polarity patterns control the forces that shape multicellular aggregates and tissues. PMID:25563791

  13. Novel Components of the Toxoplasma Inner Membrane Complex Revealed by BioID

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Allan L.; Kim, Elliot W.; Toh, Justin Y.; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Rashoff, Andrew Q.; Van, Christina; Huang, Amy S.; Moon, Andy S.; Bell, Hannah N.; Bentolila, Laurent A.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The inner membrane complex (IMC) of Toxoplasma gondii is a peripheral membrane system that is composed of flattened alveolar sacs that underlie the plasma membrane, coupled to a supporting cytoskeletal network. The IMC plays important roles in parasite replication, motility, and host cell invasion. Despite these central roles in the biology of the parasite, the proteins that constitute the IMC are largely unknown. In this study, we have adapted a technique named proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID) for use in T. gondii to identify novel components of the IMC. Using IMC proteins in both the alveoli and the cytoskeletal network as bait, we have uncovered a total of 19 new IMC proteins in both of these suborganellar compartments, two of which we functionally evaluate by gene knockout. Importantly, labeling of IMC proteins using this approach has revealed a group of proteins that localize to the sutures of the alveolar sacs that have been seen in their entirety in Toxoplasma species only by freeze fracture electron microscopy. Collectively, our study greatly expands the repertoire of known proteins in the IMC and experimentally validates BioID as a strategy for discovering novel constituents of specific cellular compartments of T. gondii. PMID:25691595

  14. Relaxation dynamics of two-component fluid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Ryuichi; Kanemori, Yuichi; Komura, Shigeyuki; Fournier, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-05-01

    We theoretically investigate the relaxation dynamics of a nearly flat binary lipid bilayer membrane by taking into account the membrane tension, hydrodynamics of the surrounding fluid, inter-monolayer friction and mutual diffusion. Mutual diffusion is the collective irreversible process that leads to homogenization of the density difference between the two lipid species. We find that two relaxation modes associated with the mutual diffusion appear in addition to the three previously discussed relaxation modes reflecting the bending and compression of the membrane. Because of the symmetry, only one of the two diffusive modes is coupled to the bending mode. The two diffusive modes are much slower than the bending and compression modes in the entire realistic wave number range. This means that the long time relaxation behavior is dominated by the mutual diffusion in binary membranes. The two diffusive modes become even slower in the vicinity of the unstable region towards phase separation, while the other modes are almost unchanged. In short time scales, on the other hand, the lipid composition heterogeneity induces in-plane compression and bending of the bilayer. PMID:27145960

  15. Interaction of murine macrophage-membrane proteins with components of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M L; Duarte-Escalante, E; Reyes-Montes, M R; Elizondo, N; Maldonado, G; Zenteno, E

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin, a crude antigen of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum, was studied using murine peritoneal macrophages. Membrane proteins were purified via membrane attachment to polycationic beads and solubilized in Tris–HCl/SDS/DTT/glycerol for protein extraction; afterwards they were adsorbed or not with H. capsulatum yeast or lectin binding-enriched by affinity chromatography. Membrane proteins and histoplasmin interactions were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting assays using anti-H. capsulatum human or mouse serum and biotinylated goat anti-human or anti-mouse IgG/streptavidin-peroxidase system to reveal the interaction. Results indicate that macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components interact in a dose-dependent reaction, and adsorption of macrophage-membrane proteins by yeast cells induces a critical decrease in the interaction. Macrophage-membrane glycoproteins with terminal d-galactosyl residues, purified by chromatography with Abrus precatorius lectin, bound to histoplasmin; and two bands of 68 kD and 180 kD of transferred membrane protein samples interacted with histoplasmin components, as revealed by immunoblot assays. Specificity for β-galactoside residues on the macrophage-membrane was confirmed by galactose inhibition of the interaction between macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components, in competitive ELISA using sugars, as well as by enzymatic cleavage of the galactoside residues. PMID:9737672

  16. Integrin clustering as a result of local membrane deformations and local signaling feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felizzi, Federico; Iber, Dagmar

    2014-08-01

    Integrins are essential receptors for the development and functioning of multicellular animals because they mediate cell adhesion and migration, and regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. Ligand-dependent activation of integrins involves the formation of receptor clusters and this has been accounted both to extracellular forces as mediated by the glycocalyx as well as to intracellular forces mediated by the cytoskeleton. Here we describe a Monte Carlo simulation that considers both the binding processes on the membrane as well as the intracellular signaling processes that stabilize the open integrin conformation. We show that integrin clustering can result both from the effects of integrin avidity, as a result of membrane deformations, as well as from the locally enhanced availability of talins in the open conformation, as a result of local positive feedback signaling via PIPKIγ and PIP2. The model was carefully parameterized based on reported quantitative data and reproduces a wide range of experimental data, including results that previously appeared inconsistent.

  17. Concentration Fluctuation in a Two-Component Fluid Membrane Surrounded with Three-Dimensional Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaura, Keiichiro; Fujitani, Youhei

    2008-11-01

    We calculate the relaxation rate of the critical concentration fluctuation in a two-component fluid membrane by considering hydrodynamics of the surrounding fluids. Results are compared with the previous results obtained by Seki, Komura, and Imai (2007), who treated the momentum flux from the membrane to its environments using the friction coefficient.

  18. A Local Learning Rule for Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isomura, Takuya; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2016-06-01

    Humans can separately recognize independent sources when they sense their superposition. This decomposition is mathematically formulated as independent component analysis (ICA). While a few biologically plausible learning rules, so-called local learning rules, have been proposed to achieve ICA, their performance varies depending on the parameters characterizing the mixed signals. Here, we propose a new learning rule that is both easy to implement and reliable. Both mathematical and numerical analyses confirm that the proposed rule outperforms other local learning rules over a wide range of parameters. Notably, unlike other rules, the proposed rule can separate independent sources without any preprocessing, even if the number of sources is unknown. The successful performance of the proposed rule is then demonstrated using natural images and movies. We discuss the implications of this finding for our understanding of neuronal information processing and its promising applications to neuromorphic engineering.

  19. A Local Learning Rule for Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Isomura, Takuya; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Humans can separately recognize independent sources when they sense their superposition. This decomposition is mathematically formulated as independent component analysis (ICA). While a few biologically plausible learning rules, so-called local learning rules, have been proposed to achieve ICA, their performance varies depending on the parameters characterizing the mixed signals. Here, we propose a new learning rule that is both easy to implement and reliable. Both mathematical and numerical analyses confirm that the proposed rule outperforms other local learning rules over a wide range of parameters. Notably, unlike other rules, the proposed rule can separate independent sources without any preprocessing, even if the number of sources is unknown. The successful performance of the proposed rule is then demonstrated using natural images and movies. We discuss the implications of this finding for our understanding of neuronal information processing and its promising applications to neuromorphic engineering. PMID:27323661

  20. A Local Learning Rule for Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Isomura, Takuya; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Humans can separately recognize independent sources when they sense their superposition. This decomposition is mathematically formulated as independent component analysis (ICA). While a few biologically plausible learning rules, so-called local learning rules, have been proposed to achieve ICA, their performance varies depending on the parameters characterizing the mixed signals. Here, we propose a new learning rule that is both easy to implement and reliable. Both mathematical and numerical analyses confirm that the proposed rule outperforms other local learning rules over a wide range of parameters. Notably, unlike other rules, the proposed rule can separate independent sources without any preprocessing, even if the number of sources is unknown. The successful performance of the proposed rule is then demonstrated using natural images and movies. We discuss the implications of this finding for our understanding of neuronal information processing and its promising applications to neuromorphic engineering. PMID:27323661

  1. Ultrastructural localization of membrane phosphatases in teratocarcinoma and early embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Damjanov, I.; Cutler, L. S.; Solter, D.

    1977-01-01

    Ectodermal cells of the two- and three-germ layer-thick mouse egg-cylinders are considered to be the progenitors of embryonal carcinoma cells in embryo-derived teratocarcinomas. In an attempt to find differences between the tumor cells and equivalent embryonic cells, we have studied the electron microscopic cytochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase, and Mg2+-activated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) in embryo-derived teratocarcinomas and mouse egg-cylinders. Alkaline phosphatase was detected in both embryonic and tumor cells, but its activity appeared much more intense in the tumor cells. No ATPase was demonstrated in embryonic ectodermal cells of 6-day-old embryos and only in occasional cells of 7- and 8-day-old embryos. No 5'-nucleotidase activity could be demonstrated in 6- to 8-day-old cylinders. There was marked ATPase and 5'-nucleotidase activity in the membranes of embryonal carcinoma cells. These data point out some differences on the plasma membrane between the embryonal carcinoma cells and equivalent embryonic cells. The potential significance of these differences is discussed with regards to the transformation of embryonic cells in tumor cells. (Am J Pathol 87:297-310, 1977). Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 2 PMID:192083

  2. Localization of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in caveolae membrane domains.

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, B; Lachambre, M; Bousquet-Gagnon, N; Pagé, M; Gingras, D; Béliveau, R

    2001-01-01

    Membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-associated MMP that has been recently reported to have a central role in tumour cell invasion. Here we report that both the native and overexpressed recombinant forms of MT1-MMP are highly enriched in low-density Triton X-100-insoluble membrane domains that contain the caveolar marker protein caveolin 1. Moreover, the MT1-MMP-dependent activation of proMMP-2 induced by concanavalin A and cytochalasin D was correlated with the processing of MT1-MMP to its proteolytically inactive 43 kDa fragment in U-87 glioblastoma and HT-1080 fibrosarcoma tumour cell lines; this processing was also preferentially observed within the caveolar fraction. Interestingly, whereas the expression of caveolin 1 had no effect on the MT1-MMP-dependent activation of proMMP-2, its co-expression with MT1-MMP antagonized the MT1-MMP-increased migratory potential of COS-7 cells. Taken together, our results provide evidence that MT1-MMP is preferentially compartmentalized and proteolytically processed in caveolae of cancer cells. The inhibition of MT1-MMP-dependent cell migration by caveolin 1 also suggests that the localization of MT1-MMP to caveolin-enriched domains might have an important function in the control of its enzymic activity. PMID:11171051

  3. Crooked, coiled and crimpled are three Ly6-like proteins required for proper localization of septate junction components.

    PubMed

    Nilton, Anna; Oshima, Kenzi; Zare, Fariba; Byri, Sunitha; Nannmark, Ulf; Nyberg, Kevin G; Fehon, Richard G; Uv, Anne E

    2010-07-01

    Cellular junction formation is an elaborate process that is dependent on the regulated synthesis, assembly and membrane targeting of constituting components. Here, we report on three Drosophila Ly6-like proteins essential for septate junction (SJ) formation. SJs provide a paracellular diffusion barrier and appear molecularly and structurally similar to vertebrate paranodal septate junctions. We show that Crooked (Crok), a small GPI-anchored Ly6-like protein, is required for septa formation and barrier functions. In embryos that lack Crok, SJ components are produced but fail to accumulate at the plasma membrane. Crok is detected in intracellular puncta and acts tissue-autonomously, which suggests that it resides in intracellular vesicles to assist the cell surface localization of SJ components. In addition, we demonstrate that two related Ly6 proteins, Coiled (Cold) and Crimpled (Crim), are required for SJ formation and function in a tissue-autonomous manner, and that Cold also localizes to intracellular vesicles. Specifically, Crok and Cold are required for correct membrane trafficking of Neurexin IV, a central SJ component. The non-redundant requirement for Crok, Cold, Crim and Boudin (Bou; another Ly6 protein that was recently shown to be involved in SJ formation) suggests that members of this conserved family of proteins cooperate in the assembly of SJ components, possibly by promoting core SJ complex formation in intracellular compartments associated with membrane trafficking. PMID:20570942

  4. Effects of minor components in carbon dioxide capture using polymeric gas separation membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Scholes, C.; Kentish, S.; Stevens, G.

    2009-07-01

    The capture of carbon dioxide by membrane gas separation has been identified as one potential solution to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In particular, the application of membranes to CO{sub 2} capture from both pre- and post-combustion strategies is of interest. For membrane technology to become commercially viable in CO{sub 2} capture, a number of factors need to be overcome, one being the role of minor components in the process on membrane performance. This review considers the effects of minor components in both pre- and post-combustion use of polymeric membranes for CO{sub 2} capture. In particular, gases such as SOx, NOx, CO, H{sub 2}S, NH3, as well as condensable water and hydrocarbons are reviewed in terms of their permeability through polymeric membranes relative to CO{sub 2}, as well as their plasticization and aging effects on membrane separation performance. A major conclusion of the review is that while many minor components can affect performance both through competitive sorption and plasticization, much remains unknown. This limits the selection process for membranes in this application.

  5. Adaptive Decomposition of Highly Resolved Time Series into Local and Non‐local Components

    EPA Science Inventory

    Highly time-resolved air monitoring data are widely being collected over long time horizons in order to characterizeambient and near-source air quality trends. In many applications, it is desirable to split the time-resolved data into two ormore components (e.g., local and region...

  6. The single epsin homolog in Giardia lamblia localizes to the ventral disk of trophozoites and is not associated with clathrin membrane coats.

    PubMed

    Ebneter, Jacqueline A; Hehl, Adrian B

    2014-10-01

    Epsins serve as recruitment platforms for clathrin membrane coat protein components and induce membrane curvature via their N-terminal homology (ENTH) domain. Unexpectedly, the single ENTH domain protein, a putative epsinR homolog (Glepsin), in the diverged protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia, localizes exclusively to the specialized attachment organelle, the ventral disk (VD). Glepsin binds both to phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate phospholipids and the VD cytoskeleton, but lacks canonical domains for interaction with clathrin coat components. This suggests reassignment of giardial epsin function from membrane trafficking to a structural role in linking the plasma membrane to the highly specialized VD during evolution of this genus. PMID:25286382

  7. Basement membrane components are potent promoters of rat intestinal epithelial cell differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hahn, U; Stallmach, A; Hahn, E G; Riecken, E O

    1990-02-01

    Basement membranes have been implicated in morphogenesis and cell differentiation. In this study, the effect of basement membrane components on intestinal epithelial cell maturation in a mesenchyme-free environment was investigated. Fetal rat small intestinal epithelial cells (from the 14th-17th day of gestation) were exposed to basement membrane-derived proteins (laminin, collagen type IV, and a complex basement membrane-enriched extract from the Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm sarcoma) and other extracellular matrix proteins (collagen type I and fibronectin) coated onto Petri dishes. The cells attached readily only to fibronectin and basement membrane proteins. For 5 days the developing epithelial colonies were monitored in vitro, assessing morphological and functional parameters of cell maturation. Colonies grown on laminin and the basement membrane extract were larger and of greater cell density. An increase in alkaline phosphatase and lactase activity was observed after 3-4 days in these colonies which could be enhanced to yield 90%-100% positive cells by the addition of dexamethasone to the medium while no sucrase-isomaltase activity was elicited. Electron microscopy confirmed a high degree of cellular polarization illustrated by tight junctions and apical microvilli in epithelial cells grown on a basement membrane-like support. In contrast, none of the other proteins stimulated the cells to mature in vitro. The authors conclude that certain basement membrane components actively promote fetal intestinal epithelial cell differentiation. PMID:2295387

  8. Locating Local Earthquakes Using Single 3-Component Broadband Seismological Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, S. B.; Mitra, S.

    2015-12-01

    We devised a technique to locate local earthquakes using single 3-component broadband seismograph and analyze the factors governing the accuracy of our result. The need for devising such a technique arises in regions of sparse seismic network. In state-of-the-art location algorithms, a minimum of three station recordings are required for obtaining well resolved locations. However, the problem arises when an event is recorded by less than three stations. This may be because of the following reasons: (a) down time of stations in a sparse network; (b) geographically isolated regions with limited logistic support to setup large network; (c) regions of insufficient economy for financing multi-station network and (d) poor signal-to-noise ratio for smaller events at most stations, except the one in its closest vicinity. Our technique provides a workable solution to the above problematic scenarios. However, our methodology is strongly dependent on the velocity model of the region. Our method uses a three step processing: (a) ascertain the back-azimuth of the event from the P-wave particle motion recorded on the horizontal components; (b) estimate the hypocentral distance using the S-P time; and (c) ascertain the emergent angle from the vertical and radial components. Once this is obtained, one can ray-trace through the 1-D velocity model to estimate the hypocentral location. We test our method on synthetic data, which produces results with 99% precision. With observed data, the accuracy of our results are very encouraging. The precision of our results depend on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and choice of the right band-pass filter to isolate the P-wave signal. We used our method on minor aftershocks (3 < mb < 4) of the 2011 Sikkim earthquake using data from the Sikkim Himalayan network. Location of these events highlight the transverse strike-slip structure within the Indian plate, which was observed from source mechanism study of the mainshock and larger aftershocks.

  9. Adhesion-Induced Phase Behavior of Two-Component Membranes and Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Rouhiparkouhi, Tahereh; Weikl, Thomas R.; Discher, Dennis E.; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The interplay of adhesion and phase separation is studied theoretically for two-component membranes that can phase separate into two fluid phases such as liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases. Many adhesion geometries provide two different environments for these membranes and then partition the membranes into two segments that differ in their composition. Examples are provided by adhering vesicles, by hole- or pore-spanning membranes, and by membranes supported by chemically patterned surfaces. Generalizing a lattice model for binary mixtures to these adhesion geometries, we show that the phase behavior of the adhering membranes depends, apart from composition and temperature, on two additional parameters, the area fraction of one membrane segment and the affinity contrast between the two segments. For the generic case of non-vanishing affinity contrast, the adhering membranes undergo two distinct phase transitions and the phase diagrams in the composition/temperature plane have a generic topology that consists of two two-phase coexistence regions separated by an intermediate one-phase region. As a consequence, phase separation and domain formation is predicted to occur separately in each of the two membrane segments but not in both segments simultaneously. Furthermore, adhesion is also predicted to suppress the phase separation process for certain regions of the phase diagrams. These generic features of the adhesion-induced phase behavior are accessible to experiment. PMID:23340655

  10. The effects of applied electric fields on Micrasterias. II. The distributions of cytoplasmic and plasma membrane components.

    PubMed

    Brower, D L; Giddings, T H

    1980-04-01

    The accompanying paper describes the effects of applied electric fields on the morphogenesis and patterns of wall deposition of growing cells of Micrasterias denticulata. This paper details the effects of electric fields (approximately 14 V cm-1) on the subcellular components of Micrasterias, including a description of the plasma membrane of growing semi-cells as visualized by freeze-fracturing. There are no gross cytoplasmic abnormalities or asymmetrics in the distributions of cytoplasmic organelles caused by the fields. In particular, neither the Large Vesicles nor Dark Vesicles are concentrated in the cathode-facing (CF) halves of lobes oriented perpendicular to the fields, where extra deposition of wall material has been shown to occur. In freeze-fracture replicas, there are about twice as many plasma membrane particles near the tips of growing lobes as there are in proximal regions of the lobes. Additionally, rosettes, consisting of 6 membrane particles, are seen predominantly in the distal parts of the lobes, and these rosettes are believed to be important in the synthesis of cell wall microfibrils. The applied fields cause a large asymmetry in the distributions of membrane particles, with larger numbers being found on the CF sides of lobes oriented perpendicular to the fields. We were not able to detect a specific effect on any class of particles. Taken all together, the data support the hypothesis that some of the factors responsible for growth localization in Micrasterias reside in the plasma membrane. PMID:7400237

  11. Reversible control of current across lipid membranes by local heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Patrick; Kirchner, Silke R.; Mühlbauer, Christian; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    Lipid membranes are almost impermeable for charged molecules and ions that can pass the membrane barrier only with the help of specialized transport proteins. Here, we report how temperature manipulation at the nanoscale can be employed to reversibly control the electrical resistance and the amount of current that flows through a bilayer membrane with pA resolution. For this experiment, heating is achieved by irradiating gold nanoparticles that are attached to the bilayer membrane with laser light at their plasmon resonance frequency. We found that controlling the temperature on the nanoscale renders it possible to reproducibly regulate the current across a phospholipid membrane and the membrane of living cells in absence of any ion channels.

  12. Reversible control of current across lipid membranes by local heating

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Patrick; Kirchner, Silke R.; Mühlbauer, Christian; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Lipid membranes are almost impermeable for charged molecules and ions that can pass the membrane barrier only with the help of specialized transport proteins. Here, we report how temperature manipulation at the nanoscale can be employed to reversibly control the electrical resistance and the amount of current that flows through a bilayer membrane with pA resolution. For this experiment, heating is achieved by irradiating gold nanoparticles that are attached to the bilayer membrane with laser light at their plasmon resonance frequency. We found that controlling the temperature on the nanoscale renders it possible to reproducibly regulate the current across a phospholipid membrane and the membrane of living cells in absence of any ion channels. PMID:26940847

  13. LOCALIZATION AND PROTEOMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANE MICRODOMAINS IN THE INNER EAR

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Paul V.; Cheng, Andrew L.; Colby, Candice C.; Liu, Liqian; Patel, Chintan K.; Josephs, Lydia; Duncan, R. Keith

    2014-01-01

    Biological membranes organize and compartmentalize cell signaling into discrete microdomains, a process that often involves stable, cholesterol-rich platforms that facilitate protein-protein interactions. Polarized cells with distinct apical and basolateral cell processes rely on such compartmentalization to maintain proper function. In the cochlea, a variety of highly polarized sensory and non-sensory cells are responsible for the early stages of sound processing in the ear, yet little is known about the mechanisms that traffic and organize signaling complexes within these cells. We sought to determine the prevalence, localization, and protein composition of cholesterol-rich lipid microdomains in the cochlea. Lipid raft components, including the scaffolding protein caveolin and the ganglioside GM1, were found in sensory, neural, and glial cells. Mass spectrometry of detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fractions revealed over 600 putative raft proteins associated with subcellular localization, trafficking, and metabolism. Among the DRM constituents were several proteins involved in human forms of deafness including those involved in ion homeostasis, such as the potassium channel KCNQ1, the co-transporter SLC12A2, and gap junction proteins GJA1 and GJB6. The presence of caveolin in the cochlea and the abundance of proteins in cholesterol-rich DRM suggest that lipid microdomains play a significant role in cochlear physiology. PMID:24713161

  14. Expression and localization of predicted inclusion membrane proteins in Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mary M; Bauler, Laura D; Lam, Jennifer; Hackstadt, Ted

    2015-12-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that replicates in a membrane-bound vacuole termed the inclusion. Early in the infection cycle, the pathogen extensively modifies the inclusion membrane through incorporation of numerous type III secreted effector proteins, called inclusion membrane proteins (Incs). These proteins are characterized by a bilobed hydrophobic domain of 40 amino acids. The presence of this domain has been used to predict up to 59 putative Incs for C. trachomatis; however, localization to the inclusion membrane with specific antibodies has been demonstrated for only about half of them. Here, we employed recently developed genetic tools to verify the localization of predicted Incs that had not been previously localized to the inclusion membrane. Expression of epitope-tagged putative Incs identified 10 that were previously unverified as inclusion membrane localized and thus authentic Incs. One novel Inc and 3 previously described Incs were localized to inclusion membrane microdomains, as evidenced by colocalization with phosphorylated Src (p-Src). Several predicted Incs did not localize to the inclusion membrane but instead remained associated with the bacteria. Using Yersinia as a surrogate host, we demonstrated that many of these are not secreted via type III secretion, further suggesting they may not be true Incs. Collectively, our results highlight the utility of genetic tools for demonstrating secretion from chlamydia. Further mechanistic studies aimed at elucidating effector function will advance our understanding of how the pathogen maintains its unique intracellular niche and mediates interactions with the host. PMID:26416906

  15. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  16. Effect of Cholesterol on the Structure of a Five-Component Mitochondria-Like Phospholipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Kelly; Patel, Amit; Dies, Hannah; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.; Fradin, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes have a complex phospholipid composition that varies greatly depending on the organism, cell type and function. In spite of this complexity, most structural data available for phospholipid bilayers concern model systems containing only one or two different phospholipids. Here, we examine the effect of cholesterol on the structure of a complex membrane reflecting the lipid composition of mitochondrial membranes, with five different types of headgroups (phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylserine (PS) and cardiolipin (CL)) and a variety of hydrocarbon tails. This particular system was chosen because elevated cholesterol contents in mitochondrial membranes have been linked to a breaking down of Bax-mediated membrane permeabilization and resistance to cancer treatments. High resolution electron density profiles were determined by X-ray reflectivity, while the area per phospholipid chain, Apc, and the chain order parameter, SX-ray, were determined by wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). We show that chain order increases upon the addition of cholesterol, resulting in both a thickening of the lipid bilayer and a reduction in the average surface area per phospholipid chain. This effect, well known as cholesterol’s condensation effect, is similar, but not as pronounced as for single-component phospholipid membranes. We conclude by discussing the relevance of these findings for the insertion of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in mitochondrial membranes with elevated cholesterol content. PMID:26529029

  17. MEMBRANE FILTER PROCEDURE FOR ENUMERATING THE COMPONENT GENERA OF THE COLIFORM GROUP IN SEAWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A facile, quantitative, membrane filter procedure (mC) for defining the distribution of coliform populations in seawater according to the component genera was developed. The procedure, which utilizes a series of in situ substrate tests to obviate the picking of colonies for ident...

  18. Coxiella burnetii Effector Proteins That Localize to the Parasitophorous Vacuole Membrane Promote Intracellular Replication

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Charles L.; Beare, Paul A.; Voth, Daniel E.; Howe, Dale; Cockrell, Diane C.; Bastidas, Robert J.; Valdivia, Raphael H.

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Coxiella burnetii directs biogenesis of a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that acquires host endolysosomal components. Formation of a PV that supports C. burnetii replication requires a Dot/Icm type 4B secretion system (T4BSS) that delivers bacterial effector proteins into the host cell cytosol. Thus, a subset of T4BSS effectors are presumed to direct PV biogenesis. Recently, the PV-localized effector protein CvpA was found to promote C. burnetii intracellular growth and PV expansion. We predict additional C. burnetii effectors localize to the PV membrane and regulate eukaryotic vesicle trafficking events that promote pathogen growth. To identify these vacuolar effector proteins, a list of predicted C. burnetii T4BSS substrates was compiled using bioinformatic criteria, such as the presence of eukaryote-like coiled-coil domains. Adenylate cyclase translocation assays revealed 13 proteins were secreted in a Dot/Icm-dependent fashion by C. burnetii during infection of human THP-1 macrophages. Four of the Dot/Icm substrates, termed Coxiella vacuolar protein B (CvpB), CvpC, CvpD, and CvpE, labeled the PV membrane and LAMP1-positive vesicles when ectopically expressed as fluorescently tagged fusion proteins. C. burnetii ΔcvpB, ΔcvpC, ΔcvpD, and ΔcvpE mutants exhibited significant defects in intracellular replication and PV formation. Genetic complementation of the ΔcvpD and ΔcvpE mutants rescued intracellular growth and PV generation, whereas the growth of C. burnetii ΔcvpB and ΔcvpC was rescued upon cohabitation with wild-type bacteria in a common PV. Collectively, these data indicate C. burnetii encodes multiple effector proteins that target the PV membrane and benefit pathogen replication in human macrophages. PMID:25422265

  19. Electrostatic Localization of RNA to Protocell Membranes by Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Neha P; Tobé, Sylvia; Hill, Ian T; Szostak, Jack W

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative interactions between RNA and vesicle membranes on the prebiotic earth may have led to the emergence of primitive cells. The membrane surface offers a potential platform for the catalysis of reactions involving RNA, but this scenario relies upon the existence of a simple mechanism by which RNA could become associated with protocell membranes. Here, we show that electrostatic interactions provided by short, basic, amphipathic peptides can be harnessed to drive RNA binding to both zwitterionic phospholipid and anionic fatty acid membranes. We show that the association of cationic molecules with phospholipid vesicles can enhance the local positive charge on a membrane and attract RNA polynucleotides. This phenomenon can be reproduced with amphipathic peptides as short as three amino acids. Finally, we show that peptides can cross bilayer membranes to localize encapsulated RNA. This mechanism of polynucleotide confinement could have been important for primitive cellular evolution. PMID:26223820

  20. Electrostatic Localization of RNA to Protocell Membranes by Cationic Hydrophobic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Neha P; Tobé, Sylvia; Hill, Ian T; Szostak, Jack W

    2015-09-28

    Cooperative interactions between RNA and vesicle membranes on the prebiotic earth may have led to the emergence of primitive cells. The membrane surface offers a potential platform for the catalysis of reactions involving RNA, but this scenario relies upon the existence of a simple mechanism by which RNA could become associated with protocell membranes. Here, we show that electrostatic interactions provided by short, basic, amphipathic peptides can be harnessed to drive RNA binding to both zwitterionic phospholipid and anionic fatty acid membranes. We show that the association of cationic molecules with phospholipid vesicles can enhance the local positive charge on a membrane and attract RNA polynucleotides. This phenomenon can be reproduced with amphipathic peptides as short as three amino acids. Finally, we show that peptides can cross bilayer membranes to localize encapsulated RNA. This mechanism of polynucleotide confinement could have been important for primitive cellular evolution. PMID:26223820

  1. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-02-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion.

  2. Structure of the poly-C9 component of the complement membrane attack complex

    PubMed Central

    Dudkina, Natalya V.; Spicer, Bradley A.; Reboul, Cyril F.; Conroy, Paul J.; Lukoyanova, Natalya; Elmlund, Hans; Law, Ruby H. P.; Ekkel, Susan M.; Kondos, Stephanie C.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Ramm, Georg; Whisstock, James C.; Saibil, Helen R.; Dunstone, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    The membrane attack complex (MAC)/perforin-like protein complement component 9 (C9) is the major component of the MAC, a multi-protein complex that forms pores in the membrane of target pathogens. In contrast to homologous proteins such as perforin and the cholesterol-dependent cytolysins (CDCs), all of which require the membrane for oligomerisation, C9 assembles directly onto the nascent MAC from solution. However, the molecular mechanism of MAC assembly remains to be understood. Here we present the 8 Å cryo-EM structure of a soluble form of the poly-C9 component of the MAC. These data reveal a 22-fold symmetrical arrangement of C9 molecules that yield an 88-strand pore-forming β-barrel. The N-terminal thrombospondin-1 (TSP1) domain forms an unexpectedly extensive part of the oligomerisation interface, thus likely facilitating solution-based assembly. These TSP1 interactions may also explain how additional C9 subunits can be recruited to the growing MAC subsequent to membrane insertion. PMID:26841934

  3. Role of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate in Regulating EHD2 Plasma Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Laura C.; Caplan, Steve; Naslavsky, Naava

    2013-01-01

    The four mammalian C-terminal Eps15 homology domain-containing proteins (EHD1-EHD4) play pivotal roles in endocytic membrane trafficking. While EHD1, EHD3 and EHD4 associate with intracellular tubular/vesicular membranes, EHD2 localizes to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Currently, little is known about the regulation of EHD2. Thus, we sought to define the factors responsible for EHD2’s association with the plasma membrane. The subcellular localization of endogenous EHD2 was examined in HeLa cells using confocal microscopy. Although EHD partner proteins typically mediate EHD membrane recruitment, EHD2 was targeted to the plasma membrane independent of two well-characterized binding proteins, syndapin2 and EHBP1. Additionally, the EH domain of EHD2, which facilitates canonical EHD protein interactions, was not required to direct overexpressed EHD2 to the cell surface. On the other hand, several lines of evidence indicate that the plasma membrane phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) plays a crucial role in regulating EHD2 subcellular localization. Pharmacologic perturbation of PIP2 metabolism altered PIP2 plasma membrane distribution (as assessed by confocal microscopy), and caused EHD2 to redistribute away from the plasma membrane. Furthermore, overexpressed EHD2 localized to PIP2-enriched vacuoles generated by active Arf6. Finally, we show that although cytochalasin D caused actin microfilaments to collapse, EHD2 was nevertheless maintained at the plasma membrane. Intriguingly, cytochalasin D induced relocalization of both PIP2 and EHD2 to actin aggregates, supporting a role of PIP2 in controlling EHD2 subcellular localization. Altogether, these studies emphasize the significance of membrane lipid composition for EHD2 subcellular distribution and offer new insights into the regulation of this important endocytic protein. PMID:24040268

  4. ERAD Components in Organisms with Complex Red Plastids Suggest Recruitment of a Preexisting Protein Transport Pathway for the Periplastid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Felsner, Gregor; Sommer, Maik S.; Gruenheit, Nicole; Hempel, Franziska; Moog, Daniel; Zauner, Stefan; Martin, William; Maier, Uwe G.

    2011-01-01

    The plastids of cryptophytes, haptophytes, and heterokontophytes (stramenopiles) (together once known as chromists) are surrounded by four membranes, reflecting the origin of these plastids through secondary endosymbiosis. They share this trait with apicomplexans, which are alveolates, the plastids of which have been suggested to stem from the same secondary symbiotic event and therefore form a phylogenetic clade, the chromalveolates. The chromists are quantitatively the most important eukaryotic contributors to primary production in marine ecosystems. The mechanisms of protein import across their four plastid membranes are still poorly understood. Components of an endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery in cryptophytes, partially encoded by the reduced genome of the secondary symbiont (the nucleomorph), are implicated in protein transport across the second outermost plastid membrane. Here, we show that the haptophyte Emiliania huxleyi, like cryptophytes, stramenopiles, and apicomplexans, possesses a nuclear-encoded symbiont-specific ERAD machinery (SELMA, symbiont-specific ERAD-like machinery) in addition to the host ERAD system, with targeting signals that are able to direct green fluorescent protein or yellow fluorescent protein to the predicted cellular localization in transformed cells of the stramenopile Phaeodactylum tricornutum. Phylogenies of the duplicated ERAD factors reveal that all SELMA components trace back to a red algal origin. In contrast, the host copies of cryptophytes and haptophytes associate with the green lineage to the exclusion of stramenopiles and alveolates. Although all chromalveolates with four membrane-bound plastids possess the SELMA system, this has apparently not arisen in a single endosymbiotic event. Thus, our data do not support the chromalveolate hypothesis. PMID:21081314

  5. Membrane-Based Characterization of a Gas Component — A Transient Sensor Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lazik, Detlef

    2014-01-01

    Based on a multi-gas solution-diffusion problem for a dense symmetrical membrane this paper presents a transient theory of a planar, membrane-based sensor cell for measuring gas from both initial conditions: dynamic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Using this theory, the ranges for which previously developed, simpler approaches are valid will be discussed; these approaches are of vital interest for membrane-based gas sensor applications. Finally, a new theoretical approach is introduced to identify varying gas components by arranging sensor cell pairs resulting in a concentration independent gas-specific critical time. Literature data for the N2, O2, Ar, CH4, CO2, H2 and C4H10 diffusion coefficients and solubilities for a polydimethylsiloxane membrane were used to simulate gas specific sensor responses. The results demonstrate the influence of (i) the operational mode; (ii) sensor geometry and (iii) gas matrices (air, Ar) on that critical time. Based on the developed theory the case-specific suitable membrane materials can be determined and both operation and design options for these sensors can be optimized for individual applications. The results of mixing experiments for different gases (O2, CO2) in a gas matrix of air confirmed the theoretical predictions. PMID:24608004

  6. Localization of cytochromes to the outer membrane of anaerobically grown Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, C R; Myers, J M

    1992-01-01

    In gram-negative bacteria, numerous cell functions, including respiration-linked electron transport, have been ascribed to the cytoplasmic membrane. Gram-negative bacteria which use solid substrates (e.g., oxidized manganese or iron) as terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration are presented with a unique problem: they must somehow establish an electron transport link across the outer membrane between large particulate metal oxides and the electron transport chain in the cytoplasmic membrane. When the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 is grown under anaerobic conditions and membrane fractions are purified from cells lysed by an EDTA-lysozyme-polyoxyethylene cetyl ether (Brij 58) protocol, approximately 80% of its membrane-bound cytochromes are localized in its outer membrane. These outer membrane cytochromes could not be dislodged by treatment with chaotropic agents or by increased concentrations of the nonionic detergent Brij 58, suggesting that they are integral membrane proteins. Cytochrome distribution in cells lysed by a French press protocol confirm the localization of cytochromes to the outer membrane of anaerobically grown cells. This novel cytochrome distribution could play a key role in the anaerobic respiratory capabilities of this bacterium, especially in its ability to mediate manganese and iron reduction. Images PMID:1592800

  7. Inhibition effect of a non-permeating component on gas permeability of nanoporous graphene membranes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Boyao; Sun, Chengzhen; Bai, Bofeng

    2015-09-28

    We identify the inhibition effect of a non-permeating gas component on gases permeating through the nanoporous graphene membranes and reveal its mechanisms from molecular dynamics insights. The membrane separation process involves the gas mixtures of CH4/H2 and CH4/N2 with different partial pressures of the non-permeating gas component (CH4). The results show that the permeance of the H2 and N2 molecules decreases sharply in the presence of the CH4 molecules. The permeance of the N2 molecules can be reduced to as much as 64.5%. The adsorption of the CH4 molecules on the graphene surface weakens the surface adsorption of the H2 and N2 molecules due to a competitive mechanism, accordingly reducing the permeability of the H2 and N2 molecules. For the N2 molecules with stronger adsorption ability, the reduction of the permeance is greater. On the other hand, the CH4 molecules near the nanopore have a blocking effect, which further inhibits the permeation of the H2 and N2 molecules. In addition, we predict the selectivity of the nanopore by using density functional theory calculations. This work can provide valuable guidance for the application of nanoporous graphene membranes in the separation of the gas mixtures consisting of permeating and non-permeating components with different adsorption abilities. PMID:26299564

  8. Transport of pure components in pervaporation through a microporous silica membrane.

    PubMed

    Bettens, Ben; Dekeyzer, Sofie; Van der Bruggen, Bart; Degrève, Jan; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2005-03-24

    The pervaporation mechanism of pure components through a commercial microporous silica membrane was studied by performing experiments using water, methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol, and n-propanol in the 40-80 degrees C temperature range. Experimental fluxes were correlated to feed temperature and viscosity. It was found that the permeation mechanism obeys the adsorption-diffusion description, covering both the microscopic models based on configurational (micropore) diffusion and on activated surface diffusion. The contribution of convection was negligible. Size parameters for the permeating molecules such as molecular weight, kinetic diameter, and effective diameter, which are expected to have an influence on diffusion, did not correlate with the flux, thus strongly emphasizing the importance of sorption as the rate-determining step for transport in the pervaporation process. This was confirmed by correlating parameters reflecting polarity with flux: an exponential relation between the Hansen polarity (especially the hydrogen bonding component) and the flux was observed. A similar correlation was found between the dielectric constant and the flux. Furthermore, the flux increases in the same direction as the hydrophilicity of the pure components (log P). The effects of membrane surface tension and contact angles are less outspoken, but experiments performed on glass supported and silica supported membrane top layers suggest an important influence of the sublayers on the flux. PMID:16863187

  9. Localization of glycolipids in membranes by in vivo labeling and neutron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Weik, M; Patzelt, H; Zaccai, G; Oesterhelt, D

    1998-02-01

    Evidence is accumulating for the lateral organization of cell membrane lipids and proteins in the context of sorting or intracellular signaling. So far, however, information has been lacking on the details of protein-lipid interactions in such aggregates. Purple membranes are patches made up of lipids and the protein bacteriorhodopsin in the plasma membrane of certain Archaea. Naturally crystalline, they provide a unique opportunity to study the structure of a natural membrane at submolecular resolution by diffraction methods. We present a direct structural determination of the glycolipids with respect to bacteriorhodopsin in these membranes. Deuterium labels incorporated in vivo into the sugar moieties of the major glycolipid were localized by neutron diffraction. The data suggest a role for specific aromatic residue-carbohydrate stacking interactions in the formation of the purple membrane crystalline patches. PMID:9660925

  10. Localization and proliferation of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane in normal state and regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Takenori; Burford, James L.; Hong, Young-Kwon; Gevorgyan, Haykanush; Lam, Lisa; Mori, Nozomu; Peti-Peterdi, Janos

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •We newly developed the whole-mount imaging method of the tympanic membrane. •Lymphatic vessel loops were localized around the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. •In regeneration, abundant lymphatic vessels were observed in the pars tensa. •Site-specific lymphatic vessels may play an important role in the tympanic membrane. -- Abstract: We clarified the localization of lymphatic vessels in the tympanic membrane and proliferation of lymphatic vessels during regeneration after perforation of the tympanic membrane by using whole-mount imaging of the tympanic membrane of Prox1 GFP mice. In the pars tensa, lymphatic vessel loops surrounded the malleus handle and annulus tympanicus. Apart from these locations, lymphatic vessel loops were not observed in the pars tensa in the normal tympanic membrane. Lymphatic vessel loops surrounding the malleus handle were connected to the lymphatic vessel loops in the pars flaccida and around the tensor tympani muscle. Many lymphatic vessel loops were detected in the pars flaccida. After perforation of the tympanic membrane, abundant lymphatic regeneration was observed in the pars tensa, and these regenerated lymphatic vessels extended from the lymphatic vessels surrounding the malleus at day 7. These results suggest that site-specific lymphatic vessels play an important role in the tympanic membrane.

  11. Two-Component Coarse-Grained Molecular-Dynamics Model for the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2012-01-01

    We present a two-component coarse-grained molecular-dynamics model for simulating the erythrocyte membrane. The proposed model possesses the key feature of combing the lipid bilayer and the erythrocyte cytoskeleton, thus showing both the fluidic behavior of the lipid bilayer and the elastic properties of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. In this model, three types of coarse-grained particles are introduced to represent clusters of lipid molecules, actin junctions, and band-3 complexes, respectively. The proposed model facilitates simulations that span large length scales (approximately micrometers) and timescales (approximately milliseconds). By tuning the interaction potential parameters, we were able to control the diffusivity and bending rigidity of the membrane model. We studied the membrane under shearing and found that at a low shear strain rate, the developed shear stress was due mainly to the spectrin network, whereas the viscosity of the lipid bilayer contributed to the resulting shear stress at higher strain rates. In addition, we investigated the effects of a reduced spectrin network connectivity on the shear modulus of the membrane. PMID:22225800

  12. An intimate link between antimicrobial peptide sequence diversity and binding to essential components of bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Paulina; Rosa, Rafael D; Destoumieux-Garzón, Delphine

    2016-05-01

    Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are widespread in the living kingdom. They are key effectors of defense reactions and mediators of competitions between organisms. They are often cationic and amphiphilic, which favors their interactions with the anionic membranes of microorganisms. Several AMP families do not directly alter membrane integrity but rather target conserved components of the bacterial membranes in a process that provides them with potent and specific antimicrobial activities. Thus, lipopolysaccharides (LPS), lipoteichoic acids (LTA) and the peptidoglycan precursor Lipid II are targeted by a broad series of AMPs. Studying the functional diversity of immune effectors tells us about the essential residues involved in AMP mechanism of action. Marine invertebrates have been found to produce a remarkable diversity of AMPs. Molluscan defensins and crustacean anti-LPS factors (ALF) are diverse in terms of amino acid sequence and show contrasted phenotypes in terms of antimicrobial activity. Their activity is directed essentially against Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria due to their specific interactions with Lipid II or Lipid A, respectively. Through those interesting examples, we discuss here how sequence diversity generated throughout evolution informs us on residues required for essential molecular interaction at the bacterial membranes and subsequent antibacterial activity. Through the analysis of molecular variants having lost antibacterial activity or shaped novel functions, we also discuss the molecular bases of functional divergence in AMPs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Antimicrobial peptides edited by Karl Lohner and Kai Hilpert. PMID:26498397

  13. Hybrid membrane-microfluidic components using a novel ceramic MEMS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Brent J.; Polyakov, Oleg; Rinaldo, Chris

    2012-03-01

    A novel hybrid nano/microfabrication technology has been employed to produce unique MEMS and microfluidic components that integrate nanoporous membranes. The components are made by micromachining a self-organized nanostructured ceramic material that is biocompatible and amenable to surface chemistry modification. Microfluidic structures, such as channels and wells, can be made with a precision of <2 microns. Thin-film membranes can be integrated into the bottom of these structures, featuring a wide range of possible thicknesses, from 100 micron to <50 nm. Additionally, these membranes may be non-porous or porous (with controllable pore sizes from 200 nm to <5 nm), for sophisticated size-based separations. With previous and current support from the NIH SBIR program, we have built several unique devices, and demonstrated improved separations, cell culturing, and imaging (optical and electron microscopy) versus standard products. Being ceramic, the material is much more robust to demanding environments (e.g. high and low temperatures and organic solvents), compared to polymer-based devices. Additionally, we have applied multiple surface modification techniques, including atomic layer deposition, to manipulate properties such as electrical conductivity. This microfabrication technology is highly scaleable, and thus can yield low-cost, reliable, disposable microcomponents and devices. Specific applications that can benefit from this technology includes cell culturing and assays, imaging by cryo-electron tomography, environmental sample processing, as well as many others.

  14. Different Transmembrane Domains Associate with Distinct Endoplasmic Reticulum Components during Membrane Integration of a Polytopic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Meacock, Suzanna L.; Lecomte, Fabienne J.L.; Crawshaw, Samuel G.; High, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    We have been studying the insertion of the seven transmembrane domain (TM) protein opsin to gain insights into how the multiple TMs of polytopic proteins are integrated at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We find that the ER components associated with the first and second TMs of the nascent opsin polypeptide chain are clearly distinct. The first TM (TM1) is adjacent to the α and β subunits of the Sec61 complex, and a novel component, a protein associated with the ER translocon of 10 kDa (PAT-10). The most striking characteristic of PAT-10 is that it remains adjacent to TM1 throughout the biogenesis and membrane integration of the full-length opsin polypeptide. TM2 is also found to be adjacent to Sec61α and Sec61β during its membrane integration. However, TM2 does not form any adducts with PAT-10; rather, a transient association with the TRAM protein is observed. We show that the association of PAT-10 with opsin TM1 does not require the N-glycosylation of the nascent chain and occurs irrespective of the amino acid sequence and transmembrane topology of TM1. We conclude that the precise makeup of the ER membrane insertion site can be distinct for the different transmembrane domains of a polytopic protein. We find that the environment of a particular TM can be influenced by both the “stage” of nascent chain biosynthesis reached, and the TM's relative location within the polypeptide. PMID:12475939

  15. Two unrelated putative membrane-bound progestin receptors, progesterone membrane receptor component 1 (PGMRC1) and membrane progestin receptor (mPR) beta, are expressed in the rainbow trout oocyte and exhibit similar ovarian expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mourot, Brigitte; Nguyen, Thaovi; Fostier, Alexis; Bobe, Julien

    2006-01-01

    Background In lower vertebrates, steroid-induced oocyte maturation is considered to involve membrane-bound progestin receptors. Two totally distinct classes of putative membrane-bound progestin receptors have been reported in vertebrates. A first class of receptors, now termed progesterone membrane receptor component (PGMRC; subtypes 1 and 2) has been studied since 1996 but never studied in a fish species nor in the oocyte of any animal species. A second class of receptors, termed membrane progestin receptors (mPR; subtypes alpha, beta and gamma), was recently described in vertebrates and implicated in the progestin-initiated induction of oocyte maturation in fish. Methods In the present study, we report the characterization of the full coding sequence of rainbow trout PGMRC1 and mPR beta cDNAs, their tissue distribution, their ovarian expression profiles during oogenesis, their hormonal regulation in the full grown ovary and the in situ localization of PGMRC1 mRNA in the ovary. Results Our results clearly show, for the first time in any animal species, that rainbow trout PGMRC1 mRNA is present in the oocyte and has a strong expression in ovarian tissue. In addition, we show that both mPR beta and PGMRC1, two members of distinct membrane-bound progestin receptor classes, exhibit highly similar ovarian expression profiles during the reproductive cycle with maximum levels during vitellogenesis and a down-expression during late vitellogenesis. In addition, the mRNA abundance of both genes is not increased after in vitro hormonal stimulation of full grown follicles by maturation inducing hormones. Conclusion Together, our findings suggest that PGMRC1 is a new possible participant in the progestin-induced oocyte maturation in fish. However, its participation in the process of oocyte maturation, which remains to be confirmed, would occur at post-transcriptional levels. PMID:16457725

  16. Single-spanning membrane protein insertion in membrane mimetic systems: role and localization of aromatic residues.

    PubMed

    Coïc, Yves-Marie; Vincent, Michel; Gallay, Jacques; Baleux, Françoise; Mousson, Florence; Beswick, Veronica; Neumann, Jean-Michel; de Foresta, Béatrice

    2005-12-01

    Membrane protein insertion in the lipid bilayer is determining for their activity and is governed by various factors such as specific sequence motifs or key amino-acids. A detailed fluorescence study of such factors is exemplified with PMP1, a small (38 residues) single-membrane span protein that regulates the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in yeast and specifically interacts with phosphatidylserines. Such interactions may stabilize raft domains that have been shown to contain H(+)-ATPase. Previous NMR studies of various fragments have focused on the critical role of interfacial residues in the PMP1 structure and intermolecular interactions. The C-terminal domain contains a terminal Phe (F38), a single Trp (W28) and a single Tyr (Y25) that may act together to anchor the protein in the membrane. In order to describe the location and dynamics of W28 and the influence of Y25 on protein insertion within membrane, we carried out a detailed steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence study of the synthetic G13-F38 fragment and its Tyr-less mutant, Y25L in various membrane mimetic systems. Detergent micelles are conveniently used for this purpose. We used dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) in order to compare with and complement previous NMR results. In addition, dodecylmaltoside (DM) was used so that we could apply our recently described new quenching method by two brominated analogs of DM (de Foresta et al. 2002, Eur. Biophys. J. 31:185-97). In both systems, and in the presence and absence of Y25, W28 was shown to be located below but close to the polar headgroup region, as shown by its maximum emission wavelengths (lambda(max)), curves for the quenching of Trp by the brominated analogs of DM and bimolecular constants for quenching (k(q)) by acrylamide. Results were interpreted by comparison with calibration data obtained with fluorescent model peptides. Time-resolved anisotropy measurements were consistent with PMP1 fragment immobilization within peptide-detergent complexes. We

  17. The localization of chitin synthase in membranous vesicles (chitosomes) in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Sietsma, J H; Beth Din, A; Ziv, V; Sjollema, K A; Yarden, O

    1996-07-01

    Polyclonal anti-chitin synthase antibodies raised against the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CHS2 gene product were used to identify and localize chitin synthase in the filamentous ascomycete Neurospora crassa. A single band of approximately 110 kDa was observed in Western blots of total protein extracts of N. crassa, probed with these antibodies. However, several additional bands were labelled when membrane fraction proteins (microsomes) were probed. Histo-immunochemical localization of chitin synthase confirmed that the polypeptide is compartmentalized in membranous vesicles (chitosomes), which are abundant in the vicinity of the hyphal tip. TEM analysis did not reveal chitin synthase in the plasma membrane. However, dense labelling of membrane-associated chitin synthase was observed by light-microscopic analysis of N. crassa protoplasts and at young hyphal tips. PMID:8757723

  18. Interactions of phosphororganic agents with water and components of polyelectrolyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Neimark, Alexander V

    2011-11-24

    Interactions of nerve G-agents (sarin and soman) and their simulants DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate) and DIFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate) with water and components of polyelectrolyte membranes are studied using ab initio calculations in conjunction with thermodynamic modeling using the conductor-like screening model for real solvents (COSMO-RS). To test reliability of COSMO-RS calculations, we measured the vapor-liquid equilibrium in DMMP-water mixtures and found quantitative agreement between computed and experimental results. Using COSMO-RS, we studied the interactions of phosphororganic agents with the characteristic fragments of perfluorinated and sulfonated polystyrene (sPS) polyelectrolytes, which are explored for protective clothing membranes. We found that both simulants, DIFP and DMMP, mimic the thermodynamic properties of G-agents reasonably well; however, there are certain specific differences that are discussed. We also suggested that sPS-based polyelectrolytes have less affinity for phosphorganic agents compared to prefluorinated polyelectrolytes similar to Nafion. PMID:21988501

  19. Localized Patch Clamping of Plasma Membrane of a Polarized Plant Cell 1

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alison R.; Brownlee, Colin

    1992-01-01

    We used an ultraviolet laser to rupture a small region of cell wall of a polarized Fucus spiralis rhizoid cell and gained localized access to the plasma membrane at the growing apex. Careful control of cell turgor enabled a small portion of plasma membrane-bound cytoplasm to be exposed. Gigaohm seals allowing single-channel recordings were obtained with a high success rate using this method with conventional patch clamp techniques. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:16669092

  20. Tuning nano electric field to affect restrictive membrane area on localized single cell nano-electroporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Tuhin Subhra; Wang, Pen-Cheng; Chang, Hwan-You; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2013-12-01

    Interaction of electric field with biological cells is an important phenomenon for field induced drug delivery system. We demonstrate a selective and localized single cell nano-electroporation (LSCNEP) by applying an intense electric field on a submicron region of the single cell membrane, which can effectively allow high efficient molecular delivery but low cell damage. The delivery rate is controlled by adjusting transmembrane potential and manipulating membrane status. Thermal and ionic influences are deteriorated from the cell membrane by dielectric passivation. Either reversible or irreversible by LSCNEP can fully controlled with potential applications in medical diagnostics and biological studies.

  1. Immunohistochemical localization of protein components of catecholamine storage vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Geffen, L. B.; Livett, B. G.; Rush, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    1. The distribution of specific proteins in sympathetic neurones has been examined by immunofluorescent histology using antibodies prepared against soluble protein components of the catecholamine storage vesicles of the adrenal medulla. 2. Two antigen preparations were separated by ion exchange chromatography of the soluble proteins released on osmotic lysis of catecholamine storage vesicles which had been isolated by centrifugation from homogenates of sheep adrenal medulla. One fraction (AgDH) had high dopamine-β-hydroxylase activity, while another (AgCB), consisting of the bulk of the protein, had some capacity to bind catecholamines. On disk gel electrophoresis the antigens ran as single bands with very different mobilities. 3. Antisera (AsDH) and (AsCB) produced in rabbits to the two antigens were shown to react specifically with their antigens by immunodiffusion and electrophoresis in agarose. 4. Indirect immunofluorescent staining of tissue sections was achieved by layering first the rabbit anti-sera, followed by goat anti-rabbit globulin serum which had been conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate. 5. The adrenal medulla and the cell bodies of sympathetic ganglia showed the most intense green fluorescence with the immune rabbit sera, and hardly stained when pre-immune serum from the same animal was used. The reactivity of the antisera could be abolished by incubation with the corresponding antigen. 6. The preterminal and terminal axons of sympathetic nerves also stained specifically but less intensely with both antisera. When the nerves were ligated for up to 24 hr, the portion immediately proximal to the constriction showed an enhanced reaction to the antisera. 7. The results provide evidence that sympathetic neurones contain proteins immunologically identical to those involved in the synthesis and storage of noradrenaline in the adrenal medulla, and support the concept that granular vesicles are synthesized in the perikaryon of the neurone and are

  2. Local Area Water Removal Analysis of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell under Gas Purge Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold. PMID:22368495

  3. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold. PMID:22368495

  4. Extender components and surfactants affect boar sperm function and membrane behavior during cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Pettitt, M J; Buhr, M M

    1998-01-01

    To determine how the individual components of extenders affected boar sperm function and membrane structure and to test a new surfactant's cryoprotective ability, boar sperm were cryopreserved in straws in BF5 extender plus or minus egg yolk plus or minus glycerol plus or minus a surfactant (Orvus ES Paste [OEP] or various concentrations of Pluronic F-127). After thawing, sperm function and fluidity of the isolated head plasma membrane (HPM) were determined. Total motility and adenosine triphosphate content (a measure of viability) were superior postthaw in sperm extended in egg yolk plus glycerol (P < 0.05); neither surfactant improved function. Egg yolk plus any other ingredients improved normal acrosome morphology, whereas a combined measure of motility and normal acrosome morphology was better in the presence of 0.33% OEP or 0.1% Pluronic F-127 (P < 0.05 vs. controls). Head plasma membrane was isolated from freshly collected spermatozoa and spermatozoa cryopreserved in the various extenders. Membrane fluidity was monitored with the probes cis-parinaric acid (cPNA), transparinaric acid (tPNA), and 1,6-diphenyl-1 ,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The cPNA and the DPH monitor the fluidity of gel and liquid-crystalline areas of the membrane, whereas the tPNA preferentially monitors the gel-phase domains of the membrane. Additionally, DPH monitors the hydrophobic core of the bilayer. In the HPM from fresh sperm, the fluidity of each domain changed over time in a manner unique to that domain, and the behavior of the DPH domain varied among boars. The fluidity dynamics of each domain responded uniquely to cryopreservation. The cPNA domain was unaffected, the tPNA domain was altered by four of the eight extenders, and all extenders affected the fluidity of the DPH domain. Membrane structure was significantly correlated with cell function for sperm cryopreserved in extenders that preserved viability and motility. Sperm cryopreserved in egg yolk plus glycerol plus either OEP or 0

  5. Structure of two-component lipid membranes on solid support: An x-ray reflectivity study

    SciTech Connect

    Novakova, Eva; Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Salditt, Tim

    2006-11-15

    We report an x-ray reflectivity study of phospholipid membranes deposited on silicon by vesicle fusion. The samples investigated were composed of single phospholipid bilayers as well as two-component lipid bilayer systems with varied charge density. We show that the resolution obtained in the density profile across the bilayer is high enough to distinguish two head-group maxima in the profile if the sample is in the phase coexistence regime. The water layer between the bilayer and silicon is found to depend on the lipid surface charge density.

  6. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    PubMed

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, <0.9). For the first time, we have demonstrated that mitochondrial MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. PMID:26722004

  7. Intraepidermal expression of basement membrane components in the lesional skin of a patient with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, T; Ko, T; Honoki, K; Hatoko, M; Shirai, T; Vnittanakom, P

    1999-02-01

    The patient was a 15-year-old male. Since birth, he had developed blistering and erosion of the skin. Biopsy skin specimen of the bullous lesions showed subepidermal blister formation. Electron microscopic examination revealed that tissue separation had occurred at the sublamina densa level. By indirect immunofluorescence using antibodies specific for alpha 6 integrin, laminin 5, type IV collagen, and type VII collagen, all of these basement membrane components were detected as coarse granular intracytoplasmic deposits only in the basal and suprabasal cells of the blister roof. In the non-blistered regions, these basement membrane components showed a linear pattern similar to that seen in normal skin. These findings suggest that intraepidermal expression of basement membrane components was closely related to the blister formation. The biological meaning of intraepidermal expression of basement membrane components were also discussed. PMID:10091480

  8. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Clare L; Barrett, M; Toppozini, L; Yamani, Zahra; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Fragneto, Giovanna; Rheinstadter, Maikel C

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  9. ADP-ribosylation of membrane components by pertussis and cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Neto, F.A.P.; Mattera, F.; Hildebrandt, J.D.; Codina, J.; Field, J.B.; Birnbaumer, L.; Sekura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis and cholera toxins are important tools to investigate functional and structural aspects of the stimulatory (N/sub s/) and inhibitory (N/sub i/) regulatory components of adenylyl cyclase. Cholera toxin acts on N/sub s/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha../sub s/ subunit; pertussis toxin acts on N/sub i/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha..; subunit. By using (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and determining the transfer of its (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribose moiety to membrane components, it is possible to obtain information on N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A set of protocols is presented that can be used to study simultaneously and comparatively the susceptibility of N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ to be ADP-ribosylated by cholera and pertussis toxin.

  10. Chronic alcohol exposure affects the cell components involved in membrane traffic in neuronal dendrites.

    PubMed

    Romero, Ana M; Renau-Piqueras, Jaime; Marín, M Pilar; Esteban-Pretel, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    The specific traffic of the membrane components in neurons is a major requirement to establish and maintain neuronal domains-the axonal and the somatodendritic domains-and their polarized morphology. Unlike axons, dendrites contain membranous organelles, which are involved in the secretory pathway, including the endoplasmic reticulum, the Golgi apparatus and post-Golgi apparatus carriers, the cytoskeleton, and plasma membrane. A variety of molecules and factors are also involved in this process. Previous studies have shown that chronic alcohol exposure negatively affects several of these cell components, such as the Golgi apparatus or cytoskeleton in neurons. Yet very little information is available on the possible effects of this exposure on the remaining cell elements involved in intracellular trafficking in neurons, particularly in dendrites. By qualitative and quantitative electron microscopy, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, we herein show that chronic exposure to moderate levels (30 mM) of ethanol in cultured neurons reduces the volume and surface density of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, and increases the levels of GRP78, a chaperone involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Ethanol also significantly diminishes the proportion of neurons that show an extension of Golgi into dendrites and dendritic Golgi outposts, a structure present exclusively in longer, thicker apical dendrites. Both Golgi apparatus types were also fragmented into a large number of cells. We also investigated the effect of alcohol on the levels of microtubule-based motor proteins KIF5, KIF17, KIFC2, dynein, and myosin IIb, responsible for transporting different cargoes in dendrites. Of these, alcohol differently affects several of them by lowering dynein and raising KIF5, KIFC2, and myosin IIb. These results, together with other previously published ones, suggest that practically all the protein trafficking steps in dendrites are altered to a greater or lesser extent by chronic

  11. One, two or three? Probing the stoichiometry of membrane proteins by single-molecule localization microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, Franziska; Beaudouin, Joel; Eils, Roland; Heilemann, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Probing the oligomeric state of abundant molecules, such as membrane proteins in intact cells, is essential, but has not been straightforward. We address this challenge with a simple counting strategy that is capable of reporting the oligomeric state of dense, membrane-bound protein complexes. It is based on single-molecule localization microscopy to super-resolve protein structures in intact cells and basic quantitative evaluation. We validate our method with membrane-bound monomeric CD86 and dimeric cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein as model proteins and confirm their oligomeric states. We further detect oligomerization of CD80 and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein and propose coexistence of monomers and dimers for CD80 and trimeric assembly of the viral protein at the cell membrane. This approach should prove valuable for researchers striving for reliable molecular counting in cells. PMID:26358640

  12. Local defects in the nanostructure of the membrane of erythrocytes upon ionizing radiation of blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlova, E. K.; Sergunova, V. A.; Krasavin, E. A.; Boreyko, A. V.; Zavialova, A. V.; Kozlov, A. P.; Chernysh, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate local topological defects in the erythrocyte membranes resulting from the ultraviolet (UV) radiation of blood in vitro. Biological effects in the erythrocytes after exposure to UV radiation at a wavelength of 254 nm are equivalent to those after γ radiation. It has been shown that oxidative processes developing in a suspension upon UV radiation result in the disruption of the nanostructure of the membranes of erythrocytes. In the experiments, typical topological defects in the membrane nanostructure were observed. The parameters of the defects differed from the characteristics of the nanostructure of the control cell membrane without irradiation. The characteristic dimensions of the topological defects are commensurate with the size of the spectrin matrix. As a result of the exposure to the UV radiation, polymorphism of the erythrocytes was observed.

  13. S-Acylation of the cellulose synthase complex is essential for its plasma membrane localization.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Wightman, Raymond; Atanassov, Ivan; Gupta, Anjali; Hurst, Charlotte H; Hemsley, Piers A; Turner, Simon

    2016-07-01

    Plant cellulose microfibrils are synthesized by a process that propels the cellulose synthase complex (CSC) through the plane of the plasma membrane. How interactions between membranes and the CSC are regulated is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that all catalytic subunits of the CSC, known as cellulose synthase A (CESA) proteins, are S-acylated. Analysis of Arabidopsis CESA7 reveals four cysteines in variable region 2 (VR2) and two cysteines at the carboxy terminus (CT) as S-acylation sites. Mutating both the VR2 and CT cysteines permits CSC assembly and trafficking to the Golgi but prevents localization to the plasma membrane. Estimates suggest that a single CSC contains more than 100 S-acyl groups, which greatly increase the hydrophobic nature of the CSC and likely influence its immediate membrane environment. PMID:27387950

  14. Histochemical and biochemical urease localization in the periplasm and outer membrane of two Proteus mirabilis strains.

    PubMed

    McLean, R J; Cheng, K J; Gould, W D; Nickel, J C; Costerton, J W

    1986-10-01

    Proteus mirabilis, a gram-negative bacillus, is often implicated in the formation of infectious kidney stones. As ureolytic activity of this organism is thought to play a major role in its pathogenesis, we adapted our recently described urease localization technique to visualize urease activity in vivo. Urease activity was ultrastructurally localized in two clinically isolated P. mirabilis strains by precipitating the enzymatic reaction product (ammonia) with sodium tetraphenylboron. Subsequent silver staining of the cells revealed urease activity to be predominantly associated with the periplasm and outer membranes of each strain. Biochemical measurements of urease activity in P. mirabilis cell fractions correlated well with histochemical observations in that the majority of urease activity was associated with the periplasm. Membrane-bound urease activity of these strains was associated mainly with the peptidoglycan in the detergent-insoluble (outer membrane) fraction. PMID:3539291

  15. The Membrane Fusion Step of Vaccinia Virus Entry Is Cooperatively Mediated by Multiple Viral Proteins and Host Cell Components

    PubMed Central

    Laliberte, Jason P.; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    For many viruses, one or two proteins allow cell attachment and entry, which occurs through the plasma membrane or following endocytosis at low pH. In contrast, vaccinia virus (VACV) enters cells by both neutral and low pH routes; four proteins mediate cell attachment and twelve that are associated in a membrane complex and conserved in all poxviruses are dedicated to entry. The aim of the present study was to determine the roles of cellular and viral proteins in initial stages of entry, specifically fusion of the membranes of the mature virion and cell. For analysis of the role of cellular components, we used well characterized inhibitors and measured binding of a recombinant VACV virion containing Gaussia luciferase fused to a core protein; viral and cellular membrane lipid mixing with a self-quenching fluorescent probe in the virion membrane; and core entry with a recombinant VACV expressing firefly luciferase and electron microscopy. We determined that inhibitors of tyrosine protein kinases, dynamin GTPase and actin dynamics had little effect on binding of virions to cells but impaired membrane fusion, whereas partial cholesterol depletion and inhibitors of endosomal acidification and membrane blebbing had a severe effect at the later stage of core entry. To determine the role of viral proteins, virions lacking individual membrane components were purified from cells infected with members of a panel of ten conditional-lethal inducible mutants. Each of the entry protein-deficient virions had severely reduced infectivity and except for A28, L1 and L5 greatly impaired membrane fusion. In addition, a potent neutralizing L1 monoclonal antibody blocked entry at a post-membrane lipid-mixing step. Taken together, these results suggested a 2-step entry model and implicated an unprecedented number of viral proteins and cellular components involved in signaling and actin rearrangement for initiation of virus-cell membrane fusion during poxvirus entry. PMID:22194690

  16. Drosophila exocyst components Sec5, Sec6, and Sec15 regulate DE-Cadherin trafficking from recycling endosomes to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Johanna; Morgan, Matthew J; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Aresta, Sandra; Murthy, Mala; Schwarz, Thomas; Camonis, Jacques; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2005-09-01

    The E-Cadherin-catenin complex plays a critical role in epithelial cell-cell adhesion, polarization, and morphogenesis. Here, we have analyzed the mechanism of Drosophila E-Cadherin (DE-Cad) localization. Loss of function of the Drosophila exocyst components sec5, sec6, and sec15 in epithelial cells results in DE-Cad accumulation in an enlarged Rab11 recycling endosomal compartment and inhibits DE-Cad delivery to the membrane. Furthermore, Rab11 and Armadillo interact with the exocyst components Sec15 and Sec10, respectively. Our results support a model whereby the exocyst regulates DE-Cadherin trafficking, from recycling endosomes to sites on the epithelial cell membrane where Armadillo is located. PMID:16224820

  17. Dependence on membrane components of methanogenesis from methyl-CoM with formaldehyde or molecular hydrogen as electron donors.

    PubMed

    Deppenmeier, U; Blaut, M; Gottschalk, G

    1989-12-01

    Methane formation from 2-(methylthio)-ethanesulfonate (methyl-CoM) and H2 by the soluble fraction from the methanogenic bacterium strain Gö1 was stimulated up to tenfold by the addition of the membrane fraction. This stimulation was observed with membranes from various methanogenic species belonging to different phylogenetic families, but not with membranes from Escherichia coli or Acetobacterium woodii. Treatment of the membranes with strong oxidants, i.e. O2 and K3[Fe(CN)6], or with SH reagents, i.e. Ag+, p-chloromercuribenzoate or iodoacetamide, caused an irreversible decrease or loss in stimulatory activity, as did heat treatment at temperatures above 78 degrees C. Methanogenesis from methyl-CoM with formaldehyde instead of H2 as electron donor depended similarly on the membrane fraction. With membranes, 1 mol HCHO was oxidized to 1 mol CO2 and allowed the formation of 2 mol CH4 from 2 mol CH3-CoM. Without membranes, per mol of HCHO oxidized 1 mol H2 was formed and 1 mol CH4 was produced from CH3-CoM; the rate was 10-20% of that in the presence of membranes. When methyl-CoM was replaced by an artificial electron acceptor system consisting of methylviologen and metronidazole, the formaldehyde-oxidizing activity was no longer stimulated by the membrane fraction. These results demonstrate for the first time an essential function of membrane components in methanogenic electron transfer. PMID:2513188

  18. Data-Based Locally Directed Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs. Component 6. Evaluation of Occupational Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Program of Vocational Education.

    Part of a system by which local education agency (LEA) personnel may evaluate secondary and postsecondary vocational education programs, this sixth of eight components focuses on the evaluation of students' occupational competence based on the identification of job tasks. The component makes use of existing Vocational-Technical Education…

  19. Dual effect of local anesthetics on the function of excitable rod outer segment disk membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Mashimo, T.; Abe, K.; Yoshiya, I.

    1986-04-01

    The effects of local anesthetics and a divalent cation, Ca2+, on the function of rhodopsin were estimated from the measurements of light-induced proton uptake. The light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin in the rod outer segment disk membrane was enhanced at lower pH (4) but depressed at higher pHs (6 to 8) by the tertiary amine local anesthetics lidocaine, bupivacaine, tetracaine, and dibucaine. The order of local anesthetic-induced depression of the proton uptake followed that of their clinical anesthetic potencies. The depression of the proton uptake versus the concentration of the uncharged form of local anesthetic nearly describes the same curve for small and large dose of added anesthetic. Furthermore, a neutral local anesthetic, benzocaine, depressed the proton uptake at all pHs between 4 and 7. These results indicate that the depression of the proton uptake is due to the effect of only the uncharged form. It is hypothesized that the uncharged form of local anesthetics interacts hydrophobically with the rhodopsin in the disk membrane. The dual effect of local anesthetics on the proton uptake, on the other hand, suggests that the activation of the function of rhodopsin may be caused by the charged form. There was no significant change in the light-induced proton uptake by rhodopsin when 1 mM of Ca2+ was introduced into the disk membrane at varying pHs in the absence or presence of local anesthetics. This fact indicates that Ca2+ ion does not influence the diprotonating process of metarhodopsin; neither does it interfere with the local anesthetic-induced changes in the rhodopsin molecule.

  20. Crystal Structure of Escherichia coli CusC the Outer Membrane Component of a Heavy Metal Efflux Pump

    SciTech Connect

    R Kulathila; R Kulathila; M Indic; B van den Berg

    2011-12-31

    While copper has essential functions as an enzymatic co-factor, excess copper ions are toxic for cells, necessitating mechanisms for regulating its levels. The cusCBFA operon of E. coli encodes a four-component efflux pump dedicated to the extrusion of Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions. We have solved the X-ray crystal structure of CusC, the outer membrane component of the Cus heavy metal efflux pump, to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. The structure has the largest extracellular opening of any outer membrane factor (OMF) protein and suggests, for the first time, the presence of a tri-acylated N-terminal lipid anchor. The CusC protein does not have any obvious features that would make it specific for metal ions, suggesting that the narrow substrate specificity of the pump is provided by other components of the pump, most likely by the inner membrane component CusA.

  1. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a recirculating control loop which had no water quality maintenance. Results show that periodic water maintenance can improve performance of the SWME. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage of this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to enhance the robustness of the SWME through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A patented bed design that was developed for a United Technologies Aerospace System military application provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in the SWME recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for the ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  2. Determination of fluorescent probes localization in membranes by nonradiative energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Dobretsov, G E; Kurek, N K; Machov, V N; Syrejshchikova, T I; Yakimenko, M N

    1989-10-01

    One of the new methods of studying the structure and dimensions of biological membranes is based on the Förster's nonradiative energy transfer between special molecules, the so-called 'membrane fluorescent probes'. Further development of the approach is presented in this article. It consists of the combined use of the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence data with subsequent computer simulation of the energy transfer in membranes. Anthracene as an energy donor, and 4-p-(dimethylamino)styryl-N-dodecylpyridinium (DSP-12) or 4-dimethylaminochalcone (DMC) as energy acceptors were bound with artificial phospholipid membrane vesicles ('liposomes'). The synchrotron radiation was used as an impulse source for the excitation light. The steady-state fluorescence data permit the area of possible probe localization in membranes to be distinguished, while the kinetic data allow them to be narrowed significantly. There is a good agreement between the obtained localization and our present-day knowledge of lipid bilayer structure. The accuracy of the method is ca. several Angströms. PMID:2614002

  3. Measuring Local Viscosities near Plasma Membranes of Living Cells with Photonic Force Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jünger, Felix; Kohler, Felix; Meinel, Andreas; Meyer, Tim; Nitschke, Roland; Erhard, Birgit; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The molecular processes of particle binding and endocytosis are influenced by the locally changing mobility of the particle nearby the plasma membrane of a living cell. However, it is unclear how the particle's hydrodynamic drag and momentum vary locally and how they are mechanically transferred to the cell. We have measured the thermal fluctuations of a 1 μm-sized polystyrene sphere, which was placed in defined distances to plasma membranes of various cell types by using an optical trap and fast three-dimensional (3D) interferometric particle tracking. From the particle position fluctuations on a 30 μs timescale, we determined the distance-dependent change of the viscous drag in directions perpendicular and parallel to the cell membrane. Measurements on macrophages, adenocarcinoma cells, and epithelial cells revealed a significantly longer hydrodynamic coupling length of the particle to the membrane than those measured at giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) or a plane glass interface. In contrast to GUVs, there is also a strong increase in friction and in mean first passage time normal to the cell membrane. This hydrodynamic coupling transfers a different amount of momentum to the interior of living cells and might serve as an ultra-soft stimulus triggering further reactions. PMID:26331245

  4. Measuring Local Viscosities near Plasma Membranes of Living Cells with Photonic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jünger, Felix; Kohler, Felix; Meinel, Andreas; Meyer, Tim; Nitschke, Roland; Erhard, Birgit; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The molecular processes of particle binding and endocytosis are influenced by the locally changing mobility of the particle nearby the plasma membrane of a living cell. However, it is unclear how the particle’s hydrodynamic drag and momentum vary locally and how they are mechanically transferred to the cell. We have measured the thermal fluctuations of a 1 μm-sized polystyrene sphere, which was placed in defined distances to plasma membranes of various cell types by using an optical trap and fast three-dimensional (3D) interferometric particle tracking. From the particle position fluctuations on a 30 μs timescale, we determined the distance-dependent change of the viscous drag in directions perpendicular and parallel to the cell membrane. Measurements on macrophages, adenocarcinoma cells, and epithelial cells revealed a significantly longer hydrodynamic coupling length of the particle to the membrane than those measured at giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) or a plane glass interface. In contrast to GUVs, there is also a strong increase in friction and in mean first passage time normal to the cell membrane. This hydrodynamic coupling transfers a different amount of momentum to the interior of living cells and might serve as an ultra-soft stimulus triggering further reactions. PMID:26331245

  5. Dynamic Localization of G-actin During Membrane Protrusion in Neuronal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Wai; Vitriol, Eric A.; Shim, Sangwoo; Wise, Ariel L.; Velayutham, Radhi P.; Zheng, James Q.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Actin-based cell motility is fundamental for the development, function, and malignant events of eukaryotic organisms. During neural development, axonal growth cones depend on rapid assembly and disassembly of actin filaments (F-actin) for their guided extension to specific targets for wiring. Monomeric globular actin (G-actin) is the building block for F-actin but is not considered to play a direct role in spatiotemporal control of actin dynamics in cell motility. Results Here we report that a pool of G-actin dynamically localizes to the leading edge of growth cones and neuroblastoma cells to spatially elevate the G-/F-actin ratio that drives membrane protrusion and cell movement. Loss of G-actin localization leads to the cessation and retraction of membrane protrusions. Moreover, G-actin localization occurs asymmetrically in growth cones during attractive turning. Finally, we identify the actin monomer binding proteins profilin and thymosin β4 as key molecules that localize actin monomers to the leading edge of lamellipodia for their motility. Conclusions Our results suggest that dynamic localization of G-actin provides a novel mechanism to regulate the spatiotemporal actin dynamics underlying membrane protrusion in cell locomotion and growth cone chemotaxis. PMID:23746641

  6. Genetically Encoded Spy Peptide Fusion System to Detect Plasma Membrane-Localized Proteins In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Bedbrook, Claire N; Kato, Mihoko; Ravindra Kumar, Sripriya; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Nath, Ravi D; Sun, Fei; Sternberg, Paul W; Arnold, Frances H; Gradinaru, Viviana

    2015-08-20

    Membrane proteins are the main gatekeepers of cellular state, especially in neurons, serving either to maintain homeostasis or instruct response to synaptic input or other external signals. Visualization of membrane protein localization and trafficking in live cells facilitates understanding the molecular basis of cellular dynamics. We describe here a method for specifically labeling the plasma membrane-localized fraction of heterologous membrane protein expression using channelrhodopsins as a case study. We show that the genetically encoded, covalent binding SpyTag and SpyCatcher pair from the Streptococcus pyogenes fibronectin-binding protein FbaB can selectively label membrane-localized proteins in living cells in culture and in vivo in Caenorhabditis elegans. The SpyTag/SpyCatcher covalent labeling method is highly specific, modular, and stable in living cells. We have used the binding pair to develop a channelrhodopsin membrane localization assay that is amenable to high-throughput screening for opsin discovery and engineering. PMID:26211362

  7. The emergence of ribozymes synthesizing membrane components in RNA-based protocells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wentao; Yu, Chunwu; Zhang, Wentao; Zhou, Ping; Hu, Jiming

    2010-03-01

    A significant problem of the origin of life is the emergence of cellular self-replication. In the context of the "RNA world", a crucial concern is how the RNA-based protocells could achieve the ability to produce their own membrane. Here we show, with the aid of a computer simulation, that for these protocells, there would be "immediately" a selection pressure for the emergence of a ribozyme synthesizing membrane components. The ribozyme would promote the enlargement of cellular space and favor the incoming (by permeation) of RNA's precursors, thus benefit the replication of inner RNA, including itself. Via growth and division, protocells containing the ribozyme would achieve superiority and spread in the system, and meanwhile the ribozyme would spread in the system. The present work is inspiring because it suggests that the transition from molecular self-replication to cellular self-replication might have occurred naturally (and necessarily) in the origin of life, leading to the emergence of Darwinian evolution at the cellular level. PMID:19961895

  8. Local Partition Coefficients Govern Solute Permeability of Cholesterol-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Zocher, Florian; van der Spoel, David; Pohl, Peter; Hub, Jochen S.

    2013-01-01

    The permeability of lipid membranes for metabolic molecules or drugs is routinely estimated from the solute’s oil/water partition coefficient. However, the molecular determinants that modulate the permeability in different lipid compositions have remained unclear. Here, we combine scanning electrochemical microscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations to study the effect of cholesterol on membrane permeability, because cholesterol is abundant in all animal membranes. The permeability of membranes from natural lipid mixtures to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic solutes monotonously decreases with cholesterol concentration [Chol]. The same is true for hydrophilic solutes and planar bilayers composed of dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine or dioleoyl-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine. However, these synthetic lipids give rise to a bell-shaped dependence of membrane permeability on [Chol] for very hydrophobic solutes. The simulations indicate that cholesterol does not affect the diffusion constant inside the membrane. Instead, local partition coefficients at the lipid headgroups and at the lipid tails are modulated oppositely by cholesterol, explaining the experimental findings. Structurally, these modulations are induced by looser packing at the lipid headgroups and tighter packing at the tails upon the addition of cholesterol. PMID:24359748

  9. Localization of cell surface glycoproteins in membrane domains associated with the underlying filament network.

    PubMed

    Roos, E; Spiele, H; Feltkamp, C A; Huisman, H; Wiegant, F A; Traas, J; Mesland, D A

    1985-11-01

    To visualize the localization of cell surface constituents in relation to the plasma membrane-associated filament network, we developed a method based on a combination of immunogold labeling and dry-cleaving. For labeling we used trinitrophenyl-derivatized ligand, anti-TNP antibodies, and protein A-coated colloidal gold. Dry-cleaving (Mesland, D. A. M., H. Spiele, and E. Roos, 1981, Exp. Cell Res., 132: 169-184) involves cleavage of lightly fixed critical point-dried cells by means of adhesive tape. Since cells cleave close to the cell surface, the remaining layer is thin enough to be examined in transmission electron microscopy. Using this method, we studied concanavalin A-binding constituents on the medium-facing surface of H35 hepatoma cells. The distribution of the gold particles, which was partly dispersed and partly patchy, coincided strikingly with membrane-associated filaments, and label was virtually absent from areas overlying openings in the filament network. In stereo pairs we observed the label to be localized to areas of somewhat enhanced electron density at the plane of the membrane. These areas were interconnected in a pattern congruent with the filament network. Preliminary observations on wheat germ agglutinin receptors on the hepatoma cells as well as concanavalin A receptors on isolated hepatocytes yielded comparable results. It thus appears that surface glycoproteins, although seemingly randomly distributed as observed in thin sections, may actually be localized to particular membrane domains associated with underlying filaments. PMID:3902855

  10. Local elasticity and adhesion of nanostructures on Drosophila melanogaster wing membrane studied using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Ryan; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Raman, Arvind

    2012-10-01

    Insect wings have a naturally occurring, complex, functional, hierarchical microstructure and nanostructure, which enable a remarkably water-resistant and self-cleaning surface. Insect wings are used as a basis for engineering biomimetic materials; however, the material properties of these nanostructures such as local elastic modulus and adhesion are poorly understood. We studied the wings of the Canton-S strain of Drosophila melanogaster (hereafter referred to as Drosophila) with atomic force microscopy (AFM) to quantify the local material properties of Drosophila wing surface nanostructures. The wings are found to have a hierarchical structure of 10-20 μm long, 0.5-1 μm diameter hair, and at a much smaller scale, 100 nm diameter and 30-60 nm high bumps. The local properties of these nanoscale bumps were studied under ambient and dry conditions with force-volume AFM. The wing membrane was found to have a elastic modulus on the order of 1000 MPa and the work of adhesion between the probe and wing membrane surface was found to be on the order of 100 mJ/m2, these properties are the same order of magnitude as common thermoplastic polymers such as polyethylene. The difference in work of adhesion between the nanoscale bump and membrane does not change significantly between ambient (relative humidity of 30%) or dry conditions. This suggests that the nanoscale bumps and the surrounding membrane are chemically similar and only work to increase hydrophobicity though surface roughening or the geometric lotus effect.

  11. Local-Level Prognostics Health Management Systems Framework for Passive AdvSMR Components. Interim Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Roy, Surajit; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Pardini, Allan F.; Jones, Anthony M.; Deibler, John E.; Pitman, Stan G.; Tucker, Joseph C.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2014-09-12

    This report describes research results to date in support of the integration and demonstration of diagnostics technologies for prototypical AdvSMR passive components (to establish condition indices for monitoring) with model-based prognostics methods. The focus of the PHM methodology and algorithm development in this study is at the localized scale. Multiple localized measurements of material condition (using advanced nondestructive measurement methods), along with available measurements of the stressor environment, enhance the performance of localized diagnostics and prognostics of passive AdvSMR components and systems.

  12. Unconventional PINK1 localization to the outer membrane of depolarized mitochondria drives Parkin recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Okatsu, Kei; Kimura, Mayumi; Oka, Toshihiko; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dysfunction of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1), a Ser/Thr kinase with an N-terminal mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS), causes familial recessive parkinsonism. Reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential limits MTS-mediated matrix import and promotes PINK1 accumulation on the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) of depolarized mitochondria. PINK1 then undergoes autophosphorylation and phosphorylates ubiquitin and Parkin, a cytosolic ubiquitin ligase, for clearance of damaged mitochondria. The molecular basis for PINK1 localization on the OMM of depolarized mitochondria rather than release to the cytosol is poorly understood. Here, we disentangle the PINK1 localization mechanism using deletion mutants and a newly established constitutively active PINK1 mutant. Disruption of the MTS through N-terminal insertion of aspartic acid residues results in OMM localization of PINK1 in energized mitochondria. Unexpectedly, the MTS and putative transmembrane domain (TMD) are dispensable for OMM localization, whereas mitochondrial translocase Tom40 (also known as TOMM40) and an alternative mitochondrial localization signal that resides between the MTS and TMD are required. PINK1 utilizes a mitochondrial localization mechanism that is distinct from that of conventional MTS proteins and that presumably functions in conjunction with the Tom complex in OMM localization when the conventional N-terminal MTS is inhibited. PMID:25609704

  13. Surface-Localized Spermidine Protects the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Outer Membrane from Antibiotic Treatment and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lori; Mulcahy, Heidi; Kanevets, Uliana; Shi, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular DNA acts as a cation chelator and induces the expression of antibiotic resistance genes regulated by Mg2+ levels. Here we report the characterization of novel DNA-induced genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that are annotated as homologs of the spermidine synthesis genes speD (PA4773) and speE (PA4774). The addition of sublethal concentrations of DNA and membrane-damaging antibiotics induced expression of the genes PA4773 to PA4775, as shown using transcriptional lux fusions and quantitative RT-PCR. Exogenous polyamine addition prevented DNA- and peptide-mediated gene induction. Mutation of PA4774 resulted in an increased outer membrane (OM) susceptibility phenotype upon polymyxin B, CP10A, and gentamicin treatment. When the membrane-localized fluorescent probe C11-BODIPY581/591 was used as an indicator of peroxidation of membrane lipids, the PA4774::lux mutant demonstrated an increased susceptibility to oxidative membrane damage from H2O2 treatment. Addition of exogenous polyamines protected the membranes of the PA4774::lux mutant from polymyxin B and H2O2 treatment. Polyamines from the outer surface were isolated and shown to contain putrescine and spermidine by using high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. The PA4774::lux mutant did not produce spermidine on the cell surface, but genetic complementation restored surface spermidine production as well as the antibiotic and oxidative stress resistance phenotypes of the membrane. We have identified new functions for spermidine on the cell surface and propose that polyamines are produced under Mg2+-limiting conditions as an organic polycation to bind lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to stabilize and protect the outer membrane against antibiotic and oxidative damage. PMID:22155771

  14. Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly

    DOEpatents

    Shore, Lawrence

    2012-02-28

    The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

  15. Distribution and origin of the basement membrane component perlecan in rat liver and primary hepatocyte culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rescan, P. Y.; Loréal, O.; Hassell, J. R.; Yamada, Y.; Guillouzo, A.; Clément, B.

    1993-01-01

    Basement membranes contain three major components (ie collagen IV, laminin, and the heparan sulfate proteoglycan termed perlecan). Although the distribution and origin of both collagen IV and laminin have been well documented in the liver, perlecan has been poorly investigated, so far. We have studied the distribution and cellular origin of perlecan in rat livers in various conditions as well as in hepatocyte primary culture. By immunolocalization in both adult and 18-day-old fetal liver, perlecan was found in portal spaces, around central veins, and throughout the lobule. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed its presence at the level of basement membranes surrounding bile ducts and blood vessels, and in the space of Disse discontinuously interacting with hepatocyte microvilli. Precursors of perlecan were detected in the rough endoplasmic reticulum of bile duct cells and both vascular and sinusoidal endothelial cells. Both hepatocytes and Ito cells were negative. Northern-blot analysis confirmed the lack of appreciable expression of perlecan in hepatocytes isolated from either fetal or adult livers. In 18-month-diethylnitrosamine-treated rat liver, perlecan was abundant in neoplastic nodules. Electron microscopic investigation revealed an almost continuous layer of perlecan in the space of Disse and intracellular staining in sinusoidal endothelial cells, only. Perlecan mRNAs were detectable in malignant nodules, and absent in hepatocytes from nontumorous areas. Hepatocytes expressed high levels of perlecan mRNAs only when put in culture. This expression was reduced in conditions that allow improvement of hepatocyte survival and function (ie addition of corticoids, dimethylsulfoxide or nicotinamide to the medium, or in coculture with liver epithelial cells from biliary origin). Immunolocalization by light and electron microscopy showed that deposition of the proteoglycan occurred in coculture, in basement membranelike structures located around hepatocyte cords. In

  16. Localization of Membrane Proteins in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 (Radial Asymmetry in the Photosynthetic Complexes).

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, D. M.; Troyan, T. A.; Sherman, L. A.

    1994-01-01

    Localization of membrane proteins in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 was determined by transmission electron microscopy utilizing immunocytochemistry with cells prepared by freeze-substitution. This preparation procedure maintained cellular morphology and permitted detection of cellular antigens with high sensitivity and low background. Synechococcus sp. PCC7942 is a unicellular cyanobacterium with thylakoids organized in concentric layers toward the periphery of the cell. Cytochrome oxidase was localized almost entirely in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas a carotenoprotein (P35) was shown to be a cell wall component. The major photosystem II (PSII) proteins (D1, D2 CP43, and CP47) were localized throughout the thylakoids. Proteins of the Cyt b6/f complex were found to have a similar distribution. Thylakoid luminal proteins, such as the Mn-stabilizing protein, were located primarily in the thylakoid, but a small, reproducible fraction was found in the outer compartment. The photosystem I (PSI) reaction center proteins and the ATP synthase proteins were found associated mostly with the outermost thylakoid and with the cytoplasmic membrane. These results indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus is not evenly distributed throughout the thylakoids. Rather, there is a radial asymmetry such that much of the PSI and the ATPase synthase is located in the outermost thylakoid. The relationship of this structure to the photosynthetic mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that the photosystems are separated because of kinetic differences between PSII and PSI, as hypothesized by H.-W. Trissl and C. Wilhelm (Trends Biochem Sci [1993] 18:415-419). PMID:12232325

  17. Influence of Global and Local Membrane Curvature on Mechanosensitive Ion Channels: A Finite Element Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bavi, Omid; Cox, Charles D.; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Naghdabadi, Reza; Jamali, Yousef; Martinac, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) channels are ubiquitous molecular force sensors that respond to a number of different mechanical stimuli including tensile, compressive and shear stress. MS channels are also proposed to be molecular curvature sensors gating in response to bending in their local environment. One of the main mechanisms to functionally study these channels is the patch clamp technique. However, the patch of membrane surveyed using this methodology is far from physiological. Here we use continuum mechanics to probe the question of how curvature, in a standard patch clamp experiment, at different length scales (global and local) affects a model MS channel. Firstly, to increase the accuracy of the Laplace’s equation in tension estimation in a patch membrane and to be able to more precisely describe the transient phenomena happening during patch clamping, we propose a modified Laplace’s equation. Most importantly, we unambiguously show that the global curvature of a patch, which is visible under the microscope during patch clamp experiments, is of negligible energetic consequence for activation of an MS channel in a model membrane. However, the local curvature (RL < 50) and the direction of bending are able to cause considerable changes in the stress distribution through the thickness of the membrane. Not only does local bending, in the order of physiologically relevant curvatures, cause a substantial change in the pressure profile but it also significantly modifies the stress distribution in response to force application. Understanding these stress variations in regions of high local bending is essential for a complete understanding of the effects of curvature on MS channels. PMID:26861405

  18. Lateral organization of membranes and cell shapes.

    PubMed Central

    Markin, V S

    1981-01-01

    The relations among membrane structure, mechanical properties, and cell shape have been investigated. The fluid mosaic membrane models used contains several components that move freely in the membrane plane. These components interact with each other and determine properties of the membrane such as curvature and elasticity. A free energy equation is postulated for such a multicomponent membrane and the condition of free energy minimum is used to obtain differential equations relating the distribution of membrane components and the local membrane curvature. The force that moves membrane components along the membrane in a variable curvature field is calculated. A change in the intramembrane interactions can bring about phase separation or particle clustering. This, in turn, may strongly affect the local curvature. The numerical solution of the set of equations for the two dimensional case allows determination of the cell shape and the component distribution along the membrane. The model has been applied to describe certain erythrocytes shape transformations. PMID:7284547

  19. Differential expression of epithelial basement membrane components nidogens and perlecan in corneal stromal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Abirami; Torricelli, Andre A. M.; Wu, Jiahui; Marino, Gustavo K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of corneal epithelial basement membrane (EBM) components in different corneal stromal cell types. In vitro model systems were used to explore the expression of EBM components nidogen-1, nidogen-2, and perlecan that are the primary components in the lamina lucida and the lamina densa that defectively regenerate in corneas with stromal opacity after in −9.0 D photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Methods Primary rabbit corneal stromal cells were cultured using varying serum concentrations and exogenous growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, to optimize the growth of each cell type of interest. The expression of the keratocyte-specific marker keratocan and the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were analyzed with real-time PCR, western blot, and immunocytochemical staining to evaluate the specificity of the cell types and select optimal conditions (high keratocan and low α-SMA for keratocytes; low keratocan and high α-SMA for myofibroblasts; low keratocan and low α-SMA for corneal fibroblasts). The expression of the EBM components nidogen-1, nidogen-2, and perlecan was evaluated in each corneal cell type using real-time PCR, immunostaining, and western blotting. In agreement with previous studies, serum-free DMEM was found to be optimal for keratocytes, DMEM with 10% serum and 40 ng/ml FGF-2 yielded the best marker profile for corneal fibroblasts, and DMEM with 1% serum and 2 ng/ml TGF-β1 was found to be optimal for myofibroblasts. Results Nidogen-1 and nidogen-2 mRNAs were highly expressed in keratocytes, whereas perlecan was highly expressed in myofibroblasts. In keratocytes, nidogen-2 and perlecan proteins were expressed predominantly in intracellular compartments, whereas in myofibroblasts expression of both EBM components was observed diffusely throughout the cell. Although the perlecan mRNA levels were high

  20. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition

    PubMed Central

    Holdbrook, Daniel A.; Huber, Roland G.; Piggot, Thomas J.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model. PMID:27310814

  1. Expression of recombinant dystrophin and its localization to the cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Lee, C C; Pearlman, J A; Chamberlain, J S; Caskey, C T

    1991-01-24

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked progressive myopathy caused by a defect in the DMD gene locus. The gene corresponding to the DMD locus produces a 14-kilobase (kb) messenger RNA that codes for a large cytoskeletal membrane protein, dystrophin. DMD and Becker's muscular dystrophy are the consequences of dystrophin mutations. The exact biological function of dystrophin remains unknown but it has been demonstrated that it is localized to the cytoplasmic face of the cell membrane and has direct interaction with several other membrane proteins. We report here the synthesis of a 14-kb full-length complementary DNA for the mouse muscle dystrophin mRNA and the expression of this cDNA in COS cells. The recombinant dystrophin is indistinguishable from mouse muscle dystrophin by western blot analysis with anti-dystrophin antibodies and was shown by an immunofluorescent technique to be localized in the cell membrane. Our successful construction of a functional full-length cDNA opens opportunities for the study of structure and function of dystrophin and provides an opportunity to initiate gene therapy studies. PMID:1824797

  2. Dynamics of Crowded Vesicles: Local and Global Responses to Membrane Composition.

    PubMed

    Holdbrook, Daniel A; Huber, Roland G; Piggot, Thomas J; Bond, Peter J; Khalid, Syma

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell envelope is composed of a mixture of different lipids and proteins, making it an inherently complex organelle. The interactions between integral membrane proteins and lipids are crucial for their respective spatial localization within bacterial cells. We have employed microsecond timescale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of vesicles of varying sizes and with a range of protein and lipid compositions, and used novel approaches to measure both local and global system dynamics, the latter based on spherical harmonics analysis. Our results suggest that both hydrophobic mismatch, enhanced by embedded membrane proteins, and curvature based sorting, due to different modes of undulation, may drive assembly in vesicular systems. Interestingly, the modes of undulation of the vesicles were found to be altered by the specific protein and lipid composition of the vesicle. Strikingly, lipid dynamics were shown to be coupled to proteins up to 6 nm from their surface, a substantially larger distance than has previously been observed, resulting in multi-layered annular rings enriched with particular types of phospholipid. Such large protein-lipid complexes may provide a mechanism for long-range communication. Given the complexity of bacterial membranes, our results suggest that subtle changes in lipid composition may have major implications for lipid and protein sorting under a curvature-based membrane-sorting model. PMID:27310814

  3. Interaction of the two components of leukocidin from Staphylococcus aureus with human polymorphonuclear leukocyte membranes: sequential binding and subsequent activation.

    PubMed Central

    Colin, D A; Mazurier, I; Sire, S; Finck-Barbançon, V

    1994-01-01

    The sequential interaction between the two components S and F of leukocidin from Staphylococcus aureus and the membrane of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils has been investigated in the presence of 1 mM Ca2+. With 125I-labeled components, it has been shown that binding of the F component occurred only after binding of the S component. The kinetic constants of binding of both components were not statistically different (Kd, approximately 5 nM; Bm, approximately 35,000 molecules per cell), and both Hill coefficients were 1. The application of increasing concentrations of leukocidin provoked a dose-dependent secretion of the granule content, as determined by hexosaminidase and lysozyme activity measurements. Furthermore, the separate perfusion of S and F components on human polymorphonuclear neutrophils deposited on a filter induced secretion of the granules content only when the perfusion of the S component preceded that of the F component. We conclude, therefore, that (i) S-component binding is a prerequisite for F-component binding and for subsequent activation of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and (ii) there is a specific binding site for the S component in the plasma membrane. PMID:8039887

  4. The local anesthetic tetracaine destabilizes membrane structure by interaction with polar headgroups of phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Shimooka, T; Shibata, A; Terada, H

    1992-03-01

    The effect of the local anesthetic tetracaine at less than 10 mM on the water permeability of the phospholipid membrane was examined using liposomes composed of various molar ratios of negatively charged cardiolipin to electrically neutral phosphatidylcholine by monitoring their osmotic shrinkage in hypertonic glucose solution at 30 degrees C. The concentration of tetracaine causing the maximum velocity of shrinkage of liposomes increased with increase in the molar ratio of cardiolipin. Tetracaine increased the zeta-potential of the negatively charged liposomal membrane toward the positive side due to the binding of its cationic form to the negatively charged polar headgroups in the membrane. The maximum velocity of water permeation induced by osmotic shock was observed at essentially the same tetracaine concentration giving a zeta-potential of the liposomal membrane of 0 mV. These concentrations were not affected by change in the sort of acyl-chain of phospholipids in the liposomes when their negative charges were the same. These results suggests that the membrane integrity is governed mainly by the electrical charge of phospholipid polar headgroups when phospholipid bilayers are in the highly fluid state, and that positively charged tetracaine molecules neutralize the negative surface charge, lowering the barrier for water permeation through phospholipid bilayers. PMID:1547263

  5. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintenance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara M.; Steele, John W.; Makinen, Janice; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessons learned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  6. Performance of Water Recirculation Loop Maintentance Components for the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rector, Tony; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John W.; Bue, Grant C.; Campbell, Colin; Makinen, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Water loop maintenance components to maintain the water quality of the Advanced Spacesuit Water Membrane Evaporation (SWME) water recirculation loop have undergone a comparative performance evaluation with a second SWME water recirculation loop with no water quality maintenance. Results show the benefits of periodic water maintenance. The SWME is a heat rejection device under development at the NASA Johnson Space Center to perform thermal control for advanced spacesuits. One advantage to this technology is the potential for a significantly greater degree of tolerance to contamination when compared to the existing Sublimator technology. The driver for the evaluation of water recirculation maintenance components was to further enhance this advantage through the leveraging of fluid loop management lessonslearned from the International Space Station (ISS). A bed design that was developed for a UTAS military application, and considered for a potential ISS application with the Urine Processor Assembly, provided a low pressure drop means for water maintenance in a recirculation loop. The bed design is coupled with high capacity ion exchange resins, organic adsorbents, and a cyclic methodology developed for the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Transport Water loop. The maintenance cycle included the use of a biocide delivery component developed for ISS to introduce a biocide in a microgravity-compatible manner for the Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS). The leveraging of these water maintenance technologies to the SWME recirculation loop is a unique demonstration of applying the valuable lessons learned on the ISS to the next generation of manned spaceflight Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) hardware.

  7. Alternative 3'UTRs act as scaffolds to regulate membrane protein localization

    PubMed Central

    Berkovits, Binyamin D.; Mayr, Christine

    2015-01-01

    About half of human genes use alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (ApA) to generate mRNA transcripts that differ in the length of their 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) while producing the same protein 1–3. Here we show in human cell lines that alternative 3' UTRs differentially regulate the localization of membrane proteins. The long 3'UTR of CD47 enables efficient cell surface expression of CD47 protein, whereas the short 3'UTR primarily localizes CD47 protein to the endoplasmic reticulum. CD47 protein localization occurs post-translationally and independently of RNA localization. In our model of 3' UTR-dependent protein localization, the long 3' UTR of CD47 acts as a scaffold to recruit a protein complex containing the RNA-binding protein HuR (also known as ELAVL1) and SET4 to the site of translation. This facilitates interaction of SET with the newly translated cytoplasmic domains of CD47 and results in subsequent translocation of CD47 to the plasma membrane via activated RAC1 5. We also show that CD47 protein has different functions depending on whether it was generated by the short or long 3'UTR isoforms. Thus, ApA contributes to the functional diversity of the proteome without changing the amino acid sequence. 3' UTR-dependent protein localization has the potential to be a widespread trafficking mechanism for membrane proteins because HuR binds to thousands of mRNAs6–9, and we show that the long 3' UTRs of CD44, ITGA1 and TNFRSF13C, which are bound by HuR, increase surface protein expression compared to their corresponding short 3' UTRs. We propose that during translation the scaffold function of 3' UTRs facilitates binding of proteins to nascent proteins to direct their transport or function—and that this role of 3' UTRs can be regulated by ApA. PMID:25896326

  8. Localization of extracellular matrix components in developing mouse salivary glands by confocal microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in developing organisms is well established. Proteoglycans and interstitial collagens are required for the growth, morphogenesis, and differentiation of epithelial organs and the distribution of these molecules has been described. However, much less is known about other ECM macromolecules in developing epithelial organs. We used confocal microscopy to examine the distribution of laminin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, fibronectin, and collagen types I, IV, and V, in mouse embryonic salivary glands. Organ rudiments were isolated from gestational day 13 mouse embryos and cultured for 24, 48, or 72 hours. Whole mounts were stained by indirect immunofluorescence and then examined using a Zeiss Laser Scan Microscope. We found that each ECM component examined had a distinct distribution and that the distribution of some molecules varied with culture time. Laminin was mainly restricted to the basement membrane. BM-1 proteoglycan was concentrated in the basement membrane and also formed a fine network throughout the mesenchyme. Type IV collagen was mainly located in the basement membrane of the epithelium, but it was also present throughout the mesenchyme. Type V collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at 24 hours, but at 48 hours was principally located in the basement membrane. Type I collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at all culture times, and accumulated in the clefts and particularly at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface as time in culture increased. Fibronectin was observed throughout the mesenchyme at all times.

  9. X11/Mint Genes Control Polarized Localization of Axonal Membrane Proteins in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Garrett G.; Lone, G. Mohiddin; Leung, Lok Kwan; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-01-01

    Mislocalization of axonal proteins can result in misassembly and/or miswiring of neural circuits, causing disease. To date, only a handful of genes that control polarized localization of axonal membrane proteins have been identified. Here we report that Drosophila X11/Mint proteins are required for targeting several proteins, including human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Drosophila APP-like protein (APPL), to axonal membranes and for their exclusion from dendrites of the mushroom body in Drosophila, a brain structure involved in learning and memory. Axonal localization of APP is mediated by an endocytic motif, and loss of X11/Mint results in a dramatic increase in cell-surface levels of APPL, especially on dendrites. Mutations in genes required for endocytosis show similar mislocalization of these proteins to dendrites, and strongly enhance defects seen in X11/Mint mutants. These results suggest that X11/Mint-dependent endocytosis in dendrites may serve to promote the axonal localization of membrane proteins. Since X11/Mint binds to APP, and abnormal trafficking of APP contributes to Alzheimer's disease, deregulation of X11/Mint may be important for Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. PMID:23658195

  10. X11/Mint genes control polarized localization of axonal membrane proteins in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gross, Garrett G; Lone, G Mohiddin; Leung, Lok Kwan; Hartenstein, Volker; Guo, Ming

    2013-05-01

    Mislocalization of axonal proteins can result in misassembly and/or miswiring of neural circuits, causing disease. To date, only a handful of genes that control polarized localization of axonal membrane proteins have been identified. Here we report that Drosophila X11/Mint proteins are required for targeting several proteins, including human amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Drosophila APP-like protein (APPL), to axonal membranes and for their exclusion from dendrites of the mushroom body in Drosophila, a brain structure involved in learning and memory. Axonal localization of APP is mediated by an endocytic motif, and loss of X11/Mint results in a dramatic increase in cell-surface levels of APPL, especially on dendrites. Mutations in genes required for endocytosis show similar mislocalization of these proteins to dendrites, and strongly enhance defects seen in X11/Mint mutants. These results suggest that X11/Mint-dependent endocytosis in dendrites may serve to promote the axonal localization of membrane proteins. Since X11/Mint binds to APP, and abnormal trafficking of APP contributes to Alzheimer's disease, deregulation of X11/Mint may be important for Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. PMID:23658195

  11. Local Laser Strengthening of Steel Sheets for Load Adapted Component Design in Car Body Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, Axel; Heitmanek, Marco; Standfuss, Jens; Brenner, Berndt; Wunderlich, Gerd; Donat, Bernd

    The current trend in car body construction concerning light weight design and car safety improvement increasingly requires an adaption of the local material properties on the component load. Martensitic hardenable steels, which are typically used in car body components, show a significant hardening effect, for instance in laser welded seams. This effect can be purposefully used as a local strengthening method. For several steel grades the local strengthening, resulting from a laser remelting process was investigated. The strength in the treated zone was determined at crash relevant strain rates. A load adapted design of complex reinforcement structures was developed for compression and bending loaded tube samples, using numerical simulation of the deformation behavior. Especially for bending loaded parts, the crash energy absorption can be increased significantly by local laser strengthening.

  12. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical localization of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in Ca2+-transporting epithelia.

    PubMed

    Alexander, R Todd; Beggs, Megan R; Zamani, Reza; Marcussen, Niels; Frische, Sebastian; Dimke, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPases (PMCAs) participate in epithelial Ca(2+) transport and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. The Pmca4 isoform is enriched in distal nephron isolates and decreased in mice lacking the epithelial transient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. We therefore hypothesized that Pmca4 plays a significant role in transcellular Ca(2+) flux and investigated the localization and regulation of Pmca4 in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. Using antibodies directed specifically against Pmca4, we found it expressed only in the smooth muscle layer of mouse and human intestines, whereas pan-specific Pmca antibodies detected Pmca1 in lateral membranes of enterocytes. In the kidney, Pmca4 showed broad localization to the distal nephron. In the mouse, expression was most abundant in segments coexpressing the epithelial ransient receptor potential vanilloid 5 Ca(2+) channel. Significant, albeit lower, expression was also evident in the region encompassing the cortical thick ascending limbs, macula densa, and early distal tubules as well as smooth muscle layers surrounding renal vessels. In the human kidney, a similar pattern of distribution was observed, with the highest PMCA4 expression in Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter-positive tubules. Electron microscopy demonstrated Pmca4 localization in distal nephron cells at both the basolateral membrane and intracellular perinuclear compartments but not submembranous vesicles, suggesting rapid trafficking to the plasma membrane is unlikely to occur in vivo. Pmca4 expression was not altered by perturbations in Ca(2+) balance, pointing to a housekeeping function of the pump in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia. In conclusion, Pmca4 shows a divergent expression pattern in Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, inferring diverse roles for this isoform not limited to transepithelial Ca(2+) transport. PMID:26180241

  13. Free fatty acids as a major component of the chlorosulfolipid membrane of Ochromonas danica

    SciTech Connect

    Winicov, I.

    1985-01-01

    This work is an attempt to determine whether or not free fatty acids are components of the natural membrane of Ochromonas danica. If the FFAs were artifacts, they would most likely have been produced during solvent extraction or during the procedure for flagellar detachment. Attempts to denature putative solvent-activated lipase(s) through exposure to boiling isopropanol or by crosslinking the flagella with glutaraldehyde prior to extraction failed to eliminate the free fatty acid fraction, nor to significantly alter its composition. Exposure of flagella to albumin resulted in the net transfer of FFAs to the supernatant phase, showing their presence is not caused by solvent activated lipolysis. Finally levels of labelled free fatty acids failed to rise as a function of time after deflagellation in cells grown in the presence of (10-/sup 14/C)-oleic acid. Acid hydrolysis of the total labelled lipid at elevated temperature increased the percentage of counts occurring as unesterified fatty acids (from 2.6% to 64.8%). This, taken together with a corresponding loss of the more polar labelled material (66.8% to 8.2%) indicates that some esterified lipids were present, but probably not broken down during the isolation procedure.

  14. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 and its role in ovarian follicle growth.

    PubMed

    Peluso, John J

    2013-01-01

    Progesterone (P4) is synthesized in the ovary and acts directly on granulosa cells of developing ovarian follicles to suppress their rate of mitosis and apoptosis. Granulosa cells do not express nuclear progesterone receptor (PGR) but rather progesterone receptor membrane component-1 (PGRMC1). PGRMC1 binds P4 and mediates P4's actions, as evidenced by PGRMC1 siRNA studies. PGRMC1 acts by binding plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 RNA-binding protein and regulating gene expression. Specifically, PGRMC1 suppresses some genes that promote cell death (i.e., Bad, Caspase-3, Caspase-4). P4 regulates gene expression in part by inhibiting PGRMC1 binding to Tcf/Lef transcription sites, thereby reducing Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Since Tcf/Lef transcription sites are located within the promoters of genes that initiate mitosis and/or apoptosis (i.e., c-jun and c-myc), P4-PGRMC1 mediated suppression of these Tcf/Lef regulated genes could account for P4's actions. PGRMC1 expression is also altered in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome, premature ovarian failure and infertility. Collectively, these observations support a role for PGRMC1 in regulating human ovarian follicle development. PMID:23781168

  15. 24 CFR 1000.325 - How is the need component adjusted for local area costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the need component adjusted for local area costs? 1000.325 Section 1000.325 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC AND INDIAN...

  16. The X-ray Emitting Components towards l = 111 deg: The Local Hot Bubble and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Snowden, S. L.

    2006-01-01

    We have obtained an XMM-Newton spectrum of the diffuse X-ray emission towards (l, b) = (111.14,1.11), a line of sight with a relatively simple distribution of absorbing clouds; > 9 x 10(exp 19)/sq cm at R>170 pc, a 6 x 10(exp 21)/sq cm molecular cloud at 2.5-3.3 kpc, and a total column of 1.2 x 10(exp 22)/sq cm. We find that the analysis of the XMM-Newton spectrum in conjunction with the RASS spectral energy distribution for the same direction requires three thermal components to be well fit: a "standard" Local Hot Bubble component with kT = 0.089, a component beyond the molecular cloud with kT = 0.59, and a component before the molecular cloud with kT = 0.21. The strength of the O VII 0.56 keV line from the Local Hot Bubble, 2.1+/-0.7 photons/sq cm/s/sr, is consistent with other recent measures. The 0.21 keV component has an emission measure of 0.0022+/-0.0006 pc and is not localized save as diffuse emission within the Galactic plane; it is the best candidate for a pervasive hot medium. The spatial separation of the approx. 0.2 keV component from the approx. 0.6 keV component suggests that the spectral decompositions of the emission from late-type spiral disks found in the literature do represent real temperature components rather than reflecting more complex temperature distributions.

  17. HGAL localization to cell membrane regulates B-cell receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Sicard, Renaud; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Stockus, Jessica N.; McNamara, George; Abdulreda, Midhat; Moy, Vincent T.; Landgraf, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Human germinal center–associated lymphoma (HGAL) is specifically expressed only in germinal center (GC) B lymphocytes and GC-derived lymphomas. HGAL protein decreases lymphocyte motility by inhibiting the ability of myosin to translocate actin via direct interaction with F-actin and myosin II and by activating RhoA signaling via direct interactions with RhoA-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors. HGAL protein also regulates B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling by directly binding to and enhancing Syk kinase activity and activation of its downstream effectors. Herein we demonstrate that HGAL protein can be myristoylated and palmitoylated and that these modifications localize HGAL to cellular membrane raft microdomains with distinct consequences for BCR signaling and chemoattractant-induced cell mobility. In BCR signaling, raft localization of HGAL facilitates interaction with Syk and modulation of the BCR activation and signaling, which induces HGAL phosphorylation and redistribution from lipid raft to bulk membrane and cytoplasm, followed by degradation. In contrast, HGAL myristoylation and palmitoylation avert its inhibitory effects on chemoattractant-induced cell motility. These findings further elucidate the growing and complex role of HGAL in B-cell biology and suggest that membrane-bound and cytoplasmic HGAL protein differently regulates distinct biological processes. PMID:25381061

  18. Localization of the event-related potential novelty response as defined by principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    Dien, Joseph; Spencer, Kevin M; Donchin, Emanuel

    2003-10-01

    Recent research indicates that novel stimuli elicit at least two distinct components, the Novelty P3 and the P300. The P300 is thought to be elicited when a context updating mechanism is activated by a wide class of deviant events. The functional significance of the Novelty P3 is uncertain. Identification of the generator sources of the two components could provide additional information about their functional significance. Previous localization efforts have yielded conflicting results. The present report demonstrates that the use of principal components analysis (PCA) results in better convergence with knowledge about functional neuroanatomy than did previous localization efforts. The results are also more convincing than that obtained by two alternative methods, MUSIC-RAP and the Minimum Norm. Source modeling on 129-channel data with BESA and BrainVoyager suggests the P300 has sources in the temporal-parietal junction whereas the Novelty P3 has sources in the anterior cingulate. PMID:14561451

  19. Lipid raft components cholesterol and sphingomyelin increase H+/OH− permeability of phosphatidylcholine membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gensure, Rebekah H.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Hill, Warren G.

    2006-01-01

    H+/OH− permeation through lipid bilayers occurs at anomalously high rates and the determinants of proton flux through membranes are poorly understood. Since all life depends on proton gradients, it is important to develop a greater understanding of proton leak phenomena. We have used stopped-flow fluorimetry to probe the influence of two lipid raft components, chol (cholesterol) and SM (sphingomyelin), on H+/OH− and water permeability. Increasing the concentrations of both lipids in POPC (palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine) liposomes decreased water permeability in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that correlated with increased lipid order. Surprisingly, proton flux was increased by increasing the concentration of chol and SM. The chol effect was complex with molar concentrations of 17.9, 33 and 45.7% giving 2.8-fold (P<0.01), 2.2-fold (P<0.001) and 5.1-fold (P<0.001) increases in H+/OH− permeability from a baseline of 2.4×10−2 cm/s. SM at 10 mole% effected a 2.8-fold increase (P<0.01), whereas 20 and 30 mole% enhanced permeability by 3.6-fold (P<0.05) and 4.1-fold respectively (P<0.05). Supplementing membranes containing chol with SM did not enhance H+/OH− permeability. Of interest was the finding that chol addition to soya-bean lipids decreased H+/OH− permeability, consistent with an earlier report [Ira and Krishnamoorthy (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 1484–1488]. We speculate that the presence of proton carriers in crude lipid extracts might contribute to this result. We conclude that (i) chol and SM specifically and independently increase rates of proton permeation in POPC bilayers, (ii) domains enriched in these lipids or domain interfaces may represent regions with high H+/OH− conductivity, (iii) H+/OH− fluxes are not governed by lipid order and (iv) chol can inhibit or promote H+/OH− permeability depending on the total lipid environment. Theories of proton permeation are discussed in the light of these results. PMID

  20. Lactoperoxidase-125I localization of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-01

    Previous histochemical and biochemical localizations of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis MC14 have shown that the membrane-associated form of the enzyme is located on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, and soluble forms are located in the periplasmic space and in the growth medium. The distribution of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the surfaces of the cytoplasmic membrane of B. licheniformis MC14 was determined by using lactoperoxidase-125I labeling techniques. Cells harvested during rapid alkaline phosphatase production were converted to protoplasts or lysed protoplasts and labeled. Analysis of the data obtained indicated that 30% of the salt-extractable, membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase was located on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas 70% of the membrane-associated enzyme was localized on the inner surface. Controls for protoplast integrity (release of tritiated thymidine or examination of cytoplasmic proteins for label content) indicated excellent protoplast stability. Controls indicated that chemical labeling was not a factor in the apparent distribution of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane. These results support the previously reported histochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane inner surface. The presence of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane outer surface is reasonable, considering the soluble forms of the enzyme found in the periplasmic region and in the culture medium. PMID:7462164

  1. Lactoperoxidase-125I localization of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacillus licheniformis.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Hulett, F M

    1981-01-01

    Previous histochemical and biochemical localizations of alkaline phosphatase in Bacillus licheniformis MC14 have shown that the membrane-associated form of the enzyme is located on the inner surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, and soluble forms are located in the periplasmic space and in the growth medium. The distribution of salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase on the surfaces of the cytoplasmic membrane of B. licheniformis MC14 was determined by using lactoperoxidase-125I labeling techniques. Cells harvested during rapid alkaline phosphatase production were converted to protoplasts or lysed protoplasts and labeled. Analysis of the data obtained indicated that 30% of the salt-extractable, membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase was located on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas 70% of the membrane-associated enzyme was localized on the inner surface. Controls for protoplast integrity (release of tritiated thymidine or examination of cytoplasmic proteins for label content) indicated excellent protoplast stability. Controls indicated that chemical labeling was not a factor in the apparent distribution of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane. These results support the previously reported histochemical localization of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane inner surface. The presence of alkaline phosphatase on the membrane outer surface is reasonable, considering the soluble forms of the enzyme found in the periplasmic region and in the culture medium. Images PMID:7462164

  2. Effect of local anesthetics on the organization and dynamics in membranes of varying phase: A fluorescence approach.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Sandeep; Dutta, Diya; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-06-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying the action of local anesthetics remains elusive. Phenylethanol (PEtOH) is an ingredient of essential oils with a rose-like odor and has been used as a local anesthetic. In this work, we explored the effect of PEtOH on organization and dynamics in membranes representing various biologically relevant phases using differentially localized fluorescent membrane probes, DPH and TMA-DPH. We show here that PEtOH induces disorder in membranes of all phases (gel/fluid/liquid-ordered). However, the extent of membrane disorder varies in a phase-specific manner. Maximum membrane disordering was observed in gel phase, followed by liquid-ordered membranes. The disordering was minimal in fluid phase membranes. Interestingly, our results show that the disordering effect of PEtOH in gel phase is sufficiently large to induce phase change at higher PEtOH concentrations. Our results are relevant in the context of natural membranes and could be useful in understanding the role of anesthetics in membrane protein function. PMID:27154601

  3. Flotillin-1 is essential for PKC-triggered endocytosis and membrane microdomain localization of DAT

    PubMed Central

    Cremona, M. Laura; Matthies, Heinrich J.G.; Pau, Kelvin; Bowton, Erica; Speed, Nicole; Lute, Brandon J.; Anderson, Monique; Sen, Namita; Robertson, Sabrina D.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Rothman, James E.; Galli, Aurelio; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Yamamoto, Ai

    2011-01-01

    Plasmalemmal neurotransmitter transporters (NTTs) regulate the level of neurotransmitters, such as dopamine (DA) and glutamate, following their release at brain synapses. Stimuli including protein kinase C (PKC) activation can lead to the internalization of some NTTs and a reduction in neurotransmitter clearance capacity. We find that the protein Flotillin-1/Reggie-2 (Flot1) is required for PKC-regulated internalization of members of two different NTT families, the DA transporter (DAT) and the glial glutamate transporter EAAT2, and we have identified a conserved serine residue in Flot1 that is essential for transporter internalization. Further analysis revealed that Flot1 is also required to localize DAT within plasma membrane microdomains in stable cell lines, and is essential for amphetamine-induced reverse transport of DA in neurons but not for DA uptake. In sum, our findings provide evidence for a critical role of Flot1-enriched membrane microdomains in PKC-triggered DAT endocytosis and the actions of amphetamine. PMID:21399631

  4. Filament networks attached to membranes: cytoskeletal pressure and local bilayer deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auth, Thorsten; Safran, S. A.; Gov, Nir S.

    2007-11-01

    Several cell types, among them red blood cells, have a cortical, two-dimensional (2D) network of filaments sparsely attached to their lipid bilayer. In many mammalian cells, this 2D polymer network is connected to an underlying 3D, more rigid cytoskeleton. In this paper, we consider the pressure exerted by the thermally fluctuating, cortical network of filaments on the bilayer and predict the bilayer deformations that are induced by this pressure. We treat the filaments as flexible polymers and calculate the pressure that a network of such linear chains exerts on the bilayer; we then minimize the bilayer shape in order to predict the resulting local deformations. We compare our predictions with membrane deformations observed in electron micrographs of red blood cells. The polymer pressure along with the resulting membrane deformation can lead to compartmentalization, regulate in-plane diffusion and may influence protein sorting as well as transmit signals to the polymerization of the underlying 3D cytoskeleton.

  5. Factors Influencing Local Membrane Curvature Induction by N-BAR Domains as Revealed by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Blood, Philip D.; Swenson, Richard D.; Voth, Gregory A.

    2008-01-01

    N-BAR domains are protein modules that bind to and induce curvature in membranes via a charged concave surface and N-terminal amphipathic helices. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations have demonstrated that the N-BAR domain can induce a strong local curvature that matches the curvature of the BAR domain surface facing the bilayer. Here we present further molecular dynamics simulations that examine in greater detail the roles of the concave surface and amphipathic helices in driving local membrane curvature. We find that the strong curvature induction observed in our previous simulations requires the stable presentation of the charged concave surface to the membrane and is not driven by the membrane-embedded amphipathic helices. Nevertheless, without these amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane, the N-BAR domain does not maintain a close association with the bilayer, and fails to drive membrane curvature. Increasing the membrane negative charge through the addition of PIP2 facilitates closer association with the membrane in the absence of embedded helices. At sufficiently high concentrations, amphipathic helices embedded in the membrane drive membrane curvature independently of the BAR domain. PMID:18469070

  6. The μ Subunit of Arabidopsis Adaptor Protein-2 Is Involved in Effector-Triggered Immunity Mediated by Membrane-Localized Resistance Proteins.

    PubMed

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Hillmer, Rachel; Yamaoka, Shohei; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Katagiri, Fumiaki

    2016-05-01

    Endocytosis has been suggested to be important in the cellular processes of plant immune responses. However, our understanding of its role during effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is still limited. We have previously shown that plant endocytosis, especially clathrin-coated vesicle formation at the plasma membrane, is mediated by the adaptor protein-2 (AP-2) complex and that loss of the μ subunit of AP-2 (AP2M) affects plant growth and floral organ development. Here, we report that AP2M is required for full-strength ETI mediated by the disease resistance (R) genes RPM1 and RPS2 in Arabidopsis. Reduced ETI was observed in an ap2m mutant plant, measured by growth of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 strains carrying the corresponding effector genes avrRpm1 or avrRpt2 and by hypersensitive cell death response and defense gene expression triggered by these strains. In contrast, RPS4-mediated ETI and its associated immune responses were not affected by the ap2m mutation. While RPM1 and RPS2 are localized to the plasma membrane, RPS4 is localized to the cytoplasm and nucleus. Our results suggest that AP2M is involved in ETI mediated by plasma membrane-localized R proteins, possibly by mediating endocytosis of the immune receptor complex components from the plasma membrane. PMID:26828402

  7. Control of heterochromatin localization and silencing by the nuclear membrane protein Lem2

    PubMed Central

    Barrales, Ramón Ramos; Forn, Marta; Georgescu, Paula Raluca; Sarkadi, Zsuzsa; Braun, Sigurd

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptionally silent chromatin localizes to the nuclear periphery, which provides a special microenvironment for gene repression. A variety of nuclear membrane proteins interact with repressed chromatin, yet the functional role of these interactions remains poorly understood. Here, we show that, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the nuclear membrane protein Lem2 associates with chromatin and mediates silencing and heterochromatin localization. Unexpectedly, we found that these functions can be separated and assigned to different structural domains within Lem2, excluding a simple tethering mechanism. Chromatin association and tethering of centromeres to the periphery are mediated by the N-terminal LEM (LAP2–Emerin–MAN1) domain of Lem2, whereas telomere anchoring and heterochromatin silencing require exclusively its conserved C-terminal MSC (MAN1–Src1 C-terminal) domain. Particularly, silencing by Lem2 is epistatic with the Snf2/HDAC (histone deacetylase) repressor complex SHREC at telomeres, while its necessity can be bypassed by deleting Epe1, a JmjC protein with anti-silencing activity. Furthermore, we found that loss of Lem2 reduces heterochromatin association of SHREC, which is accompanied by increased binding of Epe1. This reveals a critical function of Lem2 in coordinating these antagonistic factors at heterochromatin. The distinct silencing and localization functions mediated by Lem2 suggest that these conserved LEM-containing proteins go beyond simple tethering to play active roles in perinuclear silencing. PMID:26744419

  8. Plasma membrane localization signals in the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Steward, Lance E.; Ho, Helen; Garay, Patton E.; Sun, Sarah W.; Gilmore, Marcella A.; Ordas, Joseph V.; Wang, Joanne; Francis, Joseph; Aoki, K. Roger

    2004-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is a potent biological substance used to treat neuromuscular and pain disorders. Both BoNT type A and BoNT type E display high-affinity uptake into motor neurons and inhibit exocytosis through cleavage of the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP25). The therapeutic effects of BoNT/A last from 3 to 12 months, whereas the effects of BoNT/E last less than 4 weeks. Using confocal microscopy and site-specific mutagenesis, we have determined that the protease domain of BoNT/A light chain (BoNT/A-LC) localizes in a punctate manner to the plasma membrane, colocalizing with the cleaved product, SNAP25197. In contrast, the short-duration BoNT/E serotype is cytoplasmic. Mutations in the BoNT/A-LC have revealed sequences at the N terminus necessary for plasma membrane localization, and an active dileucine motif in the C terminus that is likely involved in trafficking and interaction with adaptor proteins. These data support sequence-specific signals as determinants of intracellular localization and as a basis for the different durations of action in these two BoNT serotypes. PMID:14982988

  9. Progesterone, Inflammatory Cytokine (TNF-α), and Oxidative Stress (H2O2) Regulate Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 Expression in Fetal Membrane Cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yan; Murtha, Amy P; Feng, Liping

    2016-09-01

    Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) is an important novel mediator of progesterone (P4) function in fetal membrane cells. We demonstrated previously that PGRMC1 is differentially expressed in fetal membranes among pregnancy subjects and diminished in preterm premature rupture of membrane subjects. In the current study, we aim to elucidate whether PGRMC1 expression is regulated by P4, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), and H2O2 in fetal membrane cells. Primary cultured membrane cells were serum starved for 24 hours followed by treatments of P4, 17 hydroxyprogesterone caproate, and medroxyprogesterone 17 acetate (MPA) at 10(-7) mol/L with ethanol as vehicle control; TNF-α at 10, 20, and 50 ng/mL with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as control; and H2O2 at 10 and 100 μmol/L with culture media as control for 24, 48, and 72 hours. The messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of PGRMC1 was quantified using polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting, respectively. We found that PGRMC1 protein expression was regulated by MPA, TNF-α, and H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner. This regulation is also specific to the type of cell (amnion, chorion, or decidua). The upregulation of PGRMC1 by MPA might be mediated through glucocorticoid receptor (GR) demonstrated using amnion and chorion cells model with GR knockdown by specific small interfering RNA transfection. The mRNA expression of PGRMC1 was decreased by H2O2 (100 μmol/L) treatment in amnion cells, which might ultimately result in downregulation of PGRMC1 protein as our data demonstrated. None of other treatments changed PGRMC1 mRNA level in these cells. We conclude that these stimuli act as regulatory factors of PGRMC1 in a cell-specific manner. PMID:26919974

  10. Poisoning of mixed matrix membranes by fermentation components in pervaporation of ethanol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pervaporation is an alternative to distillation for recovering ethanol produced by fermentation of grains and biomass. Ethanol-selective mixed matrix membranes of the hydrophobic zeolite ZSM-5 in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) have superior performance compared to pure PDMS membranes in pervaporation o...

  11. Cytological assessment of the epithelial cells of the nasal mucous membrane after local fluticasone therapy.

    PubMed

    Trybus, E; Krol, T; Obarzanowski, T; Trybus, W; Kopacz-Bednarska, A; Obarzanowski, M

    2015-02-01

    The majority of cytological studies concern the influence of glucocorticosteroids on cells involved in creating and sustaining inflammation, such as eosinophils or neutrophils. Much less attention is devoted to epithelial cells. It should also be noticed that glucocorticosteroid drugs administered nasally for local action can significantly change the cytological image of the nasal mucous membrane. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to cytologically assess the influence of topical fluticasone therapy on the nasal mucous membrane cells, with special attention for the changes in the morphology of epithelial cells. The research samples were taken from patients with symptoms of chronic rhinitis and suspected allergies. The research was a two-step process. In the first step, a smear was taken from the surface of the nasal mucous membrane of the above-mentioned patients before the start of therapy and the obtained cytological image was compared with a control image of the nasal mucous of healthy people. Step two involved the cytology of the same patients after 4 weeks of fluticasone therapy, applied as a nasal aerosol in two doses of 50 μg to each nostril once per day, in the combined daily dose of 200 μg (for adults and children aged 12 or more). Children aged between 4 and 12 were given a single dose of 50 μg to each nostril once per day, in a daily dose of 100 μg. Based on smears stained according to the Papanicolaou and Pappenheim method, a qualitative and quantitative analysis of changes in the mucous membrane of nasal cells was performed. The cytological assessment of nasal mucous membrane stains of patients with chronic rhinitis before fluticasone treatment enabled a diagnosis of chronic infectious rhinitis, compared through the presence of numerous neutrophils and bacteria. The studied samples did not show significant changes in the morphology of epithelial cells, only a few cells with mild vacuolation changes of the cytoplasm were found. The use of

  12. TRP Channels Localize to Subdomains of the Apical Plasma Membrane in Human Fetal Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peter Y.; Gan, Geliang; Peng, Shaomin; Wang, Shao-Bin; Chen, Bo; Adelman, Ron A.; Rizzolo, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Calcium regulates many functions of the RPE. Its concentration in the subretinal space and RPE cytoplasm is closely regulated. Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are a superfamily of ion channels that are moderately calcium-selective. This study investigates the subcellular localization and potential functions of TRP channels in a first-passage culture model of human fetal RPE (hfRPE). Methods. The RPE isolated from 15- to 16-week gestation fetuses were maintained in serum-free media. Cultures were treated with barium chloride (BaCl2) in the absence and presence of TRP channel inhibitors and monitored by the transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). The expression of TRP channels was determined using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, and immunofluorescence confocal microscopy. Results. Barium chloride substantially decreased TER and disrupted cell–cell contacts when added to the apical surface of RPE, but not when added to the basolateral surface. The effect could be partially blocked by the general TRP inhibitor, lanthanum chloride (LaCl3, ~75%), or an inhibitor of calpain (~25%). Family member-specific inhibitors, ML204 (TRPC4) and HC-067047 (TRPV4), had no effect on basal channel activity. Expression of TRPC4, TRPM1, TRPM3, TRPM7, and TRPV4 was detected by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. The TRPM3 localized to the base of the primary cilium, and TRPC4 and TRPM3 localized to apical tight junctions. The TRPV4 localized to apical microvilli in a small subset of cells. Conclusions. The TRP channels localized to subdomains of the apical membrane, and BaCl2 was only able to dissociate tight junctions when presented to the apical membrane. The data suggest a potential role for TRP channels as sensors of [Ca2+] in the subretinal space. PMID:25736794

  13. One-dimensional nonlinear elastodynamic models and their local conservation laws with applications to biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Cheviakov, A F; Ganghoffer, J-F

    2016-05-01

    The framework of incompressible nonlinear hyperelasticity and viscoelasticity is applied to the derivation of one-dimensional models of nonlinear wave propagation in fiber-reinforced elastic solids. Equivalence transformations are used to simplify the resulting wave equations and to reduce the number of parameters. Local conservation laws and global conserved quantities of the models are systematically computed and discussed, along with other related mathematical properties. Sample numerical solutions are presented. The models considered in the paper are appropriate for the mathematical description of certain aspects of the behavior of biological membranes and similar structures. PMID:26410196

  14. Unmasking local activity within local field potentials (LFPs) by removing distal electrical signals using independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Nathan W.; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly thought to reflect the aggregate dynamics in local neural circuits around recording electrodes. However, we show that when LFPs are recorded in awake behaving animals against a distal reference on the skull as commonly practiced, LFPs are significantly contaminated by non-local and non-neural sources arising from the reference electrode and from movement-related noise. In a data set with simultaneously recorded LFPs and electroencephalograms (EEGs) across multiple brain regions while rats perform an auditory oddball task, we used independent component analysis (ICA) to identify signals arising from electrical reference and from volume-conducted noise based on their distributed spatial pattern across multiple electrodes and distinct power spectral features. These sources of distal electrical signals collectively accounted for 23–77% of total variance in unprocessed LFPs, as well as most of the gamma oscillation responses to the target stimulus in EEGs. Gamma oscillation power was concentrated in volume-conducted noise and was tightly coupled with the onset of licking behavior, suggesting a likely origin of muscle activity associated with body movement or orofacial movement. The removal of distal signal contamination also selectively reduced correlations of LFP/EEG signals between distant brain regions but not within the same region. Finally, the removal of contamination from distal electrical signals preserved an event-related potential (ERP) response to auditory stimuli in the frontal cortex and also increased the coupling between the frontal ERP amplitude and neuronal activity in the basal forebrain, supporting the conclusion that removing distal electrical signals unmasked local activity within LFPs. Together, these results highlight the significant contamination of LFPs by distal electrical signals and caution against the straightforward interpretation of unprocessed LFPs. Our results provide a principled approach to

  15. Unmasking local activity within local field potentials (LFPs) by removing distal electrical signals using independent component analysis.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, Nathan W; Lin, Shih-Chieh

    2016-05-15

    Local field potentials (LFPs) are commonly thought to reflect the aggregate dynamics in local neural circuits around recording electrodes. However, we show that when LFPs are recorded in awake behaving animals against a distal reference on the skull as commonly practiced, LFPs are significantly contaminated by non-local and non-neural sources arising from the reference electrode and from movement-related noise. In a data set with simultaneously recorded LFPs and electroencephalograms (EEGs) across multiple brain regions while rats perform an auditory oddball task, we used independent component analysis (ICA) to identify signals arising from electrical reference and from volume-conducted noise based on their distributed spatial pattern across multiple electrodes and distinct power spectral features. These sources of distal electrical signals collectively accounted for 23-77% of total variance in unprocessed LFPs, as well as most of the gamma oscillation responses to the target stimulus in EEGs. Gamma oscillation power was concentrated in volume-conducted noise and was tightly coupled with the onset of licking behavior, suggesting a likely origin of muscle activity associated with body movement or orofacial movement. The removal of distal signal contamination also selectively reduced correlations of LFP/EEG signals between distant brain regions but not within the same region. Finally, the removal of contamination from distal electrical signals preserved an event-related potential (ERP) response to auditory stimuli in the frontal cortex and also increased the coupling between the frontal ERP amplitude and neuronal activity in the basal forebrain, supporting the conclusion that removing distal electrical signals unmasked local activity within LFPs. Together, these results highlight the significant contamination of LFPs by distal electrical signals and caution against the straightforward interpretation of unprocessed LFPs. Our results provide a principled approach to

  16. Effect of relative humidity cycles accompanied by intermittent start/stop switches on performance degradation of membrane electrode assembly components in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yanling; Zhong, Hexiang; Wang, Meiri; Zhang, Huamin

    2015-06-01

    The performance degradation of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) components in proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is studied by designing relative humidity (RH) cycles accompanied by intermittent start/stop switches. Cathode catalyst activity, permeability and resistance of proton exchange membrane (PEM) as well as cell performance are monitored during the test procedure. The interfaces of MEA, the catalyst particle distribution near the cathode inlet are characterized by SEM and TEM, respectively. The results demonstrate both the overall H2 permeability and crossover current of PEM are doubled compared with its initial properties. Signs of PEM degradation, including periodical thinning, cracks and pinholes formation, are observed after 300 RH cycles and 40 times of start/stop switches. The average Pt particle size increases by more than 75%, and the cathode electrochemical surface area decreases by 48% after the test procedure. Meanwhile, the cathode catalyst layer becomes looser due to the dissolution of some smaller Pt particles and catalyst agglomeration in the RH cycles and the high potential during the intermittent start/stop switches. The membrane resistance demonstrates downshift variation during the RH cycles. PEMFC performance, however, decays due to the chemical and electrochemical attack as well as the mechanical stresses.

  17. Existence of Anderson localization of classical waves in a random two-component medium

    SciTech Connect

    Soukoulis, C.M.; Economou, E.N.; Grest, G.S.; Cohen, M.H.

    1989-01-30

    An exact mapping of the classical wave problem to that of electronic motion is utilized together with extensive numerical results to examine the question of the existence of genuine localization (i.e., one occurring when both components have real positive dielectric constants) of classical waves in random binary alloys A/sub 1-//sub x/B/sub x/. We find that scalar waves do exhibit localization. We have also developed a coherent potential approximation which for x<0.2 gives results not that much different from the numerical ones. This result can be easily generalized to electromagnetic fields as well.

  18. The mitochondrial outer membrane protein MDI promotes local protein synthesis and mtDNA replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Xu, Hong

    2016-05-17

    Early embryonic development features rapid nuclear DNA replication cycles, but lacks mtDNA replication. To meet the high-energy demands of embryogenesis, mature oocytes are furnished with vast amounts of mitochondria and mtDNA However, the cellular machinery driving massive mtDNA replication in ovaries remains unknown. Here, we describe a Drosophila AKAP protein, MDI that recruits a translation stimulator, La-related protein (Larp), to the mitochondrial outer membrane in ovaries. The MDI-Larp complex promotes the synthesis of a subset of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins by cytosolic ribosomes on the mitochondrial surface. MDI-Larp's targets include mtDNA replication factors, mitochondrial ribosomal proteins, and electron-transport chain subunits. Lack of MDI abolishes mtDNA replication in ovaries, which leads to mtDNA deficiency in mature eggs. Targeting Larp to the mitochondrial outer membrane independently of MDI restores local protein synthesis and rescues the phenotypes of mdi mutant flies. Our work suggests that a selective translational boost by the MDI-Larp complex on the outer mitochondrial membrane might be essential for mtDNA replication and mitochondrial biogenesis during oogenesis. PMID:27053724

  19. Membrane localization and topology of the DnpA protein control fluoroquinolone tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liebens, Veerle; Frangipani, Emanuela; Van der Leyden, Annelies; Fauvart, Maarten; Visca, Paolo; Michiels, Jan

    2016-09-01

    DnpA, a putative de-N-acetylase of the PIG-L superfamily, is required for antibiotic tolerance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exactly how dnpA (gene locus PA5002) directs the formation of antibiotic-tolerant persister cells is currently unknown. Previous research provided evidence for a role in surface-associated process(es), possibly in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis. In silico sequence analysis of DnpA predicts a single transmembrane domain and Nin/Cout orientation of DnpA. In contrast, we here show that DnpA is an integral inner membrane protein containing two transmembrane domains, with the major C-terminal part located at the cytoplasmic face. Correct insertion into the inner membrane is necessary for DnpA to promote fluoroquinolone tolerance. The membrane localization of DnpA further supports its role in cell envelope-associated process(es). In addition to shedding light on the biological role of DnpA, this study highlights the risks of overreliance on the predictive value of bioinformatics tools and the importance of rigorous experimental validation of in silico predictions. PMID:27481702

  20. ATPaseTb2, a Unique Membrane-bound FoF1-ATPase Component, Is Essential in Bloodstream and Dyskinetoplastic Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Šubrtová, Karolína; Panicucci, Brian; Zíková, Alena

    2015-01-01

    In the infectious stage of Trypanosoma brucei, an important parasite of humans and livestock, the mitochondrial (mt) membrane potential (Δψm) is uniquely maintained by the ATP hydrolytic activity and subsequent proton pumping of the essential FoF1-ATPase. Intriguingly, this multiprotein complex contains several trypanosome-specific subunits of unknown function. Here, we demonstrate that one of the largest novel subunits, ATPaseTb2, is membrane-bound and localizes with monomeric and multimeric assemblies of the FoF1-ATPase. Moreover, RNAi silencing of ATPaseTb2 quickly leads to a significant decrease of the Δψm that manifests as a decreased growth phenotype, indicating that the FoF1-ATPase is impaired. To further explore the function of this protein, we employed a trypanosoma strain that lacks mtDNA (dyskinetoplastic, Dk) and thus subunit a, an essential component of the proton pore in the membrane Fo-moiety. These Dk cells generate the Δψm by combining the hydrolytic activity of the matrix-facing F1-ATPase and the electrogenic exchange of ATP4- for ADP3- by the ATP/ADP carrier (AAC). Surprisingly, in addition to the expected presence of F1-ATPase, the monomeric and multimeric FoF1-ATPase complexes were identified. In fact, the immunoprecipitation of a F1-ATPase subunit demonstrated that ATPaseTb2 was a component of these complexes. Furthermore, RNAi studies established that the membrane-bound ATPaseTb2 subunit is essential for maintaining normal growth and the Δψm of Dk cells. Thus, even in the absence of subunit a, a portion of the FoF1-ATPase is assembled in Dk cells. PMID:25714685

  1. Ultrastructural Study of Salmonella typhimurium Treated with Membrane-Active Agents: Specific Reaction of Dansylchloride with Cell Envelope Components

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Peter R. G.; Teuber, Michael

    1978-01-01

    Amino groups of cell envelope proteins, lipids, and lipopolysaccharides cannot be labeled in intact cells of Salmonella typhimurium G 30 by using 5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonylchloride incorporated in lecithin-cholesterol vesicles. However, application of membrane-interacting agents like tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-hydrochloride, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (Na salt) (EDTA), divalent cations, and sublethal doses of the cationic antibacterial agents polymyxin B and chlorhexidine induced specific fluorescent labeling of envelope proteins and lipids but not of cytoplasmic compounds, with the exception of a soluble protein with a molecular weight of 46,000 in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Treatment with Tris-hydrochloride buffer produced labeling of the heat-modifiable protein B/B+ and of proteins with molecular weights of 26,000, 22,000, and below 17,000. A combination of Tris-hydrochloride and EDTA induced additional dansylation of the major protein A and of proteins of molecular weights 80,000, 60,000, and 44,000. Polymyxin B and chlorhexidine caused similar labeling patterns. In every case, except with divalent cation treatment, protein B/B+ was the most prominently labeled species. Phosphatidylethanolamine was dansylated up to 30%. Lipopolysaccharide was not reactive under any condition or treatment. In addition, the peptidoglycan-bound lipoprotein did not react with dansylchloride in either intact or Tris-hydrochloride-treated cells. The results are discussed with regard to a possible localization of labeled and unlabeled compounds of the cell envelope on the basis of a model placing cell envelope amino groups into ion-ion interactions with anionic components of other envelope compounds like phosphate and carboxyl groups. Images PMID:97268

  2. Markers for trans-Golgi Membranes and the Intermediate Compartment Localize to Induced Membranes with Distinct Replication Functions in Flavivirus-Infected Cells†

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Jason M.; Jones, Malcolm K.; Westaway, Edwin G.

    1999-01-01

    Replication of the flavivirus Kunjin virus is associated with virus-induced membrane structures within the cytoplasm of infected cells; these membranes appear as packets of vesicles associated with the sites of viral RNA synthesis and as convoluted membranes (CM) and paracrystalline arrays (PC) containing the components of the virus-specified protease (E. G. Westaway, J. M. Mackenzie, M. T. Kenney, M. K. Jones, and A. A. Khromykh, J. Virol. 71:6650–6661, 1997). To determine the cellular origins of these membrane structures, we compared the immunolabelling patterns of several cell markers in relation to these sites by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. A marker for the trans-Golgi membranes and the trans-Golgi network, 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalT), was redistributed to large foci in the cytoplasm of Kunjin virus-infected cells, partially coincident with immunofluorescent foci associated with the putative sites of viral RNA synthesis. As determined by immunoelectron microscopy, the induced vesicle packets contained GalT, whereas the CM and PC contained a specific protein marker for the intermediate compartment (ERGIC53). A further indicator of the role of cellular organelles in their biogenesis was the observation that the Golgi apparatus-disrupting agent brefeldin A prevented further development of immunofluorescent foci of induced membranes if added before the end of the latent period but that once formed, these membrane foci were resistant to brefeldin A dispersion. Reticulum membranes emanating from the induced CM and PC were also labelled with the rough endoplasmic reticulum marker anti-protein disulfide isomerase and were obviously redistributed during infection. This is the first report identifying trans-Golgi membranes and the intermediate compartment as the apparent sources of the flavivirus-induced membranes involved in events of replication. PMID:10516064

  3. Controlling the localization of polymer-functionalized nanoparticles in mixed lipid/polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Olubummo, Adekunle; Schulz, Matthias; Lechner, Bob-Dan; Scholtysek, Peggy; Bacia, Kirsten; Blume, Alfred; Kressler, Jörg; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2012-10-23

    Surface hydrophobicity plays a significant role in controlling the interactions between nanoparticles and lipid membranes. In principle, a nanoparticle can be encapsulated into a liposome, either being incorporated into the hydrophobic bilayer interior or trapped within the aqueous vesicle core. In this paper, we demonstrate the preparation and characterization of polymer-functionalized CdSe NPs, tuning their interaction with mixed lipid/polymer membranes from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phophocholine and PIB(87)-b-PEO(17) block copolymer by varying their surface hydrophobicity. It is observed that hydrophobic PIB-modified CdSe NPs can be selectively located within polymer domains in a mixed lipid/polymer monolayer at the air/water interface, changing their typical domain morphologies, while amphiphilic PIB-PEO-modified CdSe NPs showed no specific localization in phase-separated lipid/polymer films. In addition, hydrophilic water-soluble CdSe NPs can readily adsorb onto spread monolayers, showing a larger effect on the molecule packing at the air/water interface in the case of pure lipid films compared to mixed monolayers. Furthermore, the incorporation of PIB-modified CdSe NPs into hybrid lipid/polymer GUVs is demonstrated with respect to the prevailing phase state of the hybrid membrane. Monitoring fluorescent-labeled PIB-CdSe NPs embedded into phase-separated vesicles, it is demonstrated that they are enriched in one specific phase, thus probing their selective incorporation into the hydrophobic portion of PIB(87)-b-PEO(17) BCP-rich domains. Thus, the formation of biocompatible hybrid GUVs with selectively incorporated nanoparticles opens a new perspective for subtle engineering of membranes together with their (nano-) phase structure serving as a model system in designing functional nanomaterials for effective nanomedicine or drug delivery. PMID:22950802

  4. Modification of pro-inflammatory signaling by dietary components: The plasma membrane as a target.

    PubMed

    Ciesielska, Anna; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2015-07-01

    You are what you eat - this well-known phrase properly describes the phenomenon of the effects of diet on acute and chronic inflammation. Several lipids and lipophilic compounds that are delivered with food or are produced in situ in pathological conditions exert immunomodulatory activity due to their interactions with the plasma membrane. This group of compounds includes cholesterol and its oxidized derivatives, fatty acids, α-tocopherol, and polyphenols. Despite their structural heterogeneity, all these compounds ultimately induce changes in plasma membrane architecture and fluidity. By doing this, they modulate the dynamics of plasma membrane receptors, such as TLR4. This receptor is activated by lipopolysaccharide, triggering acute inflammation during bacterial infection, which often leads to sepsis and is linked with diverse chronic inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss how the impact on plasma membrane properties contributes to the immunomodulatory activity of dietary compounds, pointing to the therapeutic potential of some of them. Also watch the Video Abstract. PMID:25966354

  5. Identification method of satellite local components based on combined feature metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Xi-yang; Hou, Qing-yu; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    In order to meet the requirements of identification of satellite local targets, a new method based on combined feature metrics is proposed. Firstly, the geometric features of satellite local targets including body, solar panel and antenna are analyzed respectively, and then the cluster of each component are constructed based on the combined feature metrics of mathematical morphology. Then the corresponding fractal clustering criterions are given. A cluster model is established, which determines the component classification according to weighted combination of the fractal geometric features. On this basis, the identified targets in the satellite image can be recognized by computing the matching probabilities between the identified targets and the clustered ones, which are weighted combinations of the component fractal feature metrics defined in the model. Moreover, the weights are iteratively selected through particle swarm optimization to promote recognition accuracy. Finally, the performance of the identification algorithm is analyzed and verified. Experimental results indicate that the algorithm is able to identify the satellite body, solar panel and antenna accurately with identification probability up to 95%, and has high computing efficiency. The proposed method can be applied to identify on-orbit satellite local targets and possesses potential application prospects on spatial target detection and identification.

  6. Integrin-like proteins are localized to plasma membrane fractions, not plastids, in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swatzell, L. J.; Edelmann, R. E.; Makaroff, C. A.; Kiss, J. Z.

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are a large family of integral membrane proteins that function in signal transduction in animal systems. These proteins are conserved in vertebrates, invertebrates, and fungi. Evidence from previous research suggests that integrin-like proteins may be present in plants as well, and that these proteins may function in signal transduction during gravitropism. In past studies, researchers have used monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies to localize beta 1 integrin-like proteins in plants. However, there is a disparity between data collected from these studies, especially since molecular weights obtained from these investigations range from 55-120 kDa for integrin-like proteins. To date, a complete investigation which employs all three basic immunolabeling procedures, immunoblotting, immunofluorescence microscopy, and immunogold labeling, in addition to extensive fractionation and exhaustive controls, has been lacking. In this paper, we demonstrate that use of a polyclonal antibody against the cytoplasmic domain of avian beta 1-integrin can produce potential artifacts in immunolocalization studies. However, these problems can be eliminated through use of starchless mutants or proper specimen preparation prior to electrophoresis. We also show that this antibody, when applied within the described parameters and with careful controls, identifies a large (100 kDa) integrin-like protein that is localized to plasma membrane fractions in Arabidopsis.

  7. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  8. mDia1 regulates breast cancer invasion by controlling membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase localization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daehwan; Jung, Jangho; You, Eunae; Ko, Panseon; Oh, Somi; Rhee, Sangmyung

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian diaphanous-related formin 1 (mDia1) expression has been linked with progression of malignant cancers in various tissues. However, the precise molecular mechanism underlying mDia1-mediated invasion in cancer cells has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we found that mDia1 is upregulated in invasive breast cancer cells. Knockdown of mDia1 in invasive breast cancer profoundly reduced invasive activity by controlling cellular localization of membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) through interaction with microtubule tracks. Gene silencing and ectopic expression of the active form of mDia1 showed that mDia1 plays a key role in the intracellular trafficking of MT1-MMP to the plasma membrane through microtubules. We also demonstrated that highly invasive breast cancer cells possessed invasive activity in a 3D culture system, which was significantly reduced upon silencing mDia1 or MT1-MMP. Furthermore, mDia1-deficient cells cultured in 3D matrix showed impaired expression of the cancer stem cell marker genes, CD44 and CD133. Collectively, our findings suggest that regulation of cellular trafficking and microtubule-mediated localization of MT1-MMP by mDia1 is likely important in breast cancer invasion through the expression of cancer stem cell genes. PMID:26893363

  9. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  10. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  11. Perkinsus marinus superoxide dismutase 2 (PmSOD2) localizes to single-membrane subcellular compartments

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Robledo, Jose A.; Schott, Eric J.; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2008-10-17

    Perkinsus marinus (Phylum Perkinsozoa), a protozoan parasite of oysters, is considered one of the earliest diverging groups of the lineage leading to dinoflagellates. Perkinsus trophozoites are phagocytosed by oyster hemocytes, where they are likely exposed to reactive oxygen species. As part of its reactive oxygen detoxifying pathway, P. marinus possesses two iron-cofactored SOD (PmSOD1 and PmSOD2). Immunoflourescence analysis of P. marinus trophozoites and gene complementation in yeast revealed that PmSOD1 is targeted to the mitochondria. Surprisingly, although PmSOD2 is characterized by a bipartite N-terminus extension typical of plastid targeting, in preliminary immunofluorescence studies it was visualized as punctuate regions in the cytoplasm that could not be assigned to any organelle. Here, we used immunogold electron microscopy to examine the subcellular localization PmSOD2 in P. marinus trophozoites. Gold grains were mostly associated with single-membrane vesicle-like structures, and eventually, localized to electron-dense, apparently amorphous material present in the lumen of a larger, unique compartment. The images suggested that PmSOD2 is targeted to small vesicles that fuse and/or discharge their content into a larger compartment, possibly the large vacuole typical of the mature trophozoites. In light of the in silico targeting prediction, the association of PmSOD2 with single-membrane compartments raises interesting questions regarding its organellar targeting, and the nature of a putative relic plastid in Perkinsus species.

  12. Immunocytochemical localization of acyl-lipid desaturases in cyanobacterial cells: evidence that both thylakoid membranes and cytoplasmic membranes are sites of lipid desaturation.

    PubMed Central

    Mustardy, L; Los, D A; Gombos, Z; Murata, N

    1996-01-01

    There are four acyl-lipid desaturases in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Each of these desaturases introduces a double bond at a specific position, such as the Delta6, Delta9, Delta12, or omicron3 position, in C18 fatty acids. The localization of the desaturases in cyanobacterial cells was examined immunocytochemically with antibodies raised against synthetic oligopeptides that corresponded to the carboxyl-terminal regions of the desaturases. All four desaturases appeared to be located in the regions of both the cytoplasmic and the thylakoid membranes. These findings suggest that fatty acid desaturation of membrane lipids takes place in the thylakoid membranes as well as in the cytoplasmic membranes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:11607709

  13. Localization of Membrane-Associated Proteins in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Use of Hydrophobic Membrane Probes and Cross-Linking Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Zakowski, Jack J.; Wagner, Robert R.

    1980-01-01

    The location of membrane-associated proteins of vesicular stomatitis virus was investigated by using two monofunctional and three bifunctional probes that differ in the degree to which they partition into membranes and in their specific group reactivity. Two hydrophobic aryl azide probes, [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide and [3H]pyrenesulfonylazide, readily partitioned into virion membrane and, when activated to nitrenes by UV irradiation, formed stable covalent adducts to membrane constituents. Both of these monofunctional probes labeled the glyco-protein G and matrix M proteins, but [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide also labeled the nucleocapsid N protein and an unidentified low-molecular-weight component. Protein labeling of intact virions was unaffected by the presence of cytochrome c or glutathione, but disruption of membrane by sodium dodecyl sulfate greatly enhanced the labeling of all viral proteins except G. Labeling of G protein was essentially restricted to the membrane-embedded, thermolysin-resistant tail fragment. Three bifunctional reagents, tartryl diazide, dimethylsuberimidate, and 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide, were tested for their capacity to cross-link proteins to membrane phospholipids of virions grown in the presence of [3H]palmitate. Only G and M proteins of intact virions were labeled with 3H-phospholipid by these cross-linkers; the reactions were not affected by cytochrome c but were abolished by disruption of virus with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Dimethylsuberimidate, which reacts with free amino groups, cross-linked 3H-phospholipid to both G and M protein. In contrast, the hydrophilic tartryl diazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the M protein, whereas the hydrophobic 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the intrinsic G protein. These data support the hypothesis that the G protein traverses the virion membrane and that the M protein is membrane associated but does not penetrate very deeply, if at all. PMID:6255216

  14. In vitro synthesis of immunoglobulins, secretory component and complement in normal and pathological skin and the adjacent mucous membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lai A Fat, R. F. M.; Suurmond, D.; Van Furth, R.

    1973-01-01

    A study on the synthesis of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, IgM, IgD, and IgE), secretory component and complement in normal and pathological skin and in the adjacent mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal, oral and vaginal mucosa) is reported. The results are based on the culture of tissue samples in a medium with two radioactive amino acids and the detection of synthesized proteins by autoradiography of the immunoelectrophoretic pattern of the culture fluid, except in the case of IgE for which the Ouchterlony technique was used. The results indicate that the normal skin does not synthesize immunoglobulins, whereas normal mucous membranes produce IgG and IgA. In the lesions of various skin diseases immunoglobulins are synthesized, mainly IgG but sometimes also IgA and IgE. The cells responsible for the production of immunoglobulins are plasma cells and lymphoid cells present in the skin lesions and mucous membranes. Synthesis of the free secretory component could be demonstrated only in certain mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal mucosa, and oral mucosa). Complement (C3) synthesis was found in normal skin, mucous membranes (i.e. conjunctiva, nasal and oral mucosa), and in the lesions of such skin diseases as discoid lupus erythematosus, (bullous) pemphigoid, dermatitis herpetiformis, malignant reticulosis, eczema and lichen planus. Complement production was also demonstrated in allergic skin reactions (i.e. tissue from allergic-positive patch tests, positive Mantoux tests and drug eruptions), but no immunoglobulin synthesis was detected in these lesions. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5 PMID:4199092

  15. Recovery of Phytochemical Components from Various Parts of Morinda citrifolia Extracts by Using Membrane Separator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaiah, Duduku; Sarbatly, Rosalam; Nah, Ng Lee

    In this study, extracts from various Morinda Citrifolia parts (leaf, fruit and root) by methanol was separated into permeate and retentate fractions using a membrane system equipped with a nanofiltration (NF) membrane. NF was carried on a ceramic membrane with MWCO of 5 kD. Effect of NF transmembrane pressure at 0.1, 0.12 and 0.17 bar was examined at constant temperature 45EC with constant flow rate. The influence of transmembrane pressure on the efficiency of antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of permeate retentate concentration was examined. The antioxidant activities of crude mengkudu extracts, NF permeate and retentate were evaluated by using the DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content.

  16. Independent component analysis of EEG dipole source localization in resting and action state of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almurshedi, Ahmed; Ismail, Abd Khamim

    2015-04-01

    EEG source localization was studied in order to determine the location of the brain sources that are responsible for the measured potentials at the scalp electrodes using EEGLAB with Independent Component Analysis (ICA) algorithm. Neuron source locations are responsible in generating current dipoles in different states of brain through the measured potentials. The current dipole sources localization are measured by fitting an equivalent current dipole model using a non-linear optimization technique with the implementation of standardized boundary element head model. To fit dipole models to ICA components in an EEGLAB dataset, ICA decomposition is performed and appropriate components to be fitted are selected. The topographical scalp distributions of delta, theta, alpha, and beta power spectrum and cross coherence of EEG signals are observed. In close eyes condition it shows that during resting and action states of brain, alpha band was activated from occipital (O1, O2) and partial (P3, P4) area. Therefore, parieto-occipital area of brain are active in both resting and action state of brain. However cross coherence tells that there is more coherence between right and left hemisphere in action state of brain than that in the resting state. The preliminary result indicates that these potentials arise from the same generators in the brain.

  17. Characteristics of membrane progestin receptor alpha (mPRα) and progesterone membrane receptor component one (PGMRC1) and their roles in mediating rapid progestin actions

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Rapid, progestin actions initiated at the cell surface that are often nongenomic have been described in a variety of reproductive tissues, but until recently the identities of the membrane receptors mediating these nonclassical progestins actions remained unclear. Evidence has been obtained in the last 4-5 years for the involvement of two types of novel membrane proteins unrelated to nuclear steroid receptors, progesterone membrane receptors (mPRs) and progesterone receptor membrane component one (PGMRC1 [also known as progesterone receptor membrane component 1, PGRMC1]), in progestin signaling in several vertebrate reproductive tissues and in the brain. The mPRs, (MW ∼40 kDa) initially discovered in fish ovaries, comprise at least three subtypes, α, β and γ and belong to the seven-transmembrane progesterone adiponectin Q receptor (PAQR) family. Both recombinant and wild type mPRs display high affinity (Kd ∼5 nM), limited capacity, displaceable and specific progesterone binding. The mPRs are directly coupled to G proteins and typically activate pertussis-sensitive inhibitory G proteins (Gi), to down regulate adenylyl cyclase activity. Recent studies suggest the alpha subtype (mPRα) has important physiological functions in variety of reproductive tissues. The mPRα is an intermediary in progestin induction of oocyte maturation and stimulation of sperm hypermotility in fish. In mammals, the mPRαs have been implicated in progesterone regulation of uterine function in humans and GnRH secretion in rodents. The single-transmembrane protein PGMRC1 (MW 26 ∼28 kDa) was first purified from porcine livers and its cDNA was subsequently cloned from porcine smooth muscle cells and a variety of other tissues by different investigators. PGMRC1 and the closely related PGMRC2 belong to the membrane-associated progesterone receptor (MAPR) family. The PGMRC1 protein displays moderately high binding affinity for progesterone which is 2-10-fold greater than that for

  18. Ultrastructural localization of cytochrome b in the membranes of resting and phagocytosing human granulocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jesaitis, A J; Buescher, E S; Harrison, D; Quinn, M T; Parkos, C A; Livesey, S; Linner, J

    1990-01-01

    Affinity-purified rabbit anti-neutrophil cytochrome b light or heavy chain antibodies were used to immunocytochemically and biochemically localize cytochrome b in neutrophils and eosinophils. The antibodies were monospecific, recognizing polypeptides of 91 and 22 kD, respectively, on Western blots of whole neutrophil extracts. The antibodies were used in Western blot analysis of subcellular fractions of purified neutrophils to confirm that the distribution of cytochrome b spectral absorbance matched that of the two subunits. Thin sections of cryofixed, molecular distillation-dried granulocytes were labeled with the anti-cytochrome b antibodies, followed by incubation with biotin-conjugated secondary antibody, and final labeling with streptavidin-conjugated colloidal gold. Electron microscopy revealed that the cytochrome b light and heavy chains were localized primarily (80%) to 0.1-0.2-micron round or elliptical granule-like structures in neutrophils and 0.4-0.5-micron granules in eosinophils. Approximately 20% of the cytochrome b was localized to the surface, confirming the subcellular fractionation studies. Double staining experiments on the neutrophils, using polyclonal rabbit anti-lactoferrin antibody, indicated that the cytochrome-bearing structures also contained lactoferrin and thus were specific granules. When the analysis was performed on neutrophils that had phagocytosed Staphylococcus aureus, cytochrome b was found in the phagosomal membrane adjoining the bacterial cell wall. Images PMID:2312727

  19. Local delivery of FTY720 in PCL membrane improves SCI functional recovery by reducing reactive astrogliosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junjuan; Wang, Jiaqiu; Lu, Ping; Cai, Youzhi; Wang, Yafei; Hong, Lan; Ren, Hao; Heng, Boon Chin; Liu, Hua; Zhou, Jing; Ouyang, Hongwei

    2015-09-01

    FTY720 has recently been approved as an oral drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis, and exerts its therapeutic effect by acting as an immunological inhibitor targeting the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor subtype (S1P1) of T cells. Recently studies demonstrated positive efficacy of this drug on spinal cord injury (SCI) in animal models after systemic administration, albeit with significant adverse side effects. We hereby hypothesize that localized delivery of FTY720 can promote SCI recovery by reducing pathological astrogliosis. The mechanistic functions of FTY720 were investigated in vitro and in vivo utilizing immunofluorescence, histology, MRI and behavioral analysis. The in vitro study showed that FTY720 can reduce astrocyte migration and proliferation activated by S1P. FTY720 can prolong internalization of S1P1 and exert antagonistic effects on S1P1. In vivo study of SCI animal models demonstrated that local delivery of FTY720 with polycaprolactone (PCL) membrane significantly decreased S1P1 expression and glial scarring compared with the control group. Furthermore, FTY720-treated groups exhibited less cavitation volume and neuron loss, which significantly improved recovery of motor function. These findings demonstrated that localized delivery of FTY720 can promote SCI recovery by targeting the S1P1 receptor of astrocytes, provide a new therapeutic strategy for SCI treatment. PMID:26036174

  20. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Yingfei; Frydenlund, Didrik S; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos) plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor), but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders. PMID:19863494

  1. Mechanisms regulating cell membrane localization of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Edgar B; Dediulia, Tatjana; Fernando, Joan; Bertran, Esther; Egea, Gustavo; Navarro, Estanislao; Fabregat, Isabel

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells with a mesenchymal phenotype show an asymmetric subcellular distribution of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, which is required for cell migration and invasion. In this work we examine the mechanisms that regulate the intracellular trafficking of CXCR4 in HCC cells. Results indicate that HCC cells present CXCR4 at the cell surface, but most of this protein is in endomembranes colocalizing with markers of the Golgi apparatus and recycling endosomes. The presence of high protein levels of CXCR4 present at the cell surface correlates with a mesenchymal-like phenotype and a high autocrine activation of the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) pathway. CXCR4 traffics along the Golgi/exocyst/plasma membrane pathway and requires EXOC4 (Sec8) component of the exocyst complex. HCC cells use distinct mechanisms for the CXCR4 internalization such as dynamin-dependent endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Regardless of the endocytic mechanisms, colocalization of CXCR4 and Rab11 is observed, which could be involved not only in receptor recycling but also in its post-Golgi transport. In summary, this work highlights membrane trafficking pathways whose pharmacological targeting could subsequently result in the inactivation of one of the main guiding mechanisms used by metastatic cells to colonize secondary organs and tissues. PMID:25704914

  2. Vitamin K1-induced localized scleroderma (morphea) with linear deposition of IgA in the basement membrane zone.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Llamazares, J; Ahmed, I

    1998-02-01

    We describe a 45-year-old white man in whom distinctive clinical and histologic features of localized scleroderma developed at sites of injection of vitamin K1 (phytonadione). A direct immunofluorescence test demonstrated prominent linear deposition of IgA along the basement membrane zone. No circulating antibasement membrane zone IgA antibodies were identified on indirect immunofluorescence testing. We believe that the unusual immunofluorescence finding in our patient is nonspecific and represents an epiphenomenon caused by cutaneous injury. PMID:9486707

  3. Thermal Regulation of Membrane Lipid Fluidity by a Two-Component System in "Bacillus Subtilis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredeston, L. M.; Marciano, D.; Albanesi, D.; De Mendoza, D.; Delfino, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a simple and robust laboratory exercise on the regulation of membrane unsaturated fatty acid composition in bacteria by a decrease in growth temperature. We take advantage of the well characterized Des pathway of "Bacillus subtilis", composed of a [delta]5-desaturase (encoded by the "des" gene) and the canonical…

  4. Yeast Vps13 promotes mitochondrial function and is localized at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Sook; Thorsness, Mary K; Policastro, Robert; McGoldrick, Luke L; Hollingsworth, Nancy M; Thorsness, Peter E; Neiman, Aaron M

    2016-08-01

    The Vps13 protein family is highly conserved in eukaryotic cells. Mutations in human VPS13 genes result in a variety of diseases, such as chorea acanthocytosis (ChAc), but the cellular functions of Vps13 proteins are not well defined. In yeast, there is a single VPS13 orthologue, which is required for at least two different processes: protein sorting to the vacuole and sporulation. This study demonstrates that VPS13 is also important for mitochondrial integrity. In addition to preventing transfer of DNA from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, VPS13 suppresses mitophagy and functions in parallel with the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrion encounter structure (ERMES). In different growth conditions, Vps13 localizes to endosome-mitochondrion contacts and to the nuclear-vacuole junctions, indicating that Vps13 may function at membrane contact sites. The ability of VPS13 to compensate for the absence of ERMES correlates with its intracellular distribution. We propose that Vps13 is present at multiple membrane contact sites and that separation-of-function mutants are due to loss of Vps13 at specific junctions. Introduction of VPS13A mutations identified in ChAc patients at cognate sites in yeast VPS13 are specifically defective in compensating for the lack of ERMES, suggesting that mitochondrial dysfunction might be the basis for ChAc. PMID:27280386

  5. Novel approach to measure the size of plasma-membrane nanodomains in single molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ziomkiewicz, Iwona; Sporring, Jon; Pomorski, Thomas Günther; Schulz, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Many membrane proteins are not evenly distributed over the plasma membrane, but gathered in domains assumed to have a particular lipid composition. Using single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) we have immunolocalized a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor protein that labels nanodomains in a specialized plant cell type, and compared the suitability of three methods to estimate their size. As conventional methods full width at half maximum (FWHM) and the full diameter (FWMin) of domains were used. A boundary detection method of the domain area (DA) was performed in order to take irregular shapes into account. In order to compare the influence of the chosen measurement methods, we have developed a MatLab program that allows for automated analysis of domain sizes from multiple SMLM images and provides the statistics of three key features of domains: FWHM and FWMin along their long and short axes as well as the DA, derived from the molecular density. Domains formed by the GPI-anchor protein are approximating elliptical shapes. Direct and indirect immunolabeling resulted in a statistically significant difference in apparent domain size, reflecting the fact that the secondary antibody molecules extend the uncertainty along the nanodomain border. FWMin values along the long and short axis give good estimates of regular, geometrically centred domain shapes, while the DA value matches regular as well as irregular shapes best, as derived from computer-generated, irregular point clusters. PMID:26109552

  6. Large effect of membrane tension on the fluid–solid phase transitions of two-component phosphatidylcholine vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Santore, Maria M.

    2014-01-01

    Model phospholipid membranes and vesicles have long provided insight into the nature of confined materials and membranes while also providing a platform for drug delivery. The rich thermodynamic behavior and interesting domain shapes in these membranes have previously been mapped in extensive studies that vary temperature and composition; however, the thermodynamic impact of tension on bilayers has been restricted to recent reports of subtly reduced fluid–fluid transition temperatures. In two-component phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles [1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC)], we report a dramatic influence of tension on the fluid–solid transition and resulting phases: At fixed composition, systematic variations in tension produce differently shaped solid domains (striped or irregular hexagons), shift fluid–solid transition temperatures, and produce a triple-point–like intersection of coexistence curves at elevated tensions, about 3 mN/m for 30% DOPC/70% DPPC. Tension therefore represents a potential switch of microstructure in responsive engineered materials; it is an important morphology-determining variable in confined systems, and, in biological membranes, it may provide a means to regulate dynamic structure. PMID:24344297

  7. Pulsating Tandem Microbubble for Localized and Directional Single Cell Membrane Poration

    PubMed Central

    Sankin, G.N.; Yuan, F.; Zhong, P.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of laser-generated tandem microbubble (maximum diameter about 50 μm) with single (rat mammary carcinoma) cells is investigated in a 25-μm liquid layer. Anti-phase and coupled oscillation of the tandem microbubble leads to the formation of alternating, directional microjets (with max. microstreaming velocity of 10 m/s) and vortices (max. vorticity of 350,000 s−1) in opposite directions. Localized and directional membrane poration (200 nm to 2 μm in pore size) can be produced by the tandem microbubble in an orientation and proximity dependent manner, which is absence from a single oscillating microbubble of comparable size and at the same stand-off distance. PMID:20868077

  8. In-situ monitoring of internal local temperature and voltage of proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Fan, Wei-Yuan; Hsieh, Wei-Jung

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of temperature and voltage of a fuel cell are key factors that influence performance. Conventional sensors are normally large, and are also useful only for making external measurements of fuel cells. Centimeter-scale sensors for making invasive measurements are frequently unable to accurately measure the interior changes of a fuel cell. This work focuses mainly on fabricating flexible multi-functional microsensors (for temperature and voltage) to measure variations in the local temperature and voltage of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) that are based on micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS). The power density at 0.5 V without a sensor is 450 mW/cm(2), and that with a sensor is 426 mW/cm(2). Since the reaction area of a fuel cell with a sensor is approximately 12% smaller than that without a sensor, but the performance of the former is only 5% worse. PMID:22163556

  9. In silico local structure approach: a case study on outer membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Martin, Juliette; de Brevern, Alexandre G; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2008-04-01

    The detection of Outer Membrane Proteins (OMP) in whole genomes is an actual question, their sequence characteristics have thus been intensively studied. This class of protein displays a common beta-barrel architecture, formed by adjacent antiparallel strands. However, due to the lack of available structures, few structural studies have been made on this class of proteins. Here we propose a novel OMP local structure investigation, based on a structural alphabet approach, i.e., the decomposition of 3D structures using a library of four-residue protein fragments. The optimal decomposition of structures using hidden Markov model results in a specific structural alphabet of 20 fragments, six of them dedicated to the decomposition of beta-strands. This optimal alphabet, called SA20-OMP, is analyzed in details, in terms of local structures and transitions between fragments. It highlights a particular and strong organization of beta-strands as series of regular canonical structural fragments. The comparison with alphabets learned on globular structures indicates that the internal organization of OMP structures is more constrained than in globular structures. The analysis of OMP structures using SA20-OMP reveals some recurrent structural patterns. The preferred location of fragments in the distinct regions of the membrane is investigated. The study of pairwise specificity of fragments reveals that some contacts between structural fragments in beta-sheets are clearly favored whereas others are avoided. This contact specificity is stronger in OMP than in globular structures. Moreover, SA20-OMP also captured sequential information. This can be integrated in a scoring function for structural model ranking with very promising results. PMID:17932925

  10. Identification of a Regulatory Acidic Motif as the Determinant of Membrane Localization of TICAM-2.

    PubMed

    Funami, Kenji; Matsumoto, Misako; Enokizono, Yoshiaki; Ishii, Noriko; Tatematsu, Megumi; Oshiumi, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Seya, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    TLR4 triggers LPS signaling through the adaptors Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule (TICAM)-2 (also called TRAM) and TICAM-1 (also called TRIF), together with Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) and MyD88. The MyD88 pathway mediates early phase responses to LPS on the plasma membrane, whereas the TICAM pathway mediates late-phase responses, which induce the production of type I IFN and activation of inflammasomes. TICAM-2 bridges TLR4 and TICAM-1 for LPS signaling in the endosome. Recently, we identified an acidic motif, E87/D88/D89 in TICAM-2, that provides the interaction surfaces between TICAM-2 and TICAM-1. In the present study, we found additional D91/E92 in TICAM-2, conserved across species, that is crucial for TICAM-1 activation. The D91A/E92A mutant protein was distributed largely to the cytosol, despite myristoylation, suggesting its importance for assistance of membrane localization of TICAM-2. An ectopically expressed D91A/E92A mutant per se failed to activate TICAM-1, unlike its wild-type counterpart that forms self-aggregation, but it still retained the ability to pass LPS-mediated IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 activation. In a TICAM-2 knockout human cell line expressing TLR4/MD-2 with or without CD14, overexpression of the D91A/E92A mutant did not activate IRF3, but upon LPS stimulation, it induced sufficient TLR4-mediated IRF3 activation with high coefficient colocalization. Hence, the D91/E92 motif guides TICAM-2 membrane localization and self-activation for signaling. Our results suggest the presence of two distinct steps underlying endosomal LPS signaling on TICAM-2 for TICAM-1 activation: TICAM-2 assembling in TLR4 and/or TICAM-2 self-activation. D91A/E92A of TICAM-2 selectively associates the TLR4-dependent TICAM-2 assembling, but not cytosolic TICAM-2 self-aggregation, to activate TICAM-1. PMID:26408662

  11. Mutations in the exocyst component Sec5 disrupt neuronal membrane traffic, but neurotransmitter release persists.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Mala; Garza, Dan; Scheller, Richard H; Schwarz, Thomas L

    2003-02-01

    The exocyst (Sec6/8) complex is necessary for secretion in yeast and has been postulated to establish polarity by directing vesicle fusion to specific sites along the plasma membrane. The complex may also function in the nervous system, but its precise role is unknown. We have investigated exocyst function in Drosophila with mutations in one member of the complex, sec5. Null alleles die as growth-arrested larvae, whose neuromuscular junctions fail to expand. In culture, neurite outgrowth fails in sec5 mutants once maternal Sec5 is exhausted. Using a trafficking assay, we found impairments in the membrane addition of newly synthesized proteins. In contrast, synaptic vesicle fusion was not impaired. Thus, Sec5 differentiates between two forms of vesicle trafficking: trafficking for cell growth and membrane protein insertion depend on sec5, whereas transmitter secretion does not. In this regard, sec5 differs from the homologs of other yeast exocytosis genes that are required for both neuronal trafficking pathways. PMID:12575951

  12. Implementation of CUAHSI-HIS Community Project Components in a Local Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muste, M.; Arnold, N.; Kim, D.

    2008-12-01

    The deployment of the eleven WATERS Network local observatories using CUAHSI-HIS project products showed that water observations data collected by academic investigators could be stored, published on the Internet, federated with water observations data published by water agencies, and searched using a concept framework that connects with variables in each individual data source. For many within the water resources community, the CUAHSI-HIS community project represents a new opportunity to approach the management, publication, and analysis of their data systematically - i.e., moving from collections of ASCII text or spreadsheet files to relational data models. This research describes the initial efforts carried out by a University of Iowa research group during the component implementation of a hydrologic community project in a local CI-based digital watershed (DW). The goal was to test what types of data query the DW can handle and see how it performs in use cases where data streams are coupled with models for continuous forecasting. This paper also discusses the general context for the DW development and summarizes the lessons learned by the group during this initial developmental stage. Given the uniform and scalable nature of the community project components, it is expected that the workflows presented herein are transferable to other users and other watersheds.

  13. The Investigation and Development of Low Cost Hardware Components for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    George A. Marchetti

    1999-12-15

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components, which would have a low-cost structure in mass production, were fabricated and tested. A fuel cell electrode structure, comprising a thin layer of graphite (50 microns) and a front-loaded platinum catalyst layer (600 angstroms), was shown to produce significant power densities. In addition, a PEM bipolar plate, comprising flexible graphite, carbon cloth flow-fields and an integrated polymer gasket, was fabricated. Power densities of a two-cell unit using this inexpensive bipolar plate architecture were shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art bipolar plates.

  14. Calmodulin localization and its effects on endocytic and phagocytic membrane trafficking in Paramecium multimicronucleatum.

    PubMed

    Fok, Agnes K; Aihara, Marilynn S; Ishida, Masaki; Allen, Richard D

    2008-01-01

    In ciliates, calmodulin (CaM), as in other cells, has multiple functions, such as activation of regulatory enzymes and modulating calcium-dependent cellular processes. By immunogold localization, CaM is concentrated at multiple sites in Paramecium. It is seen scattered over the cytosol, but bound to its matrix, and is concentrated at the pores of the contractile vacuole complexes and with at least three microtubular arrays. It was localized peripheral to the nine-doublet microtubules of the ciliary axonemes. The most striking localization was on the akinetic side only of the cytopharyngeal microtubular ribbons opposite the side where the discoidal vesicles, acidosomes and the 100-nm carrier vesicles bind and move. CaM was also present at the periphery of the postoral microtubular bundles along which the early vacuole moves and was associated with the cytoproct microtubules that guide the spent digestive vacuoles to the cytoproct. It was not found on the membranes of, or in the interior of nuclei, mitochondria, phagosomes, and trichocysts, and was only sparsely scattered over the cytosolic sides of discoidal vesicles, acidosomes, lysosomes, and digestive vacuoles. Together the associations with specific microtubular arrays and the effects of trifluoperazine and calmidazolium indicate that CaM is involved (i) in vesicle transport to the cytopharynx area for vacuole formation and subsequent vacuole acidification, (ii) in early vacuole transport along the postoral fiber, and (iii) in transporting the spent vacuole to the cytoproct. Higher CaM concentrations subjacent to the cell's pellicle and close to the decorated tubules of the contractile vacuole complex may support a role for CaM in ion traffic. PMID:19120793

  15. Subcellular localization and membrane association of the replicase protein of grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus, family Betaflexiviridae.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Sean W; Xiao, Huogen; Li, Caihong; Nelson, Richard S; Meng, Baozhong

    2015-04-01

    As a member of the newly established Betaflexiviridae family, grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV) has an RNA genome containing five ORFs. ORF1 encodes a putative replicase polyprotein typical of the alphavirus superfamily of positive-strand ssRNA viruses. Several viruses of this superfamily have been demonstrated to replicate in structures designated viral replication complexes associated with intracellular membranes. However, structure and cellular localization of the replicase complex have not been studied for members of Betaflexiviridae, a family of mostly woody plant viruses. As a first step towards the elucidation of the replication complex of GRSPaV, we investigated the subcellular localization of full-length and truncated versions of its replicase polyprotein via fluorescent tagging, followed by fluorescence microscopy. We found that the replicase polyprotein formed distinctive punctate bodies in both Nicotiana benthamiana leaf cells and tobacco protoplasts. We further mapped a region of 76 amino acids in the methyl-transferase domain responsible for the formation of these punctate structures. The punctate structures are distributed in close proximity to the endoplasmic reticulum network. Membrane flotation and biochemical analyses demonstrate that the N-terminal region responsible for punctate structure formation associated with cellular membrane is likely through an amphipathic α helix serving as an in-plane anchor. The identity of this membrane is yet to be determined. This is, to our knowledge, the first report on the localization and membrane association of the replicase proteins of a member of the family Betaflexiviridae. PMID:25502653

  16. Membrane localization of scaffold proteins promotes graded signaling in the yeast MAP kinase cascade

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Background Signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade pathways can show various input-output behaviors, including either switch-like or graded responses to increasing levels of stimulus. Prior studies suggest that switch-like behavior is promoted by positive feedback loops and nonprocessive phosphorylation reactions, but it is unclear whether graded signaling is a default behavior or if it must be enforced by separate mechanisms. Scaffold proteins have been hypothesized to promote graded behavior. Results Here, we experimentally probe the determinants of graded signaling in the yeast mating MAPK pathway. We find that graded behavior is robust, as it resists perturbation by loss of several negative feedback regulators. However, the pathway becomes switch-like when activated by a crosstalk stimulus that bypasses multiple upstream components. To dissect the contributing factors, we developed a method for gradually varying the signal input at different pathway steps in vivo. Input at the beginning of the kinase cascade produced a sharp, threshold-like response. Surprisingly, the scaffold protein Ste5 increased this threshold behavior when limited to the cytosol. However, signaling remained graded whenever Ste5 was allowed to function at the plasma membrane. Conclusions The results suggest that the MAPK cascade module is inherently ultrasensitive, but is converted to a graded system by the pathway-specific activation mechanism. Scaffold-mediated assembly of signaling complexes at the plasma membrane allows faithful propagation of weak signals, which consequently reduces pathway ultrasensitivity. These properties help shape the input-output properties of the system to fit the physiological context. PMID:18722124

  17. Immunohistochemical localization of components of the insulin-like growth factor system in human permanent teeth.

    PubMed

    Götz, Werner; Heinen, Michael; Lossdörfer, Stefan; Jäger, Andreas

    2006-05-01

    There is growing evidence that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays an important role in the biology of oro-dento-facial tissues and organs, including the development, homeostasis and regeneration of the periodontium. To obtain basic data on the occurrence and distribution of IGF components in human permanent teeth we immunohistochemically investigated 25 extracted, decalcified and paraffin-embedded teeth using mono and polyclonal antibodies against the ligands IGF-I and -II, the IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) and all six IGF binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6). In the extracellular matrix (ECM) of the adhering periodontal ligament (PDL), immunoreactivity for IGF-I, -II and IGFBP-1 and -6 was observed. PDL fibroblasts showed immunostaining for the IGF1R. For the cementum, in the acellular cementum only IGF-II could be detected, while outer cementum layers with inserting Sharpey's fibers reacted with all antibodies applied except for IGFBP-4 and -6. In the pulp, mainly fibrotic areas and areas around denticles were immunoreactive for IGF-I, IGFBP-1, -3, -5 and -6. Predentin and odontoblastic processes were stained for IGF-I and IGFBP-3. The spatially oriented occurrence of components of the IGF system in human permanent teeth indicates that specific functions of the IGFs may be localized in particular tissue compartments. In the cementum, several IGF components were found indicating roles in tissue homeostasis or attachment. The PDL may function as a reservoir for IGFs probably bound to ECM components. PDL fibroblasts could then respond in a paracrine manner. In the pulp, the IGF system may be involved in odontoblast biology, fibrosis and denticle formation. PMID:16321360

  18. Perinuclear Localization of Internalized Outer Membrane Vesicles Carrying Active Cytolethal Distending Toxin from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Rompikuntal, Pramod Kumar; Thay, Bernard; Khan, Muhammad Khanzeb; Alanko, Jonna; Penttinen, Anna-Maija; Asikainen, Sirkka; Wai, Sun Nyunt

    2012-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is implicated in aggressive forms of periodontitis. Similarly to several other Gram-negative species, this organism produces and excretes a cytolethal distending toxin (CDT), a genotoxin associated with cell distention, G2 cell cycle arrest, and/or apoptosis in many mammalian cell types. In this study, we have identified A. actinomycetemcomitans outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) as a vehicle for simultaneous delivery of multiple proteins, including CDT, into human cells. The OMV proteins were internalized in both HeLa cells and human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) via a mechanism of OMV fusion with lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. The active toxin unit, CdtB, was localized inside the nucleus of the intoxicated cells, whereas OmpA and proteins detected using an antibody specific to whole A. actinomycetemcomitans serotype a cells had a perinuclear distribution. In accordance with a tight association of CdtB with OMVs, vesicles isolated from A. actinomycetemcomitans strain D7SS (serotype a), in contrast to OMVs from a D7SS cdtABC mutant, induced a cytolethal distending effect on HeLa and HGF cells, indicating that OMV-associated CDT was biologically active. Association of CDT with OMVs was also observed in A. actinomycetemcomitans isolates belonging to serotypes b and c, indicating that OMV-mediated release of CDT may be conserved in A. actinomycetemcomitans. Although the role of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal disease has not yet been elucidated, our present data suggest that OMVs could deliver biologically active CDT and additional virulence factors into susceptible cells of the periodontium. PMID:22025516

  19. Local translational diffusion rates of membranous Na+,K(+)-ATPase measured by saturation transfer ESR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Esmann, M; Marsh, D

    1992-01-01

    Diffusion-controlled Heisenberg spin exchange between spin-labeled Na+,K(+)-ATPase [ATP phosphohydrolase (Na+/K(+)-transporting), EC 3.6.1.37] proteins has been studied by saturation transfer ESR spectroscopy in reconstituted membranes. Na+,K(+)-ATPase from the salt gland of Squalus acanthias was solubilized in a polyoxyethylene ether detergent, octa(ethylene glycol) dodecyl monoether. Part of the solubilized enzyme was covalently spin-labeled with a nitroxide derivative of indanedione and recombined with various proportions of the unlabeled enzyme while the native lipid/protein ratio was maintained. Purified membranes were then reconstituted from the various samples by precipitation with divalent ions. The reciprocal integrated intensities of the saturation transfer ESR spectra were found to increase linearly with the fraction of protein that was spin-labeled, and the gradient of the concentration dependence increased with increasing temperature over the range 4 degrees-25 degrees C. Comparison with theoretical analyses of the effects of weak Heisenberg spin exchange [Marsh, D. & Horváth, L. I. (1992) J. Magn. Reson. 97, 13-26] suggests that the effects on the saturation transfer ESR intensity are attributable to short-range diffusional collisions between the spin-labeled protein molecules. The effective value of the local translational diffusion coefficient is 1.8-2.9 microns2.s-1 at 15 degrees C, depending on the diffusion model used, which is much larger than the values obtained for the long-range diffusion coefficient in cells by photobleaching techniques. The temperature dependence of the translational diffusion is larger than expected but correlates with the anomalous temperature dependence of the rotational diffusion observed in the same system. PMID:1323847

  20. SNARE and regulatory proteins induce local membrane protrusions to prime docked vesicles for fast calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Malsam, Jörg; Hagen, Wim J H; Scheutzow, Andrea; Söllner, Thomas H; Briggs, John A G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane in response to Ca2+ influx, thereby releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. The protein machinery that mediates this process, consisting of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and regulatory proteins, is well known, but the mechanisms by which these proteins prime synaptic membranes for fusion are debated. In this study, we applied large-scale, automated cryo-electron tomography to image an in vitro system that reconstitutes synaptic fusion. Our findings suggest that upon docking and priming of vesicles for fast Ca2+-triggered fusion, SNARE proteins act in concert with regulatory proteins to induce a local protrusion in the plasma membrane, directed towards the primed vesicle. The SNAREs and regulatory proteins thereby stabilize the membrane in a high-energy state from which the activation energy for fusion is profoundly reduced, allowing synchronous and instantaneous fusion upon release of the complexin clamp. PMID:24493260

  1. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  2. A Potential Nanofiber Membrane Device for Filling Surgical Residual Cavity to Prevent Glioma Recurrence and Improve Local Neural Tissue Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Daoxiang; Lin, Chao; Wen, Xuejun; Gu, Shuying; Zhao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a novel device with nanofiber membrane capable of sustained release of temozolomide (TMZ) and neuron growth factor (NGF). An improved bio-availability of TMZ and NGF in surroundings proximal to the device was expected to be attained for a prolonged period of time. The device was developed by integrating TMZ-doped polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofiber (TP) membrane and NGF-coated PCL (NGFP) membrane using sodium alginate hydrogel. TP was prepared by direct electrospinning of TMZ/PCL. NGFP membrane was developed by layer-by-layer assembling technology. The incorporation of TMZ-doped nanofiber and NGFP nanofiber in the device was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The number of NGF layer in NGF-coated PCL membrane could be readily measured with energy spectrum analysis. The in vitro release study showed that TP-NGFP-TP membrane could efficiently liberate TMZ to inhibit the growth of C6 glioma cells, and sufficient NGF to induce the differentiation of PC12 neuron cells over four weeks. Such TP-NGFP-TP membrane device can be employed as a tampon to fill up surgical residual cavity and afford residual glioma removal, structural support, hemostasis, and local neural tissue reconstruction in the surgical treatment of glioma. The study opens a horizon to develop multifunctional biomaterial device for maximized glioma treatment efficacy. PMID:27548322

  3. Studies on the interactions between parabens and lipid membrane components in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Gawryś, Maciej; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between parabens (PBs) and lipid components of mammalian and bacterial cell membranes were investigated in model systems of Langmuir monolayers. Me-, Et-, Pr- and Bu-paraben studied in this paper are frequently applied as cosmetics and food preservatives, since they possess broad antimicrobial activity. The mode of PB action is connected with their incorporation into the membrane of bacterial organisms, however; it is not known what is the role of the respective lipid species in this mechanism. This problem is crucial to understand the differences in paraben activity toward individual microorganisms and to shed the light onto the problem of PB cytotoxicity reported in studies on mammalian cells. In this paper, the mentioned aspects were investigated with application of the Langmuir monolayer technique complemented with BAM and GIXD. Our experiments revealed that the influence of PBs depends on their chemical structure, solution concentration and on the class of lipid. The strongest modification of the monolayer characteristics, leading to its collapse at low surface pressure, occurred in the presence of BuPB, having the largest chain. PBs interact preferentially with the monolayers possessing low degree of condensation, whereas for LC state, the effect was weaker and observed only as modification of the 2D unit cells. In the model systems, PBs interact with phospholipids characteristic for mammalian membranes (phosphatidylcholine) stronger than with bacterial (phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin). This strong influence of parabens on the model systems composed of animal lipids may explain cytotoxic activity of these preservatives. PMID:26777770

  4. Linking Findings in Microfluidics to Membrane Emulsification Process Design: The Importance of Wettability and Component Interactions with Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schroën, Karin; Ferrando, Montse; de Lamo-Castellví, Silvia; Sahin, Sami; Güell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    In microfluidics and other microstructured devices, wettability changes, as a result of component interactions with the solid wall, can have dramatic effects. In emulsion separation and emulsification applications, the desired behavior can even be completely lost. Wettability changes also occur in one phase systems, but the effect is much more far-reaching when using two-phase systems. For microfluidic emulsification devices, this can be elegantly demonstrated and quantified for EDGE (Edge-base Droplet GEneration) devices that have a specific behavior that allows us to distinguish between surfactant and liquid interactions with the solid surface. Based on these findings, design rules can be defined for emulsification with any micro-structured emulsification device, such as direct and premix membrane emulsification. In general, it can be concluded that mostly surface interactions increase the contact angle toward 90°, either through the surfactant, or the oil that is used. This leads to poor process stability, and very limited pressure ranges at which small droplets can be made in microfluidic systems, and cross-flow membrane emulsification. In a limited number of cases, surface interactions can also lead to lower contact angles, thereby increasing the operational stability. This paper concludes with a guideline that can be used to come to the appropriate combination of membrane construction material (or any micro-structured device), surfactants and liquids, in combination with process conditions. PMID:27187484

  5. Linking Findings in Microfluidics to Membrane Emulsification Process Design: The Importance of Wettability and Component Interactions with Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Schroën, Karin; Ferrando, Montse; de Lamo-Castellví, Silvia; Sahin, Sami; Güell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    In microfluidics and other microstructured devices, wettability changes, as a result of component interactions with the solid wall, can have dramatic effects. In emulsion separation and emulsification applications, the desired behavior can even be completely lost. Wettability changes also occur in one phase systems, but the effect is much more far-reaching when using two-phase systems. For microfluidic emulsification devices, this can be elegantly demonstrated and quantified for EDGE (Edge-base Droplet GEneration) devices that have a specific behavior that allows us to distinguish between surfactant and liquid interactions with the solid surface. Based on these findings, design rules can be defined for emulsification with any micro-structured emulsification device, such as direct and premix membrane emulsification. In general, it can be concluded that mostly surface interactions increase the contact angle toward 90°, either through the surfactant, or the oil that is used. This leads to poor process stability, and very limited pressure ranges at which small droplets can be made in microfluidic systems, and cross-flow membrane emulsification. In a limited number of cases, surface interactions can also lead to lower contact angles, thereby increasing the operational stability. This paper concludes with a guideline that can be used to come to the appropriate combination of membrane construction material (or any micro-structured device), surfactants and liquids, in combination with process conditions. PMID:27187484

  6. Membrane anchoring domain of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gB is sufficient for nuclear envelope localization.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, R; Ghosh, K; Rasile, L; Ghosh, H P

    1994-01-01

    We have used the glycoprotein gB of herpes simplex virus type 1 (gB-1), which buds from the inner nuclear membrane, as a model protein to study localization of membrane proteins in the nuclear envelope. To determine whether specific domains of gB-1 glycoprotein are involved in localization in the nuclear envelope, we have used deletion mutants of gB-1 protein as well as chimeric proteins constructed by replacing the domains of the cell surface glycoprotein G of vesicular stomatitis virus with the corresponding domains of gB. Mutant and chimeric proteins expressed in COS cells were localized by immunoelectron microscopy. A chimeric protein (gB-G) containing the ectodomain of gB and the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of G did not localize in the nuclear envelope. When the ectodomain of G was fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of gB, however, the resulting chimeric protein (G-gB) was localized in the nuclear envelope. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of G with the 69 hydrophobic amino acids containing the membrane anchoring domain of gB allowed the hybrid protein (G-tmgB) to be localized in the nuclear envelope, suggesting that residues 721 to 795 of gB can promote retention of proteins in the nuclear envelope. Deletion mutations in the hydrophobic region further showed that a transmembrane segment of 21 hydrophobic amino acids, residues 774 to 795 of gB, was sufficient for localization in the nuclear envelope. Since wild-type gB and the mutant and chimeric proteins that were localized in the nuclear envelope were also retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, the membrane spanning segment of gB could also influence retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. Images PMID:8139012

  7. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: A novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bonekamp, Nina A.; Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf; Schrader, Michael

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  8. Pannexin2 oligomers localize in the membranes of endosomal vesicles in mammalian cells while Pannexin1 channels traffic to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Boassa, Daniela; Nguyen, Phuong; Hu, Junru; Ellisman, Mark H.; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2015-01-01

    Pannexin2 (Panx2) is the largest of three members of the pannexin proteins. Pannexins are topologically related to connexins and innexins, but serve different functional roles than forming gap junctions. We previously showed that pannexins form oligomeric channels but unlike connexins and innexins, they form only single membrane channels. High levels of Panx2 mRNA and protein in the Central Nervous System (CNS) have been documented. Whereas Pannexin1 (Panx1) is fairly ubiquitous and Pannexin3 (Panx3) is found in skin and connective tissue, both are fully glycosylated, traffic to the plasma membrane and have functions correlated with extracellular ATP release. Here, we describe trafficking and subcellular localizations of exogenous Panx2 and Panx1 protein expression in MDCK, HeLa, and HEK 293T cells as well as endogenous Panx1 and Panx2 patterns in the CNS. Panx2 was found in intracellular localizations, was partially N-glycosylated, and localizations were non-overlapping with Panx1. Confocal images of hippocampal sections immunolabeled for the astrocytic protein GFAP, Panx1 and Panx2 demonstrated that the two isoforms, Panx1 and Panx2, localized at different subcellular compartments in both astrocytes and neurons. Using recombinant fusions of Panx2 with appended genetic tags developed for correlated light and electron microscopy and then expressed in different cell lines, we determined that Panx2 is localized in the membrane of intracellular vesicles and not in the endoplasmic reticulum as initially indicated by calnexin colocalization experiments. Dual immunofluorescence imaging with protein markers for specific vesicle compartments showed that Panx2 vesicles are early endosomal in origin. In electron tomographic volumes, cross-sections of these vesicles displayed fine structural details and close proximity to actin filaments. Thus, pannexins expressed at different subcellular compartments likely exert distinct functional roles, particularly in the nervous system

  9. Tom40, the pore-forming component of the protein-conducting TOM channel in the outer membrane of mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Ahting, U; Thieffry, M; Engelhardt, H; Hegerl, R; Neupert, W; Nussberger, S

    2001-06-11

    Tom40 is the main component of the preprotein translocase of the outer membrane of mitochondria (TOM complex). We have isolated Tom40 of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptor Tom22 and the small Tom components Tom6 and Tom7 from the purified TOM core complex. Tom40 is organized in a high molecular mass complex of approximately 350 kD. It forms a high conductance channel. Mitochondrial presequence peptides interact specifically with Tom40 reconstituted into planar lipid membranes and decrease the ion flow through the pores in a voltage-dependent manner. The secondary structure of Tom40 comprises approximately 31% beta-sheet, 22% alpha-helix, and 47% remaining structure as determined by circular dichroism measurements and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Electron microscopy of purified Tom40 revealed particles primarily with one center of stain accumulation. They presumably represent an open pore with a diameter of approximately 2.5 nm, similar to the pores found in the TOM complex. Thus, Tom40 is the core element of the TOM translocase; it forms the protein-conducting channel in an oligomeric assembly. PMID:11402060

  10. Localization of lysobisphosphatidic acid-rich membrane domains in late endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Startchev, K; Whitney, A J; Gruenber, J

    2001-03-01

    Late endosomes accumulate internal membranes within the lumen of the organelle. These internal membranes are enriched in the late endosome specific phospholipid, lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). The organization of LBPA-rich membrane domains is not well characterized. Using an LBPA-specific monoclonal antibody (6C4), we show that these membrane domains are not accessible from the cytoplasm. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, we also show that 6C4 only binds sonicated, but not intact, late endosomes, presumably reflecting the release of internal membranes upon endosome rupture. PMID:11347897

  11. Localization and distribution of tissue type and urokinase type plasminogen activators and their inhibitors Type 1 and 2 in human and rhesus monkey fetal membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y X; Hu, Z Y; Liu, K; Byrne, S; Zou, R J; Ny, T; d'Lacey, C; Ockleford, C D

    1998-01-01

    Fetal membranes consist of 10 distinct layers including components of amnion, chorion and decidua, the latter being of maternal origin. They form mechanically integrated sheets capable of retaining amniotic fluid and play an essential role in protecting fetal growth and development in the pregnant uterus. The extracellular matrix, substrate for plasminogen activators (PAs), is an important supportive framework of the fetal membranes. Fetal membranes from women with preterm premature rupture of membranes may differ in their protease activity compared with normal membranes. To identify the presence of PAs and their inhibitors (PAI) and their possible role in the process of fetal membrane rupture, this study investigated the distribution and localization of both protein and mRNA for tissue (t) and urokinase (u) PA and their inhibitors type 1 (PAI-1) and type 2 (PAI-2) in amniochorion of human and rhesus monkey using conventional and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. In situ hybridization analysis showed that the distribution and localization of mRNAs for tPA, uPA, PAI-1 and PAI-2 were similar in the fetal membranes of human and rhesus monkey; no obvious species difference was observed. Evidence of tPA mRNA was detected in amniotic epithelium, trophoblast cells and nearly all cells of the decidual layer. Strong expression of uPA mRNA was noted in the decidual cells which increased in intensity as the abscission point was approached. Weak staining in chorion laeve trophoblast was also detected. In situ hybridization experiments showed PAI-1 mRNA to be concentrated mainly in the decidual cells, some of which were interposed into the maternal-facing edge of the chorion laeve. Maximal labelling of the decidua occurred towards the zone of abscission. Weak expression of PAI-1 mRNA was also noted in some cells of the chorion laeve. The distribution of PAI-2 mRNA in amniochorion was also concentrated in the cells of the decidual layer, maximum expression of the mRNA was

  12. High Accuracy Passive Magnetic Field-Based Localization for Feedback Control Using Principal Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Foong, Shaohui; Sun, Zhenglong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a novel magnetic field-based sensing system employing statistically optimized concurrent multiple sensor outputs for precise field-position association and localization is presented. This method capitalizes on the independence between simultaneous spatial field measurements at multiple locations to induce unique correspondences between field and position. This single-source-multi-sensor configuration is able to achieve accurate and precise localization and tracking of translational motion without contact over large travel distances for feedback control. Principal component analysis (PCA) is used as a pseudo-linear filter to optimally reduce the dimensions of the multi-sensor output space for computationally efficient field-position mapping with artificial neural networks (ANNs). Numerical simulations are employed to investigate the effects of geometric parameters and Gaussian noise corruption on PCA assisted ANN mapping performance. Using a 9-sensor network, the sensing accuracy and closed-loop tracking performance of the proposed optimal field-based sensing system is experimentally evaluated on a linear actuator with a significantly more expensive optical encoder as a comparison. PMID:27529253

  13. Ligand-dependent localization and function of ORP-VAP complexes at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Kentala, Henriikka; Peränen, Johan; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2015-05-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein/OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) constitute a conserved family of sterol/phospholipid-binding proteins with lipid transporter or sensor functions. We investigated the spatial occurrence and regulation of the interactions of human OSBP/ORPs or the S. cerevisiae orthologs, the Osh (OSBP homolog) proteins, with their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) anchors, the VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs), by employing bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down set-ups. The ORP-VAP interactions localize frequently at distinct subcellular sites, shown in several cases to represent membrane contact sites (MCSs). Using established ORP ligand-binding domain mutants and pull-down assays with recombinant proteins, we show that ORP liganding regulates the ORP-VAP association, alters the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes, or modifies organelle morphology. There is distinct protein specificity in the effects of the mutants on subcellular targeting of ORP-VAP complexes. We provide evidence that complexes of human ORP2 and VAPs at ER-lipid droplet interfaces regulate the hydrolysis of triglycerides and lipid droplet turnover. The data suggest evolutionarily conserved, complex ligand-dependent functions of ORP-VAP complexes at MCSs, with implications for cellular lipid homeostasis and signaling. PMID:25420878

  14. Multiphoton-generated localized electron plasma for membrane permeability modification in single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merritt, T.; Leblanc, M.; McMillan, J.; Westwood, J.; Khodaparast, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    Successful incorporation of a specific macromolecule into a single cell would be ideal for characterizing trafficking dynamics through plasmodesmata or for studying intracellular localizations. Here, we demonstrate NIR femtosecond laser-mediated infiltration of a membrane impermeable dextran-conjugated dye into living cells of Arabidopsis thaliana seedling stems. Based on the reactions of fluorescing vacuoles of transgenic cells and artificial cell walls comprised of nanocellulose, laser intensity and exposure time were adjusted to avoid deleterious effects. Using these plant-tailored laser parameters, cells were injected with the fluorophores and long-term dye retention was observed, all while preserving vital cell functions. This method is ideal for studies concerning cell-to-cell interactions and potentially paves the way for introducing transgenes to specific cells. This work was supported by NSF award IOS-0843372 to JHW, with additional support from and U.S. Department of Agriculture Hatch Project no. 135997, and by the Institute of Critical Technology and Applied Sciences (ICTAS) at Virginia Tech.

  15. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Mediate Cytosolic Localization of LPS and Caspase-11 Activation.

    PubMed

    Vanaja, Sivapriya Kailasan; Russo, Ashley J; Behl, Bharat; Banerjee, Ishita; Yankova, Maya; Deshmukh, Sachin D; Rathinam, Vijay A K

    2016-05-19

    Sensing of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the cytosol triggers caspase-11 activation and is central to host defense against Gram-negative bacterial infections and to the pathogenesis of sepsis. Most Gram-negative bacteria that activate caspase-11, however, are not cytosolic, and the mechanism by which LPS from these bacteria gains access to caspase-11 in the cytosol remains elusive. Here, we identify outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria as a vehicle that delivers LPS into the cytosol triggering caspase-11-dependent effector responses in vitro and in vivo. OMVs are internalized via endocytosis, and LPS is released into the cytosol from early endosomes. The use of hypovesiculating bacterial mutants, compromised in their ability to generate OMVs, reveals the importance of OMVs in mediating the cytosolic localization of LPS. Collectively, these findings demonstrate a critical role for OMVs in enabling the cytosolic entry of LPS and, consequently, caspase-11 activation during Gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:27156449

  16. Enhanced sludge properties and distribution study of sludge components in electrically-enhanced membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Giwa, Adewale; Ahmed, Iftikhar; Hasan, Shadi Wajih

    2015-08-15

    This study investigated the impact of electric field on the physicochemical and biological characteristics of sludge wasted from an electrically-enhanced membrane bioreactor treating medium-strength raw wastewater. This method offers a chemical-free electrokinetic technique to enhance sludge properties and remove heavy metals. For example, sludge volume index (SVI), time-to-filter (TTF), mean sludge particle diameter (PSD), viscosity, and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of 21.7 mL/g, 7 min, 40.2 μm, 3.22 mPa s, and -4.9 mV were reported, respectively. Also, X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses provided mechanisms for heavy metal removal so as to establish relevant pathways for nutrient recovery. Furthermore, variations in dissolved oxygen (DO), conductivity, viscosity, ORP, total suspended solids (MLSS), and volatile suspended solids (MLVSS) were interrelated to evaluate the quality of wasted sludge. A pathway study on the transport and chemical distribution of nutrients and metals in sludge showed great potential for metal removal and nutrient recovery. PMID:26048394

  17. Local thermal resonance control of GaInP photonic crystal membrane cavities using ambient gas cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Sergei Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; Mosk, Allard P.; Combrié, Sylvain; Lehoucq, Gaelle; De Rossi, Alfredo

    2015-04-27

    We perform spatially dependent tuning of a GaInP photonic crystal cavity using a continuous wave violet laser. Local tuning is obtained by laser heating of the photonic crystal membrane. The cavity resonance shift is measured for different pump positions and for two ambient gases: He and N{sub 2}. We find that the width of the temperature profile induced in the membrane depends strongly on the thermal conductivity of the ambient gas. For He gas, a narrow spatial width of the temperature profile of 2.8 μm is predicted and verified in experiment.

  18. Evidence that Synthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mitochondrially Encoded Ribosomal Protein Var1p May Be Membrane Localized

    PubMed Central

    Fiori, Alessandro; Mason, Thomas L.; Fox, Thomas D.

    2003-01-01

    The 5′-untranslated leaders of mitochondrial mRNAs appear to localize translation within the organelle. VAR1 is the only yeast mitochondrial gene encoding a major soluble protein. A chimeric mRNA bearing the VAR1 untranslated regions and the coding sequence for pre-Cox2p appears to be translated at the inner membrane surface. We propose that translation of the ribosomal protein Var1p is also likely to occur in close proximity to the inner membrane. PMID:12796311

  19. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  20. HIV-1 Nef promotes the localization of Gag to the cell membrane and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Newly synthesized HIV-1 particles assemble at the plasma membrane of infected cells, before being released as free virions or being transferred through direct cell-to-cell contacts to neighboring cells. Localization of HIV-1 Gag precursor at the cell membrane is necessary and sufficient to trigger viral assembly, whereas the GagPol precursor is additionally required to generate a fully matured virion. HIV-1 Nef is an accessory protein that optimizes viral replication through partly defined mechanisms. Whether Nef modulates Gag and/or GagPol localization and assembly at the membrane and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer has not been extensively characterized so far. Results We report that Nef increases the total amount of Gag proteins present in infected cells, and promotes Gag localization at the cell membrane. Moreover, the processing of p55 into p24 is improved in the presence of Nef. We also examined the effect of Nef during HIV-1 cell-to-cell transfer. We show that without Nef, viral transfer through direct contacts between infected cells and target cells is impaired. With a nef-deleted virus, the number of HIV-1 positive target cells after a short 2h co-culture is reduced, and viral material transferred to uninfected cells is less matured. At later time points, this defect is associated with a reduction in the productive infection of new target cells. Conclusions Our results highlight a previously unappreciated role of Nef during the viral replication cycle. Nef promotes HIV-1 Gag membrane localization and processing, and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer. PMID:23899341

  1. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  2. Enhancement of cell surface expression and receptor functions of membrane progestin receptor α (mPRα) by progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1): evidence for a role of PGRMC1 as an adaptor protein for steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Pang, Yefei; Dong, Jing

    2014-03-01

    A variety of functions have been proposed for progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), including acting as a component of a membrane progestin receptor and as an adaptor protein. Here we show that stable overexpression of human PGRMC1 in nuclear progesterone receptor (PR)-negative breast cancer cell lines causes increased expression of PGRMC1 and membrane progesterone receptor α (mPRα) on cell membranes that is associated with increased specific [(3)H]progesterone binding. The membrane progestin binding affinity and specificity were characteristic of mPRα, with a Kd of 4.7 nM and high affinity for the mPR-specific agonist, Org OD 02-0, and low affinity for corticosteroids. Progestin treatment caused activation of G proteins, further evidence for increased expression of functional mPRs on PGRMC1-transfected cell membranes. Immunocytochemical and coimmunoprecipitation studies showed a close association of PGRMC1 with mPRα in cell membranes. Transfection of PGRMC1 into spontaneously immortalized rat granulosa cells was associated with membrane expression of PGRMC1 and mPRα as well as antiapoptotic effects of progestins that were abolished after cotransfection with small interfering RNA for mPRα. These data demonstrate that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein, transporting mPRα to the cell surface, and that the progestin binding and apoptotic functions previously ascribed to PGRMC1 are dependent on cell surface expression of mPRα. Collectively, the results suggest PGRMC1 and mPRα are components of a membrane progesterone receptor protein complex. Increased expression of estrogen receptor β was also observed in the membranes of PGRMC1-transfected cells, suggesting that PGRMC1 can act as an adaptor protein for multiple classes of steroid receptors. PMID:24424068

  3. Modulation of lateral transport of membrane components by spatial variations in diffusivity and solubility.

    PubMed Central

    de Beus, A; Eisinger, J

    1992-01-01

    The effect of spatially varying diffusivity and solubility on the efficiency of intramembrane transport is investigated by obtaining solutions to the generalized lateral diffusion equation in which both the diffusion coefficient, D(r), and the partition coefficient, K(r), are functions of position. The mean-time-to-capture by a sink, tc, of particles diffusing in a plane is obtained analytically for the case of a sink surrounded by gradients in D(r) and K(r) with radially symmetrical geometry. It is shown that for particles originating at random locations, tc is shortened dramatically, if in an annular region around the sink, D and K are significantly greater than in the remainder of the plane. Similarly, a viscous boundary layer surrounding a sink is demonstrated to represent a significant barrier for diffusing particles. To investigate more complex geometries, a finite difference numerical integration method is used and is shown to provide comparable results for tc with modest computational power. The same method is used to calculate the tc for particles originating at a source that is joined to the sink by a channel. The increase in the rate with which particles travel from a source to a sink when they are joined by a high diffusivity and/or solubility channel is illustrated by several numerical examples and by graphical representations that show the equilibrium particle density (and hence the effective particle flow) in the presence of different sink, source, and channel combinations. These results are discussed in terms of fluidity domains and other membrane heterogeneities. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 PMID:1420902

  4. Rice OsVAMP714, a membrane-trafficking protein localized to the chloroplast and vacuolar membrane, is involved in resistance to rice blast disease.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Shoji; Hayashi, Nagao; Kawagoe, Yasushi; Mochizuki, Susumu; Inoue, Haruhiko; Mori, Masaki; Nishizawa, Yoko; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Matsui, Minami; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Membrane trafficking plays pivotal roles in many cellular processes including plant immunity. Here, we report the characterization of OsVAMP714, an intracellular SNARE protein, focusing on its role in resistance to rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Disease resistance tests using OsVAMP714 knockdown and overexpressing rice plants demonstrated the involvement of OsVAMP714 in blast resistance. The overexpression of OsVAMP7111, whose product is highly homologous to OsVAMP714, did not enhance blast resistance to rice, implying a potential specificity of OsVAMP714 to blast resistance. OsVAMP714 was localized to the chloroplast in mesophyll cells and to the cellular periphery in epidermal cells of transgenic rice plant leaves. We showed that chloroplast localization is critical for the normal OsVAMP714 functioning in blast resistance by analyzing the rice plants overexpressing OsVAMP714 mutants whose products did not localize in the chloroplast. We also found that OsVAMP714 was located in the vacuolar membrane surrounding the invasive hyphae of M. oryzae. Furthermore, we showed that OsVAMP714 overexpression promotes leaf sheath elongation and that the first 19 amino acids, which are highly conserved between animal and plant VAMP7 proteins, are crucial for normal rice plant growths. Our studies imply that the OsVAMP714-mediated trafficking pathway plays an important role in rice blast resistance as well as in the vegetative growth of rice. PMID:26879413

  5. Complementary Constrains on Component based Multiphase Flow Problems, Should It Be Implemented Locally or Globally?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Huang, Y.; Kolditz, O.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow problems are numerically difficult to solve, as it often contains nonlinear Phase transition phenomena A conventional technique is to introduce the complementarity constraints where fluid properties such as liquid saturations are confined within a physically reasonable range. Based on such constraints, the mathematical model can be reformulated into a system of nonlinear partial differential equations coupled with variational inequalities. They can be then numerically handled by optimization algorithms. In this work, two different approaches utilizing the complementarity constraints based on persistent primary variables formulation[4] are implemented and investigated. The first approach proposed by Marchand et.al[1] is using "local complementary constraints", i.e. coupling the constraints with the local constitutive equations. The second approach[2],[3] , namely the "global complementary constrains", applies the constraints globally with the mass conservation equation. We will discuss how these two approaches are applied to solve non-isothermal componential multiphase flow problem with the phase change phenomenon. Several benchmarks will be presented for investigating the overall numerical performance of different approaches. The advantages and disadvantages of different models will also be concluded. References[1] E.Marchand, T.Mueller and P.Knabner. Fully coupled generalized hybrid-mixed finite element approximation of two-phase two-component flow in porous media. Part I: formulation and properties of the mathematical model, Computational Geosciences 17(2): 431-442, (2013). [2] A. Lauser, C. Hager, R. Helmig, B. Wohlmuth. A new approach for phase transitions in miscible multi-phase flow in porous media. Water Resour., 34,(2011), 957-966. [3] J. Jaffré, and A. Sboui. Henry's Law and Gas Phase Disappearance. Transp. Porous Media. 82, (2010), 521-526. [4] A. Bourgeat, M. Jurak and F. Smaï. Two-phase partially miscible flow and transport modeling in

  6. Localization of the expression of complement component 3 in the human endometrium by in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sayegh, R.A.; Tao, Xiao Jing; Awwad, J.T.

    1996-04-01

    C3 production by the human endometrium has been previously described. The objective of the current study was to localize the site of expression and regulation of the third component of complement, C3, in the endometrium. Eight secretory and eight proliferative archival endometrial samples from hysterectomy and endometrial biopsy specimens were used for in situ hybridization analysis. This analysis was performed with a radiolabeled riboprobe synthesized from a 736-bp template representing sequence 1944-2680 of the human C3 complementary DNA. Duplicate sections were hybridized with sense and antisense riboprobes. Resultant autoradiograms were analyzed qualitatively by light- and darkfield microscopy. In proliferative endometrium, minimal expression of C3 was observed and was limited to a few stromal patches and glands throughout the section. In the secretory samples, prominent C3 expression was observed in both the glands and stroma of the basalis layer. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3. Endometrial stromal and glandular cells express the C3 gene. Endometrial lymphocytes did not express C3, but other nondistinct lymphoid elements scattered in the stroma may be expressing C3. There was a visibly more intense expression of C3 in the basalis layer of the secretory endometrium than in proliferative endometrium. The spatial and temporal pattern of C3 expression may have implications in normal menstrual physiology and in the immunological response of the endometrium to the invading trophoblast during placentation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine.

  8. High spectral specificity of local chemical components characterization with multichannel shift-excitation Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun; Wu, Tao; Wei, Haoyun; Wu, Xuejian; Li, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for its noninvasive and nondestructive characterization of local chemical structures. However, spectrally overlapping components prevent the specific identification of hyperfine molecular information of different substances, because of limitations in the spectral resolving power. The challenge is to find a way of preserving scattered photons and retrieving hidden/buried Raman signatures to take full advantage of its chemical specificity. Here, we demonstrate a multichannel acquisition framework based on shift-excitation and slit-modulation, followed by mathematical post-processing, which enables a significant improvement in the spectral specificity of Raman characterization. The present technique, termed shift-excitation blind super-resolution Raman spectroscopy (SEBSR), uses multiple degraded spectra to beat the dispersion-loss trade-off and facilitate high-resolution applications. It overcomes a fundamental problem that has previously plagued high-resolution Raman spectroscopy: fine spectral resolution requires large dispersion, which is accompanied by extreme optical loss. Applicability is demonstrated by the perfect recovery of fine structure of the C-Cl bending mode as well as the clear discrimination of different polymorphs of mannitol. Due to its enhanced discrimination capability, this method offers a feasible route at encouraging a broader range of applications in analytical chemistry, materials and biomedicine. PMID:26350355

  9. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  10. Plasma membrane localization and function of the estrogen receptor α variant (ER46) in human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Haynes, M. Page; Bender, Jeffrey R.

    2003-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) α variants have been identified in an array of nonendothelial cells. We previously demonstrated that estrogen rapidly induces nitric oxide release via a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) pathway in EA.hy926 cells (immortalized human endothelial cells), which express a 46-kDa ER. We now confirm that, due to alternative splicing, the 46-kDa endothelial cell protein (ER46) is an amino-terminal truncated product of full-length ERα (ER66). ER46 is expressed in the plasma membrane, cytosol, and nucleus of resting, estrogen-deprived cells. Flow cytometric and immunofluorescence microscopic analyses demonstrated that the ER46 C but not N terminus is Ab-accessible in the plasma membrane. Inhibition of palmitoylation with tunicamycin and [3H]palmitic acid labeling demonstrated an estrogen-induced, palmitoylation-dependent plasma membrane ER46 recruitment, with reorganization into caveolae. In reconstituted, estrogen-stimulated COS-7 (ER-null) cells, membrane ER46 more efficiently triggered membrane eNOS phosphorylation than ER66. Conversely, ER66 more efficiently mediated estrogen response element reporter-gene transactivation than ER46. These results demonstrate that ER46 is localized and further dynamically targeted to the plasma membrane in a palmitoylation-dependent manner. ER46 more efficiently modulates membrane-initiated estrogen actions, including eNOS activation, than full-length ER66. These findings may have important implications in vascular-specific targeting of estrogen receptor agonists. PMID:12682286

  11. Both idebenone and idebenol are localized near the lipid-water interface of the membrane and increase its fluidity.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Murcia, Victoria; Torrecillas, Alejandro; de Godos, Ana M; Corbalán-García, Senena; Gómez-Fernández, Juan C

    2016-06-01

    Idebenone is a synthetic analog of coenzyme Q; both share a quinone moiety but idebenone has a shorter lipophilic tail ending with a hydroxyl group. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments showed that both idebenone and idebenol widened and shifted the phase transition of 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) to a lower temperature and a phase separation with different concentrations of these molecules was observed. Also small angle X-ray diffraction and wide angle X-ray diffraction revealed that both, idebenone and idebenol, induced laterally separated phases in fluid membranes when included in DPPC membranes. Electronic profiles showed that both forms, idebenone and idebenol, reduced the thickness of the fluid membrane. (2)H NMR measurements showed that the order of the membrane decreased at all temperatures in the presence of idebenone or idebenol, the greatest disorder being observed in the segments of the acyl chains close to the lipid-water interface. (1)H NOESY MAS NMR spectra were obtained using 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine membranes and results pointed to a similar location in the membrane for both forms, with the benzoquinone or benzoquinol rings and their terminal hydroxyl group of the hydrophobic chain located near the lipid/water interface of the phospholipid bilayer and the terminal hydroxyl group of the hydrophobic chain of both compounds located at the lipid/water interface. Taken together, all these different locations might explain the different physiological behavior shown by the idebenone/idebenol compared with the ubiquinone-10/ubiquinol-10 pair in which both compounds are differently localized in the membrane. PMID:26926421

  12. Local changes in lipid environment of TCR microclusters regulate membrane binding by the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, David A.; Gordo, Susana; Chu, H. Hamlet

    2012-01-01

    The CD3ε and ζ cytoplasmic domains of the T cell receptor bind to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), and a previous nuclear magnetic resonance structure showed that both tyrosines of the CD3ε immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif partition into the bilayer. Electrostatic interactions between acidic phospholipids and clusters of basic CD3ε residues were previously shown to be essential for CD3ε and ζ membrane binding. Phosphatidylserine (PS) is the most abundant negatively charged lipid on the inner leaflet of the PM and makes a major contribution to membrane binding by the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that TCR triggering by peptide–MHC complexes induces dissociation of the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain from the plasma membrane. Release of the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain from the membrane is accompanied by a substantial focal reduction in negative charge and available PS in TCR microclusters. These changes in the lipid composition of TCR microclusters even occur when TCR signaling is blocked with a Src kinase inhibitor. Local changes in the lipid composition of TCR microclusters thus render the CD3ε cytoplasmic domain accessible during early stages of T cell activation. PMID:23166358

  13. C60 fullerene localization and membrane interactions in RAW 264.7 immortalized mouse macrophages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russ, K. A.; Elvati, P.; Parsonage, T. L.; Dews, A.; Jarvis, J. A.; Ray, M.; Schneider, B.; Smith, P. J. S.; Williamson, P. T. F.; Violi, A.; Philbert, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    There continues to be a significant increase in the number and complexity of hydrophobic nanomaterials that are engineered for a variety of commercial purposes making human exposure a significant health concern. This study uses a combination of biophysical, biochemical and computational methods to probe potential mechanisms for uptake of C60 nanoparticles into various compartments of living immune cells. Cultures of RAW 264.7 immortalized murine macrophage were used as a canonical model of immune-competent cells that are likely to provide the first line of defense following inhalation. Modes of entry studied were endocytosis/pinocytosis and passive permeation of cellular membranes. The evidence suggests marginal uptake of C60 clusters is achieved through endocytosis/pinocytosis, and that passive diffusion into membranes provides a significant source of biologically-available nanomaterial. Computational modeling of both a single molecule and a small cluster of fullerenes predicts that low concentrations of fullerenes enter the membrane individually and produce limited perturbation; however, at higher concentrations the clusters in the membrane causes deformation of the membrane. These findings are bolstered by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of model membranes that reveal deformation of the cell membrane upon exposure to high concentrations of fullerenes. The atomistic and NMR models fail to explain escape of the particle out of biological membranes, but are limited to idealized systems that do not completely recapitulate the complexity of cell membranes. The surprising contribution of passive modes of cellular entry provides new avenues for toxicological research that go beyond the pharmacological inhibition of bulk transport systems such as pinocytosis.There continues to be a significant increase in the number and complexity of hydrophobic nanomaterials that are engineered for a variety of commercial purposes making human exposure a significant health concern

  14. C60 fullerene localization and membrane interactions in RAW 264.7 immortalized mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Russ, K A; Elvati, P; Parsonage, T L; Dews, A; Jarvis, J A; Ray, M; Schneider, B; Smith, P J S; Williamson, P T F; Violi, A; Philbert, M A

    2016-02-21

    There continues to be a significant increase in the number and complexity of hydrophobic nanomaterials that are engineered for a variety of commercial purposes making human exposure a significant health concern. This study uses a combination of biophysical, biochemical and computational methods to probe potential mechanisms for uptake of C60 nanoparticles into various compartments of living immune cells. Cultures of RAW 264.7 immortalized murine macrophage were used as a canonical model of immune-competent cells that are likely to provide the first line of defense following inhalation. Modes of entry studied were endocytosis/pinocytosis and passive permeation of cellular membranes. The evidence suggests marginal uptake of C60 clusters is achieved through endocytosis/pinocytosis, and that passive diffusion into membranes provides a significant source of biologically-available nanomaterial. Computational modeling of both a single molecule and a small cluster of fullerenes predicts that low concentrations of fullerenes enter the membrane individually and produce limited perturbation; however, at higher concentrations the clusters in the membrane causes deformation of the membrane. These findings are bolstered by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of model membranes that reveal deformation of the cell membrane upon exposure to high concentrations of fullerenes. The atomistic and NMR models fail to explain escape of the particle out of biological membranes, but are limited to idealized systems that do not completely recapitulate the complexity of cell membranes. The surprising contribution of passive modes of cellular entry provides new avenues for toxicological research that go beyond the pharmacological inhibition of bulk transport systems such as pinocytosis. PMID:26866469

  15. Clostridium sordellii Lethal-Toxin Autoprocessing and Membrane Localization Activities Drive GTPase Glucosylation Profiles in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Craven, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium sordellii infections cause gangrene and edema in humans and gastrointestinal infections in livestock. One of the principle virulence factors is TcsL, a large protein toxin which glucosylates host GTPases to cause cytopathic and cytotoxic effects. TcsL has two enzymatic domains, an N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and an autoprocessing domain responsible for release of the GTD within the cell. The GTD can then use its N-terminal membrane localization domain (MLD) for orientation on membranes and modification of GTPases. This study describes the use of conditionally immortalized murine pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells as a model for the study of TcsL functional activities. Point mutations that disrupt the glucosyltransferase, autoprocessing, or membrane localization activities were introduced into a recombinant version of TcsL, and the activities of these mutants were compared to those of wild-type toxin. We observed that all mutants are defective or impaired in cytotoxicity but differ in their modification of Rac1 and Ras. The data suggest a model where differences in GTPase localization dictate cellular responses to intoxication and highlight the importance of autoprocessing in the function of TcsL. IMPORTANCE Clostridium sordellii is a bacterium that can infect humans and cause serious disease and death. The principle virulence factor associated with clinical symptoms is a large protein toxin known as lethal toxin. The mechanism of lethal-toxin intoxication is assumed to be similar to that of the homologous toxins from C. difficile, but very few studies have been done in the context of endothelial cells, a relevant target in C. sordellii infections. This study was designed to test the role of the lethal-toxin enzymatic activities and membrane localization in endothelial cell toxicity and host substrate modification. PMID:27303685

  16. Race-specific elicitors of Cladosporium fulvum promote translocation of cytosolic components of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane of tomato cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, T; Higgins, V J; Blumwald, E

    1997-01-01

    The effect of race-specific elicitors on NADPH oxidase was examined in vivo by treating tomato cells with elicitor-containing intercellular fluids prepared from infected tomato leaves inoculated with specific Cladosporium fulvum races. Treatment of Cf-4 or Cf-5 cells with intercellular fluids from incompatible but not from compatible races of C. fulvum increased oxidase activity and the amount of p67-phox, p47-phox, and rac2 in the plasma membrane. Comparison of these three components in the cytosol and plasma membrane indicated that elicitors promoted the translocation of cytosolic components of NADPH oxidase to the plasma membrane of tomato cells carrying the appropriate resistance gene. Protein kinase C activators and inhibitors did not affect enzyme activity or the binding of these three components to the plasma membrane. In contrast, staurosporine, calmodulin antagonists, and EGTA inhibited elicitor-induced oxidase activity and the translocation of the cytosolic components. The assembly process involves a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase that catalyzes the phosphorylation of p67-phox and p47-phox, facilitating their translocation to the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that although both plants and animals share common elements in eukaryotic signal transduction, the involvement of different protein kinases mediating the activation of phosphorylation of p67-phox and p47-phox may reflect the unique spatial and temporal distribution of signal transduction pathways in plants. PMID:9061955

  17. A method for detergent-free isolation of membrane proteins in their local lipid environment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sarah C; Knowles, Tim J; Postis, Vincent L G; Jamshad, Mohammed; Parslow, Rosemary A; Lin, Yu-Pin; Goldman, Adrian; Sridhar, Pooja; Overduin, Michael; Muench, Stephen P; Dafforn, Timothy R

    2016-07-01

    Despite the great importance of membrane proteins, structural and functional studies of these proteins present major challenges. A significant hurdle is the extraction of the functional protein from its natural lipid membrane. Traditionally achieved with detergents, purification procedures can be costly and time consuming. A critical flaw with detergent approaches is the removal of the protein from the native lipid environment required to maintain functionally stable protein. This protocol describes the preparation of styrene maleic acid (SMA) co-polymer to extract membrane proteins from prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression systems. Successful isolation of membrane proteins into SMA lipid particles (SMALPs) allows the proteins to remain with native lipid, surrounded by SMA. We detail procedures for obtaining 25 g of SMA (4 d); explain the preparation of protein-containing SMALPs using membranes isolated from Escherichia coli (2 d) and control protein-free SMALPS using E. coli polar lipid extract (1-2 h); investigate SMALP protein purity by SDS-PAGE analysis and estimate protein concentration (4 h); and detail biophysical methods such as circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation (svAUC) to undertake initial structural studies to characterize SMALPs (∼2 d). Together, these methods provide a practical tool kit for those wanting to use SMALPs to study membrane proteins. PMID:27254461

  18. Host Erythrocyte Environment Influences the Localization of Exported Protein 2, an Essential Component of the Plasmodium Translocon

    PubMed Central

    Meibalan, Elamaran; Comunale, Mary Ann; Lopez, Ana M.; Bergman, Lawrence W.; Mehta, Anand; Vaidya, Akhil B.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites replicating inside red blood cells (RBCs) export a large subset of proteins into the erythrocyte cytoplasm to facilitate parasite growth and survival. PTEX, the parasite-encoded translocon, mediates protein transport across the parasitophorous vacuolar membrane (PVM) in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Proteins exported into the erythrocyte cytoplasm have been localized to membranous structures, such as Maurer's clefts, small vesicles, and a tubovesicular network. Comparable studies of protein trafficking in Plasmodium vivax-infected reticulocytes are limited. With Plasmodium yoelii-infected reticulocytes, we identified exported protein 2 (Exp2) in a proteomic screen of proteins putatively transported across the PVM. Immunofluorescence studies showed that P. yoelii Exp2 (PyExp2) was primarily localized to the PVM. Unexpectedly, PyExp2 was also associated with distinct, membrane-bound vesicles in the reticulocyte cytoplasm. This is in contrast to P. falciparum in mature RBCs, where P. falciparum Exp2 (PfExp2) is exclusively localized to the PVM. Two P. yoelii-exported proteins, PY04481 (encoded by a pyst-a gene) and PY06203 (PypAg-1), partially colocalized with these PyExp2-positive vesicles. Further analysis revealed that with P. yoelii, Plasmodium berghei, and P. falciparum, cytoplasmic Exp2-positive vesicles were primarily observed in CD71+ reticulocytes versus mature RBCs. In transgenic P. yoelii 17X parasites, the association of hemagglutinin-tagged PyExp2 with the PVM and cytoplasmic vesicles was retained, but the pyexp2 gene was refractory to deletion. These data suggest that the localization of Exp2 in mouse and human RBCs can be influenced by the host cell environment. Exp2 may function at multiple points in the pathway by which parasites traffic proteins into and through the reticulocyte cytoplasm. PMID:25662767

  19. Charge-Mediated Localization of Conjugated Polythiophenes in Zwitterionic Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Houston, Judith E; Kraft, Mario; Mooney, Ian; Terry, Ann E; Scherf, Ullrich; Evans, Rachel C

    2016-08-16

    chain. Our results suggest that charge-mediated self-assembly may provide a simple and effective route to design luminescent CPE probes capable of specific localization within phospholipid membranes. PMID:27434827

  20. Insect Stage-Specific Receptor Adenylate Cyclases Are Localized to Distinct Subdomains of the Trypanosoma brucei Flagellar Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saada, Edwin A.; Kabututu, Z. Pius; Lopez, Miguel; Shimogawa, Michelle M.; Langousis, Gerasimos; Oberholzer, Michael; Riestra, Angelica; Jonsson, Zophonias O.; Wohlschlegel, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that the Trypanosoma brucei flagellum (synonymous with cilium) plays important roles in host-parasite interactions. Several studies have identified virulence factors and signaling proteins in the flagellar membrane of bloodstream-stage T. brucei, but less is known about flagellar membrane proteins in procyclic, insect-stage parasites. Here we report on the identification of several receptor-type flagellar adenylate cyclases (ACs) that are specifically upregulated in procyclic T. brucei parasites. Identification of insect stage-specific ACs is novel, as previously studied ACs were constitutively expressed or confined to bloodstream-stage parasites. We show that procyclic stage-specific ACs are glycosylated, surface-exposed proteins that dimerize and possess catalytic activity. We used gene-specific tags to examine the distribution of individual AC isoforms. All ACs examined localized to the flagellum. Notably, however, while some ACs were distributed along the length of the flagellum, others specifically localized to the flagellum tip. These are the first transmembrane domain proteins to be localized specifically at the flagellum tip in T. brucei, emphasizing that the flagellum membrane is organized into specific subdomains. Deletion analysis reveals that C-terminal sequences are critical for targeting ACs to the flagellum, and sequence comparisons suggest that differential subflagellar localization might be specified by isoform-specific C termini. Our combined results suggest insect stage-specific roles for a subset of flagellar adenylate cyclases and support a microdomain model for flagellar cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in T. brucei. In this model, cAMP production is compartmentalized through differential localization of individual ACs, thereby allowing diverse cellular responses to be controlled by a common signaling molecule. PMID:24879126

  1. FRET imaging in living maize cells reveals that plasma membrane aquaporins interact to regulate their subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Zelazny, Enric; Borst, Jan Willem; Muylaert, Mélanie; Batoko, Henri; Hemminga, Marcus A; Chaumont, François

    2007-07-24

    Zea mays plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (ZmPIPs) fall into two groups, ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s, that exhibit different water channel activities when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. ZmPIP1s are inactive, whereas ZmPIP2s induce a marked increase in the membrane osmotic water permeability coefficient, P(f). We previously showed that, in Xenopus oocytes, ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 interact to increase the cell P(f). Here, we report the localization and interaction of ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s in living maize cells. ZmPIPs were fused to monomeric yellow fluorescent protein and/or monomeric cyan fluorescent protein and expressed transiently in maize mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed alone, ZmPIP1 fusion proteins were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas ZmPIP2s were found in the plasma membrane. Interestingly, when coexpressed with ZmPIP2s, ZmPIP1s were relocalized to the plasma membrane. Using FRET/fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we demonstrated that this relocalization results from interaction between ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided additional evidence for the association of ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 in maize roots and suspension cells. These data suggest that PIP1-PIP2 interaction is required for in planta PIP1 trafficking to the plasma membrane to modulate plasma membrane permeability. PMID:17636130

  2. Establishment of the model of white blood cell membrane chromatography and screening of antagonizing TLR4 receptor component from Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiqin; He, Langchong

    2006-04-01

    A model of white blood cell membrane chromatography (WB-CMC) was established to screen active component from Atractylodes macrocephala Koidz. The component can antagonize Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibit inflammatory reaction. In the model of WB-CMC, cell membrane stationary phase (CMSP) was prepared by immobilizing the rabbit white blood cell membrane (WBCM) onto the surface of silica carrier and taxinol was used as a model molecule. The active component which can act on WBCM and its receptor (such as TLR4) as an effective target in A. macrocephala was determined by using a replacement experiment. The anti-inflammatory effects of the active component were tested by using pharmacological methods in vivo. The results indicated that the retention characteristics of atractylenolide I as active component was similar to that of taxinol in the model of WB-CMC. And so, atractylenolide I acted on the WBCM and TLR4 and its anti-inflammatory activity was related with antagonizing TLR4. Therefore, the interaction between the active component and WBCM and its receptor can be simulated by the model of WB-CMC in vitro. This model can be used to screen active components and to study effective characteristics for acting on definite targets. PMID:16704122

  3. Labeling of the Plasma Membrane of Pea Cells by a Surface-localized Glucan Synthetase 1

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Robin L.; Ray, Peter M.

    1978-01-01

    When radioactive UDP-glucose is supplied to 1-millimeter-thick slices of pea (Pisum sativum) stem tissue, radioactive glucose becomes incorporated into membrane-bound polysaccharides. Evidence is given that this incorporation does not result from breakdown of UDP-glucose and utilization of the resultant free glucose, and that the incorporation most likely takes place at the cell surface, leading to a specific labeling of the plasma membrane. The properties of the plasma membrane that are indicated by this method of recognition, including the association of K+-stimulated ATPase activity with the plasma membrane, resemble properties inferred using other approaches. The membrane-associated polysaccharide product formed from UDP-glucose is largely 1,3-linked glucan, presumably callose, and does not behave as a precursor of cell wall polymers. No substantial amount of cellulose is formed from UDP-glucose in this procedure, even though these cells incorporate free glucose rapidly into cellulose. This synthetase system that uses external UDP-glucose may serve for formation of wound callose. PMID:16660373

  4. Factors regulating the abundance and localization of synaptobrevin in the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Dittman, Jeremy S.; Kaplan, Joshua M.

    2006-01-01

    After synaptic vesicle fusion, vesicle proteins must be segregated from plasma membrane proteins and recycled to maintain a functional vesicle pool. We monitored the distribution of synaptobrevin, a vesicle protein required for exocytosis, in Caenorhabditis elegans motor neurons by using a pH-sensitive synaptobrevin GFP fusion protein, synaptopHluorin. We estimated that 30% of synaptobrevin was present in the plasma membrane. By using a panel of endocytosis and exocytosis mutants, we found that the majority of surface synaptobrevin derives from fusion of synaptic vesicles and that, in steady state, synaptobrevin equilibrates throughout the axon. The surface synaptobrevin was enriched near active zones, and its spatial extent was regulated by the clathrin adaptin AP180. These results suggest that there is a plasma membrane reservoir of synaptobrevin that is supplied by the synaptic vesicle cycle and available for retrieval throughout the axon. The size of the reservoir is set by the relative rates of exo- and endocytosis. PMID:16844789

  5. Membrane-localized estrogen receptor α is required for normal organ development and function.

    PubMed

    Pedram, Ali; Razandi, Mahnaz; Lewis, Michael; Hammes, Stephen; Levin, Ellis R

    2014-05-27

    Steroid receptors are found in discrete cellular locations, but it is unknown whether extranuclear pools are necessary for normal organ development. To assess this, we developed a point mutant estrogen receptor α (ERα) knockin mouse (C451A) that precludes palmitoylation and membrane trafficking of the steroid receptor in all organs. Homozygous knockin female mice (nuclear-only ERα [NOER]) show loss of rapid signaling that occurs from membrane ERα in wild-type mice. Multiple developmental abnormalities were found, including infertility, relatively hypoplastic uteri, abnormal ovaries, stunted mammary gland ductal development, and abnormal pituitary hormone regulation in NOER mice. These abnormalities were rescued in heterozygous NOER mice that were comparable to wild-type mice. mRNAs implicated in organ development were often poorly stimulated by estrogen only in homozygous NOER mice. We conclude that many organs require membrane ERα and resulting signal transduction to collaborate with nuclear ERα for normal development and function. PMID:24871949

  6. Toward a Chemical Marker for Inflammatory Disease: A Fluorescent Probe for Membrane-Localized Thioredoxin

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a redox-active protein that plays a key role in mitigating the effects of oxidative stress. The secretion of Trx on the plasma membrane has been suggested as a distinctive feature of inflammation. However, selective monitoring of membrane-associated Trx activity has proved challenging because of the ubiquity of Trx action in cells. Here, we report a Trx-specific probe that allows visualization of Trx activity associated with the membranes via fluorescence microscopy. The ability of this probe to act as a possible screening tool for agents that modulate Trx secretion was demonstrated in HeLa cells under oxidative stress conditions and in a cellular hepatosteatosis model. Control experiments serve to confirm that the response seen for the present probe is due to Trx and that it is selective over various potentially competing metabolites, including thiol-containing small molecules and test proteins. PMID:24840911

  7. The Relationship between Components of the Ohio Local School District Report Card and the Outcome of a School Tax Levy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, Vicki Ann

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between components of the local school district report card, school district typology, and the outcome of public school tax levy requests were examined in this study. A correlation research design was used to measure the relationship between the independent variables (performance index, average yearly progress, value added,…

  8. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76 degrees C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92 degrees C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60 degrees C and 76 degrees C or heat-shocked at 85 degrees C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface.

  9. Intracellular localization of a group II chaperonin indicates a membrane-related function

    PubMed Central

    Trent, Jonathan D.; Kagawa, Hiromi K.; Paavola, Chad D.; McMillan, R. Andrew; Howard, Jeanie; Jahnke, Linda; Lavin, Colleen; Embaye, Tsegereda; Henze, Christopher E.

    2003-01-01

    Chaperonins are protein complexes that are believed to function as part of a protein folding system in the cytoplasm of the cell. We observed, however, that the group II chaperonins known as rosettasomes in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus shibatae, are not cytoplasmic but membrane associated. This association was observed in cultures grown at 60°C and 76°C or heat-shocked at 85°C by using immunofluorescence microscopy and in thick sections of rapidly frozen cells grown at 76°C by using immunogold electron microscopy. We observed that increased abundance of rosettasomes after heat shock correlated with decreased membrane permeability at lethal temperature (92°C). This change in permeability was not seen in cells heat-shocked in the presence of the amino acid analogue azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, indicating functional protein synthesis influences permeability. Azetidine experiments also indicated that observed heat-induced changes in lipid composition in S. shibatae could not account for changes in membrane permeability. Rosettasomes purified from cultures grown at 60°C and 76°C or heat-shocked at 85°C bind to liposomes made from either the bipolar tetraether lipids of Sulfolobus or a variety of artificial lipid mixtures. The presence of rosettasomes did not significantly change the transition temperature of liposomes, as indicated by differential scanning calorimetry, or the proton permeability of liposomes, as indicated by pyranine fluorescence. We propose that these group II chaperonins function as a structural element in the natural membrane based on their intracellular location, the correlation between their functional abundance and membrane permeability, and their potential distribution on the membrane surface. PMID:14673104

  10. Sustained Attention to Local and Global Target Features Is Different: Performance and Tympanic Membrane Temperature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helton, William S.; Hayrynen, Lauren; Schaeffer, David

    2009-01-01

    Vision researchers have investigated the differences between global and local feature perception. No one has, however, examined the role of global and local feature discrimination in sustained attention tasks. In this experiment participants performed a sustained attention task requiring either global or local letter target discriminations or…

  11. A gene-fusion strategy for stoichiometric and co-localized expression of light-gated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; Terpitz, Ulrich; Legrum, Barbara; Gökbuget, Deniz; Boyden, Edward S; Bamann, Christian; Wood, Phillip G; Bamberg, Ernst

    2011-12-01

    The precise co-localization and stoichiometric expression of two different light-gated membrane proteins can vastly improve the physiological usefulness of optogenetics for the modulation of cell excitability with light. Here we present a gene-fusion strategy for the stable 1:1 expression of any two microbial rhodopsins in a single polypeptide chain. By joining the excitatory channelrhodopsin-2 with the inhibitory ion pumps halorhodopsin or bacteriorhodopsin, we demonstrate light-regulated quantitative bi-directional control of the membrane potential in HEK293 cells and neurons in vitro. We also present synergistic rhodopsin combinations of channelrhodopsin-2 with Volvox carteri channelrhodopsin-1 or slow channelrhodopsin-2 mutants, to achieve enhanced spectral or kinetic properties, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our fusion strategy to determine ion-turnovers of as yet uncharacterized rhodopsins, exemplified for archaerhodopsin and CatCh, or to correct pump cycles, exemplified for halorhodopsin. PMID:22056675

  12. Topography of thylakoid membranes: In situ localization of photosystems I and II. [Porphyridium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, E.; Mustardy, L.; Cunningham, F.X. Jr. )

    1991-05-01

    The organization of the photosynthetic membrane structure is being studied in the red alga Porphyridium cruentum. Excitation energy transfer between the photosystems, which occurs readily in red algae and cyanobacteria, requires a close spatial relationship between the photosystems. The authors initial efforts have focused on the in situ labelling of PSI and PSII, two of four major protein complexes in thylakoids. Stoichiometries of PSI and PSII in P. cruentum are readily affected by light spectral quality. Cultures grown under continuous red light contain nearly five times as many A{sub A}'s per P{sub 700} as cells grown under green light. Thylakoids were isolated from cells grown under red or green light, and rinsed exhaustively to remove stromal proteins and phycobilisomes. These membranes were spread on electron microscope grids and immunolabelled with affinity-purified IgG antibodies to PSI and PSII. Gold particles were directly coupled to the antibodies of PSI (10 nm Au) and PSII (15nm Au). The labelling results are consistent with the Q{sub A} and P{sub 700} determinations. The density of PSII is greater in membranes from red light cells relative to green light cells, while the PSI density is greater in green light cells. The photosystems appear to be uniformly distributed over the thylakoid membranes. Double labelling experiments indicate that PSI and PSII can occur in close proximity with a distance of less than 20 nm. Such proximity increases the possibility of excitation energy transfer between PSI and PSII.

  13. The effect of temperature and transmembrane potentials on the rates of electron transfer between membrane-bound biological redox components.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A M; Ulstrup, J

    1981-06-12

    We have investigated rate data for the temperature and free energy dependence of the primary electron-transfer processes in bacterial photosynthesis. Rather than representing the whole electronic-nuclear coupling by a frequently applied discrete single-mode model, we have incorporated a continuum of modes characterized by a certain distribution function. In this way, we can illuminate the role of both a broad distribution of low-frequency modes representing the medium and a narrow distribution representing local nuclear modes. Furthermore, it emerges from the calculations that both sets are important in the overall scheme of primary photosynthetic electron-transfer processes. By means of this model and quantum-mechanical rate theory, we can reproduce a number of important features of the primary photosynthetic processes concerning in particular the temperature (tunnelling or thermally activated nuclear motion) and free energy dependence ('normal', 'activation-less', or 'inverted' regions) of the rate constants and estimate such parameters as nuclear-reorganization energy electron-exchange integrals and electron-transfer distances. We have finally considered some of the important factors which determine the potential drop across the membrane and estimated the extent to which variations in the potential drop affect the rate constants of the electron-transfer processes. PMID:7284345

  14. Bacteria Localization and Chorion Thinning among Preterm Premature Rupture of Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fortner, Kimberly B.; Grotegut, Chad A.; Ransom, Carla E.; Bentley, Rex C.; Feng, Liping; Lan, Lan; Heine, R. Phillips; Seed, Patrick C.; Murtha, Amy P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Bacterial colonization of the fetal membranes and its role in pathogenesis of membrane rupture is poorly understood. Prior retrospective work revealed chorion layer thinning in preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) subjects. Our objective was to prospectively examine fetal membrane chorion thinning and to correlate to bacterial presence in PPROM, preterm, and term subjects. Study Design Paired membrane samples (membrane rupture and membrane distant) were prospectively collected from: PPROM = 14, preterm labor (PTL = 8), preterm no labor (PTNL = 8), term labor (TL = 10), and term no labor (TNL = 8), subjects. Sections were probed with cytokeratin to identify fetal trophoblast layer of the chorion using immunohistochemistry. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed using broad range 16 s ribosomal RNA probe. Images were evaluated, chorion and choriodecidua were measured, and bacterial fluorescence scored. Chorion thinning and bacterial presence were compared among and between groups using Student's t-test, linear mixed effect model, and Poisson regression model (SAS Cary, NC). Results In all groups, the fetal chorion cellular layer was thinner at rupture compared to distant site (147.2 vs. 253.7 µm, p<0.0001). Further, chorion thinning was greatest among PPROM subjects compared to all other groups combined, regardless of site sampled [PPROM(114.9) vs. PTL(246.0) vs. PTNL(200.8) vs. TL(217.9) vs. TNL(246.5)]. Bacteria counts were highest among PPROM subjects compared to all other groups regardless of site sampled or histologic infection [PPROM(31) vs. PTL(9) vs. PTNL(7) vs. TL(7) vs. TNL(6)]. Among all subjects at both sites, bacterial counts were inversely correlated with chorion thinning, even excluding histologic chorioamnionitis (p<0.0001 and p = 0.05). Conclusions Fetal chorion was uniformly thinner at rupture site compared to distant sites. In PPROM fetal chorion, we demonstrated pronounced global thinning

  15. FcγRIIB-Independent Mechanisms Controlling Membrane Localization of the Inhibitory Phosphatase SHIP in Human B Cells.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Ray, Arnab; Hou, Sen; Vaughan, Andrew T; Cragg, Mark S; Marshall, Aaron J

    2016-09-01

    SHIP is an important regulator of immune cell signaling that functions to dephosphorylate the phosphoinositide phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate at the plasma membrane and mediate protein-protein interactions. One established paradigm for SHIP activation involves its recruitment to the phospho-ITIM motif of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. Although SHIP is essential for the inhibitory function of FcγRIIB, it also has critical modulating functions in signaling initiated from activating immunoreceptors such as B cell Ag receptor. In this study, we found that SHIP is indistinguishably recruited to the plasma membrane after BCR stimulation with or without FcγRIIB coligation in human cell lines and primary cells. Interestingly, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis reveals differential mobility of SHIP-enhanced GFP depending on the mode of stimulation, suggesting that although BCR and FcγRIIB can both recruit SHIP, this occurs via distinct molecular complexes. Mutagenesis of a SHIP-enhanced GFP fusion protein reveals that the SHIP-Src homology 2 domain is essential in both cases whereas the C terminus is required for recruitment via BCR stimulation, but is less important with FcγRIIB coligation. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors reveal that Syk activity is required for optimal stimulation-induced membrane localization of SHIP, whereas neither PI3K or Src kinase activity is essential. BCR-induced association of SHIP with binding partner Shc1 is dependent on Syk, as is tyrosine phosphorylation of both partners. Our results indicate that FcγRIIB is not uniquely able to promote membrane recruitment of SHIP, but rather modulates its function via formation of distinct signaling complexes. Membrane recruitment of SHIP via Syk-dependent mechanisms may be an important factor modulating immunoreceptor signaling. PMID:27456487

  16. Membrane topology of human monoacylglycerol acyltransferase-2 and identification of regions important for its localization to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    McFie, Pamela J; Izzard, Sabrina; Vu, Huyen; Jin, Youzhi; Beauchamp, Erwan; Berthiaume, Luc G; Stone, Scot J

    2016-09-01

    Acyl CoA:2-monoacylglycerol acyltransferase (MGAT)-2 has an important role in dietary fat absorption in the intestine. MGAT2 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and catalyzes the synthesis of diacylglycerol which is then utilized as a substrate for triacylglycerol synthesis. This triacylglycerol is then incorporated into chylomicrons which are released into the circulation. In this study, we determined the membrane topology of human MGAT2. Protease protection experiments showed that the C-terminus is exposed to the cytosol, while the N-terminus is partially buried in the ER membrane. MGAT2, like murine DGAT2, was found to have two transmembrane domains. We also identified a region of MGAT2 associated with the ER membrane that contains the histidine-proline-histidine-glycine sequence present in all DGAT2 family members that is thought to comprise the active site. Proteolysis experiments demonstrated that digestion of total cellular membranes from cells expressing MGAT2 with trypsin abolished MGAT activity, indicating that domains that are important for catalysis face the cytosol. We also explored the role that the five cysteines residues present in MGAT2 have in catalysis. MGAT activity was sensitive to two thiol modifiers, N-ethylmaleimide and 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid). Furthermore, mutation of four cysteines resulted in a reduction in MGAT activity. However, when the C-terminal cysteine (C334) was mutated, MGAT activity was actually higher than that of wild-type FL-MGAT2. Lastly, we determined that both transmembrane domains of MGAT2 are important for its ER localization, and that MGAT2 is present in mitochondrial-associated membranes. PMID:27373844

  17. The 3′-UTR mediates the cellular localization of an mRNA encoding a short plasma membrane protein

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Adi; Pnueli, Lilach; Yosefzon, Yahav; Wexler, Ydo; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal; Arava, Yoav

    2008-01-01

    Cotranslational synthesis of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum is preceded by targeting of the translating mRNA once a signal peptide emerges from the ribosome exit tunnel. Many mRNAs, however, are unlikely to be targeted by this process because they encode proteins that do not contain a signal peptide or because they are too short to be recognized by the signal recognition particle. Herein we tested the possible involvement of the 3′-UTR in the localization of an mRNA that encodes a very short Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein (Pmp1). We found by ribosome density mapping, sedimentation analysis, differential centrifugation, and fluorescent in situ hybridization that the 3′-UTR is essential for the association of the transcript with membrane compartments. Fusion of the 3′-UTR to heterologous open reading frames conferred on them a sedimentation and cellular localization pattern resembling that of PMP1. Mutation analysis revealed that a repeating UG-rich sequence within the 3′-UTR is important for membrane association. Taken together, our results reveal an essential role for elements within the 3′-UTR in the localization of an mRNA that is likely to be ignored by the standard signal-dependant mechanism. PMID:18492794

  18. Impact of local sea surface temperature on changes of summer precipitation components over Northeast Asia in mid-1990s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Eun-Chul; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Yoshimura, Kei

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the new global atmospheric analysis dataset (DA126) which is produced by the global and regional integrated model system (GRIMs) global model program (GMP) is used to identify changes of the summer precipitation components in mid-1990s over Northeast Asia. The convective rain ratio (CRR) is used as the index to find changes of the precipitation component, which is the proportion of convective precipitation to the total precipitation. The CRR shows increasing trend over Northeast Asia where includes the Korea-Japan region for recent 30-years, whereas precipitation anomaly does not have a distinct trend over this region. The increased CRR shows a significant relationship with the increased local sea surface temperature (SST) variability. To investigate effects of the local SST on the summer precipitation components over Northeast Asia, two experiments are performed by utilizing the GRIMs regional model program (RMP). The CNTL experiment is forced by the observed SST whereas the CLIM run is forced by the climatological SST. Lateral boundary condition for two regional model experiments is provided by the GRIMs GMP run forced by the historical SSTs over tropical region to exclude mid-latitude SST effect. The SST warming increases the convective precipitation through the increased convective available potential energy and does not have large effects on the large-scale rainfall component. Consequently, the total amount of the precipitation and the CRR are increased by the local SST warming over Northeast Asia.

  19. Apical Membrane Localization of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Tumor Suppressor Protein and Subcellular Distribution of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex in Polarized Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinacher-Schick, Anke; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein is implicated in the majority of hereditary and sporadic colon cancers. APC is known to function as a tumor suppressor through downregulation of β-catenin as part of a high molecular weight complex known as the β-catenin destruction complex. The molecular composition of the intact complex and its site of action in the cell are still not well understood. Reports on the subcellular localization of APC in various cell systems have differed significantly and have been consistent with an association with a cytosolic complex, with microtubules, with the nucleus, or with the cortical actin cytoskeleton. To better understand the role of APC and the destruction complex in colorectal cancer, we have begun to characterize and isolate these complexes from confluent polarized human colon epithelial cell monolayers and other epithelial cell types. Subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy reveal that a predominant fraction of APC associates tightly with the apical plasma membrane in a variety of epithelial cell types. This apical membrane association is not dependent on the mutational status of either APC or β-catenin. An additional pool of APC is cytosolic and fractionates into two distinct high molecular weight complexes, 20S and 60S in size. Only the 20S fraction contains an appreciable portion of the cellular axin and small but detectable amounts of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and β-catenin. Therefore, it is likely to correspond to the previously characterized β-catenin destruction complex. Dishevelled is almost entirely cytosolic, but does not significantly cofractionate with the 20S complex. The disproportionate amount of APC in the apical membrane and the lack of other destruction complex components in the 60S fraction of APC raise questions about whether these pools of APC take part in the degradation of β-catenin, or alternatively, whether they could be involved in other functions of the protein that

  20. A single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC algorithm for impact localization on complex composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Shenfang; Bao, Qiao; Qiu, Lei; Zhong, Yongteng

    2015-10-01

    The growing use of composite materials on aircraft structures has attracted much attention for impact monitoring as a kind of structural health monitoring (SHM) method. Multiple signal classification (MUSIC)-based monitoring technology is a promising method because of its directional scanning ability and easy arrangement of the sensor array. However, for applications on real complex structures, some challenges still exist. The impact-induced elastic waves usually exhibit a wide-band performance, giving rise to the difficulty in obtaining the phase velocity directly. In addition, composite structures usually have obvious anisotropy, and the complex structural style of real aircrafts further enhances this performance, which greatly reduces the localization precision of the MUSIC-based method. To improve the MUSIC-based impact monitoring method, this paper first analyzes and demonstrates the influence of measurement precision of the phase velocity on the localization results of the MUSIC impact localization method. In order to improve the accuracy of the phase velocity measurement, a single frequency component extraction method is presented. Additionally, a single frequency component-based re-estimated MUSIC (SFCBR-MUSIC) algorithm is proposed to reduce the localization error caused by the anisotropy of the complex composite structure. The proposed method is verified on a real composite aircraft wing box, which has T-stiffeners and screw holes. Three typical categories of 41 impacts are monitored. Experimental results show that the SFCBR-MUSIC algorithm can localize impact on complex composite structures with an obviously improved accuracy.

  1. Parasite infracommunity diversity in eels: a reflection of local component community diversity.

    PubMed

    Norton, J; Lewis, J W; Rollinson, D

    2003-11-01

    The intestinal macroparasite communities of freshwater eels (Anguilla anguilla) captured in the south of England from Windsor (River Thames) during August 2001, and Leckford (River Test) during late June/July 2000, are reported for the first time. Parasite component communities were among the most species rich and diverse recorded from European eels. A total of 13 intestinal macroparasite species were encountered during the study, 8 from each eel host population with 3 being common to both. Acanthocephalans, nematodes and cestodes were recovered from each host population. Eels from Windsor additionally harboured Nicolla gallica (Digenea), which was also the most prevalent and abundant macroparasite species in these hosts. Each component community followed a log normal rank abundance distribution and demonstrated reduced species dominance and increased species equitability compared with previous studies. As such, the study component communities were suitable for testing the hypothesis of low infracommunity diversity in European eel hosts. Specifically, this hypothesis predicts that the intestinal macroparasite infracommunities of European eels are species-poor, displaying low density and diversity with high dominance, irrespective of component community diversity, and that this may be more pronounced in UK host populations. This hypothesis was not upheld; study findings demonstrate that higher infracommunity diversity in eel hosts is possible, and suggest that infracommunity diversity in individual eel hosts may be a simple, stochastic reflection of component community diversity. PMID:14653536

  2. Secretion of curli fibre subunits is mediated by the outer membrane-localized CsgG protein

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lloyd S.; Ashman, Elisabeth M.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Chapman, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Produced by many Enterobacteriaceae spp., curli are biologically important amyloid fibres that have been associated with biofilm formation, host cell adhesion and invasion, and immune system activation. CsgA is the major fibre subunit and CsgE, CsgF and CsgG are non-structural proteins involved in curli biogenesis. We have characterized the role of CsgG in curli subunit secretion across the outer membrane. Directed mutagenesis of CsgG confirmed that its activity is dependent on localization to the outer membrane. Rotary Shadow electron microscopy of purified CsgG suggested that this protein assembles into an oligomeric complex with an apparent central pore. Oligomeric CsgG complexes were confirmed using co-purification experiments. Antibiotic sensitivity assays demonstrated that overexpression of CsgG rendered Escherichia coli susceptible to the antibiotic erythromycin. A 22-amino-acid sequence at the N-terminus of CsgA was sufficient to direct heterologous proteins to the CsgG secretion apparatus. Finally, we determined that CsgG participates in an outer membrane complex with two other curli assembly proteins, CsgE and CsgF. PMID:16420357

  3. Multimerization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Promotes Its Localization to Barges, Raft-Like Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lindwasser, O. Wolf; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2001-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) organizes the assembly of nascent virions at the plasma membrane of infected cells. Here we demonstrate that a population of Gag is present in distinct raft-like membrane microdomains that we have termed “barges.” Barges have a higher density than standard rafts, most likely due to the presence of oligomeric Gag-Gag assembly complexes. The regions of the Gag protein responsible for barge targeting were mapped by examining the flotation behavior of wild-type and mutant proteins on Optiprep density gradients. N-myristoylation of Gag was necessary for association with barges. Removal of the NC and p6 domains shifted much of the Gag from barges into typical raft fractions. These data are consistent with a model in which multimerization of myristoylated Gag proteins drives association of Gag oligomers into raft-like barges. The functional significance of barge association was revealed by several lines of evidence. First, Gag isolated from virus-like particles was almost entirely localized in barges. Moreover, a comparison of wild-type Gag with Fyn(10)Gag, a chimeric protein containing the N-terminal sequence of Fyn, revealed that Fyn(10)Gag exhibited increased affinity for barges and a two- to fourfold increase in particle production. These results imply that association of Gag with raft-like barge membrane microdomains plays an important role in the HIV-1 assembly process. PMID:11483736

  4. Oligomerization of the UapA Purine Transporter Is Critical for ER-Exit, Plasma Membrane Localization and Turnover.

    PubMed

    Martzoukou, Olga; Karachaliou, Mayia; Yalelis, Vassilis; Leung, James; Byrne, Bernadette; Amillis, Sotiris; Diallinas, George

    2015-08-14

    Central to the process of transmembrane cargo trafficking is the successful folding and exit from the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) through packaging in COPII vesicles. Here, we use the UapA purine transporter of Aspergillus nidulans to investigate the role of cargo oligomerization in membrane trafficking. We show that UapA oligomerizes (at least dimerizes) and that oligomerization persists upon UapA endocytosis and vacuolar sorting. Using a validated bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay, we provide evidence that a UapA oligomerization is associated with ER-exit and turnover, as ER-retained mutants due to either modification of a Tyr-based N-terminal motif or partial misfolding physically associate but do not associate properly. Co-expression of ER-retained mutants with wild-type UapA leads to in trans plasma membrane localization of the former, confirming that oligomerization initiates in the ER. Genetic suppression of an N-terminal mutation in the Tyr motif and mutational analysis suggest that transmembrane α-helix 7 affects the oligomerization interface. Our results reveal that transporter oligomerization is essential for membrane trafficking and turnover and is a common theme in fungi and mammalian cells. PMID:26049015

  5. Sodium modulates opioid receptors through a membrane component different from G-proteins. Demonstration by target size analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, S.; Costa, T.; Herz, A.

    1988-07-25

    The target size for opioid receptor binding was studied after manipulations known to affect the interactions between receptor and GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins). Addition of GTP or its analogs to the binding reaction, exposure of intact cells to pertussis toxin prior to irradiation, or treatment of irradiated membranes with N-ethylmaleimide did not change the target size (approximately equal to 100 kDa) for opioid receptors in NG 108-15 cells and rat brain. These data suggest that the 100-kDa species does not include an active subunit of a G-protein or alternatively that GTP does not promote the dissociation of the receptor-G-protein complex. The presence of Na+ (100 mM) in the radioligand binding assay induced a biphasic decay curve for agonist binding and a flattening of the monoexponential decay curve for a partial agonist. In both cases the effect was explained by an irradiation-induced loss of the low affinity state of the opioid receptor produced by the addition of Na+. This suggests that an allosteric inhibitor that mediates the effect of sodium on the receptor is destroyed at low doses of irradiation, leaving receptors which are no longer regulated by sodium. The effect of Na+ on target size was slightly increased by the simultaneous addition of GTP but was not altered by pertussis toxin treatment. Thus, the sodium unit is distinct from G-proteins and may represent a new component of the opioid receptor complex. Assuming a simple bimolecular model of one Na+ unit/receptor, the size of this inhibitor can be measured as 168 kDa.

  6. The Sigma-2 Receptor and Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component 1 are Different Binding Sites Derived From Independent Genes

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Uyen B.; Mavlyutov, Timur A.; Chu, Ming-Liang; Yang, Huan; Schulman, Amanda; Mesangeau, Christophe; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Guo, Lian-Wang; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-2 receptor (S2R) is a potential therapeutic target for cancer and neuronal diseases. However, the identity of the S2R has remained a matter of debate. Historically, the S2R has been defined as (1) a binding site with high affinity to 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and haloperidol but not to the selective sigma-1 receptor ligand (+)-pentazocine, and (2) a protein of 18–21 kDa, as shown by specific photolabeling with [3H]-Azido-DTG and [125I]-iodoazido-fenpropimorph ([125I]-IAF). Recently, the progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), a 25 kDa protein, was reported to be the S2R (Nature Communications, 2011, 2:380). To confirm this identification, we created PGRMC1 knockout NSC34 cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 technology. We found that in NSC34 cells devoid of or overexpressing PGRMC1, the maximum [3H]-DTG binding to the S2R (Bmax) as well as the DTG-protectable [125I]-IAF photolabeling of the S2R were similar to those of wild-type control cells. Furthermore, the affinities of DTG and haloperidol for PGRMC1 (KI = 472 μM and 350 μM, respectively), as determined in competition with [3H]-progesterone, were more than 3 orders of magnitude lower than those reported for the S2R (20–80 nM). These results clarify that PGRMC1 and the S2R are distinct binding sites expressed by different genes. PMID:26870805

  7. The Cytochrome c Maturation Components CcmF, CcmH, and CcmI Form a Membrane-integral Multisubunit Heme Ligation Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Carsten; Turkarslan, Serdar; Lee, Dong-Woo; Onder, Ozlem; Kranz, Robert G.; Daldal, Fevzi

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome c maturation (Ccm) is a post-translational and post-export protein modification process that involves ten (CcmABCDEFGHI and CcdA or DsbD) components in most Gram-negative bacteria. The absence of any of these components abolishes the ability of cells to form cytochrome c, leading in the case of Rhodobacter capsulatus to the loss of photosynthetic proficiency and respiratory cytochrome oxidase activity. Based on earlier molecular genetic studies, we inferred that R. capsulatus CcmF, CcmH, and CcmI interact with each other to perform heme-apocytochrome c ligation. Here, using functional epitope-tagged derivatives of these components coproduced in appropriate mutant strains, we determined protein-protein interactions between them in detergent-dispersed membranes. Reciprocal affinity purification as well as tandem size exclusion and affinity chromatography analyses provided the first biochemical evidence that CcmF, CcmH, and CcmI associate stably with each other, indicating that these Ccm components form a membrane-integral complex. Under the conditions used, the CcmFHI complex does not contain CcmG, suggesting that the latter thio-reduction component is not always associated with the heme ligation components. The findings are discussed with respect to defining the obligatory components of a minimalistic heme-apocytochrome c ligation complex in R. capsulatus. PMID:18753134

  8. Anomalous effect of uncouplers on respiratory chain-linked transhydrogenation in Escherichia coli membranes: evidence for a localized proton pathway?

    PubMed

    Chang, D Y; Hou, C; Bragg, P D

    1992-03-01

    Energization of the pyridine nucleotide transhydrogenase in everted membrane vesicles from Escherichia coli JM83 was compared with the process in vesicles of the same strain transformed with the plasmid pDC21 overexpressing this enzyme. Proton translocation was assayed by the quenching of the fluorescence of the probe quinacrine. Agents able to discharge transmembrane proton gradients such as nigericin and the uncouplers 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone inhibited ATP-dependent transhydrogenation of NADP by NADH and discharged transmembrane proton gradients generated by transhydrogenation of AcNAD by NADPH, by oxidation of NADH, and by hydrolysis of ATP. This was observed in everted membrane vesicles of both strains JM83 and JM83pDC21. These strains differed significantly in the response of the NADH oxidation-dependent transhydrogenase. This reaction was inhibited by nigericin and uncouplers in membrane vesicles of JM83 but there was little inhibition or the reaction was stimulated in JM83pDC21, in spite of the discharge of the NADH oxidation-generated proton gradient measured by quinacrine fluorescence in the latter strain. It is proposed that the transhydrogenase is energized by direct or local (nonbulk phase) proton translocation in membranes of this strain. Uncouplers might facilitate these routes but would not discharge them. The generality of these observations was shown using other strains. NADH oxidase activity was severalfold lower in membrane vesicles of JM83pDC21 compared with JM83. The levels of ubiquinone and cytochromes, and the activities of NADH dehydrogenases I and II, and of cytochrome oxidase, were similar in the two strains. It is concluded that the NADH oxidase activity of JM83pDC21 is low because of the reduced rate of collision between electron-transferring complexes of the respiratory chain due to the large amount of transhydrogenase protein in the membranes of this strain. The large amount of

  9. A Guide for Local Nutrition Consultants on the Nutrition Component of Head Start Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Head Start Bureau.

    This handbook has been prepared as a guide for the nutritionist providing services to Head Start and other preschool day care programs. Introductory sections describe Project Head Start; the program's major components and aspects of the program; center-based, home-based, child and family development, and Child Development Associate (CDA) programs;…

  10. Area per Lipid and Cholesterol Interactions in Membranes from Separated Local-Field 13C NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leftin, Avigdor; Molugu, Trivikram R.; Job, Constantin; Beyer, Klaus; Brown, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Investigations of lipid membranes using NMR spectroscopy generally require isotopic labeling, often precluding structural studies of complex lipid systems. Solid-state 13C magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy at natural isotopic abundance gives site-specific structural information that can aid in the characterization of complex biomembranes. Using the separated local-field experiment DROSS, we resolved 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings that were interpreted with a statistical mean-torque model. Liquid-disordered and liquid-ordered phases were characterized according to membrane thickness and average cross-sectional area per lipid. Knowledge of such structural parameters is vital for molecular dynamics simulations, and provides information about the balance of forces in membrane lipid bilayers. Experiments were conducted with both phosphatidylcholine (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and egg-yolk sphingomyelin (EYSM) lipids, and allowed us to extract segmental order parameters from the 13C-1H residual dipolar couplings. Order parameters were used to calculate membrane structural quantities, including the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Relative to POPC, EYSM is more ordered in the ld phase and experiences less structural perturbation upon adding 50% cholesterol to form the lo phase. The loss of configurational entropy is smaller for EYSM than for POPC, thus favoring its interaction with cholesterol in raftlike lipid systems. Our studies show that solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is applicable to investigations of complex lipids and makes it possible to obtain structural parameters for biomembrane systems where isotope labeling may be prohibitive. PMID:25418296

  11. Sphingosine Kinase 1 Localized to the Plasma Membrane Lipid Raft Microdomain Overcomes Serum Deprivation Induced Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hengst, Jeremy A.; Francy-Guilford, Jacquelyn M.; Fox, Todd E.; Wang, Xujun; Conroy, Elizabeth J.; Yun, Jong K.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) translocates to the plasma membrane (PM) upon its activation and further suggested the plasma membrane lipid raft microdomain (PMLRM) as a target for SphK1 relocalization. To date, however, direct evidence of SphK1 localization to the PMLRM has been lacking. In this report, using multiple biochemical and subcellular fractionation techniques we demonstrate that endogenous SphK1 protein and its substrate, D-erythro sphingosine, are present within the PMLRM. Additionally, we demonstrate that the PMA stimulation of SphK1 localized to the PMLRM results in production of sphingosine-1-phosphate as well as induction of cell growth under serum-deprivation conditions. We further report that Ser225Ala and Thr54Cys mutations, reported to abrogate phosphatidylserine binding, block SphK1 targeting to the PMLRM and SphK1 induced cell growth. Together these findings provide direct evidence that the PMLRM is the major site-of-action for SphK1 to overcome serum-deprived cell growth inhibition. PMID:19782042

  12. Tonoplast- and Plasma Membrane-Localized Aquaporin-Family Transporters in Blue Hydrangea Sepals of Aluminum Hyperaccumulating Plant

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Takashi; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Kanai, Masatake; Mano, Shoji; Nishimura, Mikio; Yoshida, Kumi

    2012-01-01

    Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla) is tolerant of acidic soils in which toxicity generally arises from the presence of the soluble aluminum (Al) ion. When hydrangea is cultivated in acidic soil, its resulting blue sepal color is caused by the Al complex formation of anthocyanin. The concentration of vacuolar Al in blue sepal cells can reach levels in excess of approximately 15 mM, suggesting the existence of an Al-transport and/or storage system. However, until now, no Al transporter has been identified in Al hyperaccumulating plants, animals or microorganisms. To identify the transporter being responsible for Al hyperaccumulation, we prepared a cDNA library from blue sepals according to the sepal maturation stage, and then selected candidate genes using a microarray analysis and an in silico study. Here, we identified the vacuolar and plasma membrane-localized Al transporters genes vacuolar Al transporter (VALT) and plasma membrane Al transporter 1 (PALT1), respectively, which are both members of the aquaporin family. The localization of each protein was confirmed by the transient co-expression of the genes. Reverse transcription-PCR and immunoblotting results indicated that VALT and PALT1 are highly expressed in sepal tissue. The overexpression of VALT and PALT1 in Arabidopsis thaliana conferred Al-tolerance and Al-sensitivity, respectively. PMID:22952644

  13. Cholesterol induces surface localization of polyphenols in model membranes thus enhancing vesicle stability against lysozyme, but reduces protection of distant double bonds from reactive-oxygen species.

    PubMed

    de Athayde Moncorvo Collado, Alejandro; Dupuy, Fernando G; Morero, Roberto D; Minahk, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The main scope of the present study was to analyze the membrane interaction of members of different classes of polyphenols, i.e. resveratrol, naringenin, epigallocatechin gallate and enterodiol, in model systems of different compositions and phase states. In addition, the possible association between membrane affinity and membrane protection against both lipid oxidation and bilayer-disruptive compounds was studied. Gibbs monolayer experiments indicated that even though polyphenols showed poor surface activity, it readily interacted with lipid films. Actually, a preferential interaction with expanded monolayers was observed, while condensed and cholesterol-containing monolayers decreased the affinity of these phenolic compounds. On the other hand, fluorescence anisotropy studies showed that polyphenols were able to modulate membrane order degree, but again this effect was dependent on the cholesterol concentration and membrane phase state. In fact, cholesterol induced a surface rather than deep into the hydrophobic core localization of phenolic compounds in the membranes. In general, the polyphenolic molecules tested had a better antioxidant activity when they were allowed to get inserted into the bilayers, i.e. in cholesterol-free membranes. On the other hand, a membrane-protective effect against bilayer permeabilizing activity of lysozyme, particularly in the presence of cholesterol, could be assessed. It can be hypothesized that phenolic compounds may protect membrane integrity by loosely covering the surface of lipid vesicles, once cholesterol push them off from the membrane hydrophobic core. However, this cholesterol-driven distribution may lead to a reduced antioxidant activity of linoleic acid double bonds. PMID:27063609

  14. Immunofluorescence localization of dissociation supernatant and extracellular matrix components in Lytechinus pictus sectioned embryos. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garciaflack, Ana Leticia

    1988-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to localize specific extracellular components in embryos of the sea urchin Lytechinus pictus. Hyalin and S2 (a group of components found in the disaggregation supernatant from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus blastulae) were uniformly present at all stages (unfertilized up to 32 hr) except hyalin could not be detected at the 12 hour early blastula stage. Laminin was found in 16 cell, 32 cell, 6 hour, 18 hour, 24 hour, and 32 hour stages, with especially bright fluorescence at 18 hours. Collagen I was present at all stages (freshly fertilized up to 32 hour) except little was detected at 12 hours. Fibronectin was uniformly present in blastocoelar fibers stained with anto-collagen I and anti-fibronectin. These results were compared with those for S. purpuratus to produce an overview of the localization of specific extracellular matrix components during development of two species of sea urchins. The results set the stage for future studies that will examine the function of these components at the various developmental stages.

  15. Non-rigid registration and non-local principle component analysis to improve electron microscopy spectrum images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.; Zhang, Chenyu; Oh, Albert; Slater, Thomas J. A.; Azough, Feridoon; Freer, Robert; Haigh, Sarah J.; Willett, Rebecca; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-09-01

    Image registration and non-local Poisson principal component analysis (PCA) denoising improve the quality of characteristic x-ray (EDS) spectrum imaging of Ca-stabilized Nd2/3TiO3 acquired at atomic resolution in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Image registration based on the simultaneously acquired high angle annular dark field image significantly outperforms acquisition with a long pixel dwell time or drift correction using a reference image. Non-local Poisson PCA denoising reduces noise more strongly than conventional weighted PCA while preserving atomic structure more faithfully. The reliability of and optimal internal parameters for non-local Poisson PCA denoising of EDS spectrum images is assessed using tests on phantom data.

  16. Localization of Curvature and Relaxation of Stress Due to an Isolated Disclination in Crystalline Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yiwei; Davidovitch, Benny; Grason, Gregory M.

    2014-03-01

    A crystalline membrane with an isolated disclination buckles below a critical thickness. Examples include mechanical models of viral capsids-pentavalent and hexavalent units assembled into triangulated shells-that show a pronounced faceting above a critical size. While buckling from the planar state has been studied previously in coarse-grained simulations, questions remain regarding the organization of structure and mechanics of the buckled state. Specifically, how is elastic stress distributed within the membrane; more precisely - how does this mechanical state evolve from the buckling threshold to the asymptotic limit of vanishing thickness, where the shape is expected to be isometric (conical) nearly everywhere? We employ a combination of numerical and analytic approaches to studying the solutions of the Föppl-von Kármán equations describing the shape of and stress in circular sheets possessing a 5-fold defect. Despite the complexity underlying the solution of these highly nonlinear relations, we search for much simpler set of mechanical principles to quantitatively capture the inhomogeneous concentration of stress and shape deformation throughout the full range of the von Kármán number.

  17. Identification and localization of two sensory neuron membrane proteins from Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Liu, Yang; Walker, William B; Dong, Shuang-Lin; Wang, Gui-Rong

    2015-03-01

    Sensory neuron membrane proteins (SNMPs), which are located on the dendritic membrane of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), are proposed to be associated with odor reception in insects. Recent studies have demonstrated that SNMP1 is essential for electrophysiological responses of OSNs to the sex pheromone, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) in Drosophila melanogaster. To investigate the function of Lepidoptera SNMPs, we cloned two SNMP genes, SlituSNMP1 and SltiuSNMP2, from Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that both genes bear the general characteristics of SNMPs, including six conserved cysteine residues and two transmembrane domains. Further expression profile experiments showed that SlituSNMP1 is mainly expressed in the antenna, while SlituSNMP2 is broadly expressed in various tissues. By in situ hybridization experiments, it was found that SlituSNMP1 expressing cells are surrounded by the SlituSNMP2 expressing cells in the pheromone sensitive sensilla, suggesting different functions of the two SNMPs in insect olfaction. PMID:24757100

  18. Dynamic FtsA and FtsZ localization and outer membrane alterations during polar growth and cell division in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Zupan, John R; Cameron, Todd A; Anderson-Furgeson, James; Zambryski, Patricia C

    2013-05-28

    Growth and cell division in rod-shaped bacteria have been primarily studied in species that grow predominantly by peptidoglycan (PG) synthesis along the length of the cell. Rhizobiales species, however, predominantly grow by PG synthesis at a single pole. Here we characterize the dynamic localization of several Agrobacterium tumefaciens components during the cell cycle. First, the lipophilic dye FM 4-64 predominantly stains the outer membranes of old poles versus growing poles. In cells about to divide, however, both poles are equally labeled with FM 4-64, but the constriction site is not. Second, the cell-division protein FtsA alternates from unipolar foci in the shortest cells to unipolar and midcell localization in cells of intermediate length, to strictly midcell localization in the longest cells undergoing septation. Third, the cell division protein FtsZ localizes in a cell-cycle pattern similar to, but more complex than, FtsA. Finally, because PG synthesis is spatially and temporally regulated during the cell cycle, we treated cells with sublethal concentrations of carbenicillin (Cb) to assess the role of penicillin-binding proteins in growth and cell division. Cb-treated cells formed midcell circumferential bulges, suggesting that interrupted PG synthesis destabilizes the septum. Midcell bulges contained bands or foci of FtsA-GFP and FtsZ-GFP and no FM 4-64 label, as in untreated cells. There were no abnormal morphologies at the growth poles in Cb-treated cells, suggesting unipolar growth uses Cb-insensitive PG synthesis enzymes. PMID:23674672

  19. Membrane localization of MinD is mediated by a C-terminal motif that is conserved across eubacteria, archaea, and chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Tim H; Rowland, Susan L; Rothfield, Lawrence I; King, Glenn F

    2002-11-26

    MinD is a widely conserved ATPase that has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in selection of the division site in eubacteria and chloroplasts. It is a member of the large ParA superfamily of ATPases that are characterized by a deviant Walker-type ATP-binding motif. MinD localizes to the cytoplasmic face of the inner membrane in Escherichia coli, and its association with the inner membrane is a prerequisite for membrane recruitment of the septation inhibitor MinC. However, the mechanism by which MinD associates with the membrane has proved enigmatic; it seems to lack a transmembrane domain and the amino acid sequence is devoid of hydrophobic tracts that might predispose the protein to interaction with lipids. In this study, we show that the extreme C-terminal region of MinD contains a highly conserved 8- to 12-residue sequence motif that is essential for membrane localization of the protein. We provide evidence that this motif forms an amphipathic helix that most likely mediates a direct interaction between MinD and membrane phospholipids. A model is proposed whereby the membrane-targeting motif mediates the rapid cycles of membrane attachment-release-reattachment that are presumed to occur during pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD in E. coli. PMID:12424340

  20. Progesterone Receptor Membrane Component-1 (PGRMC1) and PGRMC-2 Interact to Suppress Entry into the Cell Cycle in Spontaneously Immortalized Rat Granulosa Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Peluso, John J.; Griffin, Daniel; Liu, Xiufang; Horne, Meghan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1) and PGRMC2 are expressed in rat granulosa cells and spontaneously immortalized granulosa cells (SIGCs) but their biological roles are not well defined. The present studies demonstrate that depleting either Pgrmc1 or Pgrmc2 in SIGCs increases entry into the cell cycle but does not increase cell proliferation. Rather, PGRMC1 and/or PGRMC2-deplete cells accumulate in metaphase and undergo apoptosis. Because both PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 localize to the mitotic spindle, their absence likely accounts for cells arresting in metaphase. Moreover, pull-down assays, colocalization studies and in situ proximity ligation assays (PLA) indicate that PGRMC1 binds PGRMC2. Disrupting the PGRMC1:PGRMC2 complex through the use of siRNA or the cytoplasmic delivery of a PGRMC2 antibody increases entry into the cell cycle. Conversely, overexpressing either PGRMC1-GFP or GFP-PGRMC2 fusion protein inhibits entry into the cell cycle. Subsequent studies reveal that depleting PGRMC1 and/or PGRMC2 reduces the percentage of cells in G0 and increases the percentage of cells in G1. These observations indicate that in addition to their role at metaphase, PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 are involved in regulating entry into the G1 stage of the cell cycle. Interestingly, both PGRMC1 and PGRMC2 bind GTPase-activating protein-binding protein 2 (G3BP2) as demonstrated by pull-down assays, colocalization assays, and PLAs. G3bp2 siRNA treatment also promotes entry into the G1 stage. This implies that dynamic changes in the interaction among PGRMC1, PGRMC2, and G3BP2 play an important protein regulating the rate at which SIGCs enter into the cell cycle. PMID:25253729

  1. Atypical nuclear localization of CD133 plasma membrane glycoprotein in rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nunukova, Alena; Neradil, Jakub; Skoda, Jan; Jaros, Josef; Hampl, Ales; Sterba, Jaroslav; Veselska, Renata

    2015-07-01

    CD133 (also known as prominin-1) is a cell surface glycoprotein that is widely used for the identification of stem cells. Furthermore, its glycosylated epitope, AC133, has recently been discussed as a marker of cancer stem cells in various human malignancies. During our recent experiments on rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS), we unexpectedly identified an atypical nuclear localization of CD133 in a relatively stable subset of cells in five RMS cell lines established in our laboratory. To the best of our knowledge, this atypical localization of CD133 has not yet been proven or analyzed in detail in cancer cells. In the present study, we verified the nuclear localization of CD133 in RMS cells using three independent anti-CD133 antibodies, including both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies. Indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy followed by software cross-section analysis, transmission electron microscopy and cell fractionation with immunoblotting were also employed, and all the results undeniably confirmed the presence of CD133 in the nuclei of stable minor subpopulations of all five RMS cell lines. The proportion of cells showing an exclusive nuclear localization of CD133 ranged from 3.4 to 7.5%, with only minor differences observed among the individual anti-CD133 antibodies. Although the role of CD133 in the cell nucleus remains unclear, these results clearly indicate that this atypical nuclear localization of CD133 in a minor subpopulation of cancer cells is a common phenomenon in RMS cell lines. PMID:25977066

  2. Systemic localization of seven major types of carbohydrates on cell membranes by dSTORM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates on the cell surface control intercellular interactions and play a vital role in various physiological processes. However, their systemic distribution patterns are poorly understood. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we systematically revealed that several types of representative carbohydrates are found in clustered states. Interestingly, the results from dual-color dSTORM imaging indicate that these carbohydrate clusters are prone to connect with one another and eventually form conjoined platforms where different functional glycoproteins aggregate (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor, (EGFR) and band 3 protein). A thorough understanding of the ensemble distribution of carbohydrates on the cell surface paves the way for elucidating the structure-function relationship of cell membranes and the critical roles of carbohydrates in various physiological and pathological cell processes. PMID:27453176

  3. Systemic localization of seven major types of carbohydrates on cell membranes by dSTORM imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Min; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates on the cell surface control intercellular interactions and play a vital role in various physiological processes. However, their systemic distribution patterns are poorly understood. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we systematically revealed that several types of representative carbohydrates are found in clustered states. Interestingly, the results from dual-color dSTORM imaging indicate that these carbohydrate clusters are prone to connect with one another and eventually form conjoined platforms where different functional glycoproteins aggregate (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor, (EGFR) and band 3 protein). A thorough understanding of the ensemble distribution of carbohydrates on the cell surface paves the way for elucidating the structure-function relationship of cell membranes and the critical roles of carbohydrates in various physiological and pathological cell processes. PMID:27453176

  4. Subcellular localization of the pyoverdine biogenesis machinery of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a membrane-associated "siderosome".

    PubMed

    Imperi, Francesco; Visca, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    The peptidic siderophore pyoverdine is the primary iron uptake system of fluorescent pseudomonads, and a virulence factor in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pyoverdine biogenesis is a co-ordinate process requiring several precursor-generating enzymes and large nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) in the cytoplasm, followed by extracytoplasmic maturation. By using cell fractionation, protein-protein interaction, and in vivo labeling assays we obtained evidence that, in P. aeruginosa, pyoverdine NRPSs assemble with precursor-generating enzymes into a membrane-bound multi-enzymatic complex, for which we propose the name "siderosome". The pyoverdine biogenetic complex represents a novel example of subcellular compartmentalization of a secondary metabolic pathway in prokaryotes. PMID:24042050

  5. Immunolocalization of entactin, a sulfated basement membrane component, in rodent tissues, and comparison with GP-2 (laminin).

    PubMed Central

    Bender, B. L.; Jaffe, R.; Carlin, B.; Chung, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    Entactin is a sulfated glycoprotein in the extracellular basement membrane like matrix produced by M1536-B3 cells, a mouse endodermal line derived from an embryonal carcinoma. It has a molecular weight of 158,000 and is chemically and immunologically distinguishable from GP-2 (laminin) and fibronectin. Antibodies produced against entactin and GP-2 react with subepithelial and vascular basement membranes in rat lung, liver, spleen, and kidney and mouse placenta and kidney when examined by light microscopy. Both antibodies yield staining around the marginal sinus of the white pulp of the spleen. Antientactin reacts with basement membrane and mesangium in rat glomeruli, and anti-GP2 does not. Ultrastructurally, staining in kidneys is strongest at epithelial or endothelial cell membranes bordering basement membranes, with only moderate staining of the basement membrane proper. Intracellular staining is not present. The location of entactin suggests that it has a role in the interaction of cells with extracellular matrix, possibly in adhesion. Lack of intracellular staining suggests that the tissues studied are not actively producing entactin or GP-2 and that these substances may be fairly stable in adult organisms. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:6165248

  6. p38 MAPK α and β isoforms differentially regulate plasma membrane localization of MRP2.

    PubMed

    Schonhoff, Christopher M; Park, Se Won; Webster, Cynthia R L; Anwer, M Sawkat

    2016-06-01

    In hepatocytes, cAMP both activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and increases the amount of multidrug resistance-associated protein-2 (MRP2) in the plasma membrane (PM-MRP2). Paradoxically, taurolithocholate (TLC) activates p38 MAPK but decreases PM-MRP2 in hepatocytes. These opposing effects of cAMP and TLC could be mediated via different p38 MAPK isoforms (α and β) that are activated differentially by upstream kinases (MKK3, MKK4, and MKK6). Thus we tested the hypothesis that p38α MAPK and p38β MAPK mediate increases and decreases in PM-MRP2 by cAMP and TLC, respectively. Studies were conducted in hepatocytes isolated from C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and MKK3-knockout (MKK3(-/-)) mice and in a hepatoma cell line (HuH7) that overexpresses sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) (HuH-NTCP). Cyclic AMP activated MKK3, p38 MAPK, and p38α MAPK and increased PM-MRP2 in WT hepatocytes, but failed to activate p38α MAPK or increase PM-MRP2 in MKK3(-/-) hepatocytes. In contrast to cAMP, TLC activated total p38 MAPK but decreased PM-MRP2, and did not activate MKK3 or p38α MAPK in WT hepatocytes. In MKK3(-/-) hepatocytes, TLC still decreased PM-MRP2 and activated p38 MAPK, indicating that these effects are not MKK3-dependent. Additionally, TLC activated MKK6 in MKK3(-/-) hepatocytes, and small interfering RNA knockdown of p38β MAPK abrogated TLC-mediated decreases in PM-MRP2 in HuH-NTCP cells. Taken together, these results suggest that p38α MAPK facilitates plasma membrane insertion of MRP2 by cAMP, whereas p38β MAPK mediates retrieval of PM-MRP2 by TLC. PMID:27012769

  7. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:27482602

  8. C-terminal domain of rodent intestinal mucin Muc3 is proteolytically cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum to generate extracellular and membrane components.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rongquan; Khatri, Ismat A; Forstner, Janet F

    2002-01-01

    Although human MUC3 and rodent Muc3 are both membrane-associated intestinal mucins, the present study has explored the possibility that rodent Muc3 might exist in soluble as well as membrane forms. No evidence was obtained for the existence of soluble splice variants; however, experiments with heterologous cells transfected with cDNA encoding the 381-residue C-terminal domain of rodent Muc3 showed that a definitive proteolytic cleavage occurs during processing in the endoplasmic reticulum. The products consisted of a V5-tagged 30 kDa extracellular glycopeptide and a Myc-tagged 49 kDa membrane-associated glycopeptide. Throughout their cellular transport to the plasma membrane, the two fragments remained associated by non-covalent SDS-sensitive interactions. Site-specific mutagenesis pinpointed the need for glycine and serine residues in the cleavage sequence Leu-Ser-Lys-Gly-Ser-Ile-Val-Val, which is localized between the two epidermal-growth-factor-like motifs of the mucin. A similar cleavage sequence (Phe-Arg-Pro-Gly downward arrow Ser-Val-Val-Val, where downward arrow signifies the cleavage site) has been reported in human MUC1 and analogous sites are present in human MUC3, MUC12 and MUC17. Thus early proteolytic cleavage may be a conserved characteristic of many membrane-associated mucins, possibly as a prelude to later release of their large extracellular domains at cell surfaces. PMID:12027806

  9. Surgery is an essential component of multimodality therapy for patients with locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Caitlin C.; Correa, Arlene M.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Komaki, Ritsuko U.; Welsh, James W.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Experience with neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CXRT) has raised questions regarding the additional benefit of surgery after locally advanced esophageal adenocarcinoma patients achieve a clinical response to CXRT. We sought to quantify the value of surgery by comparing the overall (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of trimodality eligible patients treated with definitive CXRT versus CXRT followed by esophagectomy. Methods We identified 143 clinical stage III esophageal adenocarcinoma patients that were eligible for trimodality therapy. All patients successfully completed neoadjuvant CXRT and were considered appropriate candidates for resection. Patients that were medically inoperable were excluded. Cox regression models were used to identify significant predictors of survival. Results Among the 143 patients eligible for surgery after completing CXRT, 114 underwent resection and 29 did not. Poorly differentiated tumors (HR=2.041, 95% CI 1.235–3.373) and surgical resection (HR=0.504, 95% CI 0.283–0.899) were the only independent predictors of OS. Patients treated with surgery had a 50% and 54% risk reduction in overall and cancer-specific mortality, respectively. Median OS (41.2 months vs. 20.3 months, p=0.012) and DFS (21.5 months vs. 11.4 months, p=0.007) were significantly improved with the addition of surgery compared to definitive CXRT. Conclusions Surgery provides a significant survival benefit to trimodality-eligible esophageal adenocarcinoma patients with locally advanced disease. PMID:23715646

  10. Stimulus selectivity and spatial coherence of gamma components of the local field potential

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaoxuan; Smith, Matthew A.; Kohn, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The gamma frequencies of the local field potential (LFP) provide a physiological correlate for numerous perceptual and cognitive phenomena and have been proposed to play a role in cortical function. Understanding the spatial extent of gamma and its relationship to spiking activity is critical for interpreting this signal and elucidating its function, but previous studies have provided widely disparate views of these properties. We addressed these issues by simultaneously recording LFPs and spiking activity using microelectrode arrays implanted in the primary visual cortex of macaque monkeys. We find that the spatial extent of gamma and its relationship to local spiking activity is stimulus dependent. Small gratings, and those masked with noise, induce a broadband increase in spectral power. This signal is tuned similarly to spiking activity and has limited spatial coherence. Large gratings, on the other hand, induce a gamma rhythm characterized by a distinctive spectral “bump”, which is coherent across widely separated sites. This signal is well tuned, but its stimulus preference is similar across millimeters of cortex. The preference of this global gamma rhythm is sensitive to adaptation, in a manner consistent with it magnifying a bias in the neuronal representation of visual stimuli. Gamma thus arises from two sources that reflect different spatial scales of neural ensemble activity. Our results show that there is not a single, fixed ensemble contributing to gamma and that the selectivity of gamma cannot be used to infer its spatial extent. PMID:21697389

  11. The pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein Bim interacts with components of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM).

    PubMed

    Frank, Daniel O; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated. PMID:25875815

  12. The Pro-Apoptotic BH3-Only Protein Bim Interacts with Components of the Translocase of the Outer Mitochondrial Membrane (TOM)

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Daniel O.; Dengjel, Jörn; Wilfling, Florian; Kozjak-Pavlovic, Vera; Häcker, Georg; Weber, Arnim

    2015-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family protein Bim belongs to the BH3-only proteins known as initiators of apoptosis. Recent data show that Bim is constitutively inserted in the outer mitochondrial membrane via a C-terminal transmembrane anchor from where it can activate the effector of cytochrome c-release, Bax. To identify regulators of Bim-activity, we conducted a search for proteins interacting with Bim at mitochondria. We found an interaction of Bim with Tom70, Tom20 and more weakly with Tom40, all components of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM). In vitro import assays performed on tryptically digested yeast mitochondria showed reduced Bim insertion into the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) indicating that protein receptors may be involved in the import process. However, RNAi against components of TOM (Tom40, Tom70, Tom22 or Tom20) by siRNA, individually or in combination, did not consistently change the amount of Bim on HeLa mitochondria, either at steady state or upon de novo-induction. In support of this, the individual or combined knock-downs of TOM receptors also failed to alter the susceptibility of HeLa cells to Bim-induced apoptosis. In isolated yeast mitochondria, lack of Tom70 or the TOM-components Tom20 or Tom22 alone did not affect the import of Bim into the outer mitochondrial membrane. In yeast, expression of Bim can sensitize the cells to Bax-dependent killing. This sensitization was unaffected by the absence of Tom70 or by an experimental reduction in Tom40. Although thus the physiological role of the Bim-TOM-interaction remains unclear, TOM complex components do not seem to be essential for Bim insertion into the OMM. Nevertheless, this association should be noted and considered when the regulation of Bim in other cells and situations is investigated. PMID:25875815

  13. Long-Term Outcomes With Intraoperative Radiotherapy as a Component of Treatment for Locally Advanced or Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Barney, Brandon M.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Dowdy, Sean C.; Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Haddock, Michael G.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To report our institutional experience with intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) as a component of treatment for women with locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 2010, 16 women with primary (n = 3) or locoregionally recurrent (n = 13) uterine sarcoma received IORT as a component of combined modality treatment. Tumor histology studies found leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), endometrial stromal sarcoma (n = 4), and carcinosarcoma (n = 3). Surgery consisted of gross total resection in 2 patients, subtotal resection in 6 patients, and resection with close surgical margins in 8 patients. The median IORT dose was 12.5 Gy (range, 10-20 Gy). All patients received perioperative external beam radiotherapy (EBRT; median dose, 50.4 Gy; range, 20-62.5 Gy), and 6 patients also received perioperative systemic therapy. Results: Seven of the 16 patients are alive at a median follow-up of 44 months (range, 11-203 months). The 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of local relapse (within the EBRT field) was 7%, and central control (within the IORT field) was 100%. No local failures occurred in any of the 6 patients who underwent subtotal resection. The 3-year freedom from distant relapse was 48%, with failures occurring most frequently in the lungs or mediastinum. Median survival was 18 months, and 3-year Kaplan-Meier estimates of cause-specific and overall survival were 58% and 53%, respectively. Three patients (19%) experienced late Grade 3 toxicity. Conclusions: A combined modality approach with perioperative EBRT, surgery, and IORT for locally advanced or recurrent uterine sarcoma resulted in excellent local disease control with acceptable toxicity, even in patients with positive resection margins. With this approach, some patients were able to experience long-term freedom from recurrence.

  14. Local Relationship between Global-Flash Multifocal Electroretinogram Optic Nerve Head Components and Visual Field Defects in Patients with Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Chan Hee; Han, Jungwoo; Ohn, Young-Hoon; Park, Tae Kwann

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the local relationship between quantified global-flash multifocal electroretinogram (mfERG) optic nerve head component (ONHC) and visual field defects in patients with glaucoma. Methods. Thirty-nine patients with glaucoma and 30 normal controls were enrolled. The ONHC amplitude was measured from the baseline to the peak of the second positive deflection of the induced component. The ONHC amplitude was normalized by dividing ONHC amplitude by the average of seven largest ONHC amplitudes. The ONHC amplitude ratio map and ONHC deficiency map were constructed. The local relationship between the ONHC measurements and visual field defects was evaluated by calculating the overlap between the ONHC deficiency maps and visual field defect plots. Results. The mean ONHC amplitude measurements of patients with glaucoma (6.01 ± 1.91 nV/deg2) were significantly lower than those of the normal controls (10.29 ± 0.94 nV/deg2) (P < 0.001). The average overlap between the ONHC deficiency map and visual field defect plot was 71.4%. The highest overlap (75.0%) was between the ONHC ratios less than 0.5 and the total deviations less than 5%. Conclusions. The ONHC amplitude was reduced in patients with glaucoma compared to that in normal controls. Loss of the ONHC amplitude from the global-flash mfERG showed a high local agreement with visual field defects in patients with glaucoma. PMID:26697210

  15. All-Optical Sensing of the Components of the Internal Local Electric Field in Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Drobizhev, M.; Scott, J. N.; Callis, P. R.; Rebane, A.

    2014-01-01

    Here, we present a new all-optical method of interrogation of the internal electric field vector inside proteins. The method is based on experimental evaluation of the permanent dipole moment change upon excitation and the pure electronic transition frequency of a fluorophore embedded in a protein matrix. The permanent dipole moment change can be obtained from two-photon absorption measurements. In addition, permanent dipole moment change, tensor of polarizability change, and transition frequency for the free chromophore should be calculated quantum–mechanically. This allows obtaining the components of the electric field by considering the second-order Stark shift. We use the fluorescent protein mCherry as an example to demonstrate the applicability of the method. PMID:25419440

  16. All-Optical Sensing of the Components of the Internal Local Electric Field in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Drobizhev, M; Scott, J N; Callis, P R; Rebane, A

    2012-10-01

    Here, we present a new all-optical method of interrogation of the internal electric field vector inside proteins. The method is based on experimental evaluation of the permanent dipole moment change upon excitation and the pure electronic transition frequency of a fluorophore embedded in a protein matrix. The permanent dipole moment change can be obtained from two-photon absorption measurements. In addition, permanent dipole moment change, tensor of polarizability change, and transition frequency for the free chromophore should be calculated quantum-mechanically. This allows obtaining the components of the electric field by considering the second-order Stark shift. We use the fluorescent protein mCherry as an example to demonstrate the applicability of the method. PMID:25419440

  17. [Local EEG characteristics of the children with psychic abnormalities, examined by independent components analysis (ICA)].

    PubMed

    Kozhushko, N Iu; Evdokimov, S A; Matveev, Iu K; Tereshchenko, E P; Kropotov, Iu D

    2014-01-01

    The method of independent components within the range of 3-13 Hz was used for the analysis of EEG of the children with psychic abnormalities of perinatal origin. The research was undertaken while children were keeping awake with open eyes. In cases of harder developmental delay it was revealed a significant rise of θ-range power spectrum in frontal-temporal cortex areas of left hemisphere and temporal areas of right hemisphere. This fact make it possible to regard these areas as hypothetic sources of slow activity and a damage/immaturity marker of frontal-thalamic area and the temporal areas, responsible for auditory analysis and verbal synthesis, audio & visual data integration. PMID:25711093

  18. Phosphorylated SAP155, the spliceosomal component, is localized to chromatin in postnatal mouse testes

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Ko; Sonoda, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Yuji; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-19

    SAP155 is an essential component of the spliceosome and its phosphorylation is required for splicing catalysis, but little is known concerning its expression and regulation during spermatogenesis in postnatal mouse testes. We report that SAP155 is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of germ and Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules of 6- and 35-day postpartum (dpp) testes. Analyses by fractionation of testes revealed that (1) phosphorylated SAP155 was found in the fraction containing nuclear structures at 6 dpp in amounts much larger than that at other ages; (2) non-phosphorylated SAP155 was detected in the fraction containing nucleoplasm; and (3) phosphorylated SAP155 was preferentially associated with chromatin. Our findings suggest that the active spliceosome, containing phosphorylated SAP155, performs pre-mRNA splicing on chromatin concomitant with transcription during testicular development.

  19. TRAIL protein localization in human primary T cells by 3D microscopy using 3D interactive surface plot: a new method to visualize plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Gras, Christophe; Smith, Nikaïa; Sengmanivong, Lucie; Gandini, Mariana; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; Herbeuval, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-31

    The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis ligand (TRAIL) is expressed on the membrane of immune cells during HIV infection. The intracellular stockade of TRAIL in human primary CD4(+) T cells is not known. Here we investigated whether primary CD4(+) T cells expressed TRAIL in their intracellular compartment and whether TRAIL is relocalized on the plasma membrane under HIV activation. We found that TRAIL protein was stocked in intracellular compartment in non activated CD4(+) T cells and that the total level of TRAIL protein was not increased under HIV-1 stimulation. However, TRAIL was massively relocalized on plasma membrane when cells were cultured with HIV. Using three dimensional (3D) microscopy we localized TRAIL protein in human T cells and developed a new method to visualize plasma membrane without the need of a membrane marker. This method used the 3D interactive surface plot and bright light acquired images. PMID:23085529

  20. Norbin Stimulates the Catalytic Activity and Plasma Membrane Localization of the Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor P-Rex1*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Dingxin; Barber, Mark A.; Hornigold, Kirsti; Baker, Martin J.; Toth, Judit M.; Oxley, David; Welch, Heidi C. E.

    2016-01-01

    P-Rex1 is a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that activates the small G protein (GTPase) Rac1 to control Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal dynamics, and thus cell morphology. Three mechanisms of P-Rex1 regulation are currently known: (i) binding of the phosphoinositide second messenger PIP3, (ii) binding of the Gβγ subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, and (iii) phosphorylation of various serine residues. Using recombinant P-Rex1 protein to search for new binding partners, we isolated the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-adaptor protein Norbin (Neurochondrin, NCDN) from mouse brain fractions. Coimmunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between overexpressed P-Rex1 and Norbin in COS-7 cells, as well as between endogenous P-Rex1 and Norbin in HEK-293 cells. Binding assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that their interaction is direct, and mutational analysis revealed that the pleckstrin homology domain of P-Rex1 is required. Rac-GEF activity assays with purified recombinant proteins showed that direct interaction with Norbin increases the basal, PIP3- and Gβγ-stimulated Rac-GEF activity of P-Rex1. Pak-CRIB pulldown assays demonstrated that Norbin promotes the P-Rex1-mediated activation of endogenous Rac1 upon stimulation of HEK-293 cells with lysophosphatidic acid. Finally, immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation showed that coexpression of P-Rex1 and Norbin induces a robust translocation of both proteins from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, as well as promoting cell spreading, lamellipodia formation, and membrane ruffling, cell morphologies generated by active Rac1. In summary, we have identified a novel mechanism of P-Rex1 regulation through the GPCR-adaptor protein Norbin, a direct P-Rex1 interacting protein that promotes the Rac-GEF activity and membrane localization of P-Rex1. PMID:26792863

  1. Roles of the protruding loop of factor B essential for the localization of lipoproteins (LolB) in the anchoring of bacterial triacylated proteins to the outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-04-11

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  2. Roles of the Protruding Loop of Factor B Essential for the Localization of Lipoproteins (LolB) in the Anchoring of Bacterial Triacylated Proteins to the Outer Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yumi; Tsurumizu, Ryoji; Tsukahara, Jun; Takeda, Kazuki; Narita, Shin-ichiro; Mori, Makiko; Miki, Kunio; Tokuda, Hajime

    2014-01-01

    The Lol system comprising five Lol proteins, LolA through LolE, sorts Escherichia coli lipoproteins to outer membranes. The LolCDE complex, an ATP binding cassette transporter in inner membranes, releases outer membrane-specific lipoproteins in an ATP-dependent manner, causing formation of the LolA-lipoprotein complex in the periplasm. LolA transports lipoproteins through the periplasm to LolB on outer membranes. LolB is itself a lipoprotein anchored to outer membranes, although the membrane anchor is functionally dispensable. LolB then localizes lipoproteins to outer membranes through largely unknown mechanisms. The crystal structure of LolB is similar to that of LolA, and it possesses a hydrophobic cavity that accommodates acyl chains of lipoproteins. To elucidate the molecular function of LolB, a periplasmic version of LolB, mLolB, was mutagenized at various conserved residues. Despite the lack of acyl chains, most defective mutants were insoluble. However, a derivative with glutamate in place of leucine 68 was soluble and unable to localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. This leucine is present in a loop protruding from mLolB into an aqueous environment, and no analogous loop is present in LolA. Thus, leucine 68 was replaced with other residues. Replacement by acidic, but not hydrophobic, residues generated for the first time mLolB derivatives that can accept but cannot localize lipoproteins to outer membranes. Moreover, deletion of the leucine with neighboring residues impaired the lipoprotein receptor activity. Based on these observations, the roles of the protruding loop of LolB in the last step of lipoprotein sorting are discussed. PMID:24569999

  3. Zinc deficiency-inducible OsZIP8 encodes a plasma membrane-localized zinc transporter in rice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sichul; Kim, Sun A; Lee, Joohyun; Guerinot, Mary Lou; An, Gynheung

    2010-06-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient for several physiological and biochemical processes. To investigate its transport in rice, we characterized OsZIP8, a rice ZIP (Zrt, Irt-like Protein) gene that is strongly up-regulated in shoots and roots under Zn deficiency. OsZIP8 could complement the growth defect of Zn-uptake yeast mutant. The OsZIP8-GFP fusion proteins were localized to the plasma membrane, suggesting that OsZIP8 is a plasma membrane zinc transporter in rice. Activation and overexpression of this gene disturbed the zinc distribution in rice plants, resulting in lower levels in shoots and mature seeds, but an increase in the roots. Field-grown transgenic plants were shorter than the WT. Under treatment with excess zinc, transgenics contained less zinc in their shoots but accumulated more in the roots. Altogether, these results demonstrate that OsZIP8 is a zinc transporter that functions in Zn uptake and distribution. Furthermore, zinc homeostasis is important to the proper growth and development of rice. PMID:20496122

  4. Bilateral renal vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism secondary to membranous glomerulonephritis treated with percutaneous catheter thrombectomy and localized thrombolytic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Janda, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Renal vein thrombosis (RVT) is a rare event but is prevalent in patients with nephrotic syndrome. Bilateral RVT is even rarer. The literature is relatively sparse in terms of the management of RVT because of its rarity and consists of a few case reports and case series. We present a case with bilateral RVT complicated by a pulmonary embolism in a patient with membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). A 19-year-old female presented with acute flank pain and worsening renal function after a couple of weeks in hospital while being treated with diuretics for anasarca secondary to MGN. Venography was used for diagnosis. The patient underwent percutaneous catheter thrombectomy and localized thrombolysis achieving resolution of pain and improvement of renal function. The patient was then anticoagulated for life with warfarin. PMID:21072156

  5. Localization and physical mapping of the prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) gene to human chromosome 11

    SciTech Connect

    Rinker-Schaeffer, C.W.; Hawkins, A.L.; Griffin, C.A.; Isaacs, J.T.

    1995-11-01

    The prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSM) was identified by the monoclonal antibody 7E11-C5.3, which was raised against the human prostatic carcinoma cell line LNCaP. The PSM antigen is expressed by normal, neoplastic, and metastatic prostatic tissues. The 2.65-kb cDNA encoding the 100-kDa PSM glycoprotein was cloned from LNCaP cells. Studies have shown that the expression of PSM is tissue-specific. In the present study monochromosomal somatic cell hybrids were used to localize the PSM gene to human chromosome 11. Using this information, initial mapping studies identified two potential PSM gene loci at 11p11.1-p13 and 11q14. Further high-stringency analysis using cosmid probes identified the 11q14 region as the location of the PSM gene. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Type I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase homo- and heterodimerization determines its membrane localization and activity.

    PubMed

    Lacalle, Rosa Ana; de Karam, Juan C; Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Artetxe, Ibai; Peregil, Rosa M; Sot, Jesús; Rojas, Ana M; Goñi, Félix M; Mellado, Mario; Mañes, Santos

    2015-06-01

    Type I phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5KIs; α, β, and γ) are a family of isoenzymes that produce phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] using phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate as substrate. Their structural homology with the class II lipid kinases [type II phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate 4-kinase (PIP4KII)] suggests that PIP5KI dimerizes, although this has not been formally demonstrated. Neither the hypothetical structural dimerization determinants nor the functional consequences of dimerization have been studied. Here, we used Förster resonance energy transfer, coprecipitation, and ELISA to show that PIP5KIβ forms homo- and heterodimers with PIP5KIγ_i2 in vitro and in live human cells. Dimerization appears to be a general phenomenon for PIP5KI isoenzymes because PIP5KIβ/PIP5KIα heterodimers were also detected by mass spectrometry. Dimerization was independent of actin cytoskeleton remodeling and was also observed using purified proteins. Mutagenesis studies of PIP5KIβ located the dimerization motif at the N terminus, in a region homologous to that implicated in PIP4KII dimerization. PIP5KIβ mutants whose dimerization was impaired showed a severe decrease in PI(4,5)P2 production and plasma membrane delocalization, although their association to lipid monolayers was unaltered. Our results identify dimerization as an integral feature of PIP5K proteins and a central determinant of their enzyme activity. PMID:25713054

  7. LRRK2 Affects Vesicle Trafficking, Neurotransmitter Extracellular Level and Membrane Receptor Localization

    PubMed Central

    Spissu, Ylenia; Sanna, Giovanna; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Galioto, Manuela; Rocchitta, Gaia; Biosa, Alice; Serra, Pier Andrea; Carri, Maria Teresa; Crosio, Claudia; Iaccarino, Ciro

    2013-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene was found to play a role in the pathogenesis of both familial and sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a large multi-domain protein that is expressed in different tissues. To date, the physiological and pathological functions of LRRK2 are not clearly defined. In this study we have explored the role of LRRK2 in controlling vesicle trafficking in different cellular or animal models and using various readouts. In neuronal cells, the presence of LRRK2G2019S pathological mutant determines increased extracellular dopamine levels either under basal conditions or upon nicotine stimulation. Moreover, mutant LRRK2 affects the levels of dopamine receptor D1 on the membrane surface in neuronal cells or animal models. Ultrastructural analysis of PC12-derived cells expressing mutant LRRK2G2019S shows an altered intracellular vesicle distribution. Taken together, our results point to the key role of LRRK2 to control vesicle trafficking in neuronal cells. PMID:24167564

  8. Membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis that requires detergent for solubilization: lactoperoxidase 125I localization and molecular weight determination.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D B; Hansa, J G; Stuckmann, K V; Hulett, F M

    1982-05-01

    When membranes of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 were extracted exhaustively with 1 M magnesium, approximately 80% of the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase [alkaline optimum], E.C. 3.1.3.1) was solubilized. The remaining activity could be extracted with a cationic detergent, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, without loss of enzymatic activity. The detergent-extractable alkaline phosphatase was immunoprecipitable with antibody to the salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase or the secreted alkaline phosphatase, had an approximate molecular weight of 60,000, and was localized 100% on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:7040342

  9. Membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis that requires detergent for solubilization: lactoperoxidase 125I localization and molecular weight determination.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, D B; Hansa, J G; Stuckmann, K V; Hulett, F M

    1982-01-01

    When membranes of Bacillus licheniformis MC14 were extracted exhaustively with 1 M magnesium, approximately 80% of the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase [alkaline optimum], E.C. 3.1.3.1) was solubilized. The remaining activity could be extracted with a cationic detergent, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, without loss of enzymatic activity. The detergent-extractable alkaline phosphatase was immunoprecipitable with antibody to the salt-extractable alkaline phosphatase or the secreted alkaline phosphatase, had an approximate molecular weight of 60,000, and was localized 100% on the outer surface of the cytoplasmic membrane. Images PMID:7040342

  10. G(q/11) is involved in insulin-stimulated inositol phosphoglycan putative mediator generation in rat liver membranes: co-localization of G(q/11) with the insulin receptor in membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sleight, S; Wilson, B A; Heimark, D B; Larner, J

    2002-07-12

    Insulin signaling to generate inositol phosphoglycans (IPGs) was demonstrated to occur via the participation of the heterotrimeric G-proteins G(q/11). IPGs were measured as two specific inositol markers, myo-inositol and chiro-inositol after strong acid hydrolysis. Insulin and Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) generated both myo-inositol and chiro-inositol IPGs in a dose-dependent manner. PMT has been shown to activate G(q) specifically. Insulin action was abrogated by pre-treatment with anti G(q/11) antibody. Western blotting demonstrated the enrichment of both insulin receptor beta subunit and G(q/11) in the liver membrane vesicles. Vesicles also contained clathrin, caveolin PLC beta 1 and PLC Delta. Immunogold staining revealed the co-localization of both insulin receptor beta subunit and G(q/11) in an approximate stochiometric ratio of 1:3. No vesicles were detected with either component alone. The present and considerable published data provide strong evidence for insulin signaling both via a tyrosine kinase cascade mechanism and via heterotrimeric G-protein interactions. PMID:12150987

  11. 8-Hydroxyquinoline-based inhibitors of the Rce1 protease disrupt Ras membrane localization in human cells.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Idrees; Hampton, Shahienaz E; Ashall, Louise; Hildebrandt, Emily R; Kutlik, Robert A; Manandhar, Surya P; Floyd, Brandon J; Smith, Haley E; Dozier, Jonathan K; Distefano, Mark D; Schmidt, Walter K; Dore, Timothy M

    2016-01-15

    Ras converting enzyme 1 (Rce1) is an endoprotease that catalyzes processing of the C-terminus of Ras protein by removing -aaX from the CaaX motif. The activity of Rce1 is crucial for proper localization of Ras to the plasma membrane where it functions. Ras is responsible for transmitting signals related to cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. The disregulation of these pathways due to constitutively active oncogenic Ras can ultimately lead to cancer. Ras, its effectors and regulators, and the enzymes that are involved in its maturation process are all targets for anti-cancer therapeutics. Key enzymes required for Ras maturation and localization are the farnesyltransferase (FTase), Rce1, and isoprenylcysteine carboxyl methyltransferase (ICMT). Among these proteins, the physiological role of Rce1 in regulating Ras and other CaaX proteins has not been fully explored. Small-molecule inhibitors of Rce1 could be useful as chemical biology tools to understand further the downstream impact of Rce1 on Ras function and serve as potential leads for cancer therapeutics. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of a previously reported Rce1 inhibitor, NSC1011, has been performed to generate a new library of Rce1 inhibitors. The new inhibitors caused a reduction in Rce1 in vitro activity, exhibited low cell toxicity, and induced mislocalization of EGFP-Ras from the plasma membrane in human colon carcinoma cells giving rise to a phenotype similar to that observed with siRNA knockdowns of Rce1 expression. Several of the new inhibitors were more effective at mislocalizing K-Ras compared to a potent farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI), which is significant because of the preponderance of K-Ras mutations in cancer. PMID:26706114

  12. Separation of Dimethyl Ether from Syn-Gas Components by Poly(dimethylsiloxane) and Poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart

    2011-05-01

    Permeability and selectivity in gas transport through poly(4-methyl-1-pentene) (TPX) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) using variable temperature mixed gas experiments is reported. Selected gases include H2, CO, CH4, CO2, and dimethyl ether (DME). The DME data is the first to be reported through these membranes. In this paper, the chosen polymers reflect both rubbery and crystalline materials. Rubbery polymers tend to be weakly size sieving, which, in this work, has resulted in larger permeabilities, lower separation factors, and lower activation energies of permeation (Ep). Conversely, the crystalline TPX membranes showed much greater sensitivity to penetrant size; although the gas condensability also played a role in transport.

  13. Multiple Lines of Evidence Localize Signaling, Morphology, and Lipid Biosynthesis Machinery to the Mitochondrial Outer Membrane of Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Owen; Taylor, Nicolas L.; Carrie, Chris; Eubel, Holger; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Zhang, Botao; Narsai, Reena; Millar, A. Harvey; Whelan, James

    2011-01-01

    The composition of the mitochondrial outer membrane is notoriously difficult to deduce by orthology to other organisms, and biochemical enrichments are inevitably contaminated with the closely associated inner mitochondrial membrane and endoplasmic reticulum. In order to identify novel proteins of the outer mitochondrial membrane in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we integrated a quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of highly enriched and prefractionated samples with a number of confirmatory biochemical and cell biology approaches. This approach identified 42 proteins, 27 of which were novel, more than doubling the number of confirmed outer membrane proteins in plant mitochondria and suggesting novel functions for the plant outer mitochondrial membrane. The novel components identified included proteins that affected mitochondrial morphology and/or segregation, a protein that suggests the presence of bacterial type lipid A in the outer membrane, highly stress-inducible proteins, as well as proteins necessary for embryo development and several of unknown function. Additionally, proteins previously inferred via orthology to be present in other compartments, such as an NADH:cytochrome B5 reductase required for hydroxyl fatty acid accumulation in developing seeds, were shown to be located in the outer membrane. These results also revealed novel proteins, which may have evolved to fulfill plant-specific requirements of the mitochondrial outer membrane, and provide a basis for the future functional characterization of these proteins in the context of mitochondrial intracellular interaction. PMID:21896887

  14. Effect of a Vietnamese Cinnamomum cassia essential oil and its major component trans-cinnamaldehyde on the cell viability, membrane integrity, membrane fluidity, and proton motive force of Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Nga-Thi-Thanh; Dumas, Emilie; Thanh, Mai Le; Degraeve, Pascal; Ben Amara, Chedia; Gharsallaoui, Adem; Oulahal, Nadia

    2015-04-01

    The antibacterial mechanism of a Cinnamomum cassia essential oil from Vietnam and of its main component (trans-cinnamaldehyde, 90% (m/m) of C. cassia essential oil) against a Listeria innocua strain was investigated to estimate their potential for food preservation. In the presence of C. cassia essential oil or trans-cinnamaldehyde at their minimal bactericidal concentration (2700 μg·mL(-1)), L. innocua cells fluoresced green after staining with Syto9® and propidium iodide, as observed by epifluorescence microscopy, suggesting that the perturbation of membrane did not cause large pore formation and cell lysis but may have introduced the presence of viable but nonculturable bacteria. Moreover, the fluidity, potential, and intracellular pH of the cytoplasmic membrane were perturbed in the presence of the essential oil or trans-cinnamaldehyde. However, these membrane perturbations were less severe in the presence of trans-cinnamaldehyde than in the presence of multicomponent C. cassia essential oil. This indicates that in addition to trans-cinnamaldehyde, other minor C. cassia essential oil components play a major role in its antibacterial activity against L. innocua cells. PMID:25728340

  15. How to tackle the issues in free energy simulations of long amphiphiles interacting with lipid membranes: convergence and local membrane deformations.

    PubMed

    Filipe, Hugo A L; Moreno, Maria João; Róg, Tomasz; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Loura, Luís M S

    2014-04-01

    One of the great challenges in membrane biophysics is to find a means to foster the transport of drugs across complex membrane structures. In this spirit, we elucidate methodological challenges associated with free energy computations of complex chainlike molecules across lipid membranes. As an appropriate standard molecule to this end, we consider 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl-labeled fatty amine, NBD-Cn, which is here dealt with as a homologous series with varying chain lengths. We found the membrane-water interface region to be highly sensitive to details in free energy computations. Despite considerable simulation times, we observed substantial hysteresis, the cause being the small frequency of insertion/desorption events of the amphiphile's alkyl chain in the membrane interface. The hysteresis was most pronounced when the amphiphile was pulled from water to the membrane and compromised the data that were not in line with experiments. The subtleties in umbrella sampling for computing distance along the transition path were also observed to be potential causes of artifacts. With the PGD (pull geometry distance) scheme, in which the distance from the molecule was computed to a reference plane determined by an average over all lipids in the membrane, we found marked deformations in membrane structure when the amphiphile was close to the membrane. The deformations were weaker with the PGC (pull geometry cylinder) method, where the reference plane is chosen based on lipids that are within a cylinder of radius 1.7 nm from the amphiphile. Importantly, the free energy results given by PGC were found to be qualitatively consistent with experimental data, while the PGD results were not. We conclude that with long amphiphiles there is reason for concern with regard to computations of their free energy profiles. The membrane-water interface is the region where the greatest care is warranted. PMID:24635540

  16. Characterization of Chloroplast Protein Import without Tic56, a Component of the 1-Megadalton Translocon at the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts1

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Daniel; Montandon, Cyril; Hause, Gerd; Majovsky, Petra; Kessler, Felix; Baginsky, Sacha; Agne, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    We report on the characterization of Tic56, a unique component of the recently identified 1-MD translocon at the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TIC) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) comprising Tic20, Tic100, and Tic214. We isolated Tic56 by copurification with Tandem Affinity Purification-tagged Toc159 in the absence of precursor protein, indicating spontaneous and translocation-independent formation of the translocon at the outer envelope membrane of chloroplasts (TOC) and TIC supercomplexes. Tic56 mutant plants have an albino phenotype and are unable to grow without an external carbon source. Using specific enrichment of protein amino termini, we analyzed the tic56-1 and plastid protein import2 (toc159) mutants to assess the in vivo import capacity of plastids in mutants of an outer and inner envelope component of the anticipated TOC-TIC supercomplex. In both mutants, we observed processing of several import substrates belonging to various pathways. Our results suggest that despite the severe developmental defects, protein import into Tic56-deficient plastids is functional to a considerable degree, indicating the existence of alternative translocases at the inner envelope membrane. PMID:25588737

  17. Influence of local-field corrections on Thomson scattering in collision-dominated two-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fortmann, Carsten; Wierling, August; Roepke, Gerd

    2010-02-15

    The dynamic structure factor, which determines the Thomson scattering spectrum, is calculated via an extended Mermin approach. It incorporates the dynamical collision frequency as well as the local-field correction factor. This allows to study systematically the impact of electron-ion collisions as well as electron-electron correlations due to degeneracy and short-range interaction on the characteristics of the Thomson scattering signal. As such, the plasmon dispersion and damping width is calculated for a two-component plasma, where the electron subsystem is completely degenerate. Strong deviations of the plasmon resonance position due to the electron-electron correlations are observed at increasing Brueckner parameters r{sub s}. These results are of paramount importance for the interpretation of collective Thomson scattering spectra, as the determination of the free electron density from the plasmon resonance position requires a precise theory of the plasmon dispersion. Implications due to different approximations for the electron-electron correlation, i.e., different forms of the one-component local-field correction, are discussed.

  18. Influence of local-field corrections on Thomson scattering in collision-dominated two-component plasmas.

    PubMed

    Fortmann, Carsten; Wierling, August; Röpke, Gerd

    2010-02-01

    The dynamic structure factor, which determines the Thomson scattering spectrum, is calculated via an extended Mermin approach. It incorporates the dynamical collision frequency as well as the local-field correction factor. This allows to study systematically the impact of electron-ion collisions as well as electron-electron correlations due to degeneracy and short-range interaction on the characteristics of the Thomson scattering signal. As such, the plasmon dispersion and damping width is calculated for a two-component plasma, where the electron subsystem is completely degenerate. Strong deviations of the plasmon resonance position due to the electron-electron correlations are observed at increasing Brueckner parameters r(s). These results are of paramount importance for the interpretation of collective Thomson scattering spectra, as the determination of the free electron density from the plasmon resonance position requires a precise theory of the plasmon dispersion. Implications due to different approximations for the electron-electron correlation, i.e., different forms of the one-component local-field correction, are discussed. PMID:20365663

  19. Influence of local-field corrections on Thomson scattering in collision-dominated two-component plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortmann, Carsten; Wierling, August; Röpke, Gerd

    2010-02-01

    The dynamic structure factor, which determines the Thomson scattering spectrum, is calculated via an extended Mermin approach. It incorporates the dynamical collision frequency as well as the local-field correction factor. This allows to study systematically the impact of electron-ion collisions as well as electron-electron correlations due to degeneracy and short-range interaction on the characteristics of the Thomson scattering signal. As such, the plasmon dispersion and damping width is calculated for a two-component plasma, where the electron subsystem is completely degenerate. Strong deviations of the plasmon resonance position due to the electron-electron correlations are observed at increasing Brueckner parameters rs . These results are of paramount importance for the interpretation of collective Thomson scattering spectra, as the determination of the free electron density from the plasmon resonance position requires a precise theory of the plasmon dispersion. Implications due to different approximations for the electron-electron correlation, i.e., different forms of the one-component local-field correction, are discussed.

  20. Nonlinear dynamic response analysis of localized damaged laminated composite structures in the context of component mode synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, S.; Trivaudey, F.; Bouhaddi, N.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is the prediction of the dynamic response of damaged laminated composite structures in the context of component mode synthesis. Hence, a method of damage localization of complex structures is proposed. The dynamic behavior of transversely isotropic layers is expressed through elasticity coupled with damage based on an existing macro model for cracked structures. The damage is located only in some regions of the whole structure, which is decomposed on substructures. The incremental linear dynamic governing equations are obtained by using the classical linear Kirchhoff-Love theory of plates. Then, considering the damage-induced nonlinearity, the obtained nonlinear dynamic equations are solved in time domain. However, a detailed finite element modelling of such structure on the scale of localized damage would generate very high computational costs. To reduce this cost, Component Mode Synthesis method (CMS) is used for modelling a nonlinear fine-scale substructure damaged, connected to linear dynamic models of the remaining substructures, which can be condensed and not updated at each iteration. Numerical results show that the mechanical properties of the structure highly change when damage is taken into account. Under an impact load, damage increases and reaches its highest value with the maximum of the applied load and then remains unchanged. Besides, the eigenfrequencies of the damaged structure decrease comparing with those of an undamaged one. This methodology can be used for monitoring strategies and lifetime estimations of hybrid complex structures due to the damage state is known in space and time.

  1. Full-field transient vibrometry of the human tympanic membrane by local phase correlation and high-speed holography

    PubMed Central

    Dobrev, Ivo; Furlong, Cosme; Cheng, Jeffrey T.; Rosowski, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Understanding the human hearing process would be helped by quantification of the transient mechanical response of the human ear, including the human tympanic membrane (TM or eardrum). We propose a new hybrid high-speed holographic system (HHS) for acquisition and quantification of the full-field nanometer transient (i.e., >10  kHz) displacement of the human TM. We have optimized and implemented a 2+1 frame local correlation (LC) based phase sampling method in combination with a high-speed (i.e., >40  K fps) camera acquisition system. To our knowledge, there is currently no existing system that provides such capabilities for the study of the human TM. The LC sampling method has a displacement difference of <11  nm relative to measurements obtained by a four-phase step algorithm. Comparisons between our high-speed acquisition system and a laser Doppler vibrometer indicate differences of <10  μs. The high temporal (i.e., >40  kHz) and spatial (i.e., >100  k data points) resolution of our HHS enables parallel measurements of all points on the surface of the TM, which allows quantification of spatially dependent motion parameters, such as modal frequencies and acoustic delays. Such capabilities could allow inferring local material properties across the surface of the TM. PMID:25191832

  2. AtAGP18 is localized at the plasma membrane and functions in plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yizhu; Yang, Jie; Showalter, Allan M

    2011-04-01

    Arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) are a family of highly glycosylated hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs). AtAGP17, 18 and 19 comprise the lysine-rich classical AGP subfamily in Arabidopsis. Overexpression of GFP-AtAGP17/18/19 fusion proteins in Arabidopsis revealed localization of the fusion proteins on the plant cell surface of different organs. Subcellular localization of the fusion proteins at the plasma membrane was further determined by plasmolysis of leaf trichome cells. To elucidate AtAGP17/18/19 function(s), these AGPs were expressed without the green fluorescent protein (GFP) tag under the control of 35S cauliflower mosaic virus promoter. In contrast to AtAGP17/AtAGP19 overexpressors which showed phenotypes identical to wild-type plants, AtAGP18 overexpressors displayed several phenotypes distinct from wild-type plants. Specifically, these overexpressors had smaller rosettes and shorter stems and roots, produced more branches and had less viable seeds. Moreover, these AtAGP18 overexpressors exhibited similar phenotypes to tomato LeAGP-1 overexpressors, suggesting these two AGP genes may have similar function(s) in Arabidopsis and tomato. PMID:21165646

  3. A biophysically detailed model of neocortical Local Field Potentials predicts the critical role of active membrane currents

    PubMed Central

    Reimann, Michael W.; Anastassiou, Costas A.; Perin, Rodrigo; Hill, Sean; Markram, Henry; Koch, Christof

    2013-01-01

    Summary Brain activity generates extracellular voltage fluctuations recorded as local field potentials (LFPs). While known that the relevant micro-variables, the ionic currents across membranes, jointly generate the macro-variables, the extracellular voltage, neither the detailed biophysical knowledge nor the required computational power has been available to model these processes. We simulated the LFP in a model of the rodent neocortical column composed of >12,000 reconstructed, multi-compartmental and spiking cortical layer 4 and 5 pyramidal neurons and basket cells, including five million dendritic and somatic compartments with voltage- and ion-dependent currents, realistic connectivity and probabilistic AMPA, NMDA and GABA synapses. We found that, depending on a number of factors, the LFP reflects local and cross-layer processing and active currents dominate the generation of LFPs rather than synaptic ones. Spike-related currents impact the LFP not only at higher frequencies but lower than 50 Hz. This work calls for re-evaluating the genesis of LFPs. PMID:23889937

  4. Electrostatics of Deformable Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Vorobyov, Igor; Bekker, Borislava; Allen, Toby W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract It was recently demonstrated that significant local deformations of biological membranes take place due to the fields of charged peptides and ions, challenging the standard model of membrane electrostatics. The ability of ions to retain their immediate hydration environment, combined with the lack of sensitivity of permeability to ion type or even ion pairs, led us to question the extent to which hydration energetics and electrostatics control membrane ion permeation. Using the arginine analog methyl-guanidinium as a test case, we find that although hydrocarbon electronic polarizability causes dramatic changes in ion solvation free energy, as well as a significant change (∼0.4 V) in the membrane dipole potential, little change in membrane permeation energetics occurs. We attribute this to compensation of solvation terms from polar and polarizable nonpolar components within the membrane, and explain why the dipole potential is not fully sensed in terms of the locally deformed bilayer interface. Our descriptions provide a deeper understanding of the translocation process and allow predictions for poly-ions, ion pairs, charged lipids, and lipid flip-flop. We also report simulations of large hydrophobic-ion-like membrane defects and the ionophore valinomycin, which exhibit little membrane deformation, as well as hydrophilic defects and the ion channel gramicidin A, to provide parallels to membranes deformed by unassisted ion permeation. PMID:20550903

  5. Iodixanol Gradient Centrifugation to Separate Components of the Low-Density Membrane Fraction from 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Jessica B A; Lamb, Christopher A; Gould, Gwyn W; Bryant, Nia J

    2016-02-01

    We optimized a set of fractionation techniques to facilitate the isolation of subcellular compartments containing insulin-sensitive glucose transporter isoform 4 (GLUT4), which is mobilized from GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs) in fat and muscle cells in response to insulin. In the absence of insulin, GLUT4 undergoes a continuous cycle of GSV formation and fusion with other compartments. Full membrane fractionation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes produces a low-density membrane fraction that contains both the constitutive recycling pool (the endosomal recycling compartments) and the insulin-sensitive pool (the GSVs). These two pools can be separated based on density using iodixanol gradient centrifugation, described here. PMID:26832683

  6. Membrane Transporters for Sulfated Steroids in the Human Testis - Cellular Localization, Expression Pattern and Functional Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wapelhorst, Britta; Grosser, Gary; Günther, Sabine; Alber, Jörg; Döring, Barbara; Kliesch, Sabine; Weidner, Wolfgang; Galuska, Christina E.; Hartmann, Michaela F.; Wudy, Stefan A.; Bergmann, Martin; Geyer, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Sulfated steroid hormones are commonly considered to be biologically inactive metabolites, but may be reactivated by the steroid sulfatase into biologically active free steroids, thereby having regulatory function via nuclear androgen and estrogen receptors which are widespread in the testis. However, a prerequisite for this mode of action would be a carrier-mediated import of the hydrophilic steroid sulfate molecules into specific target cells in reproductive tissues such as the testis. In the present study we detected predominant expression of the Sodium-dependent Organic Anion Transporter (SOAT), the Organic Anion Transporting Polypeptide 6A1, and the Organic Solute Carrier Partner 1 in human testis biopsies. All of these showed significantly lower or even absent mRNA expression in severe disorders of spermatogenesis (arrest at the level of spermatocytes or spermatogonia, Sertoli cell only syndrome). Only SOAT was significantly lower expressed in biopsies showing hypospermatogenesis. By use of immunohistochemistry SOAT was localized to germ cells at various stages in human testis biopsies showing normal spermatogenesis. SOAT immunoreactivity was detected in zygotene primary spermatocytes of stage V, pachytene spermatocytes of all stages (I–V), secondary spermatocytes of stage VI, and round spermatids (step 1 and step 2) in stages I and II. Furthermore, SOAT transport function for steroid sulfates was analyzed with a novel liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry procedure capable of profiling steroid sulfate molecules from cell lysates. With this technique, the cellular inward-directed SOAT transport was verified for the established substrates dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and estrone-3-sulfate. Additionally, β-estradiol-3-sulfate and androstenediol-3-sulfate were identified as novel SOAT substrates. PMID:23667501

  7. Functional characterization of nuclear localization and export signals in hepatitis C virus proteins and their role in the membranous web.

    PubMed

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A; Wozniak, Richard W; Tyrrell, D Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication. PMID:25485706

  8. Calcineurin homologous proteins regulate the membrane localization and activity of sodium/proton exchangers in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Allman, Erik; Wang, Qian; Walker, Rachel L; Austen, Molly; Peters, Maureen A; Nehrke, Keith

    2016-02-01

    Calcineurin B homologous proteins (CHP) are N-myristoylated, EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding proteins that bind to and regulate Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, which occurs through a variety of mechanisms whose relative significance is incompletely understood. Like mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans has three CHP paralogs, but unlike mammals, worms can survive CHP loss-of-function. However, mutants for the CHP ortholog PBO-1 are unfit, and PBO-1 has been shown to be required for proton signaling by the basolateral Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHX-7 and for proton-coupled intestinal nutrient uptake by the apical Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHX-2. Here, we have used this genetic model organism to interrogate PBO-1's mechanism of action. Using fluorescent tags to monitor Na(+)/H(+) exchanger trafficking and localization, we found that loss of either PBO-1 binding or activity caused NHX-7 to accumulate in late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, NHX-2 was stabilized at the apical membrane by a nonfunctional PBO-1 protein and was only internalized following its complete loss. Additionally, two pbo-1 paralogs were identified, and their expression patterns were analyzed. One of these contributed to the function of the excretory cell, which acts like a kidney in worms, establishing an alternative model for testing the role of this protein in membrane transporter trafficking and regulation. These results lead us to conclude that the role of CHP in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulation differs between apical and basolateral transporters. This further emphasizes the importance of proper targeting of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers and the critical role of CHP family proteins in this process. PMID:26561640

  9. Functional Characterization of Nuclear Localization and Export Signals in Hepatitis C Virus Proteins and Their Role in the Membranous Web

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Aviad; Neufeldt, Christopher J.; Pang, Daniel; Wilson, Kristen; Loewen-Dobler, Darci; Joyce, Michael A.; Wozniak, Richard W.; Tyrrell, D. Lorne J

    2014-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a positive strand RNA virus of the Flavivirus family that replicates in the cytoplasm of infected hepatocytes. Previously, several nuclear localization signals (NLS) and nuclear export signals (NES) have been identified in HCV proteins, however, there is little evidence that these proteins travel into the nucleus during infection. We have recently shown that nuclear pore complex (NPC) proteins (termed nucleoporins or Nups) are present in the membranous web and are required during HCV infection. In this study, we identify a total of 11 NLS and NES sequences in various HCV proteins. We show direct interactions between HCV proteins and importin α5 (IPOA5/kapα1), importin β3 (IPO5/kap β3), and exportin 1 (XPO1/CRM1) both in-vitro and in cell culture. These interactions can be disrupted using peptides containing the specific NLS or NES sequences of HCV proteins. Moreover, using a synchronized infection system, we show that these peptides inhibit HCV infection during distinct phases of the HCV life cycle. The inhibitory effects of these peptides place them in two groups. The first group binds IPOA5 and inhibits infection during the replication stage of HCV life cycle. The second group binds IPO5 and is active during both early replication and early assembly. This work delineates the entire life cycle of HCV and the active involvement of NLS sequences during HCV replication and assembly. Given the abundance of NLS sequences within HCV proteins, our previous finding that Nups play a role in HCV infection, and the relocation of the NLS double-GFP reporter in HCV infected cells, this work supports our previous hypothesis that NPC-like structures and nuclear transport factors function in the membranous web to create an environment conducive to viral replication. PMID:25485706

  10. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  11. Characterization of anti-leukemia components from Indigo naturalis using comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatography and in silico target identification.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xunxun; Chen, Xiaofei; Dan, Jia; Cao, Yan; Gao, Shouhong; Guo, Zhiying; Zerbe, Philipp; Chai, Yifeng; Diao, Yong; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been developed for thousands of years and has formed an integrated theoretical system based on a large amount of clinical practice. However, essential ingredients in TCM herbs have not been fully identified, and their precise mechanisms and targets are not elucidated. In this study, a new strategy combining comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatographic system and in silico target identification was established to characterize active components from Indigo naturalis, a famous TCM herb that has been widely used for the treatment of leukemia in China, and their targets. Three active components, indirubin, tryptanthrin and isorhamnetin, were successfully characterized and their anti-leukemia effects were validated by cell viability and cell apoptosis assays. Isorhamnetin, with undefined cancer related targets, was selected for in silico target identification. Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src) was identified as its membrane target and the dissociation constant (Kd) between Src and isorhamnetin was 3.81 μM. Furthermore, anti-leukemia effects of isorhamnetin were mediated by Src through inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. The results demonstrated that the integrated strategy could efficiently characterize active components in TCM and their targets, which may bring a new light for a better understanding of the complex mechanism of herbal medicines. PMID:27150638

  12. Characterization of anti-leukemia components from Indigo naturalis using comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatography and in silico target identification

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xunxun; Chen, Xiaofei; Dan, Jia; Cao, Yan; Gao, Shouhong; Guo, Zhiying; Zerbe, Philipp; Chai, Yifeng; Diao, Yong; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been developed for thousands of years and has formed an integrated theoretical system based on a large amount of clinical practice. However, essential ingredients in TCM herbs have not been fully identified, and their precise mechanisms and targets are not elucidated. In this study, a new strategy combining comprehensive two-dimensional K562/cell membrane chromatographic system and in silico target identification was established to characterize active components from Indigo naturalis, a famous TCM herb that has been widely used for the treatment of leukemia in China, and their targets. Three active components, indirubin, tryptanthrin and isorhamnetin, were successfully characterized and their anti-leukemia effects were validated by cell viability and cell apoptosis assays. Isorhamnetin, with undefined cancer related targets, was selected for in silico target identification. Proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase (Src) was identified as its membrane target and the dissociation constant (Kd) between Src and isorhamnetin was 3.81 μM. Furthermore, anti-leukemia effects of isorhamnetin were mediated by Src through inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. The results demonstrated that the integrated strategy could efficiently characterize active components in TCM and their targets, which may bring a new light for a better understanding of the complex mechanism of herbal medicines. PMID:27150638

  13. Treponema pallidum in Gel Microdroplets: A Method for Topological Analysis of BamA (TP0326) and Localization of Rare Outer Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Amit; Anand, Arvind; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-01-01

    The noncultivable spirochete Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum (T. pallidum) is the etiological agent of venereal syphilis. In contrast to the outer membranes (OMs) of gram-negative bacteria, the OM of T. pallidum lacks lipopolysaccharide, contains a paucity of integral membrane proteins, and is extremely labile. The lability of the T. pallidum OM greatly hinders efforts to localize the bacterium's rare outer membrane proteins (OMPs). To circumvent this problem, we developed the gel microdroplet method in which treponemes are encapsulated in porous agarose beads and then probed with specific antibodies in the absence or presence of low concentrations of the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. To demonstrate the general utility of this method for surface localization of any T. pallidum antigen, herein we describe a protocol for immunolabeling of encapsulated treponemes using antibodies directed against the β-barrel and POTRA domains of TP0326, the spirochete's BamA ortholog. PMID:26427677

  14. A Novel Di-Leucine Motif at the N-Terminus of Human Organic Solute Transporter Beta Is Essential for Protein Association and Membrane Localization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shuhua; Soroka, Carol J; Sun, An-Qiang; Backos, Donald S; Mennone, Albert; Suchy, Frederick J; Boyer, James L

    2016-01-01

    The heteromeric membrane protein Organic Solute Transporter alpha/beta is the major bile acid efflux transporter in the intestine. Physical association of its alpha and beta subunits is essential for their polarized basolateral membrane localization and function in the transport of bile acids and other organic solutes. We identified a highly conserved acidic dileucine motif (-EL20L21EE) at the extracellular amino-tail of organic solute transporter beta from multiple species. To characterize the role of this protein interacting domain in the association of the human beta and alpha subunits and in membrane localization of the transporter, Leu20 and Leu21 on the amino-tail of human organic solute transporter beta were replaced with alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. Co-immunoprecipitation study in HEK293 cells demonstrated that substitution of the leucine residues with alanines prevented the interaction of the human beta mutant with the alpha subunit. Membrane biotinylation demonstrated that the LL/AA mutant eliminated membrane expression of both subunits. Computational-based modelling of human organic solute transporter beta suggested that the LL/AA mutation substantially alters both the structure and lipophilicity of the surface, thereby not only affecting the interaction with the alpha subunit but also possibly impacting the capacity of the beta subunit to traffick through the cell and interact with the membrane. In summary, our findings indicate that the dileucine motif in the extracellular N-terminal region of human organic solute transporter beta subunit plays a critical role in the association with the alpha subunit and in its polarized plasma membrane localization. PMID:27351185

  15. A Novel Di-Leucine Motif at the N-Terminus of Human Organic Solute Transporter Beta Is Essential for Protein Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuhua; Soroka, Carol J.; Sun, An-Qiang; Backos, Donald S.; Mennone, Albert; Suchy, Frederick J.; Boyer, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The heteromeric membrane protein Organic Solute Transporter alpha/beta is the major bile acid efflux transporter in the intestine. Physical association of its alpha and beta subunits is essential for their polarized basolateral membrane localization and function in the transport of bile acids and other organic solutes. We identified a highly conserved acidic dileucine motif (-EL20L21EE) at the extracellular amino-tail of organic solute transporter beta from multiple species. To characterize the role of this protein interacting domain in the association of the human beta and alpha subunits and in membrane localization of the transporter, Leu20 and Leu21 on the amino-tail of human organic solute transporter beta were replaced with alanines by site-directed mutagenesis. Co-immunoprecipitation study in HEK293 cells demonstrated that substitution of the leucine residues with alanines prevented the interaction of the human beta mutant with the alpha subunit. Membrane biotinylation demonstrated that the LL/AA mutant eliminated membrane expression of both subunits. Computational-based modelling of human organic solute transporter beta suggested that the LL/AA mutation substantially alters both the structure and lipophilicity of the surface, thereby not only affecting the interaction with the alpha subunit but also possibly impacting the capacity of the beta subunit to traffick through the cell and interact with the membrane. In summary, our findings indicate that the dileucine motif in the extracellular N-terminal region of human organic solute transporter beta subunit plays a critical role in the association with the alpha subunit and in its polarized plasma membrane localization. PMID:27351185

  16. Optimization of solubilization and purification procedures for the hydroxylase component of membrane-bound methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus strain M.

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, V I; Tikhonova, T V; Gvozdev, R I; Tukhvatullin, I A; Popov, V O

    2006-12-01

    The hydroxylase component of membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus strain M was isolated and purified to homogeneity. The pMMO molecule comprises three subunits of molecular masses 47, 26, and 23 kD and contains three copper atoms and one iron atom. In solution the protein exists as a stable oligomer of 660 kD with possible subunit composition (alpha beta gamma)6. Mass spectroscopy shows high homology of the purified protein with methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus strain Bath. Pilot screening of crystallization conditions has been carried out. PMID:17223785

  17. Defining regulatory and phosphoinositide-binding sites in the human WIPI-1 β-propeller responsible for autophagosomal membrane localization downstream of mTORC1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Autophagy is a cytoprotective, lysosomal degradation system regulated upon induced phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P) generation by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase class III (PtdIns3KC3) downstream of mTORC1 inhibition. The human PtdIns(3)P-binding β-propeller protein WIPI-1 accumulates at the initiation site for autophagosome formation (phagophore), functions upstream of the Atg12 and LC3 conjugation systems, and localizes at both the inner and outer membrane of generated autophagosomes. In addition, to a minor degree WIPI-1 also binds PtdIns(3,5)P2. By homology modelling we earlier identified 24 evolutionarily highly conserved amino acids that cluster at two opposite sites of the open Velcro arranged WIPI-1 β-propeller. Results By alanine scanning mutagenesis of 24 conserved residues in human WIPI-1 we define the PtdIns-binding site of human WIPI-1 to critically include S203, S205, G208, T209, R212, R226, R227, G228, S251, T255, H257. These amino acids confer PtdIns(3)P or PtdIns(3,5)P2 binding. In general, WIPI-1 mutants unable to bind PtdIns(3)P/PtdIns(3,5)P2 lost their potential to localize at autophagosomal membranes, but WIPI-1 mutants that retained PtdIns(3)P/PtdIns(3,5)P2 binding localized at Atg12-positive phagophores upon mTORC1 inhibition. Both, downregulation of mTOR by siRNA or cellular PtdIns(3)P elevation upon PIKfyve inhibition by YM201636 significantly increased the localization of WIPI-1 at autophagosomal membranes. Further, we identified regulatory amino acids that influence the membrane recruitment of WIPI-1. Exceptional, WIPI-1 R110A localization at Atg12-positive membranes was independent of autophagy stimulation and insensitive to wortmannin. R112A and H185A mutants were unable to bind PtdIns(3)P/PtdIns(3,5)P2 but localized at autophagosomal membranes, although in a significant reduced number of cells when compared to wild-type WIPI-1. Conclusions We identified amino acids of the WIPI-1 β-propeller that confer PtdIns(3

  18. Localization of Filipin-Sterol Complexes in the Membranes of Beta vulgaris Roots and Spinacia oleracea Chloroplasts 1

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Curt H.; Mudd, J. Brian

    1982-01-01

    Filipin was used as a cytochemical probe for membrane sterols in the root storage tissue of the red beet Beta vulgaris L. and the chloroplasts of Spinacia oleracea L. In unfixed beet tissue, filipin lysed the cells. Freeze-fracture replicas revealed that the filipin-sterol complexes were tightly aggregated in the plasma membrane, while in thin section the complexes corrugated the plasma membrane. If the cells were fixed with glutaraldehyde prior to the filipin treatment, the cell structure was preserved. Filipin-induced lesions were dispersed or clustered loosely in the plasma membrane. A few filipin-sterol complexes were observed in the tonoplast. In spinach chloroplasts, filipin-sterol complexes were limited to the outer membrane of the envelope and were not found in the inner membrane of the envelope or in the lamellar membranes. If the filipin-sterol complexes accurately mapped the distribution of membrane sterols, then sterol was located predominantly in the plasma membrane of the red beet and in the outer membrane of the chloroplast envelope. Furthermore, the sterol may be heterogenously distributed laterally in both these membranes. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16662716

  19. Localization of FtsI (PBP3) to the Septal Ring Requires Its Membrane Anchor, the Z Ring, FtsA, FtsQ, and FtsL

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, David S.; Chen, Joseph C.; Ghigo, Jean-Marc; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon

    1999-01-01

    Assembly of the division septum in bacteria is mediated by several proteins that localize to the division site. One of these, FtsI (also called penicillin-binding protein 3) of Escherichia coli, consists of a short cytoplasmic domain, a single membrane-spanning segment, and a large periplasmic domain that encodes a transpeptidase activity involved in synthesis of septal peptidoglycan. We have constructed a merodiploid strain with a wild-type copy of ftsI at the normal chromosomal locus and a genetic fusion of ftsI to the green fluorescent protein (gfp) at the lambda attachment site. gfp-ftsI was expressed at physiologically appropriate levels under control of a regulatable promoter. Consistent with previous results based on immunofluorescence microscopy GFP-FtsI localized to the division site during the later stages of cell growth and throughout septation. Localization of GFP-FtsI to the cell pole(s) was not observed unless the protein was overproduced about 10-fold. Membrane anchor alterations shown previously to impair division but not membrane insertion or transpeptidase activity were found to interfere with localization of GFP-FtsI to the division site. In contrast, GFP-FtsI localized well in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics that inhibit the transpeptidase activity of FtsI. Septal localization depended upon every other division protein tested (FtsZ, FtsA, FtsQ, and FtsL). We conclude that FtsI is a late recruit to the division site, and that its localization depends on an intact membrane anchor. PMID:9882665

  20. Multicomponent membranes

    DOEpatents

    Kulprathipanja, Santi; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    A multicomponent membrane which may be used for separating various components which are present in a fluid feed mixture comprises a mixture of a plasticizer such as a glycol and an organic polymer cast upon a porous organic polymer support. The membrane may be prepared by casting an emulsion or a solution of the plasticizer and polymer on the porous support, evaporating the solvent and recovering the membrane after curing.

  1. Membrane cholesterol modulates {beta}-amyloid-dependent tau cleavage by inducing changes in the membrane content and localization of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, Alexandra M; Methner, D Nicole Riherd; Ferreira, Adriana

    2011-01-14

    We have previously shown that β-amyloid (Aβ) treatment resulted in an age-dependent calpain activation leading to Tau cleavage into a neurotoxic 17-kDa fragment in a cellular model of Alzheimer disease. This detrimental cellular response was mediated by a developmentally regulated increase in membrane cholesterol levels. In this study, we assessed the molecular mechanisms by which cholesterol modulated Aβ-induced Tau cleavage in cultured hippocampal neurons. Our results indicated that these mechanisms did not involve the regulation of the binding of Aβ aggregates to the plasma membrane. On the other hand, experiments using N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor inhibitors suggested that these receptors played an essential role in cholesterol-mediated Aβ-dependent calpain activity and 17-kDa Tau production. Biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that decreasing membrane cholesterol levels in mature neurons resulted in a significant reduction of the NR1 subunit at the membrane as well as an increase in the number of large NR1, NR2A, and NR2B subunit clusters. Moreover, the majority of these larger N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor subunit immunoreactive spots was not juxtaposed to presynaptic sites in cholesterol-reduced neurons. These data suggested that changes at the synaptic level underlie the mechanism by which membrane cholesterol modulates developmental changes in the susceptibility of hippocampal neurons to Aβ-induced toxicity. PMID:21047784

  2. Properties of estrogen binding components in the plasma membrane of neurohypophysis in hens and changes in its binding before and after oviposition.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Kawashima, M

    2009-10-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate whether the estrogen binding component regarded as a receptor exists in the plasma membrane fraction of neurohypophysis in hens and whether the binding of receptor changes with relation to oviposition. The specific binding for estradiol-17beta (E2) in the neurohypophysis of hens was demonstrated by the use of radioligand binding assays on the plasma membrane fraction of the tissue. The binding to [3H]E2 had a binding specificity to E2 and diethylstilbestrol, reversibility, and saturation. Scatchard analysis revealed that the binding sites are of a single class. The equilibrium dissociation constant obtained by Scatchard analysis and kinetic analysis suggested a high affinity, and the maximum binding capacity obtained by Scatchard analysis suggested a limited capacity. These properties are characteristics of a receptor, which suggests that an estrogen receptor exists in the plasma membrane of hen neurohypophysis. The equilibrium dissociation constant value of estrogen receptor of the neurohypophysis was not significantly different between laying hens and nonlaying hens, but the maximum binding capacity value was statistically smaller (the binding affinity is higher) in laying hens than in nonlaying hens. The specific binding of estrogen receptor showed a decrease at 1 h after an injection of diethylstilbestrol in nonlaying hens. The specific binding also decreased 3 h before oviposition in laying hens and maintained low value until just after oviposition. The present study suggests that estrogen may act directly on the neurohypophysis during 3 h before oviposition in hens. PMID:19762877

  3. Structure and distribution of inorganic components in the cake layer of a membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lijie; Xia, Siqing; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    A laboratory-scale submerged anoxic-oxic membrane bioreactor treating municipal wastewater was operated to investigate the structure and distribution of the inorganic cake layer buildup on the membrane. BCR (European Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and both map and line scan of energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) were performed for cake layer characterization. BCR results showed that Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Fe, and Ba were the predominant inorganic elements in the cake layer, and they occurred mostly as crystal particles. Crystal SiO2 was the dominant inorganic compound while Ca in the form of CaSO4 (dominant) and CaCO3 were also present, but exerted little effect on the cake layer structure because most of these compounds were deposited as precipitates on the reactor bottom. EDX results indicated that Si and Al accumulated together along the cross-sectional cake layer in the form of Si-Al (SiO2-Al2O3) crystal particles. PMID:26298402

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa extracellular secondary metabolite, Paerucumarin, chelates iron and is not localized to extracellular membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Qaisar, Uzma; Kruczek, Cassandra J; Azeem, Muhammed; Javaid, Nasir; Colmer-Hamood, Jane A; Hamood, Abdul N

    2016-08-01

    Proteins encoded by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa pvcA-D operon synthesize a novel isonitrile functionalized cumarin termed paerucumarin. The pvcA-D operon enhances the expression of the P. aeruginosa fimbrial chaperone/usher pathway (cup) genes and this effect is mediated through paerucumarin. Whether pvcA-D and/or paerucumarin affect the expression of other P. aeruginosa genes is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of a mutation in pvcA-D operon the global transcriptome of the P. aeruginosa strain PAO1-UW. The mutation reduced the expression of several ironcontrolled genes including pvdS, which is essential for the expression of the pyoverdine genes. Additional transcriptional studies showed that the pvcA-D operon is not regulated by iron. Exogenously added paerucumarin enhanced pyoverdine production and pvdS expression in PAO1-UW. Iron-chelation experiments revealed that purified paerucumarin chelates iron. However, exogenously added paerucumarin significantly reduced the growth of a P. aeruginosa mutant defective in pyoverdine and pyochelin production. In contrast to other secondary metabolite, Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), paerucumarin is not localized to the P. aeruginosa membrane vesicles. These results suggest that paerucumarin enhances the expression of iron-controlled genes by chelating iron within the P. aeruginosa extracellular environment. Although paerucumarin chelates iron, it does not function as a siderophore. Unlike PQS, paerucumarin is not associated with the P. aeruginosa cell envelope. PMID:27480638

  5. Characterization of the plasma membrane localization and orientation of HPV16 E5 for cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-10-10

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped DNA virus with an approx 8000 base pair genome. Infection with certain types of HPV is associated with cervical cancer, although the molecular mechanism by which HPV induces carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Three genes encoded by HPV16 are regarded as oncogenic - E5, E6, and E7. The role of E5 has been controversial. Expression of HPV16 E5 causes cell-cell fusion, an event that can lead to increased chromosomal instability, particularly in the presence of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors like HPV16 E6 and E7. Using biochemical and cell biological assays to better understand HPV16 E5, we find that HPV16 E5 localizes to the plasma membrane with an intracellular amino terminus and an extracellular carboxyl-terminus. Further, HPV16 E5 must be expressed on both cells for cell fusion to occur. When the extracellular epitope of HPV16 E5 is targeted with an antibody, the number of bi-nucleated cells decreases.

  6. Human CASK/LIN-2 Binds Syndecan-2 and Protein 4.1 and Localizes to the Basolateral Membrane of Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Alexandra R.; Wood, Daniel F.; Marfatia, Shirin M.; Walther, Zenta; Chishti, Athar H.; Anderson, James Melvin

    1998-01-01

    In Caenorhabditis elegans, mutations in the lin-2 gene inactivate the LET-23 receptor tyrosine kinase/Ras/MAP kinase pathway required for vulval cell differentiation. One function of LIN-2 is to localize LET-23 to the basal membrane domain of vulval precursor cells. LIN-2 belongs to the membrane-associated guanylate kinase family of proteins. We have cloned and characterized the human homolog of LIN-2, termed hCASK, and Northern and Western blot analyses reveal that it is ubiquitously expressed. Indirect immunofluorescence localizes CASK to distinct lateral and/or basal plasma membrane domains in different epithelial cell types. We detect in a yeast two-hybrid screen that the PDZ domain of hCASK binds to the heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-2. This interaction is confirmed using in vitro binding assays and immunofluorescent colocalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hCASK binds the actin-binding protein 4.1. Syndecans are known to bind extracellular matrix, and to form coreceptor complexes with receptor tyrosine kinases. We speculate that CASK mediates a link between the extracellular matrix and the actin cytoskeleton via its interaction with syndecan and with protein 4.1. Like other membrane-associated guanylate kinases, its multidomain structure enables it to act as a scaffold at the membrane, potentially recruiting multiple proteins and coordinating signal transduction. PMID:9660868

  7. Reticulomics: Protein-Protein Interaction Studies with Two Plasmodesmata-Localized Reticulon Family Proteins Identify Binding Partners Enriched at Plasmodesmata, Endoplasmic Reticulum, and the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Botchway, Stanley W; Slade, Susan E; Knox, Kirsten; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Oparka, Karl; Hawes, Chris

    2015-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a ubiquitous organelle that plays roles in secretory protein production, folding, quality control, and lipid biosynthesis. The cortical ER in plants is pleomorphic and structured as a tubular network capable of morphing into flat cisternae, mainly at three-way junctions, and back to tubules. Plant reticulon family proteins (RTNLB) tubulate the ER by dimerization and oligomerization, creating localized ER membrane tensions that result in membrane curvature. Some RTNLB ER-shaping proteins are present in the plasmodesmata (PD) proteome and may contribute to the formation of the desmotubule, the axial ER-derived structure that traverses primary PD. Here, we investigate the binding partners of two PD-resident reticulon proteins, RTNLB3 and RTNLB6, that are located in primary PD at cytokinesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Coimmunoprecipitation of green fluorescent protein-tagged RTNLB3 and RTNLB6 followed by mass spectrometry detected a high percentage of known PD-localized proteins as well as plasma membrane proteins with putative membrane-anchoring roles. Förster resonance energy transfer by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy assays revealed a highly significant interaction of the detected PD proteins with the bait RTNLB proteins. Our data suggest that RTNLB proteins, in addition to a role in ER modeling, may play important roles in linking the cortical ER to the plasma membrane. PMID:26353761

  8. Protein 4.1, a component of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton and its related homologue proteins forming the protein 4.1/FERM superfamily.

    PubMed

    Diakowski, Witold; Grzybek, Michał; Sikorski, Aleksander F

    2006-01-01

    The review is focused on the domain structure and function of protein 4.1, one of the proteins belonging to the membrane skeleton. The protein 4.1 of the red blood cells (4.1R) is a multifunctional protein that localizes to the membrane skeleton and stabilizes erythrocyte shape and membrane mechanical properties, such as deformability and stability, via lateral interactions with spectrin, actin, glycophorin C and protein p55. Protein 4.1 binding is modulated through the action of kinases and/or calmodulin-Ca2+. Non-erythroid cells express the 4.1R homologues: 4.1G (general type), 4.1B (brain type), and 4.1N (neuron type), and the whole group belongs to the protein 4.1 superfamily, which is characterized by the presence of a highly conserved FERM domain at the N-terminus of the molecule. Proteins 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1N and 4.1B are encoded by different genes. Most of the 4.1 superfamily proteins also contain an actin-binding domain. To date, more than 40 members have been identified. They can be divided into five groups: protein 4.1 molecules, ERM proteins, talin-related molecules, protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPH) proteins and NBL4 proteins. We have focused our attention on the main, well known representatives of 4.1 superfamily and tried to choose the proteins which are close to 4.1R or which have distinct functions. 4.1 family proteins are not just linkers between the plasma membrane and membrane skeleton; they also play an important role in various processes. Some, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells, play the role in cell adhesion. The other members control or take part in tumor suppression, regulation of cell cycle progression, inhibition of cell proliferation, downstream signaling of the glutamate receptors, and establishment of cell polarity; some are also involved in cell proliferation, cell motility, and/or cell-to-cell communication. PMID:17219717

  9. Munc18-1 Is Critical for Plasma Membrane Localization of Syntaxin1 but Not of SNAP-25 in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Lakshmanan; Han, Liping; Tassew, Nardos G.; He, Yu; Wang, Li; Xie, Li; Fujita, Yoshihito; Kwan, Edwin; Davletov, Bazbek; Monnier, Philippe P.; Gaisano, Herbert Y.

    2008-01-01

    Although Munc18-1 was originally identified as a syntaxin1–interacting protein, the physiological significance of this interaction remains unclear. In fact, recent studies of Munc18-1 mutants have suggested that Munc18-1 plays a critical role for docking of secretory vesicles, independent of syntaxin1 regulation. Here we investigated the role of Munc18-1 in syntaxin1 localization by generating stable neuroendocrine cell lines in which Munc18-1 was strongly down-regulated. In these cells, the secretion capability, as well as the docking of dense-core vesicles, was significantly reduced. More importantly, not only was the expression level of syntaxin1 reduced, but the localization of syntaxin1 at the plasma membrane was also severely perturbed. The mislocalized syntaxin1 resided primarily in the perinuclear region of the cells, in which it was highly colocalized with Secretogranin II, a marker protein for dense-core vesicles. In contrast, the expression level and the plasma membrane localization of SNAP-25 were not affected. Furthermore, the syntaxin1 localization and the secretion capability were restored upon transfection-mediated reintroduction of Munc18-1. Our results indicate that endogenous Munc18-1 plays a critical role for the plasma membrane localization of syntaxin1 in neuroendocrine cells and therefore necessitates the interpretation of Munc18-1 mutant phenotypes to be in terms of mislocalized syntaxin1. PMID:18077557

  10. Apical sterol-rich membranes are essential for localizing cell end markers that determine growth directionality in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Norio; Higashitsuji, Yuhei; Konzack, Sven; Fischer, Reinhard

    2008-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, hyphal extension depends on the continuous delivery of vesicles to the growing tip. Here, we describe the identification of two cell end marker proteins, TeaA and TeaR, in Aspergillus nidulans, corresponding to Tea1 and Mod5 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Deletion of teaA or teaR caused zig-zag-growing and meandering hyphae, respectively. The Kelch-repeat protein TeaA, the putatively prenylated TeaR protein, and the formin SepA were highly concentrated in the Spitzenkörper, a vesicle transit station at the tip, and localized along the tip membrane. TeaA localization at tips depended on microtubules, and TeaA was required for microtuble convergence in the hyphal apex. The CENP-E family kinesin KipA was necessary for proper localization of TeaA and TeaR, but not for their transportation. TeaA and TeaR localization were interdependent. TeaA interacted in vivo with TeaR, and TeaA colocalized with SepA. Sterol-rich membrane domains localized at the tip in teaA and teaR mutants like in wild type, and filipin treatment caused mislocalization of both proteins. This suggests that sterol-rich membrane domains determine cell end factor destinations and thereby polarized growth. PMID:18003978

  11. Global Proteomic Analysis Reveals an Exclusive Role of Thylakoid Membranes in Bioenergetics of a Model Cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Liberton, Michelle; Saha, Rajib; Jacobs, Jon M; Nguyen, Amelia Y; Gritsenko, Marina A; Smith, Richard D; Koppenaal, David W; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-06-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes with highly differentiated membrane systems. These organisms contain an outer membrane, plasma membrane, and an internal system of thylakoid membranes where the photosynthetic and respiratory machinery are found. This existence of compartmentalization and differentiation of membrane systems poses a number of challenges for cyanobacterial cells in terms of organization and distribution of proteins to the correct membrane system. Proteomics studies have long sought to identify the components of the different membrane systems in cyanobacteria, and to date about 450 different proteins have been attributed to either the plasma membrane or thylakoid membrane. Given the complexity of these membranes, many more proteins remain to be identified, and a comprehensive catalogue of plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane proteins is needed. Here we describe the identification of 635 differentially localized proteins in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by quantitative iTRAQ isobaric labeling; of these, 459 proteins were localized to the plasma membrane and 176 were localized to the thylakoid membrane. Surprisingly, we found over 2.5 times the number of unique proteins identified in the plasma membrane compared with the thylakoid membrane. This suggests that the protein composition of the thylakoid membrane is more homogeneous than the plasma membrane, consistent with the role of the plasma membrane in diverse cellular processes including protein trafficking and nutrient import, compared with a more specialized role for the thylakoid membrane in cellular energetics. Thus, our data clearly define the two membrane systems with distinct functions. Overall, the protein compositions of the Synechocystis 6803 plasma membrane and thylakoid membrane are quite similar to that of the plasma membrane of Escherichia coli and thylakoid membrane of Arabidopsis chloroplasts, respectively. Synechocystis 6803 can therefore be described as a Gram

  12. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila

    2016-01-01

    The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the expression of cidABC and lrgAB operons, the gene products of which are involved in programmed cell death and lysis. In vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of two overlapping regulatory networks in regulating the lrgAB operon, both depending on LytR. One regulatory network responds to glucose metabolism and the other responds to changes in the cell membrane potential. Herein, we show that LytS has autokinase activity and can catalyze a fast phosphotransfer reaction, with 50% of its phosphoryl group lost within 1 minute of incubation with LytR. LytS has also phosphatase activity. Notably, LytR undergoes phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate at a rate that is 2-fold faster than the phosphorylation by LytS. This observation is significant in lieu of the in vivo observations that regulation of the lrgAB operon is LytR-dependent in the presence of excess glucose in the medium. The latter condition does not lead to perturbation of the cell membrane potential but rather to the accumulation of acetate in the cell. Our study provides insights into the molecular basis for regulation of lrgAB in a LytR-dependent manner under conditions that do not involve sensing by LytS. PMID:27127614

  13. Signaling mechanism by the Staphylococcus aureus two-component system LytSR: role of acetyl phosphate in bypassing the cell membrane electrical potential sensor LytS.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kevin; Golemi-Kotra, Dasantila

    2015-01-01

    The two-component system LytSR has been linked to the signal transduction of cell membrane electrical potential perturbation and is involved in the adaptation of Staphylococcus aureus to cationic antimicrobial peptides. It consists of a membrane-bound histidine kinase, LytS, which belongs to the family of multiple transmembrane-spanning domains receptors, and a response regulator, LytR, which belongs to the novel family of non-helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain proteins. LytR regulates the expression of cidABC and lrgAB operons, the gene products of which are involved in programmed cell death and lysis. In vivo studies have demonstrated involvement of two overlapping regulatory networks in regulating the lrgAB operon, both depending on LytR. One regulatory network responds to glucose metabolism and the other responds to changes in the cell membrane potential. Herein, we show that LytS has autokinase activity and can catalyze a fast phosphotransfer reaction, with 50% of its phosphoryl group lost within 1 minute of incubation with LytR. LytS has also phosphatase activity. Notably, LytR undergoes phosphorylation by acetyl phosphate at a rate that is 2-fold faster than the phosphorylation by LytS. This observation is significant in lieu of the in vivo observations that regulation of the lrgAB operon is LytR-dependent in the presence of excess glucose in the medium. The latter condition does not lead to perturbation of the cell membrane potential but rather to the accumulation of acetate in the cell. Our study provides insights into the molecular basis for regulation of lrgAB in a LytR-dependent manner under conditions that do not involve sensing by LytS. PMID:27127614

  14. Streptococcus mutans Extracellular DNA Is Upregulated during Growth in Biofilms, Actively Released via Membrane Vesicles, and Influenced by Components of the Protein Secretion Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Sumei; Klein, Marlise I.; Heim, Kyle P.; Fan, Yuwei; Bitoun, Jacob P.; Ahn, San-Joon; Burne, Robert A.; Koo, Hyun; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a major etiological agent of human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in biofilms. Limited information is available concerning the extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a scaffolding matrix in S. mutans biofilms. This study demonstrates that S. mutans produces eDNA by multiple avenues, including lysis-independent membrane vesicles. Unlike eDNAs from cell lysis that were abundant and mainly concentrated around broken cells or cell debris with floating open ends, eDNAs produced via the lysis-independent pathway appeared scattered but in a structured network under scanning electron microscopy. Compared to eDNA production of planktonic cultures, eDNA production in 5- and 24-h biofilms was increased by >3- and >1.6-fold, respectively. The addition of DNase I to growth medium significantly reduced biofilm formation. In an in vitro adherence assay, added chromosomal DNA alone had a limited effect on S. mutans adherence to saliva-coated hydroxylapatite beads, but in conjunction with glucans synthesized using purified glucosyltransferase B, the adherence was significantly enhanced. Deletion of sortase A, the transpeptidase that covalently couples multiple surface-associated proteins to the cell wall peptidoglycan, significantly reduced eDNA in both planktonic and biofilm cultures. Sortase A deficiency did not have a significant effect on membrane vesicle production; however, the protein profile of the mutant membrane vesicles was significantly altered, including reduction of adhesin P1 and glucan-binding proteins B and C. Relative to the wild type, deficiency of protein secretion and membrane protein insertion machinery components, including Ffh, YidC1, and YidC2, also caused significant reductions in eDNA. PMID:24748612

  15. Bestrophin, the product of the Best vitelliform macular dystrophy gene (VMD2), localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marmorstein, Alan D.; Marmorstein, Lihua Y.; Rayborn, Mary; Wang, Xinxing; Hollyfield, Joe G.; Petrukhin, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is a dominantly inherited, early onset, macular degenerative disease that exhibits some histopathologic similarities to age-related macular degeneration. Although the vitelliform lesion is common in the fundus of individuals with Best disease, diagnosis is based on a reduced ratio of the light peak to dark trough in the electrooculogram. Recently, the VMD2 gene on chromosome 11q13, encoding the protein bestrophin, was identified. The function of bestrophin is unknown. To facilitate studies of bestrophin, we produced both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies that proved useful for Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunocytochemistry. To characterize bestrophin, we initially probed the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived cell lines ARPE-19, D407, and RPE-J. All of the cell lines expressed bestrophin mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, but not on Western blots. Bestrophin in human RPE partitioned in the detergent phase during Triton X-114 extraction and could be modified by biotin in intact cells, indicative of a plasma membrane localization. Immunocytochemical staining of macaque and porcine eyes indicated that bestrophin is localized at the basolateral plasma membrane of RPE cells. When expressed in RPE-J cells by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, bestrophin again was determined by confocal microscopy and cell surface biotinylation to be a basolateral plasma membrane protein. The basolateral plasma membrane localization of bestrophin suggests the possibility that bestrophin plays a role in generating the altered electrooculogram of individuals with Best disease. PMID:11050159

  16. Bestrophin, the product of the Best vitelliform macular dystrophy gene (VMD2), localizes to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Marmorstein, A D; Marmorstein, L Y; Rayborn, M; Wang, X; Hollyfield, J G; Petrukhin, K

    2000-11-01

    Best vitelliform macular dystrophy is a dominantly inherited, early onset, macular degenerative disease that exhibits some histopathologic similarities to age-related macular degeneration. Although the vitelliform lesion is common in the fundus of individuals with Best disease, diagnosis is based on a reduced ratio of the light peak to dark trough in the electrooculogram. Recently, the VMD2 gene on chromosome 11q13, encoding the protein bestrophin, was identified. The function of bestrophin is unknown. To facilitate studies of bestrophin, we produced both rabbit polyclonal and mouse monoclonal antibodies that proved useful for Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunocytochemistry. To characterize bestrophin, we initially probed the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-derived cell lines ARPE-19, D407, and RPE-J. All of the cell lines expressed bestrophin mRNA by reverse transcription-PCR, but not on Western blots. Bestrophin in human RPE partitioned in the detergent phase during Triton X-114 extraction and could be modified by biotin in intact cells, indicative of a plasma membrane localization. Immunocytochemical staining of macaque and porcine eyes indicated that bestrophin is localized at the basolateral plasma membrane of RPE cells. When expressed in RPE-J cells by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, bestrophin again was determined by confocal microscopy and cell surface biotinylation to be a basolateral plasma membrane protein. The basolateral plasma membrane localization of bestrophin suggests the possibility that bestrophin plays a role in generating the altered electrooculogram of individuals with Best disease. PMID:11050159

  17. Plasma Membrane-Located Purine Nucleotide Transport Proteins Are Key Components for Host Exploitation by Microsporidian Intracellular Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Hacker, Christian; Dean, Paul; Mifsud, John; Goldberg, Alina V.; Williams, Tom A.; Nakjang, Sirintra; Gregory, Alison; Hirt, Robert P.; Lucocq, John M.; Kunji, Edmund R. S.; Embley, T. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia are obligate intracellular parasites of most animal groups including humans, but despite their significant economic and medical importance there are major gaps in our understanding of how they exploit infected host cells. We have investigated the evolution, cellular locations and substrate specificities of a family of nucleotide transport (NTT) proteins from Trachipleistophora hominis, a microsporidian isolated from an HIV/AIDS patient. Transport proteins are critical to microsporidian success because they compensate for the dramatic loss of metabolic pathways that is a hallmark of the group. Our data demonstrate that the use of plasma membrane-located nucleotide transport proteins (NTT) is a key strategy adopted by microsporidians to exploit host cells. Acquisition of an ancestral transporter gene at the base of the microsporidian radiation was followed by lineage-specific events of gene duplication, which in the case of T. hominis has generated four paralogous NTT transporters. All four T. hominis NTT proteins are located predominantly to the plasma membrane of replicating intracellular cells where they can mediate transport at the host-parasite interface. In contrast to published data for Encephalitozoon cuniculi, we found no evidence for the location for any of the T. hominis NTT transporters to its minimal mitochondria (mitosomes), consistent with lineage-specific differences in transporter and mitosome evolution. All of the T. hominis NTTs transported radiolabelled purine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, GTP and GDP) when expressed in Escherichia coli, but did not transport radiolabelled pyrimidine nucleotides. Genome analysis suggests that imported purine nucleotides could be used by T. hominis to make all of the critical purine-based building-blocks for DNA and RNA biosynthesis during parasite intracellular replication, as well as providing essential energy for parasite cellular metabolism and protein synthesis. PMID:25474405

  18. Photochemical solar energy conversion utilizing semiconductors localized in membrane-mimetic systems. Performance report, April 1, 1989--August 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Fendler, J.H.

    1991-08-31

    Extending the frontiers of colloidal photochemistry and colloidal electrochemistry to solar photochemistry research had been the main objective of this research. More specific objectives of this proposal include the examination of semiconductor-particle-mediated photoelectron transfer and photoelectric effects in different membrane mimetic systems. Emphasis had been placed on developing bilayer lipid membranes and Langmuir-Blodgett films as new membrane-mimetic systems, as well as on the characterization and utilization of these systems.

  19. The two neutrophil plasma membrane markers alkaline phosphatase and HLA class I antigen localize differently in granule-deficient cytoplasts. An ideal plasma membrane marker in human neutrophils is still lacking.

    PubMed

    Pellmé, Sara; Dahlgren, Claes; Karlsson, Anna

    2007-08-31

    Neutrophil function relies largely on the ability of the cell to mobilize its different granules and vesicles to the cell surface and thereby expose and/or release effector molecules to the surrounding tissue. To properly identify these subcellular compartments is thus a prerequisite for studies of neutrophil physiology. A range of specific markers for the classical granules is available, but finding optimal markers for the secretory vesicles and plasma membrane has historically been more challenging. Latent and non-latent alkaline phosphatase activities are often used to distinguish these two light membrane structures, but the outcome using this technique depends on the level of cellular activation. Therefore, HLA-I was introduced some years ago as a specific, stimulation-independent marker for the plasma membrane. In this study we however report that detailed fractionation studies of neutrophil cytoplasts, lacking secretory vesicles, granules and other dense organelles, reveal that the HLA-I antigen is not only co-localizing with the plasma membrane marker ALP, but is also present in other, more dense organelles. Further, we found the mixed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MELISA), detecting the beta(2)-microglobulin/HLA-I complex, to be negatively influenced by uncomplexed beta(2)-microglobulin present in the specific granules and secretory vesicles, making it difficult to use HLA-I as a plasma membrane marker during maturation of for example phagolysosomes. PMID:17673253

  20. Neisseria gonorrhoeae PIII has a role on NG1873 outer membrane localization and is involved in bacterial adhesion to human cervical and urethral epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein PIII is one of the major outer membrane proteins of Neisseria gonorrhoeae, 95% identical to RmpM (reduction modifiable protein M) or class 4 protein of Neisseria meningitidis. RmpM is known to be a membrane protein associated by non-covalent bonds to the peptidoglycan layer and interacting with PorA/PorB porin complexes resulting in the stabilization of the bacterial membrane. The C-terminal domain of PIII (and RmpM) is highly homologous to members of the OmpA family, known to have a role in adhesion/invasion in many bacterial species. The contribution of PIII in the membrane architecture and its role in the interaction with epithelial cells has never been investigated. Results We generated a ΔpIII knock-out mutant strain and evaluated the effects of the loss of PIII expression on bacterial morphology and on outer membrane composition. Deletion of the pIII gene does not cause any alteration in bacterial morphology or sensitivity to detergents. Moreover, the expression profile of the main membrane proteins remains the same for the wild-type and knock-out strains, with the exception of the NG1873 which is not exported to the outer membrane and accumulates in the inner membrane in the ΔpIII knock-out mutant strain. We also show that purified PIII protein is able to bind human cervical and urethral cells and that the ΔpIII knock-out mutant strain has a lower ability to adhere to human cervical and urethral cells. Conclusion Here we demonstrated that the PIII protein does not play a key structural role in the membrane organization of gonococcus and does not induce major effects on the expression of the main outer membrane proteins. However, in the PIII knock-out strain, the NG1873 protein is not localized in the outer membrane as it is in the wild-type strain suggesting a possible interaction of PIII with NG1873. The evidence that PIII binds to human epithelial cells derived from the female and male genital tract highlights a possible role of PIII

  1. Septal and lateral wall localization of PBP5, the major D,D-carboxypeptidase of Escherichia coli, requires substrate recognition and membrane attachment

    PubMed Central

    Potluri, Lakshmiprasad; Karczmarek, Aneta; Verheul, Jolanda; Piette, Andre; Wilkin, Jean-Marc; Werth, Nadine; Banzhaf, Manuel; Vollmer, Waldemar; Young, Kevin D; Nguyen-Distèche, Martine; den Blaauwen, Tanneke

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of PBP5, the major D,D-carboxypeptidase in Escherichia coli, was mapped by immunolabelling and by visualization of GFP fusion proteins in wild-type cells and in mutants lacking one or more D,D-carboxypeptidases. In addition to being scattered around the lateral envelope, PBP5 was also concentrated at nascent division sites prior to visible constriction. Inhibiting PBP2 activity (which eliminates wall elongation) shifted PBP5 to midcell, whereas inhibiting PBP3 (which aborts divisome invagination) led to the creation of PBP5 rings at positions of preseptal wall formation, implying that PBP5 localizes to areas of ongoing peptidoglycan synthesis. A PBP5(S44G) active site mutant was more evenly dispersed, indicating that localization required enzyme activity and the availability of pentapeptide substrates. Both the membrane bound and soluble forms of PBP5 converted pentapeptides to tetrapeptides in vitro and in vivo, and the enzymes accepted the same range of substrates, including sacculi, Lipid II, muropeptides and artificial substrates. However, only the membrane-bound form localized to the developing septum and restored wild-type rod morphology to shape defective mutants, suggesting that the two events are related. The results indicate that PBP5 localization to sites of ongoing peptidoglycan synthesis is substrate dependent and requires membrane attachment. PMID:20545860

  2. Cleavage of a rat serosal mast cell membrane component during degranulation mediated by chymase, a secretory granule protease.

    PubMed Central

    Schick, B

    1990-01-01

    Exogenous addition of purified chymase, a rat serosal mast cell (RSMC) chymotryptic enzyme, results in RSMC degranulation at 37 degrees, but not at 1 degree. Chymase can cause an active site-dependent inducing event at 1 degree such that RSMC degranulation occurs if the cells are later incubated at 37 degrees. RSMC exposed to chymase or other stimuli were surface radiolabelled using 125I and Iodo-Gen, solubilized with 1% Nonidet-40, and the resulting 25,000 g supernatants analysed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. A 125I-labelled RSMC membrane protein of approximate 90,000 MW decreased upon exposure to either chymase or alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT) for 5 min at 37 degrees or to chymase for 60 min at 1 degree. Exposure of RSMC to the secretagogues ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, and anti-IgE for 5 min at 37 degrees resulted in beta-hexosaminidase (a secretory granule enzyme) release, but did not cause a detectable change in the 90,000 MW surface-labelled protein. Lima bean trypsin inhibitor, which inhibits both the esterase and RSMC degranulation activities of chymase and alpha-CT, prevented the disappearance of the 125I-labelled 90,000 MW band when added with chymase or alpha-CT. Exposure of RSMC to chymase at 1 degree for 0-10 min, prior to addition of LBTI, led to a progressive disappearance of the 90,000 MW band, which corresponded to the kinetics of priming for subsequent RSMC degranulation at 37 degrees. When RSMC were exposed to trypsin (2.5 micrograms/ml) for 0-120 min at 1 degree, a progressive disappearance of the 90,000 MW band occurred, in association with a loss of sensitivity to subsequent activation by chymase at 37 degrees. The disappearance of the 90,000 MW determinant in association with chymase-mediated priming for degranulation and the inability of chymase to mediate degranulation of trypsin-treated RSMC, which lack this membrane protein, suggests that it is involved in chymase-mediated RSMC degranulation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

  3. Angiotensin 2 directly increases rabbit renal brush-border membrane sodium transport: Presence of local signal transduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Morduchowicz, G.A.; Sheikh-Hamad, D.; Dwyer, B.E.; Stern, N.; Jo, O.D.; Yanagawa, N. )

    1991-05-01

    In the present study, the authors have examined the direct actions of angiotensin II (AII) in rabbit renal brush border membrane (BBM) where binding sites for AII exist. Addition of AII (10(-11)-10(-7) M) was found to stimulate 22Na+ uptake by the isolated BBM vesicles directly. All did not affect the Na(+)-dependent BBM glucose uptake, and the effect of AII on BBM 22Na+ uptake was inhibited by amiloride, suggesting the involvement of Na+/H+ exchange mechanism. BBM proton permeability as assessed by acridine orange quenching was not affected by AII, indicating the direct effect of AII on Na+/H+ antiport system. In search of the signal transduction mechanism, it was found that AII activated BBM phospholipase A2 (PLA) and that BBM contains a 42-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G-protein) that underwent pertussis toxin (PTX)-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Addition of GTP potentiated, while GDP-beta S or PTX abolished, the effects of AII on BBM PLA and 22Na+ uptake, suggesting the involvement of G-protein in AII's actions. On the other hand, inhibition of PLA by mepacrine prevented AII's effect on BBM 22Na+ uptake, and activation of PLA by mellitin or addition of arachidonic acid similarly enhanced BBM 22Na+ uptake, suggesting the role of PLA activation in mediating AII's effect on BBM 22Na+ uptake. In summary, results of the present study show a direct stimulatory effect of AII on BBM Na+/H+ antiport system, and suggest the presence of a local signal transduction system involving G-protein mediated PLA activation.

  4. The HPV16 and MusPV1 papillomaviruses initially interact with distinct host components on the basement membrane

    PubMed Central

    Day, Patricia M.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2015-01-01

    To understand and compare the mechanisms of murine and human PV infection, we examined pseudovirion binding and infection of the newly described MusPV1 using the murine cervicovaginal challenge model. These analyses revealed primary tissue interactions distinct from those previously described for HPV16. Unlike HPV16, MusPV1 bound basement membrane (BM) in an HSPG-independent manner. Nevertheless, subsequent HSPG interactions were critical. L2 antibodies or low doses of VLP antibodies, sufficient to prevent infection, did not lead to disassociation of the MusPV1 pseudovirions from the BM, in contrast to previous findings with HPV16. Similarly, furin inhibition did not lead to loss of MusPV1 from the BM. Therefore, phylogenetically distant PV types that differ in their initial interactions with host attachment factors, but initiate their lifecycle on the acellular BM. Despite these differences, these distantly related PV types displayed similar intracellular trafficking patterns and susceptibilities to biochemical inhibition of infection. PMID:25771496

  5. The HPV16 and MusPV1 papillomaviruses initially interact with distinct host components on the basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Day, Patricia M; Thompson, Cynthia D; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2015-07-01

    To understand and compare the mechanisms of murine and human PV infection, we examined pseudovirion binding and infection of the newly described MusPV1 using the murine cervicovaginal challenge model. These analyses revealed primary tissue interactions distinct from those previously described for HPV16. Unlike HPV16, MusPV1 bound basement membrane (BM) in an HSPG-independent manner. Nevertheless, subsequent HSPG interactions were critical. L2 antibodies or low doses of VLP antibodies, sufficient to prevent infection, did not lead to disassociation of the MusPV1 pseudovirions from the BM, in contrast to previous findings with HPV16. Similarly, furin inhibition did not lead to loss of MusPV1 from the BM. Therefore, phylogenetically distant PV types differ in their initial interactions with host attachment factors, but initiate their lifecycle on the acellular BM. Despite these differences, these distantly related PV types displayed similar intracellular trafficking patterns and susceptibilities to biochemical inhibition of infection. PMID:25771496

  6. Membrane Binding and Subcellular Localization of Retroviral Gag Proteins Are Differentially Regulated by MA Interactions with Phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-Bisphosphate and RNA

    PubMed Central

    Inlora, Jingga; Collins, David R.; Trubin, Marc E.; Chung, Ji Yeon J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The matrix (MA) domain of HIV-1 mediates proper Gag localization and membrane binding via interaction with a plasma-membrane (PM)-specific acidic phospholipid, phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. HIV-1 MA also interacts with RNA, which prevents Gag from binding to membranes containing phosphatidylserine, a prevalent cellular acidic phospholipid. These results suggest that the MA-bound RNA promotes PM-specific localization of HIV-1 Gag by blocking nonspecific interactions with cellular membranes that do not contain PI(4,5)P2. To examine whether PI(4,5)P2 dependence and RNA-mediated inhibition collectively determine MA phenotypes across a broad range of retroviruses and elucidate the significance of their interrelationships, we compared a panel of Gag-leucine zipper constructs (GagLZ) containing MA of different retroviruses. We found that in vitro membrane binding of GagLZ via HIV-1 MA and Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) MA is both PI(4,5)P2 dependent and susceptible to RNA-mediated inhibition. The PM-specific localization and virus-like particle (VLP) release of these GagLZ proteins are severely impaired by overexpression of a PI(4,5)P2-depleting enzyme, polyphosphoinositide 5-phosphatase IV (5ptaseIV). In contrast, membrane binding of GagLZ constructs that contain human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) MA, murine leukemia virus (MLV) MA, and human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) MA is PI(4,5)P2 independent and not blocked by RNA. The PM localization and VLP release of these GagLZ chimeras were much less sensitive to 5ptaseIV expression. Notably, single amino acid substitutions that confer a large basic patch rendered HTLV-1 MA susceptible to the RNA-mediated block, suggesting that RNA readily blocks MA containing a large basic patch, such as HIV-1 and RSV MA. Further analyses of these MA mutants suggest a possibility that HIV-1 and RSV MA acquired PI(4,5)P2 dependence to alleviate the membrane binding block imposed by RNA. PMID:25491356

  7. Segregative clustering of Lo and Ld membrane microdomains induced by local pH gradients in GM1-containing giant vesicles: a lipid model for cellular polarization.

    PubMed

    Staneva, Galya; Puff, Nicolas; Seigneuret, Michel; Conjeaud, Hélène; Angelova, Miglena I

    2012-11-27

    Several cell polarization processes are coupled to local pH gradients at the membrane surface. We have investigated the involvement of a lipid-mediated effect in such coupling. The influence of lateral pH gradients along the membrane surface on lipid microdomain dynamics in giant unilamellar vesicles containing phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and the ganglioside GM1 was studied. Lo/Ld phase separation was generated by photosensitization. A lateral pH gradient was established along the external membrane surface by acid local microinjection. The gradient promotes the segregation of microdomains: Lo domains within an Ld phase move toward the higher pH side, whereas Ld domains within an Lo phase move toward the lower pH side. This results in a polarization of the vesicle membrane into Lo and Ld phases poles in the axis of the proton source. A secondary effect is inward tubulation in the Ld phase. None of these processes occurs without GM1 or with the analog asialo-GM1. These are therefore related to the acidic character of the GM1 headgroup. LAURDAN fluorescence experiments on large unilamellar vesicles indicated that, with GM1, an increase in lipid packing occurs with decreasing pH, attributed to the lowering of repulsion between GM1 molecules. Packing increase is much higher for Ld phase vesicles than for Lo phase vesicles. It is proposed that the driving forces for domain vectorial segregative clustering and vesicle polarization are related to such differences in packing variations with pH decrease between the Lo and Ld phases. Such pH-driven domain clustering might play a role in cellular membrane polarization processes in which local lateral pH gradients are known to be important, such as migrating cells and epithelial cells. PMID:23121205

  8. Localization of polyamine enhancement of protein synthesis to subcellular components of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim.

    PubMed Central

    Rosano, C L; Bunce, S C; Hurwitz, C

    1983-01-01

    At 5 mM Mg2+, spermidine stimulation of polyphenylalanine synthesis by cell-free extracts of Escherichia coli was found to be about 30 times greater than that by extracts of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim, a unique organism which lacks detectable levels of spermidine. By means of reconstitution experiments, the target of spermidine stimulation was localized to the protein fraction of the highspeed supernatant component (S-100) of E. coli and was absent from, or deficient in, the S-100 fraction of Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim. The spermidine stimulation did not appear to be due to the presence in the E. coli S-100 fraction of ribosomal protein S1, elongation factors, or E. coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. The failure to observe spermidine stimulation by the Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim S-100 fraction was also not due to a spermidine-enhanced polyuridylic acid degradation. The synthesis of polyphenylalanine by Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was stimulated by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine to a greater degree than was synthesis by E. coli extracts. The enhancement by putrescine and by S-(+)-2-hydroxyputrescine with Pseudomonas sp. strain Kim extracts was found to be due to effects on its ribosomes. PMID:6336736

  9. Study of a membrane bioreactor with glass fiber flat grille modules and the modules' optimization based on the local critical flux theory.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Dongdong; Fan, Yaobo; Yu, Yan; Xu, Guoliang; Yang, Wenjing; Wu, Guangxia

    2010-02-01

    A novel flat grille membrane module using inorganic glass fibers as filter media is proposed for use in a membrane bioreactor for wastewater treatment. A model which integrates the concepts of back transport velocity, spatial local critical flux and temporal variation of the local flux has been developed. The membrane module was optimized based on experimental results and calculations using the model. The optimized parameters include the volume ratio of membrane solution for the surface modification of glass fibers, the fiber inner diameter and fiber length. The optimal values were 1:2 and 5mm respectively but the length had little effect on the performance of the module. The critical time was then calculated with the model and an equation developed. The result was in very good agreement with the observed one. Finally, the performance of the glass fiber MBR was monitored. The effluent quality and stability of the system were comparable to that of conventional MBRs. This MBR will be a promising technique for wastewater treatment given its low cost, high strength and good effluent quality. PMID:19913276

  10. PilF Is an Outer Membrane Lipoprotein Required for Multimerization and Localization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pilus Secretin

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, J.; Tammam, S; Ku, S; Samplaeanu, L; Burrows, L; Howell, P

    2008-01-01

    Type IV pili (T4P) are retractile appendages that contribute to the virulence of bacterial pathogens. PilF is a Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipoprotein that is essential for T4P biogenesis. Phenotypic characterization of a pilF mutant confirmed that T4P-mediated functions are abrogated: T4P were no longer present on the cell surface, twitching motility was abolished, and the mutant was resistant to infection by T4P retraction-dependent bacteriophage. The results of cellular fractionation studies indicated that PilF is the outer membrane pilotin required for the localization and multimerization of the secretin, PilQ. Mutation of the putative PilF lipidation site untethered the protein from the outer membrane, causing secretin assembly in both inner and outer membranes. T4P-mediated twitching motility and bacteriophage susceptibility were moderately decreased in the lipidation site mutant, while cell surface piliation was substantially reduced. The tethering of PilF to the outer membrane promotes the correct localization of PilQ and appears to be required for the formation of stable T4P. Our 2.0-A structure of PilF revealed a superhelical arrangement of six tetratricopeptide protein-protein interaction motifs that may mediate the contacts with PilQ during secretin assembly. An alignment of pseudomonad PilF sequences revealed three highly conserved surfaces that may be involved in PilF function.

  11. Plasma Membrane Localization Is Essential for Oryza sativa Pto-Interacting Protein 1a-Mediated Negative Regulation of Immune Signaling in Rice1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Hidenori; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Hamada, Satoshi; Shimamoto, Ko; Nomura, Yuko; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Akira; Hirochika, Hirohiko

    2014-01-01

    Oryza sativa Pto-interacting protein 1a (OsPti1a), an ortholog of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) SlPti1, functions as a negative regulator of innate immunity in rice (Oryza sativa). In ospti1a mutants, the activation of immune responses, including hypersensitive response-like cell death, is caused by loss of the OsPti1a protein; however, it is as yet unclear how OsPti1a suppresses immune responses. Here, we report that OsPti1a localizes to detergent-resistant membrane fractions of the plasma membrane through lipid modification of the protein’s amino terminus, which is highly conserved among Pti1 orthologs in several plant species. Importantly, mislocalization of OsPti1a after deletion of its amino terminus reduced its ability to complement the mutant phenotypes, including hypersensitive response-like cell death. Furthermore, complex formation of OsPti1a depends on its amino terminus-mediated membrane localization. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis of OsPti1a complex-interacting proteins identified several defense-related proteins. Collectively, these findings indicate that appropriate complex formation by OsPti1a at the plasma membrane is required for the negative regulation of plant immune responses in rice. PMID:24958714

  12. Local-global conformational coupling in a heptahelical membrane protein: transport mechanism from crystal structures of the nine states in the bacteriorhodopsin photocycle.

    PubMed

    Lanyi, Janos K; Schobert, Brigitte

    2004-01-13

    Proton pumps utilize a chemical or photochemical reaction to create pH and electrical gradients between the interior and the exterior of cells and organelles that energize ATP synthesis and the accumulation and extrusion of solutes and ions. G-protein coupled receptors bind agonists and assume signaling states that communicate with the coupled transducers. How these two kinds of proteins convert chemical potential to a proton transmembrane electrochemical potential or a signal are the great questions in structural membrane biology, and they may have a common answer. Bacteriorhodopsin, a particularly simple integral membrane protein, functions as a proton pump but has a heptahelical structure like membrane receptors. Crystallographic structures are now available for all of the intermediates of the bacteriorhodopsin transport cycle, and they describe the proton translocation mechanism, step by step and in atomic detail. The results show how local conformational changes propagate upon the gradual relaxation of the initially twisted photoisomerized retinal toward the two membrane surfaces. Such local-global conformational coupling between the ligand-binding site and the distant regions of the protein may be the shared mechanism of ion pumps and G-protein related receptors. PMID:14705925

  13. Different components of /sup 3/H-imipramine binding in rat brain membranes: relation to serotonin uptake sites

    SciTech Connect

    Gobbi, M.; Taddei, C.; Mennini, T.

    1988-01-01

    In the present paper, the authors confirm and extend previous studies showing heterogeneous /sup 3/H-imipramine (/sup 3/H-IMI) binding sites. Inhibition curves of various drugs (serotonin, imipramine, desmethyl-imipramine, d-fenfluramine, d-norfenfluramine and indalpine, a potent serotonin uptake inhibitor) obtained using 2 nM /sup 3/H-IMI and in presence of 120 mM NaCl, confirmed the presence of at least three /sup 3/H-IMI binding sites: two of these were serotonin-insensitive while the third one was selectively inhibited by serotonin and indalpine with nanomolar affinities. Moreover this last component was found to be selectively modulated by chronic imipramine treatment thus suggesting a close relation to serontonin uptake mechanism. These data indicate that the use of a more selective inhibitors of the serotonin-sensitive component (like indalpine or serotonin itself) to define non specific /sup 3/H-IMI, may be of help in understanding its relation with serotonin uptake system. 22 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  14. A soluble alkaline phosphatase from Bacillus licheniformis MC14. Histochemical localization, purification, characterization and comparison with the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Hansa, J G; Laporta, M; Kuna, M A; Reimschuessel, R; Hulett, F M

    1981-02-13

    Growth conditions affect the quantity and distribution of alkaline phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (alkaline optimum), EC 3.1.3.1) in Bacillus licheniformis MC14. The soluble alkaline phosphatase, which has been found in biochemical localization studies between the cell wall and cell membrane (Glynn, J.A., Schaffel, S.D., McNicholas, J.M. and Hulett, F.M. (1977) J. Bacteriol. 129, 1010-1019), was localized via electron microscope histochemistry in cells cultured under conditions which result in increased quantities of this activity. This soluble alkaline phosphatase was stabilized with 20% glycerol and purified to homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate(SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The purified enzyme is soluble in dilute buffer. This soluble alkaline phosphatase has been characterized and compared to the membrane-associated alkaline phosphatase from this organism. PMID:6783099

  15. Investigation of Local Environments in Nafion-SiO2 Composite Membranes used in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakumar, M.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2012-04-01

    The proton conducting polymer composite membranes are of technological interest in many energy devices such as fuel cells and redox flow batteries. In particular, the polymer composite membranes such as SiO2 incorporated Nafion membranes are recently reported as highly promising for the redox flow batteries. However, there is conflicting reports regarding the performance of this Nafion-SiO2 composite membrane in the redox flow cell. This paper presents results of the analysis of the Nafion-SiO2 composite membrane used in a vanadium redox flow battery by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. The XPS study reveals the chemical identity and environment of vanadium cations accumulated at the surface. On the other hand, the 19F and 29Si NMR measurement explores the nature of the interaction between the silica particles, Nafion side chains and diffused vanadium cations. The 29Si NMR shows that the silica particles interaction via hydrogen bonds to the sulfonic groups of Nafion and diffused vanadium cations. Based on these spectroscopic studies, the chemical environment of the silica particles inside the Nafion membrane and their interaction with diffusing vanadium cations during flow cell operations are discussed. This study discusses the origin of performance degradation of the Nafion-SiO2 composite membrane materials in vanadium redox flow batteries.

  16. Investigation of local environments in Nafion-SiO(2) composite membranes used in vanadium redox flow batteries.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, M; Schwenzer, Birgit; Kim, Soowhan; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, S; Liu, Jun; Graff, Gordon L; Hu, Jianzhi

    2012-04-01

    Proton conducting polymer composite membranes are of technological interest in many energy devices such as fuel cells and redox flow batteries. In particular, polymer composite membranes, such as SiO(2) incorporated Nafion membranes, are recently reported as highly promising for the use in redox flow batteries. However, there is conflicting reports regarding the performance of this type of Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane in the redox flow cell. This paper presents results of the analysis of the Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane used in a vanadium redox flow battery by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. The XPS study reveals the chemical identity and environment of vanadium cations accumulated at the surface. On the other hand, the (19)F and (29)Si NMR measurement explores the nature of the interaction between the silica particles, Nafion side chains and diffused vanadium cations. The (29)Si NMR shows that the silica particles interact via hydrogen bonds with the sulfonic groups of Nafion and the diffused vanadium cations. Based on these spectroscopic studies, the chemical environment of the silica particles inside the Nafion membrane and their interaction with diffusing vanadium cations during flow cell operations are discussed. This study discusses the origin of performance degradation of the Nafion-SiO(2) composite membrane materials in vanadium redox flow batteries. PMID:22192576

  17. A microRNA from infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus modulates expression of the virus-mock basement membrane component VP08R.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muting; He, Jianhui; Zhu, Weibin; Zhang, Jing; Xia, Qiong; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Xu, Xiaopeng

    2016-05-01

    Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) is the type species of the genus Megalocytivirus, family Iridoviridae. Infection of ISKNV is characterized by a unique pathological phenomenon in that the infected cells are attached by lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). ISKNV mediates the formation of a virus-mock basement membrane (VMBM) structure on the surface of infected cells to provide attaching sites for LECs. The viral protein VP08R is an important component of VMBM. In this study, a novel ISKNV-encoded microRNA, temporarily named ISKNV-miR-1, was identified. ISKNV-miR-1 is complementary to the VP08R-coding sequence and can modulate VP08R expression through reducing its mRNA level. This suggests that formation of VMBM may be under fine regulation by ISKNV. PMID:26896933

  18. A Stochastic System with Infinite Interacting Components to Model the Time Evolution of the Membrane Potentials of a Population of Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaginuma, K.

    2016-05-01

    We consider a new class of interacting particle systems with a countable number of interacting components. The system represents the time evolution of the membrane potentials of an infinite set of interacting neurons. We prove the existence and uniqueness of the process, using a perfect simulation procedure. We show that this algorithm is successful, that is, we show that the number of steps of the algorithm is almost surely finite. We also construct a perfect simulation procedure for the coupling of a process with a finite number of neurons and the process with an infinite number of neurons. As a consequence, we obtain an upper bound for the error that we make when sampling from a finite set of neurons instead of the infinite set of neurons.

  19. TOM22, a core component of the mitochondria outer membrane protein translocation pore, is a mitochondrial receptor for the proapoptotic protein Bax.

    PubMed

    Bellot, G; Cartron, P-F; Er, E; Oliver, L; Juin, P; Armstrong, L C; Bornstein, P; Mihara, K; Manon, S; Vallette, F M

    2007-04-01

    The association of Bax with mitochondria is an essential step in the implementation of apoptosis. By using a bacterial two-hybrid assay and crosslinking strategies, we have identified TOM22, a component of the translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM), as a mitochondrial receptor of Bax. Peptide mapping showed that the interaction of Bax with TOM22 involved the first alpha helix of Bax and possibly two central alpha helices, which are homologous to the pore forming domains of some toxins. Antibodies directed against TOM22 or an antisense knockdown of the expression of TOM22 specifically inhibited the association of Bax with mitochondria and prevented Bax-dependent apoptosis. In yeast, a haploid strain for TOM22 exhibited a decreased expression of TOM22 and mitochondrial association of ectopically expressed human Bax. Our data provide a new perspective on the mechanism of association of Bax with mitochondria as it involves a classical import pathway. PMID:17096026

  20. Comparative proteomics reveals novel components at the plasma membrane of differentiated HepaRG cells and different distribution in hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells.

    PubMed

    Petrareanu, Catalina; Macovei, Alina; Sokolowska, Izabela; Woods, Alisa G; Lazar, Catalin; Radu, Gabriel L; Darie, Costel C; Branza-Nichita, Norica

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a human pathogen causing severe liver disease and eventually death. Despite important progress in deciphering HBV internalization, the early virus-cell interactions leading to infection are not known. HepaRG is a human bipotent liver cell line bearing the unique ability to differentiate towards a mixture of hepatocyte- and biliary-like cells. In addition to expressing metabolic functions normally found in liver, differentiated HepaRG cells support HBV infection in vitro, thus resembling cultured primary hepatocytes more than other hepatoma cells. Therefore, extensive characterization of the plasma membrane proteome from HepaRG cells would allow the identification of new cellular factors potentially involved in infection. Here we analyzed the plasma membranes of non-differentiated and differentiated HepaRG cells using nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the differences between the proteomes and the changes that lead to differentiation of these cells. We followed up on differentially-regulated proteins in hepatocytes- and biliary-like cells, focusing on Cathepsins D and K, Cyclophilin A, Annexin 1/A1, PDI and PDI A4/ERp72. Major differences between the two proteomes were found, including differentially regulated proteins, protein-protein interactions and intracellular localizations following differentiation. The results advance our current understanding of HepaRG differentiation and the unique properties of these cells. PMID:23977166

  1. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-02-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling.

  2. Membrane-associated proteomics of chickpea identifies Sad1/UNC-84 protein (CaSUN1), a novel component of dehydration signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Poonam; Subba, Pratigya; Rathi, Divya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration affects almost all the physiological processes including those that result in the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which in turn elicits a highly conserved signaling, the unfolded protein response (UPR). We investigated the dehydration-responsive membrane-associated proteome of a legume, chickpea, by 2-DE coupled with mass spectrometry. A total of 184 protein spots were significantly altered over a dehydration treatment of 120 h. Among the differentially expressed proteins, a non-canonical SUN domain protein, designated CaSUN1 (Cicer arietinum Sad1/UNC-84), was identified. CaSUN1 localized to the nuclear membrane and ER, besides small vacuolar vesicles. The transcripts were downregulated by both abiotic and biotic stresses, but not by abscisic acid treatment. Overexpression of CaSUN1 conferred stress tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Furthermore, functional complementation of the yeast mutant, slp1, could rescue its growth defects. We propose that the function of CaSUN1 in stress response might be regulated via UPR signaling. PMID:24577507

  3. [The effect of ionizing radiation in a wide dosage range on the structural-functional characteristics of the protein and lipid components of erythrocyte plasma membranes].

    PubMed

    Zima, G V; Dreval', V I

    2000-01-01

    The erythrocyte ghosts were irradiated with doses of 4 x 10(-3) Gy-10(3) Gy. Changes in the membrane lipid microviscosity, membrane proteins' structural mobility, membrane surface potential and intensity of the lipid peroxidation processes were determined. It has been established that the features of membrane structural changes are characterised, by polyphase changes of examined parameters. PMID:10907401

  4. A Conserved Functional Domain of Drosophila Coracle Is Required for Localization at the Septate Junction and Has Membrane-organizing Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ward IV, Robert E.; Lamb, Rebecca S.; Fehon, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    The protein 4.1 superfamily is comprised of a diverse group of cytoplasmic proteins, many of which have been shown to associate with the plasma membrane via binding to specific transmembrane proteins. Coracle, a Drosophila protein 4.1 homologue, is required during embryogenesis and is localized to the cytoplasmic face of the septate junction in epithelial cells. Using in vitro mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the amino-terminal 383 amino acids of Coracle define a functional domain that is both necessary and sufficient for proper septate junction localization in transgenic embryos. Genetic mutations within this domain disrupt the subcellular localization of Coracle and severely affect its genetic function, indicating that correct subcellular localization is essential for Coracle function. Furthermore, the localization of Coracle and the transmembrane protein Neurexin to the septate junction display an interdependent relationship, suggesting that Coracle and Neurexin interact with one another at the cytoplasmic face of the septate junction. Consistent with this notion, immunoprecipitation and in vitro binding studies demonstrate that the amino-terminal 383 amino acids of Coracle and cytoplasmic domain of Neurexin interact directly. Together these results indicate that Coracle provides essential membrane-organizing functions at the septate junction, and that these functions are carried out by an amino-terminal domain that is conserved in all protein 4.1 superfamily members. PMID:9508778

  5. Modeling of membrane processes for air revitalization and water recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Kevin E.; Foerg, Sandra L.; Dall-Bauman, Liese A.

    1992-01-01

    Gas-separation and reverse-osmosis membrane models are being developed in conjunction with membrane testing at NASA JSC. The completed gas-separation membrane model extracts effective component permeabilities from multicomponent test data, and predicts the effects of flow configuration, operating conditions, and membrane dimensions on module performance. Variable feed- and permeate-side pressures are considered. The model has been applied to test data for hollow-fiber membrane modules with simulated cabin-air feeds. Results are presented for a membrane designed for air drying applications. Extracted permeabilities are used to predict the effect of operating conditions on water enrichment in the permeate. A first-order reverse-osmosis model has been applied to test data for spiral wound membrane modules with a simulated hygiene water feed. The model estimates an effective local component rejection coefficient under pseudosteady-state conditions. Results are used to define requirements for a detailed reverse-osmosis model.

  6. Evidence for basolateral but not apical membrane localization of outwardly rectifying depolarization-induced Cl(-) channel in airway epithelia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T H; Lee, H J; Lee, N K; Choi, Y C

    2000-08-01

    The rat primary cultured-airway monolayer had been an excellent model for deciphering the ion channel after nystatin permeabilization of its basolateral or apical membrane (Hwang et al., 1996). After apical membrane permeabilization of rat primary cultured-airway monolayer, 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2, 2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)-sensitive outwardly rectifying depolarization-induced Cl(-) (BORDIC) currents were observed across the basolateral membrane in symmetrical NMG-Cl solution in this study. No significant Cl(-) current induced by the application of voltage clamping was observed across the apical membrane in symmetrical NMG-Cl solution after basolateral membrane permeabilization. The halide permeability sequence for BORDIC current was Br(-) = I(-) > Cl(-). BORDIC current was not affected by basolaterally applied bumetanide (0.5 mm). Basolateral DIDS (0.2 mm) but not apical DIDS inhibited CFTR mediated short-circuit current (I(sc)) in an intact monolayer of rat airway epithelia, a T84 human colonal epithelial cell line, and a Calu-3 human airway epithelial cell line. This is the first report showing that depolarization induced Cl(-) current is present on the basolateral membrane of airway epithelia. PMID:10931973

  7. Using local biodiversity to prevent pollution transfers to environmental components of a Mediterranean semi-arid ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckenroth, Alma; Rabier, Jacques; Laffont-Schwob, Isabelle

    2014-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid Mediterranean coastal areas, metals and metalloids (MM) pollution coming from unreclaimed brownfields has increased the negative environmental stresses leading to ecosystems degradations as soil erosion and losses of organic matter and biodiversity. On these sites, maintaining or restoring a local vegetation cover is considered as a key step to stop the degradation cycle. Furthermore, in a context of high pollution occurring in natural areas, phytoremediation is considered as an attractive alternative to conventional soil remediation techniques, the first reducing pollution transfers, improving the soil quality. In protected or natural areas, it is also important to perceive then design phytoremediation as a way to assist ecosystems recovery, using the restoration ecology concepts. However, only few works in the literature deal with the potential use of native Mediterranean plant species for phytoremediation. On the South-East coast of Marseille (France), the activity of the former smelting factory of l'Escalette, ceased since 1925. However, its brownfield is still a source of pollution by trace metals and metalloids for abiotic and biotic components of the surrounding massif. This massif hosts a rich biodiversity with rare and protected plant species despite the metallic pollution and this area has been included in the recently created first peri-urban French National Park of Calanques. In this context, an integrated research project is being conducted with local actors and stakeholders, from the selection of native plant species, assessment and optimization of phytostabilization capacities of selected species, to the development of ecological engineering techniques well adapted to local constraints and phytostabilization field trials. The first part of this study has been conducted on two areas, corresponding to different pollution pattern, plant communities and environmental drivers: a halophytic area, characterized by typical coastal

  8. Chronic growth hormone treatment in normal rats reduces post-prandial skeletal muscle plasma membrane GLUT1 content, but not glucose transport or GLUT4 expression and localization.

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, R; Cittadini, A; Chow, J C; Hirshman, M F; Smith, R J; Douglas, P S; Horton, E S

    1996-01-01

    Whether skeletal muscle glucose transport system is impaired in the basal, post-prandial state during chronic growth hormone treatment is unknown. The current study was designed to determine whether 4 weeks of human growth hormone (hGH) treatment (3.5 mg/kg per day) would impair glucose transport and/or the number of glucose transporters in plasma membrane vesicles isolated from hindlimb skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats under basal, post-prandial conditions. hGH treatment was shown to have no effect on glucose influx (Vmax or K(m)) determined under equilibrium exchange conditions in isolated plasma membrane vesicles. Plasma membrane glucose transporter number (Ro) measured by cytochalasin B binding was also unchanged by hGH treatment. Consequently, glucose transporter turnover number (Vmax/Ro), a measure of average glucose transporter intrinsic activity, was similar in hGH-treated and control rats. hGH did not change GLUT4 protein content in whole muscle or in the plasma membrane, and muscle content of GLUT4 mRNA also was unchanged. In contrast, GLUT1 protein content in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly reduced by hGH treatment. This was associated with a modest, although not significant, decrease in muscle content of GLUT1 mRNA. In conclusion, high-dose hGH treatment for 4 weeks did not alter post-prandial skeletal muscle glucose transport activity. Neither the muscle level nor the intracellular localization of GLUT4 was changed by the hormone treatment. On the contrary, the basal post-prandial level of GLUT1 in the plasma membrane was reduced by hGH. The mRNA data suggest that this reduction might result from a decrease in the synthesis of GLUT1. PMID:8645183

  9. Regulation of plasma membrane localization of the Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp) by hyperosmolarity and tauroursodeoxycholate.

    PubMed

    Sommerfeld, Annika; Mayer, Patrick G K; Cantore, Miriam; Häussinger, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    In perfused rat liver, hepatocyte shrinkage induces a Fyn-dependent retrieval of the bile salt export pump (Bsep) and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) from the canalicular membrane (Cantore, M., Reinehr, R., Sommerfeld, A., Becker, M., and Häussinger, D. (2011) J. Biol. Chem. 286, 45014-45029) leading to cholestasis. However little is known about the effects of hyperosmolarity on short term regulation of the Na(+)-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (Ntcp), the major bile salt uptake system at the sinusoidal membrane of hepatocytes. The aim of this study was to analyze hyperosmotic Ntcp regulation and the underlying signaling events. Hyperosmolarity induced a significant retrieval of Ntcp from the basolateral membrane, which was accompanied by an activating phosphorylation of the Src kinases Fyn and Yes but not of c-Src. Hyperosmotic internalization of Ntcp was sensitive to SU6656 and PP-2, suggesting that Fyn mediates Ntcp retrieval from the basolateral membrane. Hyperosmotic internalization of Ntcp was also found in livers from wild-type mice but not in p47(phox) knock-out mice. Tauroursodeoxycholate (TUDC) and cAMP reversed hyperosmolarity-induced Fyn activation and triggered re-insertion of the hyperosmotically retrieved Ntcp into the membrane. This was associated with dephosphorylation of the Ntcp on serine residues. Insertion of Ntcp by TUDC was sensitive to the integrin inhibitory hexapeptide GRGDSP and inhibition of protein kinase A. TUDC also reversed the hyperosmolarity-induced retrieval of bile salt export pump from the canalicular membrane. These findings suggest a coordinated and oxidative stress- and Fyn-dependent retrieval of sinusoidal and canalicular bile salt transport systems from the corresponding membranes. Ntcp insertion was also identified as a novel target of β1-integrin-dependent TUDC action, which is frequently used in the treatment of cholestatic liver disease. PMID:26306036

  10. 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein related protein (P70R/ABCD4) localizes to endoplasmic reticulum not peroxisomes, and NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic property determines the subcellular localization of ABC subfamily D proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwayama, Yoshinori; Seki, Midori; Yasui, Akina; Murasaki, Yoshiyuki; Morita, Masashi; Yamashita, Yukari; Sakaguchi, Masao; Tanaka, Yoshitaka; Imanaka, Tsuneo

    2009-01-15

    70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein related protein (P70R/ABCD4) is a member of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein subfamily D. ABC subfamily D proteins are also known as peroxisomal ABC proteins. Therefore, P70R is thought to be a peroxisomal membrane protein. However, the subcellular localization of P70R is not extensively investigated. In this study, we transiently expressed P70R in fusion with HA (P70R-HA) in CHO cells and examined subcellular localization by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, P70R-HA was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), not to peroxisomes. To examine the ER-targeting property of P70R, we expressed various NH{sub 2}-terminal deletion constructs of P70R. Among the NH{sub 2}-terminal deletion constructs, mutant proteins starting with hydrophobic transmembrane segment (TMS) were localized to ER, but the ones containing the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophilic cytosolic domain were not. ABC subfamily D proteins destined for peroxisomes have NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophilic region adjacent to TMS1. However, only P70R lacks the region and is translated with NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic TMS1. Furthermore, attachment of the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophilic domain to the NH{sub 2}-terminus of P70R excluded P70R from the ER-targeting pathway. These data suggest that P70R resides in the ER but not the peroxisomal membranes, and the hydrophobic property of NH{sub 2}-terminal region determines the subcellular localization of ABC subfamily D proteins.

  11. Rho2 Palmitoylation Is Required for Plasma Membrane Localization and Proper Signaling to the Fission Yeast Cell Integrity Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Mir, Laura; Franco, Alejandro; Martín-García, Rebeca; Madrid, Marisa; Vicente-Soler, Jero; Soto, Teresa; Gacto, Mariano; Pérez, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    The fission yeast small GTPase Rho2 regulates morphogenesis and is an upstream activator of the cell integrity pathway, whose key element, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Pmk1, becomes activated by multiple environmental stimuli and controls several cellular functions. Here we demonstrate that farnesylated Rho2 becomes palmitoylated in vivo at cysteine-196 within its carboxyl end and that this modification allows its specific targeting to the plasma membrane. Unlike that of other palmitoylated and prenylated GTPases, the Rho2 control of morphogenesis and Pmk1 activity is strictly dependent upon plasma membrane localization and is not found in other cellular membranes. Indeed, artificial plasma membrane targeting bypassed the Rho2 need for palmitoylation in order to signal. Detailed functional analysis of Rho2 chimeras fused to the carboxyl end from the essential GTPase Rho1 showed that GTPase palmitoylation is partially dependent on the prenylation context and confirmed that Rho2 signaling is independent of Rho GTP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) function. We further demonstrate that Rho2 is an in vivo substrate for DHHC family acyltransferase Erf2 palmitoyltransferase. Remarkably, Rho3, another Erf2 target, negatively regulates Pmk1 activity in a Rho2-independent fashion, thus revealing the existence of cross talk whereby both GTPases antagonistically modulate the activity of this MAPK cascade. PMID:24820419

  12. Localization of Pom121 to the inner nuclear membrane is required for an early step of interphase nuclear pore complex assembly

    PubMed Central

    Funakoshi, Tomoko; Clever, Michaela; Watanabe, Ai; Imamoto, Naoko

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is a large protein assembly that mediates molecular trafficking between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. NPCs assemble twice during the cell cycle in metazoans: postmitosis and during interphase. In this study, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) in conjunction with a cell fusion–based NPC assembly assay, we demonstrated that pore membrane protein (Pom)121, a vertebrate-specific integral membrane nucleoporin, is indispensable for an early step in interphase NPC assembly. Functional domain analysis of Pom121 showed that its nuclear localization signals, which bind to importin β via importin α and likely function with RanGTP, play an essential role in targeting Pom121 to the interphase NPC. Furthermore, a region of Pom121 that interacts with the inner nuclear membrane (INM) and lamin B receptor was found to be crucial for its NPC targeting. Based on these findings and on evidence that Pom121 localizes at the INM in the absence of a complete NPC structure, we propose that the nuclear migration of Pom121 and its subsequent interaction with INM proteins are required to initiate interphase NPC assembly. Our data also suggest, for the first time, the importance of the INM as a seeding site for “prepores” during interphase NPC assembly. PMID:21289085

  13. Effect of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) infection of nasal mucosa epithelial cells on integrin alpha 6 and on different components of the basement membrane.

    PubMed

    Bannazadeh Baghi, Hossein; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory mucosa is the common port of entry of equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) and several other alphaherpesviruses. An important prerequisite for successful host invasion of the virus is to cross the epithelial cell layer and the underlying basement membrane barrier. In the present study, an analysis was performed to see if an EHV-1 infection of nasal mucosa epithelial cells leads to damage of the underlying extracellular matrix proteins. Nasal mucosa explants were inoculated with EHV-1 and collected at 0, 24 and 48 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Then, double immunofluorescence staining was performed to detect viral-antigen-positive cells on the one hand and integrin alpha 6, laminin, collagen IV and collagen VII on the other hand. The area of these extracellular matrix proteins was measured in regions of interest (ROIs) at a magnification of 200X by means of the software imaging system ImageJ. ROIs were defined beneath uninfected and infected regions. In uninfected regions, 22-28 % of the ROI was stained for integrin alpha 6, 18-37 % for laminin, 14-38 % for collagen IV and 18-26 % for collagen VII. In infected regions, the percentage positive for integrin alpha 6 was significantly decreased to 0.1-9 % and 0.1-6 % after 24 and 48 hours of inoculation, respectively. Infection did not alter the percentages for laminin and collagen IV. For collagen VII, an increase in the percentage (from 18-26 % to 28-39 %) could be observed underneath EHV-1-infected plaques at 48 hours of inoculation. In conclusion, the results revealed a substantial impact of EHV-1 infection on integrin alpha 6 and collagen VII, two important components of the extracellular matrix, which are associated with the basement membrane and may facilitate virus penetration via hijacked leukocytes to underlying tissues. PMID:26497179

  14. Preliminary comparison of different immune and production components in local and imported Saanen goats reared under a sub-tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Elie K; Itani, Houssam H; Sleiman, Fawwak T; Saade, Maya F; Harakeh, Steve; Nour, Afif M Abdel; Shaib, Houssam A

    2012-01-01

    Three objectives were included in this research work. The first objective compared different immune components in healthy mature males, mature females, and female kids of local and imported Saanen goats, reared under a sub-tropical environment. The significantly differing immune components were the blood monocyte percent, blood CD8 count, and the total white blood cell count. The second objective compared the performance of Saanen versus local does. The means of the milk yield and prolificacy of the imported Saanen does were significantly higher than those of the local does (p<0.05). The third objective compared the immune responses (hemagglutination-HA titers) and complement fixation (CF) titers in mature does of the two breeds to chicken red blood cells (c-RBC). The HA titers showed a significant seroconversion only in imported Saanen (p<0.05) but not in local does; however, the CF titers increased significantly at 4 weeks following priming with c-RBC in local (p<0.05) but not in the imported Saanen does. The impact of the differences in blood immune components and responses to antigens in the compared goats on protection potential against prevalent diseases in the sub-tropical zone of the eastern Mediterranean countries is discussed. PMID:21720787

  15. Independent component analysis for three-dimensional optical imaging and localization of a fluorescent contrast agent target embedded in a slab of ex vivo human breast tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrubaiee, M.; Xu, M.; Gayen, S. K.; Alfano, R. R.

    2005-08-01

    An innovative approach for three-dimensional localization and characterization of a fluorescent target embedded in a turbid medium is presented. The target was a ~4-mm diameter glass sphere with a solution of indocyanine green placed within a 50-mm thick tissuelike phantom with mean free path of ~1-mm at 784-nm and a ~ 26-mm thick ex vivo breast tissue slab. The experimental approach uses a multi-source illumination, and a multi-detector signal acquisition scheme. An analysis scheme based on the independent component analysis from information theory is used for target localization and characterization. Independent component analysis of the perturbation in the spatial intensity distribution of the fluorescent signal measured on the exit plane of the turbid medium locates the embedded objects. The location and size, of the embedded objects are obtained from a Green's function analysis and back-projection Fourier transform of the retrieved independent components.

  16. Cell Cycle-dependent Changes in Localization and Phosphorylation of the Plasma Membrane Kv2.1 K+ Channel Impact Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Contact Sites in COS-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Melanie M; Austin, Daniel C; Sack, Jon T; Trimmer, James S

    2015-12-01

    The plasma membrane (PM) comprises distinct subcellular domains with diverse functions that need to be dynamically coordinated with intracellular events, one of the most impactful being mitosis. The Kv2.1 voltage-gated potassium channel is conditionally localized to large PM clusters that represent specialized PM:endoplasmic reticulum membrane contact sites (PM:ER MCS), and overexpression of Kv2.1 induces more exuberant PM:ER MCS in neurons and in certain heterologous cell types. Localization of Kv2.1 at these contact sites is dynamically regulated by changes in phosphorylation at one or more sites located on its large cytoplasmic C terminus. Here, we show that Kv2.1 expressed in COS-1 cells undergoes dramatic cell cycle-dependent changes in its PM localization, having diffuse localization in interphase cells, and robust clustering during M phase. The mitosis-specific clusters of Kv2.1 are localized to PM:ER MCS, and M phase clustering of Kv2.1 induces more extensive PM:ER MCS. These cell cycle-dependent changes in Kv2.1 localization and the induction of PM:ER MCS are accompanied by increased mitotic Kv2.1 phosphorylation at several C-terminal phosphorylation sites. Phosphorylation of exogenously expressed Kv2.1 is significantly increased upon metaphase arrest in COS-1 and CHO cells, and in a pancreatic β cell line that express endogenous Kv2.1. The M phase clustering of Kv2.1 at PM:ER MCS in COS-1 cells requires the same C-terminal targeting motif needed for conditional Kv2.1 clustering in neurons. The cell cycle-dependent changes in localization and phosphorylation of Kv2.1 were not accompanied by changes in the electrophysiological properties of Kv2.1 expressed in CHO cells. Together, these results provide novel insights into the cell cycle-dependent changes in PM protein localization and phosphorylation. PMID:26442584

  17. Intracellular distribution of an integral nuclear pore membrane protein fused to green fluorescent protein--localization of a targeting domain.

    PubMed

    Söderqvist, H; Imreh, G; Kihlmark, M; Linnman, C; Ringertz, N; Hallberg, E

    1997-12-15

    The 121-kDa pore membrane protein (POM121) is a bitopic integral membrane protein specifically located in the pore membrane domain of the nuclear envelope with its short N-terminal tail exposed on the luminal side and its major C-terminal portion adjoining the nuclear pore complex. In order to locate a signal for targeting of POM121 to the nuclear pores, we overexpressed selected regions of POM121 alone or fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transiently transfected COS-1 cells or in a stably transfected neuroblastoma cell line. Microscopic analysis of the GFP fluorescence or immunostaining was used to determine the intracellular distribution of the overexpressed proteins. The endofluorescent GFP tag had no effect on the distribution of POM121, since the chimerical POM121-GFP fusion protein was correctly targeted to the nuclear pores of both COS-1 cells and neuroblastoma cells. Based on the differentiated intracellular sorting of the POM121 variants, we conclude that the first 128 amino acids of POM121 contains signals for targeting to the continuous endoplasmic reticulum/nuclear envelope membrane system but not specifically to the nuclear pores and that a specific nuclear pore targeting signal is located between amino acids 129 and 618 in the endoplasmically exposed portion of POM121. PMID:9461306

  18. Local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method in the Lennard-Jones system

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, K.; Shibahara, M.

    2014-07-21

    A classical molecular dynamics simulation was conducted for a system composed of fluid molecules between two planar solid surfaces, and whose interactions are described by the 12-6 Lennard-Jones form. This paper presents a general description of the pressure components and interfacial tension at a fluid-solid interface obtained by the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics, proposes a method to consider the pressure components tangential to an interface which are affected by interactions with solid atoms, and applies this method to the calculation system. The description of the perturbative method is extended to subsystems, and the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface are obtained and examined in one- and two-dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained by two alternative methods: (a) an evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane, and (b) the conventional method based on the virial expression. The accuracy of the numerical results is examined through the comparison of the results obtained by each method. The calculated local pressure components and interfacial tension of the fluid at a liquid-solid interface agreed well with the results of the two alternative methods at each local position in one dimension. In two dimensions, the results showed a characteristic profile of the tangential pressure component which depended on the direction tangential to the liquid-solid interface, which agreed with that obtained by the evaluation of the intermolecular force acting on a plane in the present study. Such good agreement suggests that the perturbative method on the basis of statistical thermodynamics used in this study is valid to obtain the local pressure components and interfacial tension at a liquid-solid interface.

  19. The linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a protein 4.1N-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tsuchiya, Ayako; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2013-03-01

    In yeast two-hybrid screening, protein 4.1N, a scaffolding protein, was identified as a binding partner of the α7 ACh (acetylcholine) receptor. For rat hippocampal slices, the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA {8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid} increased the association of the α7 ACh receptor with 4.1N, and the effect was inhibited by GF109203X, an inhibitor of PKC (protein kinase C), although DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of 4.1N. For PC-12 cells, the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction was significantly suppressed by knocking down 4.1N. DCP-LA increased the presence of the α7 ACh receptor in the plasma membrane fraction, and the effect was still inhibited by knocking down 4.1N. In the monitoring of α7 ACh receptor mobilization, DCP-LA enhanced signal intensities for the α7 ACh receptor at the membrane surface in PC-12 cells, which was clearly prevented by knocking down 4.1N. Taken together, the results of the present study show that 4.1N interacts with the α7 ACh receptor and participates in the receptor tethering to the plasma membrane. The results also indicate that DCP-LA increases membrane surface localization of the α7 ACh receptor in a 4.1N-dependent manner under the control of PKC, but without phosphorylating 4.1N. PMID:23256752

  20. Measuring localization and diffusion coefficients of basolateral proteins in lateral versus basal membranes using functionalized substrates and kICS analysis.

    PubMed

    Marlar, Saw; Arnspang, Eva C; Pedersen, Gitte A; Koffman, Jennifer S; Nejsum, Lene N

    2014-10-01

    Micropatterning enabled semiquantitation of basolateral proteins in lateral and basal membranes of the same cell. Lateral diffusion coefficients of basolateral aquaporin-3 (AQP3-EGFP) and EGFP-AQP4 were extracted from "lateral" and "basal" membranes using identical live-cell imaging and k-space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS). To simultaneously image proteins in "lateral" and "basal" membranes, micropatterning with the extracellular domain of E-cadherin and collagen, to mimic cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesion, respectively, was used. In kidney collecting duct principal cells AQP3 localizes lateral and basal whereas AQP4 localizes mainly basal. On alternating stripes of E-cadherin and collagen, AQP3-EGFP was predominantly localized to "lateral" compared to "basal" membranes, whereas Orange-AQP4 was evenly distributed. Average diffusion coefficients were extracted via kICS analysis of rapid time-lapse sequences of AQP3-EGFP and EGFP-AQP4 on uniform substrates of either E-cadherin or collagen. AQP3-EGFP was measured to 0.022±0.010μm(2)/s on E-cadherin and 0.019±0.004μm(2)/s on collagen, whereas EGFP-AQP4 was measured to 0.044±0.009μm(2)/s on E-cadherin and 0.037±0.009μm(2)/s on collagen, thus, diffusion did not differ between substrates. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) reduced the AQP3-EGFP diffusion coefficient by 43% from 0.024±0.007μm(2)/s (water) to 0.014±0.003μm(2)/s (MBCD) (p<0.05) on collagen surfaces, and by 41% from 0.023±0.011μm(2)/s (water) to 0.014±0.005μm(2)/s (MBCD) (p<0.05) on E-cadherin surfaces. Thus, protein patterning enables the semiquantitation of protein distribution between the "lateral" and "basal" membranes as well as measurements of lateral diffusion coefficients. PMID:24950246

  1. A Co-Operative Provincial-Local Project to Evaluate Components of a Local System with a View to Initiating Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilling, H. J.

    This paper describes an evaluation model developed by the Ontario Ministry of Education and illustrates how it was adapted to meet local and provincial needs of the Scarborough School System for accountability data and direction for change. The basic Cooperative Evaluation and Development of School Systems (CEDSS) model includes five stages of…

  2. The effect of MEP pathway and other inhibitors on the intracellular localization of a plasma membrane-targeted, isoprenylable GFP reporter protein in tobacco BY-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    We have established an in vivo visualization system for the geranylgeranylation of proteins in a stably transformed tobacco BY-2 cell line, based on the expression of a dexamethasone-inducible GFP fused to the carboxy-terminal basic domain of the rice calmodulin CaM61, which naturally bears a CaaL geranylgeranylation motif (GFP-BD-CVIL). By using pathway-specific inhibitors it was demonstrated that inhibition of the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway with known inhibitors like oxoclomazone and fosmidomycin, as well as inhibition of the protein geranylgeranyltransferase type 1 (PGGT-1), shifted the localization of the GFP-BD-CVIL protein from the membrane to the nucleus. In contrast, the inhibition of the mevalonate (MVA) pathway with mevinolin did not affect the localization. During the present work, this test system has been used to examine the effect of newly designed inhibitors of the MEP pathway and inhibitors of sterol biosynthesis such as squalestatin, terbinafine and Ro48-8071. In addition, we also studied the impact of different post-prenylation inhibitors or those suspected to affect the transport of proteins to the plasma membrane on the localization of the geranylgeranylable fusion protein GFP-BD-CVIL. PMID:24555083

  3. Insights into the Localization and Function of the Membrane Trafficking Regulator GNOM ARF-GEF at the Golgi Apparatus in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Naramoto, Satoshi; Otegui, Marisa S.; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; de Rycke, Riet; Dainobu, Tomoko; Karampelias, Michael; Fujimoto, Masaru; Feraru, Elena; Miki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    GNOM is one of the most characterized membrane trafficking regulators in plants, with crucial roles in development. GNOM encodes an ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) that activates small GTPases of the ARF (ADP ribosylation factor) class to mediate vesicle budding at endomembranes. The crucial role of GNOM in recycling of PIN auxin transporters and other proteins to the plasma membrane was identified in studies using the ARF-GEF inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). GNOM, the most prominent regulator of recycling in plants, has been proposed to act and localize at so far elusive recycling endosomes. Here, we report the GNOM localization in context of its cellular function in Arabidopsis thaliana. State-of-the-art imaging, pharmacological interference, and ultrastructure analysis show that GNOM predominantly localizes to Golgi apparatus. Super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy identified GNOM and its closest homolog GNOM-like 1 at distinct subdomains on Golgi cisternae. Short-term BFA treatment stabilizes GNOM at the Golgi apparatus, whereas prolonged exposures results in GNOM translocation to trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosomes (EEs). Malformed TGN/EE in gnom mutants suggests a role for GNOM in maintaining TGN/EE function. Our results redefine the subcellular action of GNOM and reevaluate the identity and function of recycling endosomes in plants. PMID:25012191

  4. Insights into the localization and function of the membrane trafficking regulator GNOM ARF-GEF at the Golgi apparatus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Naramoto, Satoshi; Otegui, Marisa S; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; de Rycke, Riet; Dainobu, Tomoko; Karampelias, Michael; Fujimoto, Masaru; Feraru, Elena; Miki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Friml, Jiří

    2014-07-01

    GNOM is one of the most characterized membrane trafficking regulators in plants, with crucial roles in development. GNOM encodes an ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) that activates small GTPases of the ARF (ADP ribosylation factor) class to mediate vesicle budding at endomembranes. The crucial role of GNOM in recycling of PIN auxin transporters and other proteins to the plasma membrane was identified in studies using the ARF-GEF inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). GNOM, the most prominent regulator of recycling in plants, has been proposed to act and localize at so far elusive recycling endosomes. Here, we report the GNOM localization in context of its cellular function in Arabidopsis thaliana. State-of-the-art imaging, pharmacological interference, and ultrastructure analysis show that GNOM predominantly localizes to Golgi apparatus. Super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy identified GNOM and its closest homolog GNOM-like 1 at distinct subdomains on Golgi cisternae. Short-term BFA treatment stabilizes GNOM at the Golgi apparatus, whereas prolonged exposures results in GNOM translocation to trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosomes (EEs). Malformed TGN/EE in gnom mutants suggests a role for GNOM in maintaining TGN/EE function. Our results redefine the subcellular action of GNOM and reevaluate the identity and function of recycling endosomes in plants. PMID:25012191

  5. Tunicamycin Depresses P-Glycoprotein Glycosylation Without an Effect on Its Membrane Localization and Drug Efflux Activity in L1210 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Šereš, Mário; Cholujová, Dana; Bubenčíkova, Tatiana; Breier, Albert; Sulová, Zdenka

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), also known as ABCB1, is a member of the ABC transporter family of proteins. P-gp is an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump that is localized to the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and confers multidrug resistance in neoplastic cells. P-gp is a 140-kDa polypeptide that is glycosylated to a final molecular weight of 170 kDa. Our experimental model used two variants of L1210 cells in which overexpression of P-gp was achieved: either by adaptation of parental cells (S) to vincristine (R) or by transfection with the human gene encoding P-gp (T). R and T cells were found to differ from S cells in transglycosylation reactions in our recent studies. The effects of tunicamycin on glycosylation, drug efflux activity and cellular localization of P-gp in R and T cells were examined in the present study. Treatment with tunicamycin caused less concentration-dependent cellular damage to R and T cells compared with S cells. Tunicamycin inhibited P-gp N-glycosylation in both of the P-gp-positive cells. However, tunicamycin treatment did not alter either the P-gp cellular localization to the plasma membrane or the P-gp transport activity. The present paper brings evidence that independently on the mode of P-gp expression (selection with drugs or transfection with a gene encoding P-gp) in L1210 cells, tunicamycin induces inhibition of N-glycosylation of this protein, without altering its function as plasma membrane drug efflux pump. PMID:22174631

  6. The group IV-A cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, CNGC19 and CNGC20, localize to the vacuole membrane in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Christen C. Y.; Christopher, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are implicated in the uptake of both essential and toxic cations, Ca2+ signalling, and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. The 20 CNGC paralogues of Arabidopsis are divided into five evolutionary groups. Group IV-A is highly isolated and consists only of two closely spaced genes, CNGC19 and CNGC20. Prior studies have shown that both genes are induced by salinity and biotic stress. A unique feature of CNGC19 and CNGC20 is their long hydrophilic N-termini. To determine the subcellular locations of CNGC19 and CNGC20, partial and full-length fusions to GFP(S65T) were generated. Translational fusions of the N-termini of CNGC19 (residues 1–171) and CNGC20 (residues 1–200) to GFP(S65T) were targeted to punctate structures when transiently expressed in leaf protoplasts. In the case of CNGC20, but not CNGC19, the punctate structures were co-labelled with a marker for the Golgi. The full-length CNGC19-GFP fusion co-localized with markers for the vacuole membrane (αTIP- and γTIP-mCherry). Vacuole membrane labelling by the full-length CNGC20-GFP fusion was also observed, but the signal was weak and accompanied by numerous punctate signals that did not co-localize with αTIP- or γTIP-mCherry. These punctate structures diminished, and localization of full-length CNGC20-GFP to the vacuole increased, when it was co-expressed with the full-length CNGC19-mCherry. Vacuole membrane labelling was also detected in planta via immunoelectron microscopy using a CNGC20-antiserum on cryopreserved ultrathin sections of roots. We hypothesize that the role of group IV-A CNGCs is to mediate the movement of cations between the central vacuole and the cytosol in response to certain types of abiotic and biotic stress.

  7. Ltc1 is an ER-localized sterol transporter and a component of ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contacts

    PubMed Central

    Murley, Andrew; Sarsam, Reta D.; Toulmay, Alexandre; Yamada, Justin; Prinz, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Organelle contact sites perform fundamental functions in cells, including lipid and ion homeostasis, membrane dynamics, and signaling. Using a forward proteomics approach in yeast, we identified new ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contacts specified by an uncharacterized protein, Ylr072w. Ylr072w is a conserved protein with GRAM and VASt domains that selectively transports sterols and is thus termed Ltc1, for Lipid transfer at contact site 1. Ltc1 localized to ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contacts via the mitochondrial import receptors Tom70/71 and the vacuolar protein Vac8, respectively. At mitochondria, Ltc1 was required for cell viability in the absence of Mdm34, a subunit of the ER–mitochondria encounter structure. At vacuoles, Ltc1 was required for sterol-enriched membrane domain formation in response to stress. Increasing the proportion of Ltc1 at vacuoles was sufficient to induce sterol-enriched vacuolar domains without stress. Thus, our data support a model in which Ltc1 is a sterol-dependent regulator of organelle and cellular homeostasis via its dual localization to ER–mitochondria and ER–vacuole contact sites. PMID:25987606

  8. Influence of heat-labile serum components in the presence of OmpA on the outer membrane of Salmonella gallinarum.

    PubMed

    Vega-Manriquez, X; Huerta-Ascencio, L; Martínez-Gómez, D; López-Vidal, Y; Verdugo-Rodríguez, A

    2016-03-01

    Salmonella gallinarum is the causative agent of fowl typhoid. Being a Gram-negative bacteria, its outer membrane proteins (OMP) can be regulated by different microenvironments. S. gallinarum was cultured under the following conditions: nutrient broth (NB), NB supplemented with serum from specific pathogen-free birds (NBS) and NB with serum incubated at 56 °C prior to incubation with the bacteria (NBSD); OMP were subsequently extracted. Several changes were observed in the apparent expression of OMP, mainly a decrease in an OMP with a size of 30 kDa, approximately, under the NBS condition. In contrast, the same event was not observed in NB and NBSD when using one- and two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels (SDS-PAGE). Using the OMP with a size of 30 kDa, approximately, as antigen in indirect ELISA, we were able to differentiate serum from healthy and vaccinated birds, as well as birds infected with S. gallinarum and S. enteritidis. The amino-terminal of this protein was sequenced, showing 100 % identity with OmpA of S. typhimurium. Subsequently, we designed primers to amplify the gene by PCR. The partial sequence of the amplified gene showed 100 % identity with OmpA of S. gallinarum. (1) Heat-labile serum components influence the presence of OmpA in the OM of S. gallinarum; (2) by the way of ELISA, OmpA allows to specifically differentiate healthy from diseased birds. PMID:26597854

  9. TssK Is a Trimeric Cytoplasmic Protein Interacting with Components of Both Phage-like and Membrane Anchoring Complexes of the Type VI Secretion System*

    PubMed Central

    Zoued, Abdelrahim; Durand, Eric; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Brunet, Yannick R.; Douzi, Badreddine; Cambillau, Christian; Cascales, Eric; Journet, Laure

    2013-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a macromolecular machine that mediates bacteria-host or bacteria-bacteria interactions. The T6SS core apparatus assembles from 13 proteins that form two sub-assemblies: a phage-like complex and a trans-envelope complex. The Hcp, VgrG, TssE, and TssB/C subunits are structurally and functionally related to components of the tail of contractile bacteriophages. This phage-like structure is thought to be anchored to the membrane by a trans-envelope complex composed of the TssJ, TssL, and TssM proteins. However, how the two sub-complexes are connected remains unknown. Here we identify TssK, a protein that establishes contacts with the two T6SS sub-complexes through direct interactions with TssL, Hcp, and TssC. TssK is a cytoplasmic protein assembling trimers that display a three-armed shape, as revealed by TEM and SAXS analyses. Fluorescence microscopy experiments further demonstrate the requirement of TssK for sheath assembly. Our results suggest a central role for TssK by linking both complexes during T6SS assembly. PMID:23921384

  10. Hyaluronic acid promotes the expression of progesterone receptor membrane component 1 via epigenetic silencing of miR-139-5p in human and rat granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guangfeng; Zhou, Xue; Fang, Ting; Hou, Yayi; Hu, Yali

    2014-11-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a serious reproductive dysfunction in which the follicle pool is reduced and depleted. Abnormal apoptosis of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs) is believed to result in follicle loss. Progesterone receptor membrane component 1 (PGRMC1), which is critical for GC survival, was reported to be reduced in POI patients, but the mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we found that PGRMC1 expression was correlated with the level of hyaluronic acid (HA) in POI patients. HA up-regulated PGRMC1 expression in GCs via suppression of miR-139-5p, which was proven by Western blotting and luciferase reporter assays to target PGRMC1. Consistent with these findings, levels of miR-139-5p were significantly increased and presented an inverse correlation with PGRMC1 in POI patients. Noticeably, HA inhibited CD44-mediated miR-139-5p expression but had no effect on luciferase activity after insertion of miR-139 promoter into luciferase plasmid. Interestingly, miR-139-5p was significantly up-regulated in KGN cells (GC tumor cell line) by the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, indicating that HA down-regulated miR-139-5p expression via histone deacetylation. Taken together, we report an unrecognized mechanism of HA in the promotion of PGRMC1 expression, suggesting that HA may be a potential molecule for the prevention and treatment of POI. PMID:25232020

  11. The modular structure of the inner-membrane ring component PrgK facilitates assembly of the type III secretion system basal body.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Julien R C; Worrall, Liam J; De, Soumya; Sgourakis, Nikolaos G; Cheung, Adrienne H; Lameignere, Emilie; Okon, Mark; Wasney, Gregory A; Baker, David; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a large macromolecular assembly found at the surface of many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Its role is to inject toxic "effector" proteins into the cells of infected organisms. The molecular details of the assembly of this large, multimembrane-spanning complex remain poorly understood. Here, we report structural, biochemical, and functional analyses of PrgK, an inner-membrane component of the prototypical Salmonella typhimurium T3SS. We have obtained the atomic structures of the two ring building globular domains and show that the C-terminal transmembrane helix is not essential for assembly and secretion. We also demonstrate that structural rearrangement of the two PrgK globular domains, driven by an interconnecting linker region, may promote oligomerization into ring structures. Finally, we used electron microscopy-guided symmetry modeling to propose a structural model for the intimately associated PrgH-PrgK ring interaction within the assembled basal body. PMID:25533490

  12. Bis-quaternary gemini surfactants as components of nonviral gene delivery systems: a comprehensive study from physicochemical properties to membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana M; Morais, Catarina M; Silva, Sandra G; Marques, Eduardo F; de Lima, Maria C Pedroso; Jurado, Maria Amália S

    2014-10-20

    Gemini surfactants have been successfully used as components of gene delivery systems. In the present work, a family of gemini surfactants, represented by the general structure [CmH2m+1(CH3)2N(+)(CH2)sN(+)(CH3)2CmH2m+1]2Br(-), or simply m-s-m, was used to prepare cationic gene carriers, aiming at their application in transfection studies. An extensive characterization of the gemini surfactant-based complexes, produced with and without the helper lipids cholesterol and DOPE, was carried out in order to correlate their physico-chemical properties with transfection efficiency. The most efficient complexes were those containing helper lipids, which, combining amphiphiles with propensity to form structures with different intrinsic curvatures, displayed a morphologically labile architecture, putatively implicated in the efficient DNA release upon complex interaction with membranes. While complexes lacking helper lipids were translocated directly across the lipid bilayer, complexes containing helper lipids were taken up by cells also by macropinocytosis. This study contributes to shed light on the relationship between important physico-chemical properties of surfactant-based DNA vectors and their efficiency to promote gene transfer, which may represent a step forward to the rational design of gene delivery systems. PMID:25111434

  13. Localization of the 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein to human 1p21-p22 and mouse 3

    SciTech Connect

    Gaertner, J.; Kearns, W.; Rosenberg, C.; Pearson, P.; Valle, D. ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-02-01

    The 70-kDa peroxisomal membrane protein (PXMPI) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family. In humans, mutations in this gene may be responsible for a subset of patients with Zellweger syndrome, a lethal inborn error of peroxisome assembly. The PXMPI gene was assigned to human chromosome 1p21-p22 by in situ hybridization and its murine homologue (Pxmp-1) to chromosome 3 by interspecific backcross analysis. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Membrane Partitioning of Anionic, Ligand-Coated Nanoparticles Is Accompanied by Ligand Snorkeling, Local Disordering, and Cholesterol Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Gkeka, Paraskevi; Angelikopoulos, Panagiotis; Sarkisov, Lev; Cournia, Zoe

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) may induce phase transitions, restructuring, stretching, or even complete disruption of the cell membrane. Therefore, NP cytotoxicity assessment requires a thorough understanding of the mechanisms by which these engineered nanostructures interact with the cell membrane. In this study, extensive Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the partitioning of an anionic, ligand-decorated NP in model membranes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) phospholipids and different concentrations of cholesterol. Spontaneous fusion and translocation of the anionic NP is not observed in any of the 10-µs unbiased MD simulations, indicating that longer timescales may be required for such phenomena to occur. This picture is supported by the free energy analysis, revealing a considerable free energy barrier for NP translocation across the lipid bilayer. 5-µs unbiased MD simulations with the NP inserted in the bilayer core reveal that the hydrophobic and hydrophilic ligands of the NP surface rearrange to form optimal contacts with the lipid bilayer, leading to the so-called snorkeling effect. Inside cholesterol-containing bilayers, the NP induces rearrangement of the structure of the lipid bilayer in its vicinity from the liquid-ordered to the liquid phase spanning a distance almost twice its core radius (8–10 nm). Based on the physical insights obtained in this study, we propose a mechanism of cellular anionic NPpartitioning, which requires structural rearrangements of both the NP and the bilayer, and conclude that the translocation of anionic NPs through cholesterol-rich membranes must be accompanied by formation of cholesterol-lean regions in the proximity of NPs. PMID:25474252

  15. Dual Lipid Modification of the Yeast Gγ Subunit Ste18p Determines Membrane Localization of Gβγ

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Jodi E.; Jenness, Duane D.

    1999-01-01

    The pheromone response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a heterotrimeric G protein. The Gβγ subunit (a complex of Ste4p and Ste18p) is associated with both internal and plasma membranes, and a portion is not stably associated with either membrane fraction. Like Ras, Ste18p contains a farnesyl-directing CaaX box motif (C-terminal residues 107 to 110) and a cysteine residue (Cys 106) that is a potential site for palmitoylation. Mutant Ste18p containing serine at position 106 (mutation ste18-C106S) migrated more rapidly than wild-type Ste18p during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The electrophoretic mobility of wild-type Ste18p (but not the mutant Ste18p) was sensitive to hydroxylamine treatment, consistent with palmitoyl modification at Cys 106. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation of the Gβγ complex from cells cultured in the presence of [3H]palmitic acid resulted in two radioactive species on nonreducing SDS-PAGE gels, with molecular weights corresponding to Gγ and Gβγ. Substitution of serine for either Cys 107 or Cys 106 resulted in the failure of Gβγ to associate with membranes. The Cys 107 substitution also resulted in reduced steady-state accumulation of Ste18p, suggesting that the stability of Ste18p requires modification at Cys 107. All of the mutant forms of Ste18p formed complexes with Ste4p, as assessed by coimmunoprecipitation. We conclude that tight membrane attachment of the wild-type Gβγ depends on palmitoylation at Cys 106 and prenylation at Cys 107 of Ste18p. PMID:10523659

  16. Problem-Solving Test: Submitochondrial Localization of Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are surrounded by two membranes (outer and inner mitochondrial membrane) that separate two mitochondrial compartments (intermembrane space and matrix). Hundreds of proteins are distributed among these submitochondrial components. A simple biochemical/immunological procedure is described in this test to determine the localization of…

  17. Mutagenesis analysis of the murine leukemia virus matrix protein: identification of regions important for membrane localization and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Soneoka, Y; Kingsman, S M; Kingsman, A J

    1997-07-01

    We have created two sets of substitution mutations in the Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) matrix protein in order to identify domains involved in association with the plasma membrane and in incorporation of the viral envelope glycoproteins into virus particles. The first set of mutations was targeted at putative membrane-associating regions similar to those of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 matrix protein, which include a polybasic region at the N terminus of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and two regions predicted to form beta strands. The second set of mutations was created within hydrophobic residues to test for the production of virus particles lacking envelope proteins, with the speculation of an involvement of the membrane-spanning region of the envelope protein in incorporation into virus particles. We have found that mutation of the N-terminal polybasic region redirected virus assembly to the cytoplasm, and we show that tryptophan residues may also play a significant role in the intracellular transport of the matrix protein. In total, 21 mutants of the Mo-MuLV matrix protein were produced, but we did not observe any mutant virus particles lacking the envelope glycoproteins, suggesting that a direct interaction between the Mo-MuLV matrix protein and envelope proteins either may not exist or may occur through multiple redundant interactions. PMID:9188629

  18. Regulation of the V-ATPase along the Endocytic Pathway Occurs through Reversible Subunit Association and Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Lafourcade, Céline; Sobo, Komla; Kieffer-Jaquinod, Sylvie; Garin, Jérome; van der Goot, F. Gisou

    2008-01-01

    The lumen of endosomal organelles becomes increasingly acidic when going from the cell surface to lysosomes. Luminal pH thereby regulates important processes such as the release of internalized ligands from their receptor or the activation of lysosomal enzymes. The main player in endosomal acidification is the vacuolar ATPase (V-ATPase), a multi-subunit transmembrane complex that pumps protons from the cytoplasm to the lumen of organelles, or to the outside of the cell. The active V-ATPase is composed of two multi-subunit domains, the transmembrane V0 and the cytoplasmic V1. Here we found that the ratio of membrane associated V1/Vo varies along the endocytic pathway, the relative abundance of V1 being higher on late endosomes than on early endosomes, providing an explanation for the higher acidity of late endosomes. We also found that all membrane-bound V-ATPase subunits were associated with detergent resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from late endosomes, raising the possibility that association with lipid-raft like domains also plays a role in regulating the activity of the proton pump. In support of this, we found that treatment of cells with U18666A, a drug that leads to the accumulation of cholesterol in late endosomes, affected acidification of late endosome. Altogether our findings indicate that the activity of the vATPase in the endocytic pathway is regulated both by reversible association/dissociation and the interaction with specific lipid environments. PMID:18648502

  19. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Localizes to Epidermal Basement Membrane and Is Reduced in Patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stephen A; Dayal, Jasbani H S; Wright, Sheila; Riddle, Megan; Pourreyron, Celine; McMillan, James R; Kimble, Roy M; Prisco, Marco; Gartner, Ulrike; Warbrick, Emma; McLean, W H Irwin; Leigh, Irene M; McGrath, John A; Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Tolar, Jakub; South, Andrew P

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in COL7A1 resulting in reduced or absent type VII collagen, aberrant anchoring fibril formation and subsequent dermal-epidermal fragility. Here, we identify a significant decrease in PLOD3 expression and its encoded protein, the collagen modifying enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), in RDEB. We show abundant LH3 localising to the basement membrane in normal skin which is severely depleted in RDEB patient skin. We demonstrate expression is in-part regulated by endogenous type VII collagen and that, in agreement with previous studies, even small reductions in LH3 expression lead to significantly less secreted LH3 protein. Exogenous type VII collagen did not alter LH3 expression in cultured RDEB keratinocytes and we show that RDEB patients receiving bone marrow transplantation who demonstrate significant increase in type VII collagen do not show increased levels of LH3 at the basement membrane. Our data report a direct link between LH3 and endogenous type VII collagen expression concluding that reduction of LH3 at the basement membrane in patients with RDEB will likely have significant implications for disease progression and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26380979

  20. Lysyl Hydroxylase 3 Localizes to Epidermal Basement Membrane and Is Reduced in Patients with Recessive Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Stephen A.; Dayal, Jasbani H. S.; Wright, Sheila; Riddle, Megan; Pourreyron, Celine; McMillan, James R.; Kimble, Roy M.; Prisco, Marco; Gartner, Ulrike; Warbrick, Emma; McLean, W. H. Irwin; Leigh, Irene M.; McGrath, John A.; Salas-Alanis, Julio C.; Tolar, Jakub; South, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB) is caused by mutations in COL7A1 resulting in reduced or absent type VII collagen, aberrant anchoring fibril formation and subsequent dermal-epidermal fragility. Here, we identify a significant decrease in PLOD3 expression and its encoded protein, the collagen modifying enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 3 (LH3), in RDEB. We show abundant LH3 localising to the basement membrane in normal skin which is severely depleted in RDEB patient skin. We demonstrate expression is in-part regulated by endogenous type VII collagen and that, in agreement with previous studies, even small reductions in LH3 expression lead to significantly less secreted LH3 protein. Exogenous type VII collagen did not alter LH3 expression in cultured RDEB keratinocytes and we show that RDEB patients receiving bone marrow transplantation who demonstrate significant increase in type VII collagen do not show increased levels of LH3 at the basement membrane. Our data report a direct link between LH3 and endogenous type VII collagen expression concluding that reduction of LH3 at the basement membrane in patients with RDEB will likely have significant implications for disease progression and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26380979

  1. Recycling of used perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    DOEpatents

    Grot, Stephen; Grot, Walther

    2007-08-14

    A method for recovering and recycling catalyst coated fuel cell membranes includes dissolving the used membranes in water and solvent, heating the dissolved membranes under pressure and separating the components. Active membranes are produced from the recycled materials.

  2. Localization and Function of the Membrane-bound Riboflavin in the Na+-translocating NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from Vibrio cholerae*

    PubMed Central

    Casutt, Marco S.; Huber, Tamara; Brunisholz, René; Tao, Minli; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The sodium ion-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na+-NQR) from the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is a respiratory membrane protein complex that couples the oxidation of NADH to the transport of Na+ across the bacterial membrane. The Na+-NQR comprises the six subunits NqrABCDEF, but the stoichiometry and arrangement of these subunits are unknown. Redox-active cofactors are FAD and a 2Fe-2S cluster on NqrF, covalently attached FMNs on NqrB and NqrC, and riboflavin and ubiquinone-8 with unknown localization in the complex. By analyzing the cofactor content and NADH oxidation activity of subcomplexes of the Na+-NQR lacking individual subunits, the riboflavin cofactor was unequivocally assigned to the membrane-bound NqrB subunit. Quantitative analysis of the N-terminal amino acids of the holo-complex revealed that NqrB is present in a single copy in the holo-complex. It is concluded that the hydrophobic NqrB harbors one riboflavin in addition to its covalently attached FMN. The catalytic role of two flavins in subunit NqrB during the reduction of ubiquinone to ubiquinol by the Na+-NQR is discussed. PMID:20558724

  3. A new look at the hemolytic effect of local anesthetics, considering their real membrane/water partitioning at pH 7.4.

    PubMed

    Malheiros, Sônia V P; Pinto, Luciana M A; Gottardo, Luciane; Yokaichiya, Daniela K; Fraceto, Leonardo F; Meirelles, Nilce C; de Paula, Eneida

    2004-08-01

    The interaction of local anesthetics (LA) with biological and phospholipid bilayers was investigated regarding the contribution of their structure and physicochemical properties to membrane partition and to erythrocyte solubilization. We measured the partition into phospholipid vesicles-at pH 5.0 and 10.5-and the biphasic hemolytic effect on rat erythrocytes of: benzocaine, chloroprocaine, procaine, tetracaine, bupivacaine, mepivacaine, lidocaine, prilocaine, and dibucaine. At pH 7.4, the binding of uncharged and charged LA to the membranes was considered, since it results in an ionization constant (pK(app)) different from that observed for the anesthetic in the aqueous phase (pK(w)). Even though it occurred at a pH at which there is a predominance of the charged species, hemolysis was greatly influenced by the uncharged species, revealing that the disrupting effect of LA on these membranes is mainly a consequence of hydrophobic interactions. The correlation between the hemolytic activity and the LA potency shows that hemolytic experiments could be used for the prediction of activity in the development of new LA molecules. PMID:15228957

  4. Sub-Cellular Localization and Complex Formation by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Cyanobacteria: Evidence for Interaction of Membrane-Anchored ValRS with ATP Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A. G.; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Luque, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    tRNAs are charged with cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and subsequently delivered to the ribosome to be used as substrates for gene translation. Whether aminoacyl-tRNAs are channeled to the ribosome by transit within translational complexes that avoid their diffusion in the cytoplasm is a matter of intense investigation in organisms of the three domains of life. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) is anchored to thylakoid membranes by means of the CAAD domain. We have investigated whether in this organism ValRS could act as a hub for the nucleation of a translational complex by attracting other aaRSs to the membranes. Out of the 20 aaRSs, only ValRS was found to localize in thylakoid membranes whereas the other enzymes occupied the soluble portion of the cytoplasm. To investigate the basis for this asymmetric distribution of aaRSs, a global search for proteins interacting with the 20 aaRSs was conducted. The interaction between ValRS and the FoF1 ATP synthase complex here reported is of utmost interest and suggests a functional link between elements of the gene translation and energy production machineries. PMID:27375579

  5. Sub-Cellular Localization and Complex Formation by Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases in Cyanobacteria: Evidence for Interaction of Membrane-Anchored ValRS with ATP Synthase.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Gómez, Javier; Ochoa de Alda, Jesús A G; Olmedo-Verd, Elvira; Bru-Martínez, Roque; Luque, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    tRNAs are charged with cognate amino acids by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) and subsequently delivered to the ribosome to be used as substrates for gene translation. Whether aminoacyl-tRNAs are channeled to the ribosome by transit within translational complexes that avoid their diffusion in the cytoplasm is a matter of intense investigation in organisms of the three domains of life. In the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) is anchored to thylakoid membranes by means of the CAAD domain. We have investigated whether in this organism ValRS could act as a hub for the nucleation of a translational complex by attracting other aaRSs to the membranes. Out of the 20 aaRSs, only ValRS was found to localize in thylakoid membranes whereas the other enzymes occupied the soluble portion of the cytoplasm. To investigate the basis for this asymmetric distribution of aaRSs, a global search for proteins interacting with the 20 aaRSs was conducted. The interaction between ValRS and the FoF1 ATP synthase complex here reported is of utmost interest and suggests a functional link between elements of the gene translation and energy production machineries. PMID:27375579

  6. Inactivation of plasma membrane-localized CDPK-RELATED KINASE5 decelerates PIN2 exocytosis and root gravitropic response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rigó, Gábor; Ayaydin, Ferhan; Tietz, Olaf; Zsigmond, Laura; Kovács, Hajnalka; Páy, Anikó; Salchert, Klaus; Darula, Zsuzsanna; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Szabados, László; Palme, Klaus; Koncz, Csaba; Cséplo, Agnes

    2013-05-01

    CRK5 is a member of the Arabidopsis thaliana Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase-related kinase family. Here, we show that inactivation of CRK5 inhibits primary root elongation and delays gravitropic bending of shoots and roots. Reduced activity of the auxin-induced DR5-green fluorescent protein reporter suggests that auxin is depleted from crk5 root tips. However, no tip collapse is observed and the transcription of genes for auxin biosynthesis, AUXIN TRANSPORTER/AUXIN TRANSPORTER-LIKE PROTEIN (AUX/LAX) auxin influx, and PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux carriers is unaffected by the crk5 mutation. Whereas AUX1, PIN1, PIN3, PIN4, and PIN7 display normal localization, PIN2 is depleted from apical membranes of epidermal cells and shows basal to apical relocalization in the cortex of the crk5 root transition zone. This, together with an increase in the number of crk5 lateral root primordia, suggests facilitated auxin efflux through the cortex toward the elongation zone. CRK5 is a plasma membrane-associated kinase that forms U-shaped patterns facing outer lateral walls of epidermis and cortex cells. Brefeldin inhibition of exocytosis stimulates CRK5 internalization into brefeldin bodies. CRK5 phosphorylates the hydrophilic loop of PIN2 in vitro, and PIN2 shows accelerated accumulation in brefeldin bodies in the crk5 mutant. Delayed gravitropic response of the crk5 mutant thus likely reflects defective phosphorylation of PIN2 and deceleration of its brefeldin-sensitive membrane recycling. PMID:23673979

  7. Control of the localization and function of a miRNA silencing component TNRC6A by Argonaute protein

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Kenji; Takahashi, Tomoko; Suzawa, Masataka; Miyakawa, Takuya; Nagasawa, Tatsuya; Ming, Yvelt; Tanokura, Masaru; Ui-Tei, Kumiko

    2015-01-01

    GW182 family proteins play important roles in microRNA (miRNA)-mediated RNA silencing. They directly interact with Argonaute (Ago) proteins in processing bodies (P bodies), cytoplasmic foci involved in mRNA degradation and storage. Recently, we revealed that a human GW182 family protein, TNRC6A, is a nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling protein, and its subcellular localization is regulated by its own nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal. Regarding the further controlling mechanism of TNRC6A subcellular localization, we found that TNRC6A protein is tethered in P bodies by direct interaction with Ago2 under Ago2 overexpression condition in HeLa cells. Furthermore, it was revealed that such Ago proteins might be strongly tethered in the P bodies through Ago-bound small RNAs. Thus, our results indicate that TNRC6A subcellular localization is substantially controlled by the interaction with Ago proteins. Furthermore, it was also revealed that the TNRC6A subcellular localization affects the RNA silencing activity. PMID:26446993

  8. Case with Brunsting-Perry-like localized subepidermal blister formations and immunoglobulin G antibodies against unidentified basement membrane zone antigen.

    PubMed

    Sato-Shibuya, Mami; Dainichi, Teruki; Egawa, Gyohei; Honda, Tetsuya; Otsuka, Atsushi; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2016-04-01

    Brunsting-Perry type bullous pemphigoid is defined by the blister formation limited to the head and neck, and autoantibodies to type VII collagen are detected in several cases. However, the pathomechanisms and autoantigens in this condition remain unknown. We report a 20-year-old female patient with a more than 2-year history of recurrent tense blisters localized on the face with no distinct atrophic scar formation. The patient had neither extensive sun exposure nor a history suggestive of contact dermatitis. Oral betamethasone was effective on the skin lesions. Histopathology revealed subepidermal blister formation with dermal infiltrates of neutrophils. Although direct and indirect immunofluorescence tests detected immunoglobulin G antibodies to the basement membrane zone (BMZ), no known dermal or epidermal autoantigens were detected in immunoblot analyses. Therefore, this case may be a rare variant of Brunsting-Perry type localized bullous pemphigoid with autoantibodies to an undetermined BMZ antigen. PMID:26362108

  9. Interaction Network and Localization of Brucella abortus Membrane Proteins Involved in the Synthesis, Transport, and Succinylation of Cyclic β-1,2-Glucans

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Leticia S.; Morrone Seijo, Susana M.; Guaimas, Francisco F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG) are periplasmic homopolysaccharides that play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. Once synthesized in the cytoplasm by the CβG synthase (Cgs), CβG are transported to the periplasm by the CβG transporter (Cgt) and succinylated by the CβG modifier enzyme (Cgm). Here, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system and coimmunoprecipitation techniques to study the interaction network between these three integral inner membrane proteins. Our results indicate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm can form both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. Analyses carried out with Cgs mutants revealed that the N-terminal region of the protein (Cgs region 1 to 418) is required to sustain the interactions with Cgt and Cgm as well as with itself. We demonstrated by single-cell fluorescence analysis that in Brucella, Cgs and Cgt are focally distributed in the membrane, particularly at the cell poles, whereas Cgm is mostly distributed throughout the membrane with a slight accumulation at the poles colocalizing with the other partners. In summary, our results demonstrate that Cgs, Cgt, and Cgm form a membrane-associated biosynthetic complex. We propose that the formation of a membrane complex could serve as a mechanism to ensure the fidelity of CβG biosynthesis by coordinating their synthesis with the transport and modification. IMPORTANCE In this study, we analyzed the interaction and localization of the proteins involved in the synthesis, transport, and modification of Brucella abortus cyclic β-1,2-glucans (CβG), which play an important role in the virulence and interaction of Brucella with the host. We demonstrate that these proteins interact, forming a complex located mainly at the cell poles; this is the first experimental evidence of the existence of a multienzymatic complex involved in the metabolism of osmoregulated periplasmic glucans in bacteria and argues for another example of pole differentiation in Brucella

  10. Focal Adhesion Kinase Controls pH-Dependent Epidermal Barrier Homeostasis by Regulating Actin-Directed Na+/H+ Exchanger 1 Plasma Membrane Localization

    PubMed Central

    Ilic, Dusko; Mao-Qiang, Man; Crumrine, Debra; Dolganov, Gregory; Larocque, Nicholas; Xu, Pu; Demerjian, Marianne; Brown, Barbara E.; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Ossovskaya, Valeria; Schlaepfer, David D.; Fisher, Susan J.; Feingold, Kenneth R.; Elias, Peter M.; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2007-01-01

    Ubiquitously expressed focal adhesion kinase (FAK), linked to multiple intracellular signaling pathways, has previously been shown to control cell motility, invasion, proliferation, and survival. Using mice with a keratinocyte-restricted deletion of fak (FAKK5 KO), we report here a novel role for FAK: maintenance of adult epidermal permeability barrier homeostasis. Abundant lacunae of unprocessed lipids in stratum corneum (SC) of FAKK5 KO mice and delayed barrier recovery pointed to malfunction of pH-dependent enzymes active in extracellular space of SC. Measuring the SC pH gradient showed significantly more neutral pH values in FAKK5 KO mice, suggesting the importance of FAK for acidification. Moreover, normal functions were restored when FAKK5 KO mice were exposed to a surface pH typical of mouse SC (pH = 5.5). Baseline levels and response to barrier disruption of secretory phospholipase A2 isoforms, enzymes that mediate generation of free fatty acids in epidermis, appeared similar in both FAKK5 KO and control littermates. We found that the critical SC acidification regulator Na+/H+ exchanger 1 failed to localize to the plasma membrane in FAK-deficient keratinocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Thus, for plasma membrane localization in terminally differentiated keratinocytes, Na+/H+ exchanger 1 requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, which is impaired in FAK-deficient cells. PMID:17525272

  11. Intracellular localization of 7-benzylamino-6-chloro-2-piperazino-4-pyrrolidino-pteridine in membrane structures impeding the inhibition of cytosolic cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Marko, Doris; Merz, Karl Heinz; Kunz, Claudia; Müller, Anja; Tarasova, Nadya; Eisenbrand, Gerhard

    2002-02-15

    7-Benzylamino-6-chloro-2-piperazino-4-pyrrolidino-pteridine (DC-TA-46) is a potent inhibitor of the rolipram-sensitive cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoenzyme family PDE4. DC-TA-46 inhibits cAMP-hydrolysis of PDE4 isolated from solid tumors of the human large cell lung tumor xenograft LXFL529 in the nanomolar range (IC(50)=16+/-5nM). Tumor cells, however, are growth inhibited only in the lower micromolar range as shown for the human large cell lung carcinoma cell line LXFL529L. To investigate reasons for the discrepancy between IC(50) values for target inhibition and inhibition of cell growth, uptake, subcellular distribution and elimination of the compound were measured. DC-TA-46 was rapidly taken up by the cells, predominantly localized in intracellular membranes. Elimination was slow, with 70% of the compound still persisting in the membranes 50hr after withdrawal. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed a clear colocalization with a fluorescent marker for the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER). As a result of the subcellular localization, the membrane-bound PDE activity of LXFL529L cells was effectively inhibited by DC-TA-46 (IC(50)=0.06+/-0.02 microM). In contrast, inhibition of the cytosolic PDE activity was only achieved at concentrations >1 microM (IC(50)=2.0+/-0.5 microM), in the concentration range where also growth inhibition was observed. Thus, the inhibition of the intracellular PDE activity in the different cellular compartments appears to represent an important parameter for the evaluation of the inhibitory properties at least of this class of compounds. PMID:11992634

  12. Comparative evaluation of a bioabsorbable collagen membrane and connective tissue graft in the treatment of localized gingival recession: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Harsha Mysore; Gujjari, Sheela Kumar; Prasad, Deepak; Sehgal, Praveen Kumar; Srinivasan, Aishwarya

    2011-01-01

    Background: Gingival recession (GR) can result in root sensitivity, esthetic concern to the patient, and predilection to root caries. The purpose of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate (1) the effect of guided tissue regeneration (GTR) procedure using a bioabsorbable collagen membrane, in comparison to autogenous subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG) for root coverage in localized gingival recession defects; and (2) the change in width of keratinized gingiva following these two procedures. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 cases, showing at least two localized Miller's Class I or Class II gingival recession, participated in this study. In a split mouth design, the pairs of defects were randomly assigned for treatment with either SCTG (SCTG Group) or GTR-based collagen membrane (GTRC Group). Both the grafts were covered with coronally advanced flap. Recession depth (RD), recession width (RW), width of keratinized gingiva (KG), probing depth (PD), relative attachment level (RAL), plaque index (PI), and gingival index (GI) were recorded at baseline, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: Six months following root coverage procedures, the mean root coverage was found to be 84.84% ± 16.81% and 84.0% ± 15.19% in SCTG Group and GTRC Group, respectively. The mean keratinized gingival width increase was 1.50 ± 0.70 mm and 2.30 ± 0.67 mm in the SCTG and GTRC group, respectively, which was not statistically significant. Conclusion: It may be concluded that resorbable collagen membrane can be a reliable alternative to autogenous connective tissue graft in the treatment of gingival recession. PMID:22368359

  13. Lipid membrane domains in cell surface and vacuolar systems.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Hirabayashi, Y

    2000-01-01

    Detergent insoluble sphingolipid-cholesterol enriched 'raft'-like membrane microdomains have been implicated in a variety of biological processes including sorting, trafficking, and signaling. Mutant cells and knockout animals of sphingolipid biosynthesis are clearly useful to understand the biological roles of lipid components in raft-like domains. It is suggested that raft-like domains distribute in internal vacuolar membranes as well as plasma membranes. In addition to sphingolipid-cholesterol-rich membrane domains, recent studies suggest the existence of another lipid-membrane domain in the endocytic pathway. This domain is enriched with a unique phospholipid, lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) and localized in the internal membrane of multivesicular endosome. LBPA-rich membrane domains are involved in lipid and protein sorting within the endosomal system. Possible interaction between sphingolipids and LBPA in sphingolipid-storage disease is discussed. PMID:11201787

  14. Local membrane length conservation in two-dimensional vesicle simulation using a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, I.; Lishchuk, S. V.; Spencer, T. J.; Pontrelli, G.; Evans, P. C.

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for applying a class of velocity-dependent forces within a multicomponent lattice Boltzmann equation simulation that is designed to recover continuum regime incompressible hydrodynamics. This method is applied to the problem, in two dimensions, of constraining to uniformity the tangential velocity of a vesicle membrane implemented within a recent multicomponent lattice Boltzmann simulation method, which avoids the use of Lagrangian boundary tracers. The constraint of uniform tangential velocity is carried by an additional contribution to an immersed boundary force, which we derive here from physical arguments. The result of this enhanced immersed boundary force is to apply a physically appropriate boundary condition at the interface between separated lattice fluids, defined as that region over which the phase-field varies most rapidly. Data from this enhanced vesicle boundary method are in agreement with other data obtained using related methods [e.g., T. Krüger, S. Frijters, F. Günther, B. Kaoui, and J. Harting, Eur. Phys. J. 222, 177 (2013), 10.1140/epjst/e2013-01834-y] and underscore the importance of a correct vesicle membrane condition.

  15. Evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts localized at the ER-mitochondria associated membranes in autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Tina; Matarrese, Paola; Manganelli, Valeria; Marconi, Matteo; Tinari, Antonella; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Faggioni, Alberto; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Malorni, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria. This membrane scrambling between ER and mitochondria appears to play a critical role in the earliest steps of autophagy. Recently, lipid microdomains, i.e. lipid rafts, have been identified as further actors of the autophagic process. In the present work, a series of biochemical and molecular analyses has been carried out in human fibroblasts with the specific aim of characterizing lipid rafts in MAMs and to decipher their possible implication in the autophagosome formation. In fact, the presence of lipid microdomains in MAMs has been detected and, in these structures, a molecular interaction of the ganglioside GD3, a paradigmatic "brick" of lipid rafts, with core-initiator proteins of autophagy, such as AMBRA1 and WIPI1, was revealed. This association seems thus to take place in the early phases of autophagic process in which MAMs have been hypothesized to play a key role. The functional activity of GD3 was suggested by the experiments carried out by knocking down ST8SIA1 gene expression, i.e., the synthase that leads to the ganglioside formation. This experimental condition results in fact in the impairment of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk and the subsequent hindering of autophagosome nucleation. We thus hypothesize that MAM raft-like microdomains could be pivotal in the initial organelle scrambling activity that finally leads to the formation of autophagosome. PMID:27123544

  16. Cellular and subcellular localization of the neuron-specific plasma membrane calcium ATPase PMCA1a in the rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Katharine A.; Bushong, Eric A; Mauer, Amy S.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Weinberg, Richard J.; Burette, Alain C.

    2010-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is crucial both for proper neuronal function and survival. By coupling ATP hydrolysis with Ca2+ extrusion from the cell, the plasma membrane calcium-dependent ATPases (PMCAs) play an essential role in controlling intracellular calcium levels in neurons. In contrast to PMCA2 and PMCA3, which are expressed in significant levels only in the brain and a few other tissues, PMCA1 is ubiquitously distributed, and is thus widely believed to play a “housekeeping” function in mammalian cells. Whereas the PMCA1b splice variant is predominant in most tissues, an alternative variant, PMCA1a, is the major form of PMCA1 in the adult brain. Here, we use immunohistochemistry to analyze the cellular and subcellular distribution of PMCA1a in the brain. We show that PMCA1a is not ubiquitously expressed, but rather is confined to neurons, where it concentrates in the plasma membrane of somata, dendrites and spines. Thus, rather than serving a general “housekeeping” function, our data suggest that PMCA1a is a calcium pump specialized for neurons, where it may contribute to the modulation of somatic and dendritic Ca2+ transients. PMID:20575074

  17. Phosphatase of Regenerating Liver-3 Localizes to Cyto-Membrane and Is Required for B16F1 Melanoma Cell Metastasis In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ran; Qian, Feng; Li, Yu-Pei; Sheng, Xia; Cao, Shao-Xian; Xu, Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Background Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3) is a member of the novel phosphatases of regenerating liver family, characterized by one protein tyrosine phosphatase active domain and a C-terminal prenylation (CCVM) motif. Though widely proposed to facilitate metastasis in many cancer types, PRL-3's cellular localization and the function of its CCVM motif in metastatic process remain unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, a series of Myc tagged PRL-3 wild type or mutant plasmids were expressed in B16F1 melanoma cells to investigate the relationship between PRL-3's cellular localization and metastasis. With immuno-fluorescence microcopy and cell adhesion/migration assay in vitro, and an experimental passive metastasis model in vivo, we found that CCVM motif is critical for the localization of PRL-3 on cell plasma membrane and the lung metastasis of melanoma. In particular, Cystine170 is the key site for prenylation in this process. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that cellular localization of PRL-3 is highly correlated with its function in tumor metastasis, and inhibition of PRL-3 prenylation might be a new approach to cancer therapy. PMID:19214221

  18. HYDROPHOBIC ZEOLITE-SILICONE RUBBER MIXED MATRIX MEMBRANES FOR ETHANOL-WATER SEPARATION: EFFECT OF ZEOLITE AND SILICONE COMPONENT SELECTION ON PERVAPORATION PERFORMANCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-silica ZSM 5 zeolites were incorporated into poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) polymers to form mixed matrix membranes for ethanol removal from water via pervaporation. Membrane formulation and preparation parameters were varied to determine the effect on pervaporation perform...

  19. Three-component competitive adsorption model for flow-through PAC systems. 1. Model development and verification with a PAC/membrane system.

    PubMed

    Li, Qilin; Mariñas, Benito J; Snoeyink, Vernon L; Campos, Carlos

    2003-07-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) interferes with the adsorption of trace organic compounds on porous adsorbents such as powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pore blockage and direct competition for adsorption sites. The competitive effect of NOM in flow-through systems in which the retention time of the PAC is greater than the hydraulic retention time of the system can be magnified because NOM from the influent water can continue to adsorb on the PAC retained in the system. As a result, the adsorption capacity and the diffusion coefficient of trace compounds can decrease as NOM from the influent water accumulates. In this study, a dynamic three-component adsorption model was developed to quantitatively describe the removal of a trace compound from water in flow-through PAC processes. The system was simplified by using p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB) to represent the NOM fraction that competes directly with the target trace organic atrazine for adsorption sites and by using poly(styrene sulfonate) (PSS-1.8k) to represent large, pore-blocking NOM. The model was based on the homogeneous surface diffusion assumption with the adsorption capacity of atrazine being gradually adjusted using a simplified version of the ideal adsorbed solution theory model developed in this study. The surface diffusion coefficients of atrazine and p-DCB were modeled as a function of the surface concentration of the pore-blocking compound, PSS-1.8k. The model was verified experimentally with a PAC/microfiltration (MF) system. The use of single-solute adsorption parameters obtained from batch isotherm and kinetic tests resulted in good model predictions for the adsorption of atrazine and the two model compounds under operating conditions typical of PAC/MF systems. The model will be applied to study various operating conditions and other system parameters of PAC/membrane systems in part 2 of this study. PMID:12875406

  20. Unfolding-resistant translocase targeting: a novel mechanism for outer mitochondrial membrane localization exemplified by the Bbeta2 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Dagda, Ruben K; Barwacz, Chris A; Cribbs, J Thomas; Strack, Stefan

    2005-07-22

    Heterotrimeric serine/threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) consists of scaffolding (A), catalytic (C), and variable (B, B', and B'') subunits. Variable subunits dictate subcellular localization and substrate specificity of the PP2A holoenzyme. The Bbeta regulatory subunit gene is mutated in spinocerebellar ataxia type 12, and one of its splice variants, Bbeta2, targets PP2A to mitochondria to promote apoptosis in PC12 cells (Dagda, R. K., Zaucha, J. A., Wadzinski, B. E., and Strack, S. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 24976-24985). Here, we report that Bbeta2 is localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane by a novel mechanism, combining a cryptic mitochondrial import signal with a structural arrest domain. Scanning mutagenesis demonstrates that basic and hydrophobic residues mediate mitochondrial association and the proapoptotic activity of Bbeta2. When fused to green fluorescent protein, the N terminus of Bbeta2 acts as a cleavable mitochondrial import signal. Surprisingly, full-length Bbeta2 is not detectably cleaved and is retained at the outer mitochondrial membrane, even though it interacts with the TOM22 import receptor, as shown by luciferase complementation in intact cells. Mutations that open the C-terminal beta-propeller of Bbeta2 facilitate mitochondrial import, indicating that this rigid fold acts as a stop-transfer domain by resisting the partial unfolding step prerequisite for matrix translocation. Because hybrids of prototypical import and beta-propeller domains recapitulate this behavior, we predict the existence of other similarly localized proteins and a selection against highly stable protein folds in the mitochondrial matrix. This unfolding-resistant targeting to the mitochondrial translocase is necessary but not sufficient for the proapoptotic activity of Bbeta2, which also requires association with the rest of the PP2A holoenzyme. PMID:15923182

  1. Cellular Asymmetric Catalysis by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A8 Shows Functional Localization to the Basolateral Plasma Membrane*

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Kerstin; Tumova, Sarka; Kerimi, Asimina; Williamson, Gary

    2015-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are highly expressed in liver, intestine and kidney, and catalyze the glucuronic acid conjugation of both endogenous compounds and xenobiotics. Using recombinant human UGT isoforms, we show that glucuronic acid conjugation of the model substrate, (−)-epicatechin, is catalyzed mainly by UGT1A8 and UGT1A9. In HepG2 cells, pretreatment with polyunsaturated fatty acids increased substrate glucuronidation. In the intestinal Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture model, overall relative glucuronidation rates were much higher than in HepG2 cells, and (−)-epicatechin was much more readily conjugated when applied to the basolateral side of the cell monolayer. Under these conditions, 95% of the conjugated product was effluxed back to the site of application, and none of the other phase 2-derived metabolites followed this distribution pattern. HT29-MTX cells contained >1000-fold higher levels of UGT1A8 mRNA than Caco-2 or HepG2 cells. Gene expression of UGT1A8 increased after treatment of cells with docosahexaenoic acid, as did UGT1A protein levels. Immunofluorescence staining and Western blotting showed the presence of UGT1A in the basal and lateral parts of the plasma membrane of HT29-MTX cells. These results suggest that some of the UGT1A8 enzyme is not residing in the endoplasmic reticulum but spans the plasma membrane, resulting in increased accessibility to compounds outside the cell. This facilitates more efficient conjugation of substrate and is additionally coupled with rapid efflux by functionally associated basolateral transporters. This novel molecular strategy allows the cell to carry out conjugation without the xenobiotic entering into the interior of the cell. PMID:25586184

  2. Localization of IL-4 and IL-4 receptors in the human term placenta, decidua and amniochorionic membranes.

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes-Pinto, M I; Vince, G S; Flanagan, B F; Hart, C A; Johnson, P M

    1997-01-01

    There has been much recent interest in cytokine expression at the materno-fetal interface. Although T-helper 2 (Th2)-type cytokines have been described in the murine feto-placental unit, few studies have as yet been performed in human pregnancy. We have examined the production of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and expression of IL-4 receptors in the human term placenta, decidua and amniochorionic membranes. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that cytotrophoblast, decidual macrophages and both maternal and fetal endothelial cells consistently expressed IL-4, whereas syncytiotrophoblast and placental macrophages showed an inconsistent pattern between specimens. High- and low-affinity IL-4 receptors were demonstrated by immunohistochemistry at the same cellular sites as stained for IL-4, and detection of IL-4 receptors was also variable in syncytiotrophoblast. Reverse-transcribed-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that both IL-4 and its alternative splice variant, IL-482, are produced both in placental villi and in amniochorionic and decidual tissue. Ligand-binding assays identified the presence, on isolated term syncytiotrophoblast microvillous plasma membrane vesicle preparations, of functional high-affinity binding sites for IL-4 with a Kd in the range 102-112 pM and an apparent receptor density in the range 99-102 x 10(8) sites/mg protein. Three human choriocarcinoma (BeWo, JEG-3 and Jar) and one amnion-derived (AV3) cell lines expressed IL-4 and both high- and low-affinity IL-4 receptors. The constitutive expression of both IL-4 and IL-4 receptors, together with the novel finding of the alternative splice variant IL-482 in the immediate tissues at the materno fetal interface suggest an immunobiological role for IL-4 in human pregnancy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9038717

  3. The UL31 and UL34 Gene Products of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Are Required for Optimal Localization of Viral Glycoproteins D and M to the Inner Nuclear Membranes of Infected Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Elizabeth; Mou, Fan; Baines, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    UL31 and UL34 of herpes simplex virus type 1 form a complex necessary for nucleocapsid budding at the inner nuclear membrane (INM). Previous examination by immunogold electron microscopy and electron tomography showed that pUL31, pUL34, and glycoproteins D and M are recruited to perinuclear virions and densely staining regions of the INM where nucleocapsids bud into the perinuclear space. We now show by quantitative immunogold electron microscopy coupled with analysis of variance that gD-specific immunoreactivity is significantly reduced at both the INM and outer nuclear membrane (ONM) of cells infected with a UL34 null virus. While the amount of gM associated with the nuclear membrane (NM) was only slightly (P = 0.027) reduced in cells infected with the UL34 null virus, enrichment of gM in the INM at the expense of that in the ONM was greatly dependent on UL34 (P < 0.0001). pUL34 also interacted directly or indirectly with immature forms of gD (species expected to reside in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear membrane) in lysates of infected cells and with the cytosolic tail of gD fused to glutathione S-transferase in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, suggesting a role for the pUL34/gD interaction in recruiting gD to the NM. The effects of UL34 on gD and gM localization were not a consequence of decreased total expression of gD and gM, as determined by flow cytometry. Separately, pUL31 was dispensable for targeting gD and gM to the two leaflets of the NM but was required for (i) the proper INM-versus-ONM ratio of gD and gM in infected cells and (ii) the presence of electron-dense regions in the INM, representing nucleocapsid budding sites. We conclude that in addition to their roles in nucleocapsid envelopment and lamina alteration, UL31 and UL34 play separate but related roles in recruiting appropriate components to nucleocapsid budding sites at the INM. PMID:19279119

  4. Lunapark Is a Component of a Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Localized to the Endoplasmic Reticulum Three-way Junctions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yupeng; Zhang, Ting; Huo, Huanhuan; Ye, Yihong; Liu, Yanfen

    2016-08-26

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network comprises sheets and tubules that are connected by dynamic three-way junctions. Lunapark (Lnp) localizes to and stabilizes ER three-way junctions by antagonizing the small GTPase Atlastin, but how Lnp shapes the ER network is unclear. Here, we used an affinity purification approach and mass spectrometry to identify Lnp as an interacting partner of the ER protein quality control ubiquitin ligase gp78. Accordingly, Lnp purified from mammalian cells has a ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro Intriguingly, biochemical analyses show that this activity can be attributed not only to associated ubiquitin ligase, but also to an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity borne by Lnp itself. This activity is contained in the N-terminal 45 amino acids of Lnp although this segment does not share homology to any known ubiquitin ligase motifs. Despite its interaction with gp78, Lnp does not seem to have a broad function in degradation of misfolded ER proteins. On the other hand, the N-terminal ubiquitin ligase-bearing motif is required for the ER three-way junction localization of Lnp. Our study identifies a new type of ubiquitin ligase and reveals a potential link between ubiquitin and ER morphology regulation. PMID:27387505

  5. The Conformation of a Plasma Membrane-Localized Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase Complex Is Altered by a Potato Aphid-Derived Effector1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hsuan-Chieh; Hicks, Glenn R.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are transmembrane receptors involved in plant immunity. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carries three SERK members. One of these, SlSERK1, is required for Mi-1.2-mediated resistance to potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Mi-1.2 encodes a coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein that in addition to potato aphids confers resistance to two additional phloem-feeding insects and to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). How SlSERK1 participates in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance is unknown, and no Mi-1.2 cognate pest effectors have been identified. Here, we study the mechanistic involvement of SlSERK1 in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance. We show that potato aphid saliva and protein extracts induce the Mi-1.2 defense marker gene SlWRKY72b, indicating that both saliva and extracts contain a Mi-1.2 recognized effector. Resistant tomato cultivar Motelle (Mi-1.2/Mi-1.2) plants overexpressing SlSERK1 were found to display enhanced resistance to potato aphids. Confocal microscopy revealed that Mi-1.2 localizes at three distinct subcellular compartments: the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments in these tomato plants and in Nicotiana benthamiana transiently expressing Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 showed that Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 colocalize only in a microsomal complex. Interestingly, bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis showed that the interaction of Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 at the plasma membrane distinctively changes in the presence of potato aphid saliva, suggesting a model in which a constitutive complex at the plasma membrane participates in defense signaling upon effector binding. PMID:27208261

  6. The Conformation of a Plasma Membrane-Localized Somatic Embryogenesis Receptor Kinase Complex Is Altered by a Potato Aphid-Derived Effector.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hsuan-Chieh; Mantelin, Sophie; Hicks, Glenn R; Takken, Frank L W; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2016-07-01

    Somatic embryogenesis receptor kinases (SERKs) are transmembrane receptors involved in plant immunity. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) carries three SERK members. One of these, SlSERK1, is required for Mi-1.2-mediated resistance to potato aphids (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Mi-1.2 encodes a coiled-coil nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein that in addition to potato aphids confers resistance to two additional phloem-feeding insects and to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). How SlSERK1 participates in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance is unknown, and no Mi-1.2 cognate pest effectors have been identified. Here, we study the mechanistic involvement of SlSERK1 in Mi-1.2-mediated resistance. We show that potato aphid saliva and protein extracts induce the Mi-1.2 defense marker gene SlWRKY72b, indicating that both saliva and extracts contain a Mi-1.2 recognized effector. Resistant tomato cultivar Motelle (Mi-1.2/Mi-1.2) plants overexpressing SlSERK1 were found to display enhanced resistance to potato aphids. Confocal microscopy revealed that Mi-1.2 localizes at three distinct subcellular compartments: the plasma membrane, cytoplasm, and nucleus. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments in these tomato plants and in Nicotiana benthamiana transiently expressing Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 showed that Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 colocalize only in a microsomal complex. Interestingly, bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis showed that the interaction of Mi-1.2 and SlSERK1 at the plasma membrane distinctively changes in the presence of potato aphid saliva, suggesting a model in which a constitutive complex at the plasma membrane participates in defense signaling upon effector binding. PMID:27208261

  7. Effects of physostigmine on local cerebral glucose utilization in the central components of the rat visual system.

    PubMed

    Grünwald, F; Crane, A; Mende, M; Suda, S; Kennedy, C; Pettigrew, K D; Biersack, H J; Sokoloff, L; Kuschinsky, W

    1993-11-26

    The effects of intravenous administration of physostigmine at doses of 0.03, 0.095, or 0.3 mg/kg on local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) were determined in 3 structures of the visual system of the rat brain by means of the quantitative 2-[14C]deoxyglucose method. LCGU was increased in the superior colliculus (superficial gray layer), but unchanged in the visual cortex and the lateral geniculate body. To determine whether the observed effect of physostigmine on the superior colliculus depended on input from the retina, the highest dose of physostigmine was administered to rats which had previously been enucleated bilaterally. Enucleation decreased LCGU in the superior colliculus of the animals not treated with physostigmine and blocked the effect of physostigmine on LCGU. The effect of physostigmine in the superior colliculus appears, therefore, to depend on input from the retina. PMID:8295735

  8. The role of cytoskeleton in organizing growth cones: a microfilament- associated growth cone component depends upon microtubules for its localization

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We are interested in the relationship between the cytoskeleton and the organization of polarized cell morphology. We show here that the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in culture are specifically stained by a monoclonal antibody called 13H9. In other systems, the antigen recognized by 13H9 is associated with marginal bands of chicken erythrocytes and shows properties of both microtubule-and microfilament- associated proteins (Birgbauer, E., and F. Solomon. 1989 J. Cell Biol. 109:1609-1620). This dual nature is manifest in hippocampal neurons as well. At early stages after plating, the antibody stains the circumferential lamellipodia that mediate initial cell spreading. As processes emerge, 13H9 staining is heavily concentrated in the distal regions of growth cones, particularly in lamellipodial fans. In these cells, the 13H9 staining is complementary to the localization of assembled microtubules. It colocalizes partially, but not entirely, with phalloidin staining of assembled actin. Incubation with nocodazole rapidly induces microtubule depolymerization, which proceeds in the distal-to-proximal direction in the processes. At the same time, a rapid and dramatic redistribution of the 13H9 staining occurs; it delocalizes along the axon shaft, becoming clearly distinct from the phalloidin staining and always remaining distal to the receding front of assembled microtubules. After longer times without assembled microtubules, no staining of 13H9 can be detected. Removal of the nocodazole allows the microtubules to reform, in an ordered proximal-to- distal fashion. The 13H9 immunoreactivity also reappears, but only in the growth cones, not in any intermediate positions along the axon, and only after the reformation of microtubules is complete. The results indicate that the antigen recognized by 13H9 is highly concentrated in growth cones, closely associated with polymerized actin, and that its proper localization depends upon intact microtubules. PMID:2677024

  9. Degradation of uric acid in fish liver peroxisomes. Intraperoxisomal localization of hepatic allantoicase and purification of its peroxisomal membrane-bound form.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, S; Fujiwara, S; Noguchi, T

    1989-02-25

    Urate-degrading enzymes such as uricase, allantoinase, and allantoicase are located in the peroxisomes of marine fish liver (Noguchi, T., Takada, Y., and Fujiwara, S. (1979) J. Biol. Chem. 254, 5272-5275). On the basis of intraperoxisomal localization of hepatic allantoicase, 13 different fishes were classified into two groups: mackerel group and sardine group. Allantoicase is located on the outer surface of the peroxisomal membrane in the mackerel group and in the peroxisomal soluble matrix in the sardine group. The peroxisomal membrane enzyme and the peroxisomal matrix enzyme are not distinguishable on the basis of the number and molecular weight of the subunits, but differ in isoelectric point and electrophoretic mobility. The molecular weight of the fish allantoicase subunit is identical with that of the small subunit (allantoicase subunit) of amphibian allantoinase-allantoicase complex, suggesting that the subunit of fish allantoicase changed to the small subunit of the amphibian complex during evolution: allantoinase and allantoicase are present as a complex in amphibian liver (Noguchi, T., Fujiwara, S., and Hayashi, S. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 4221-4223). PMID:2492531

  10. CD63 Interacts with the Carboxy-Terminus of the Colonic H+,K+-ATPase to Increase Plasma Membrane Localization and Rb+-Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Codina, Juan; Li, Jian; DuBose, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    The carboxy-terminus of the colonic H+,K+-ATPase is required for stable assembly with the β-subunit, translocation to the plasma membrane and efficient function of the transporter. To identify protein-protein interactions involved in the localization and function of HKα2, we selected 84 amino acids in the carboxy-terminus of the α-subunit of mouse colonic H+,K+-ATPase (CT-HKα2) as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a mouse kidney cDNA library. The longest identified clone was CD63. To characterize interaction of CT-HKα2 with CD63, recombinant CT-HKα2 and CD63 were synthesized in vitro, incubated, and complexes immunoprecipitated. CT-HKα 2 protein (but not CT-HKα1) co-precipitated with CD63, confirming stable assembly of HKα2 with CD63. In HEK-293 transfected with HKα2 plus β1-Na+,K+-ATPase, suppression of CD63 by RNA interference increased cell surface expression of HKα2/NKβ1 and 86Rb+-uptake. These studies demonstrate that CD63 participates in the regulation of the abundance of the HKα2/NKβ1 complex in the cell membrane. PMID:15647390

  11. Definition of a physiologic aging autoantigen by using synthetic peptides of membrane protein band 3: localization of the active antigenic sites.

    PubMed

    Kay, M M; Marchalonis, J J; Hughes, J; Watanabe, K; Schluter, S F

    1990-08-01

    Senescent cell antigen (SCA), an aging antigen, is a protein that appears on old cells and marks them for removal by the immune system in mammals. It is derived from band 3, a ubiquitous membrane transport protein found in diverse cell types and tissues. We have used synthetic peptides to identify aging antigenic sites on band 3, using a competitive inhibition assay and immunoblotting with IgG directed against the aging antigen on old cells. Results indicate that: (i) the active antigenic sites of the aging antigen reside on membrane protein band 3 residues that are extracellular regions implicated in anion transport (residues 538-554 and 788-827); (ii) a putative ankyrin-binding-region peptide is not involved in SCA activity; and (iii) carbohydrate moieties are not required for the antigenicity or recognition of SCA because synthetic peptides alone abolish binding of senescent cell IgG to erythrocytes. One of the putative transport sites that contributes to the aging antigen is located toward the carboxyl terminus. A model of band 3 is presented. Localization of the active antigenic site on the band 3 molecule facilitates definition of the molecular changes occurring during aging that initiate molecular as well as cellular degeneration. PMID:1696010

  12. Design of a modular tetrameric scaffold for the synthesis of membrane-localized D-peptide inhibitors of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Francis, J. Nicholas; Redman, Joseph S.; Eckert, Debra M.; Kay, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    The highly conserved HIV-1 gp41 “pocket” region is a promising target for inhibiting viral entry. PIE12-trimer is a protease-resistant trimeric D-peptide inhibitor that binds to this pocket and potently blocks HIV entry. PIE12-trimer also possesses a reserve of binding energy that provides it with a strong genetic barrier to resistance (“resistance capacitor”). Here we report the design of a modular scaffold employing PEGs of discrete lengths for the efficient optimization and synthesis of PIE12-trimer. This scaffold also allows us to conjugate PIE12-trimer to several membrane-localizing cargoes, resulting in dramatically improved potency and retention of PIE12-trimer’s ability to absorb the impact of resistance mutations. This scaffold design strategy should be of broad utility for the rapid prototyping of multimeric peptide inhibitors attached to potency- or pharmacokinetic-enhancing groups. PMID:22545664

  13. Localization of type IV collagen a 1 to a 6 chains in basement membrane during mouse molar germ development.

    PubMed

    Nagai, N; Nakano, K; Sado, Y; Naito, I; Gunduz, M; Tsujigiwa, H; Nagatsuka, H; Ninomiya, Y; Siar, C H

    2001-10-01

    The dental basement membrane (BM) putatively mediates epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during tooth morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. Type IV collagen alpha chains, a major network-forming protein of the dental BM, was studied and results disclosed distinct expression patterns at different stages of mouse molar germ development. At the dental placode and bud stage, the BM of the oral epithelium expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains while the gubernaculum dentis, in addition to the above four chains, also expressed a 4 chain. An asymmetrical expression for alpha 4, alpha 5 and alpha 6 chains was observed at the bud stage. At the early bell stage, the BM associated with the inner enamel epithelium (IEE) of molar germ expressed alpha 1, alpha 2 and alpha 4 chains while the BM of the outer enamel epithelium (OEE) expressed only alpha 1 and a 2 chains. With the onset of dentinogenesis, the collagen a chain profile of the IEE BM gradually disappeared. Howeverfrom the early to late bell stage, the gubernaculum dentis consistently expressed alpha 1, alpha 2, alpha 5 and a 6 chains resembling fetal oral mucosa. These findings suggest that stage- and position-specific distribution of type IV collagen alpha subunits occur during molar germ development and that these changes are essential for molar morphogenesis and cytodifferentiation. PMID:11732842

  14. The outer membrane localization of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MsrA/B is involved in survival against reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Eric P.; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Quick, J.; Judd, Ralph C.; Weissbach, Herbert; Etienne, Frantzy; Brot, Nathan; Seifert, H. Steven

    2002-01-01

    The PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been reported to be involved in the regulation of pilin gene transcription, but it also possesses significant homology to the peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase family of enzymes, specifically MsrA and MsrB from Escherichia coli. MsrA and MsrB in E. coli are able to reduce methionine sulfoxide residues in proteins to methionines. In addition, the gonococcal PilB protein encodes for both MsrA and MsrB activity associated with the repair of oxidative damage to proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that the PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is not involved in pilus expression. Additionally, we show that wild-type N. gonorrhoeae produces two forms of this polypeptide, one of which contains a signal sequence and is secreted from the bacterial cytoplasm to the outer membrane; the other lacks a signal sequence and is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that the secreted form of the PilB protein is involved in survival in the presence of oxidative damage. PMID:12096194

  15. Light- and guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate-sensitive localization of a G protein and its effector on detergent-resistant membrane rafts in rod photoreceptor outer segments.

    PubMed

    Seno, K; Kishimoto, M; Abe, M; Higuchi, Y; Mieda, M; Owada, Y; Yoshiyama, W; Liu, H; Hayashi, F

    2001-06-15

    Detergent-resistant membrane microdomains in the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts, have been implicated in various cellular processes. We report here that a low-density Triton X-100-insoluble membrane (detergent-resistant membrane; DRM) fraction is present in bovine rod photoreceptor outer segments (ROS). In dark-adapted ROS, transducin and most of cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) were detergent-soluble. When ROS membranes were exposed to light, however, a large portion of transducin localized in the DRM fraction. Furthermore, on addition of guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPgammaS) to light-bleached ROS, transducin became detergent-soluble again. PDE was not recruited to the DRM fraction after light stimulus alone, but simultaneous stimulation by light and GTPgammaS induced a massive translocation of all PDE subunits to the DRM. A cholesterol-removing reagent, methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, selectively but partially solubilized PDE from the DRM, suggesting that cholesterol contributes, at least in part, to the association of PDE with the DRM. By contrast, transducin was not extracted by the depletion of cholesterol. These data suggest that transducin and PDE are likely to perform their functions in phototransduction by changing their localization between two distinct lipid phases, rafts and surrounding fluid membrane, on disc membranes in an activation-dependent manner. PMID:11319214

  16. Localization of the N-terminal and C-terminal ends of triadin with respect to the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane of rabbit skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Marty, I; Robert, M; Ronjat, M; Bally, I; Arlaud, G; Villaz, M

    1995-01-01

    Antibodies were raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to the N-terminal (residues 2-17) and C-terminal (residues 691-706) ends of rabbit skeletal muscle triadin, a 95 kDa protein located in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane at the triad junction. The specificity of the antibodies generated was tested by ELISA and Western blot analysis. These tests demonstrated the ability of the antibodies to react specifically with the proteins. The anti-N-terminus antibodies bound to sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, indicating that the N-terminal end of the membrane-embedded triadin is exposed on the cytoplasmic side of the vesicles. In contrast, the anti-C-terminus antibodies were able to react with sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles only after permeabilization of the vesicles with a detergent, indicating that the C-terminal end is exposed on the luminal side of the vesicles. These immunological data were complemented by proteolysis experiments using carboxypeptidases and endoproteinase Arg C. A mixture of carboxypeptidases A, B and Y was used to induce degradation of the C-terminal end of triadin in sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles. This degradation, and a concomitant loss of reactivity of the anti-C-terminus antibodies in Western blots, was observed only when the vesicles were permeabilized, providing further evidence for the luminal localization of the C-terminal end of triadin. Treatment of sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles with endoproteinase Arg C resulted in the removal of the N-terminal end of triadin, probably due to cleavage after Arg-34. This is a further indication of the cytoplasmic localization of the N-terminal end of triadin (and of its first 34 amino acids). When the proteolysis with endoproteinase Arg C was carried out with permeabilized vesicles, the cleavage occurred after Arg-141 or Arg-157, indicating that at least one of these residues is luminal. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7741707

  17. LRP130, a single-stranded DNA/RNA-binding protein, localizes at the outer nuclear and endoplasmic reticulum membrane, and interacts with mRNA in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Naoto; Fukuda, Hirokazu; Nakashima, Katsuhiko; Nagao, Minako; Sugimura, Takashi; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2004-05-01

    LRP130 (also known as a LRPPRC) is an RNA and single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and recently identified as a candidate gene responsible for the Leigh syndrome, a French-Canadian type cytochrome c oxidase deficiency. However, the biological function of LRP130 still remains largely unresolved. In the present study, we found that the C-terminal half of the mouse LRP130 located within a 120 amino acid sequence (a.a. 845-964) binds to synthetic RNA homopolymers, poly(G), poly(U), and poly(C), as well as r(CUGCC)(6). Assessment of the subcellular localization indicated both nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial fractions to be positive. To further analyze the subcellular localization of LRP130, a nuclear/ER fraction was fractionated into the nucleoplasm (NP) and nuclear envelope (NE)/ER, and the latter was further separated into outer nuclear membrane (ONM)/ER and inner nuclear membrane (INM) by treatment with Triton X-100. LRP130 was detectable in all three fractions, and the distribution pattern was in good accordance with that known for ONM/ER proteins. Interestingly, immunostaining of HeLa cells demonstrated nuclear rim staining of LRP130, specifically at the outside of the NE and also at ER, and association of LRP130 with poly(A)(+) RNA was restricted only to the ONM/ER fraction. Overexpression of full-length mouse LRP130 fused with EGFP resulted in nuclear accumulation of poly(A)(+) RNA in HeLa cells. Taking all these results together, it is suggested that LRP130, a novel type of RNA-binding protein, associates with mRNA/mRNP complexes at the outside of NE and ER, and plays a role in control of mRNA metabolisms. PMID:15081402

  18. The Transmembrane Domains of β and IX Subunits Mediate the Localization of the Platelet Glycoprotein Ib-IX Complex to the Glycosphingolipid-enriched Membrane Domain.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guofeng; Shang, Dan; Zhang, Zuping; Shaw, Tanner S; Ran, Yali; López, José A; Peng, Yuandong

    2015-09-01

    We have previously reported that the structural elements of the GP Ib-IX complex required for its localization to glycosphingolipid-enriched membranes (GEMs) reside in the Ibβ and IX subunits. To identify them, we generated a series of cell lines expressing mutant GP Ibβ and GP IX where 1) the cytoplasmic tails (CTs) of either or both GP Ibβ and IX are truncated, and 2) the transmembrane domains (TMDs) of GP Ibβ and GP IX were swapped with the TMD of a non-GEMs associating molecule, human transferrin receptor. Sucrose density fractionation analysis showed that the removal of either or both of the CTs from GP Ibβ and GP IX does not alter GP Ibα-GEMs association when compared with the wild type. In contrast, swapping of the TMDs of either GP Ibβ or GP IX with that of transferrin receptor results in a significant loss (∼ 50%) of GP Ibα from the low density GEMs fractions, with the largest effect seen in the dual TMD-replaced cells (> 80% loss) when compared with the wild type cells (100% of GP Ibα present in the GEMs fractions). Under high shear flow, the TMD-swapped cells adhere poorly to a von Willebrand factor-immobilized surface to a much lesser extent than the previously reported disulfide linkage dysfunctional GP Ibα-expressing cells. Thus, our data demonstrate that the bundle of GP Ibβ and GP IX TMDs instead of their individual CTs is the structural element that mediates the β/IX complex localization to the membrane GEMs, which through the α/β disulfide linkage brings GP Ibα into the GEMs. PMID:26203189

  19. Functional Characterization of a Novel Outer Membrane Porin KpnO, Regulated by PhoBR Two-Component System in Klebsiella pneumoniae NTUH-K2044

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Vijaya Bharathi; Venkataramaiah, Manjunath; Mondal, Amitabha; Vaidyanathan, Vasanth; Govil, Tanvi; Rajamohan, Govindan

    2012-01-01

    Background The diffusion of antibiotics through the outer membrane is primarily affected by the porin super family, changes contribute to antibiotic resistance. Recently we demonstrated that the CpxAR two-component signaling system alters the expression of an uncharacterized porin OmpCKP, to mediate antimicrobial resistance in K. pneumoniae. Principal Findings In this study, functional characterization of the putative porin OmpCKP (denoted kpnO) with respect to antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence was evaluated by generating an isogenic mutant, ΔkpnO in a clinical isolate of K. pneumoniae. Estimation of uronic acid content confirmed that ΔkpnO produced ∼2.0 fold lesser capsular polysaccharide than the wild-type. The ΔkpnO displayed higher sensitivity to hyper osmotic and bile conditions. Disruption of kpnO increased the susceptibility of K. pneumoniae to oxidative and nitrostative stress by ∼1.6 fold and >7 fold respectively. The loss of the Klebsiella porin led to an increase in the minimum inhibitory concentration of tetracycline (3-fold), nalidixic acid (4-fold), tobramycin (4-fold), streptomycin (10-fold), and spectinomycin (10-fold), which could be restored following complementation. The single deletion of kpnO reduced the survival of the pathogen by 50% when exposed to disinfectants. In Caenorhabditis elegans model, the kpnO mutant exhibited significantly (P<0.01) lower virulence. To dissect the role of PhoBR signaling system in regulating the expression of the kpnO, a phoBKP isogenic mutant was constructed. The phoBKP mutant exhibited impaired gastrointestinal stress response and decreased antimicrobial susceptibility. The mRNA levels of kpnO were found to be 4-fold less in phoBKP mutant compared to wild type. A regulatory role of PhoBKP for the expression of kpnO was further supported by the specific binding of PhoBKP to the putative promoter of kpnO. Conclusions and Significance Loss of PhoBR regulated porin KpnO resulted in increased

  20. Phospholipase C beta3 is a key component in the Gbetagamma/PKCeta/PKD-mediated regulation of trans-Golgi network to plasma membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Díaz Añel, Alberto M

    2007-08-15

    The requirement of DAG (diacylglycerol) to recruit PKD (protein kinase D) to the TGN (trans-Golgi network) for the targeting of transport carriers to the cell surface, has led us to a search for new components involved in this regulatory pathway. Previous findings reveal that the heterotrimeric Gbetagamma (GTP-binding protein betagamma subunits) act as PKD activators, leading to fission of transport vesicles at the TGN. We have recently shown that PKCeta (protein kinase Ceta) functions as an intermediate member in the vesicle generating pathway. DAG is capable of activating this kinase at the TGN, and at the same time is able to recruit PKD to this organelle in order to interact with PKCeta, allowing phosphorylation of PKD's activation loop. The most qualified candidates for the production of DAG at the TGN are PI-PLCs (phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipases C), since some members of this family can be directly activated by Gbetagamma, utilizing PtdIns(4,5)P2 as a substrate, to produce the second messengers DAG and InsP3. In the present study we show that betagamma-dependent Golgi fragmentation, PKD1 activation and TGN to plasma membrane transport were affected by a specific PI-PLC inhibitor, U73122 [1-(6-{[17-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino}hexyl)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione]. In addition, a recently described PI-PLC activator, m-3M3FBS [2,4,6-trimethyl-N-(m-3-trifluoromethylphenyl)benzenesulfonamide], induced vesiculation of the Golgi apparatus as well as PKD1 phosphorylation at its activation loop. Finally, using siRNA (small interfering RNA) to block several PI-PLCs, we were able to identify PLCbeta3 as the sole member of this family involved in the regulation of the formation of transport carriers at the TGN. In conclusion, we demonstrate that fission of transport carriers at the TGN is dependent on PI-PLCs, specifically PLCbeta3, which is necessary to activate PKCeta and PKD in that Golgi compartment, via DAG production. PMID:17492941

  1. The PTI1-like kinase ZmPti1a from maize (Zea mays L.) co-localizes with callose at the plasma membrane of pollen and facilitates a competitive advantage to the male gametophyte

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Markus M; Pinto, Sheena; Kluth, Jantjeline; Wienand, Udo; Lorbiecke, René

    2006-01-01

    Background The tomato kinase Pto confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in a gene for gene manner. Upon recognition of specific avirulence factors the Pto kinase activates multiple signal transduction pathways culminating in induction of pathogen defense. The soluble cytoplasmic serine/threonine kinase Pti1 is one target of Pto phosphorylation and is involved in the hypersensitive response (HR) reaction. However, a clear role of Pti1 in plant pathogen resistance is