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Sample records for membrane fusion iii

  1. Class III viral membrane fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Backovic, Marija

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Accumulating structural studies of viral fusion glycoproteins have revealed unanticipated structural relationships between unrelated virus families and allowed the grouping of these membrane fusogens into three distinct classes. Here we review the newly identified group of class III viral fusion proteins, whose members include fusion proteins from rhabdoviruses, herpesviruses and baculoviruses. While clearly related in structure, the class III viral fusion proteins exhibit distinct structural features in their architectures as well as in their membrane-interacting fusion loops, which are likely related to their virus-specific differences in cellular entry. Further study of the similarities and differences in the class III viral fusion glycoproteins may provide greater insights into protein:membrane interactions that are key to promoting efficient bilayer fusion during virus entry. PMID:19356922

  2. Membrane tension and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Michael M; Chernomordik, Leonid V

    2015-08-01

    Diverse cell biological processes that involve shaping and remodeling of cell membranes are regulated by membrane lateral tension. Here we focus on the role of tension in driving membrane fusion. We discuss the physics of membrane tension, forces that can generate the tension in plasma membrane of a cell, and the hypothesis that tension powers expansion of membrane fusion pores in late stages of cell-to-cell and exocytotic fusion. We propose that fusion pore expansion can require unusually large membrane tensions or, alternatively, low line tensions of the pore resulting from accumulation in the pore rim of membrane-bending proteins. Increase of the inter-membrane distance facilitates the reaction. PMID:26282924

  3. Viral membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. PMID:25866377

  4. Viral membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  5. Fusion Power Demonstration III

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1985-07-01

    This is the third in the series of reports covering the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. This volume considers the FPD-III configuration that incorporates an octopole end plug. As compared with the quadrupole end-plugged designs of FPD-I and FPD-II, this octopole configuration reduces the number of end cell magnets and shortens the minimum ignition length of the central cell. The end-cell plasma length is also reduced, which in turn reduces the size and cost of the end cell magnets and shielding. As a contiuation in the series of documents covering the FPD, this report does not stand alone as a design description of FPD-III. Design details of FPD-III subsystems that do not differ significantly from those of the FPD-II configuration are not duplicated in this report.

  6. A Model for Membrane Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngatchou, Annita

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor of the adrenal gland which originates from chromaffin cells and is characterized by the secretion of excessive amounts of neurotransmitter which lead to high blood pressure and palpitations. Pheochromocytoma contain membrane bound granules that store neurotransmitter. The release of these stored molecules into the extracellular space occurs by fusion of the granule membrane with the cell plasma membrane, a process called exocytosis. The molecular mechanism of this membrane fusion is not well understood. It is proposed that the so called SNARE proteins [1] are the pillar of vesicle fusion as their cleavage by clostridial toxin notably, Botulinum neurotoxin and Tetanus toxin abrogate the secretion of neurotransmitter [2]. Here, I describe how physical principles are applied to a biological cell to explore the role of the vesicle SNARE protein synaptobrevin-2 in easing granule fusion. The data presented here suggest a paradigm according to which the movement of the C-terminal of synaptobrevin-2 disrupts the lipid bilayer to form a fusion pore through which molecules can exit.

  7. Class II virus membrane fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kielian, Margaret . E-mail: kielian@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-01-05

    Enveloped animal viruses fuse their membrane with a host cell membrane, thus delivering the virus genetic material into the cytoplasm and initiating infection. This critical membrane fusion reaction is mediated by a virus transmembrane protein known as the fusion protein, which inserts its hydrophobic fusion peptide into the cell membrane and refolds to drive the fusion reaction. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the class II fusion proteins of the alphaviruses and flaviviruses. Inhibition of the fusion protein refolding reaction confirms its importance in fusion and suggests new antiviral strategies for these medically important viruses.

  8. Membrane fusion during phage lysis.

    PubMed

    Rajaure, Manoj; Berry, Joel; Kongari, Rohit; Cahill, Jesse; Young, Ry

    2015-04-28

    In general, phages cause lysis of the bacterial host to effect release of the progeny virions. Until recently, it was thought that degradation of the peptidoglycan (PG) was necessary and sufficient for osmotic bursting of the cell. Recently, we have shown that in Gram-negative hosts, phage lysis also requires the disruption of the outer membrane (OM). This is accomplished by spanins, which are phage-encoded proteins that connect the cytoplasmic membrane (inner membrane, IM) and the OM. The mechanism by which the spanins destroy the OM is unknown. Here we show that the spanins of the paradigm coliphage lambda mediate efficient membrane fusion. This supports the notion that the last step of lysis is the fusion of the IM and OM. Moreover, data are provided indicating that spanin-mediated fusion is regulated by the meshwork of the PG, thus coupling fusion to murein degradation by the phage endolysin. Because endolysin function requires the formation of μm-scale holes by the phage holin, the lysis pathway is seen to require dramatic dynamics on the part of the OM and IM, as well as destruction of the PG. PMID:25870259

  9. Membrane fusion during phage lysis

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Joel; Kongari, Rohit; Cahill, Jesse; Young, Ry

    2015-01-01

    In general, phages cause lysis of the bacterial host to effect release of the progeny virions. Until recently, it was thought that degradation of the peptidoglycan (PG) was necessary and sufficient for osmotic bursting of the cell. Recently, we have shown that in Gram-negative hosts, phage lysis also requires the disruption of the outer membrane (OM). This is accomplished by spanins, which are phage-encoded proteins that connect the cytoplasmic membrane (inner membrane, IM) and the OM. The mechanism by which the spanins destroy the OM is unknown. Here we show that the spanins of the paradigm coliphage lambda mediate efficient membrane fusion. This supports the notion that the last step of lysis is the fusion of the IM and OM. Moreover, data are provided indicating that spanin-mediated fusion is regulated by the meshwork of the PG, thus coupling fusion to murein degradation by the phage endolysin. Because endolysin function requires the formation of μm-scale holes by the phage holin, the lysis pathway is seen to require dramatic dynamics on the part of the OM and IM, as well as destruction of the PG. PMID:25870259

  10. Mitochondrial fusion through membrane automata.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Konstantinos; Andronikos, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that malfunctions in mitochondrial processes can be blamed for diseases. However, the mechanism behind these operations is yet not sufficiently clear. In this work we present a novel approach to describe a biomolecular model for mitochondrial fusion using notions from the membrane computing. We use a case study defined in BioAmbient calculus and we show how to translate it in terms of a P automata variant. We combine brane calculi with (mem)brane automata to produce a new scheme capable of describing simple, realistic models. We propose the further use of similar methods and the test of other biomolecular models with the same behaviour. PMID:25417022

  11. The role of cholesterol in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kreutzberger, Alex J B; Lee, Jinwoo; Kiessling, Volker; Tamm, Lukas K

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol modulates the bilayer structure of biological membranes in multiple ways. It changes the fluidity, thickness, compressibility, water penetration and intrinsic curvature of lipid bilayers. In multi-component lipid mixtures, cholesterol induces phase separations, partitions selectively between different coexisting lipid phases, and causes integral membrane proteins to respond by changing conformation or redistribution in the membrane. But, which of these often overlapping properties are important for membrane fusion?-Here we review a range of recent experiments that elucidate the multiple roles that cholesterol plays in SNARE-mediated and viral envelope glycoprotein-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:27179407

  12. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roehrig, John T.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M.; Bennett, Susan L.; Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  13. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc

    PubMed Central

    Barriga, Gonzalo P.; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L.; Bignon, Eduardo A.; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H.; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A.; Vidal, Simon E.; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  14. Inhibition of the Hantavirus Fusion Process by Predicted Domain III and Stem Peptides from Glycoprotein Gc.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Gonzalo P; Villalón-Letelier, Fernando; Márquez, Chantal L; Bignon, Eduardo A; Acuña, Rodrigo; Ross, Breyan H; Monasterio, Octavio; Mardones, Gonzalo A; Vidal, Simon E; Tischler, Nicole D

    2016-07-01

    Hantaviruses can cause hantavirus pulmonary syndrome or hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in humans. To enter cells, hantaviruses fuse their envelope membrane with host cell membranes. Previously, we have shown that the Gc envelope glycoprotein is the viral fusion protein sharing characteristics with class II fusion proteins. The ectodomain of class II fusion proteins is composed of three domains connected by a stem region to a transmembrane anchor in the viral envelope. These fusion proteins can be inhibited through exogenous fusion protein fragments spanning domain III (DIII) and the stem region. Such fragments are thought to interact with the core of the fusion protein trimer during the transition from its pre-fusion to its post-fusion conformation. Based on our previous homology model structure for Gc from Andes hantavirus (ANDV), here we predicted and generated recombinant DIII and stem peptides to test whether these fragments inhibit hantavirus membrane fusion and cell entry. Recombinant ANDV DIII was soluble, presented disulfide bridges and beta-sheet secondary structure, supporting the in silico model. Using DIII and the C-terminal part of the stem region, the infection of cells by ANDV was blocked up to 60% when fusion of ANDV occurred within the endosomal route, and up to 95% when fusion occurred with the plasma membrane. Furthermore, the fragments impaired ANDV glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion, and cross-inhibited the fusion mediated by the glycoproteins from Puumala virus (PUUV). The Gc fragments interfered in ANDV cell entry by preventing membrane hemifusion and pore formation, retaining Gc in a non-resistant homotrimer stage, as described for DIII and stem peptide inhibitors of class II fusion proteins. Collectively, our results demonstrate that hantavirus Gc shares not only structural, but also mechanistic similarity with class II viral fusion proteins, and will hopefully help in developing novel therapeutic strategies against hantaviruses

  15. Sequential conformational rearrangements in flavivirus membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Luke H; Klein, Daryl E; Schmidt, Aaron G; Peña, Jennifer M; Harrison, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    The West Nile Virus (WNV) envelope protein, E, promotes membrane fusion during viral cell entry by undergoing a low-pH triggered conformational reorganization. We have examined the mechanism of WNV fusion and sought evidence for potential intermediates during the conformational transition by following hemifusion of WNV virus-like particles (VLPs) in a single particle format. We have introduced specific mutations into E, to relate their influence on fusion kinetics to structural features of the protein. At the level of individual E subunits, trimer formation and membrane engagement of the threefold clustered fusion loops are rate-limiting. Hemifusion requires at least two adjacent trimers. Simulation of the kinetics indicates that availability of competent monomers within the contact zone between virus and target membrane makes trimerization a bottleneck in hemifusion. We discuss the implications of the model we have derived for mechanisms of membrane fusion in other contexts. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04389.001 PMID:25479384

  16. Role of sequence and structure of the Hendra fusion protein fusion peptide in membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Gregory, Sonia M; Tamm, Lukas K; Creamer, Trevor P; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2012-08-24

    Viral fusion proteins are intriguing molecular machines that undergo drastic conformational changes to facilitate virus-cell membrane fusion. During fusion a hydrophobic region of the protein, termed the fusion peptide (FP), is inserted into the target host cell membrane, with subsequent conformational changes culminating in membrane merger. Class I fusion proteins contain FPs between 20 and 30 amino acids in length that are highly conserved within viral families but not between. To examine the sequence dependence of the Hendra virus (HeV) fusion (F) protein FP, the first eight amino acids were mutated first as double, then single, alanine mutants. Mutation of highly conserved glycine residues resulted in inefficient F protein expression and processing, whereas substitution of valine residues resulted in hypofusogenic F proteins despite wild-type surface expression levels. Synthetic peptides corresponding to a portion of the HeV F FP were shown to adopt an α-helical secondary structure in dodecylphosphocholine micelles and small unilamellar vesicles using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Interestingly, peptides containing point mutations that promote lower levels of cell-cell fusion within the context of the whole F protein were less α-helical and induced less membrane disorder in model membranes. These data represent the first extensive structure-function relationship of any paramyxovirus FP and demonstrate that the HeV F FP and potentially other paramyxovirus FPs likely require an α-helical structure for efficient membrane disordering and fusion. PMID:22761418

  17. Pseudorabies Virus Glycoprotein M Inhibits Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, Barbara G.; Nixdorf, Ralf; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2000-01-01

    A transient transfection-fusion assay was established to investigate membrane fusion mediated by pseudorabies virus (PrV) glycoproteins. Plasmids expressing PrV glycoproteins under control of the immediate-early 1 promoter-enhancer of human cytomegalovirus were transfected into rabbit kidney cells, and the extent of cell fusion was quantitated 27 to 42 h after transfection. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH, and gL resulted in formation of polykaryocytes, as has been shown for homologous proteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) (A. Turner, B. Bruun, T. Minson, and H. Browne, J. Virol. 72:873–875, 1998). However, in contrast to HSV-1, fusion was also observed when the gD-encoding plasmid was omitted, which indicates that PrV gB, gH, and gL are sufficient to mediate fusion. Fusogenic activity was enhanced when a carboxy-terminally truncated version of gB (gB-008) lacking the C-terminal 29 amino acids was used instead of wild-type gB. With gB-008, only gH was required in addition for fusion. A very rapid and extended fusion was observed after cotransfection of plasmids encoding gB-008 and gDH, a hybrid protein consisting of the N-terminal 271 amino acids of gD fused to the 590 C-terminal amino acids of gH. This protein has been shown to substitute for gH, gD, and gL function in the respective viral mutants (B. G. Klupp and T. C. Mettenleiter, J. Virol. 73:3014–3022, 1999). Cotransfection of plasmids encoding PrV gC, gE, gI, gK, and UL20 with gB-008 and gDH had no effect on fusion. However, inclusion of a gM-expressing plasmid strongly reduced the extent of fusion. An inhibitory effect was also observed after inclusion of plasmids encoding gM homologs of equine herpesvirus 1 or infectious laryngotracheitis virus but only in conjunction with expression of the gM complex partner, the gN homolog. Inhibition by PrV gM was not limited to PrV glycoprotein-mediated fusion but also affected fusion induced by the F protein of bovine

  18. Cryomicroscopy provides structural snapshots of influenza virus membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Calder, Lesley J; Rosenthal, Peter B

    2016-09-01

    The lipid-enveloped influenza virus enters host cells during infection by binding cell-surface receptors and, after receptor-mediated endocytosis, fusing with the membrane of the endosome and delivering the viral genome and transcription machinery into the host cell. These events are mediated by the hemagglutinin (HA) surface glycoprotein. At the low pH of the endosome, an irreversible conformational change in the HA, including the exposure of the hydrophobic fusion peptide, activates membrane fusion. Here we used electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography to image the fusion of influenza virus with target membranes at low pH. We visualized structural intermediates of HA and their interactions with membranes during the course of membrane fusion as well as ultrastructural changes in the virus that accompany membrane fusion. Our observations are relevant to a wide range of protein-mediated membrane-fusion processes and demonstrate how dynamic membrane events may be studied by cryomicroscopy. PMID:27501535

  19. Structures and Mechanisms of Viral Membrane Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    White, Judith M.; Delos, Sue E.; Brecher, Matthew; Schornberg, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Recent work has identified three distinct classes of viral membrane fusion proteins based on structural criteria. In addition, there are at least four distinct mechanisms by which viral fusion proteins can be triggered to undergo fusion-inducing conformational changes. Viral fusion proteins also contain different types of fusion peptides and vary in their reliance on accessory proteins. These differing features combine to yield a rich diversity of fusion proteins. Yet despite this staggering diversity, all characterized viral fusion proteins convert from a fusion-competent state (dimers or trimers, depending on the class) to a membrane-embedded homotrimeric prehairpin, and then to a trimer-of-hairpins that brings the fusion peptide, attached to the target membrane, and the transmembrane domain, attached to the viral membrane, into close proximity thereby facilitating the union of viral and target membranes. During these conformational conversions, the fusion proteins induce membranes to progress through stages of close apposition, hemifusion, and then the formation of small, and finally large, fusion pores. Clearly, highly divergent proteins have converged on the same overall strategy to mediate fusion, an essential step in the life cycle of every enveloped virus. PMID:18568847

  20. Protein-driven membrane stresses in fusion and fission

    PubMed Central

    Kozlov, Michael M.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular membranes undergo continuous remodeling. Exocytosis and endocytosis, mitochondrial fusion and fission, entry of enveloped viruses into host cellsand release of the newly assembled virions, cell-to-cell fusion and cell division, and budding and fusion of transport carriers all proceed via topologically similar, but oppositely ordered, membrane rearrangements. The biophysical similarities and differences between membrane fusion and fission become more evident if we disregard the accompanying biological processes and consider only remodeling of the lipid bilayer. The forces that determine the bilayer propensity to undergo fusion or fission come from proteins and inmost cases from membrane-bound proteins. In this review, we consider the mechanistic principles underlying the fusion and fission reactions and discuss the current hypotheses on how specific proteins act in the two types of membrane remodeling. PMID:20638285

  1. Modulation of membrane fusion by calcium-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, K; Düzgüneş, N; Papahadjopoulos, D

    1982-01-01

    The effects of several Ca2+-binding proteins (calmodulin, prothrombin, and synexin) on the kinetics of Ca2+-induced membrane fusion were examined. Membrane fusion was assayed by following the mixing of aqueous contents of phospholipid vesicles. Calmodulin inhibited slightly the fusion of phospholipid vesicles. Bovine prothrombin and its proteolytic fragment 1 had a strong inhibitory effect on fusion. Depending on the phospholipid composition, synexin could either facilitate or inhibit Ca2+-induced fusion of vesicles. The effects of synexin were Ca2+ specific. 10 microM Ca2+ was sufficient to induce fusion of vesicles composed of phosphatidic acid/phosphatidylethanolamine (1:3) in the presence of synexin and 1 mM Mg2+. We propose that synexin may be involved in intracellular membrane fusion events mediated by Ca2+, such as exocytosis, and discuss possible mechanisms facilitating fusion. PMID:6459804

  2. ATG14 promotes membrane tethering and fusion of autophagosomes to endolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Jiajie; Liu, Rong; Rong, Yueguang; Zhao, Minglei; Zhang, Jing; Lai, Ying; Zhou, Qiangjun; Wilz, Livia M.; Li, Jianxu; Vivona, Sandro; Pfuetzner, Richard A.; Brunger, Axel T.; Zhong, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, an important catabolic pathway implicated in a broad spectrum of human diseases, begins by forming double membrane autophagosomes that engulf cytosolic cargo and ends by fusing autophagosomes with lysosomes for degradation1,2. Membrane fusion activity is required for early biogenesis of autophagosomes and late degradation in lysosomes3–7. However, the key regulatory mechanisms of autophagic membrane tethering and fusion remain largely unknown. Here we report that ATG14 (also known as beclin-1-associated autophagy-related key regulator (Barkor) or ATG14L), an essential autophagy-specific regulator of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex8–11, promotes membrane tethering of protein-free liposomes, and enhances hemifusion and full fusion of proteoliposomes reconstituted with the target (t)-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) syntaxin 17 (STX17) and SNAP29, and the vesicle (v)-SNARE VAMP8 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 8). ATG14 binds to the SNARE core domain of STX17 through its coiled-coil domain, and stabilizes the STX17–SNAP29 binary t-SNARE complex on autophagosomes. The STX17 binding, membrane tethering and fusion-enhancing activities of ATG14 require its homo-oligomerization by cysteine repeats. In ATG14 homo-oligomerization-defective cells, autophagosomes still efficiently form but their fusion with endolysosomes is blocked. Recombinant ATG14 homo-oligomerization mutants also completely lose their ability to promote membrane tethering and to enhance SNARE-mediated fusion in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest an autophagy-specific membrane fusion mechanism in which oligomeric ATG14 directly binds to STX17–SNAP29 binary t-SNARE complex on autophagosomes and primes it for VAMP8 interaction to promote autophagosome–endolysosome fusion. PMID:25686604

  3. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-03-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules.

  4. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead's thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  5. Direct observation of intermediate states in model membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, Andrea; Bartsch, Tobias F.; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel assay for membrane fusion of solid supported membranes on silica beads and on coverslips. Fusion of the lipid bilayers is induced by bringing an optically trapped bead in contact with the coverslip surface while observing the bead’s thermal motion with microsecond temporal and nanometer spatial resolution using a three-dimensional position detector. The probability of fusion is controlled by the membrane tension on the particle. We show that the progression of fusion can be monitored by changes in the three-dimensional position histograms of the bead and in its rate of diffusion. We were able to observe all fusion intermediates including transient fusion, formation of a stalk, hemifusion and the completion of a fusion pore. Fusion intermediates are characterized by axial but not lateral confinement of the motion of the bead and independently by the change of its rate of diffusion due to the additional drag from the stalk-like connection between the two membranes. The detailed information provided by this assay makes it ideally suited for studies of early events in pure lipid bilayer fusion or fusion assisted by fusogenic molecules. PMID:27029285

  6. Membrane Fusion Induced by Small Molecules and Ions

    PubMed Central

    Mondal Roy, Sutapa; Sarkar, Munna

    2011-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a key event in many biological processes. These processes are controlled by various fusogenic agents of which proteins and peptides from the principal group. The fusion process is characterized by three major steps, namely, inter membrane contact, lipid mixing forming the intermediate step, pore opening and finally mixing of inner contents of the cells/vesicles. These steps are governed by energy barriers, which need to be overcome to complete fusion. Structural reorganization of big molecules like proteins/peptides, supplies the required driving force to overcome the energy barrier of the different intermediate steps. Small molecules/ions do not share this advantage. Hence fusion induced by small molecules/ions is expected to be different from that induced by proteins/peptides. Although several reviews exist on membrane fusion, no recent review is devoted solely to small moleculs/ions induced membrane fusion. Here we intend to present, how a variety of small molecules/ions act as independent fusogens. The detailed mechanism of some are well understood but for many it is still an unanswered question. Clearer understanding of how a particular small molecule can control fusion will open up a vista to use these moleucles instead of proteins/peptides to induce fusion both in vivo and in vitro fusion processes. PMID:21660306

  7. Observations of membrane fusion in a liposome dispersion: the missing fusion intermediate?

    PubMed Central

    Foldvari, Marianna

    2015-01-01

    Early intermediate structures of liposome-liposome fusion events were captured by freeze-fracture electron microscopic (EM) technique. The images show the morphology of the fusion interface at several different stages of the fusion event. One of the intermediates was captured at a serendipitous stage of two vesicles’ membranes (both leaflets) merging and their contents starting to intermix clearly showing the fusion interface with a previously unseen fusion rim. From the morphological information a hypothetical sequence of the fusion event and corresponding lipid structural arrangements are described. PMID:26069726

  8. Cis and trans interactions between atlastin molecules during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tina Y.; Bian, Xin; Romano, Fabian B.; Shemesh, Tom; Rapoport, Tom A.; Hu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Atlastin (ATL), a membrane-anchored GTPase that mediates homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, is required for formation of the tubular network of the peripheral ER. How exactly ATL mediates membrane fusion is only poorly understood. Here we show that fusion is preceded by the transient tethering of ATL-containing vesicles caused by the dimerization of ATL molecules in opposing membranes. Tethering requires GTP hydrolysis, not just GTP binding, because the two ATL molecules are pulled together most strongly in the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Most tethering events are futile, so that multiple rounds of GTP hydrolysis are required for successful fusion. Supported lipid bilayer experiments show that ATL molecules sitting on the same (cis) membrane can also undergo nucleotide-dependent dimerization. These results suggest that GTP hydrolysis is required to dissociate cis dimers, generating a pool of ATL monomers that can dimerize with molecules on a different (trans) membrane. In addition, tethering and fusion require the cooperation of multiple ATL molecules in each membrane. We propose a comprehensive model for ATL-mediated fusion that takes into account futile tethering and competition between cis and trans interactions. PMID:25825753

  9. Recyclotron III, a recirculating plasma fusion system

    SciTech Connect

    Jarnagin, W.S.

    1987-01-27

    This patent describes a recyclotron nuclear fusion system comprising recyclotrons. Each recyclotron comprises cyclotron means for receiving and accelerating charged particles in spiral and work conservative pathways. An output means forms a beam from particles received from the cyclotron means; (i) the cyclotron means comprising (a) a channel shaped electromagnet having a pair of indented polefaces, oriented along an input axis and defining an input axis and defining an input magnetic well, (b) a pair of elongated linear electrodes centered along the input magnetic well arranged generally parallel to the input axis and having a gap therebetween, (c) tuned oscillator means connected to the electrodes for applying an oscillating electric potential thereto, (ii) the output means comprising (e) inverter means comprising an electromagnet having a polarity opposite that of the channel shaped electromagnet oriented contigously therealong for extracting fully accelerated particles from the cyclotron means, and (f) reinverter means comprising an electromagnet having a polarity the same as that of the channel shaped electromagnet for correcting the flightpath of the extracted particles.

  10. Membrane mechanics can account for fusion pore dilation in stages.

    PubMed Central

    Chizmadzhev, Y A; Cohen, F S; Shcherbakov, A; Zimmerberg, J

    1995-01-01

    Once formed, fusion pores rapidly enlarge to semi-stable conductance values. The membranes lining the fusion pore are continuous bilayer structures, so variations of conductance in time reflect bending and stretching of membranes. We therefore modeled the evolution of fusion pores using the theory of the mechanics of deforming homogeneous membranes. We calculated the changes in length and width of theoretical fusion pores according to standard dynamical equations of motion. Theoretical fusion pores quickly achieve semi-stable dimensions, which correspond to energy minima located in a canyon between energy barriers. The height of the barrier preventing pore expansion diminishes along the dimensions of length and width. The bottom of the canyon slopes gently downward along increasing length. As a consequence, theoretical fusion pores slowly lengthen and widen as the dimensions migrate along the bottom of the canyon, until the barrier vanishes and the pore rapidly enlarges. The dynamics of growth is sensitive to tension, spontaneous curvature, bending elasticity, and mobilities. This sensitivity can account for the quantitative differences in pore evolution observed in two experimental systems: HA-expressing cells fusing to planar bilayer membranes and beige mouse mast cell degranulation. We conclude that the mechanics of membranes could cause the phenomenon of stagewise growth of fusion pores. Images FIGURE 9 PMID:8599655

  11. Stochastic Fusion Simulations and Experiments Suggest Passive and Active Roles of Hemagglutinin during Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Donald W.; Thapar, Vikram; Clancy, Paulette; Daniel, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Influenza enters the host cell cytoplasm by fusing the viral and host membrane together. Fusion is mediated by hemagglutinin (HA) trimers that undergo conformational change when acidified in the endosome. It is currently debated how many HA trimers, w, and how many conformationally changed HA trimers, q, are minimally required for fusion. Conclusions vary because there are three common approaches for determining w and q from fusion data. One approach correlates the fusion rate with the fraction of fusogenic HA trimers and leads to the conclusion that one HA trimer is required for fusion. A second approach correlates the fusion rate with the total concentration of fusogenic HA trimers and indicates that more than one HA trimer is required. A third approach applies statistical models to fusion rate data obtained at a single HA density to establish w or q and suggests that more than one HA trimer is required. In this work, all three approaches are investigated through stochastic fusion simulations and experiments to elucidate the roles of HA and its ability to bend the target membrane during fusion. We find that the apparent discrepancies among the results from the various approaches may be resolved if nonfusogenic HA participates in fusion through interactions with a fusogenic HA. Our results, based on H3 and H1 serotypes, suggest that three adjacent HA trimers and one conformationally changed HA trimer are minimally required to induce membrane fusion (w = 3 and q = 1). PMID:24559987

  12. The dengue virus type 2 envelope protein fusion peptide is essential for membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Claire Y.-H.; Butrapet, Siritorn; Moss, Kelly J.; Childers, Thomas; Erb, Steven M.; Calvert, Amanda E.; Silengo, Shawn J.; Kinney, Richard M.; Blair, Carol D.; Roehrig, John T.

    2010-01-20

    The flaviviral envelope (E) protein directs virus-mediated membrane fusion. To investigate membrane fusion as a requirement for virus growth, we introduced 27 unique mutations into the fusion peptide of an infectious cDNA clone of dengue 2 virus and recovered seven stable mutant viruses. The fusion efficiency of the mutants was impaired, demonstrating for the first time the requirement for specific FP AAs in optimal fusion. Mutant viruses exhibited different growth kinetics and/or genetic stabilities in different cell types and adult mosquitoes. Virus particles could be recovered following RNA transfection of cells with four lethal mutants; however, recovered viruses could not re-infect cells. These viruses could enter cells, but internalized virus appeared to be retained in endosomal compartments of infected cells, thus suggesting a fusion blockade. Mutations of the FP also resulted in reduced virus reactivity with flavivirus group-reactive antibodies, confirming earlier reports using virus-like particles.

  13. The Effect of Acute Microgravity on Mechanically-Induced Membrane Damage and Membrane-Membrane Fusion Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Mark, S. F.; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Feedback, Daniel L.

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". This response is characterized by both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  14. The effect of acute microgravity on mechanically-induced membrane damage and membrane-membrane fusion events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, M. S.; Vanderburg, C. R.; Feeback, D. L.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Although it is unclear how a living cell senses gravitational forces there is no doubt that perturbation of the gravitational environment results in profound alterations in cellular function. In the present study, we have focused our attention on how acute microgravity exposure during parabolic flight affects the skeletal muscle cell plasma membrane (i.e. sarcolemma), with specific reference to a mechanically-reactive signaling mechanism known as mechanically-induced membrane disruption or "wounding". Both membrane rupture and membrane resealing events mediated by membrane-membrane fusion characterize this response. We here present experimental evidence that acute microgravity exposure can inhibit membrane-membrane fusion events essential for the resealing of sarcolemmal wounds in individual human myoblasts. Additional evidence to support this contention comes from experimental studies that demonstrate acute microgravity exposure also inhibits secretagogue-stimulated intracellular vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane in HL-60 cells. Based on our own observations and those of other investigators in a variety of ground-based models of membrane wounding and membrane-membrane fusion, we suggest that the disruption in the membrane resealing process observed during acute microgravity is consistent with a microgravity-induced decrease in membrane order.

  15. Inner membrane fusion mediates spatial distribution of axonal mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yiyi; Lee, Hao-Chih; Chen, Kuan-Chieh; Suhan, Joseph; Qiu, Minhua; Ba, Qinle; Yang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondria form a dynamic interconnected network to respond to changing needs at different subcellular locations. A fundamental yet unanswered question regarding this network is whether, and if so how, local fusion and fission of individual mitochondria affect their global distribution. To address this question, we developed high-resolution computational image analysis techniques to examine the relations between mitochondrial fusion/fission and spatial distribution within the axon of Drosophila larval neurons. We found that stationary and moving mitochondria underwent fusion and fission regularly but followed different spatial distribution patterns and exhibited different morphology. Disruption of inner membrane fusion by knockdown of dOpa1, Drosophila Optic Atrophy 1, not only increased the spatial density of stationary and moving mitochondria but also changed their spatial distributions and morphology differentially. Knockdown of dOpa1 also impaired axonal transport of mitochondria. But the changed spatial distributions of mitochondria resulted primarily from disruption of inner membrane fusion because knockdown of Milton, a mitochondrial kinesin-1 adapter, caused similar transport velocity impairment but different spatial distributions. Together, our data reveals that stationary mitochondria within the axon interconnect with moving mitochondria through fusion and fission and that local inner membrane fusion between individual mitochondria mediates their global distribution. PMID:26742817

  16. Oligomerization of Fusogenic Peptides Promotes Membrane Fusion by Enhancing Membrane Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wai Leung; Ege, David S.; Lear, James D.; Hammer, Daniel A.; DeGrado, William F.

    2004-01-01

    A key element of membrane fusion reactions in biology is the involvement of specific fusion proteins. In many viruses, the proteins that mediate membrane fusion usually exist as homotrimers. Furthermore, they contain extended triple-helical coiled-coil domains and fusogenic peptides. It has been suggested that the coiled-coil domains present the fusogenic peptide in a conformation or geometry favorable for membrane fusion. To test the hypothesis that trimerization of fusogenic peptide is related to optimal fusion, we have designed and synthesized a triple-stranded coiled-coil X31 peptide, also known as the ccX31, which mimics the influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion peptide in the fusion-active state. We compared the membrane interactive properties of ccX31 versus the monomeric X31 fusogenic peptide. Our data show that trimerization enhances peptide-induced leakage of liposomal contents and lipid mixing. Furthermore, studies using micropipette aspiration of single vesicles reveal that ccX31 decreases lysis tension, τlysis, but not area expansion modulus, Ka, of phospholipid bilayers, whereas monomeric X31 peptide lowers both τlysis and Ka. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that oligomerization of fusogenic peptide promotes membrane fusion, possibly by enhancing localized destabilization of lipid bilayers. PMID:14695269

  17. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  18. Organelle acidification negatively regulates vacuole membrane fusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Desfougères, Yann; Vavassori, Stefano; Rompf, Maria; Gerasimaite, Ruta; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The V-ATPase is a proton pump consisting of a membrane-integral V0 sector and a peripheral V1 sector, which carries the ATPase activity. In vitro studies of yeast vacuole fusion and evidence from worms, flies, zebrafish and mice suggested that V0 interacts with the SNARE machinery for membrane fusion, that it promotes the induction of hemifusion and that this activity requires physical presence of V0 rather than its proton pump activity. A recent in vivo study in yeast has challenged these interpretations, concluding that fusion required solely lumenal acidification but not the V0 sector itself. Here, we identify the reasons for this discrepancy and reconcile it. We find that acute pharmacological or physiological inhibition of V-ATPase pump activity de-acidifies the vacuole lumen in living yeast cells within minutes. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that de-acidification induces vacuole fusion rather than inhibiting it. Cells expressing mutated V0 subunits that maintain vacuolar acidity were blocked in this fusion. Thus, proton pump activity of the V-ATPase negatively regulates vacuole fusion in vivo. Vacuole fusion in vivo does, however, require physical presence of a fusion-competent V0 sector. PMID:27363625

  19. Distinct structural rearrangements of the VSV glycoprotein drive membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Libersou, Sonia; Albertini, Aurélie A.V.; Ouldali, Malika; Maury, Virginie; Maheu, Christine; Raux, Hélène; de Haas, Felix; Roche, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    The entry of enveloped viruses into cells requires the fusion of viral and cellular membranes, driven by conformational changes in viral glycoproteins. Many studies have shown that fusion involves the cooperative action of a large number of these glycoproteins, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We used electron microscopy and tomography to study the low pH–induced fusion reaction catalyzed by vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (G). Pre- and post-fusion crystal structures were observed on virions at high and low pH, respectively. Individual fusion events with liposomes were also visualized. Fusion appears to be driven by two successive structural rearrangements of G at different sites on the virion. Fusion is initiated at the flat base of the particle. Glycoproteins located outside the contact zone between virions and liposomes then reorganize into regular arrays. We suggest that the formation of these arrays, which have been shown to be an intrinsic property of the G ectodomain, induces membrane constraints, achieving the fusion reaction. PMID:20921141

  20. Resolving single membrane fusion events on planar pore-spanning membranes

    PubMed Central

    Schwenen, Lando L. G.; Hubrich, Raphael; Milovanovic, Dragomir; Geil, Burkhard; Yang, Jian; Kros, Alexander; Jahn, Reinhard; Steinem, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Even though a number of different in vitro fusion assays have been developed to analyze protein mediated fusion, they still only partially capture the essential features of the in vivo situation. Here we established an in vitro fusion assay that mimics the fluidity and planar geometry of the cellular plasma membrane to be able to monitor fusion of single protein-containing vesicles. As a proof of concept, planar pore-spanning membranes harboring SNARE-proteins were generated on highly ordered functionalized 1.2 μm-sized pore arrays in Si3N4. Full mobility of the membrane components was demonstrated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Fusion was analyzed by two color confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy in a time resolved manner allowing to readily distinguish between vesicle docking, intermediate states such as hemifusion and full fusion. The importance of the membrane geometry on the fusion process was highlighted by comparing SNARE-mediated fusion with that of a minimal SNARE fusion mimetic. PMID:26165860

  1. Expansion of the fusion stalk and its implication for biological membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, Herre Jelger; Bubnis, Gregory; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, it has been widely accepted that membrane fusion proceeds via a hemifusion step before opening of the productive fusion pore. An initial hourglass-shaped lipid structure, the fusion stalk, is formed between the adjacent membrane leaflets (cis leaflets). It remains controversial if and how fusion proteins drive the subsequent transition (expansion) of the stalk into a fusion pore. Here, we propose a comprehensive and consistent thermodynamic understanding in terms of the underlying free-energy landscape of stalk expansion. We illustrate how the underlying free energy landscape of stalk expansion and the concomitant pathway is altered by subtle differences in membrane environment, such as leaflet composition, asymmetry, and flexibility. Nonleaky stalk expansion (stalk widening) requires the formation of a critical trans-leaflet contact. The fusion machinery can mechanically enforce trans-leaflet contact formation either by directly enforcing the trans-leaflets in close proximity, or by (electrostatically) condensing the area of the cis leaflets. The rate of these fast fusion reactions may not be primarily limited by the energetics but by the forces that the fusion proteins are able to exert. PMID:25024174

  2. Simulation of polyethylene glycol and calcium-mediated membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Pannuzzo, Martina; De Jong, Djurre H.; Marrink, Siewert J.; Raudino, Antonio

    2014-03-28

    We report on the mechanism of membrane fusion mediated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and Ca{sup 2+} by means of a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation approach. Our data provide a detailed view on the role of cations and polymer in modulating the interaction between negatively charged apposed membranes. The PEG chains cause a reduction of the inter-lamellar distance and cause an increase in concentration of divalent cations. When thermally driven fluctuations bring the membranes at close contact, a switch from cis to trans Ca{sup 2+}-lipid complexes stabilizes a focal contact acting as a nucleation site for further expansion of the adhesion region. Flipping of lipid tails induces subsequent stalk formation. Together, our results provide a molecular explanation for the synergistic effect of Ca{sup 2+} and PEG on membrane fusion.

  3. The Flocculating Cationic Polypetide from Moringa oleifera Seeds Damages Bacterial Cell Membranes by Causing Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Shebek, Kevin; Schantz, Allen B; Sines, Ian; Lauser, Kathleen; Velegol, Stephanie; Kumar, Manish

    2015-04-21

    A cationic protein isolated from the seeds of the Moringa oleifera tree has been extensively studied for use in water treatment in developing countries and has been proposed for use in antimicrobial and therapeutic applications. However, the molecular basis for the antimicrobial action of this peptide, Moringa oleifera cationic protein (MOCP), has not been previously elucidated. We demonstrate here that a dominant mechanism of MOCP antimicrobial activity is membrane fusion. We used a combination of cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and fluorescence assays to observe and study the kinetics of fusion of membranes in liposomes representing model microbial cells. We also conducted cryo-EM experiments on E. coli cells where MOCP was seen to fuse the inner and outer membranes. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of membrane vesicles with MOCP molecules were used to elucidate steps in peptide adsorption, stalk formation, and fusion between membranes. PMID:25845029

  4. Polysulfone membranes. III. Performance evaluation of polyethersulfone-PVP membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Tam, C.M.; Matsuura, T.; Tweddle, T.A. ); Hazlett, J.D. )

    1993-12-01

    The performance of membranes produced from casting solutions consisting of polyethersulfone (PES), poly-(N-vinyl-pyrrolidone) (PVP), and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) were systematically studied. Zero-shear casting solution viscosities for these polymer solutions were determined as a function of PES and PVP concentrations. Ultrafiltration membranes were then cast using the phase inversion technique and characterized by separation experiments using polyethylene glycols of various molecular weights as test solutes. A pore flow model was fitted to the resulting separation data to provide estimates of the average pore radius and membrane porosity. These parameters were used to compare laboratory results for this membrane casting solution system with performance data for commercially available polyethersulfone membranes. 15 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Membrane fusion of Semliki Forest virus involves homotrimers of the fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Wahlberg, J M; Bron, R; Wilschut, J; Garoff, H

    1992-01-01

    Infection of cells with enveloped viruses is accomplished through membrane fusion. The binding and fusion processes are mediated by the spike proteins in the envelope of the virus particle and usually involve a series of conformational changes in these proteins. We have studied the low-pH-mediated fusion process of the alphavirus Semliki Forest virus (SFV). The spike protein of SFV is composed of three copies of the protein heterodimer E2E1. This structure is resistant to solubilization in mild detergents such as Nonidet P-40 (NP40). We have recently shown that the spike structure is reorganized during virus entry into acidic endosomes (J. M. Wahlberg and H. Garoff, J. Cell Biol. 116:339-348, 1992). The original NP40-resistant heterodimer is dissociated, and the E1 subunits form new NP40-resistant protein oligomers. Here, we show that the new oligomer is represented by an E1 trimer. From studies that use an in vitro assay for fusion of SFV with liposomes, we show that the E1 trimer is efficiently expressed during virus-mediated membrane fusion. Time course studies show that both E1 trimer formation and fusion are fast processes, occurring in seconds. It was also possible to inhibit virus binding and fusion with a monoclonal antibody directed toward the trimeric E1. These results give support for a model in which the E1 trimeric structure is involved in the SFV-mediated fusion reaction. Images PMID:1433520

  6. Supported liquid membrane system for Cr(III) separation from Cr(III)/Cr(VI) mixtures.

    PubMed

    Religa, P; Rajewski, J; Gierycz, P; Swietlik, R

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of analyses of the chromium(III) transport process from mixtures of Cr(III)/Cr(VI) ions using supported liquid membranes (SLM), in which dinonylnaphthalene sulfonic acid (DNNSA) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA) were used as carriers. In both cases the membrane worked as a selective barrier for Cr(VI) ions. The increase in both the time of Cr(VI) ions-carrier interaction and the Cr(VI) concentration in the feed phase negatively influenced the Cr(III) separation. The polarizing layer consisting of Cr(VI) ions prevents the access of Cr(III) ions to the inter phase surface and leads to the deactivation of the carrier, which is the result of the strong oxidation properties of Cr(VI) ions. These factors meant that, in the case of the membrane with DNNSA, the membrane could not be used for the effective separation of Cr(III) from the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) mixture. On the other hand, the membrane with D2EHPA can be used for fast and efficient transport of Cr(III) ions, but only for strictly defined process parameters, i.e. where the level of chromium(VI) concentration is below 10(-3)M and with intensive feed phase mixing. PMID:24960010

  7. Distinct functional determinants of influenza hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovic, Tijana; Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is the critical step for infectious cell penetration by enveloped viruses. We have previously used single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics to study the molecular mechanism of influenza-virus envelope fusion. Published data on fusion inhibition by antibodies to the 'stem' of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) now allow us to incorporate into simulations the provision that some HAs are inactive. We find that more than half of the HAs are unproductive even for virions with no bound antibodies, but that the overall mechanism is extremely robust. Determining the fraction of competent HAs allows us to determine their rates of target-membrane engagement. Comparison of simulations with data from H3N2 and H1N1 viruses reveals three independent functional variables of HA-mediated membrane fusion closely linked to neutralization susceptibility. Evidence for compensatory changes in the evolved mechanism sets the stage for studies aiming to define the molecular constraints on HA evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11009.001 PMID:26613408

  8. INITIAL SIZE AND DYNAMICS OF VIRAL FUSION PORES ARE A FUNCTION OF THE FUSION PROTEIN MEDIATING MEMBRANE FUSION

    PubMed Central

    Plonsky, I.; Kingsley, D. H.; Rashtian, A.; Blank, P.S.; Zimmerberg, J.

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the role of the fusogenic protein in the initial size and dynamics of the pore that widens to finalize membrane fusion, two different fusion proteins expressed in the same cell line were investigated: the major glycoprotein of baculovirus Autographa californica (GP64) and the hemaggluttinin of influenza X31 (HA). The host Sf9 cells expressing these viral proteins, irrespective of protein species, fused to human red blood cells (RBC) upon acidification of the medium. High time resolution electrophysiological study of fusion pore conductance revealed fundamental differences in a) the initial pore conductance (pores created by HA were smaller than those created by GP64), b) the ability of pores to flicker (only HA-mediated pores flickered), and c) the time required for pore formation (HA-mediated pores took much longer to form following acidification). Thus 1) HA and GP64 have divergent electrophysiological phenotypes even when they fuse identical membranes, and 2) fusion proteins play a crucial role in determining initial fusion pore characteristics. The structure of the initial fusion pore detected by electrical conductance measurements is sensitive to the nature of the fusion protein. PMID:18208404

  9. Surface shape change during fusion of erythrocyte membranes is sensitive to membrane skeleton agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; Rosenberg, J D; Sowers, A E

    1994-01-01

    We previously reported that the induction of membrane fusion between pairs of erythrocyte ghosts is accompanied by the formation of a multipore fusion zone that undergoes an area expansion with condition-dependent characteristics. These characteristics allowed us to hypothesize substantial, if not major, involvement of the spectrin-based membrane skeleton in controlling this expansion. It was also found that the fusion zone, which first appears in phase optics as a flat diaphragm, has a lifetime that is also highly condition-dependent. We report here that 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, wheat germ agglutinin, diamide, and N-ethylmaleimide, all known to have binding sites primarily on skeleton components (including spectrin), have condition-dependent effects on specific components of the fusion zone diameter versus time expansion curve and the flat diaphragm lifetime. We also report a pH/ionic strength condition that causes a dramatic stabilization of flat diaphragms in a manner consistent with the known pH/ionic strength dependence of the spectrin calorimetric transition, thus further supporting the hypothesis of spectrin involvement. Our data suggest that the influence of the membrane skeleton on cell fusion is to restrain the rounding up that takes place after membrane fusion and that it may have variable, rather than fixed, mechanical properties. Data show that WGA, a known ligand for sialic acid, and DPG, a known metabolite, influences the flat diaphragm stability and late period expansion rates, raising the possibility that some of these mechanical properties are biologically regulated. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:7858126

  10. Cdc42 controls the dilation of the exocytotic fusion pore by regulating membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Bretou, Marine; Jouannot, Ouardane; Fanget, Isabelle; Pierobon, Paolo; Larochette, Nathanaël; Gestraud, Pierre; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina; Gasman, Stéphane; Desnos, Claire; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Darchen, François

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion underlies multiple processes, including exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membrane fusion starts with the formation of a narrow fusion pore. Radial expansion of this pore completes the process and allows fast release of secretory compounds, but this step remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibiting the expression of the small GTPase Cdc42 or preventing its activation with a dominant negative Cdc42 construct in human neuroendocrine cells impaired the release process by compromising fusion pore enlargement. Consequently the mode of vesicle exocytosis was shifted from full-collapse fusion to kiss-and-run. Remarkably, Cdc42-knockdown cells showed reduced membrane tension, and the artificial increase of membrane tension restored fusion pore enlargement. Moreover, inhibiting the motor protein myosin II by blebbistatin decreased membrane tension, as well as fusion pore dilation. We conclude that membrane tension is the driving force for fusion pore dilation and that Cdc42 is a key regulator of this force. PMID:25143404

  11. Decoding signals for membrane protein assembly using alkaline phosphatase fusions.

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, K; Ehrmann, M; Beckwith, J

    1991-01-01

    We have used genetic methods to investigate the role of the different domains of a bacterial cytoplasmic membrane protein, MalF, in determining its topology. This was done by analyzing the effects of MalF topology of deleting various domains of the protein using MalF-alkaline phosphatase fusion proteins. Our results show that the cytoplasmic domains of the protein are the pre-eminent topogenic signals. These domains contain information that determines their cytoplasmic location and, thus, the orientation of the membrane spanning segments surrounding them. Periplasmic domains do not appear to have equivalent information specifying their location and membrane spanning segments do not contain information defining their orientation in the membrane. The strength of cytoplasmic domains as topogenic signals varies, correlated with the density of positively charged amino acids within them. Images PMID:1915262

  12. A conserved regulatory mode in exocytic membrane fusion revealed by Mso1p membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Zhao, Hongxia; Aro, Nina; Yuan, Qiang; Chernov, Konstantin; Peränen, Johan; Lappalainen, Pekka; Jäntti, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Sec1/Munc18 family proteins are important components of soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex–mediated membrane fusion processes. However, the molecular interactions and the mechanisms involved in Sec1p/Munc18 control and SNARE complex assembly are not well understood. We provide evidence that Mso1p, a Sec1p- and Sec4p-binding protein, interacts with membranes to regulate membrane fusion. We identify two membrane-binding sites on Mso1p. The N-terminal region inserts into the lipid bilayer and appears to interact with the plasma membrane, whereas the C-terminal region of the protein binds phospholipids mainly through electrostatic interactions and may associate with secretory vesicles. The Mso1p membrane interactions are essential for correct subcellular localization of Mso1p–Sec1p complexes and for membrane fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These characteristics are conserved in the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of β-amyloid precursor protein–binding Mint1, the mammalian homologue of Mso1p. Both Mint1 PTB domain and Mso1p induce vesicle aggregation/clustering in vitro, supporting a role in a membrane-associated process. The results identify Mso1p as a novel lipid-interacting protein in the SNARE complex assembly machinery. Furthermore, our data suggest that a general mode of interaction, consisting of a lipid-binding protein, a Rab family GTPase, and a Sec1/Munc18 family protein, is important in all SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events. PMID:23197474

  13. A conserved regulatory mode in exocytic membrane fusion revealed by Mso1p membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Zhao, Hongxia; Aro, Nina; Yuan, Qiang; Chernov, Konstantin; Peränen, Johan; Lappalainen, Pekka; Jäntti, Jussi

    2013-02-01

    Sec1/Munc18 family proteins are important components of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex-mediated membrane fusion processes. However, the molecular interactions and the mechanisms involved in Sec1p/Munc18 control and SNARE complex assembly are not well understood. We provide evidence that Mso1p, a Sec1p- and Sec4p-binding protein, interacts with membranes to regulate membrane fusion. We identify two membrane-binding sites on Mso1p. The N-terminal region inserts into the lipid bilayer and appears to interact with the plasma membrane, whereas the C-terminal region of the protein binds phospholipids mainly through electrostatic interactions and may associate with secretory vesicles. The Mso1p membrane interactions are essential for correct subcellular localization of Mso1p-Sec1p complexes and for membrane fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These characteristics are conserved in the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of β-amyloid precursor protein-binding Mint1, the mammalian homologue of Mso1p. Both Mint1 PTB domain and Mso1p induce vesicle aggregation/clustering in vitro, supporting a role in a membrane-associated process. The results identify Mso1p as a novel lipid-interacting protein in the SNARE complex assembly machinery. Furthermore, our data suggest that a general mode of interaction, consisting of a lipid-binding protein, a Rab family GTPase, and a Sec1/Munc18 family protein, is important in all SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events. PMID:23197474

  14. Functional Analysis of the Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 Terminal Fusion Loops and Interactions with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Sicong

    2012-01-01

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) glycoprotein GP64 is the major envelope protein of the budded virus (BV). GP64 is a class III fusion protein that mediates BV attachment to the cell surface and low-pH-triggered membrane fusion between the BV envelope and the endosome membrane during entry. Class III fusion proteins contain terminal looped structures that are believed to interact with membranes. To examine the functions of 3 loops found at the apex of the GP64 postfusion structure, we generated 2-alanine substitutions that scanned the two so-called fusion loops (loop 1 and loop 2) plus an adjacent loop structure (loop 3) that is closely attached to loop 2 and is also found at the apex of the GP64 postfusion structure. We identified essential residues from Y75 to T86 (loop 1) and N149 to H156 (loop 2) that are required for fusion activity, but no essential residues in loop 3. Further analysis revealed that critical fusion loop residues fall within two groups that are associated with either membrane merger (hemifusion) or fusion pore expansion. We next examined the interactions of soluble GP64 proteins and BV with membranes composed of various phospholipids. BV interacted directly with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) comprised of phospholipids phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid (PC/PA) or phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine (PC/PS) under neutral and acidic pH. We also examined the interactions of soluble GP64 constructs containing substitutions of the most hydrophobic residues within each of the two fusion loops. We found that a 2-residue substitution in either single loop (loop 1 [positions 81 and 82] or loop 2 [positions 153 and 154]) was not sufficient to substantially reduce the GP64-liposome interaction, but the same substitutions in both fusion loops severely reduced the GP64-liposome association at neutral pH. These results suggest that critical hydrophobic residues in both fusion loops may be involved in the

  15. HIV fusion peptide penetrates, disorders, and softens T-cell membrane mimics.

    PubMed

    Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Chan, Rob; Kooijman, Edgar; Uppamoochikkal, Pradeep; Qiang, Wei; Weliky, David P; Nagle, John F

    2010-09-10

    This work investigates the interaction of N-terminal gp41 fusion peptide (FP) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with model membranes in order to elucidate how FP leads to fusion of HIV and T-cell membranes. FP constructs were (i) wild-type FP23 (23 N-terminal amino acids of gp41), (ii) water-soluble monomeric FP that adds six lysines on the C-terminus of FP23 (FPwsm), and (iii) the C-terminus covalently linked trimeric version (FPtri) of FPwsm. Model membranes were (i) LM3 (a T-cell mimic), (ii) 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (iii) 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/30 mol% cholesterol, (iv) 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and (v) 1,2-dierucoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/30 mol% cholesterol. Diffuse synchrotron low-angle x-ray scattering from fully hydrated samples, supplemented by volumetric data, showed that FP23 and FPtri penetrate into the hydrocarbon region and cause membranes to thin. Depth of penetration appears to depend upon a complex combination of factors including bilayer thickness, presence of cholesterol, and electrostatics. X-ray data showed an increase in curvature in hexagonal phase 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine, which further indicates that FP23 penetrates into the hydrocarbon region rather than residing in the interfacial headgroup region. Low-angle x-ray scattering data also yielded the bending modulus K(C), a measure of membrane stiffness, and wide-angle x-ray scattering yielded the S(xray) orientational order parameter. Both FP23 and FPtri decreased K(C) and S(xray) considerably, while the weak effect of FPwsm suggests that it did not partition strongly into LM3 model membranes. Our results are consistent with the HIV FP disordering and softening the T-cell membrane, thereby lowering the activation energy for viral membrane fusion. PMID:20655315

  16. Fusion Activity of HIV gp41 Fusion Domain is Related to its Secondary Structure and Depth of Membrane Insertion in a Cholesterol-Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Alex L.; Moorthy, Anna Eswara; Li, Yinling; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2013-01-01

    The HIV gp41 fusion domain plays a critical role in membrane fusion during viral entry. A thorough understanding of the relationship between the structure and activity of the fusion domain in different lipid environments helps to formulate mechanistic models on how it might function in mediating membrane fusion. The secondary structure of the fusion domain in small liposomes composed of different lipid mixtures was investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. In membranes containing less than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed an α-helix and in membranes containing equal to or more than 30 mol% cholesterol the fusion domain formed β-sheet secondary structure. EPR spectra of spin-labeled fusion domains also indicated different conformations in membranes with and without cholesterol. Power saturation EPR data were further used to determine the orientation and depth of α-helical fusion domains in lipid bilayers. Fusion and membrane perturbation activities of the gp41 fusion domain were measured by lipid mixing and contents leakage. The fusion domain fused membranes in both its helical and β-sheet forms. High cholesterol, which induced β-sheet, promoted fusion, but acidic lipids, which promoted relatively deep membrane insertion as an α-helix, also induced fusion. The results indicate that the structure of the HIV gp41 fusion domain is plastic and depends critically on the lipid environment. Provided their membrane insertion is deep, α-helical and β-sheet conformations contribute to membrane fusion. PMID:22343048

  17. Munc18a Scaffolds SNARE Assembly to Promote Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodkey, Travis L.; Liu, Song; Barry, Meagan

    2008-01-01

    Munc18a is an SM protein required for SNARE-mediated fusion. The molecular details of how Munc18a acts to enhance neurosecretion have remained elusive. Here, we use in vitro fusion assays to characterize how specific interactions between Munc18a and the neuronal SNAREs enhance the rate and extent of fusion. We show that Munc18a interacts directly and functionally with the preassembled t-SNARE complex. Analysis of Munc18a point mutations indicates that Munc18a interacts with helix C of the Syntaxin1a NRD in the t-SNARE complex. Replacement of the t-SNARE SNAP25b with yeast Sec9c had little effect, suggesting that Munc18a has minimal contact with SNAP25b within the t-SNARE complex. A chimeric Syntaxin built of the Syntaxin1a NRD and the H3 domain of yeast Sso1p and paired with Sec9c eliminated stimulation of fusion, suggesting that Munc18a/Syntaxin1a H3 domain contacts are important. Additionally, a Syntaxin1A mutant lacking a flexible linker region that allows NRD movement abolished stimulation of fusion. These experiments suggest that Munc18a binds to the Syntaxin1a NRD and H3 domain within the assembled t-SNARE complex, positioning them for productive VAMP2 binding. In this capacity, Munc18a serves as a platform for trans-SNARE complex assembly that facilitates efficient SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:18829865

  18. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca(2+) sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca(2+)-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca(2+). Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. PMID:27083046

  19. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca2+-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca2+. Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14211.001 PMID:27083046

  20. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 protein: Analysis of domain I and V amino acid interactions and membrane fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qianlong; Blissard, Gary W; Liu, Tong-Xian; Li, Zhaofei

    2016-01-15

    The Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus GP64 is a class III viral fusion protein. Although the post-fusion structure of GP64 has been solved, its pre-fusion structure and the detailed mechanism of conformational change are unknown. In GP64, domain V is predicted to interact with two domain I segments that flank fusion loop 2. To evaluate the significance of the amino acids involved in these interactions, we examined 24 amino acid positions that represent interacting and conserved residues within domains I and V. In several cases, substitution of a single amino acid involved in a predicted interaction disrupted membrane fusion activity, but no single amino acid pair appears to be absolutely required. We identified 4 critical residues in domain V (G438, W439, T452, and T456) that are important for membrane fusion, and two residues (G438 and W439) that appear to be important for formation or stability of the pre-fusion conformation of GP64. PMID:26655244

  1. An Ion Switch Regulates Fusion of Charged Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Siepi, Evgenios; Lutz, Silke; Meyer, Sylke; Panzner, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify the recruitment of solvent ions to lipid membranes as the dominant regulator of lipid phase behavior. Our data demonstrate that binding of counterions to charged lipids promotes the formation of lamellar membranes, whereas their absence can induce fusion. The mechanism applies to anionic and cationic liposomes, as well as the recently introduced amphoteric liposomes. In the latter, an additional pH-dependent lipid salt formation between anionic and cationic lipids must occur, as indicated by the depletion of membrane-bound ions in a zone around pH 5. Amphoteric liposomes fuse under these conditions but form lamellar structures at both lower and higher pH values. The integration of these observations into the classic lipid shape theory yielded a quantitative link between lipid and solvent composition and the physical state of the lipid assembly. The key parameter of the new model, κ(pH), describes the membrane phase behavior of charged membranes in response to their ion loading in a quantitative way. PMID:21575575

  2. The Pathway of Membrane Fusion Catalyzed by Influenza Hemagglutinin: Restriction of Lipids, Hemifusion, and Lipidic Fusion Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Frolov, Vadim A.; Leikina, Eugenia; Bronk, Peter; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of bilayer unification in biological fusion is unclear. We reversibly arrested hemagglutinin (HA)-mediated cell–cell fusion right before fusion pore opening. A low-pH conformation of HA was required to form this intermediate and to ensure fusion beyond it. We present evidence indicating that outer monolayers of the fusing membranes were merged and continuous in this intermediate, but HA restricted lipid mixing. Depending on the surface density of HA and the membrane lipid composition, this restricted hemifusion intermediate either transformed into a fusion pore or expanded into an unrestricted hemifusion, without pores but with unrestricted lipid mixing. Our results suggest that restriction of lipid flux by a ring of activated HA is necessary for successful fusion, during which a lipidic fusion pore develops in a local and transient hemifusion diaphragm. PMID:9508770

  3. HIV gp41-Mediated Membrane Fusion Occurs at Edges of Cholesterol-Rich Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Kiessling, Volker; Simmons, James A.; White, Judith M.; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid rafts in plasma membranes have emerged as possible platforms for entry of HIV and other viruses into cells. However, how lipid phase heterogeneity contributes to viral entry is little known due to the fine-grained and still poorly understood complexity of biological membranes. We used model systems mimicking HIV envelopes and T-cell membranes and showed that raft-like (Lo phase) lipid domains are necessary and sufficient for efficient membrane targeting and fusion. Interestingly, membrane binding and fusion was low in homogeneous Ld and Lo phase membranes, indicating that lipid phase heterogeneity is essential. The HIV fusion peptide preferentially targeted to Lo/Ld boundary regions and promoted full fusion at the interface between ordered and disordered lipids. Ld phase vesicles proceeded only to hemifusion. Thus, we propose that the edges, but not the areas of raft-like ordered lipid domains are vital for HIV entry and membrane fusion. PMID:25915200

  4. The Plasma Membrane Proteins Prm1 and Fig1 Ascertain Fidelity of Membrane Fusion during Yeast Mating

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Alex; Walter, Peter

    2007-01-01

    As for most cell–cell fusion events, the molecular details of membrane fusion during yeast mating are poorly understood. The multipass membrane protein Prm1 is the only known component that acts at the step of bilayer fusion. In its absence, mutant mating pairs lyse or arrest in the mating reaction with tightly apposed plasma membranes. We show that deletion of FIG 1, which controls pheromone-induced Ca2+ influx, yields similar cell fusion defects. Although extracellular Ca2+ is not required for efficient cell fusion of wild-type cells, cell fusion in prm1 mutant mating pairs is dramatically reduced when Ca2+ is removed. This enhanced fusion defect is due to lysis. Time-lapse microscopy reveals that fusion and lysis events initiate with identical kinetics, suggesting that both outcomes result from engagement of the fusion machinery. The yeast synaptotagmin orthologue and Ca2+ binding protein Tcb3 has a role in reducing lysis of prm1 mutants, which opens the possibility that the observed role of Ca2+ is to engage a wound repair mechanism. Thus, our results suggest that Prm1 and Fig1 have a role in enhancing membrane fusion and maintaining its fidelity. Their absence results in frequent mating pair lysis, which is counteracted by Ca2+-dependent membrane repair. PMID:17151357

  5. In vitro assay using engineered yeast vacuoles for neuronal SNARE-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Joon; Lee, Miriam; Kang, KyeongJin; Song, Woo Keun; Jun, Youngsoo

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular membrane fusion requires not only SNARE proteins but also other regulatory proteins such as the Rab and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) family proteins. Although neuronal SNARE proteins alone can drive the fusion between synthetic liposomes, it remains unclear whether they are also sufficient to induce the fusion of biological membranes. Here, through the use of engineered yeast vacuoles bearing neuronal SNARE proteins, we show that neuronal SNAREs can induce membrane fusion between yeast vacuoles and that this fusion does not require the function of the Rab protein Ypt7p or the SM family protein Vps33p, both of which are essential for normal yeast vacuole fusion. Although excess vacuolar SNARE proteins were also shown to mediate Rab-bypass fusion, this fusion required homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex, which bears Vps33p and was accompanied by extensive membrane lysis. We also show that this neuronal SNARE-driven vacuole fusion can be stimulated by the neuronal SM protein Munc18 and blocked by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E, a well-known inhibitor of synaptic vesicle fusion. Taken together, our results suggest that neuronal SNARE proteins are sufficient to induce biological membrane fusion, and that this new assay can be used as a simple and complementary method for investigating synaptic vesicle fusion mechanisms. PMID:24821814

  6. In vitro assay using engineered yeast vacuoles for neuronal SNARE-mediated membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young-Joon; Lee, Miriam; Kang, KyeongJin; Song, Woo Keun; Jun, Youngsoo

    2014-05-27

    Intracellular membrane fusion requires not only SNARE proteins but also other regulatory proteins such as the Rab and Sec1/Munc18 (SM) family proteins. Although neuronal SNARE proteins alone can drive the fusion between synthetic liposomes, it remains unclear whether they are also sufficient to induce the fusion of biological membranes. Here, through the use of engineered yeast vacuoles bearing neuronal SNARE proteins, we show that neuronal SNAREs can induce membrane fusion between yeast vacuoles and that this fusion does not require the function of the Rab protein Ypt7p or the SM family protein Vps33p, both of which are essential for normal yeast vacuole fusion. Although excess vacuolar SNARE proteins were also shown to mediate Rab-bypass fusion, this fusion required homotypic fusion and vacuole protein sorting complex, which bears Vps33p and was accompanied by extensive membrane lysis. We also show that this neuronal SNARE-driven vacuole fusion can be stimulated by the neuronal SM protein Munc18 and blocked by botulinum neurotoxin serotype E, a well-known inhibitor of synaptic vesicle fusion. Taken together, our results suggest that neuronal SNARE proteins are sufficient to induce biological membrane fusion, and that this new assay can be used as a simple and complementary method for investigating synaptic vesicle fusion mechanisms. PMID:24821814

  7. Single residue deletions along the length of the influenza HA fusion peptide lead to inhibition of membrane fusion function

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, William A.; Thoennes, Sudha; Bradley, Konrad C.; Galloway, Summer E.; Talekar, Ganesh R.; Cummings, Sandra F.; Vareckova, Eva; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2009-11-25

    A panel of eight single amino acid deletion mutants was generated within the first 24 residues of the fusion peptide domain of the of the hemagglutinin (HA) of A/Aichi/2/68 influenza A virus (H3N2 subtype). The mutant HAs were analyzed for folding, cell surface transport, cleavage activation, capacity to undergo acid-induced conformational changes, and membrane fusion activity. We found that the mutant DELTAF24, at the C-terminal end of the fusion peptide, was expressed in a non-native conformation, whereas all other deletion mutants were transported to the cell surface and could be cleaved into HA1 and HA2 to activate membrane fusion potential. Furthermore, upon acidification these cleaved HAs were able to undergo the characteristic structural rearrangements that are required for fusion. Despite this, all mutants were inhibited for fusion activity based on two separate assays. The results indicate that the mutant fusion peptide domains associate with target membranes in a non-functional fashion, and suggest that structural features along the length of the fusion peptide are likely to be relevant for optimal membrane fusion activity.

  8. Parameters affecting the fusion of unilamellar phospholipid vesicles with planar bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, F S; Akabas, M H; Zimmerberg, J; Finkelstein, A

    1984-03-01

    It was previously shown (Cohen, F. S., J. Zimmerberg, and A. Finkelstein, 1980, J. Gen. Physiol., 75:251-270) that multilamellar phospholipid vesicles can fuse with decane-containing phospholipid bilayer membranes. An essential requirement for fusion was an osmotic gradient across the planar membrane, with the vesicle-containing (cis) side hyperosmotic with respect to the opposite (trans) side. We now report that unilamellar vesicles will fuse with "hydrocarbon-free" membranes subject to these same osmotic conditions. Thus the same conditions that apply to fusion of multilamellar vesicles with planar bilayer membranes also apply to fusion of unilamellar vesicles with these membranes, and hydrocarbon is not required for the fusion process. If the vesicles and/or planar membrane contain negatively charged lipids, divalent cation (approximately 15 mM Ca++) is required in the cis compartment (in addition to the osmotic gradient across the membrane) to obtain substantial fusion rates. On the other hand, vesicles made from uncharged lipids readily fuse with planar phosphatidylethanolamine planar membranes in the near absence of divalent cation with just an osmotic gradient. Vesicles fuse much more readily with phosphatidylethanolamine-containing than with phosphatidylcholine-containing planar membranes. Although hydrocarbon (decane) is not required in the planar membrane for fusion, it does affect the rate of fusion and causes the fusion process to be dependent on stirring in the cis compartment. PMID:6699081

  9. Membrane organization and cell fusion during mating in fission yeast requires multipass membrane protein Prm1.

    PubMed

    Curto, M-Ángeles; Sharifmoghadam, Mohammad Reza; Calpena, Eduardo; De León, Nagore; Hoya, Marta; Doncel, Cristina; Leatherwood, Janet; Valdivieso, M-Henar

    2014-04-01

    The involvement of Schizosaccharomyces pombe prm1(+) in cell fusion during mating and its relationship with other genes required for this process have been addressed. S. pombe prm1Δ mutant exhibits an almost complete blockade in cell fusion and an abnormal distribution of the plasma membrane and cell wall in the area of cell-cell interaction. The distribution of cellular envelopes is similar to that described for mutants devoid of the Fig1-related claudin-like Dni proteins; however, prm1(+) and the dni(+) genes act in different subpathways. Time-lapse analyses show that in the wild-type S. pombe strain, the distribution of phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane undergoes some modification before an opening is observed in the cross wall at the cell-cell contact region. In the prm1Δ mutant, this membrane modification does not take place, and the cross wall between the mating partners is not extensively degraded; plasma membrane forms invaginations and fingers that sometimes collapse/retract and that are sometimes strengthened by the synthesis of cell-wall material. Neither prm1Δ nor prm1Δ dniΔ zygotes lyse after cell-cell contact in medium containing and lacking calcium. Response to drugs that inhibit lipid synthesis or interfere with lipids is different in wild-type, prm1Δ, and dni1Δ strains, suggesting that membrane structure/organization/dynamics is different in all these strains and that Prm1p and the Dni proteins exert some functions required to guarantee correct membrane organization that are critical for cell fusion. PMID:24514900

  10. Membrane Organization and Cell Fusion During Mating in Fission Yeast Requires Multipass Membrane Protein Prm1

    PubMed Central

    Curto, M.-Ángeles; Sharifmoghadam, Mohammad Reza; Calpena, Eduardo; De León, Nagore; Hoya, Marta; Doncel, Cristina; Leatherwood, Janet; Valdivieso, M.-Henar

    2014-01-01

    The involvement of Schizosaccharomyces pombe prm1+ in cell fusion during mating and its relationship with other genes required for this process have been addressed. S. pombe prm1Δ mutant exhibits an almost complete blockade in cell fusion and an abnormal distribution of the plasma membrane and cell wall in the area of cell–cell interaction. The distribution of cellular envelopes is similar to that described for mutants devoid of the Fig1-related claudin-like Dni proteins; however, prm1+ and the dni+ genes act in different subpathways. Time-lapse analyses show that in the wild-type S. pombe strain, the distribution of phosphatidylserine in the cytoplasmic leaflet of the plasma membrane undergoes some modification before an opening is observed in the cross wall at the cell–cell contact region. In the prm1Δ mutant, this membrane modification does not take place, and the cross wall between the mating partners is not extensively degraded; plasma membrane forms invaginations and fingers that sometimes collapse/retract and that are sometimes strengthened by the synthesis of cell-wall material. Neither prm1Δ nor prm1Δ dniΔ zygotes lyse after cell–cell contact in medium containing and lacking calcium. Response to drugs that inhibit lipid synthesis or interfere with lipids is different in wild-type, prm1Δ, and dni1Δ strains, suggesting that membrane structure/organization/dynamics is different in all these strains and that Prm1p and the Dni proteins exert some functions required to guarantee correct membrane organization that are critical for cell fusion. PMID:24514900

  11. Henipavirus mediated membrane fusion, virus entry and targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Deborah L; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Broder, Christopher C

    2012-02-01

    The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G) and class I fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins. PMID:22470837

  12. Henipavirus Mediated Membrane Fusion, Virus Entry and Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Deborah L.; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B.; Broder, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G) and class I fusion (F) envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins. PMID:22470837

  13. Revisit the Correlation between the Elastic Mechanics and Fusion of Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zih-An; Tsang, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Si-Han; Chen, Yi-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a vital process in key cellular events. The fusion capability of a membrane depends on its elastic properties and varies with its lipid composition. It is believed that as the composition varies, the consequent change in C0 (monolayer spontaneous curvature) is the major factor dictating fusion, owing to the associated variation in GEs (elastic energies) of the fusion intermediates (e.g. stalk). By exploring the correlations among fusion, C0 and Kcp (monolayer bending modulus), we revisit this long-held belief and re-examine the fusogenic contributions of some relevant factors. We observe that not only C0 but also Kcp variations affect fusion, with depression in Kcp leading to suppression in fusion. Variations in GEs and inter-membrane interactions cannot account for the Kcp-fusion correlation; fusion is suppressed even as the GEs decrease with Kcp, indicating the presence of factor(s) with fusogenic importance overtaking that of GE. Furthermore, analyses find that the C0 influence on fusion is effected via modulating GE of the pre-fusion planar membrane, rather than stalk. The results support a recent proposition calling for a paradigm shift from the conventional view of fusion and may reshape our understanding to the roles of fusogenic proteins in regulating cellular fusion machineries. PMID:27534263

  14. Analysis of residues near the fusion peptide in the influenza hemagglutinin structure for roles in triggering membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thoennes, Sudha; Li Zhunan; Lee, Byeong-Jae; Langley, William A.; Skehel, John J.; Russell, Rupert J.; Steinhauer, David A.

    2008-01-20

    Influenza virus entry occurs in endosomes, where acidification triggers irreversible conformational changes of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA) that are required for membrane fusion. The acid-induced HA structural rearrangements have been well documented, and several models have been proposed to relate these to the process of membrane fusion. However, details regarding the role of specific residues in the initiation of structural rearrangements and membrane fusion are lacking. Here we report the results of studies on the HA of A/Aichi/2/68 virus (H3 subtype), in which mutants with changes at several ionizable residues in the vicinity of the 'fusion peptide' were analyzed for their effects on the pH at which conformational changes and membrane fusion occur. A variety of phenotypes was obtained, including examples of substitutions that lead to an increase in HA stability at reduced pH. Of particular note was the observation that a histidine to tyrosine substitution at HA1 position 17 resulted in a decrease in pH at which HA structural changes and membrane fusion take place by 0.3 relative to WT. The results are discussed in relation to possible mechanisms by which HA structural rearrangements are initiated at low pH and clade-specific differences near the fusion peptide.

  15. Exocytotic fusion pore stability and topological defects in the membrane with orientational degree of ordering.

    PubMed

    Jesenek, Dalija; Perutková, Sárka; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Kralj, Samo; Iglič, Aleš

    2012-01-01

    Regulated exocytosis is a process that strongly depends on the formation and stability of the fusion pore. It was indicated experimentally and theoretically that narrow and highly curved fusion pore may be stabilized by accumulation of anisotropic membrane components possessing orientational ordering. On the other hand, narrow fusion pore may also undergo repetitive opening and closing, disruption in the so called kiss and run process or become completely opened in the process of full fusion of the vesicle with the membrane. In this paper we attempt to elucidate the subtle interplay between the stabilizing and destabilizing processes in the fusion neck. A possible physical mechanism which may lead to disruption of the stable fusion pore or complete fusion of the vesicle with the membrane is discussed. It is indicated that topologically driven defects of the in-plane orientational membrane ordering in the region of the fusion pore may disrupt the fusion. Alternatively, it may facilitate repetitive opening and closing of the fusion pore or induce full fusion of the vesicle with the target membrane. PMID:22541648

  16. Selective transport of Fe(III) using ionic imprinted polymer (IIP) membrane particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djunaidi, Muhammad Cholid; Jumina, Siswanta, Dwi; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2015-12-01

    The membrane particles was prepared from polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polymer IIP with weight ratios of 1: 2 and 1: 1 using different adsorbent templates and casting thickness. The permeability of membrane towards Fe(III) and also mecanism of transport were studied. The selectivity of the membrane for Fe(III) was studied by performing adsorption experiments also with Cr(III) separately. In this study, the preparation of Ionic Imprinted Polymer (IIP) membrane particles for selective transport of Fe (III) had been done using polyeugenol as functional polymer. Polyeugenol was then imprinted with Fe (III) and then crosslinked with PEGDE under alkaline condition to produce polyeugenol-Fe-PEGDE polymer aggregates. The agrregates was then crushed and sieved using mesh size of 80 and the powder was then used to prepare the membrane particles by mixing it with PVA (Mr 125,000) solution in 1-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent. The membrane was obtained after casting at a speed of 25 m/s and soaking in NaOH solution overnight. The membrane sheet was then cut and Fe(III) was removed by acid to produce IIP membrane particles. Analysis of the membrane and its constituent was done by XRD, SEM and size selectivity test. Experimental results showed the transport of Fe(III) was faster with the decrease of membrane thickness, while the higher concentration of template ion correlates with higher Fe(III) being transported. However, the transport of Fe(III) was slower for higher concentration of PVA in the membrane. IImparticles works through retarded permeation mechanism, where Fe(III) was bind to the active side of IIP. The active side of IIP membrane was dominated by the -OH groups. The selectivity of all IIP membranes was confirmed as they were all unable to transport Cr (III), while NIP (Non-imprinted Polymer) membrane was able transport Cr (III).

  17. Paramyxovirus membrane fusion: Lessons from the F and HN atomic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Robert A. . E-mail: ralamb@northwestern.edu; Paterson, Reay G.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.

    2006-01-05

    Paramyxoviruses enter cells by fusion of their lipid envelope with the target cell plasma membrane. Fusion of the viral membrane with the plasma membrane allows entry of the viral genome into the cytoplasm. For paramyxoviruses, membrane fusion occurs at neutral pH, but the trigger mechanism that controls the viral entry machinery such that it occurs at the right time and in the right place remains to be elucidated. Two viral glycoproteins are key to the infection process-an attachment protein that varies among different paramyxoviruses and the fusion (F) protein, which is found in all paramyxoviruses. For many of the paramyxoviruses (parainfluenza viruses 1-5, mumps virus, Newcastle disease virus and others), the attachment protein is the hemagglutinin/neuraminidase (HN) protein. In the last 5 years, atomic structures of paramyxovirus F and HN proteins have been reported. The knowledge gained from these structures towards understanding the mechanism of viral membrane fusion is described.

  18. Viral fusion protein transmembrane domain adopts β-strand structure to facilitate membrane topological changes for virus–cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Michelle W.; Waring, Alan J.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins such as HIV gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is traditionally viewed as a passive α-helical anchor of the protein to the virus envelope during its merger with the cell membrane. The conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of these fusion protein TMDs have so far eluded high-resolution structure characterization because of their highly hydrophobic nature. Using magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we show that the TMD of the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein adopts lipid-dependent conformations and interactions with the membrane and water. In phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes, the TMD is predominantly α-helical, but in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) membranes, the TMD changes significantly to the β-strand conformation. Measured order parameters indicate that the strand segments are immobilized and thus oligomerized. 31P NMR spectra and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data show that this β-strand–rich conformation converts the PE membrane to a bicontinuous cubic phase, which is rich in negative Gaussian curvature that is characteristic of hemifusion intermediates and fusion pores. 1H-31P 2D correlation spectra and 2H spectra show that the PE membrane with or without the TMD is much less hydrated than PC and PG membranes, suggesting that the TMD works with the natural dehydration tendency of PE to facilitate membrane merger. These results suggest a new viral-fusion model in which the TMD actively promotes membrane topological changes during fusion using the β-strand as the fusogenic conformation. PMID:26283363

  19. Inhibition of HIV-1 endocytosis allows lipid mixing at the plasma membrane, but not complete fusion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently provided evidence that HIV-1 enters HeLa-derived TZM-bl and lymphoid CEMss cells by fusing with endosomes, whereas its fusion with the plasma membrane does not proceed beyond the lipid mixing step. The mechanism of restriction of HIV-1 fusion at the cell surface and/or the factors that aid the virus entry from endosomes remain unclear. Results We examined HIV-1 fusion with a panel of target cells lines and with primary CD4+ T cells. Kinetic measurements of fusion combined with time-resolved imaging of single viruses further reinforced the notion that HIV-1 enters the cells via endocytosis and fusion with endosomes. Furthermore, we attempted to deliberately redirect virus fusion to the plasma membrane, using two experimental strategies. First, the fusion reaction was synchronized by pre-incubating the viruses with cells at reduced temperature to allow CD4 and coreceptors engagement, but not the virus uptake or fusion. Subsequent shift to a physiological temperature triggered accelerated virus uptake followed by entry from endosomes, but did not permit fusion at the cell surface. Second, blocking HIV-1 endocytosis by a small-molecule dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, resulted in transfer of viral lipids to the plasma membrane without any detectable release of the viral content into the cytosol. We also found that a higher concentration of dynasore is required to block the HIV-endosome fusion compared to virus internalization. Conclusions Our results further support the notion that HIV-1 enters disparate cell types through fusion with endosomes. The block of HIV-1 fusion with the plasma membrane at a post-lipid mixing stage shows that this membrane is not conducive to fusion pore formation and/or enlargement. The ability of dynasore to interfere with the virus-endosome fusion suggests that dynamin could be involved in two distinct steps of HIV-1 entry - endocytosis and fusion within intracellular compartments. PMID:22145853

  20. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Katarzyna E.; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J.; Kasson, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol’s ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  1. Influenza viral membrane fusion is sensitive to sterol concentration but surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Katarzyna E; Wrona, Dominik; Rawle, Robert J; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virions are enriched in cholesterol relative to the plasma membrane from which they bud. Previous work has shown that fusion between influenza virus and synthetic liposomes is sensitive to the amount of cholesterol in either the virus or the target membrane. Here, we test the chemical properties of cholesterol required to promote influenza fusion by replacing cholesterol with other sterols and assaying viral fusion kinetics. We find that influenza fusion with liposomes is surprisingly robust to sterol chemical identity, showing no significant dependence on sterol identity in target membranes for any of the sterols tested. In the viral membrane, lanosterol slowed fusion somewhat, while polar sterols produced a more pronounced slowing and inhibition of fusion. No other sterols tested showed a significant perturbation in fusion rates, including ones previously shown to alter membrane bending moduli or phase behavior. Although fusion rates depend on viral cholesterol, they thus do not require cholesterol's ability to support liquid-liquid phase coexistence. Using electron cryo-microscopy, we further find that sterol-dependent changes to hemagglutinin spatial patterning in the viral membrane do not require liquid-liquid phase coexistence. We therefore speculate that local sterol-hemagglutinin interactions in the viral envelope may control the rate-limiting step of fusion. PMID:27431907

  2. Acidification triggers Andes hantavirus membrane fusion and rearrangement of Gc into a stable post-fusion homotrimer.

    PubMed

    Acuña, Rodrigo; Bignon, Eduardo A; Mancini, Roberta; Lozach, Pierre-Yves; Tischler, Nicole D

    2015-11-01

    The hantavirus membrane fusion process is mediated by the Gc envelope glycoprotein from within endosomes. However, little is known about the specific mechanism that triggers Gc fusion activation, and its pre- and post-fusion conformations. We established cell-free in vitro systems to characterize hantavirus fusion activation. Low pH was sufficient to trigger the interaction of virus-like particles with liposomes. This interaction was dependent on a pre-fusion glycoprotein arrangement. Further, low pH induced Gc multimerization changes leading to non-reversible Gc homotrimers. These trimers were resistant to detergent, heat and protease digestion, suggesting characteristics of a stable post-fusion structure. No acid-dependent oligomerization rearrangement was detected for the trypsin-sensitive Gn envelope glycoprotein. Finally, acidification induced fusion of glycoprotein-expressing effector cells with non-susceptible CHO cells. Together, the data provide novel information on the Gc fusion trigger and its non-reversible activation involving lipid interaction, multimerization changes and membrane fusion which ultimately allow hantavirus entry into cells. PMID:26310672

  3. Inhibition of Sendai virus fusion with phospholipid vesicles and human erythrocyte membranes by hydrophobic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsey, D.R.; Flanagan, T.D.; Young, J.E.; Yeagle, P.L. )

    1991-06-01

    Hydrophobic di- and tripeptides which are capable of inhibiting enveloped virus infection of cells are also capable of inhibiting at least three different types of membrane fusion events. Large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of N-methyl dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (N-methyl DOPE), containing encapsulated 1-aminonaphthalene-3,6,8-trisulfonic acid (ANTS) and/or p-xylene bis(pyridinium bromide) (DPX), were formed by extrusion. Vesicle fusion and leakage were then monitored with the ANTS/DPX fluorescence assay. Sendai virus fusion with lipid vesicles and Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes were measured by following the relief of fluorescence quenching of virus labeled with octadecylrhodamine B chloride (R18). This study found that the effectiveness of the peptides carbobenzoxy-L-Phe-L-Phe (Z-L-Phe-L-Phe), Z-L-Phe, Z-D-Phe, and Z-Gly-L-Phe-L-Phe in inhibiting N-methyl DOPE LUV fusion or fusion of virus with N-methyl DOPE LUV also paralleled their reported ability to block viral infectivity. Furthermore, Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly and Z-Gly-L-Phe inhibited Sendai virus fusion with human erythrocyte membranes with the same relative potency with which they inhibited vesicle-vesicle and virus-vesicle fusion. The evidence suggests a mechanism by which these peptides exert their inhibition of plaque formation by enveloped viruses. This class of inhibitors apparently acts by inhibiting fusion of the viral envelope with the target cell membrane, thereby preventing viral infection. The physical pathway by which these peptides inhibit membrane fusion was investigated. {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) of proposed intermediates in the pathway for membrane fusion in LUV revealed that the potent fusion inhibitor Z-D-Phe-L-PheGly selectively altered the structure (or dynamics) of the hypothesized fusion intermediates and that the poor inhibitor Z-Gly-L-Phe did not.

  4. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation. PMID:26415228

  5. A role for a TIMP-3-sensitive, Zn(2+)-dependent metalloprotease in mammalian gamete membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Correa, L M; Cho, C; Myles, D G; Primakoff, P

    2000-09-01

    During fertilization, sperm and egg plasma membranes adhere and then fuse by a mechanism that is not well understood. Zinc metalloproteases are necessary for some intercellular fusion events, for instance, cell-cell fusion in yeast. In this study we tested the effects of class-specific and family-specific protease inhibitors on mouse gamete fusion. Capacitated, acrosome-reacted sperm and zona-free eggs were used in assays designed to define the effects of inhibitors on sperm-egg plasma membrane binding or fusion. Inhibitors of the aspartic, cysteine, and serine protease classes had no effect on sperm-egg binding or fusion. Both a synthetic metalloprotease substrate (succinyl-Ala-Ala-Phe-amidomethylcoumarin) and the zinc chelator 1,10-phenanthroline inhibited sperm-egg fusion but did not decrease sperm-egg binding. The fusion-inhibition effect of phenanthroline was reversible and activity of the inhibitable zinc metalloprotease was shown to be required during a short time window, the first 15 min after insemination. Tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-3 and Ro 31-9790, specific inhibitors of zinc metalloproteases in the matrixin and adamalysin families, also inhibited sperm-egg fusion but not sperm-egg binding. These data indicate a role in gamete fusion for one or more zinc metalloproteases of the matrixin and/or adamalysin families that act after plasma membrane binding and before sperm-egg membrane fusion. PMID:10964469

  6. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets

    PubMed Central

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  7. Binding and Fusion of Extracellular Vesicles to the Plasma Membrane of Their Cell Targets.

    PubMed

    Prada, Ilaria; Meldolesi, Jacopo

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes and ectosomes, extracellular vesicles of two types generated by all cells at multivesicular bodies and the plasma membrane, respectively, play critical roles in physiology and pathology. A key mechanism of their function, analogous for both types of vesicles, is the fusion of their membrane to the plasma membrane of specific target cells, followed by discharge to the cytoplasm of their luminal cargo containing proteins, RNAs, and DNA. Here we summarize the present knowledge about the interactions, binding and fusions of vesicles with the cell plasma membrane. The sequence initiates with dynamic interactions, during which vesicles roll over the plasma membrane, followed by the binding of specific membrane proteins to their cell receptors. Membrane binding is then converted rapidly into fusion by mechanisms analogous to those of retroviruses. Specifically, proteins of the extracellular vesicle membranes are structurally rearranged, and their hydrophobic sequences insert into the target cell plasma membrane which undergoes lipid reorganization, protein restructuring and membrane dimpling. Single fusions are not the only process of vesicle/cell interactions. Upon intracellular reassembly of their luminal cargoes, vesicles can be regenerated, released and fused horizontally to other target cells. Fusions of extracellular vesicles are relevant also for specific therapy processes, now intensely investigated. PMID:27517914

  8. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-01-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein–albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug. PMID:25864124

  9. The cytoplasmic domain of the gamete membrane fusion protein HAP2 targets the protein to the fusion site in Chlamydomonas and regulates the fusion reaction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanjie; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick; Snell, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-cell fusion between gametes is a defining step during development of eukaryotes, yet we know little about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the gamete membrane fusion reaction. HAP2 is the sole gamete-specific protein in any system that is broadly conserved and shown by gene disruption to be essential for gamete fusion. The wide evolutionary distribution of HAP2 (also known as GCS1) indicates it was present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and, therefore, dissecting its molecular properties should provide new insights into fundamental features of fertilization. HAP2 acts at a step after membrane adhesion, presumably directly in the merger of the lipid bilayers. Here, we use the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas to characterize contributions of key regions of HAP2 to protein location and function. We report that mutation of three strongly conserved residues in the ectodomain has no effect on targeting or fusion, although short deletions that include those residues block surface expression and fusion. Furthermore, HAP2 lacking a 237-residue segment of the cytoplasmic region is expressed at the cell surface, but fails to localize at the apical membrane patch specialized for fusion and fails to rescue fusion. Finally, we provide evidence that the ancient HAP2 contained a juxta-membrane, multi-cysteine motif in its cytoplasmic region, and that mutation of a cysteine dyad in this motif preserves protein localization, but substantially impairs HAP2 fusion activity. Thus, the ectodomain of HAP2 is essential for its surface expression, and the cytoplasmic region targets HAP2 to the site of fusion and regulates the fusion reaction. PMID:25655701

  10. Human Metapneumovirus Is Capable of Entering Cells by Fusion with Endosomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Reagan G.; Mainou, Bernardo A.; Johnson, Monika; Hastings, Andrew K.; Schuster, Jennifer E.; Dermody, Terence S.; Williams, John V.

    2015-01-01

    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV), a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, is a leading cause of lower respiratory illness. Although receptor binding is thought to initiate fusion at the plasma membrane for paramyxoviruses, the entry mechanism for HMPV is largely uncharacterized. Here we sought to determine whether HMPV initiates fusion at the plasma membrane or following internalization. To study the HMPV entry process in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells, we used fluorescence microscopy, an R18-dequenching fusion assay, and developed a quantitative, fluorescence microscopy assay to follow virus binding, internalization, membrane fusion, and visualize the cellular site of HMPV fusion. We found that HMPV particles are internalized into human bronchial epithelial cells before fusing with endosomes. Using chemical inhibitors and RNA interference, we determined that HMPV particles are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a dynamin-dependent manner. HMPV fusion and productive infection are promoted by RGD-binding integrin engagement, internalization, actin polymerization, and dynamin. Further, HMPV fusion is pH-independent, although infection with rare strains is modestly inhibited by RNA interference or chemical inhibition of endosomal acidification. Thus, HMPV can enter via endocytosis, but the viral fusion machinery is not triggered by low pH. Together, our results indicate that HMPV is capable of entering host cells by multiple pathways, including membrane fusion from endosomal compartments. PMID:26629703

  11. FUSION-COMPETENT STATE INDUCED BY A C-TERMINAL HIV-1 FUSION PEPTIDE IN CHOLESTEROL-RICH MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Apellániz, Beatriz; Nieva, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The replicative cycle of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 begins after fusion of the viral and target-cell membranes. The envelope glycoprotein gp41 transmembrane subunit contains conserved hydrophobic domains that engage and perturb the merging lipid bilayers. In this work, we have characterized the fusion-committed state generated in vesicles by CpreTM, a synthetic peptide derived from the sequence connecting the membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and the transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41. Pre-loading cholesterol-rich vesicles with CpreTM rendered them competent for subsequent lipid-mixing with fluorescently-labeled target vesicles. Highlighting the physiological relevance of the lasting fusion-competent state, the broadly neutralizing antibody 4E10 bound to the CpreTM-primed vesicles and inhibited lipid-mixing. Heterotypic fusion assays disclosed dependence on the lipid composition of the vesicles that acted either as virus or cell membrane surrogates. Lipid-mixing exhibited above all a critical dependence on the cholesterol content in those experiments. We infer that the fusion-competent state described herein resembles bona-fide perturbations generated by the pre-hairpin MPER-TMD connection within the viral membrane. PMID:25617671

  12. Physico-chemical requirements and kinetics of membrane fusion of flavivirus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    Espósito, Danillo L. A.; Nguyen, Jennifer B.; DeWitt, David C.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their RNA genome into the host-cell cytoplasm by fusing their lipid envelope with a cellular membrane. Expression of the flavivirus pre-membrane and envelope glycoprotein genes in the absence of other viral genes results in the spontaneous assembly and secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs) with membrane fusion activity. Here, we examined the physico-chemical requirements for membrane fusion of VLPs from West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. In a bulk fusion assay, optimal hemifusion (or lipid mixing) efficiencies were observed at 37 °C. Fusion efficiency increased with decreasing pH; half-maximal hemifusion was attained at pH 5.6. The anionic lipids bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate, when present in the target membrane, significantly enhanced fusion efficiency, consistent with the emerging model that flaviviruses fuse with intermediate-to-late endosomal compartments, where these lipids are most abundant. In a single-particle fusion assay, VLPs catalysed membrane hemifusion, tracked as lipid mixing with the cellular membrane, on a timescale of 7–20 s after acidification. Lipid mixing kinetics suggest that hemifusion is a kinetically complex, multistep process. PMID:25740960

  13. Physico-chemical requirements and kinetics of membrane fusion of flavivirus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Espósito, Danillo L A; Nguyen, Jennifer B; DeWitt, David C; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Modis, Yorgo

    2015-07-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their RNA genome into the host-cell cytoplasm by fusing their lipid envelope with a cellular membrane. Expression of the flavivirus pre-membrane and envelope glycoprotein genes in the absence of other viral genes results in the spontaneous assembly and secretion of virus-like particles (VLPs) with membrane fusion activity. Here, we examined the physico-chemical requirements for membrane fusion of VLPs from West Nile and Japanese encephalitis viruses. In a bulk fusion assay, optimal hemifusion (or lipid mixing) efficiencies were observed at 37 °C. Fusion efficiency increased with decreasing pH; half-maximal hemifusion was attained at pH 5.6. The anionic lipids bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate, when present in the target membrane, significantly enhanced fusion efficiency, consistent with the emerging model that flaviviruses fuse with intermediate-to-late endosomal compartments, where these lipids are most abundant. In a single-particle fusion assay, VLPs catalysed membrane hemifusion, tracked as lipid mixing with the cellular membrane, on a timescale of 7-20 s after acidification. Lipid mixing kinetics suggest that hemifusion is a kinetically complex, multistep process. PMID:25740960

  14. Association of the fusion protein NSF with clathrin-coated vesicle membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Steel, G J; Tagaya, M; Woodman, P G

    1996-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) is a component of intracellular transport reactions. In order to understand the role of NSF during the fusion of endocytic transport vesicles with the endosome, we have investigated the binding of NSF to purified clathrin-coated vesicle components. First, we have examined whether detergent-solubilized coated vesicle membranes will support formation of NSF-containing 'fusion complexes'. Our results show that these membranes are substantially enriched in components capable of driving formation of these complexes, when compared with membranes from other sources. Secondly, we have analysed coated vesicle preparations for their NSF content. Coated vesicle preparations contain significant amounts of NSF. This was shown to be associated with coated vesicles rather than contaminating membranes by a number of criteria, and was found to be bound in an ATP-independent manner. These findings are discussed in the light of current models for vesicle fusion. Images PMID:8631296

  15. Dynamic Viral Glycoprotein Machines: Approaches for Probing Transient States That Drive Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Natalie K.; Lee, Kelly K.

    2016-01-01

    The fusion glycoproteins that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses undergo dramatic conformational changes in the course of engaging with target cells through receptor interactions and during cell entry. These refolding events ultimately drive the fusion of viral and cellular membranes leading to delivery of the genetic cargo. While well-established methods for structure determination such as X-ray crystallography have provided detailed structures of fusion proteins in the pre- and post-fusion fusion states, to understand mechanistically how these fusion glycoproteins perform their structural calisthenics and drive membrane fusion requires new analytical approaches that enable dynamic intermediate states to be probed. Methods including structural mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy have begun to provide new insight into pathways of conformational change and fusion protein function. In combination, the approaches provide a significantly richer portrait of viral fusion glycoprotein structural variation and fusion activation as well as inhibition by neutralizing agents. Here recent studies that highlight the utility of these complementary approaches will be reviewed with a focus on the well-characterized influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion glycoprotein system. PMID:26761026

  16. Dynamic Viral Glycoprotein Machines: Approaches for Probing Transient States That Drive Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Natalie K; Lee, Kelly K

    2016-01-01

    The fusion glycoproteins that decorate the surface of enveloped viruses undergo dramatic conformational changes in the course of engaging with target cells through receptor interactions and during cell entry. These refolding events ultimately drive the fusion of viral and cellular membranes leading to delivery of the genetic cargo. While well-established methods for structure determination such as X-ray crystallography have provided detailed structures of fusion proteins in the pre- and post-fusion fusion states, to understand mechanistically how these fusion glycoproteins perform their structural calisthenics and drive membrane fusion requires new analytical approaches that enable dynamic intermediate states to be probed. Methods including structural mass spectrometry, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electron microscopy have begun to provide new insight into pathways of conformational change and fusion protein function. In combination, the approaches provide a significantly richer portrait of viral fusion glycoprotein structural variation and fusion activation as well as inhibition by neutralizing agents. Here recent studies that highlight the utility of these complementary approaches will be reviewed with a focus on the well-characterized influenza virus hemagglutinin fusion glycoprotein system. PMID:26761026

  17. G-rich, a Drosophila selenoprotein, is a Golgi-resident type III membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chang Lan; Shim, Myoung Sup; Chung, Jiyeol; Yoo, Hyun-Seung; Ha, Ji Min; Kim, Jin Young; Choi, Jinmi; Zang, Shu Liang; Hou, Xiao; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae . E-mail: imbglmg@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2006-10-06

    G-rich is a Drosophila melanogaster selenoprotein, which is a homologue of human and mouse SelK. Subcellular localization analysis using GFP-tagged G-rich showed that G-rich was localized in the Golgi apparatus. The fusion protein was co-localized with the Golgi marker proteins but not with an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker protein in Drosophila SL2 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of G-rich suggests that this protein is either type II or type III transmembrane protein. To determine the type of transmembrane protein experimentally, GFP-G-rich in which GFP was tagged at the N-terminus of G-rich, or G-rich-GFP in which GFP was tagged at the C-terminus of G-rich, were expressed in SL2 cells. The tagged proteins were then digested with trypsin, and analyzed by Western blot analysis. The results showed that the C-terminus of the G-rich protein was exposed to the cytoplasm indicating it is a type III microsomal membrane protein. G-rich is First selenoprotein identified in the Golgi apparatus.

  18. Mitotic phosphorylation of VCIP135 blocks p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Totsukawa, Go; Matsuo, Ayaka; Kubota, Ayano; Taguchi, Yuya; Kondo, Hisao

    2013-04-05

    Highlights: •VCIP135 is mitotically phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2. •Phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97ATPase. •The phosphorylation of VCIP135 inhibits p97ATPase-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. -- Abstract: In mammals, the Golgi apparatus is disassembled early mitosis and reassembled at the end of mitosis. For Golgi disassembly, membrane fusion needs to be blocked. Golgi biogenesis requires two distinct p97ATPase-mediated membrane fusion, the p97/p47 and p97/p37 pathways. We previously reported that p47 phosphorylation on Serine-140 and p37 phosphorylation on Serine-56 and Threonine-59 result in mitotic inhibition of the p97/p47 and the p97/p37 pathways, respectively [11,14]. In this study, we show another mechanism of mitotic inhibition of p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion. We clarified that VCIP135, an essential factor in both p97 membrane fusion pathways, is phosphorylated on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 by Cdc2 at mitosis and that this phosphorylated VCIP135 does not bind to p97. An in vitro Golgi reassembly assay revealed that VCIP135(T760E, S767E), which mimics mitotic phosphorylation, caused no cisternal regrowth. Our results indicate that the phosphorylation of VCIP135 on Threonine-760 and Serine-767 inhibits p97-mediated Golgi membrane fusion at mitosis.

  19. Cell-based analysis of Chikungunya virus E1 protein in membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chikungunya fever is a pandemic disease caused by the mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus (CHIKV). E1 glycoprotein mediation of viral membrane fusion during CHIKV infection is a crucial step in the release of viral genome into the host cytoplasm for replication. How the E1 structure determines membrane fusion and whether other CHIKV structural proteins participate in E1 fusion activity remain largely unexplored. Methods A bicistronic baculovirus expression system to produce recombinant baculoviruses for cell-based assay was used. Sf21 insect cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses bearing wild type or single-amino-acid substitution of CHIKV E1 and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescence protein) were employed to investigate the roles of four E1 amino acid residues (G91, V178, A226, and H230) in membrane fusion activity. Results Western blot analysis revealed that the E1 expression level and surface features in wild type and mutant substituted cells were similar. However, cell fusion assay found that those cells infected by CHIKV E1-H230A mutant baculovirus showed little fusion activity, and those bearing CHIKV E1-G91D mutant completely lost the ability to induce cell-cell fusion. Cells infected by recombinant baculoviruses of CHIKV E1-A226V and E1-V178A mutants exhibited the same membrane fusion capability as wild type. Although the E1 expression level of cells bearing monomeric-E1-based constructs (expressing E1 only) was greater than that of cells bearing 26S-based constructs (expressing all structural proteins), the sizes of syncytial cells induced by infection of baculoviruses containing 26S-based constructs were larger than those from infections having monomeric-E1 constructs, suggesting that other viral structure proteins participate or regulate E1 fusion activity. Furthermore, membrane fusion in cells infected by baculovirus bearing the A226V mutation constructs exhibited increased cholesterol-dependences and lower pH thresholds. Cells bearing the V178

  20. Protein-lipid interactions and non-lamellar lipidic structures in membrane pore formation and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2016-03-01

    Pore-forming proteins and peptides act on their targeted lipid bilayer membranes to increase permeability. This approach to the modulation of biological function is relevant to a great number of living processes, including; infection, parasitism, immunity, apoptosis, development and neurodegeneration. While some pore-forming proteins/peptides assemble into rings of subunits to generate discrete, well-defined pore-forming structures, an increasing number is recognised to form pores via mechanisms which co-opt membrane lipids themselves. Among these, membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) family proteins, Bax/colicin family proteins and actinoporins are especially prominent and among the mechanisms believed to apply are the formation of non-lamellar (semi-toroidal or toroidal) lipidic structures. In this review I focus on the ways in which lipids contribute to pore formation and contrast this with the ways in which lipids are co-opted also in membrane fusion and fission events. A variety of mechanisms for pore formation that involve lipids exists, but they consistently result in stable hybrid proteolipidic structures. These structures are stabilised by mechanisms in which pore-forming proteins modify the innate capacity of lipid membranes to respond to their environment, changing shape and/or phase and binding individual lipid molecules directly. In contrast, and despite the diversity in fusion protein types, mechanisms for membrane fusion are rather similar to each other, mapping out a pathway from pairs of separated compartments to fully confluent fused membranes. Fusion proteins generate metastable structures along the way which, like long-lived proteolipidic pore-forming complexes, rely on the basic physical properties of lipid bilayers. Membrane fission involves similar intermediates, in the reverse order. I conclude by considering the possibility that at least some pore-forming and fusion proteins are evolutionarily related

  1. Examination of Sec22 Homodimer Formation and Role in SNARE-dependent Membrane Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, John J.; Mukherjee, Indrani; Barlowe, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein complexes play essential roles in catalyzing intracellular membrane fusion events although the assembly pathway and molecular arrangement of SNARE complexes in membrane fusion reactions are not well understood. Here we monitored interactions of the R-SNARE protein Sec22 through a cysteine scanning approach and detected efficient formation of cross-linked Sec22 homodimers in cellular membranes when cysteine residues were positioned in the SNARE motif or C terminus of the transmembrane domain. When specific Sec22 cysteine derivatives are present on both donor COPII vesicles and acceptor Golgi membranes, the formation of disulfide cross-links provide clear readouts on trans- and cis-SNARE arrangements during this fusion event. The Sec22 transmembrane domain was required for efficient homodimer formation and for membrane fusion suggesting a functional role for Sec22 homodimers. We propose that Sec22 homodimers promote assembly of higher-order SNARE complexes to catalyze membrane fusion. Sec22 is also reported to function in macroautophagy and in formation of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane contact sites therefore homodimer assembly may regulate Sec22 activity across a range of cellular processes. PMID:25750128

  2. The Structural Dynamics of the Flavivirus Fusion Peptide–Membrane Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Theo L. F.; Sousa, Ivanildo P.; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Silva, Jerson L.; Gomes, Andre M. O.; Oliveira, Andréa C.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a crucial step in flavivirus infections and a potential target for antiviral strategies. Lipids and proteins play cooperative roles in the fusion process, which is triggered by the acidic pH inside the endosome. This acidic environment induces many changes in glycoprotein conformation and allows the action of a highly conserved hydrophobic sequence, the fusion peptide (FP). Despite the large volume of information available on the virus-triggered fusion process, little is known regarding the mechanisms behind flavivirus–cell membrane fusion. Here, we evaluated the contribution of a natural single amino acid difference on two flavivirus FPs, FLAG (98DRGWGNGCGLFGK110) and FLAH (98DRGWGNHCGLFGK110), and investigated the role of the charge of the target membrane on the fusion process. We used an in silico approach to simulate the interaction of the FPs with a lipid bilayer in a complementary way and used spectroscopic approaches to collect conformation information. We found that both peptides interact with neutral and anionic micelles, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed the interaction of the FPs with the lipid bilayer. The participation of the indole ring of Trp appeared to be important for the anchoring of both peptides in the membrane model, as indicated by MD simulations and spectroscopic analyses. Mild differences between FLAG and FLAH were observed according to the pH and the charge of the target membrane model. The MD simulations of the membrane showed that both peptides adopted a bend structure, and an interaction between the aromatic residues was strongly suggested, which was also observed by circular dichroism in the presence of micelles. As the FPs of viral fusion proteins play a key role in the mechanism of viral fusion, understanding the interactions between peptides and membranes is crucial for medical science and biology and may contribute to the design of new antiviral drugs. PMID:23094066

  3. Functional analysis of the transmembrane domain in paramyxovirus F protein-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bissonnette, Mei Lin Z.; Donald, Jason E.; DeGrado, William F.; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Lamb, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    To enter cells enveloped viruses use fusion-mediating glycoproteins to facilitate the merger of the viral and host cell membranes. These glycoproteins undergo large-scale irreversible refolding during membrane fusion. The paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) mediates membrane merger through its fusion protein (F). The transmembrane (TM) domains of viral fusion proteins are typically required for fusion. The TM domain of F is particularly interesting in that it is potentially unusually long; multiple calculations suggest a TM helix length between 25 and 48 residues. Oxidative cross-linking of single cysteine substitutions indicates the F TM trimer forms a helical bundle within the membrane. To assess the functional role of the PIV5 F protein TM domain, alanine scanning mutagenesis was performed. Two residues located in the outer leaflet of the bilayer are critical for fusion. Multiple amino acid substitutions at these positions indicate the physical properties of the side chain play a critical role in supporting or blocking fusion. Analysis of intermediate steps in F protein refolding indicated that the mutants were not trapped at the open stalk intermediate or the prehairpin intermediate. Incorporation of a known F protein destabilizing mutation that causes a hyperfusogenic phenotype restored fusion activity to the mutants. Further, altering the curvature of the lipid bilayer by addition of oleic acid promoted fusion of the F protein mutants. In aggregate, these data indicate that the TM domain plays a functional role in fusion beyond merely anchoring the protein in the viral envelope and that it can affect the structures and steady-state concentrations of the various conformational intermediates en route to the final postfusion state. We suggest that the unusual length of this TM helix might allow it to serve as a template for formation of or specifically stabilize the lipid stalk intermediate in fusion. PMID:19121325

  4. Regulation of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion: divergent evolution with similar solutions?

    PubMed

    Wagener, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    Continuous mitochondrial fusion and fission define the dynamic shape of mitochondria. One essential player of mitochondrial fusion is the conserved inner membrane dynamin-like GTPase Mgm1/OPA1. Limited proteolysis of this protein has been proposed as a mechanism to separate and subsequently eliminate dysfunctional parts from the mitochondrial network. Here, I briefly summarize our current knowledge about the underlying proteolytic processing steps in mammals, baker's yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Drosophila melanogaster and Aspergillus fumigatus. The apparent great diversity in Mgm1/OPA1 processing among the analyzed species indicates a surprising mechanistic heterogeneity in the regulation of mitochondrial inner membrane fusion. PMID:26613727

  5. Geometry of the Contact Zone between Fused Membrane-Coated Beads Mimicking Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Savić, Filip; Kliesch, Torben-Tobias; Verbeek, Sarah; Bao, Chunxiao; Thiart, Jan; Kros, Alexander; Geil, Burkhard; Janshoff, Andreas

    2016-05-24

    The fusion of lipid membranes is a key process in biology. It enables cells and organelles to exchange molecules with their surroundings, which otherwise could not cross the membrane barrier. To study such complex processes we use simplified artificial model systems, i.e., an optical fusion assay based on membrane-coated glass spheres. We present a technique to analyze membrane-membrane interactions in a large ensemble of particles. Detailed information on the geometry of the fusion stalk of fully fused membranes is obtained by studying the diffusional lipid dynamics with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. A small contact zone is a strong obstruction for the particle exchange across the fusion spot. With the aid of computer simulations, fluorescence-recovery-after-photobleaching recovery times of both fused and single-membrane-coated beads allow us to estimate the size of the contact zones between two membrane-coated beads. Minimizing delamination and bending energy leads to minimal angles close to those geometrically allowed. PMID:27224487

  6. Assessing the efficacy of vesicle fusion with planar membrane arrays using a mitochondrial porin as reporter

    SciTech Connect

    Pszon-Bartosz, Kamila; Hansen, Jesper S.; Stibius, Karin B.; Groth, Jesper S.; Helix-Nielsen, Claus

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} We have established a vesicle fusion efficacy assay based on the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA). {yields} Maximal fusion obtained was almost 150,000 porin insertions during 20 min. {yields} Incorporation can be either first order or exponential kinetics which has implications for establishing protein delivery to biomimetic membranes. -- Abstract: Reconstitution of functionally active membrane protein into artificially made lipid bilayers is a challenge that must be overcome to create a membrane-based biomimetic sensor and separation device. In this study we address the efficacy of proteoliposome fusion with planar membrane arrays. We establish a protein incorporation efficacy assay using the major non-specific porin of Fusobacterium nucleatum (FomA) as reporter. We use electrical conductance measurements and fluorescence microscopy to characterize proteoliposome fusion with an array of planar membranes. We show that protein reconstitution in biomimetic membrane arrays may be quantified using the developed FomA assay. Specifically, we show that FomA vesicles are inherently fusigenic. Optimal FomA incorporation is obtained with a proteoliposome lipid-to-protein molar ratio (LPR) = 50 more than 10{sup 5} FomA proteins could be incorporated in a bilayer array with a total membrane area of 2 mm{sup 2} within 20 min. This novel assay for quantifying protein delivery into lipid bilayers may be a useful tool in developing biomimetic membrane applications.

  7. Structure and orientation study of Ebola fusion peptide inserted in lipid membrane models.

    PubMed

    Agopian, Audrey; Castano, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The fusion peptide of Ebola virus comprises a highly hydrophobic sequence located downstream from the N-terminus of the glycoprotein GP2 responsible for virus-host membrane fusion. The internal fusion peptide of GP2 inserts into membranes of infected cell to mediate the viral and the host cell membrane fusion. Since the sequence length of Ebola fusion peptide is still not clear, we study in the present work the behavior of two fusion peptides of different lengths which were named EBO17 and EBO24 referring to their amino acid length. The secondary structure and orientation of both peptides in lipid model systems made of DMPC:DMPG:cholesterol:DMPE (6:2:5:3) were investigated using PMIRRAS and polarized ATR spectroscopy coupled with Brewster angle microscopy. The infrared results showed a structural flexibility of both fusion peptides which are able to transit reversibly from an α-helix to antiparallel β-sheets. Ellipsometry results corroborate together with isotherm measurements that EBO peptides interacting with lipid monolayer highly affected the lipid organization. When interacting with a single lipid bilayer, at low peptide content, EBO peptides insert as mostly α-helices mainly perpendicular into the lipid membrane thus tend to organize the lipid acyl chains. Inserted in multilamellar vesicles at higher peptide content, EBO peptides are mostly in β-sheet structures and induce a disorganization of the lipid chain order. In this paper, we show that the secondary structure of the Ebola fusion peptide is reversibly flexible between α-helical and β-sheet conformations, this feature being dependent on its concentration in lipids, eventually inducing membrane fusion. PMID:24055820

  8. Differential Cargo Mobilisation within Weibel-Palade Bodies after Transient Fusion with the Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Kiskin, Nikolai I.; Babich, Victor; Knipe, Laura; Hannah, Matthew J.; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory chemokines can be selectively released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) during kiss-and-run exocytosis. Such selectivity may arise from molecular size filtering by the fusion pore, however differential intra-WPB cargo re-mobilisation following fusion-induced structural changes within the WPB may also contribute to this process. To determine whether WPB cargo molecules are differentially re-mobilised, we applied FRAP to residual post-fusion WPB structures formed after transient exocytosis in which some or all of the fluorescent cargo was retained. Transient fusion resulted in WPB collapse from a rod to a spheroid shape accompanied by substantial swelling (>2 times by surface area) and membrane mixing between the WPB and plasma membranes. Post-fusion WPBs supported cumulative WPB exocytosis. To quantify diffusion inside rounded organelles we developed a method of FRAP analysis based on image moments. FRAP analysis showed that von Willebrand factor-EGFP (VWF-EGFP) and the VWF-propolypeptide-EGFP (Pro-EGFP) were immobile in post-fusion WPBs. Because Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP (small soluble cargo proteins) were largely depleted from post-fusion WPBs, we studied these molecules in cells preincubated in the weak base NH4Cl which caused WPB alkalinisation and rounding similar to that produced by plasma membrane fusion. In these cells we found a dramatic increase in mobilities of Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP that exceeded the resolution of our method (∼2.4 µm2/s mean). In contrast, the membrane mobilities of EGFP-CD63 and EGFP-Rab27A in post-fusion WPBs were unchanged, while P-selectin-EGFP acquired mobility. Our data suggest that selective re-mobilisation of chemokines during transient fusion contributes to selective chemokine secretion during transient WPB exocytosis. Selective secretion provides a mechanism to regulate intravascular inflammatory processes with reduced risk of thrombosis. PMID:25233365

  9. Differential cargo mobilisation within Weibel-Palade bodies after transient fusion with the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kiskin, Nikolai I; Babich, Victor; Knipe, Laura; Hannah, Matthew J; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory chemokines can be selectively released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) during kiss-and-run exocytosis. Such selectivity may arise from molecular size filtering by the fusion pore, however differential intra-WPB cargo re-mobilisation following fusion-induced structural changes within the WPB may also contribute to this process. To determine whether WPB cargo molecules are differentially re-mobilised, we applied FRAP to residual post-fusion WPB structures formed after transient exocytosis in which some or all of the fluorescent cargo was retained. Transient fusion resulted in WPB collapse from a rod to a spheroid shape accompanied by substantial swelling (>2 times by surface area) and membrane mixing between the WPB and plasma membranes. Post-fusion WPBs supported cumulative WPB exocytosis. To quantify diffusion inside rounded organelles we developed a method of FRAP analysis based on image moments. FRAP analysis showed that von Willebrand factor-EGFP (VWF-EGFP) and the VWF-propolypeptide-EGFP (Pro-EGFP) were immobile in post-fusion WPBs. Because Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP (small soluble cargo proteins) were largely depleted from post-fusion WPBs, we studied these molecules in cells preincubated in the weak base NH4Cl which caused WPB alkalinisation and rounding similar to that produced by plasma membrane fusion. In these cells we found a dramatic increase in mobilities of Eotaxin-3-EGFP and ssEGFP that exceeded the resolution of our method (∼ 2.4 µm2/s mean). In contrast, the membrane mobilities of EGFP-CD63 and EGFP-Rab27A in post-fusion WPBs were unchanged, while P-selectin-EGFP acquired mobility. Our data suggest that selective re-mobilisation of chemokines during transient fusion contributes to selective chemokine secretion during transient WPB exocytosis. Selective secretion provides a mechanism to regulate intravascular inflammatory processes with reduced risk of thrombosis. PMID:25233365

  10. A Substrate-Fusion Protein Is Trapped inside the Type III Secretion System Channel in Shigella flexneri

    PubMed Central

    Dohlich, Kim; Zumsteg, Anna Brotcke; Goosmann, Christian; Kolbe, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The Type III Secretion System (T3SS) is a macromolecular complex used by Gram-negative bacteria to secrete effector proteins from the cytoplasm across the bacterial envelope in a single step. For many pathogens, the T3SS is an essential virulence factor that enables the bacteria to interact with and manipulate their respective host. A characteristic structural feature of the T3SS is the needle complex (NC). The NC resembles a syringe with a basal body spanning both bacterial membranes and a long needle-like structure that protrudes from the bacterium. Based on the paradigm of a syringe-like mechanism, it is generally assumed that effectors and translocators are unfolded and secreted from the bacterial cytoplasm through the basal body and needle channel. Despite extensive research on T3SS, this hypothesis lacks experimental evidence and the mechanism of secretion is not fully understood. In order to elucidate details of the T3SS secretion mechanism, we generated fusion proteins consisting of a T3SS substrate and a bulky protein containing a knotted motif. Because the knot cannot be unfolded, these fusions are accepted as T3SS substrates but remain inside the NC channel and obstruct the T3SS. To our knowledge, this is the first time substrate fusions have been visualized together with isolated NCs and we demonstrate that substrate proteins are secreted directly through the channel with their N-terminus first. The channel physically encloses the fusion protein and shields it from a protease and chemical modifications. Our results corroborate an elementary understanding of how the T3SS works and provide a powerful tool for in situ-structural investigations in the future. This approach might also be applicable to other protein secretion systems that require unfolding of their substrates prior to secretion. PMID:24453973

  11. A Chemical Controller of SNARE-Driven Membrane Fusion That Primes Vesicles for Ca(2+)-Triggered Millisecond Exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Heo, Paul; Yang, Yoosoo; Han, Kyu Young; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jong-Hyeok; Jung, Younghoon; Jeong, Cherlhyun; Shin, Jaeil; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Ha, Taekjip; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-04-01

    Membrane fusion is mediated by the SNARE complex which is formed through a zippering process. Here, we developed a chemical controller for the progress of membrane fusion. A hemifusion state was arrested by a polyphenol myricetin which binds to the SNARE complex. The arrest of membrane fusion was rescued by an enzyme laccase that removes myricetin from the SNARE complex. The rescued hemifusion state was metastable and long-lived with a decay constant of 39 min. This membrane fusion controller was applied to delineate how Ca(2+) stimulates fusion-pore formation in a millisecond time scale. We found, using a single-vesicle fusion assay, that such myricetin-primed vesicles with synaptotagmin 1 respond synchronously to physiological concentrations of Ca(2+). When 10 μM Ca(2+) was added to the hemifused vesicles, the majority of vesicles rapidly advanced to fusion pores with a time constant of 16.2 ms. Thus, the results demonstrate that a minimal exocytotic membrane fusion machinery composed of SNAREs and synaptotagmin 1 is capable of driving membrane fusion in a millisecond time scale when a proper vesicle priming is established. The chemical controller of SNARE-driven membrane fusion should serve as a versatile tool for investigating the differential roles of various synaptic proteins in discrete fusion steps. PMID:26987363

  12. Disentangling Viral Membrane Fusion from Receptor Binding Using Synthetic DNA-Lipid Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Rawle, Robert J; Boxer, Steven G; Kasson, Peter M

    2016-07-12

    Enveloped viruses must bind to a receptor on the host membrane to initiate infection. Membrane fusion is subsequently initiated by a conformational change in the viral fusion protein, triggered by receptor binding, an environmental change, or both. Here, we present a strategy to disentangle the two processes of receptor binding and fusion using synthetic DNA-lipid conjugates to bind enveloped viruses to target membranes in the absence of receptor. This permits direct testing of whether receptor engagement affects the fusion mechanism as well as a comparison of fusion behavior across viruses with different receptor binding specificities. We demonstrate this approach by binding X-31 influenza virus to target vesicles and measuring the rates of individual pH-triggered lipid mixing events using fluorescence microscopy. Influenza lipid mixing kinetics are found to be independent of receptor binding, supporting the common yet previously unproven assumption that receptor binding does not produce any clustering or spatial rearrangement of viral hemagglutinin, which affects the rate-limiting step of pH-triggered fusion. This DNA-lipid tethering strategy should also allow the study of viruses where challenging receptor reconstitution has previously prevented single-virus fusion experiments. PMID:27410740

  13. The Influenza Hemagglutinin Fusion Domain Is an Amphipathic Helical Hairpin That Functions by Inducing Membrane Curvature*

    PubMed Central

    Smrt, Sean T.; Draney, Adrian W.; Lorieau, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved N-terminal 23 residues of the hemagglutinin glycoprotein, known as the fusion peptide domain (HAfp23), is vital to the membrane fusion and infection mechanism of the influenza virus. HAfp23 has a helical hairpin structure consisting of two tightly packed amphiphilic helices that rest on the membrane surface. We demonstrate that HAfp23 is a new class of amphipathic helix that functions by leveraging the negative curvature induced by two tightly packed helices on membranes. The helical hairpin structure has an inverted wedge shape characteristic of negative curvature lipids, with a bulky hydrophobic region and a relatively small hydrophilic head region. The F3G mutation reduces this inverted wedge shape by reducing the volume of its hydrophobic base. We show that despite maintaining identical backbone structures and dynamics as the wild type HAfp23, the F3G mutant has an attenuated fusion activity that is correlated to its reduced ability to induce negative membrane curvature. The inverted wedge shape of HAfp23 is likely to play a crucial role in the initial stages of membrane fusion by stabilizing negative curvature in the fusion stalk. PMID:25398882

  14. Reconstituting SNARE-mediated membrane fusion at the single liposome level

    PubMed Central

    Kiessling, Volker; Liang, Binyong; Tamm, Lukas K.

    2015-01-01

    Successful reconstitutions of SNARE-mediated intracellular membrane fusion have been achieved in bulk fusion assays since 1998 and in single liposome fusion assays since 2004. Especially in neuronal presynaptic SNARE-mediated exocytosis, fusion is controlled by numerous accessory proteins, of which some functions have also been reconstituted in vitro. The development of and results obtained with two fundamentally different single liposome fusion assays, namely liposome-to-supported membrane and liposome-to-liposome, are reviewed. Both assays distinguish between liposome docking and fusion steps of the overall fusion reaction and both assays are capable of resolving hemi-and full-fusion intermediates and end states. They have opened new windows for elucidating the mechanisms of these fundamentally important cellular reactions with unprecedented time and molecular resolution. Although many of the molecular actors in this process have been discovered, we have only scratched the surface of looking at their fascinating plays, interactions, and choreographies that lead to vesicle traffic as well as neurotransmitter and hormone release in the cell. PMID:25997356

  15. The destructive effect of botulinum neurotoxins on the SNARE protein: SNAP-25 and synaptic membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic exocytosis requires the assembly of syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 on the plasma membrane and synaptobrevin 2 (VAMP2) on the vesicular membrane to bridge the two opposite membranes. It is believed that the three SNARE proteins assemble in steps along the dynamic assembly pathway. The C-terminus of SNAP-25 is known to be the target of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT/A and BoNT/E) that block neurotransmitters release in vivo. In this study, we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to investigate the conformation of the SNAP-25 C-terminus in binary and ternary SNARE complexes. The fluorescence lipid mixing assay shows that the C-terminal of SNAP-25 is essential for membrane fusion, and that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants cleaved by BoNT/A and BoNT/E display different inhibition effects on membrane fusion: SNAP-25E (Δ26) abolishes the fusion activity of the SNARE complex, while SNAP-25A (Δ9) loses most of its function, although it can still form a SDS-resistant SNARE complex as the wild-type SNAP-25. CW-EPR spectra validate the unstable structures of the SNARE complex formed by SNAP-25 mutants. We propose that the truncated SNAP-25 mutants will disrupt the assembly of the SNARE core complex, and then inhibit the synaptic membrane fusion accordingly. PMID:26157630

  16. Fusion Peptide from Influenza Hemagglutinin Increases Membrane Surface Order: An Electron-Spin Resonance Study

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Mingtao; Freed, Jack H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A spin-labeling study of interactions of a fusion peptide from the hemagglutinin of the influenza virus, wt20, and a fusion-inactive mutant ΔG1 with dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatdylcholine bilayers was performed. We found that upon binding of wt20, the ordering of headgroups and the ordering of acyl chains near the headgroup increased significantly, in a manner consistent with a cooperative phenomenon. However, changes in the order at the end of the acyl chains were negligible. The ordering effect of wt20 on the headgroup was much stronger at pH 5 than at pH 7. No effect of ΔG1 binding on the order of bilayers was evident. We also found that 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxyl phosphatidylcholine, a membrane-fusion inhibitor, decreased the ordering of DMPC headgroups, whereas arachidonic acid, a membrane-fusion promoter, increased the ordering of DMPC headgroups. These results suggest that increases in headgroup ordering may be important for membrane fusion. We propose that upon binding of wt20, which is known to affect only the outer leaflet of the bilayer, this outer leaflet becomes more ordered, and thus more solid-like. Then the coupling between the hardened outer leaflet and the softer inner leaflet generates bending stresses in the bilayer, which tend to increase the negative curvature of the bilayer. We suggest that the increased ordering in the headgroup region enhances dipolar interactions and lowers electrostatic energy, which may provide an energy source for membrane fusion. Possible roles of bending stresses in promoting membrane fusion are discussed. PMID:19527651

  17. Retinol Binding Protein-Albumin Domain III Fusion Protein Deactivates Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangeun; Choi, Soyoung; Lee, Min-Goo; Lim, Chaeseung; Oh, Junseo

    2012-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is characterized by accumulation of extracellular matrix, and activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the primary source of the fibrotic neomatrix and considered as therapeutic target cells. We previously showed that albumin in pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs), the key cell type for pancreatic fibrogenesis, is directly involved in the formation of vitamin A-containing lipid droplets, inhibiting PSC activation. In this study, we evaluated the anti-fibrotic activity of both albumin and retinol binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (R-III), designed for stellate cell-targeted delivery of albumin III, in rat primary HSCs and investigated the underlying mechanism. Forced expression of albumin or R-III in HSCs after passage 2 (activated HSCs) induced lipid droplet formation and deactivated HSCs, whereas point mutations in high-affinity fatty acid binding sites of albumin domain III abolished their activities. Exogenous R-III, but not albumin, was successfully internalized into and deactivated HSC-P2. When HSCs at day 3 after plating (pre-activated HSCs) were cultured in the presence of purified R-III, spontaneous activation of HSCs was inhibited even after passage 2, suggestive of a potential for preventive effect. Furthermore, treatment of HSCs-P2 with R-III led to a significant reduction in both cytoplasmic levels of all-trans retinoic acid and the subsequent retinoic acid signaling. Therefore, our data suggest that albumin deactivates HSCs with reduced retinoic acid levels and that R-III may have therapeutic and preventive potentials on liver fibrosis. PMID:23161170

  18. VAMP8-dependent fusion of recycling endosomes with the plasma membrane facilitates T lymphocyte cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Misty R.; Pattu, Varsha; Halimani, Mahantappa; Maier-Peuschel, Monika; Müller, Martha-Lena; Becherer, Ute; Hong, Wanjin; Hoth, Markus; Tschernig, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) eliminate infected and neoplastic cells through directed release of cytotoxic granule contents. Although multiple SNARE proteins have been implicated in cytotoxic granule exocytosis, the role of vesicular SNARE proteins, i.e., vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs), remains enigmatic. VAMP8 was posited to represent the cytotoxic granule vesicular SNARE protein mediating exocytosis in mice. In primary human CTLs, however, VAMP8 colocalized with Rab11a-positive recycling endosomes. Upon stimulation, these endosomes rapidly trafficked to and fused with the plasma membrane, preceding fusion of cytotoxic granules. Knockdown of VAMP8 blocked both recycling endosome and cytotoxic granule fusion at immune synapses, without affecting activating signaling. Mechanistically, VAMP8-dependent recycling endosomes deposited syntaxin-11 at immune synapses, facilitating assembly of plasma membrane SNARE complexes for cytotoxic granule fusion. Hence, cytotoxic granule exocytosis is a sequential, multivesicle fusion process requiring VAMP8-mediated recycling endosome fusion before cytotoxic granule fusion. Our findings imply that secretory granule exocytosis pathways in other cell types may also be more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:26124288

  19. Calcium release through P2X4 activates calmodulin to promote endolysosomal membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Qi; Zhong, Xi Zoë; Zou, Yuanjie; Murrell-Lagnado, Ruth; Zhu, Michael X.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release is required for endolysosomal membrane fusion with intracellular organelles. However, the molecular mechanisms for intra-endolysosomal Ca2+ release and the downstream Ca2+ targets involved in the fusion remain elusive. Previously, we demonstrated that endolysosomal P2X4 forms channels activated by luminal adenosine triphosphate in a pH-dependent manner. In this paper, we show that overexpression of P2X4, as well as increasing endolysosomal P2X4 activity by alkalinization of endolysosome lumen, promoted vacuole enlargement in cells and endolysosome fusion in a cell-free assay. These effects were prevented by inhibiting P2X4, expressing a dominant-negative P2X4 mutant, and disrupting the P2X4 gene. We further show that P2X4 and calmodulin (CaM) form a complex at endolysosomal membrane where P2X4 activation recruits CaM to promote fusion and vacuolation in a Ca2+-dependent fashion. Moreover, P2X4 activation-triggered fusion and vacuolation were suppressed by inhibiting CaM. Our data thus suggest a new molecular mechanism for endolysosomal membrane fusion involving P2X4-mediated endolysosomal Ca2+ release and subsequent CaM activation. PMID:26101220

  20. Calcium-dependent Regulation of SNARE-mediated Membrane Fusion by Calmodulin*

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, Jerome; Iborra, Cécile; Maulet, Yves; Lévêque, Christian; El Far, Oussama; Seagar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Neuroexocytosis requires SNARE proteins, which assemble into trans complexes at the synaptic vesicle/plasma membrane interface and mediate bilayer fusion. Ca2+ sensitivity is thought to be conferred by synaptotagmin, although the ubiquitous Ca2+-effector calmodulin has also been implicated in SNARE-dependent membrane fusion. To examine the molecular mechanisms involved, we examined the direct action of calmodulin and synaptotagmin in vitro, using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to assay lipid mixing between target- and vesicle-SNARE liposomes. Ca2+/calmodulin inhibited SNARE assembly and membrane fusion by binding to two distinct motifs located in the membrane-proximal regions of VAMP2 (KD = 500 nm) and syntaxin 1 (KD = 2 μm). In contrast, fusion was increased by full-length synaptotagmin 1 anchored in vesicle-SNARE liposomes. When synaptotagmin and calmodulin were combined, synaptotagmin overcame the inhibitory effects of calmodulin. Furthermore, synaptotagmin displaced calmodulin binding to target-SNAREs. These findings suggest that two distinct Ca2+ sensors act antagonistically in SNARE-mediated fusion. PMID:20519509

  1. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology. PMID:26813789

  2. Fusion-Triggered Switching of Enzymatic Activity on an Artificial Cell Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mukai, Masaru; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Kikuchi, Jun-ichi

    2012-01-01

    A nanosensory membrane device was constructed for detecting liposome fusion through changes in an enzymatic activity. Inspired by a biological signal transduction system, the device design involved functionalized liposomal membranes prepared by self-assembly of the following molecular components: a synthetic peptide lipid and a phospholipid as matrix membrane components, a Schiff's base of pyridoxal 5′-phosphate with phosphatidylethanolamine as a thermo-responsive artificial receptor, NADH-dependent L-lactate dehydrogenase as a signal amplifier, and Cu2+ ion as a signal mediator between the receptor and enzyme. The enzymatic activity of the membrane device was adjustable by changing the matrix lipid composition, reflecting the thermotropic phase transition behavior of the lipid membranes, which in turn controlled receptor binding affinity toward the enzyme-inhibiting mediator species. When an effective fusogen anionic polymer was added to these cationic liposomes, membrane fusion occurred, and the functionalized liposomal membranes responded with changes in enzymatic activity, thus serving as an effective nanosensory device for liposome fusion detection. PMID:22778625

  3. Towards reconstitution of membrane fusion mediated by SNAREs and other synaptic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunger, Axel T.; Cipriano, Daniel J.; Diao, Jiajie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Proteoliposomes have been widely used for in vitro studies of membrane fusion mediated by synaptic proteins. Initially, such studies were made with large unsynchronized ensembles of vesicles. Such ensemble assays limited the insights into the SNARE-mediated fusion mechanism that could be obtained from them. Single particle microscopy experiments can alleviate many of these limitations but they pose significant technical challenges. Here we summarize various approaches that have enabled studies of fusion mediated by SNAREs and other synaptic proteins at a single-particle level. Currently available methods are described and their advantages and limitations are discussed. PMID:25788028

  4. Crystal structure of the membrane fusion protein CusB from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yang, Feng; Long, Feng; Reyon, Deepak; Routh, Mathew D.; Kuo, Dennis W.; Mokhtari, Adam K.; Van Ornam, Jonathan D.; Rabe, Katherine L.; Hoy, Julie A.; Lee, Young Jin; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These systems contain a periplasmic membrane fusion protein that is critical for substrate transport. We here present the x-ray structures of the CusB membrane fusion protein from the copper/silver efflux system of E. coli. This is the first structure of any membrane fusion proteins associated with heavy-metal efflux transporters. CusB bridges the inner membrane efflux pump CusA and outer membrane channel CusC to mediate resistance to Cu+ and Ag+ ions. Two distinct structures of the elongated molecules of CusB were found in the asymmetric unit of a single crystal, which suggests the flexible nature of this protein. Each protomer of CusB can be divided into four different domains, whereby the first three domains are mostly β-strands and the last domain adopts an entirely helical architecture. Unlike other known structures of membrane fusion proteins, the α-helical domain of CusB is folded into a three-helix bundle. This three-helix bundle presumably interacts with the periplasmic domain of CusC. The N and C-termini of CusB form the first β-strand domain, which is found to interact with the periplasmic domain of the CusA efflux pump. Atomic details of how this efflux protein binds Cu+ and Ag+ were revealed by the crystals of the CusB-Cu(I) and CusB-Ag(I) complexes. The structures indicate that CusB consists of multiple binding sites for these metal ions. These findings reveal novel structural features of a membrane fusion protein in the resistance-nodulation-division efflux system, and provide evidence that this protein specifically interacts with transported substrates. PMID:19695261

  5. Influenza hemagglutinin assumes a tilted conformation during membrane fusion as determined by attenuated total reflection FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Tatulian, S A; Hinterdorfer, P; Baber, G; Tamm, L K

    1995-01-01

    Fusion of influenza virus with target membranes is mediated by an acid-induced conformational change of the viral fusion protein hemagglutinin (HA) involving an extensive reorganization of the alpha-helices. A 'spring-loaded' displacement over at least 100 A provides a mechanism for the insertion of the fusion peptide into the target membrane, but does not explain how the two membranes are brought into fusion contact. Here we examine, by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, the secondary structure and orientation of HA reconstituted in planar membranes. At neutral pH, the orientation of the HA trimers in planar membranes is approximately perpendicular to the membrane. However, at the pH of fusion, the HA trimers are tilted 55-70 degrees from the membrane normal in the presence or absence of bound target membranes. In the absence of target membranes, the overall secondary structure of HA at the fusion pH is similar to that at neutral pH, but approximately 50-60 additional residues become alpha-helical upon the conformational change in the presence of bound target membranes. These results are discussed in terms of a structural model for the fusion intermediate of influenza HA. Images PMID:8521808

  6. Viral Membrane Fusion and Nucleocapsid Delivery into the Cytoplasm are Distinct Events in Some Flaviviruses

    PubMed Central

    Nour, Adel M.; Li, Yue; Wolenski, Joseph; Modis, Yorgo

    2013-01-01

    Flaviviruses deliver their genome into the cell by fusing the viral lipid membrane to an endosomal membrane. The sequence and kinetics of the steps required for nucleocapsid delivery into the cytoplasm remain unclear. Here we dissect the cell entry pathway of virions and virus-like particles from two flaviviruses using single-particle tracking in live cells, a biochemical membrane fusion assay and virus infectivity assays. We show that the virus particles fuse with a small endosomal compartment in which the nucleocapsid remains trapped for several minutes. Endosomal maturation inhibitors inhibit infectivity but not membrane fusion. We propose a flavivirus cell entry mechanism in which the virus particles fuse preferentially with small endosomal carrier vesicles and depend on back-fusion of the vesicles with the late endosomal membrane to deliver the nucleocapsid into the cytoplasm. Virus entry modulates intracellular calcium release and phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase signaling. Moreover, the broadly cross-reactive therapeutic antibody scFv11 binds to virus-like particles and inhibits fusion. PMID:24039574

  7. Engineering hybrid exosomes by membrane fusion with liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yuko T.; Umezaki, Kaori; Sawada, Shinichi; Mukai, Sada-atsu; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Harada, Naozumi; Shiku, Hiroshi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are a valuable biomaterial for the development of novel nanocarriers as functionally advanced drug delivery systems. To control and modify the performance of exosomal nanocarriers, we developed hybrid exosomes by fusing their membranes with liposomes using the freeze–thaw method. Exosomes embedded with a specific membrane protein isolated from genetically modified cells were fused with various liposomes, confirming that membrane engineering methods can be combined with genetic modification techniques. Cellular uptake studies performed using the hybrid exosomes revealed that the interactions between the developed exosomes and cells could be modified by changing the lipid composition or the properties of the exogenous lipids. These results suggest that the membrane-engineering approach reported here offers a new strategy for developing rationally designed exosomes as hybrid nanocarriers for use in advanced drug delivery systems. PMID:26911358

  8. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein mutations that affect membrane fusion activity and abolish virus infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericksen, B L; Whitt, M A

    1995-01-01

    We have introduced amino acid substitutions into two regions of the extracellular domain of the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (G protein) and examined the effect of these mutations on protein transport, low-pH-induced stability of G protein oligomers, and membrane fusion activity. We suggested previously that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 may be important for the membrane fusion activity of G protein, on the basis of the characterization of a fusion-defective G protein mutant (M. A. Whitt, P. Zagouras, B. Crise, and J. K. Rose, J. Virol. 64:4907-4913, 1990). It has also been postulated by others that this region as well as the region between amino acids 181 and 212 may constitute putative internal fusion domains of VSV G protein. In this report, we show that three different amino acids substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E, P-127-->D, and A-133-->K) either altered or abolished low-pH-dependent membrane fusion activity. In contrast, substitutions between residues 192 and 212 resulted either in G proteins that had wild-type fusion activity or in mutant proteins in which the mutation prevented transport of G protein to the cell surface. Two of the substitutions between residues 118 and 139 (G-124-->E and P-127-->D) resulted in G proteins that were fusion defective at pH 5.7, although syncytia were observed after cells were treated with fusion buffer at pH 5.5, albeit at levels significantly less than that induced by wild-type G protein. Interestingly, when either G-124-->E or P-127-->D was incorporated into tsO45 virions, the resulting particles were not infectious, presumably because the viral envelope was not able to fuse with the proper intracellular membrane. These results support the hypothesis that the region between amino acids 118 and 139 is important for the membrane fusion activity of VSV G protein and may constitute an internal fusion domain. PMID:7853475

  9. Single event recording shows that docking onto receptor alters the kinetics of membrane fusion mediated by influenza hemagglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Niles, W D; Cohen, F S

    1993-01-01

    The initial steps of membrane fusion, receptor binding and membrane destabilization, are mediated by the envelope glycoprotein hemagglutinin of influenza virus. Interaction between these functions was determined from the time course of individual virion fusions to a planar membrane with and without receptor. With receptor, fusion was described by a Poisson process. In the absence of receptor, the time course was more complicated and could not be described with exponential rate constants. The conversion of a non-Markovian process into a simple Markov chain is direct evidence that receptor binding fundamentally alters the route of fusion. PMID:8369426

  10. Lipid intermediates in membrane fusion: formation, structure, and decay of hemifusion diaphragm.

    PubMed Central

    Kozlovsky, Yonathan; Chernomordik, Leonid V; Kozlov, Michael M

    2002-01-01

    Lipid bilayer fusion is thought to involve formation of a local hemifusion connection, referred to as a fusion stalk. The subsequent fusion stages leading to the opening of a fusion pore remain unknown. The earliest fusion pore could represent a bilayer connection between the membranes and could be formed directly from the stalk. Alternatively, fusion pore can form in a single bilayer, referred to as hemifusion diaphragm (HD), generated by stalk expansion. To analyze the plausibility of stalk expansion, we studied the pathway of hemifusion theoretically, using a recently developed elastic model. We show that the stalk has a tendency to expand into an HD for lipids with sufficiently negative spontaneous splay, (~)J(s)< 0. For different experimentally relevant membrane configurations we find two characteristic values of the spontaneous splay. (~)J*(s) and (~)J**(s), determining HD dimension. The HD is predicted to have a finite equilibrium radius provided that the spontaneous splay is in the range (~)J**(s)< (~)J(s)<(~)J*(s), and to expand infinitely for (~)J(s)<(~)J**(s). In the case of common lipids, which do not fuse spontaneously, an HD forms only under action of an external force pulling the diaphragm rim apart. We calculate the dependence of the HD radius on this force. To address the mechanism of fusion pore formation, we analyze the distribution of the lateral tension emerging in the HD due to the establishment of lateral equilibrium between the deformed and relaxed portions of lipid monolayers. We show that this tension concentrates along the HD rim and reaches high values sufficient to rupture the bilayer and form the fusion pore. Our analysis supports the hypothesis that transition from a hemifusion to a fusion pore involves radial expansion of the stalk. PMID:12414697

  11. Evolution of the Hemifused Intermediate on the Pathway to Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Jason M.; O’Shaughnessy, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The pathway to membrane fusion in synthetic and biological systems is thought to pass through hemifusion, in which the outer leaflets are fused while the inner leaflets engage in a hemifusion diaphragm (HD). Fusion has been proposed to be completed by lysis of the expanded HD that matures from a localized stalklike initial connection. However, the process that establishes the expanded HD is poorly understood. Here we mathematically modeled hemifusion of synthetic vesicles, where hemifusion and fusion are most commonly driven by calcium and membrane tension. The model shows that evolution of the hemifused state is driven by these agents and resisted by interleaflet frictional and tensile stresses. Predicted HD growth rates depend on tension and salt concentration, and agree quantitatively with experimental measurements. For typical conditions, we predict that HDs expand at ∼30 μm2/s, reaching a final equilibrium area ∼7% of the vesicle area. Key model outputs are the evolving HD tension and area during the growth transient, properties that may determine whether HD lysis occurs. Applying the model to numerous published experimental studies that reported fusion, our results are consistent with a final fusion step in which the HD ruptures due to super-lysis HD membrane tensions. PMID:22947930

  12. Identification of a plastid protein involved in vesicle fusion and/or membrane protein translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Hugueney, P; Bouvier, F; Badillo, A; d'Harlingue, A; Kuntz, M; Camara, B

    1995-01-01

    Structural evidence has accumulated suggesting that fusion and/or translocation factors are involved in plastid membrane biogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we have developed an in vitro system in which the extent of fusion and/or translocation is monitored by the conversion of the xanthophyll epoxide (antheraxanthin) into the red ketocarotenoid (capsanthin). Only chromoplast membrane vesicles from red pepper fruits (Capsicum annuum) contain the required enzyme. Vesicles prepared from the mutant yellow cultivar are devoid of this enzyme and accumulate antheraxanthin. The fusion and/or translocation activity is characterized by complementation due to the synthesis of capsanthin and the parallel decrease of antheraxanthin when the two types of vesicles are incubated together in the presence of plastid stroma. We show that the extent of conversion is dependent upon an ATP-requiring protein that is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide. Further purification and immunological analysis have revealed that the active factor, designated plastid fusion and/or translocation factor (Pftf), resides in a protein of 72 kDa. cDNA cloning revealed that mature Pftf has significant homology to yeast and animal (NSF) or bacterial (Ftsh) proteins involved in vesicle fusion or membrane protein translocation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777561

  13. ER network formation and membrane fusion by atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants

    PubMed Central

    Ulengin, Idil; Park, John J.; Lee, Tina H.

    2015-01-01

    At least 38 distinct missense mutations in the neuronal atlastin1/SPG3A GTPase are implicated in an autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a motor-neurological disorder manifested by lower limb weakness and spasticity and length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Because the atlastin GTPase is sufficient to catalyze membrane fusion and required to form the ER network, at least in nonneuronal cells, it is logically assumed that defects in ER membrane morphogenesis due to impaired fusion activity are the primary drivers of SPG3A-associated HSP. Here we analyzed a subset of established atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants using cell-based assays for atlastin-mediated ER network formation and biochemical assays for atlastin-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis, dimer formation, and membrane fusion. As anticipated, some variants exhibited clear deficits. Surprisingly however, at least two disease variants, one of which represents that most frequently identified in SPG3A HSP patients, displayed wild-type levels of activity in all assays. The same variants were also capable of co-redistributing ER-localized REEP1, a recently identified function of atlastins that requires its catalytic activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that a deficit in the membrane fusion activity of atlastin1 may be a key contributor, but is not required, for HSP causation. PMID:25761634

  14. ER network formation and membrane fusion by atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants.

    PubMed

    Ulengin, Idil; Park, John J; Lee, Tina H

    2015-05-01

    At least 38 distinct missense mutations in the neuronal atlastin1/SPG3A GTPase are implicated in an autosomal dominant form of hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP), a motor-neurological disorder manifested by lower limb weakness and spasticity and length-dependent axonopathy of corticospinal motor neurons. Because the atlastin GTPase is sufficient to catalyze membrane fusion and required to form the ER network, at least in nonneuronal cells, it is logically assumed that defects in ER membrane morphogenesis due to impaired fusion activity are the primary drivers of SPG3A-associated HSP. Here we analyzed a subset of established atlastin1/SPG3A disease variants using cell-based assays for atlastin-mediated ER network formation and biochemical assays for atlastin-catalyzed GTP hydrolysis, dimer formation, and membrane fusion. As anticipated, some variants exhibited clear deficits. Surprisingly however, at least two disease variants, one of which represents that most frequently identified in SPG3A HSP patients, displayed wild-type levels of activity in all assays. The same variants were also capable of co-redistributing ER-localized REEP1, a recently identified function of atlastins that requires its catalytic activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that a deficit in the membrane fusion activity of atlastin1 may be a key contributor, but is not required, for HSP causation. PMID:25761634

  15. Low-pH conformational changes of rabies virus glycoprotein and their role in membrane fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Y; Ruigrok, R W; Knossow, M; Flamand, A

    1993-01-01

    Fusion of rabies virus with membranes occurs at acidic pH and is mediated by the viral spike glycoprotein (G). In this paper, we provide the basis for a description of structural transitions associated with exposure to low pH and of their role in membrane fusion. First, we have extended previous studies of fusion kinetics and we have shown that low-pH inhibition of fusion is detectable at 0.5 pH units higher than fusion. Second, low-pH-induced conformational changes were analyzed by using electron microscopy and monoclonal antibody binding assays. The existence of a pH-dependent equilibrium between the native and a low-pH inactive conformation was demonstrated. Third, besides these two conformations, we, using the fluorescent probe ANS (8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid), provide evidence for the existence of a transient third state which appears to be more hydrophobic than the native state. Our results suggest that this transient state is responsible for viral aggregation at low pH and could play a role in the first steps of the fusion mechanism. Images PMID:8437221

  16. A Rhombohedral Phase of Lipid Containing a Membrane Fusion Intermediate Structure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin; Huang, Huey W.

    2003-01-01

    We constructed the electron density distribution from the x-ray diffraction of a phase of phospholipid that exhibited rhombohedral symmetry. To determine the phases of the diffraction amplitudes, we first extended the well-known one-dimensional swelling method for planar bilayers to a three-dimensional method applicable to a layered system containing in-plane structures, such as rhombohedral structures. The complete phase determination was accomplished by a combination of the swelling method and Luzzati's pattern recognition method. The constructed electron density distribution showed that in each unit cell, two apposed monolayers merged across the water layer and developed into an hourglass structure consistent with a postulated membrane fusion intermediate state called a stalk. The observation of the stalk structure lends a strong support to the stalk hypothesis for membrane fusion and opens a way to measure the structural parameters in the fusion pathway. PMID:12609882

  17. Structural basis for activation, assembly and membrane binding of ESCRT-III Snf7 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shaogeng; Henne, W Mike; Borbat, Peter P; Buchkovich, Nicholas J; Freed, Jack H; Mao, Yuxin; Fromme, J Christopher; Emr, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) constitute hetero-oligomeric machines that catalyze multiple topologically similar membrane-remodeling processes. Although ESCRT-III subunits polymerize into spirals, how individual ESCRT-III subunits are activated and assembled together into a membrane-deforming filament remains unknown. Here, we determine X-ray crystal structures of the most abundant ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 in its active conformation. Using pulsed dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy (PDS), we show that Snf7 activation requires a prominent conformational rearrangement to expose protein-membrane and protein-protein interfaces. This promotes the assembly of Snf7 arrays with ~30 Å periodicity into a membrane-sculpting filament. Using a combination of biochemical and genetic approaches, both in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that mutations on these protein interfaces halt Snf7 assembly and block ESCRT function. The architecture of the activated and membrane-bound Snf7 polymer provides crucial insights into the spatially unique ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12548.001 PMID:26670543

  18. Towards fully automated Identification of Vesicle-Membrane Fusion Events in TIRF Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallotton, Pascal; James, David E.; Hughes, William E.

    2007-11-01

    Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (TIRFM) is imposing itself as the tool of choice for studying biological activity in close proximity to the plasma membrane. For example, the exquisite selectivity of TIRFM allows monitoring the diffusion of GFP-phogrin vesicles and their recruitment to the plasma membrane in pancreatic β-cells. We present a novel computer vision system for automatically identifying the elusive fusion events of GFP-phogrin vesicles with the plasma membrane. Our method is based on robust object tracking and matched filtering. It should accelerate the quantification of TIRFM data and allow the extraction of more biological information from image data to support research in diabetes and obesity.

  19. pH-Dependent Vesicle Fusion Induced by the Ectodomain of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Membrane Fusion Protein gp41: Two Kinetically Distinct Processes and Fully-Membrane-Associated gp41 with Predominant β Sheet Fusion Peptide Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Ratnayake, Punsisi U.; Sackett, Kelly; Nethercott, Matthew J.; Weliky, David P.

    2014-01-01

    The gp41 protein of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) catalyzes fusion between HIV and host cell membranes. The ~180-residue ectodomain of gp41 is outside the virion and is the most important gp41 region for membrane fusion. The ectodomain consists of an apolar fusion peptide (FP) region followed by N-heptad repeat (NHR), loop, and C-heptad repeat (CHR) regions. The FP is critical for fusion and is hypothesized to bind to the host cell membrane. Large ectodomain constructs either with or without the FP are highly aggregated at physiologic pH but soluble in the pH 3–4 range with hyperthermostable hairpin structure with antiparallel NHR and CHR helices. The present study focuses on the large gp41 ectodomain constructs “Hairpin” (HP) containing NHR+loop+CHR and “FP-Hairpin” (FP-HP) containing FP+NHR+loop+CHR. Both proteins induce rapid and extensive fusion of anionic vesicles at pH 4 where the protein is positively-charged but do not induce fusion at pH 7 where the protein is negatively charged. This observation, along with lack of fusion of neutral vesicles at either pH supports the significance of attractive protein/membrane electrostatics in fusion. The functional role of the hydrophobic FP is supported by increases in the rate and extent of fusion for FP-HP relative to HP. There are two kinetically distinct fusion processes at pH 4: (1) a faster ~100 ms−1 process with rate strongly positively correlated with vesicle charge; and (2) a slower ~5 ms−1 process with extent strongly inversely correlated with this charge. The faster charge-dependent process is likely related to the electrostatic energy released upon initial monomer protein binding to the vesicle. After dissipation of this energy, the subsequent slower process is likely due to the equilibrium membrane-associated structure of the protein. The slower process may be more physiologically relevant because HIV/host cell fusion occurs at physiologic pH with gp41 restricted to the narrow region

  20. Delivery of membrane proteins into small and giant unilamellar vesicles by charge-mediated fusion.

    PubMed

    Biner, Olivier; Schick, Thomas; Müller, Yannic; von Ballmoos, Christoph

    2016-07-01

    One of the current challenges in synthetic biology is the production of stable membrane mimetic systems and the insertion of components in these systems. Here, we employ fusion of oppositely charged liposomes to deliver separately reconstituted membrane proteins into a common lipid bilayer. After a systematic evaluation of different lipid compositions by lipid mixing and size distribution analysis, suitable conditions were further investigated for proteoliposome fusion. With this technique, we functionally coreconstituted bo3 oxidase and ATP synthase from Escherichia coli into unilamellar liposomes ranging from 100 nm to 50 μm in size. The presented method is a simple and versatile tool for oriented membrane protein reconstitution to produce biomimetic systems with increased complexity. PMID:27264202

  1. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Klein, Michael L; Shinoda, Wataru

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle-vesicle, vesicle-planar, and planar-planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion. PMID:26723597

  2. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics study of membrane fusion: Curvature effects on free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamoto, Shuhei; Shinoda, Wataru; Klein, Michael L.

    2015-12-28

    The effects of membrane curvature on the free energy barrier for membrane fusion have been investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) simulations, assuming that fusion takes place through a stalk intermediate. Free energy barriers were estimated for stalk formation as well as for fusion pore formation using the guiding potential method. Specifically, the three different geometries of two apposed membranes were considered: vesicle–vesicle, vesicle–planar, and planar–planar membranes. The free energy barriers for the resulting fusion were found to depend importantly on the fusing membrane geometries; the lowest barrier was obtained for vesicular membranes. Further, lipid sorting was observed in fusion of the mixed membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE). Specifically, DOPE molecules were found to assemble around the stalk to support the highly negative curved membrane surface. A consistent result for lipid sorting was observed when a simple continuum model (CM) was used, where the Helfrich energy and mixing entropy of the lipids were taken into account. However, the CM predicts a much higher free energy barrier than found using CG-MD. This discrepancy originates from the conformational changes of lipids, which were not considered in the CM. The results of the CG-MD simulations reveal that a large conformational change in the lipid takes place around the stalk region, which results in a reduction of free energy barriers along the stalk mechanism of membrane fusion.

  3. Crystal Structure of Dengue Virus Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and Its Implications for Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, Vinod; Dessau, Moshe; Kucera, Kaury; Anthony, Karen; Ledizet, Michel; Modis, Yorgo

    2009-07-31

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the 'pH sensor' that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  4. Polybasic KKR Motif in the Cytoplasmic Tail of Nipah Virus Fusion Protein Modulates Membrane Fusion by Inside-Out Signaling▿

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Hector C.; Matreyek, Kenneth A.; Choi, Daniel Y.; Filone, Claire Marie; Young, Sophia; Lee, Benhur

    2007-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tails of the envelope proteins from multiple viruses are known to contain determinants that affect their fusogenic capacities. Here we report that specific residues in the cytoplasmic tail of the Nipah virus fusion protein (NiV-F) modulate its fusogenic activity. Truncation of the cytoplasmic tail of NiV-F greatly inhibited cell-cell fusion. Deletion and alanine scan analysis identified a tribasic KKR motif in the membrane-adjacent region as important for modulating cell-cell fusion. The K1A mutation increased fusion 5.5-fold, while the K2A and R3A mutations decreased fusion 3- to 5-fold. These results were corroborated in a reverse-pseudotyped viral entry assay, where receptor-pseudotyped reporter virus was used to infect cells expressing wild-type or mutant NiV envelope glycoproteins. Differential monoclonal antibody binding data indicated that hyper- or hypofusogenic mutations in the KKR motif affected the ectodomain conformation of NiV-F, which in turn resulted in faster or slower six-helix bundle formation, respectively. However, we also present evidence that the hypofusogenic phenotypes of the K2A and R3A mutants were effected via distinct mechanisms. Interestingly, the K2A mutant was also markedly excluded from lipid rafts, where ∼20% of wild-type F and the other mutants can be found. Finally, we found a strong negative correlation between the relative fusogenic capacities of these cytoplasmic-tail mutants and the avidities of NiV-F and NiV-G interactions (P = 0.007, r2 = 0.82). In toto, our data suggest that inside-out signaling by specific residues in the cytoplasmic tail of NiV-F can modulate its fusogenicity by multiple distinct mechanisms. PMID:17301148

  5. SNARE and regulatory proteins induce local membrane protrusions to prime docked vesicles for fast calcium-triggered fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Malsam, Jörg; Hagen, Wim J H; Scheutzow, Andrea; Söllner, Thomas H; Briggs, John A G

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane in response to Ca2+ influx, thereby releasing neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft. The protein machinery that mediates this process, consisting of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) and regulatory proteins, is well known, but the mechanisms by which these proteins prime synaptic membranes for fusion are debated. In this study, we applied large-scale, automated cryo-electron tomography to image an in vitro system that reconstitutes synaptic fusion. Our findings suggest that upon docking and priming of vesicles for fast Ca2+-triggered fusion, SNARE proteins act in concert with regulatory proteins to induce a local protrusion in the plasma membrane, directed towards the primed vesicle. The SNAREs and regulatory proteins thereby stabilize the membrane in a high-energy state from which the activation energy for fusion is profoundly reduced, allowing synchronous and instantaneous fusion upon release of the complexin clamp. PMID:24493260

  6. Tri-membrane nanoparticles produced by combining liposome fusion and a novel patchwork of bicelles to overcome endosomal and nuclear membrane barriers to cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Asako; Mitsueda, Asako; Hasan, Mahadi; Ueda, Miho; Hama, Susumu; Warashina, Shota; Nakamura, Takashi; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kogure, Kentaro

    2016-03-01

    Membrane fusion is a rational strategy for crossing intracellular membranes that present barriers to liposomal nanocarrier-mediated delivery of plasmid DNA into the nucleus of non-dividing cells, such as dendritic cells. Based on this strategy, we previously developed nanocarriers consisting of a nucleic acid core particle coated with four lipid membranes [Akita, et al., Biomaterials, 2009, 30, 2940-2949]. However, including the endosomal membrane and two nuclear membranes, cells possess three intracellular membranous barriers. Thus, after entering the nucleus, nanoparticles coated with four membranes would still have one lipid membrane remaining, and could impede cargo delivery. Until now, coating a core particle with an odd number of lipid membranes was challenging. To produce nanocarriers with an odd number of lipid membranes, we developed a novel coating method involving lipid nano-discs, also known as bicelles, as a material for packaging DNA in a carrier with an odd number of lipid membranes. In this procedure, bicelles fuse to form an outer coating that resembles a patchwork quilt, which allows the preparation of nanoparticles coated with only three lipid membranes. Moreover, the transfection activity of dendritic cells with these three-membrane nanoparticles was higher than that for nanoparticles coated with four lipid membranes. In summary, we developed novel nanoparticles coated with an odd number of lipid membranes using the novel "patchwork-packaging method" to deliver plasmid DNA into the nucleus via membrane fusion. PMID:26667208

  7. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K.; Talledge, Nathaniel; Skowyra, Michael L.; Saunders, Marissa G.; Naismith, Teresa V.; Colf, Leremy A.; Afonine, Pavel; Arthur, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.; et al

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises “open” CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecturemore » and is encircled by an outer strand of “closed” IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.« less

  8. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K.; Talledge, Nathaniel; Skowyra, Michael L.; Saunders, Marissa G.; Naismith, Teresa V.; Colf, Leremy A.; Afonine, Pavel; Arthur, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hanson, Phyllis I.; Frost, Adam

    2015-12-18

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure, and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 angstrom resolution cryogenic electron microscopy reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, charged multivesicular body protein 1B (CHMP1B) and increased sodium tolerance 1 (IST1). The inner strand comprises “open” CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecture and is encircled by an outer strand of “closed” IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature.

  9. Relaxation of Loaded ESCRT-III Spiral Springs Drives Membrane Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Chiaruttini, Nicolas; Redondo-Morata, Lorena; Colom, Adai; Humbert, Frédéric; Lenz, Martin; Scheuring, Simon; Roux, Aurélien

    2015-01-01

    Summary ESCRT-III is required for lipid membrane remodeling in many cellular processes, from abscission to viral budding and multi-vesicular body biogenesis. However, how ESCRT-III polymerization generates membrane curvature remains debated. Here, we show that Snf7, the main component of ESCRT-III, polymerizes into spirals at the surface of lipid bilayers. When covering the entire membrane surface, these spirals stopped growing when densely packed: they had a polygonal shape, suggesting that lateral compression could deform them. We reasoned that Snf7 spirals could function as spiral springs. By measuring the polymerization energy and the rigidity of Snf7 filaments, we showed that they were deformed while growing in a confined area. Furthermore, we observed that the elastic expansion of compressed Snf7 spirals generated an area difference between the two sides of the membrane and thus curvature. This spring-like activity underlies the driving force by which ESCRT-III could mediate membrane deformation and fission. PMID:26522593

  10. Structure and membrane remodeling activity of ESCRT-III helical polymers

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, John; Clippinger, Amy K.; Talledge, Nathaniel; Skowyra, Michael L.; Saunders, Marissa G.; Naismith, Teresa V.; Colf, Leremy A.; Afonine, Pavel; Arthur, Christopher; Sundquist, Wesley I.; Hanson, Phyllis I.; Frost, Adam

    2015-01-01

    The Endosomal Sorting Complexes Required for Transport (ESCRT) proteins mediate fundamental membrane remodeling events that require stabilizing negative membrane curvature. These include endosomal intralumenal vesicle formation, HIV budding, nuclear envelope closure and cytokinetic abscission. ESCRT-III subunits perform key roles in these processes by changing conformation and polymerizing into membrane-remodeling filaments. Here, we report the 4 Å resolution cryo-EM reconstruction of a one-start, double-stranded helical copolymer composed of two different human ESCRT-III subunits, CHMP1B and IST1. The inner strand comprises “open” CHMP1B subunits that interlock in an elaborate domain-swapped architecture, and is encircled by an outer strand of “closed” IST1 subunits. Unlike other ESCRT-III proteins, CHMP1B and IST1 polymers form external coats on positively-curved membranes in vitro and in vivo. Our analysis suggests how common ESCRT-III filament architectures could stabilize different degrees and directions of membrane curvature. PMID:26634441

  11. Energetics of intermediates in membrane fusion: comparison of stalk and inverted micellar intermediate mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, D P

    1993-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of membrane fusion, we have to infer the sequence of structural transformations that occurs during the process. Here, it is shown how one can estimate the lipid composition-dependent free energies of intermediate structures of different geometries. One can then infer which fusion mechanism is the best explanation of observed behavior in different systems by selecting the mechanism that requires the least energy. The treatment involves no adjustable parameters. It includes contributions to the intermediate energy resulting from the presence of hydrophobic interstices within structures formed between apposed bilayers. Results of these calculations show that a modified form of the stalk mechanism proposed by others is a likely fusion mechanism in a wide range of lipid compositions, but a mechanism based on inverted micellar intermediates (IMIs) is not. This should be true even in the vicinity of the lamellar/inverted hexagonal phase transition, where IMI formation would be most facile. Another prediction of the calculations is that traces of apolar lipids (e.g., long-chain alkanes) in membranes should have a substantial influence on fusion rates in general. The same theoretical methods can be used to generate and refine mechanisms for protein-mediated fusion. PMID:8298039

  12. β2 Adrenergic Receptor Fluorescent Protein Fusions Traffic to the Plasma Membrane and Retain Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Bubnell, Jaclyn; Pfister, Patrick; Sapar, Maria L.; Rogers, Matthew E.; Feinstein, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has proven useful for the study of protein interactions and dynamics for the last twenty years. A variety of new fluorescent proteins have been developed that expand the use of available excitation spectra. We have undertaken an analysis of seven of the most useful fluorescent proteins (XFPs), Cerulean (and mCerulean3), Teal, GFP, Venus, mCherry and TagRFP657, as fusions to the archetypal G-protein coupled receptor, the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR). We have characterized these β2AR::XFP fusions in respect to membrane trafficking and G-protein activation. We noticed that in the mouse neural cell line, OP 6, that membrane bound β2AR::XFP fusions robustly localized in the filopodia identical to gap::XFP fusions. All β2AR::XFP fusions show responses indistinguishable from each other and the non-fused form after isoprenaline exposure. Our results provide a platform by which G-protein coupled receptors can be dissected for their functionality. PMID:24086401

  13. Regulation of membrane fusion and secretory events in the sea urchin embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Roe, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Membrane fusion and secretory events play a key role in fertilization and early development in the sea urchin embryo. To investigate the mechanism of membrane fusion, the effect of inhibitors of metalloendoprotease activity was studied on two model systems of cell fusion; fertilization and spiculogenesis by primary mesenchyme cells in the embryo. Both the zinc chelator, 1,10-phenanthroline, and peptide metalloprotease substrates were found to inhibit both fertilization and gamete fusion, while peptides that are not substrates of metalloproteases did not affect either process. Primary mesenchyme cells form the larval skeleton in the embryo by deposition of mineral and an organic matrix into a syncytial cavity formed by fusion of filopodia of these cells. Metalloprotease inhibitors were found to inhibit spiculogenesis both in vivo and in cultures of isolated primary mesenchyme cells, and the activity of a metalloprotease of the appropriate specificity was found in the primary mesenchyme cells. These two studies implicate the activity of a metalloprotease in a necessary step in membrane fusion. Following fertilization, exocytosis of the cortical granules results in the formation of the fertilization envelope and the hyaline layer, that surround the developing embryo. The hatching enzyme is secreted by the blastula stage sea urchin embryo, which proteolyzes the fertilization envelope surrounding the embryo, allowing the embryo to hatch. Using an assay that measures {sup 125}I-fertilization envelope degradation, the hatching enzyme was identified as a 33 kDa metalloprotease, and was purified by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography from the hatching media of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryos. The hatching enzyme showed a substrate preference for only a minor subset of fertilization envelope proteins.

  14. Sendai virus-erythrocyte membrane interaction: quantitative and kinetic analysis of viral binding, dissociation, and fusion.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, D; Klappe, K

    1986-04-01

    A kinetic and quantitative analysis of the binding and fusion of Sendai virus with erythrocyte membranes was performed by using a membrane fusion assay based on the relief of fluorescence self-quenching. At 37 degrees C, the process of virus association displayed a half time of 2.5 min; at 4 degrees C, the half time was 3.0 min. The fraction of the viral dose which became cell associated was independent of the incubation temperature and increased with increasing target membrane concentration. On the average, one erythrocyte ghost can accommodate ca. 1,200 Sendai virus particles. The stability of viral attachment was sensitive to a shift in temperature: a fraction of the virions (ca. 30%), attached at 4 degrees C, rapidly (half time, ca. 2.5 min) eluted from the cell surface at 37 degrees C, irrespective of the presence of free virus in the medium. The elution can be attributed to a spontaneous, temperature-induced release, rather than to viral neuraminidase activity. Competition experiments with nonlabeled virus revealed that viruses destined to fuse do not exchange with free particles in the medium but rather bind in a rapid and irreversible manner. The fusion rate of Sendai virus was affected by the density of the virus particles on the cell surface and became restrained when more than 170 virus particles were attached per ghost. In principle, all virus particles added displayed fusion activity. However, at high virus-to-ghost ratios, only a fraction actually fused, indicating that a limited number of fusion sites exist on the erythrocyte membrane. We estimate that ca. 180 virus particles maximally can fuse with one erythrocyte ghost. PMID:3005662

  15. The lipid composition of Legionella dumoffii membrane modulates the interaction with Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Reszczyńska, Emilia; Luchowski, Rafał; Kania, Magdalena; Gisch, Nicolas; Waldow, Franziska; Mak, Paweł; Danikiewicz, Witold; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), an insect homologue of human apolipoprotein E (apoE), is a widely used model protein in studies on protein-lipid interactions, and anti-Legionella activity of Galleria mellonella apoLp-III has been documented. Interestingly, exogenous choline-cultured Legionella dumoffii cells are considerably more susceptible to apoLp-III than non-supplemented bacteria. In order to explain these differences, we performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of L. dumoffii lipids and a comparative lipidomic analysis of membranes of bacteria grown without and in the presence of exogenous choline. (31)P NMR analysis of L. dumoffii phospholipids (PLs) revealed a considerable increase in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content in bacteria cultured on choline medium and a decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in approximately the same range. The interactions of G. mellonella apoLp-III with lipid bilayer membranes prepared from PLs extracted from non- and choline-supplemented L. dumoffii cells were examined in detail by means of attenuated total reflection- and linear dichroism-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the kinetics of apoLp-III binding to liposomes formed from L. dumoffii PLs was analysed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using fluorescently labelled G. mellonella apoLp-III. Our results indicated enhanced binding of apoLp-III to and deeper penetration into lipid membranes formed from PLs extracted from the choline-supplemented bacteria, i.e. characterized by an increased PC/PE ratio. This could explain, at least in part, the higher susceptibility of choline-cultured L. dumoffii to G. mellonella apoLp-III. PMID:27094351

  16. Sphingomyelin Synthase 2, but Not Sphingomyelin Synthase 1, Is Involved in HIV-1 Envelope-mediated Membrane Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Nemoto-Sasaki, Yoko; Tanikawa, Takashi; Oka, Saori; Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Zama, Kouta; Mitsutake, Susumu; Sugiura, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion between the viral envelope and plasma membranes of target cells has previously been correlated with HIV-1 infection. Lipids in the plasma membrane, including sphingomyelin, may be crucially involved in HIV-1 infection; however, the role of lipid-metabolic enzymes in membrane fusion remains unclear. In this study, we examined the roles of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) in HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion using a cell-cell fusion assay with HIV-1 mimetics and their target cells. We employed reconstituted cells as target cells that stably express Sms1 or Sms2 in Sms-deficient cells. Fusion susceptibility was ∼5-fold higher in Sms2-expressing cells (not in Sms1-expressing cells) than in Sms-deficient cells. The enhancement of fusion susceptibility observed in Sms2-expressing cells was reversed and reduced by Sms2 knockdown. We also found that catalytically nonactive Sms2 promoted membrane fusion susceptibility. Moreover, SMS2 co-localized and was constitutively associated with the HIV receptor·co-receptor complex in the plasma membrane. In addition, HIV-1 Env treatment resulted in a transient increase in nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (Pyk2) phosphorylation in Sms2-expressing and catalytically nonactive Sms2-expressing cells. We observed that F-actin polymerization in the region of membrane fusion was more prominent in Sms2-expressing cells than Sms-deficient cells. Taken together, our research provides insight into a novel function of SMS2 which is the regulation of HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion via actin rearrangement. PMID:25231990

  17. The tail domain of tomosyn controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Fujikura, Kohei; Sakaue, Mio; Okimura, Kenjiro; Kobayashi, Yuta; Nakamura, Toshihiro; Sakisaka, Toshiaki

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} The tail domain of tomosyn has no effect on the tomosyn-SNARE complex formation. {yields} The tail domain binding to the VAMP-like domain allows VAMP2 to displace tomosyn. {yields} Tomosyn displacement by VAMP2 leads to SNARE complex formation. {yields} The SNARE complex formation drives membrane fusion. -- Abstract: Neurotransmitter release is regulated by SNARE complex-mediated synaptic vesicle fusion. Tomosyn sequesters target SNAREs (t-SNAREs) through its C-terminal VAMP-like domain (VLD). Cumulative biochemical results suggest that the tomosyn-SNARE complex is so tight that VAMP2 cannot displace tomosyn. Based on these results, the tomosyn-SNARE complex has been believed to be a dead-end complex to inhibit neurotransmitter release. On the other hand, some studies using siRNA depletion of tomosyn suggest that tomosyn positively regulates exocytosis. Therefore, it is still controversial whether tomosyn is a simple inhibitor for neurotransmitter release. We recently reported that the inhibitory activity of tomosyn is regulated by the tail domain binding to the VLD. In this study, we employed the liposome fusion assay in order to further understand modes of action of tomosyn in detail. The tail domain unexpectedly had no effect on binding of the VLD to t-SNARE-bearing liposomes. Nonetheless, the tail domain decreased the inhibitory activity of the VLD on the SNARE complex-mediated liposome fusion. These results indicate that the tail domain controls membrane fusion through tomosyn displacement by VAMP2. Deletion of the tail domain-binding region in the VLD retained the binding to t-SNAREs and promoted the liposome fusion. Together, we propose here a novel mechanism of tomosyn that controls synaptic vesicle fusion positively by serving as a placeholder for VAMP2.

  18. The modified stalk mechanism of lamellar/inverted phase transitions and its implications for membrane fusion.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, D P

    1999-01-01

    A model of the energetics of lipid assemblies (Siegel. 1993. Biophys. J. 65:2124-2140) is used to predict the relative free energy of intermediates in the transitions between lamellar (Lalpha) inverted hexagonal (HII), and inverted cubic (QII) phases. The model was previously used to generate the modified stalk theory of membrane fusion. The modified stalk theory proposes that the lowest energy structures to form between apposed membranes are the stalk and the transmonolayer contact (TMC), respectively. The first steps in the Lalpha/HII and Lalpha/QII phase transitions are also intermembrane events: bilayers of the Lalpha phase must interact to form new topologies during these transitions. Hence the intermediates in these phase transitions should be similar to the intermediates in the modified stalk mechanism of fusion. The calculations here show that stalks and TMCs can mediate transitions between the Lalpha, QII, and HII phases. These predictions are supported by studies of the mechanism of these transitions via time-resolved cryoelectron microscopy (. Biophys. J. 66:402-414; Siegel and Epand. 1997. Biophys. J. 73:3089-3111), whereas the predictions of previously proposed transition mechanisms are not. The model also predicts that QII phases should be thermodynamically stable in all thermotropic lipid systems. The profound hysteresis in Lalpha/QII transitions in some phospholipid systems may be due to lipid composition-dependent effects other than differences in lipid spontaneous curvature. The relevant composition-dependent properties are the Gaussian curvature modulus and the membrane rupture tension, which could change the stability of TMCs. TMC stability also influences the rate of membrane fusion of apposed bilayers, so these two properties may also affect the fusion rate in model membrane and biomembrane systems. One way proteins catalyze membrane fusion may be by making local changes in these lipid properties. Finally, although the model identifies stalks

  19. Sequential Conformational Changes in the Morbillivirus Attachment Protein Initiate the Membrane Fusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Herren, Michael; Avila, Mislay; Alves, Lisa; Bringolf, Fanny; Örvell, Claes; Langedijk, Johannes P.; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K.; Plattet, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Despite large vaccination campaigns, measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause major morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, respectively. The MeV and CDV cell entry system relies on two interacting envelope glycoproteins: the attachment protein (H), consisting of stalk and head domains, co-operates with the fusion protein (F) to mediate membrane fusion. However, how receptor-binding by the H-protein leads to F-triggering is not fully understood. Here, we report that an anti-CDV-H monoclonal antibody (mAb-1347), which targets the linear H-stalk segment 126-133, potently inhibits membrane fusion without interfering with H receptor-binding or F-interaction. Rather, mAb-1347 blocked the F-triggering function of H-proteins regardless of the presence or absence of the head domains. Remarkably, mAb-1347 binding to headless CDV H, as well as standard and engineered bioactive stalk-elongated CDV H-constructs treated with cells expressing the SLAM receptor, was enhanced. Despite proper cell surface expression, fusion promotion by most H-stalk mutants harboring alanine substitutions in the 126-138 “spacer” section was substantially impaired, consistent with deficient receptor-induced mAb-1347 binding enhancement. However, a previously reported F-triggering defective H-I98A variant still exhibited the receptor-induced “head-stalk” rearrangement. Collectively, our data spotlight a distinct mechanism for morbillivirus membrane fusion activation: prior to receptor contact, at least one of the morbillivirus H-head domains interacts with the membrane-distal “spacer” domain in the H-stalk, leaving the F-binding site located further membrane-proximal in the stalk fully accessible. This “head-to-spacer” interaction conformationally stabilizes H in an auto-repressed state, which enables intracellular H-stalk/F engagement while preventing the inherent H-stalk’s bioactivity that may prematurely activate F. Receptor-contact disrupts the

  20. Sequential conformational changes in the morbillivirus attachment protein initiate the membrane fusion process.

    PubMed

    Ader-Ebert, Nadine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Herren, Michael; Avila, Mislay; Alves, Lisa; Bringolf, Fanny; Örvell, Claes; Langedijk, Johannes P; Zurbriggen, Andreas; Plemper, Richard K; Plattet, Philippe

    2015-05-01

    Despite large vaccination campaigns, measles virus (MeV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause major morbidity and mortality in humans and animals, respectively. The MeV and CDV cell entry system relies on two interacting envelope glycoproteins: the attachment protein (H), consisting of stalk and head domains, co-operates with the fusion protein (F) to mediate membrane fusion. However, how receptor-binding by the H-protein leads to F-triggering is not fully understood. Here, we report that an anti-CDV-H monoclonal antibody (mAb-1347), which targets the linear H-stalk segment 126-133, potently inhibits membrane fusion without interfering with H receptor-binding or F-interaction. Rather, mAb-1347 blocked the F-triggering function of H-proteins regardless of the presence or absence of the head domains. Remarkably, mAb-1347 binding to headless CDV H, as well as standard and engineered bioactive stalk-elongated CDV H-constructs treated with cells expressing the SLAM receptor, was enhanced. Despite proper cell surface expression, fusion promotion by most H-stalk mutants harboring alanine substitutions in the 126-138 "spacer" section was substantially impaired, consistent with deficient receptor-induced mAb-1347 binding enhancement. However, a previously reported F-triggering defective H-I98A variant still exhibited the receptor-induced "head-stalk" rearrangement. Collectively, our data spotlight a distinct mechanism for morbillivirus membrane fusion activation: prior to receptor contact, at least one of the morbillivirus H-head domains interacts with the membrane-distal "spacer" domain in the H-stalk, leaving the F-binding site located further membrane-proximal in the stalk fully accessible. This "head-to-spacer" interaction conformationally stabilizes H in an auto-repressed state, which enables intracellular H-stalk/F engagement while preventing the inherent H-stalk's bioactivity that may prematurely activate F. Receptor-contact disrupts the "head

  1. A delay in membrane fusion: lag times observed by fluorescence microscopy of individual fusion events induced by an electric field pulse.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, D S; Sowers, A E

    1990-09-11

    Low light level video microscopy of the fusion of DiI- (1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate) labeled rabbit erythrocyte ghosts with unlabeled rabbit erythrocyte ghosts, held in stable apposition by dielectrophoresis in sodium phosphate buffers, showed reproducible time intervals (delays) between the application of a single fusogenic electric pulse and the earliest detection of fluorescence in the unlabeled adjacent membranes. The delay increased over the range 0.3-4 s with a decrease in (i) the electric field strength of the fusion-inducing pulse from 1000 to 250 V/mm, (ii) the decay half-time of the fusogenic pulse in the range 1.8-0.073 ms, and (iii) the dielectrophoretic force which brings the membranes into close apposition. A change in the buffer viscosity from 1.8 to 10 mP.s caused the delay to increase from 0.36 to 3.7 s (in glycerol solutions) or to 5.2 s (in sucrose solutions). The delay decreased 2-3 times with an increase in temperature from 21 to 37 degrees C. It did not differ significantly for "white" ghosts [0.013 mM hemoglobin (Hb)] or "red" ghosts (0.15 mM Hb) or buffer strength over the range 5-60 mM (sodium phosphate, pH 8.5). The calculated activation energy, 17 kcal/mol, does not depend on the field strength. The yield of fused cells was high when the delay was short. The delay in electrofusion resembles the delays in pH-dependent fusion of vesicular stomatitis viruses with erythrocyte ghosts [Clague, M. J., Schoch, C., Zech, L., & Blumenthal, R. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 1303-1308] and of fibroblasts expressing influenza hemagglutinin and red blood cells [Morris, S. J., Sarkar, D.P., White, J. M., & Blumenthal, R. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 3972-3978].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2174698

  2. Lysosome fusion to the cell membrane is mediated by the dysferlin C2A domain in coronary arterial endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Xu, Ming; Boini, Krishna M.; Ritter, Joseph K.; Li, Ning-Jun; Li, Pin-Lan

    2012-01-01

    Dysferlin has recently been reported to participate in cell membrane repair in muscle and other cells through lysosome fusion. Given that lysosome fusion is a crucial mechanism that leads to membrane raft clustering, the present study attempted to determine whether dysferlin is involved in this process and its related signalling, and explores the mechanism underlying dysferlin-mediated lysosome fusion in bovine coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs). We found that dysferlin is clustered in membrane raft macrodomains after Fas Ligand (FasL) stimulation as detected by confocal microscopy and membrane fraction flotation. Small-interfering RNA targeted to dysferlin prevented membrane raft clustering. Furthermore, the translocation of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) to membrane raft clusters, whereby local ASMase activation and ceramide production – an important step that mediates membrane raft clustering – was attenuated. Functionally, silencing of the dysferlin gene reversed FasL-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation in isolated small coronary arteries. By monitoring fluorescence quenching or dequenching, silencing of the dysferlin gene was found to almost completely block lysosome fusion to plasma membrane upon FasL stimulation. Further studies to block C2A binding and silencing of AHNAK (a dysferlin C2A domain binding partner), showed that the dysferlin C2A domain is required for FasL-induced lysosome fusion to the cell membrane, ASMase translocation and membrane raft clustering. We conclude that dysferlin determines lysosome fusion to the plasma membrane through its C2A domain and it is therefore implicated in membrane-raft-mediated signaling and regulation of endothelial function in coronary circulation. PMID:22349696

  3. Kinetics of Chromium(III) Transport Through a Liquid Membrane Containing DNNSA as a Carrier

    PubMed Central

    Religa, Paweł; Gawroński, Roman; Gierycz, Paweł

    2009-01-01

    Kinetics of Cr(III) ions transport through a bulk liquid membrane containing dinonylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (DNNSA) as a carrier, flowing over aqueous phases, has been examined. Special attention has been paid to the effect of the membrane’s velocity flow on the chromium concentration decrease in a feed phase. For the description of relationships of chromium(III) concentration in particular phases with the time, a model based on the assumption of consecutive first-order reactions was proposed. Satisfactory compatibility of experiments and model results have been obtained both for the membrane flow velocities below 0.0034 m·s−1 when the interfaces begin to fluctuate slightly and for low initial Cr(III) concentration in the feed phase. PMID:19399232

  4. Intersubunit disulfide isomerization controls membrane fusion of human T-cell leukemia virus Env.

    PubMed

    Li, Kejun; Zhang, Shujing; Kronqvist, Malin; Wallin, Michael; Ekström, Maria; Derse, David; Garoff, Henrik

    2008-07-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) Env carries a typical disulfide isomerization motif, C(225)XXC, in the C-terminal domain SU. Here we have tested whether this motif is used for isomerization of the intersubunit disulfide of Env and whether this rearrangement is required for membrane fusion. We introduced the C225A and C228A mutations into Env and found that the former but not the latter mutant matured into covalently linked SU-TM complexes in transfected cells. Next, we constructed a secreted Env ectodomain and showed that it underwent incubation-dependent intersubunit disulfide isomerization on target cells. However, the rearrangement was blocked by the C225A mutation, suggesting that C(225) carried the isomerization-active thiol. Still, it was possible to reduce the intersubunit disulfide of the native C225A ectodomain mutant with dithiothreitol (DTT). The importance of the CXXC-mediated disulfide isomerization for infection was studied using murine leukemia virus vectors pseudotyped with wild-type or C225A HTLV-1 Env. We found that the mutant Env blocked infection, but this could be rescued with DTT. The fusion activity was tested in a fusion-from-within assay using a coculture of rat XC target and transfected BHK-21 effector cells. We found that the mutation blocked polykaryon formation, but this could be reversed with DTT. Similar DTT-reversible inhibition of infection and fusion was observed when a membrane-impermeable alkylator was present during the infection/fusion incubation. We conclude that the fusion activity of HTLV-1 Env is controlled by an SU CXXC-mediated isomerization of the intersubunit disulfide. Thus, this extends the applicability of the isomerization model from gammaretroviruses to deltaretroviruses. PMID:18480461

  5. Negative membrane curvature catalyzes nucleation of endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT)-III assembly.

    PubMed

    Lee, Il-Hyung; Kai, Hiroyuki; Carlson, Lars-Anders; Groves, Jay T; Hurley, James H

    2015-12-29

    The endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT) machinery functions in HIV-1 budding, cytokinesis, multivesicular body biogenesis, and other pathways, in the course of which it interacts with concave membrane necks and bud rims. To test the role of membrane shape in regulating ESCRT assembly, we nanofabricated templates for invaginated supported lipid bilayers. The assembly of the core ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B/Snf7 is preferentially nucleated in the resulting 100-nm-deep membrane concavities. ESCRT-II and CHMP6 accelerate CHMP4B assembly by increasing the concentration of nucleation seeds. Superresolution imaging was used to visualize CHMP4B/Snf7 concentration in a negatively curved annulus at the rim of the invagination. Although Snf7 assemblies nucleate slowly on flat membranes, outward growth onto the flat membrane is efficiently nucleated at invaginations. The nucleation behavior provides a biophysical explanation for the timing of ESCRT-III recruitment and membrane scission in HIV-1 budding. PMID:26668364

  6. Conformation and Lipid Interaction of the Fusion Peptide of the Paramyxovirus PIV5 in Anionic and Negative-Curvature Membranes from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Viral fusion proteins catalyze the merger of the virus envelope and the target cell membrane through multiple steps of protein conformational changes. The fusion peptide domain of these proteins is important for membrane fusion, but how it causes membrane curvature and dehydration is still poorly understood. We now use solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, topology, and lipid and water interactions of the fusion peptide of the PIV5 virus F protein in three lipid membranes, POPC/POPG, DOPC/DOPG, and DOPE. These membranes allow us to investigate the effects of lipid chain disorder, membrane surface charge, and intrinsic negative curvature on the fusion peptide structure. Chemical shifts and spin diffusion data indicate that the PIV5 fusion peptide is inserted into all three membranes but adopts distinct conformations: it is fully α-helical in the POPC/POPG membrane, adopts a mixed strand/helix conformation in the DOPC/DOPG membrane, and is primarily a β-strand in the DOPE membrane. 31P NMR spectra show that the peptide retains the lamellar structure and hydration of the two anionic membranes. However, it dehydrates the DOPE membrane, destabilizes its inverted hexagonal phase, and creates an isotropic phase that is most likely a cubic phase. The ability of the β-strand conformation of the fusion peptide to generate negative Gaussian curvature and to dehydrate the membrane may be important for the formation of hemifusion intermediates in the membrane fusion pathway. PMID:24428385

  7. Septins promote macropinosome maturation and traffic to the lysosome by facilitating membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Dolat, Lee; Spiliotis, Elias T

    2016-08-29

    Macropinocytosis, the internalization of extracellular fluid and material by plasma membrane ruffles, is critical for antigen presentation, cell metabolism, and signaling. Macropinosomes mature through homotypic and heterotypic fusion with endosomes and ultimately merge with lysosomes. The molecular underpinnings of this clathrin-independent endocytic pathway are largely unknown. Here, we show that the filamentous septin GTPases associate preferentially with maturing macropinosomes in a phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate-dependent manner and localize to their contact/fusion sites with macropinosomes/endosomes. Septin knockdown results in large clusters of docked macropinosomes, which persist longer and exhibit fewer fusion events. Septin depletion and overexpression down-regulates and enhances, respectively, the delivery of fluid-phase cargo to lysosomes, without affecting Rab5 and Rab7 recruitment to macropinosomes/endosomes. In vitro reconstitution assays show that fusion of macropinosomes/endosomes is abrogated by septin immunodepletion and function-blocking antibodies and is induced by recombinant septins in the absence of cytosol and polymerized actin. Thus, septins regulate fluid-phase cargo traffic to lysosomes by promoting macropinosome maturation and fusion with endosomes/lysosomes. PMID:27551056

  8. The BAR Domain Proteins: Molding Membranes in Fission, Fusion, and Phagy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S.; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L.

    2006-01-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt α-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  9. The BAR domain proteins: molding membranes in fission, fusion, and phagy.

    PubMed

    Ren, Gang; Vajjhala, Parimala; Lee, Janet S; Winsor, Barbara; Munn, Alan L

    2006-03-01

    The Bin1/amphiphysin/Rvs167 (BAR) domain proteins are a ubiquitous protein family. Genes encoding members of this family have not yet been found in the genomes of prokaryotes, but within eukaryotes, BAR domain proteins are found universally from unicellular eukaryotes such as yeast through to plants, insects, and vertebrates. BAR domain proteins share an N-terminal BAR domain with a high propensity to adopt alpha-helical structure and engage in coiled-coil interactions with other proteins. BAR domain proteins are implicated in processes as fundamental and diverse as fission of synaptic vesicles, cell polarity, endocytosis, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, transcriptional repression, cell-cell fusion, signal transduction, apoptosis, secretory vesicle fusion, excitation-contraction coupling, learning and memory, tissue differentiation, ion flux across membranes, and tumor suppression. What has been lacking is a molecular understanding of the role of the BAR domain protein in each process. The three-dimensional structure of the BAR domain has now been determined and valuable insight has been gained in understanding the interactions of BAR domains with membranes. The cellular roles of BAR domain proteins, characterized over the past decade in cells as distinct as yeasts, neurons, and myocytes, can now be understood in terms of a fundamental molecular function of all BAR domain proteins: to sense membrane curvature, to bind GTPases, and to mold a diversity of cellular membranes. PMID:16524918

  10. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C; sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration. PMID:22470842

  11. III-V/Si hybrid photonic devices by direct fusion bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Katsuaki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Monolithic integration of III-V compound semiconductors on silicon is highly sought after for high-speed, low-power-consumption silicon photonics and low-cost, light-weight photovoltaics. Here we present a GaAs/Si direct fusion bonding technique to provide highly conductive and transparent heterojunctions by heterointerfacial band engineering in relation to doping concentrations. Metal- and oxide-free GaAs/Si ohmic heterojunctions have been formed at 300°C; sufficiently low to inhibit active material degradation. We have demonstrated 1.3 μm InAs/GaAs quantum dot lasers on Si substrates with the lowest threshold current density of any laser on Si to date, and AlGaAs/Si dual-junction solar cells, by p-GaAs/p-Si and p-GaAs/n-Si bonding, respectively. Our direct semiconductor bonding technique opens up a new pathway for realizing ultrahigh efficiency multijunction solar cells with ideal bandgap combinations that are free from lattice-match restrictions required in conventional heteroepitaxy, as well as enabling the creation of novel high performance and practical optoelectronic devices by III-V/Si hybrid integration. PMID:22470842

  12. Flagellar membrane fusion and protein exchange in trypanosomes; a new form of cell-cell communication?

    PubMed Central

    Imhof, Simon; Fragoso, Cristina; Hemphill, Andrew; von Schubert, Conrad; Li, Dong; Legant, Wesley; Betzig, Eric; Roditi, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Diverse structures facilitate direct exchange of proteins between cells, including plasmadesmata in plants and tunnelling nanotubes in bacteria and higher eukaryotes.  Here we describe a new mechanism of protein transfer, flagellar membrane fusion, in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. When fluorescently tagged trypanosomes were co-cultured, a small proportion of double-positive cells were observed. The formation of double-positive cells was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium and was enhanced by placing cells in medium supplemented with fresh bovine serum. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that double-positive cells arose by bidirectional protein exchange in the absence of nuclear transfer.  Furthermore, super-resolution microscopy showed that this process occurred in ≤1 minute, the limit of temporal resolution in these experiments. Both cytoplasmic and membrane proteins could be transferred provided they gained access to the flagellum. Intriguingly, a component of the RNAi machinery (Argonaute) was able to move between cells, raising the possibility that small interfering RNAs are transported as cargo. Transmission electron microscopy showed that shared flagella contained two axonemes and two paraflagellar rods bounded by a single membrane. In some cases flagellar fusion was partial and interactions between cells were transient. In other cases fusion occurred along the entire length of the flagellum, was stable for several hours and might be irreversible. Fusion did not appear to be deleterious for cell function: paired cells were motile and could give rise to progeny while fused. The motile flagella of unicellular organisms are related to the sensory cilia of higher eukaryotes, raising the possibility that protein transfer between cells via cilia or flagella occurs more widely in nature. PMID:27239276

  13. A soluble form of Epstein-Barr virus gH/gL inhibits EBV-induced membrane fusion and does not function in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Cynthia L.; Connolly, Sarah A.; Chen, Jia; Jardetzky, Theodore S.; Longnecker, Richard

    2013-02-05

    We investigated whether soluble EBV gH/gL (sgH/gL) functions in fusion and made a series of truncations of gH/gL domains based on the gH/gL crystal structure. We found sgH/gL failed to mediate cell-cell fusion both when co-expressed with the other entry glycoproteins and when added exogenously to fusion assays. Interestingly, sgH/gL inhibited cell-cell fusion in a dose dependent manner when co-expressed. sgH/gL from HSV was unable to inhibit EBV fusion, suggesting the inhibition was specific to EBV gH/gL. sgH/gL stably binds gp42, but not gB nor gH/gL. The domain mutants, DI/gL, DI-II/gL and DI-II-III/gL were unable to bind gp42. Instead, DI-II/gL, DI-II-III/gL and sgH/gL but not DI/gL decreased the expression of gp42, resulting in decreased overall fusion. Overall, our results suggest that domain IV may be required for proper folding and the transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of EBV gH/gL are required for the most efficient fusion.

  14. Identification and characterization of LFD1, a novel protein involved in membrane merger during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Leeder, Abigail C; Welch, Juliet; Glass, N Louise

    2014-04-01

    Despite its essential role in development, molecular mechanisms of membrane merger during cell-cell fusion in most eukaryotic organisms remain elusive. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cell fusion occurs during asexual spore germination, where genetically identical germlings show chemotropic interactions and cell-cell fusion. Fusion of germlings and hyphae is required for the formation of the interconnected mycelial network characteristic of filamentous fungi. Previously, a multipass membrane protein, PRM1, was characterized and acts at the step of bilayer fusion in N. crassa. Here we describe the identification and characterization of lfd-1, encoding a single pass transmembrane protein, which is also involved in membrane merger. lfd-1 was identified by a targeted analysis of a transcriptional profile of a transcription factor mutant (Δpp-1) defective in germling fusion. The Δlfd-1 mutant shows a similar, but less severe, membrane merger defect as a ΔPrm1 mutant. By genetic analyses, we show that LFD1 and PRM1 act independently, but share a redundant function. The cell fusion frequency of both Δlfd-1 and ΔPrm1 mutants was sensitive to extracellular calcium concentration and was associated with an increase in cell lysis, which was suppressed by a calcium-dependent mechanism involving a homologue to synaptotagmin. PMID:24673848

  15. Large Plasma Membrane Disruptions Are Rapidly Resealed by Ca2+-dependent Vesicle–Vesicle Fusion Events

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    1997-01-01

    A microneedle puncture of the fibroblast or sea urchin egg surface rapidly evokes a localized exocytotic reaction that may be required for the rapid resealing that follows this breach in plasma membrane integrity (Steinhardt, R.A,. G. Bi, and J.M. Alderton. 1994. Science (Wash. DC). 263:390–393). How this exocytotic reaction facilitates the resealing process is unknown. We found that starfish oocytes and sea urchin eggs rapidly reseal much larger disruptions than those produced with a microneedle. When an ∼40 by 10 μm surface patch was torn off, entry of fluorescein stachyose (FS; 1,000 mol wt) or fluorescein dextran (FDx; 10,000 mol wt) from extracellular sea water (SW) was not detected by confocal microscopy. Moreover, only a brief (∼5–10 s) rise in cytosolic Ca2+ was detected at the wound site. Several lines of evidence indicate that intracellular membranes are the primary source of the membrane recruited for this massive resealing event. When we injected FS-containing SW deep into the cells, a vesicle formed immediately, entrapping within its confines most of the FS. DiI staining and EM confirmed that the barrier delimiting injected SW was a membrane bilayer. The threshold for vesicle formation was ∼3 mM Ca2+ (SW is ∼10 mM Ca2+). The capacity of intracellular membranes for sealing off SW was further demonstrated by extruding egg cytoplasm from a micropipet into SW. A boundary immediately formed around such cytoplasm, entrapping FDx or FS dissolved in it. This entrapment did not occur in Ca2+-free SW (CFSW). When egg cytoplasm stratified by centrifugation was exposed to SW, only the yolk platelet–rich domain formed a membrane, suggesting that the yolk platelet is a critical element in this response and that the ER is not required. We propose that plasma membrane disruption evokes Ca2+ regulated vesicle–vesicle (including endocytic compartments but possibly excluding ER) fusion reactions. The function in resealing of this cytoplasmic fusion

  16. HOPS prevents the disassembly of trans-SNARE complexes by Sec17p/Sec18p during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hao; Jun, Youngsoo; Thompson, James; Yates, John; Wickner, William

    2010-01-01

    SNARE-dependent membrane fusion requires the disassembly of cis-SNARE complexes (formed by SNAREs anchored to one membrane) followed by the assembly of trans-SNARE complexes (SNAREs anchored to two apposed membranes). Although SNARE complex disassembly and assembly might be thought to be opposing reactions, the proteins promoting disassembly (Sec17p/Sec18p) and assembly (the HOPS complex) work synergistically to support fusion. We now report that trans-SNARE complexes formed during vacuole fusion are largely associated with Sec17p. Using a reconstituted proteoliposome fusion system, we show that trans-SNARE complex, like cis-SNARE complex, is sensitive to Sec17p/Sec18p mediated disassembly. Strikingly, HOPS inhibits the disassembly of SNARE complexes in the trans-, but not in the cis-, configuration. This selective HOPS preservation of trans-SNARE complexes requires HOPS:SNARE recognition and is lost when the apposed bilayers are dissolved in Triton X-100; it is also observed during fusion of isolated vacuoles. HOPS thus directs the Sec17p/Sec18p chaperone system to maximize functional trans-SNARE complex for membrane fusion, a new role of tethering factors during membrane traffic. PMID:20473271

  17. Type II integral membrane protein, TM of J paramyxovirus promotes cell-to-cell fusion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuo; Hung, Cher; Paterson, Reay G.; Michel, Frank; Fuentes, Sandra; Place, Ryan; Lin, Yuan; Hogan, Robert J.; Lamb, Robert A.; He, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Paramyxoviruses include many important animal and human pathogens. Most paramyxoviruses have two integral membrane proteins: fusion protein (F) and attachment proteins hemagglutinin, hemagglutinin–neuraminidase, or glycoprotein (G), which are critical for viral entry into cells. J paramyxovirus (JPV) encodes four integral membrane proteins: F, G, SH, and transmembrane (TM). The function of TM is not known. In this work, we have generated a viable JPV lacking TM (JPV∆TM). JPV∆TM formed opaque plaques compared with JPV. Quantitative syncytia assays showed that JPV∆TM was defective in promoting cell-to-cell fusion (i.e., syncytia formation) compared with JPV. Furthermore, cells separately expressing F, G, TM, or F plus G did not form syncytia whereas cells expressing F plus TM formed some syncytia. However, syncytia formation was much greater with coexpression of F, G, and TM. Biochemical analysis indicates that F, G, and TM interact with each other. A small hydrophobic region in the TM ectodomain from amino acid residues 118 to 132, the hydrophobic loop (HL), was important for syncytial promotion, suggesting that the TM HL region plays a critical role in cell-to-cell fusion. PMID:26392524

  18. Effects of ionic liquids on membrane fusion and lipid aggregation of egg-PC liposomes.

    PubMed

    Galletti, Paola; Malferrari, Danilo; Samorì, Chiara; Sartor, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    In this study we have explored the effects of different groups of ionic liquids (ILs) on membrane fusion. The ILs used contain different head groups: N-methylimidazolium, 3-methylpyridinium and N-methylpyrrolidinium; short alkyl or ether functionalized side chains (with one or two ethoxy functionalities), paired with chloride anion. These ILs have been compared with 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide as example of a highly lipophilic IL. The effect of ILs on membrane fusion was investigated through pyrene steady state fluorescence probing, using the IE factor and excimer/monomer ratio (IE/IM) as parameters. The ratio between the vibronic bands of pyrene (I1/I3 ratio) has been used to monitor the effect of ILs on the aggregation properties of egg-PC liposomes. The effect of different ILs' families was evident; the pyridinium ILs induced a greater extent of fusion than pyrrolidinium and imidazolium ILs having the same side chain. Marginal effect could be attributed to different anions. ILs with short alkyl chains were usually more effective than ether functionalized ones. The aggregation behaviors of ILs having dioxygenated chains have been measured in buffer solution. PMID:25483843

  19. Free Energy Landscape of Rim-Pore Expansion in Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, Herre Jelger; Smirnova, Yuliya; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    The productive fusion pore in membrane fusion is generally thought to be toroidally shaped. Theoretical studies and recent experiments suggest that its formation, in some scenarios, may be preceded by an initial pore formed near the rim of the extended hemifusion diaphragm (HD), a rim-pore. This rim-pore is characterized by a nontoroidal shape that changes with size. To determine this shape as well as the free energy along the pathway of rim-pore expansion, we derived a simple analytical free energy model. We argue that dilation of HD material via expansion of a rim-pore is favored over a regular, circular pore. Further, the expanding rim-pore faces a free energy barrier that linearly increases with HD size. In contrast, the tension required to expand the rim-pore decreases with HD size. Pore flickering, followed by sudden opening, occurs when the tension in the HD competes with the line energy of the rim-pore, and the rim-pore reaches its equilibrium size before reaching the critical pore size. The experimental observation of flickering and closing fusion pores (kiss-and-run) is very well explained by the observed behavior of rim-pores. Finally, the free energy landscape of rim-pore expansion/HD dilation may very well explain why some cellular fusion reactions, in their attempt to minimize energetic costs, progress via alternative formation and dilation of microscopic hemifusion intermediates. PMID:25418297

  20. Membrane Fusion Mediated by pH-Low-Insertion-Peptide (pHLIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Jennifer; Yao, Lan; Engelman, Donald; Andreev, Oleg; Reshetnyak, Yana

    2012-02-01

    Liposomes are traditionally used as drug delivery carriers. The major mechanism of liposome entry into cell is endocytotic. First, the endocytotic pathway of cellular entry is non-specific: the delivery of therapeutics occurs to cells in both diseased and healthy tissues. Second, liposomes are usually trapped in endosome/lysosome, which prevents delivery of therapeutics to cytoplasm. We proposed to use pHLIP (pH-Low-Insertion-Peptide) to promote selective delivery of the liposome content to cytoplasm of cancer cells. We showed that liposomes coated with PEG polymer and pHLIP peptide enhance membrane fusion in acidic environments. pHLIP promotes fusion between lipid bilayer of liposome and plasma membrane or membrane of endosome/lysosome, which results in intracellular delivery of payload. Liposomes composed of 5 % pHLIP and 5 % PEG were ideal for the delivery. Since cancer and other pathological states produce an acid extracellular environment, this allows the liposome to target diseased tissue while avoiding healthy tissue (with neutral pH in extracellular space). The work is supported by NIH grants CA133890 to OAA, DME, YRK.

  1. Biochemical requirements for the targeting and fusion of ER-derived transport vesicles with purified yeast Golgi membranes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    In order for secretion to progress, ER-derived transport vesicles must target to, and fuse with the cis-Golgi compartment. These processes have been reconstituted using highly enriched membrane fractions and partially purified soluble components. The functionally active yeast Golgi membranes that have been purified are highly enriched in the cis- Golgi marker enzymes alpha 1,6 mannosyltransferase and GDPase. Fusion of transport vesicles with these membranes requires both GTP and ATP hydrolysis, and depends on cytosolic and peripheral membrane proteins. At least two protein fractions from yeast cytosol are required for the reconstitution of ER-derived vesicle fusion. Soluble fractions prepared from temperature-sensitive mutants revealed requirements for the Ypt1p, Sec19p, Sly1p, Sec7p, and Uso1 proteins. A model for the sequential involvement of these components in the targeting and fusion reaction is proposed. PMID:8636207

  2. Haploid Genetic Screen Reveals a Profound and Direct Dependence on Cholesterol for Hantavirus Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Jangra, Rohit K.; Jae, Lucas T.; Herbert, Andrew S.; Mittler, Eva; Stiles, Katie M.; Wirchnianski, Ariel S.; Kielian, Margaret; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hantaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the Old World and a highly fatal hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) in the New World. No vaccines or antiviral therapies are currently available to prevent or treat hantavirus disease, and gaps in our understanding of how hantaviruses enter cells challenge the search for therapeutics. We performed a haploid genetic screen in human cells to identify host factors required for entry by Andes virus, a highly virulent New World hantavirus. We found that multiple genes involved in cholesterol sensing, regulation, and biosynthesis, including key components of the sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, are critical for Andes virus entry. Genetic or pharmacological disruption of the membrane-bound transcription factor peptidase/site-1 protease (MBTPS1/S1P), an SREBP control element, dramatically reduced infection by virulent hantaviruses of both the Old World and New World clades but not by rhabdoviruses or alphaviruses, indicating that this pathway is broadly, but selectively, required by hantaviruses. These results could be fully explained as arising from the modest depletion of cellular membrane cholesterol that accompanied S1P disruption. Mechanistic studies of cells and with protein-free liposomes suggested that high levels of cholesterol are specifically needed for hantavirus membrane fusion. Taken together, our results indicate that the profound dependence on target membrane cholesterol is a fundamental, and unusual, biophysical property of hantavirus glycoprotein-membrane interactions during entry. PMID:26126854

  3. Proteasome Impairment Induces Recovery of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential and an Alternative Pathway of Mitochondrial Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shirozu, Ryohei; Yashiroda, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are vital and highly dynamic organelles that continuously fuse and divide to maintain mitochondrial quality. Mitochondrial dysfunction impairs cellular integrity and is known to be associated with various human diseases. However, the mechanism by which the quality of mitochondria is maintained remains largely unexplored. Here we show that impaired proteasome function recovers the growth of yeast cells lacking Fzo1, a pivotal protein for mitochondrial fusion. Decreased proteasome activity increased the mitochondrial oxidoreductase protein Mia40 and the ratio of the short isoform of mitochondrial intermembrane protein Mgm1 (s-Mgm1) to the long isoform (l-Mgm1). The increase in Mia40 restored mitochondrial membrane potential, while the increase in the s-Mgm1/l-Mgm1 ratio promoted mitochondrial fusion in an Fzo1-independent manner. Our findings demonstrate a new pathway for mitochondrial quality control that is induced by proteasome impairment. PMID:26552703

  4. Development of III-Sb metamorphic DBR membranes on InP for vertical cavity laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addamane, S. J.; Mansoori, A.; Renteria, E. J.; Dawson, N.; Shima, D. M.; Rotter, T. J.; Hains, C. P.; Dawson, L. R.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2016-04-01

    Sb-based metamorphic DBR membranes are developed for InP-based vertical cavity laser applications. The reflectivity of the metamorphic DBR membrane is compared to the reflectivity of a lattice-matched DBR to characterize the optical quality of the DBR membrane. The metamorphic interface between InP and the III-antimonides is found to degrade the reflectivity of the DBR. Therefore, the growth temperature for the metamorphic DBR is optimized in order to obtain highly reflective (>99.8%) III-Sb thin-film membranes.

  5. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development.

    PubMed

    Stith, Bradley J

    2015-05-15

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  6. Phospholipase C and D regulation of Src, calcium release and membrane fusion during Xenopus laevis development

    PubMed Central

    Stith, Bradley J.

    2015-01-01

    This review emphasizes how lipids regulate membrane fusion and the proteins involved in three developmental stages: oocyte maturation to the fertilizable egg, fertilization and during first cleavage. Decades of work show that phosphatidic acid (PA) releases intracellular calcium, and recent work shows that the lipid can activate Src tyrosine kinase or phospholipase C during Xenopus fertilization. Numerous reports are summarized to show three levels of increase in lipid second messengers inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and sn 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) during the three different developmental stages. In addition, possible roles for PA, ceramide, lysophosphatidylcholine, plasmalogens, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 5-phosphate, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate, membrane microdomains (rafts) and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate in regulation of membrane fusion (acrosome reaction, sperm-egg fusion, cortical granule exocytosis), inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors, and calcium release are discussed. The role of six lipases involved in generating putative lipid second messengers during fertilization is also discussed: phospholipase D, autotaxin, lipin1, sphingomyelinase, phospholipase C, and phospholipase A2. More specifically, proteins involved in developmental events and their regulation through lipid binding to SH3, SH4, PH, PX, or C2 protein domains is emphasized. New models are presented for PA activation of Src (through SH3, SH4 and a unique domain), that this may be why the SH2 domain of PLCγ is not required for Xenopus fertilization, PA activation of phospholipase C, a role for PA during the calcium wave after fertilization, and that calcium/calmodulin may be responsible for the loss of Src from rafts after fertilization. Also discussed is that the large DAG increase during fertilization derives from phospholipase D production of PA and lipin dephosphorylation to DAG. PMID:25748412

  7. SNARE Molecules in Marchantia polymorpha: Unique and Conserved Features of the Membrane Fusion Machinery.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Takehiko; Era, Atsuko; Minamino, Naoki; Shikano, Yu; Fujimoto, Masaru; Uemura, Tomohiro; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Yamato, Katsuyuki T; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Kohchi, Takayuki; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The membrane trafficking pathway has been diversified in a specific way for each eukaryotic lineage, probably to fulfill specific functions in the organisms. In green plants, comparative genomics has supported the possibility that terrestrialization and/or multicellularization could be associated with the elaboration and diversification of membrane trafficking pathways, which have been accomplished by an expansion of the numbers of genes required for machinery components of membrane trafficking, including soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. However, information regarding membrane trafficking pathways in basal land plant lineages remains limited. In the present study, we conducted extensive analyses of SNARE molecules, which mediate membrane fusion between target membranes and transport vesicles or donor organelles, in the liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha. The M. polymorpha genome contained at least 34 genes for 36 SNARE proteins, comprising fundamental sets of SNARE proteins that are shared among land plant lineages with low degrees of redundancy. We examined the subcellular distribution of a major portion of these SNARE proteins by expressing Citrine-tagged SNARE proteins in M. polymorpha, and the results showed that some of the SNARE proteins were targeted to different compartments from their orthologous products in Arabidopsis thaliana. For example, MpSYP12B was localized to the surface of the oil body, which is a unique organelle in liverworts. Furthermore, we identified three VAMP72 members with distinctive structural characteristics, whose N-terminal extensions contain consensus sequences for N-myristoylation. These results suggest that M. polymorpha has acquired unique membrane trafficking pathways associated with newly acquired machinery components during evolution. PMID:26019268

  8. Reverse osmosis membrane composition, structure and performance modification by bisulphite, iron(III), bromide and chlorite exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, O; Gibert, O; Cortina, J L

    2016-10-15

    Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane exposure to bisulphite, chlorite, bromide and iron(III) was assessed in terms of membrane composition, structure and performance. Membrane composition was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and membrane performance was assessed by water and chloride permeation, using a modified version of the solution-diffusion model. Iron(III) dosage in presence of bisulphite led to an autooxidation of the latter, probably generating free radicals which damaged the membrane. It comprised a significant raise in chloride passage (chloride permeation coefficient increased 5.3-5.1 fold compared to the virgin membrane under the conditions studied) rapidly. No major differences in terms of water permeability and membrane composition were observed. Nevertheless, an increase in the size of the network pores, and a raise in the fraction of aggregate pores of the polyamide (PA) layer were identified, but no amide bond cleavage was observed. These structural changes were therefore, in accordance with the transport properties observed. PMID:27470468

  9. The Membrane Fusion Step of Vaccinia Virus Entry Is Cooperatively Mediated by Multiple Viral Proteins and Host Cell Components

    PubMed Central

    Laliberte, Jason P.; Weisberg, Andrea S.; Moss, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    For many viruses, one or two proteins allow cell attachment and entry, which occurs through the plasma membrane or following endocytosis at low pH. In contrast, vaccinia virus (VACV) enters cells by both neutral and low pH routes; four proteins mediate cell attachment and twelve that are associated in a membrane complex and conserved in all poxviruses are dedicated to entry. The aim of the present study was to determine the roles of cellular and viral proteins in initial stages of entry, specifically fusion of the membranes of the mature virion and cell. For analysis of the role of cellular components, we used well characterized inhibitors and measured binding of a recombinant VACV virion containing Gaussia luciferase fused to a core protein; viral and cellular membrane lipid mixing with a self-quenching fluorescent probe in the virion membrane; and core entry with a recombinant VACV expressing firefly luciferase and electron microscopy. We determined that inhibitors of tyrosine protein kinases, dynamin GTPase and actin dynamics had little effect on binding of virions to cells but impaired membrane fusion, whereas partial cholesterol depletion and inhibitors of endosomal acidification and membrane blebbing had a severe effect at the later stage of core entry. To determine the role of viral proteins, virions lacking individual membrane components were purified from cells infected with members of a panel of ten conditional-lethal inducible mutants. Each of the entry protein-deficient virions had severely reduced infectivity and except for A28, L1 and L5 greatly impaired membrane fusion. In addition, a potent neutralizing L1 monoclonal antibody blocked entry at a post-membrane lipid-mixing step. Taken together, these results suggested a 2-step entry model and implicated an unprecedented number of viral proteins and cellular components involved in signaling and actin rearrangement for initiation of virus-cell membrane fusion during poxvirus entry. PMID:22194690

  10. Insulin-stimulated plasma membrane fusion of Glut4 glucose transporter-containing vesicles is regulated by phospholipase D1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ping; Altshuller, Yelena M; Hou, June Chunqiu; Pessin, Jeffrey E; Frohman, Michael A

    2005-06-01

    Insulin stimulates glucose uptake in fat and muscle by mobilizing Glut4 glucose transporters from intracellular membrane storage sites to the plasma membrane. This process requires the trafficking of Glut4-containing vesicles toward the cell periphery, docking at exocytic sites, and plasma membrane fusion. We show here that phospholipase D (PLD) production of the lipid phosphatidic acid (PA) is a key event in the fusion process. PLD1 is found on Glut4-containing vesicles, is activated by insulin signaling, and traffics with Glut4 to exocytic sites. Increasing PLD1 activity facilitates glucose uptake, whereas decreasing PLD1 activity is inhibitory. Diminished PA production does not substantially hinder trafficking of the vesicles or their docking at the plasma membrane, but it does impede fusion-mediated extracellular exposure of the transporter. The fusion block caused by RNA interference-mediated PLD1 deficiency is rescued by exogenous provision of a lipid that promotes fusion pore formation and expansion, suggesting that the step regulated by PA is late in the process of vesicle fusion. PMID:15772157

  11. Negative Regulation of Syntaxin4/SNAP-23/VAMP2-Mediated Membrane Fusion by Munc18c In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Avani; McNew, James A.; Bryant, Nia J.; Gould, Gwyn W.

    2008-01-01

    Background Translocation of the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT4 from an intracellular store to the plasma membrane is responsible for the increased rate of glucose transport into fat and muscle cells in response to insulin. This represents a specialised form of regulated membrane trafficking. Intracellular membrane traffic is subject to multiple levels of regulation by conserved families of proteins in all eukaryotic cells. Notably, all intracellular fusion events require SNARE proteins and Sec1p/Munc18 family members. Fusion of GLUT4-containing vesicles with the plasma membrane of insulin-sensitive cells involves the SM protein Munc18c, and is regulated by the formation of syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complexes. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have used biochemical approaches to characterise the interaction(s) of Munc18c with its cognate SNARE proteins and to examine the role of Munc18c in regulating liposome fusion catalysed by syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex formation. We demonstrate that Munc18c makes contacts with both t- and v-SNARE proteins of this complex, and directly inhibits bilayer fusion mediated by the syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex. Conclusion/Significance Our reductionist approach has enabled us to ascertain a direct inhibitory role for Munc18c in regulating membrane fusion mediated by syntaxin 4/SNAP23/VAMP2 SNARE complex formation. It is important to note that two different SM proteins have recently been shown to stimulate liposome fusion mediated by their cognate SNARE complexes. Given the structural similarities between SM proteins, it seems unlikely that different members of this family perform opposing regulatory functions. Hence, our findings indicate that Munc18c requires a further level of regulation in order to stimulate SNARE-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:19116655

  12. Membrane fusion by the GTPase atlastin requires a conserved C-terminal cytoplasmic tail and dimerization through the middle domain

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Tyler J.; Andreazza, Camilla; Verma, Avani; Daga, Andrea; McNew, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The biogenesis and maintenance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) requires membrane fusion. ER homotypic fusion is driven by the large GTPase atlastin. Domain analysis of atlastin shows that a conserved region of the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail is absolutely required for fusion activity. Atlastin in adjacent membranes must associate to bring the ER membranes into molecular contact. Drosophila atlastin dimerizes in the presence of GTPγS but is monomeric with GDP or without nucleotide. Oligomerization requires the juxtamembrane middle domain three-helix bundle, as does efficient GTPase activity. A soluble version of the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain that contains the GTPase domain and the middle domain three-helix bundle serves as a potent, concentration-dependent inhibitor of membrane fusion both in vitro and in vivo. However, atlastin domains lacking the middle domain are without effect. GTP-dependent dimerization of atlastin generates an enzymatically active protein that drives membrane fusion after nucleotide hydrolysis and conformational reorganization. PMID:21690399

  13. Interaction between the Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase and Fusion Glycoproteins of Human Parainfluenza Virus Type III Regulates Viral Growth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Rui; Palmer, Samantha G.; Porotto, Matteo; Palermo, Laura M.; Niewiesk, Stefan; Wilson, Ian A.; Moscona, Anne

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses, enveloped RNA viruses that include human parainfluenza virus type 3 (HPIV3), cause the majority of childhood viral pneumonia. HPIV3 infection starts when the viral receptor-binding protein engages sialic acid receptors in the lung and the viral envelope fuses with the target cell membrane. Fusion/entry requires interaction between two viral surface glycoproteins: tetrameric hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion protein (F). In this report, we define structural correlates of the HN features that permit infection in vivo. We have shown that viruses with an HN-F that promotes growth in cultured immortalized cells are impaired in differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures (HAE) and in vivo and evolve in HAE into viable viruses with less fusogenic HN-F. In this report, we identify specific structural features of the HN dimer interface that modulate HN-F interaction and fusion triggering and directly impact infection. Crystal structures of HN, which promotes viral growth in vivo, show a diminished interface in the HN dimer compared to the reference strain’s HN, consistent with biochemical and biological data indicating decreased dimerization and decreased interaction with F protein. The crystallographic data suggest a structural explanation for the HN’s altered ability to activate F and reveal properties that are critical for infection in vivo. IMPORTANCE Human parainfluenza viruses cause the majority of childhood cases of croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia worldwide. Enveloped viruses must fuse their membranes with the target cell membranes in order to initiate infection. Parainfluenza fusion proceeds via a multistep reaction orchestrated by the two glycoproteins that make up its fusion machine. In vivo, viruses adapt for survival by evolving to acquire a set of fusion machinery features that provide key clues about requirements for infection in human beings. Infection of the lung by parainfluenzavirus is determined by

  14. Small Mismatches in Fatty Acyl Tail Lengths Can Effect Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Induced Membrane Fusion.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Anupa; Sarkar, Munna

    2016-06-01

    Biological membranes are made up of a variety of lipids with diverse physicochemical properties. The lipid composition modulates different lipidic parameters, such as hydration, dynamics, lipid packing, curvature strain, etc. Changes in these parameters affect various membrane-mediated processes, such as membrane fusion which is an integral step in many biological processes. Packing defects, which originate either from mismatch in the headgroup region or in the hydrophobic acyl tail region, play a major role in modulating membrane dynamics. In this study, we demonstrate how even a small mismatch in the fatty acyl chain length, achieved by incorporation of low concentrations (up to 30 mol %) of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) into dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs), alters several lipidic parameters like packing, dynamics, and headgroup hydration. This in turn affects non steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced membrane fusion. Dynamic light scattering, differential scanning calorimetry, second-derivative absorption spectrophotometry, and steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence have been used to elucidate the effect of small mismatch in the tails in DMPC/DPPC mixed vesicles and how it modulates membrane fusion induced by the oxicam NSAIDs, meloxicam (Mx), piroxicam (Px), and tenoxicam (Tx). Fusion kinetics was monitored using fluorescence based fusion assays. At low DPPC concentration of 10 mol %, additional fluidization promotes lipid mixing to some extent for Mx, but at higher mol % of DPPC, subsequent increase in rigidity of membrane interior along with increase in headgroup hydration, synergistically inhibits fusion to various extents for the three different drugs, Mx, Px, and Tx. PMID:27153337

  15. Physiological lipid composition is vital for homotypic ER membrane fusion mediated by the dynamin-related GTPase Sey1p

    PubMed Central

    Sugiura, Shintaro; Mima, Joji

    2016-01-01

    Homotypic fusion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is required for generating and maintaining the characteristic reticular ER membrane structures. This organelle membrane fusion process depends on the ER-bound dynamin-related GTPases, such as atlastins in animals and Sey1p in yeast. Here, to investigate whether specific lipid molecules facilitate GTPase-dependent ER membrane fusion directly, we comprehensively evaluated membrane docking and lipid mixing of reconstituted proteoliposomes bearing purified Sey1p and a set of ER-mimicking lipids, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid, and ergosterol. Remarkably, we revealed that each specific lipid species contributed little to membrane docking mediated by Sey1p. Nevertheless, Sey1p-dependent lipid mixing was strongly reduced by omitting three major acidic lipids from the ER-mimicking set and, moreover, was entirely abolished by omitting either phosphatidylethanolamine or ergosterol. Our reconstitution studies thus established that physiological lipid composition is vital for lipid bilayer rearrangements in GTPase-mediated homotypic ER membrane fusion. PMID:26838333

  16. Effects of retroviral envelope-protein cleavage upon trafficking, incorporation, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Apte, Swapna; Sanders, David Avram

    2010-09-15

    Retroviral envelope glycoproteins undergo proteolytic processing by cellular subtilisin-like proprotein convertases at a polybasic amino-acid site in order to produce the two functional subunits, SU and TM. Most previous studies have indicated that envelope-protein cleavage is required for rendering the protein competent for promoting membrane fusion and for virus infectivity. We have investigated the role of proteolytic processing of the Moloney murine leukemia virus envelope-protein through site-directed mutagenesis of the residues near the SU-TM cleavage site and have established that uncleaved glycoprotein is unable either to be incorporated into virus particles efficiently or to induce membrane fusion. Additionally, the results suggest that cleavage of the envelope protein plays an important role in intracellular trafficking of protein via the cellular secretory pathway. Based on our results it was concluded that a positively charged residue located at either P2 or P4 along with the arginine at P1 is essential for cleavage.

  17. HACD1, a regulator of membrane composition and fluidity, promotes myoblast fusion and skeletal muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Blondelle, Jordan; Ohno, Yusuke; Gache, Vincent; Guyot, Stéphane; Storck, Sébastien; Blanchard-Gutton, Nicolas; Barthélémy, Inès; Walmsley, Gemma; Rahier, Anaëlle; Gadin, Stéphanie; Maurer, Marie; Guillaud, Laurent; Prola, Alexandre; Ferry, Arnaud; Aubin-Houzelstein, Geneviève; Demarquoy, Jean; Relaix, Frédéric; Piercy, Richard J; Blot, Stéphane; Kihara, Akio; Tiret, Laurent; Pilot-Storck, Fanny

    2015-10-01

    The reduced diameter of skeletal myofibres is a hallmark of several congenital myopathies, yet the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we investigate the role of HACD1/PTPLA, which is involved in the elongation of the very long chain fatty acids, in muscle fibre formation. In humans and dogs, HACD1 deficiency leads to a congenital myopathy with fibre size disproportion associated with a generalized muscle weakness. Through analysis of HACD1-deficient Labradors, Hacd1-knockout mice, and Hacd1-deficient myoblasts, we provide evidence that HACD1 promotes myoblast fusion during muscle development and regeneration. We further demonstrate that in normal differentiating myoblasts, expression of the catalytically active HACD1 isoform, which is encoded by a muscle-enriched splice variant, yields decreased lysophosphatidylcholine content, a potent inhibitor of myoblast fusion, and increased concentrations of ≥ C18 and monounsaturated fatty acids of phospholipids. These lipid modifications correlate with a reduction in plasma membrane rigidity. In conclusion, we propose that fusion impairment constitutes a novel, non-exclusive pathological mechanism operating in congenital myopathies and reveal that HACD1 is a key regulator of a lipid-dependent muscle fibre growth mechanism. PMID:26160855

  18. Identification and Characterization of LFD-2, a Predicted Fringe Protein Required for Membrane Integrity during Cell Fusion in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Zhao, Jiuhai; Gonçalves, A. Pedro; Starr, Trevor L.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of membrane merger during somatic cell fusion in eukaryotic species are poorly understood. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, somatic cell fusion occurs between genetically identical germinated asexual spores (germlings) and between hyphae to form the interconnected network characteristic of a filamentous fungal colony. In N. crassa, two proteins have been identified to function at the step of membrane fusion during somatic cell fusion: PRM1 and LFD-1. The absence of either one of these two proteins results in an increase of germling pairs arrested during cell fusion with tightly appressed plasma membranes and an increase in the frequency of cell lysis of adhered germlings. The level of cell lysis in ΔPrm1 or Δlfd-1 germlings is dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. An available transcriptional profile data set was used to identify genes encoding predicted transmembrane proteins that showed reduced expression levels in germlings cultured in the absence of extracellular calcium. From these analyses, we identified a mutant (lfd-2, for late fusion defect-2) that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. lfd-2 encodes a protein with a Fringe domain and showed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane localization. The deletion of an additional gene predicted to encode a low-affinity calcium transporter, fig1, also resulted in a strain that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. Genetic analyses showed that LFD-2 and FIG1 likely function in separate pathways to regulate aspects of membrane merger and repair during cell fusion. PMID:25595444

  19. Identification and characterization of LFD-2, a predicted fringe protein required for membrane integrity during cell fusion in neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Zhao, Jiuhai; Gonçalves, A Pedro; Starr, Trevor L; Glass, N Louise

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms of membrane merger during somatic cell fusion in eukaryotic species are poorly understood. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, somatic cell fusion occurs between genetically identical germinated asexual spores (germlings) and between hyphae to form the interconnected network characteristic of a filamentous fungal colony. In N. crassa, two proteins have been identified to function at the step of membrane fusion during somatic cell fusion: PRM1 and LFD-1. The absence of either one of these two proteins results in an increase of germling pairs arrested during cell fusion with tightly appressed plasma membranes and an increase in the frequency of cell lysis of adhered germlings. The level of cell lysis in ΔPrm1 or Δlfd-1 germlings is dependent on the extracellular calcium concentration. An available transcriptional profile data set was used to identify genes encoding predicted transmembrane proteins that showed reduced expression levels in germlings cultured in the absence of extracellular calcium. From these analyses, we identified a mutant (lfd-2, for late fusion defect-2) that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. lfd-2 encodes a protein with a Fringe domain and showed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi membrane localization. The deletion of an additional gene predicted to encode a low-affinity calcium transporter, fig1, also resulted in a strain that showed a calcium-dependent cell lysis phenotype. Genetic analyses showed that LFD-2 and FIG1 likely function in separate pathways to regulate aspects of membrane merger and repair during cell fusion. PMID:25595444

  20. The Structure of Herpesvirus Fusion Glycoprotein B-Bilayer Complex Reveals the Protein-Membrane and Lateral Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Ulrike E.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Cairns, Tina M.; Hannah, Brian P.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Topf, Maya; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Grünewald, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycoprotein B (gB) is a key component of the complex herpesvirus fusion machinery. We studied membrane interaction of two gB ectodomain forms and present an electron cryotomography structure of the gB-bilayer complex. The two forms differed in presence or absence of the membrane proximal region (MPR) but showed an overall similar trimeric shape. The presence of the MPR impeded interaction with liposomes. In contrast, the MPR-lacking form interacted efficiently with liposomes. Lateral interaction resulted in coat formation on the membranes. The structure revealed that interaction of gB with membranes was mediated by the fusion loops and limited to the outer membrane leaflet. The observed intrinsic propensity of gB to cluster on membranes indicates an additional role of gB in driving the fusion process forward beyond the transient fusion pore opening and subsequently leading to fusion pore expansion. PMID:23850455

  1. Surface Exposure of the HIV-1 Env Cytoplasmic Tail LLP2 Domain during the Membrane Fusion Process

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lu; Zhu, Yun; Huang, Jinghe; Chen, Xi; Yang, Hengwen; Jiang, Shibo; Chen, Ying-Hua

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 gp41 cytoplasmic tail (CT) is highly conserved among HIV-1 isolates, particularly the region designated lentivirus lytic peptide (LLP1–2), which includes two α-helical domains LLP1 and LLP2. Although the gp41 CT is recognized as a modulator of viral fusogenicity, little is known about the regulatory mechanism of this region in the viral fusion process. Here we report that anti-LLP1–2 and anti-LLP2 antibodies (IgG) inhibited HIV-1 Env-mediated cell fusion and bound to the interface between effector and target cells at a suboptimal temperature (31.5 °C), which slows down the fusion process and prolongs the fusion intermediate state. This suggests that LLP1–2, especially the LLP2 region located inside the viral membrane, is transiently exposed on the membrane surface during the fusion process. Synthetic LLP2 peptide could bind to the gp41 six-helix bundle core with high binding affinity. These results suggest that the gp41 CT may interact with the gp41 core, via the surface-exposed LLP2 domain, to regulate Env-mediated membrane fusion. PMID:18408000

  2. Dissection of the Role of the Stable Signal Peptide of the Arenavirus Envelope Glycoprotein in Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Emily L.; York, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    The arenavirus envelope glycoprotein (GPC) retains a stable signal peptide (SSP) as an essential subunit in the mature complex. The 58-amino-acid residue SSP comprises two membrane-spanning hydrophobic regions separated by a short ectodomain loop that interacts with the G2 fusion subunit to promote pH-dependent membrane fusion. Small-molecule compounds that target this unique SSP-G2 interaction prevent arenavirus entry and infection. The interaction between SSP and G2 is sensitive to the phylogenetic distance between New World (Junín) and Old World (Lassa) arenaviruses. For example, heterotypic GPC complexes are unable to support virion entry. In this report, we demonstrate that the hybrid GPC complexes are properly assembled, proteolytically cleaved, and transported to the cell surface but are specifically defective in their membrane fusion activity. Chimeric SSP constructs reveal that this incompatibility is localized to the first transmembrane segment of SSP (TM1). Genetic changes in TM1 also affect sensitivity to small-molecule fusion inhibitors, generating resistance in some cases and inhibitor dependence in others. Our studies suggest that interactions of SSP TM1 with the transmembrane domain of G2 may be important for GPC-mediated membrane fusion and its inhibition. PMID:22438561

  3. Cdc42p Is Activated during Vacuole Membrane Fusion in a Sterol-dependent Subreaction of Priming*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lynden; Tedrick, Kelly; Baier, Alicia; Logan, Michael R.; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Cdc42p is a Rho GTPase that initiates signaling cascades at spatially defined intracellular sites for many cellular functions. We have previously shown that Cdc42p is localized to the yeast vacuole where it initiates actin polymerization during membrane fusion. Here we examine the activation cycle of Cdc42p during vacuole membrane fusion. Expression of either GTP- or GDP-locked Cdc42p mutants caused several morphological defects including enlarged cells and fragmented vacuoles. Stimulation of multiple rounds of fusion enhanced vacuole fragmentation, suggesting that cycles of Cdc42p activation, involving rounds of GTP binding and hydrolysis, are required to propagate Cdc42p signaling. We developed an assay to directly examine Cdc42p activation based on affinity to a probe derived from the p21-activated kinase effector, Ste20p. Cdc42p was rapidly activated during vacuole membrane fusion, which kinetically coincided with priming subreaction. During priming, Sec18p ATPase activity dissociates SNARE complexes and releases Sec17p, however, priming inhibitors such as Sec17p and Sec18p ligands did not block Cdc42p activation. Therefore, Cdc42p activation seems to be a parallel subreaction of priming, distinct from Sec18p activity. Specific mutants in the ergosterol synthesis pathway block both Sec17p release and Cdc42p activation. Taken together, our results define a novel sterol-dependent subreaction of vacuole priming that activates cycles of Cdc42p activity to facilitate membrane fusion. PMID:20007700

  4. Maize yellow stripe1 encodes a membrane protein directly involved in Fe(III) uptake.

    PubMed

    Curie, C; Panaviene, Z; Loulergue, C; Dellaporta, S L; Briat, J F; Walker, E L

    2001-01-18

    Frequently, crop plants do not take up adequate amounts of iron from the soil, leading to chlorosis, poor yield and decreased nutritional quality. Extremely limited soil bioavailability of iron has led plants to evolve two distinct uptake strategies: chelation, which is used by the world's principal grain crops; and reduction, which is used by other plant groups. The chelation strategy involves extrusion of low-molecular-mass secondary amino acids (mugineic acids) known as 'phytosiderophores' which chelate sparingly soluble iron. The Fe(III)-phytosiderophore complex is then taken up by an unknown transporter at the root surface. The maize yellow stripe1 (ys1) mutant is deficient in Fe(III)-phytosiderophore uptake, therefore YS1 has been suggested to be the Fe(III)-phytosiderophore transporter. Here we show that ys1 is a membrane protein that mediates iron uptake. Expression of YS1 in a yeast iron uptake mutant restores growth specifically on Fe(III)-phytosiderophore media. Under iron-deficient conditions, ys1 messenger RNA levels increase in both roots and shoots. Cloning of ys1 is an important step in understanding iron uptake in grasses, and has implications for mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis in all plants. PMID:11201743

  5. Membrane-Permeable Mn(III) Complexes for Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Intracellular Targets.

    PubMed

    Barandov, Ali; Bartelle, Benjamin B; Gonzalez, Beatriz A; White, William L; Lippard, Stephen J; Jasanoff, Alan

    2016-05-01

    Intracellular compartments make up roughly two-thirds of the body, but delivery of molecular imaging probes to these spaces can be challenging. This situation is particularly true for probes designed for detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a high-resolution but relatively insensitive modality. Most MRI contrast agents are polar and membrane impermeant, making it difficult to deliver them in sufficient quantities for measurement of intracellular analytes. Here we address this problem by introducing a new class of planar tetradentate Mn(III) chelates assembled from a 1,2-phenylenediamido (PDA) backbone. Mn(III)-PDA complexes display T1 relaxivity comparable to that of Gd(III)-based contrast agents and undergo spontaneous cytosolic localization via defined mechanisms. Probe variants incorporating enzyme-cleavable acetomethoxy ester groups are processed by intracellular esterases and accumulate in cells. Probes modified with ethyl esters preferentially label genetically modified cells that express a substrate-selective esterase. In each case, the contrast agents gives rise to robust T1-weighted MRI enhancements, providing precedents for the detection of intracellular targets by Mn(III)-PDA complexes. These compounds therefore constitute a platform from which to develop reagents for molecular MRI of diverse processes inside cells. PMID:27088782

  6. Cdc42p and Rho1p are sequentially activated and mechanistically linked to vacuole membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Michael R.; Jones, Lynden; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-03-26

    Small monomeric GTPases act as molecular switches, regulating many biological functions via activation of membrane localized signaling cascades. Activation of their switch function is controlled by GTP binding and hydrolysis. Two Rho GTPases, Cdc42p and Rho1p, are localized to the yeast vacuole where they regulate membrane fusion. Here, we define a method to directly examine vacuole membrane Cdc42p and Rho1p activation based on their affinity to probes derived from effectors. Cdc42p and Rho1p showed unique temporal activation which aligned with distinct subreactions of in vitro vacuole fusion. Cdc42p was rapidly activated in an ATP-independent manner while Rho1p activation was kinetically slower and required ATP. Inhibitors that are known to block vacuole membrane fusion were examined for their effect on Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Rdi1p, which inhibits the dissociation of GDP from Rho proteins, blocked both Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Ligands of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} specifically inhibited Rho1p activation while pre-incubation with U73122, which targets Plc1p function, increased Rho1p activation. These results define unique activation mechanisms for Cdc42p and Rho1p, which may be linked to the vacuole membrane fusion mechanism.

  7. Structural Features of Membrane Fusion between Influenza Virus and Liposome as Revealed by Quick-Freezing Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kanaseki, Toku; Kawasaki, Kazunori; Murata, Masayuki; Ikeuchi, Yoko; Ohnishi, Shun-ichi

    1997-01-01

    The structure of membrane fusion intermediates between the A/PR/8(H1N1) strain of influenza virus and a liposome composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and glycophorin was studied using quick-freezing electron microscopy. Fusion by viral hemagglutinin protein was induced at pH 5.0 and 23°C. After a 19-s incubation under these conditions, small protrusions with a diameter of 10–20 nm were found on the fractured convex faces of the liposomal membranes, and small pits complementary to the protrusions were found on the concave faces. The protrusions and pits corresponded to fractured parts of outward bendings of the lipid bilayer or “microprotrusions of the lipid bilayer.” At the loci of the protrusions and pits, liposomal membranes had local contacts with viral membranes. In many cases both the protrusions and the pits were aligned in regular polygonal arrangements, which were thought to reflect the array of hemagglutinin spikes on the viral surface. These structures were induced only when the medium was acidic with the virus present. Based on these observations, it was concluded that the microprotrusions of the lipid bilayer are induced by hemagglutinin protein. Furthermore, morphological evidence for the formation of the “initial fusion pore” at the microprotrusion was obtained. The protrusion on the convex face sometimes had a tiny hole with a diameter of <4 nm in the center. The pits transformed into narrow membrane connections <10 nm in width, bridging viruses and liposomes. The structures of the fusion pore and fusion neck with larger sizes were also observed, indicating growth of the protrusions and pits to distinct fusion sites. We propose that the microprotrusion of the lipid bilayer is a fusion intermediate induced by hemagglutinin protein, and suggest that the extraordinarily high curvature of this membrane structure is a clue to the onset of fusion. The possible architecture of the fusion intermediate is discussed with regard to the

  8. A Structurally Unresolved Head Segment of Defined Length Favors Proper Measles Virus Hemagglutinin Tetramerization and Efficient Membrane Fusion Triggering

    PubMed Central

    Navaratnarajah, Chanakha K.; Rosemarie, Quincy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses include several insidious and ubiquitous pathogens of humans and animals, with measles virus (MeV) being a prominent one. The MeV membrane fusion apparatus consists of a receptor binding protein (hemagglutinin [H]) tetramer and a fusion (F) protein trimer. Four globular MeV H heads are connected to a tetrameric stalk through flexible linkers. We sought here to characterize the function of a 17-residue H-head segment proximal to the stalk that was unresolved in all five MeV H-head crystal or cocrystal structures. In particular, we assessed whether its primary sequence and length are critical for proper protein oligomerization and intracellular transport or for membrane fusion triggering. Extensive alanine substitutions had no effect on fusion triggering, suggesting that sequence identity is not critical for this function. Excessive shortening of this segment reduced or completely abrogated fusion trigger function, while length compensation restored it. We then characterized the mechanism of function loss. Mutated H proteins were efficiently transported to the cell surface, but certain alterations enhancing linker flexibility resulted in accumulation of high-molecular-weight H oligomers. Some oligomers had reduced fusion trigger capacity, while others retained this function. Thus, length and rigidity of the unresolved head segment favor proper H tetramerization and counteract interactions between subunits from different tetramers. The structurally unresolved H-head segment, together with the top of the stalk, may act as a leash to provide the right degree of freedom for the heads of individual tetramers to adopt a triggering-permissive conformation while avoiding improper contacts with heads of neighboring tetramers. IMPORTANCE Understanding the molecular mechanism of membrane fusion triggering may allow development of new antiviral strategies. The fusion apparatus of paramyxoviruses consists of a receptor binding tetramer and a fusion

  9. Clarin-1, Encoded by the Usher Syndrome III Causative Gene, Forms a Membranous Microdomain

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guilian; Zhou, Yun; Hajkova, Dagmar; Miyagi, Masaru; Dinculescu, Astra; Hauswirth, William W.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Geng, Ruishuang; Alagramam, Kumar N.; Isosomppi, Juha; Sankila, Eeva-Marja; Flannery, John G.; Imanishi, Yoshikazu

    2009-01-01

    Clarin-1 is the protein product encoded by the gene mutated in Usher syndrome III. Although the molecular function of clarin-1 is unknown, its primary structure predicts four transmembrane domains similar to a large family of membrane proteins that include tetraspanins. Here we investigated the role of clarin-1 by using heterologous expression and in vivo model systems. When expressed in HEK293 cells, clarin-1 localized to the plasma membrane and concentrated in low density compartments distinct from lipid rafts. Clarin-1 reorganized actin filament structures and induced lamellipodia. This actin-reorganizing function was absent in the modified protein encoded by the most prevalent North American Usher syndrome III mutation, the N48K form of clarin-1 deficient in N-linked glycosylation. Proteomics analyses revealed a number of clarin-1-interacting proteins involved in cell-cell adhesion, focal adhesions, cell migration, tight junctions, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with the hypothesized role of clarin-1 in actin organization, F-actin-enriched stereocilia of auditory hair cells evidenced structural disorganization in Clrn1−/− mice. These observations suggest a possible role for clarin-1 in the regulation and homeostasis of actin filaments, and link clarin-1 to the interactive network of Usher syndrome gene products. PMID:19423712

  10. N-(3-Cyanophenyl)-2-phenylacetamide, an effective inhibitor of morbillivirus-induced membrane fusion with low cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Singethan, K; Hiltensperger, G; Kendl, S; Wohlfahrt, J; Plattet, P; Holzgrabe, U; Schneider-Schaulies, J

    2010-11-01

    Based on the structural similarity of viral fusion proteins within the family Paramyxoviridae, we tested recently described and newly synthesized acetanilide derivatives for their capacity to inhibit measles virus (MV)-, canine distemper virus (CDV)- and Nipah virus (NiV)-induced membrane fusion. We found that N-(3-cyanophenyl)-2-phenylacetamide (compound 1) has a high capacity to inhibit MV- and CDV-induced (IC(50) μM), but not NiV-induced, membrane fusion. This compound is of outstanding interest because it can be easily synthesized and its cytotoxicity is low [50 % cytotoxic concentration (CC(50)) ≥ 300 μM], leading to a CC(50)/IC(50) ratio of approximately 100. In addition, primary human peripheral blood lymphocytes and primary dog brain cell cultures (DBC) also tolerate high concentrations of compound 1. Infection of human PBMC with recombinant wild-type MV is inhibited by an IC(50) of approximately 20 μM. The cell-to-cell spread of recombinant wild-type CDV in persistently infected DBC can be nearly completely inhibited by compound 1 at 50 μM, indicating that the virus spread between brain cells is dependent on the activity of the viral fusion protein. Our findings demonstrate that this compound is a most applicable inhibitor of morbillivirus-induced membrane fusion in tissue culture experiments including highly sensitive primary cells. PMID:20685931

  11. Control systems for membrane fusion in the ancestral eukaryote; evolution of tethering complexes and SM proteins

    PubMed Central

    Koumandou, V Lila; Dacks, Joel B; Coulson, Richard MR; Field, Mark C

    2007-01-01

    Background In membrane trafficking, the mechanisms ensuring vesicle fusion specificity remain to be fully elucidated. Early models proposed that specificity was encoded entirely by SNARE proteins; more recent models include contributions from Rab proteins, Syntaxin-binding (SM) proteins and tethering factors. Most information on membrane trafficking derives from an evolutionarily narrow sampling of model organisms. However, considering factors from a wider diversity of eukaryotes can provide both functional information on core systems and insight into the evolutionary history of the trafficking machinery. For example, the major Qa/syntaxin SNARE families are present in most eukaryotic genomes and likely each evolved via gene duplication from a single ancestral syntaxin before the existing eukaryotic groups diversified. This pattern is also likely for Rabs and various other components of the membrane trafficking machinery. Results We performed comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses, when relevant, on the SM proteins and components of the tethering complexes, both thought to contribute to vesicle fusion specificity. Despite evidence suggestive of secondary losses amongst many lineages, the tethering complexes are well represented across the eukaryotes, suggesting an origin predating the radiation of eukaryotic lineages. Further, whilst we detect distant sequence relations between GARP, COG, exocyst and DSL1 components, these similarities most likely reflect convergent evolution of similar secondary structural elements. No similarity is found between the TRAPP and HOPS complexes and the other tethering factors. Overall, our data favour independent origins for the various tethering complexes. The taxa examined possess at least one homologue of each of the four SM protein families; since the four monophyletic families each encompass a wide diversity of eukaryotes, the SM protein families very likely evolved before the last common eukaryotic ancestor (LCEA

  12. Minor differences in the molecular machinery mediating regulated membrane fusion has major impact on metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Valladolid-Acebes, Ismael; Daraio, Teresa; Brismar, Kerstin; Hökfelt, Tomas; Bark, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The exocytosis of signaling molecules from neuronal, neuroendocrine and endocrine cells is regulated by membrane fusion involving SNAP-25 and associated SNARE proteins. The importance of this process for metabolic control recently became evident by studies of mouse mutants genetically engineered to only express one of 2 closely related, alternatively-spliced variants of SNAP-25. The results showed that even minor differences in the function of proteins regulating exocytosis are sufficient to provoke metabolic disease, including hyperglycaemia, liver steatosis, adipocyte hypertrophy and obesity. Thus, an imbalance in the dynamics of hormonal and/or neurotransmitter release can cause obesity and type 2 diabetes. This recent discovery highlights the fact that metabolic health requires a perfectly operating interplay between the SNARE protein machinery in excitable cells and the organs responding to these messengers. PMID:27617177

  13. Early Events in Chikungunya Virus Infection—From Virus Cell Binding to Membrane Fusion

    PubMed Central

    van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K. S.; Hoornweg, Tabitha E.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a rapidly emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus causing millions of infections in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. CHIKV infection often leads to an acute self-limited febrile illness with debilitating myalgia and arthralgia. A potential long-term complication of CHIKV infection is severe joint pain, which can last for months to years. There are no vaccines or specific therapeutics available to prevent or treat infection. This review describes the critical steps in CHIKV cell entry. We summarize the latest studies on the virus-cell tropism, virus-receptor binding, internalization, membrane fusion and review the molecules and compounds that have been described to interfere with virus cell entry. The aim of the review is to give the reader a state-of-the-art overview on CHIKV cell entry and to provide an outlook on potential new avenues in CHIKV research. PMID:26198242

  14. Mucolipin-3 Regulates Luminal Calcium, Acidification, and Membrane Fusion in the Endosomal Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Lelouvier, Benjamin; Puertollano, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    Mucolipin-3 (MCOLN3) is a pH-regulated Ca2+ channel that localizes to the endosomal pathway. Gain-of-function mutation in MCOLN3 causes the varitint-waddler (Va) phenotype in mice, which is characterized by hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and coat color dilution. The Va phenotype results from a punctual mutation (A419P) in the pore region of MCOLN3 that locks the channel in an open conformation causing massive entry of Ca2+ inside cells and inducing cell death by apoptosis. Overexpression of wild-type MCOLN3 produces severe alterations of the endosomal pathway, including enlargement and clustering of endosomes, delayed EGF receptor degradation, and impaired autophagosome maturation, thus suggesting that MCOLN3 plays an important role in the regulation of endosomal function. To understand better the physiological role of MCOLN3, we inhibited MCOLN3 function by expression of a channel-dead dominant negative mutant (458DD/KK) or by knockdown of endogenous MCOLN3. Remarkably, we found that impairment of MCOLN3 activity caused a significant accumulation of luminal Ca2+ in endosomes. This accumulation led to severe defects in endosomal acidification as well as to increased endosomal fusion. Our findings reveal a prominent role for MCOLN3 in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis at the endosomal pathway and confirm the importance of luminal Ca2+ for proper acidification and membrane fusion. PMID:21245134

  15. Membrane-Active Sequences within gp41 Membrane Proximal External Region (MPER) Modulate MPER-Containing Peptidyl Fusion Inhibitor Activity and the Biosynthesis of HIV-1 Structural Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Si Min; Jejcic, Alenka; Tam, James P.; Vahlne, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The membrane proximal external region (MPER) is a highly conserved membrane-active region located at the juxtamembrane positions within class I viral fusion glycoproteins and essential for membrane fusion events during viral entry. The MPER in the human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) interacts with the lipid bilayers through a cluster of tryptophan (Trp) residues and a C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif. The inclusion of the MPER N-terminal sequence contributes to the membrane reactivity and anti-viral efficacy of the first two anti-HIV peptidyl fusion inhibitors T20 and T1249. As a type I transmembrane protein, Env also interacts with the cellular membranes during its biosynthesis and trafficking. Here we investigated the roles of MPER membrane-active sequences during both viral entry and assembly, specifically, their roles in the design of peptidyl fusion inhibitors and the biosynthesis of viral structural proteins. We found that elimination of the membrane-active elements in MPER peptides, namely, penta Trp→alanine (Ala) substitutions and the disruption of the C-terminal cholesterol-interacting motif through deletion inhibited the anti-viral effect against the pseudotyped HIV-1. Furthermore, as compared to C-terminal dimerization, N-terminal dimerization of MPER peptides and N-terminal extension with five helix-forming residues enhanced their anti-viral efficacy substantially. The secondary structure study revealed that the penta-Trp→Ala substitutions also increased the helical content in the MPER sequence, which prompted us to study the biological relevance of such mutations in pre-fusion Env. We observed that Ala mutations of Trp664, Trp668 and Trp670 in MPER moderately lowered the intracellular and intraviral contents of Env while significantly elevating the content of another viral structural protein, p55/Gag and its derivative p24/capsid. The data suggest a role of the gp41 MPER in the membrane-reactive events during

  16. Structure of a bacterial type III secretion system in contact with a host membrane in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nans, Andrea; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Saibil, Helen R.; Hayward, Richard D.

    2015-12-01

    Many bacterial pathogens of animals and plants use a conserved type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells to subvert host functions. Contact with host membranes is critical for T3SS activation, yet little is known about T3SS architecture in this state or the conformational changes that drive effector translocation. Here we use cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging to derive the intact structure of the primordial Chlamydia trachomatis T3SS in the presence and absence of host membrane contact. Comparison of the averaged structures demonstrates a marked compaction of the basal body (4 nm) occurs when the needle tip contacts the host cell membrane. This compaction is coupled to a stabilization of the cytosolic sorting platform-ATPase. Our findings reveal the first structure of a bacterial T3SS from a major human pathogen engaged with a eukaryotic host, and reveal striking `pump-action' conformational changes that underpin effector injection.

  17. Structure of a bacterial type III secretion system in contact with a host membrane in situ

    PubMed Central

    Nans, Andrea; Kudryashev, Mikhail; Saibil, Helen R.; Hayward, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens of animals and plants use a conserved type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject virulence effector proteins directly into eukaryotic cells to subvert host functions. Contact with host membranes is critical for T3SS activation, yet little is known about T3SS architecture in this state or the conformational changes that drive effector translocation. Here we use cryo-electron tomography and sub-tomogram averaging to derive the intact structure of the primordial Chlamydia trachomatis T3SS in the presence and absence of host membrane contact. Comparison of the averaged structures demonstrates a marked compaction of the basal body (4 nm) occurs when the needle tip contacts the host cell membrane. This compaction is coupled to a stabilization of the cytosolic sorting platform–ATPase. Our findings reveal the first structure of a bacterial T3SS from a major human pathogen engaged with a eukaryotic host, and reveal striking ‘pump-action' conformational changes that underpin effector injection. PMID:26656452

  18. Phosphatidylserine Decarboxylase 1 (Psd1) Promotes Mitochondrial Fusion by Regulating the Biophysical Properties of the Mitochondrial Membrane and Alternative Topogenesis of Mitochondrial Genome Maintenance Protein 1 (Mgm1)*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Eliana Y. L.; McQuibban, G. Angus

    2012-01-01

    Non–bilayer-forming lipids such as cardiolipin, phosphatidic acid, and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are proposed to generate negative membrane curvature, promoting membrane fusion. However, the mechanism by which lipids regulate mitochondrial fusion remains poorly understood. Here, we show that mitochondrial-localized Psd1, the key yeast enzyme that synthesizes PE, is required for proper mitochondrial morphology and fusion. Yeast cells lacking Psd1 exhibit fragmented and aggregated mitochondria with impaired mitochondrial fusion during mating. More importantly, we demonstrate that a reduction in PE reduces the rate of lipid mixing during fusion of liposomes with lipid compositions reflecting the mitochondrial membrane. This suggests that the mitochondrial fusion defect in the Δpsd1 strain could be due to the altered biophysical properties of the mitochondrial membrane, resulting in reduced fusion kinetics. The Δpsd1 strain also has impaired mitochondrial activity such as oxidative phosphorylation and reduced mitochondrial ATP levels which are due to a reduction in mitochondrial PE. The loss of Psd1 also impairs the biogenesis of s-Mgm1, a protein essential for mitochondrial fusion, further exacerbating the mitochondrial fusion defect of the Δpsd1 strain. Increasing s-Mgm1 levels in Δpsd1 cells markedly reduced mitochondrial aggregation. Our results demonstrate that mitochondrial PE regulates mitochondrial fusion by regulating the biophysical properties of the mitochondrial membrane and by enhancing the biogenesis of s-Mgm1. While several proteins are required to orchestrate the intricate process of membrane fusion, we propose that specific phospholipids of the mitochondrial membrane promote fusion by enhancing lipid mixing kinetics and by regulating the action of profusion proteins. PMID:23045528

  19. Use of phoA fusions to study the topology of the Escherichia coli inner membrane protein leader peptidase.

    PubMed Central

    San Millan, J L; Boyd, D; Dalbey, R; Wickner, W; Beckwith, J

    1989-01-01

    A topology of the Escherichia coli leader peptidase has been previously proposed on the basis of proteolytic studies. Here, a collection of alkaline phosphatase fusions to leader peptidase is described. Fusions to the periplasmic domain of this protein exhibit high alkaline phosphatase activity, while fusions to the cytoplasmic domain exhibit low activity. Elements within the cytoplasmic domain are necessary to stably anchor alkaline phosphatase in the cytoplasm. The amino-terminal hydrophobic segment of leader peptidase acts as a weak export signal for alkaline phosphatase. However, when this segment is preceded by four lysines, it acts as a highly efficient export signal. The coherence of in vitro studies with alkaline phosphatase fusion analysis of the topology of leader peptidase further indicates the utility of this genetic approach to membrane protein structure and insertion. Images PMID:2551889

  20. Effect of the mounting membrane on shape in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Haan, S. W.; Rygg, J. R.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Field, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Pak, A. E.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-02-15

    The performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets relies on the symmetric implosion of highly compressed fuel. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to assess in-flight low mode 2D asymmetries of the shell. These time-resolved images of the shell exhibit features that can be related to the lift-off position of the membranes used to hold the capsule within the hohlraum. Here, we describe a systematic study of this membrane or “tent” thickness and its impact on the measured low modes for in-flight and self-emission images. The low mode amplitudes of the shell in-flight shape (P{sub 2} and P{sub 4}) are weakly affected by the tent feature in time-resolved, backlit data. By contrast, time integrated self-emission images along the same axis exhibit a reversal in perceived P{sub 4} mode due to growth of a feature seeded by the tent, which can explain prior inconsistencies between the in-flight P{sub 4} and core P{sub 4}, leading to a reevaluation of optimum hohlraum length. Simulations with a tent-like feature normalized to match the feature seen in the backlit images predict a very large impact on the capsule performance from the tent feature.

  1. Direct targeting of membrane fusion by SNARE mimicry: Convergent evolution of Legionella effectors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xingqi; Halder, Partho; Yavuz, Halenur; Jahn, Reinhard; Shuman, Howard A

    2016-08-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the Gram-negative pathogen causing Legionnaires' disease, infects host cells by hijacking endocytic pathways and forming a Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) in which the bacteria replicate. To promote LCV expansion and prevent lysosomal targeting, effector proteins are translocated into the host cell where they alter membrane traffic. Here we show that three of these effectors [LegC2 (Legionella eukaryotic-like gene C2)/YlfB (yeast lethal factor B), LegC3, and LegC7/YlfA] functionally mimic glutamine (Q)-SNARE proteins. In infected cells, the three proteins selectively form complexes with the endosomal arginine (R)-SNARE vesicle-associated membrane protein 4 (VAMP4). When reconstituted in proteoliposomes, these proteins avidly fuse with liposomes containing VAMP4, resulting in a stable complex with properties resembling canonical SNARE complexes. Intriguingly, however, the LegC/SNARE hybrid complex cannot be disassembled by N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. We conclude that LegCs use SNARE mimicry to divert VAMP4-containing vesicles for fusion with the LCV, thus promoting its expansion. In addition, the LegC/VAMP4 complex avoids the host's disassembly machinery, thus effectively trapping VAMP4 in an inactive state. PMID:27436892

  2. DNA release from lipoplexes by anionic lipids: correlation with lipid mesomorphism, interfacial curvature, and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Tarahovsky, Yury S.; Koynova, Rumiana; MacDonald, Robert C.

    2010-01-18

    DNA release from lipoplexes is an essential step during lipofection and is probably a result of charge neutralization by cellular anionic lipids. As a model system to test this possibility, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between DNA and lipid covalently labeled with Cy3 and BODIPY, respectively, was used to monitor the release of DNA from lipid surfaces induced by anionic liposomes. The separation of DNA from lipid measured this way was considerably slower and less complete than that estimated with noncovalently labeled DNA, and depends on the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and anionic liposomes. This result was confirmed by centrifugal separation of released DNA and lipid. X-ray diffraction revealed a clear correlation of the DNA release capacity of the anionic lipids with the interfacial curvature of the mesomorphic structures developed when the anionic and cationic liposomes were mixed. DNA release also correlated with the rate of fusion of anionic liposomes with lipoplexes. It is concluded that the tendency to fuse and the phase preference of the mixed lipid membranes are key factors for the rate and extent of DNA release. The approach presented emphasizes the importance of the lipid composition of both lipoplexes and target membranes and suggests optimal transfection may be obtained by tailoring lipoplex composition to the lipid composition of target cells.

  3. Direct targeting of membrane fusion by SNARE mimicry: Convergent evolution of Legionella effectors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xingqi; Halder, Partho; Yavuz, Halenur; Shuman, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the Gram-negative pathogen causing Legionnaires’ disease, infects host cells by hijacking endocytic pathways and forming a Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV) in which the bacteria replicate. To promote LCV expansion and prevent lysosomal targeting, effector proteins are translocated into the host cell where they alter membrane traffic. Here we show that three of these effectors [LegC2 (Legionella eukaryotic-like gene C2)/YlfB (yeast lethal factor B), LegC3, and LegC7/YlfA] functionally mimic glutamine (Q)-SNARE proteins. In infected cells, the three proteins selectively form complexes with the endosomal arginine (R)-SNARE vesicle-associated membrane protein 4 (VAMP4). When reconstituted in proteoliposomes, these proteins avidly fuse with liposomes containing VAMP4, resulting in a stable complex with properties resembling canonical SNARE complexes. Intriguingly, however, the LegC/SNARE hybrid complex cannot be disassembled by N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor. We conclude that LegCs use SNARE mimicry to divert VAMP4-containing vesicles for fusion with the LCV, thus promoting its expansion. In addition, the LegC/VAMP4 complex avoids the host’s disassembly machinery, thus effectively trapping VAMP4 in an inactive state. PMID:27436892

  4. CNS myelin sheath is stochastically built by homotypic fusion of myelin membranes within the bounds of an oligodendrocyte process.

    PubMed

    Szuchet, Sara; Nielsen, Lauren L; Domowicz, Miriam S; Austin, Jotham R; Arvanitis, Dimitrios L

    2015-04-01

    Myelin - the multilayer membrane that envelops axons - is a facilitator of rapid nerve conduction. Oligodendrocytes form CNS myelin; the prevailing hypothesis being that they do it by extending a process that circumnavigates the axon. It is pertinent to ask how myelin is built because oligodendrocyte plasma membrane and myelin are compositionally different. To this end, we examined oligodendrocyte cultures and embryonic avian optic nerves by electron microscopy, immuno-electron microscopy and three-dimensional electron tomography. The results support three novel concepts. Myelin membranes are synthesized as tubules and packaged into "myelinophore organelles" in the oligodendrocyte perikaryon. Myelin membranes are matured in and transported by myelinophore organelles within an oligodendrocyte process. The myelin sheath is generated by myelin membrane fusion inside an oligodendrocyte process. These findings abrogate the dogma of myelin resulting from a wrapping motion of an oligodendrocyte process and open up new avenues in the quest for understanding myelination in health and disease. PMID:25682762

  5. Crystal Structure of the Membrane Fusion Protein CusB from Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Chih-Chia; Yang, Feng; Long, Feng; Reyon, Deepak; Routh, Mathew D.; Kuo, Dennis W.; Mokhtari, Adam K.; Van Ornam, Jonathan D.; Rabe, Katherine L.; Hoy, Julie A.; Lee, Young Jin; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Yu, Edward W.

    2010-03-29

    Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, frequently utilize tripartite efflux complexes belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division family to expel diverse toxic compounds from the cell. These systems contain a periplasmic membrane fusion protein (MFP) that is critical for substrate transport. We here present the x-ray structures of the CusB MFP from the copper/silver efflux system of E. coli. This is the first structure of any MFPs associated with heavy-metal efflux transporters. CusB bridges the inner-membrane efflux pump CusA and outer-membrane channel CusC to mediate resistance to Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} ions. Two distinct structures of the elongated molecules of CusB were found in the asymmetric unit of a single crystal, which suggests the flexible nature of this protein. Each protomer of CusB can be divided into four different domains, whereby the first three domains are mostly {beta}-strands and the last domain adopts an entirely helical architecture. Unlike other known structures of MFPs, the {alpha}-helical domain of CusB is folded into a three-helix bundle. This three-helix bundle presumably interacts with the periplasmic domain of CusC. The N- and C-termini of CusB form the first {beta}-strand domain, which is found to interact with the periplasmic domain of the CusA efflux pump. Atomic details of how this efflux protein binds Cu{sup +} and Ag{sup +} were revealed by the crystals of the CusB-Cu(I) and CusB-Ag(I) complexes. The structures indicate that CusB consists of multiple binding sites for these metal ions. These findings reveal novel structural features of an MFP in the resistance-nodulation-division efflux system and provide direct evidence that this protein specifically interacts with transported substrates.

  6. Crystal Structure of Dengue Type 1 Envelope Protein in the Postfusion Conformation and its Implication for Receptor Binding, Membrane Fusion and Antibody Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Nayak, V.; Dessau, M; Kucera, K; Anthony, K; Ledizet, M; Modis, Y

    2009-01-01

    Dengue virus relies on a conformational change in its envelope protein, E, to fuse the viral lipid membrane with the endosomal membrane and thereby deliver the viral genome into the cytosol. We have determined the crystal structure of a soluble fragment E (sE) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1). The protein is in the postfusion conformation even though it was not exposed to a lipid membrane or detergent. At the domain I-domain III interface, 4 polar residues form a tight cluster that is absent in other flaviviral postfusion structures. Two of these residues, His-282 and His-317, are conserved in flaviviruses and are part of the pH sensor that triggers the fusogenic conformational change in E, at the reduced pH of the endosome. In the fusion loop, Phe-108 adopts a distinct conformation, forming additional trimer contacts and filling the bowl-shaped concavity observed at the tip of the DEN-2 sE trimer.

  7. Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, Robin

    1990-10-01

    The book abounds with fascinating anecdotes about fusion's rocky path: the spurious claim by Argentine dictator Juan Peron in 1951 that his country had built a working fusion reactor, the rush by the United States to drop secrecy and publicize its fusion work as a propaganda offensive after the Russian success with Sputnik; the fortune Penthouse magazine publisher Bob Guccione sank into an unconventional fusion device, the skepticism that met an assertion by two University of Utah chemists in 1989 that they had created "cold fusion" in a bottle. Aimed at a general audience, the book describes the scientific basis of controlled fusion--the fusing of atomic nuclei, under conditions hotter than the sun, to release energy. Using personal recollections of scientists involved, it traces the history of this little-known international race that began during the Cold War in secret laboratories in the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union, and evolved into an astonishingly open collaboration between East and West.

  8. SNARE-mediated rapid lysosome fusion in membrane raft clustering and dysfunction of bovine coronary arterial endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wei-Qing; Xia, Min; Zhang, Chun; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Ming; Li, Ning-Jun

    2011-01-01

    The present study attempted to evaluate whether soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) mediate lysosome fusion in response to death receptor activation and contribute to membrane raft (MR) clustering and consequent endothelial dysfunction in coronary arterial endothelial cells. By immunohistochemical analysis, vesicle-associated membrane proteins 2 (VAMP-2, vesicle-SNAREs) were found to be abundantly expressed in the endothelium of bovine coronary arteries. Direct lysosome fusion monitoring by N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-[4-(dibutylamino)styryl]pyridinium dibromide (FM1-43) quenching demonstrated that the inhibition of VAMP-2 with tetanus toxin or specific small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) almost completely blocked lysosome fusion to plasma membrane induced by Fas ligand (FasL), a well-known MR clustering stimulator. The involvement of SNAREs was further confirmed by an increased interaction of VAMP-2 with a target-SNARE protein syntaxin-4 after FasL stimulation in coimmunoprecipitation analysis. Also, the inhibition of VAMP-2 with tetanus toxin or VAMP-2 siRNA abolished FasL-induced MR clustering, its colocalization with a NADPH oxidase unit gp91phox, and increased superoxide production. Finally, FasL-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent vasodilation was reversed by the treatment of bovine coronary arteries with tetanus toxin or VAMP-2 siRNA. VAMP-2 is critical to lysosome fusion in MR clustering, and this VAMP-2-mediated lysosome-MR signalosomes contribute to redox regulation of coronary endothelial function. PMID:21926345

  9. The role of blood cell membrane lipids on the mode of action of HIV-1 fusion inhibitor sifuvirtide

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, Pedro M.; Freitas, Teresa; Castanho, Miguel A.R.B.; Santos, Nuno C.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Sifuvirtide interacts with erythrocyte and lymphocyte membrane in a concentration dependent manner by decreasing its dipole potential. {yields} Dipole potential variations in lipid vesicles show sifuvirtide's lipid selectivity towards saturated phosphatidylcholines. {yields} This peptide-membrane interaction may direct the drug towards raft-like membrane domains where the receptors used by HIV are located, facilitating its inhibitory action. -- Abstract: Sifuvirtide is a gp41 based peptide that inhibits HIV-1 fusion with the host cells and is currently under clinical trials. Previous studies showed that sifuvirtide partitions preferably to saturated phosphatidylcholine lipid membranes, instead of fluid-phase lipid vesicles. We extended the study to the interaction of the peptide with circulating blood cells, by using the dipole potential sensitive probe di-8-ANEPPS. Sifuvirtide decreased the dipole potential of erythrocyte and lymphocyte membranes in a concentration dependent manner, demonstrating its interaction. Also, the lipid selectivity of the peptide towards more rigid phosphatidylcholines was confirmed based on the dipole potential variations. Overall, the interaction of the peptide with the cell membranes is a contribution of different lipid preferences that presumably directs the peptide towards raft-like domains where the receptors are located, facilitating the reach of the peptide to its molecular target, the gp41 in its pre-fusion conformation.

  10. Dynamic ergosterol- and ceramide-rich domains in the peroxisomal membrane serve as an organizing platform for peroxisome fusion.

    PubMed

    Boukh-Viner, Tatiana; Guo, Tong; Alexandrian, Alex; Cerracchio, André; Gregg, Christopher; Haile, Sandra; Kyskan, Robert; Milijevic, Svetlana; Oren, Daniel; Solomon, Jonathan; Wong, Vivianne; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Rachubinski, Richard A; English, Ann M; Titorenko, Vladimir I

    2005-02-28

    We describe unusual ergosterol- and ceramide-rich (ECR) domains in the membrane of yeast peroxisomes. Several key features of these detergent-resistant domains, including the nature of their sphingolipid constituent and its unusual distribution across the membrane bilayer, clearly distinguish them from well characterized detergent-insoluble lipid rafts in the plasma membrane. A distinct set of peroxisomal proteins, including two ATPases, Pex1p and Pex6p, as well as phosphoinositide- and GTP-binding proteins, transiently associates with the cytosolic face of ECR domains. All of these proteins are essential for the fusion of the immature peroxisomal vesicles P1 and P2, the earliest intermediates in a multistep pathway leading to the formation of mature, metabolically active peroxisomes. Peroxisome fusion depends on the lateral movement of Pex1p, Pex6p, and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate-binding proteins from ECR domains to a detergent-soluble portion of the membrane, followed by their release to the cytosol. Our data suggest a model for the multistep reorganization of the multicomponent peroxisome fusion machinery that transiently associates with ECR domains. PMID:15738267

  11. Kinetically coupled folding of a single HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 complex in viral membrane fusion and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Junyi; Rebane, Aleksander A.; Ma, Lu; Gao, Ying; Zhang, Yongli

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 glycoprotein 41 (gp41) mediates viral entry into host cells by coupling its folding energy to membrane fusion. Gp41 folding is blocked by fusion inhibitors, including the commercial drug T20, to treat HIV/AIDS. However, gp41 folding intermediates, energy, and kinetics are poorly understood. Here, we identified the folding intermediates of a single gp41 trimer-of-hairpins and measured their associated energy and kinetics using high-resolution optical tweezers. We found that folding of gp41 hairpins was energetically independent but kinetically coupled: Each hairpin contributed a folding energy of ∼−23 kBT, but folding of one hairpin successively accelerated the folding rate of the next one by ∼20-fold. Membrane-mimicking micelles slowed down gp41 folding and reduced the stability of the six-helix bundle. However, the stability was restored by cooperative folding of the membrane-proximal external region. Surprisingly, T20 strongly inhibited gp41 folding by actively displacing the C-terminal hairpin strand in a force-dependent manner. The inhibition was abolished by a T20-resistant gp41 mutation. The energetics and kinetics of gp41 folding established by us provides a basis to understand viral membrane fusion, infection, and therapeutic intervention. PMID:26038562

  12. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-06-20

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the Yxx{phi} domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1{sub NL4.3} compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and

  13. A novel tridentate bis(phosphinic acid)phosphine oxide based europium(III)-selective Nafion membrane luminescent sensor.

    PubMed

    Sainz-Gonzalo, F J; Popovici, C; Casimiro, M; Raya-Barón, A; López-Ortiz, F; Fernández, I; Fernández-Sánchez, J F; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A

    2013-10-21

    A new europium(III) membrane luminescent sensor based on a new tridentate bis(phosphinic acid)phosphine oxide (3) system has been developed. The synthesis of this new ligand is described and its full characterization by NMR, IR and elemental analyses is provided. The luminescent complex formed between europium(III) chloride and ligand 3 was evaluated in solution, observing that its spectroscopic and chemical characteristics are excellent for measuring in polymer inclusion membranes. Included in a Nafion membrane, all the parameters (ligand and ionic additives) that can affect the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensing membrane as well as the instrumental conditions were carefully optimized. The best luminescence signal (λexc = 229.06 nm and λem = 616.02 nm) was exhibited by the sensing film having a Nafion : ligand composition of 262.3 : 0.6 mg mL(-1). The membrane sensor showed a short response time (t95 = 5.0 ± 0.2 min) and an optimum working pH of 5.0 (25 mM acetate buffer solution). The membrane sensor manifested a good selectivity toward europium(III) ions with respect to other trivalent metals (iron, chromium and aluminium) and lanthanide(III) ions (lanthanum, samarium, terbium and ytterbium), although a small positive interference of terbium(III) ions was observed. It provided a linear range from 1.9 × 10(-8) to 5.0 × 10(-6) M with a very low detection limit (5.8 × 10(-9) M) and sensitivity (8.57 × 10(-7) a.u. per M). The applicability of this sensing film has been demonstrated by analyzing different kinds of spiked water samples obtaining recovery percentages of 95-97%. PMID:23967443

  14. Different activities of the reovirus FAST proteins and influenza hemagglutinin in cell-cell fusion assays and in response to membrane curvature agents

    SciTech Connect

    Clancy, Eileen K.; Barry, Chris; Ciechonska, Marta; Duncan, Roy

    2010-02-05

    The reovirus fusion-associated small transmembrane (FAST) proteins evolved to induce cell-cell, rather than virus-cell, membrane fusion. It is unclear whether the FAST protein fusion reaction proceeds in the same manner as the enveloped virus fusion proteins. We now show that fluorescence-based cell-cell and cell-RBC hemifusion assays are unsuited for detecting lipid mixing in the absence of content mixing during FAST protein-mediated membrane fusion. Furthermore, membrane curvature agents that inhibit hemifusion or promote pore formation mediated by influenza hemagglutinin had no effect on p14-induced cell-cell fusion, even under conditions of limiting p14 concentrations. Standard assays used to detect fusion intermediates induced by enveloped virus fusion proteins are therefore not applicable to the FAST proteins. These results suggest the possibility that the nature of the fusion intermediates or the mechanisms used to transit through the various stages of the fusion reaction may differ between these distinct classes of viral fusogens.

  15. Polymeric Membrane Electrodes with Improved Fluoride Selectivity and Lifetime Based on Zr(IV)- and Al(III)- Tetraphenylporphyrin Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzak, Mariusz; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2007-01-01

    Novel aluminum(III)- and zirconium(IV)-tetraphenylporhyrin (TPP) derivatives are examined as fluoride selective ionophores for preparing polymer membrane-based ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). The influence of t-butyl— or dichloro— phenyl ring substituents as well as the nature of the metal ion center (Al(III) vs. Zr(IV)) on the anion complexation constants of TPP derivative ionophores are reported. The anion binding stability constants of the ionophores are characterized by the so-called “sandwich membrane” method. All of the metalloporphyrins examined form their strongest anion complexes with fluoride. The influence of plasticizer as well as the type of lipophilic ionic site additive and their amounts in the sensing membrane are discussed. It is shown that membrane electrodes formulated with the metalloporphyrin derivatives and appropriate anionic or cationic additives exhibit enhanced potentiometric response toward fluoride over all other anions tested. Since selectivity toward fluoride is enhanced in the presence of both anionic and cationic additives, the metalloporphyrins can function as either charged or neutral carriers within the organic membrane phase. In contrast to previously reported fluoride-selective polymeric membrane electrodes based on metalloporphyrins, nernstian or near-nernstian (−51.2 to −60.1 mV decade−1) as well as rapid (t < 80s) and fully reversible potentiometric fluoride responses are observed. Moreover, use of aluminum(III)—t-butyltetraphenylporphyrin as the ionophore provides fluoride sensors with prolonged (7 months) functional life-time. PMID:17631098

  16. A gene-fusion strategy for stoichiometric and co-localized expression of light-gated membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kleinlogel, Sonja; Terpitz, Ulrich; Legrum, Barbara; Gökbuget, Deniz; Boyden, Edward S; Bamann, Christian; Wood, Phillip G; Bamberg, Ernst

    2011-12-01

    The precise co-localization and stoichiometric expression of two different light-gated membrane proteins can vastly improve the physiological usefulness of optogenetics for the modulation of cell excitability with light. Here we present a gene-fusion strategy for the stable 1:1 expression of any two microbial rhodopsins in a single polypeptide chain. By joining the excitatory channelrhodopsin-2 with the inhibitory ion pumps halorhodopsin or bacteriorhodopsin, we demonstrate light-regulated quantitative bi-directional control of the membrane potential in HEK293 cells and neurons in vitro. We also present synergistic rhodopsin combinations of channelrhodopsin-2 with Volvox carteri channelrhodopsin-1 or slow channelrhodopsin-2 mutants, to achieve enhanced spectral or kinetic properties, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of our fusion strategy to determine ion-turnovers of as yet uncharacterized rhodopsins, exemplified for archaerhodopsin and CatCh, or to correct pump cycles, exemplified for halorhodopsin. PMID:22056675

  17. Physics of laser fusion. Volume III. High-power pulsed lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Eimerl, D.; George, E.V.; Trenholme, J.B.; Simmons, W.W.; Hunt, J.T.

    1982-09-01

    High-power pulsed lasers can deliver sufficient energy on inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) time scales (0.1 to 10 ns) to heat and compress deuterium-tritium fuel to fusion-reaction conditions. Several laser systems have been examined, including Nd:glass, CO/sub 2/, KrF, and I/sub 2/, for their ICF applicability. A great deal of developmental effort has been applied to the Nd:glass laser and the CO/sub 2/ gas laser systems; these systems now deliver > 10/sup 4/ J and 20 x 10/sup 12/ W to ICF targets. We are constructing the Nova Nd:glass laser at LLNL to provide > 100 kJ and > 100 x 10/sup 12/ W of 1-..mu..m radiation for fusion experimentation in the mid-1980s. For ICF target gain > 100 times the laser input, we expect that the laser driver must deliver approx. 3 to 5 MJ of energy on a time scale of 10 to 20 ns. In this paper we review the technological status of fusion-laser systems and outline approaches to constructing high-power pulsed laser drivers.

  18. Association of the pr Peptides with Dengue Virus at Acidic pH Blocks Membrane Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, I.-M.; Holdaway, H.A.; Chipman, P.R.; Kuhn, R.J.; Rossmann, M.G.; Chen, J.; Purdue

    2010-07-27

    Flavivirus assembles into an inert particle that requires proteolytic activation by furin to enable transmission to other hosts. We previously showed that immature virus undergoes a conformational change at low pH that renders it accessible to furin (I. M. Yu, W. Zhang, H. A. Holdaway, L. Li, V. A. Kostyuchenko, P. R. Chipman, R. J. Kuhn, M. G. Rossmann, and J. Chen, Science 319:1834-1837, 2008). Here we show, using cryoelectron microscopy, that the structure of immature dengue virus at pH 6.0 is essentially the same before and after the cleavage of prM. The structure shows that after cleavage, the proteolytic product pr remains associated with the virion at acidic pH, and that furin cleavage by itself does not induce any major conformational changes. We also show by liposome cofloatation experiments that pr retention prevents membrane insertion, suggesting that pr is present on the virion in the trans-Golgi network to protect the progeny virus from fusion within the host cell.

  19. Structure of a phleboviral envelope glycoprotein reveals a consolidated model of membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Halldorsson, Steinar; Behrens, Anna-Janina; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Elliott, Richard M; Crispin, Max; Brennan, Benjamin; Bowden, Thomas A

    2016-06-28

    An emergent viral pathogen termed severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) is responsible for thousands of clinical cases and associated fatalities in China, Japan, and South Korea. Akin to other phleboviruses, SFTSV relies on a viral glycoprotein, Gc, to catalyze the merger of endosomal host and viral membranes during cell entry. Here, we describe the postfusion structure of SFTSV Gc, revealing that the molecular transformations the phleboviral Gc undergoes upon host cell entry are conserved with otherwise unrelated alpha- and flaviviruses. By comparison of SFTSV Gc with that of the prefusion structure of the related Rift Valley fever virus, we show that these changes involve refolding of the protein into a trimeric state. Reverse genetics and rescue of site-directed histidine mutants enabled localization of histidines likely to be important for triggering this pH-dependent process. These data provide structural and functional evidence that the mechanism of phlebovirus-host cell fusion is conserved among genetically and patho-physiologically distinct viral pathogens. PMID:27325770

  20. Accumulation of properly folded human type III procollagen molecules in specific intracellular membranous compartments in the yeast Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Keizer-Gunnink, I; Vuorela, A; Myllyharju, J; Pihlajaniemi, T; Kivirikko, K I; Veenhuis, M

    2000-02-01

    It was recently reported that co-expression of the proalpha1(III) chain of human type III procollagen with the subunits of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase in Pichia pastoris produces fully hydroxylated and properly folded recombinant type III procollagen molecules (Vuorela, A., Myllyharju, J., Nissi, R., Pihlajaniemi, T., Kivirikko, K.I., 1997. Assembly of human prolyl 4-hydroxylase and type III collagen in the yeast Pichia pastoris: formation of a stable enzyme tetramer requires coexpression with collagen and assembly of a stable collagen requires coexpression with prolyl 4-hydroxylase. EMBO J. 16, 6702-6712). These properly folded molecules accumulated inside the yeast cell, however, only approximately 10% were found in the culture medium. We report here that replacement of the authentic signal sequence of the human proalpha1(III) with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha mating factor prepro sequence led only to a minor increase in the amount secreted. Immunoelectron microscopy studies indicated that the procollagen molecules accumulate in specific membranous vesicular compartments that are closely associated with the nuclear membrane. Prolyl 4-hydroxylase, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumenal enzyme, was found to be located in the same compartments. Non-helical proalpha1(III) chains produced by expression without recombinant prolyl 4-hydroxylase likewise accumulated within these compartments. The data indicate that properly folded recombinant procollagen molecules accumulate within the ER and do not proceed further in the secretory pathway. This may be related to the large size of the procollagen molecule. PMID:10686423

  1. Fusion activity of influenza virus. A comparison between biological and artificial target membrane vesicles.

    PubMed

    Stegmann, T; Hoekstra, D; Scherphof, G; Wilschut, J

    1986-08-25

    We have investigated the pH-dependent fusion activity of influenza virus toward human erythrocyte ghosts, utilizing a recently developed fluorescence assay, which permits continuous monitoring of the fusion reaction. The rate of fusion is negligible at neutral pH but shows a sharp increase at pH values just below 5.5. This pH dependence profile closely corresponds to that of virus-induced hemolysis. Fusion is rapidly inactivated by a low-pH preincubation of the virus alone either at 37 or at 0 degrees C. The presence of ghosts during this low-pH preincubation, carried out at 0 degree C under which condition there is hardly any fusion, causes a significant protection of the viral fusion activity against inactivation. Fusion initiated at low pH can be arrested instantaneously by readjustment of the pH to neutral. The characteristics of fusion of influenza virus with ghosts deviate from those of fusion with cardiolipin liposomes (Stegmann, T., Hoekstra, D., Scherphof, G., and Wilschut, J. (1985) Biochemistry 24, 3107-3113). Fusion with ghosts is consistent with a requirement of the well-documented pH-dependent conformational change in the viral hemagglutinin, whereas fusion with cardiolipin liposomes does not exhibit a strict dependence on the conformational change. Rather, the negative surface charge on the liposomes plays a critical role, as zwitterionic liposomes containing gangliosides show fusion behavior similar to that of erythrocyte ghosts. PMID:3733744

  2. Role of the transmembrane domain in SNARE protein mediated membrane fusion: peptide nucleic acid/peptide model systems.

    PubMed

    Wehland, Jan-Dirk; Lygina, Antonina S; Kumar, Pawan; Guha, Samit; Hubrich, Barbara E; Jahn, Reinhard; Diederichsen, Ulf

    2016-08-16

    Fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane is mediated by Soluble NSF (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor) Attachment Protein Receptor proteins also known as SNAREs. The backbone of this essential process is the assembly of SNAREs from opposite membranes into tight four helix bundles forcing membranes in close proximity. With model systems resembling SNAREs with reduced complexity we aim to understand how these proteins work at the molecular level. Here, peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are used as excellent candidates for mimicking the SNARE recognition motif by forming well-characterized duplex structures. Hybridization between complementary PNA strands anchored in liposomes through native transmembrane domains (TMDs) induces the merger of the outer leaflets of the participating vesicles but not of the inner leaflets. A series of PNA/peptide hybrids differing in the length of TMDs and charges at the C-terminal end is presented. Interestingly, mixing of both outer and inner leaflets is seen for TMDs containing an amide in place of the natural carboxylic acid at the C-terminal end. Charged side chains at the C-terminal end of the TMDs are shown to have a negative impact on the mixing of liposomes. The length of the TMDs is vital for fusion as with the use of shortened TMDs, fusion was completely prevented. PMID:27345759

  3. Expression of two membrane fusion proteins, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, in choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chung, I; Burkart, A; Szmydynger-Chodobska, J; Dodd, K A; Trimble, W S; Miller, K V; Shim, M; Chodobski, A

    2003-01-01

    In addition to being the major site of cerebrospinal fluid formation, the choroid plexus epithelium emerges as an important source of polypeptides in the brain. Physiologically regulated release of some polypeptides synthesized by the choroid plexus has been shown. The molecular mechanisms underlying this polypeptide secretion have not been characterized, however. In the present study, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein, two membrane fusion proteins playing a critical role in exocytosis in neurons and endocrine cells, were found to be expressed in the choroid plexus epithelium. It was also shown that in choroidal epithelium, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa and vesicle-associated membrane protein stably interact. Two members of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2, were expressed in the rat choroid plexus at the messenger RNA and protein level. However, their newly discovered isoforms, vesicle-associated membrane protein-1b and vesicle-associated membrane protein-2b, produced by alternative RNA splicing, were not detected in choroidal tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that vesicle-associated membrane protein is confined to the cytoplasm of choroidal epithelium, whereas synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa is associated with plasma membranes, albeit with a varied cellular distribution among species studied. Specifically, in the rat choroid plexus, synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was localized to the basolateral membrane domain of choroidal epithelium and was expressed in small groups of cells. In comparison, in ovine and human choroidal tissues, apical staining for synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa was found in the majority of epithelial cells. These species-related differences in cellular synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa distribution suggested that the synaptosome-associated protein of

  4. The effect of acclimation temperature on the fusion kinetics of lipid vesicles derived from endoplasmic reticulum membranes of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Estuardo J; Hazel, Jeffrey R

    2002-02-01

    Membrane fusion is an obligatory step in many vital cellular processes. The well-established enrichment of bilayer-destabilizing lipids in membranes of poikilotherms subjected to growth at low temperatures leads to the prediction that such membranes will possess a greater propensity to undergo fusion. This hypothesis was explicitly tested in the present study by determining the kinetics of fusion between small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) prepared from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes of thermally-acclimated (to 5 and 20 degrees C) rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver and bovine brain phosphatidylserine (BBPS). At temperatures above 10 degrees C, ER vesicles from 5 degrees C-acclimated trout, fused more rapidly and to a greater extent with BBPS vesicles (by average factors of 1.25- and 1.45-fold, respectively) than ER vesicles of 20 degrees C-acclimated trout. At temperatures >35 degrees C, apparent fusion rates declined while the extent of fusion increased in both acclimation groups. Fusion kinetics were found to be well correlated with and limited by the physical properties and phase state of the BBPS vesicles. These results indicate that dynamic attributes of biological membranes, such as the propensity to undergo fusion, are of potential regulatory significance and are partially conserved when growth or environmental temperature changes. PMID:11818217

  5. Cholesterol-dependent syntaxin-4 and SNAP-23 clustering regulates caveolar fusion with the endothelial plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Predescu, Sanda A; Predescu, Dan N; Shimizu, Kayo; Klein, Irene K; Malik, Asrar B

    2005-11-01

    We determined the organization of target (t) SNARE proteins on the basolateral endothelial plasma membrane (PM) and their role in the mechanism of caveolar fusion. Studies were performed in a cell-free system involving endothelial PM sheets and isolated biotin-labeled caveolae. We monitored the fusion of caveolae with the PM by the detection of biotin-streptavidin complexes using correlative high resolution fluorescence microscopy and gold labeling electron microscopy on ultrathin sections of PM sheets. Imaging of PM sheets demonstrated and biochemical findings showed that the t-SNARE proteins present in endothelial cells (SNAP-23 and syntaxin-4) formed cholesterol-dependent clusters in discrete areas of the PM. Upon fusion of caveolae with the target PM, 50% of the caveolae co-localized with the t-SNARE clusters, indicating that these caveolae were at the peak of the fusion reaction. Fluorescent streptavidin staining of PM sheets correlated with the ultrastructure in the same area. These findings demonstrate that t-SNARE clusters in the endothelial target PM serve as the fusion sites for caveolae during exocytosis. PMID:16118213

  6. Ca2+ and membrane binding to annexin 3 modulate the structure and dynamics of its N terminus and domain III

    PubMed Central

    Sopkova, Jana; Raguenes-Nicol, Céline; Vincent, Michel; Chevalier, Anne; Lewit-Bentley, Anita; Russo-Marie, Françoise; Gallay, Jacques

    2002-01-01

    Annexin 3 (ANX A3) represents ∼1% of the total protein of human neutrophils and promotes tight contact between membranes of isolated specific granules in vitro leading to their aggregation. Like for other annexins, the primary molecular events of the action of this protein is likely its binding to negatively charged phospholipid membranes in a Ca2+-dependent manner, via Ca2+-binding sites located on the convex side of the highly conserved core of the molecule. The conformation and dynamics of domain III can be affected by this process, as it was shown for other members of the family. The 20 amino-acid, N-terminal segment of the protein also could be affected and also might play a role in the modulation of its binding to the membranes. The structure and dynamics of these two regions were investigated by fluorescence of the two tryptophan residues of the protein (respectively, W190 in domain III and W5 in the N-terminal segment) in the wild type and in single-tryptophan mutants. By contrast to ANX A5, which shows a closed conformation and a buried W187 residue in the absence of Ca2+, domain III of ANX A3 exhibits an open conformation and a widely solvent-accessible W190 residue in the same conditions. This is in agreement with the three-dimensional structure of the ANX A3-E231A mutant lacking the bidentate Ca2+ ligand in domain III. Ca2+ in the millimolar concentration range provokes nevertheless a large mobility increase of the W190 residue, while interaction with the membranes reduces it slightly. In the N-terminal region, the W5 residue, inserted in the central pore of the protein, is weakly accessible to the solvent and less mobile than W190. Its amplitude of rotation increases upon binding of Ca2+ and returns to its original value when interacting with membranes. Ca2+ concentration for half binding of the W5A mutant to negatively charged membranes is ∼0.5 mM while it increases to ∼1 mM for the ANX A3 wild type and to ∼3 mM for the W190 ANX A3 mutant. In

  7. Extending the Serum Half-Life of G-CSF via Fusion with the Domain III of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuqiang; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Hong; Chen, Xiaofei; Cai, Di; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong

    2013-01-01

    Protein fusion technology is one of the most commonly used methods to extend the half-life of therapeutic proteins. In this study, in order to prolong the half-life of Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF), the domain III of human serum albumin (3DHSA) was genetically fused to the N-terminal of G-CSF. The 3DHSA-G-CSF fusion gene was cloned into pPICZαA along with the open reading frame of the α-factor signal under the control of the AOX1 promoter. The recombinant expression vector was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115, and the recombinant strains were screened by SDS-PAGE. As expected, the 3DHSA-G-CSF showed high binding affinity with HSA antibody and G-CSF antibody, and the natural N-terminal of 3DHSA was detected by N-terminal sequencing. The bioactivity and pharmacokinetic studies of 3DHSA-G-CSF were respectively determined using neutropenia model mice and human G-CSF ELISA kit. The results demonstrated that 3DHSA-G-CSF has the ability to increase the peripheral white blood cell (WBC) counts of neutropenia model mice, and the half-life of 3DHSA-G-CSF is longer than that of native G-CSF. In conclusion, 3DHSA can be used to extend the half-life of G-CSF. PMID:24151579

  8. A Visual Screen of a Gfp-Fusion Library Identifies a New Type of Nuclear Envelope Membrane Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Melissa M.; Stein, Pascal A.; Taylor, Stephen S.; Ha, Edward; McKeon, Frank; Rapoport, Tom A.

    1999-01-01

    The nuclear envelope (NE) is a distinct subdomain of the ER, but few membrane components have been described that are specific to it. We performed a visual screen in tissue culture cells to identify proteins targeted to the NE. This approach does not require assumptions about the nature of the association with the NE or the physical separation of NE and ER. We confirmed that screening a library of fusions to the green fluorescent protein can be used to identify proteins targeted to various subcompartments of mammalian cells, including the NE. With this approach, we identified a new NE membrane protein, named nurim. Nurim is a multispanning membrane protein without large hydrophilic domains that is very tightly associated with the nucleus. Unlike the known NE membrane proteins, it is neither associated with nuclear pores, nor targeted like lamin-associated membrane proteins. Thus, nurim is a new type of NE membrane protein that is localized to the NE by a distinct mechanism. PMID:10402458

  9. Development of new cloning vectors for the production of immunogenic outer membrane fusion proteins in Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelis, P.; Sierra, J.C.; Lim, A. Jr.; Malur, A.

    1996-02-01

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipoprotein gene (oprI) was modified by cloning an in-frame polylinker in both orientations at the end of oprI. The resulting plasmids pVUBI and pVUB2 allow high lipoprotein production in E. coli after IPTG induction. The modified lipoproteins are present in the outer membrane and surface-exposed. Outer membrane-bound fusion proteins of different sizes were produced and used to generate antibodies without use of adjuvant. An 87 bp DNA fragment from the vp72 capsid protein gene of African Swine Fever virus (ASFV) and the entire Leishmania major glycoprotein gp63 gene were expressed in this system. Finally, a fusion lipoprotein containing a 16 amino acid epitope from the preS2b region of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) was presented by an antigen-presenting cell line to a T-cell hybridoma while the corresponding cross-linked S2b peptide was not. The results suggest that OprI-based fusion proteins can be used to generate both humoral and cellular immune responses. 44 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Numb regulates vesicular docking for homotypic fusion of early endosomes via membrane recruitment of Mon1b.

    PubMed

    Shao, Ximing; Liu, Yi; Yu, Qian; Ding, Zhihao; Qian, Wenyu; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jianchao; Jiang, Nan; Gui, Linfei; Xu, Zhiheng; Hong, Yang; Ma, Yifan; Wei, Yanjie; Liu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Changan; Zhu, Minyan; Li, Hongchang; Li, Huashun

    2016-05-01

    Numb is an endocytic protein that plays crucial roles in diverse cellular processes such as asymmetric cell division, cell migration and differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Numb regulates endocytic trafficking is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Numb is a docking regulator for homotypic fusion of early endosomes (EEs). Numb depletion causes clustered but unfused EEs, which can be rescued by overexpressing cytosolic Numb 65 and Numb 71 but not plasma membrane-attached Numb 66 or Numb 72. Time-lapse analysis reveals that paired vesicles tend to tether but not fuse with each other in the absence of Numb. We further show that Numb binds to another docking regulator, Mon1b, and is required for the recruitment of cytosolic Mon1b to the EE membrane. Consistent with this, deletion of Mon1b causes similar defects in EE fusion. Our study thus identifies a novel mechanism by which Numb regulates endocytic sorting by mediating EE fusion. PMID:26987402