Science.gov

Sample records for membrane materials annual

  1. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  2. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  3. Membrane behavior of clay liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jong Beom

    Membrane behavior represents the ability of porous media to restrict the migration of solutes, leading to the existence of chemico-osmosis, or the flow of liquid in response to a chemical concentration gradient. Membrane behavior is an important consideration with respect to clay soils with small pores and interactive electric diffuse double layers associated with individual particles, such as bentonite. The results of recent studies indicate the existence of membrane behavior in bentonite-based hydraulic barriers used in waste containment applications. Thus, measurement of the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior in such clay soils is becoming increasingly important. Accordingly, this research focused on evaluating the existence and magnitude of membrane behavior for three clay-based materials that typically are considered for use as liners for waste containment applications, such as landfills. The three clay-based liner materials included a commercially available geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) consisting of sodium bentonite sandwiched between two geotextiles, a compacted natural clay known locally as Nelson Farm Clay, and compacted NFC amended with 5% (dry wt.) of a sodium bentonite. The study also included the development and evaluation of a new flexible-wall cell for clay membrane testing that was used subsequently to measure the membrane behaviors of the three clay liner materials. The consolidation behavior of the GCL under isotropic states of stress also was evaluated as a preliminary step in the determination of the membrane behavior of the GCL under different effective consolidation stresses.

  4. Annual Abstract Series of Educational Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelesnyak, M. C., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    This is the fifth annual collection of abstracts of educational materials presented by the Educational Materials Review Board of the American Physiological Society under the direction of the Education Committee. The collection includes abstracts of articles, papers, textbooks, books, handbooks, and symposia which are valuable in teaching…

  5. FY 2012 Lightweight Materials Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, David C.

    2013-04-15

    The FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Lightweight Materials provides a detailed description of the activities and technical accomplishments which focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  6. 2010 Membranes: Materials & Processes Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Jerry Lin

    2010-07-30

    The GRC series on Membranes: Materials and Processes have gained significant international recognition, attracting leading experts on membranes and other related areas from around the world. It is now known for being an interdisciplinary and synergistic meeting. The next summer's edition will keep with the past tradition and include new, exciting aspects of material science, chemistry, chemical engineering, computer simulation with participants from academia, industry and national laboratories. This edition will focus on cutting edge topics of membranes for addressing several grand challenges facing our society, in particular, energy, water, health and more generally sustainability. During the technical program, we want to discuss new membrane structure and characterization techniques, the role of advanced membranes and membrane-based processes in sustainability/environment (including carbon dioxide capture), membranes in water processes, and membranes for biological and life support applications. As usual, the informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the oral presentations and posters, and ample opportunity to meet many outstanding colleagues make this an excellent conference for established scientists as well as for students. A Gordon Research Seminar (GRS) on the weekend prior to the GRC meeting will provide young researchers an opportunity to present their work and network with outstanding experts. It will also be a right warm-up for the conference participants to join and enjoy the main conference.

  7. Annual review of materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, R.A. )

    1992-01-01

    This book discusses timely, and critical appraisals of various areas within materials science, with special emphasis upon recent progress and current trends. It is hoped that it will help provide definition and coherence in this field, and be of significant assistance to the increasing number of those involved in materials education, as well as to those actively involved in the many rapidly moving areas of materials research and technology. The Editorial Committee selects topics and authors and organizes the presentation of their contributions in these volumes so as to promote this amalgamation of concepts, tools, and techniques, and thereby to further this multifaceted approach to the understanding and control of physical phenomena and technological properties in a wide range of substances.

  8. Hydrogen separation membranes annual report for FY 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Chen, L.; Ciocco, M.; Doctor, R. D.; Dorris, S.E.; Emerson, J. E.; Fisher, B.; Lee, T. H.; Killmeyer, R. P.; Morreale,B.; Picciolo, J. J.; Siriwardane, R. V.; Song, S. J.

    2007-02-05

    The objective of this work is to develop dense ceramic membranes for separating hydrogen from other gaseous components in a nongalvanic mode, i.e., without using an external power supply or electrical circuitry. This goal of this project is to develop two types of dense ceramic membrane for producing hydrogen nongalvanically, i.e., without electrodes or external power supply, at commercially significant fluxes under industrially relevant operating conditions. The first type of membrane, hydrogen transport membranes (HTMs), will be used to separate hydrogen from gas mixtures such as the product streams from coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. Potential ancillary uses of HTMs include dehydrogenation and olefin production, as well as hydrogen recovery in petroleum refineries and ammonia synthesis plants, the largest current users of deliberately produced hydrogen. The second type of membrane, oxygen transport membranes (OTMs), will produce hydrogen by nongalvanically removing oxygen that is generated when water dissociates at elevated temperatures. This report describes progress that was made during FY 2006 on the development of OTM and HTM materials.

  9. Polymer synthesis toward fuel cell membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebeck, Nathaniel T.

    Fuel cells are a promising technology that will be part of the future energy landscape. New membranes for alkaline and proton exchange membrane fuel cells are needed to improve the performance, simplify the system, and reduce cost. Polymer chemistry can be applied to develop new polymers and to assemble polymers into improved membranes that need less water, have increased performance and are less expensive, thereby removing the deficiencies of current membranes. Nucleophilic aromatic substitution polymerization typically produces thermally stable engineering polymers that can be easily functionalized. New functional monomers were developed to explore new routes to novel functional polymers. Sulfonamides were discovered as new activating groups for polymerization of high molecular weight thermooxidatively stable materials with sulfonic acid latent functionality. While the sulfonamide functional polymers could be produced, the sulfonamide group proved to be too stable to convert into a sulfonic acid after reaction. The reactivity of 2-aminophenol was investigated to search for a new class of ion conducting polymer materials. Both the amine and the phenol groups are found to be reactive in a nucleophilic aromatic substitution, however not to the extent to allow the formation of high molecular weight polymer materials. Layer-by-layer films were assembled from aqueous solutions of poly(styrene sulfonate) and trimethylammonium functionalized poly(phenylene oxide). The deposition conditions were adjusted to increase the free charge carrier content, and chloride conductivites reached almost 30 mS/cm for the best films. Block and random poly(phenylene oxide) copolymers were produced from 2,6-dimethylphenol and 2,6-diphenylphenol and the methyl substituted repeat units were functionalized with trimethylammonium bromide. The block copolymers displayed bromide conductivities up to 26 mS/cm and outperformed the random copolymers, indicating that morphology has an effect on ion

  10. Radiofrequency plasma polymerized perfluoroionomer membrane materials

    SciTech Connect

    Danilich, M.J.; Gervasio, D.F.; Marchant, R.E.

    1993-12-31

    Ion exchange membranes have received considerable attention in recent years. Applications of ion exchange membranes have included such electrochemical systems as water and organic electrolyzers, redox-flow batteries, and sensors. This work is a study of radiofrequency plasma polymerization of perfluorinated acid-containing monomers and a perfluorinated {open_quotes}backbone{close_quotes} comonomer as a method for synthesizing novel polyionomer film coatings for use as membranes on electrodes and biomedical sensors. The results indicate that, by altering the deposition conditions, some control can be exercised over the retention of acid functional groups by plasma polymers. Using AC impedance measurements, the ionic conductivity of these films was found to be two to four orders of magnitude higher than their aqueous environments. In addition, several of the acid-containing plasma polymerized films were hydrophilic, having an advancing water contact angle of less than fifteen degrees. The initial results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of using acid-containing plasma polymers as crosslinked membrane materials suitable for use with electrochemical sensors and biosensors.

  11. Hydrogen separation membranes annual report for FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.

    2011-03-14

    The objective of this work is to develop dense ceramic membranes for separating hydrogen from other gaseous components in a nongalvanic mode, i.e., without using an external power supply or electrical circuitry. The goal of this project is to develop dense hydrogen transport membranes (HTMs) that nongalvanically (i.e., without electrodes or external power supply) separate hydrogen from gas mixtures at commercially significant fluxes under industrially relevant operating conditions. These membranes will be used to separate hydrogen from gas mixtures such as the product streams from coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. Potential ancillary uses of HTMs include dehydrogenation and olefin production, as well as hydrogen recovery in petroleum refineries and ammonia synthesis plants, the largest current users of deliberately produced hydrogen. This report describes the results from the development and testing of HTM materials during FY 2010.

  12. Effect of membrane polymeric materials on relationship between surface pore size and membrane fouling in membrane bioreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Taro; Yuasa, Kotaku; Ishigami, Toru; Rajabzadeh, Saeid; Kamio, Eiji; Ohmukai, Yoshikage; Saeki, Daisuke; Ni, Jinren; Matsuyama, Hideto

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the effect of different membrane polymeric materials on the relationship between membrane pore size and development of membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor (MBR). Membranes with different pore sizes were prepared using three different polymeric materials, cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), and the development of membrane fouling in each membrane was evaluated by batch filtration tests using a mixed liquor suspension obtained from a laboratory-scale MBR. The results revealed that the optimal membrane pore size to mitigate membrane fouling differed depending on membrane polymeric material. For PVDF membranes, the degree of membrane fouling decreased as membrane pore size increased. In contrast, CAB membranes with smaller pores had less fouling propensity than those with larger ones. Such difference can be attributed to the difference in major membrane foulants in each membrane; in PVDF, they were small colloids or dissolved organics in which proteins are abundant, and in CAB, microbial flocs. The results obtained in this study strongly suggested that optimum operating conditions of MBRs differ depending on the characteristics of the used membrane.

  13. FY2011 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2011-12-01

    Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials focusing on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines by providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  14. Hydrogen separation membranes annual report for FY 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Lu, Y.; Emerson, J. E.; Park, C. Y.; Lee, T. H.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

    2010-04-16

    The objective of this work is to develop dense ceramic membranes for separating hydrogen from other gaseous components in a nongalvanic mode, i.e., without using an external power supply or electrical circuitry. The goal of this project is to develop dense hydrogen transport membranes (HTMs) that nongalvanically (i.e., without electrodes or external power supply) separate hydrogen from gas mixtures at commercially significant fluxes under industrially relevant operating conditions. HTMs will be used to separate hydrogen from gas mixtures such as the product streams from coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. Potential ancillary uses of HTMs include dehydrogenation and olefin production, as well as hydrogen recovery in petroleum refineries and ammonia synthesis plants, the largest current users of deliberately produced hydrogen. This report describes the results from the development and testing of HTM materials during FY 2009.

  15. Hydrogen separation membranes annual report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-17

    The objective of this work is to develop dense ceramic membranes for separating hydrogen from other gaseous components in a nongalvanic mode, i.e., without using an external power supply or electrical circuitry. The goal of this project is to develop dense hydrogen transport membranes (HTMs) that nongalvanically (i.e., without electrodes or external power supply) separate hydrogen from gas mixtures at commercially significant fluxes under industrially relevant operating conditions. HTMs will be used to separate hydrogen from gas mixtures such as the product streams from coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. Potential ancillary uses of HTMs include dehydrogenation and olefin production, as well as hydrogen recovery in petroleum refineries and ammonia synthesis plants, the largest current users of deliberately produced hydrogen. This report describes progress that was made during Fy 2008 on the development of HTM materials.

  16. Cellulose as Sustainable Materials for Separation Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Benjamin

    2013-03-01

    Polysaccharides, while complex, form one of the most abundant sustainable resources on earth. We want to take advantage of fundamental advances in materials understanding across length and time scales to investigate the interrelationships between structure, morphology, processing, properties, performance, and cost to meet the specific challenges arising from separation membranes for water purification. Non-woven fiber mats have unique properties, such as interconnected pores, a very large surface-to-volume ratio, and a high capacity for surface modifications. The breakthrough concept of combining fibrous mats composed of different fiber diameters for fabricating scaffolds as a unique platform for water purification is presented. Further, we take advantage of recent advances in chemical modifications, structural studies using synchrotron X-rays, and physical scale-up transformations to drastically improve filtration membrane development. Support of this work by the NSF, ONR, NIH and Stony Brook Univ. is gratefully acknowledged. The Chu/Hsiao group on water purification includes Profs. B.S.Hsiao and C.Burger, Drs. H-Y.Ma, D-F.Fang, R.Wang, and grad students: X.Wang, Z. Wang, Y.Su, R. Yang

  17. Materials for next-generation desalination and water purification membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werber, Jay R.; Osuji, Chinedum O.; Elimelech, Menachem

    2016-05-01

    Membrane-based separations for water purification and desalination have been increasingly applied to address the global challenges of water scarcity and the pollution of aquatic environments. However, progress in water purification membranes has been constrained by the inherent limitations of conventional membrane materials. Recent advances in methods for controlling the structure and chemical functionality in polymer films can potentially lead to new classes of membranes for water purification. In this Review, we first discuss the state of the art of existing membrane technologies for water purification and desalination, highlight their inherent limitations and establish the urgent requirements for next-generation membranes. We then describe molecular-level design approaches towards fabricating highly selective membranes, focusing on novel materials such as aquaporin, synthetic nanochannels, graphene and self-assembled block copolymers and small molecules. Finally, we highlight promising membrane surface modification approaches that minimize interfacial interactions and enhance fouling resistance.

  18. Improved Membrane Materials for PEM Fuel Cell Application

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Mauritz; Robert B. Moore

    2008-06-30

    The overall goal of this project is to collect and integrate critical structure/property information in order to develop methods that lead to significant improvements in the durability and performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) materials. This project is focused on the fundamental improvement of PEMFC membrane materials with respect to chemical, mechanical and morphological durability as well as the development of new inorganically-modified membranes.

  19. PERMEABILITY OF POLYMERIC MEMBRANE LINING MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Permeabilities to three gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrogen), water vapor, and five solvents (methanol, acetone, cyclohexane, xylene, and chloroform) are reported for a broad range of commercial polymeric membranes. Gas and water vapor transmission (WVT) data were determ...

  20. Applications of membrane processes for in-process materials recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, B.M.; Thornton, R.F.; Shapiro, A.P.; Freshour, A.R.; El-Shoubary, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Zero discharge of wastes should be the ultimate goal of manufacturers. Waste reduction lowers costs and lessens liability associated with plant effluents. One approach toward this goal is elimination or minimization of wastes by in-process recycling of waste materials. We have examined opportunities for waste minimization for many equipment manufacturing plants and have evaluated membrane processes for in-process recycling. Membrane processes evaluated include vibrating membranes for suspended solid removal, ion exchange membranes for acid recovery, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis for dissolved salt removal, microporous membranes for recycling of machining coolants, oil emulsions, alkaline cleaners and others. This paper presents several examples of evaluations of membrane processes for materials recycling in manufacturing plants. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2011-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  2. Thermal/chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Damle, A.S.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this program is to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are developed to separate gases produced by coal combustion and coal gasification. Membrane materials tested include alumina, vycor, platinum foil, and palladium foils. The porosity, permeability, and characterization of physical and chemical changes after exposure to hot gas streams is described.

  3. Membrane materials based on polyheteroarylenes and their application for pervaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulyalina, A. Yu; Polotskaya, G. A.; Toikka, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the transport properties of membrane materials are topical in connection with the need to solve the fundamental problems and to analyze the applied aspects of the theory of membrane separation processes including, in particular, the development of the energy- and resource-saving, environmentally safe technologies. The aim of the review is to generalize the experimental data on the separation of practically valuable mixtures using membranes based on polyheteroarylenes (thermally stable and mechanically strong polymers). First of all, our analysis covers publications that give a detailed description of the physicochemical properties of the membranes and an interpretation of the specific features of mass transfer during pervaporation of liquid mixtures using membrane materials based on polyheteroarylenes. The dependences of the transport parameters of pervaporation on the process conditions and on the methods for production of membrane materials are discussed. The data presented may be useful for the development of the theory of membrane processes taking into account the chemical nature and physicochemical features of polymeric membrane materials. The bibliography includes 151 references.

  4. Hydrogen separation membranes - annual report for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Song, S. J.; Energy Systems

    2008-01-31

    The objective of this work is to develop dense ceramic membranes for separating hydrogen from other gaseous components in a nongalvanic mode, i.e., without using an external power supply or electrical circuitry.

  5. Minerals yearbook, 1992: Materials recycling. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, A.O.

    1992-01-01

    A large variety of materials are recycled by different sectors of our society. The materials recycling that is mainly addressed in this writing is from waste that is generated after manufacturing and use. Included is recycling that is generally more obvious to the public: the collection, reprocessing, and remanufacture of materials into new products from post-consumer UBC's, scrap metal, glass containers, paper goods, increasingly plastics, as well as rubber tires and other used goods.

  6. Laser vibrometry for investigation of tympanic membrane implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahnert, Thomas; Kuster, Manfred; Vogel, Uwe; Hofmann, Gert; Huettenbrink, Karl-Bernd

    1996-12-01

    The human tympanic membrane has reasonably good sound sensing properties. A destroyed tympanic membrane due to middle ear diseases or traumata may be repaired by different types of grafts. Middle ear surgery mostly uses autologous temporal fascia, cartilage, or cartilage perichondrium transplants. We have investigated the acoustical and mechanical properties of these materials and compared them with human tympanic membrane by constructing an ear canal model completed by an artificial tympanic membrane. Circular stretched human fascia, perichondrium, and cartilage preparations were exposed to static pressures up to 4 kPa and white noise sound pressure levels of 70 dB. The vibrational amplitudes and displacements due to static pressure of the graft material were measured by laser Doppler vibrometry and compared. The thin materials temporal fascia and perichondrium show similar amplitude frequency responses compared to the tympanic membrane for dynamic excitation. The displacement of these materials at static pressures above 4 kPA yields a higher compliance than tympanic membrane. The acoustical and mechanical properties of cartilage transplants change with the thickness of the slices. However, the thinner the cartilage slice combined with lower stability, the more similar is the frequency response with the intact tympanic membrane. The vibration amplitudes decrease more and more for layer thicknesses above 500 micrometers. Cartilage acts as an excellent transplant material which provides a better prognosis than different materials in cases of ventilation disorders with long-term middle ear pressure changes. Large cartilage slice transplants should not exceed layer thicknesses of 500 micrometer in order to prevent drawbacks to the transfer characteristics of the tympanic membrane.

  7. Materials research institute annual report FY98

    SciTech Connect

    Radousky, H

    1999-11-02

    The Materials Research Institute (MRI) is the newest of the University/LLNL Institutes and began operating in March 1997. The MRI is one of five Institutes reporting to the LLNL University Relations Program (URP), all of which have as their primary goal to facilitate university interactions at LLNL. This report covers the period from the opening of the MRI through the end of FY98 (September 30, 1998). The purpose of this report is to emphasize both the science that has been accomplished, as well as the LLNL and university people who were involved. The MRI is concentrating on projects, which highlight and utilize the Laboratory's unique facilities and expertise. Our goal is to enable the best university research to enhance Laboratory programs in the area of cutting-edge materials science. The MRI is focusing on three primary areas of materials research: Biomaterials (organic/inorganic interfaces, biomemetic processes, materials with improved biological response, DNA materials science); Electro/Optical Materials (laser materials and nonlinear optical materials, semiconductor devices, nanostructured materials); and Metals/Organics (equation of state of metals, synthesis of unique materials, high explosives/polymers). In particular we are supporting projects that will enable the MRI to begin to make a distinctive name for itself within the scientific community and will develop techniques applicable to LLNL's core mission. This report is organized along the lines of these three topic areas. A fundamental goal of the MRI is to nucleate discussion and interaction between Lab and university researchers, and among Lab researchers from different LLNL Directorates. This is accomplished through our weekly seminar series, special seminar series such as Biomaterials and Applications of High Pressure Science, conferences and workshops, our extensive visitors program and MRI lunches. We are especially pleased to have housed five graduate students who are performing their thesis

  8. Geothermal Materials Development, Annual Report FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored full cost'' recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

  9. Geothermal Materials Development. Annual report FY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1991-12-01

    Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored ``full cost`` recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R&D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

  10. High Temperature Materials Laboratory third annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1990-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its third year of operation as a designated DOE User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 88 nonproprietary agreements (40 university and 48 industry) and 20 proprietary agreements (1 university, 19 industry) are now in effect. Sixty-eight nonproprietary research proposals (39 from university, 28 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and 8 proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1990 are summarized.

  11. Annual report, Materials Science Branch, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, S.

    1993-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Materials Science Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid State Theory, Solid State Spectroscopy, and Program Management. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  12. Two-dimensional materials for novel liquid separation membranes.

    PubMed

    Ying, Yulong; Yang, Yefeng; Ying, Wen; Peng, Xinsheng

    2016-08-19

    Demand for a perfect molecular-level separation membrane with ultrafast permeation and a robust mechanical property for any kind of species to be blocked in water purification and desalination is urgent. In recent years, due to their intrinsic characteristics, such as a unique mono-atom thick structure, outstanding mechanical strength and excellent flexibility, as well as facile and large-scale production, graphene and its large family of two-dimensional (2D) materials are regarded as ideal membrane materials for ultrafast molecular separation. A perfect separation membrane should be as thin as possible to maximize its flux, mechanically robust and without failure even if under high loading pressure, and have a narrow nanochannel size distribution to guarantee its selectivity. The latest breakthrough in 2D material-based membranes will be reviewed both in theories and experiments, including their current state-of-the-art fabrication, structure design, simulation and applications. Special attention will be focused on the designs and strategies employed to control microstructures to enhance permeation and selectivity for liquid separation. In addition, critical views on the separation mechanism within two-dimensional material-based membranes will be provided based on a discussion of the effects of intrinsic defects during growth, predefined nanopores and nanochannels during subsequent fabrication processes, the interlayer spacing of stacking 2D material flakes and the surface charge or functional groups. Furthermore, we will summarize the significant progress of these 2D material-based membranes for liquid separation in nanofiltration/ultrafiltration and pervaporation. Lastly, we will recall issues requiring attention, and discuss existing questionable conclusions in some articles and emerging challenges. This review will serve as a valuable platform to provide a compact source of relevant and timely information about the development of 2D material-based membranes as

  13. Two-dimensional materials for novel liquid separation membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Yulong; Yang, Yefeng; Ying, Wen; Peng, Xinsheng

    2016-08-01

    Demand for a perfect molecular-level separation membrane with ultrafast permeation and a robust mechanical property for any kind of species to be blocked in water purification and desalination is urgent. In recent years, due to their intrinsic characteristics, such as a unique mono-atom thick structure, outstanding mechanical strength and excellent flexibility, as well as facile and large-scale production, graphene and its large family of two-dimensional (2D) materials are regarded as ideal membrane materials for ultrafast molecular separation. A perfect separation membrane should be as thin as possible to maximize its flux, mechanically robust and without failure even if under high loading pressure, and have a narrow nanochannel size distribution to guarantee its selectivity. The latest breakthrough in 2D material-based membranes will be reviewed both in theories and experiments, including their current state-of-the-art fabrication, structure design, simulation and applications. Special attention will be focused on the designs and strategies employed to control microstructures to enhance permeation and selectivity for liquid separation. In addition, critical views on the separation mechanism within two-dimensional material-based membranes will be provided based on a discussion of the effects of intrinsic defects during growth, predefined nanopores and nanochannels during subsequent fabrication processes, the interlayer spacing of stacking 2D material flakes and the surface charge or functional groups. Furthermore, we will summarize the significant progress of these 2D material-based membranes for liquid separation in nanofiltration/ultrafiltration and pervaporation. Lastly, we will recall issues requiring attention, and discuss existing questionable conclusions in some articles and emerging challenges. This review will serve as a valuable platform to provide a compact source of relevant and timely information about the development of 2D material-based membranes as

  14. ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS TO PD MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PURIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; T. Adams

    2008-09-12

    Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate two different classes of materials for potential replacement of conventional Pd-alloy purification/diffuser membranes. Crystalline V-Ni-Ti and Amorphous Fe- and Co-based metallic glass alloys have been evaluated using gaseous hydrogen permeation testing techniques.

  15. ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS TO PD MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PURIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T; Paul Korinko, P

    2007-11-13

    Development of advanced hydrogen separation membranes in support of hydrogen production processes such as coal gasification and as front end gas purifiers for fuel cell based system is paramount to the successful implementation of a national hydrogen economy. Current generation metallic hydrogen separation membranes are based on Pd-alloys. Although the technology has proven successful, at issue is the high cost of palladium. Evaluation of non-noble metal based dense metallic separation membranes is currently receiving national and international attention. The focal point of the reported work was to evaluate two different classes of materials for potential replacement of conventional Pd-alloy purification/diffuser membranes. Crystalline V-Ni-Ti and Amorphous Fe- and Co-based metallic glass alloys have been evaluated using both electrochemical and gaseous hydrogen permeation testing techniques..

  16. Minerals yearbook, 1991: Nonrenewable organic materials. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, M.R.; Kelly, T.D.

    1993-05-01

    Mrs. Simmons, industrial program manager with the Branch of Materials of the U.S. Bureau of Mines, directs work in the analysis of the petroleum, petrochemical, and plastic industries as related to the application of nonrenewable organic materials in major industrial sectors. Mr. Kelly, materials specialist in the Materials Engineering Group at the Minerals Availability Office of the U.S. Bureau of Mines, has over 6 years of experience in the petroleum industry. Some of the data were prepared by John Sznopeke, materials specialist in the Materials Engineering Group at the Minerals Availability Field Office. The data were obtained from a variety of sources, including the Annual Energy Review 1991 from the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy; the Department of Commerce; and a wide variety of industry contacts.

  17. Membranes for Periodontal Regeneration--A Materials Perspective.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Marco C; Thomas, Vinoy

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting nearly 50% of adults in the United States. If left untreated, it can lead to the destruction of both soft and mineralized tissues that constitute the periodontium. Clinical management, including but not limited to flap debridement and/or curettage, as well as regenerative-based strategies with periodontal membranes associated or not with grafting materials, has been used with distinct levels of success. Unquestionably, no single implantable biomaterial can consistently guide the coordinated growth and development of multiple tissue types, especially in very large periodontal defects. With the global aging population, it is extremely important to find novel biomaterials, particularly bioactive membranes and/or scaffolds, for guided tissue (GTR) and bone regeneration (GBR) to aid in the reestablishment of the health and function of distinct periodontal tissues. This chapter offers an update on the evolution of biomaterials (i.e. membranes and bioactive scaffolds) as well as material-based strategies applied in periodontal regeneration. The authors start by providing a brief summary of the histological characteristics and functions of the periodontium and its main pathological condition, namely periodontitis. Next, a review of commercially available GTR/GBR membranes is given, followed by a critical appraisal of the most recent advances in the development of bioactive materials that enhance the chance for clinical success of periodontal tissue regeneration. PMID:26201279

  18. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1978

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Benkovitz, C.

    1981-03-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commerical light water reactors during 1978 have been compiled and reported. Data on soild waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1978 release data are compared with previous years releases in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  19. Graphene-based structure, method of suspending graphene membrane, and method of depositing material onto graphene membrane

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K.; Meyer, Jannik Christian

    2013-04-02

    An embodiment of a method of suspending a graphene membrane across a gap in a support structure includes attaching graphene to a substrate. A pre-fabricated support structure having the gap is attached to the graphene. The graphene and the pre-fabricated support structure are then separated from the substrate which leaves the graphene membrane suspended across the gap in the pre-fabricated support structure. An embodiment of a method of depositing material includes placing a support structure having a graphene membrane suspended across a gap under vacuum. A precursor is adsorbed to a surface of the graphene membrane. A portion of the graphene membrane is exposed to a focused electron beam which deposits a material from the precursor onto the graphene membrane. An embodiment of a graphene-based structure includes a support structure having a gap, a graphene membrane suspended across the gap, and a material deposited in a pattern on the graphene membrane.

  20. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a literature review to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Several impurities, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and trace metal compounds are generated during coal conversion, and they must be removed from the coal gas or the combustor flue gas to meet environmental standards. The use of membranes to separate these noxious gases is an attractive alternative to their removal by sorbents such as zinc titanate or calcium oxide. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting investigations to develop inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen from coal gas streams and noxious impurities from hot coal- and flue-gas streams. Membrane materials that have been investigated in the past include glass (silica), alumina, zirconia, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt).

  1. Proceedings of the fourth annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Braski, D.N.

    1990-08-01

    The Fourth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on may 15--17, 1990. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) Ceramics, (2) New Alloys, (3) Corrosion and Erosion, and (4) Technology Assessment and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  2. Selection and Manufacturing of Membrane Materials for Solar Sails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Seaman, Shane T.; Wilkie, W. Keats; Miyaucchi, Masahiko; Working, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Commercial metallized polyimide or polyester films and hand-assembly techniques are acceptable for small solar sail technology demonstrations, although scaling this approach to large sail areas is impractical. Opportunities now exist to use new polymeric materials specifically designed for solar sailing applications, and take advantage of integrated sail manufacturing to enable large-scale solar sail construction. This approach has, in part, been demonstrated on the JAXA IKAROS solar sail demonstrator, and NASA Langley Research Center is now developing capabilities to produce ultrathin membranes for solar sails by integrating resin synthesis with film forming and sail manufacturing processes. This paper will discuss the selection and development of polymer material systems for space, and these new processes for producing ultrathin high-performance solar sail membrane films.

  3. Block copolymers for alkaline fuel cell membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yifan

    Alkaline fuel cells (AFCs) using anion exchange membranes (AEMs) as electrolyte have recently received considerable attention. AFCs offer some advantages over proton exchange membrane fuel cells, including the potential of non-noble metal (e.g. nickel, silver) catalyst on the cathode, which can dramatically lower the fuel cell cost. The main drawback of traditional AFCs is the use of liquid electrolyte (e.g. aqueous potassium hydroxide), which can result in the formation of carbonate precipitates by reaction with carbon dioxide. AEMs with tethered cations can overcome the precipitates formed in traditional AFCs. Our current research focuses on developing different polymer systems (blend, block, grafted, and crosslinked polymers) in order to understand alkaline fuel cell membrane in many aspects and design optimized anion exchange membranes with better alkaline stability, mechanical integrity and ionic conductivity. A number of distinct materials have been produced and characterized. A polymer blend system comprised of poly(vinylbenzyl chloride)-b-polystyrene (PVBC-b-PS) diblock copolymer, prepared by nitroxide mediated polymerization (NMP), with poly(2,6-dimethyl-1,4-phenylene oxide) (PPO) or brominated PPO was studied for conversion into a blend membrane for AEM. The formation of a miscible blend matrix improved mechanical properties while maintaining high ionic conductivity through formation of phase separated ionic domains. Using anionic polymerization, a polyethylene based block copolymer was designed where the polyethylene-based block copolymer formed bicontinuous morphological structures to enhance the hydroxide conductivity (up to 94 mS/cm at 80 °C) while excellent mechanical properties (strain up to 205%) of the polyethylene block copolymer membrane was observed. A polymer system was designed and characterized with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG) as a hydrophilic polymer grafted through substitution of pendent benzyl chloride groups of a PVBC

  4. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  5. Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W.

    1989-12-31

    This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

  6. Proceedings of the fifth annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1991-09-01

    The Fifth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on May 14--16, 1991. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the Program has been decentralized to the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as the technical support contractor. The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by a substantial number of researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) Ceramics, (2) New Alloys, (3) Corrosion and Erosion, and (4) Technology Assessment and Technology Transfer. This conference is held every year to review the work on all of the projects of the Program. The agenda for the meeting is given in Appendix A, and a list of attendees is presented in Appendix B.

  7. Proceedings of the sixth annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-07-01

    The Sixth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on May 12--14, 1992. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the Program has been decentralized to the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as the technical support contractor. The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by a substantial number of researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) ceramics, (2) development and corrosion resistance of iron aluminide, advanced austenitic and chromium-niobium alloys, and (3) technology assessment and technology transfer. This conference is held each year to review the work on all of the projects of the Program. The agenda for the meeting is given in Appendix A, and a list of attendees is presented in Appendix B. ASM International cosponsored the conference, for which we are especially grateful.

  8. Mass Transport in Nanocomposite Materials for Membrane Separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galizia, Michele; Puccini, Ilaria; Messori, Massimo; Grazia De Angelis, Maria; Sarti, Giulio C.

    2010-06-01

    The vapor transport properties of nanocomposite materials obtained with different techniques and based on a high free volume glassy polymer suitable for membrane separations, poly[1-(trimethylsilyl)-1-propyne] (PTMSP), have been determined and modeled. The simple mixing in solution of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles with PTMSP leads to mixed matrix membranes, which show higher free volume and higher values of diffusivity and permeability than the pure polymeric material. If a sol-gel route is followed, with PTMSP and Tetraethoxysylane (TEOS) as precursor of the silica phase, one obtains hybrid matrices characterized by lower vapor diffusion and sorption values with respect to the pure polymer. Although the trends observed are very regular functions of the silica content in the composite, none of the behavior observed obeys traditional models for composites permeability, such as the Maxwell's one. Both types of behaviors were modeled considering the variation of polymer fractional free volume induced by the inorganic phase: in the mixed matrices the poor interactions between silica and polymer chains favor the formation of nanovoids at the interface, increasing the free volume and the vapor diffusivity, while in the more interconnected hybrid matrices the inorganic domains act as constraints, reducing the volume occupied by the polymeric phase, which is naturally endowed with a very high excess free volume.

  9. Proton dynamics in sulfonated ionic salt composites: Alternative membrane materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Almeida, N. E.; Goward, G. R.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrated Nafion, the most prevalent proton exchange membrane utilizes a vehicular mechanism for proton conduction. However, there is an increasing need for such membranes to perform under anhydrous conditions, at high temperatures, which would employ a structural transport mechanism for proton conductivity. Here, several solid-acids are characterized, both as pristine salts, and as polymer composites. Materials of interest include benzimidazolium methanesulfonate (BMSA), imidazolium methanesulfonate (IMSA), and imidazolium trifluoromethanesulfate (IFMS). The proton dynamics of these solid acids are characterized as pure salts, and as composites, embedded into porous Teflon, by solid state NMR. It was determined that spin lattice (T1) relaxation of the composites are systematically lower than that of the pure salt, indicating that local dynamics are enhanced in the composites. Spin-spin relaxation (T2∗) was measured as a function of temperature to determine the activation energy for local mobility for each salt and composite. The activation energy for local proton mobility in each salt decreased after being inserted into porous Teflon. Finally, the long-range ion transport was characterized using impedance spectroscopy. The IFMS-Teflon composite possessed the lowest activation energy for local proton mobility, the highest thermal stability, and the most favorable proton conductivity, among the investigated materials.

  10. Nuclear materials 1993 annual report. Volume 8, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1993. The report is published in two parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1993 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Note that the subtitle of No. 2 has been changed from ``Nonreactors`` to ``Nuclear Materials.`` Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1993.

  11. Chemistry and Materials Science 2004 Annual Report, Preview Edition

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, S; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Rennie, G

    2005-05-16

    Thriving from change is a constant element at LLNL. Through our commitment to scientific accomplishments, we have met the challenges posed by our evolving missions in 2004. It is the scientific breakthroughs that substantiate our strategic directions. Investments based on our strategic directions are bearing fruit, as illustrated in this preview of the 2004 Annual Report. We describe how our science is built around a strategic plan with four organizing themes: {sm_bullet} Materials properties and performance under extreme conditions {sm_bullet} Chemistry under extreme conditions and chemical engineering in support of national-security programs {sm_bullet} Science supporting national objectives at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology {sm_bullet} Applied nuclear science for human health and national security We are particularly pleased with achievements within the 'intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology,' an emerging area of science that may reshape the landscape of our national-security mission. CMS continues to have an unambiguous role both as a technology leader and as a partner for all of the four theme areas. We look forward to expanding the frontiers of science and continuing our partnership with the worldwide scientific community, as we firmly respond to the changing environment with agility and flexibility.

  12. Feed Materials Production Center annual environmental report for calendar 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, T.A.; Gels, G.L.; Oberjohn, J.S.; Rogers, L.K.

    1990-10-01

    The mission of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) has been to process uranium for United States' defense programs. On July 10, 1989, the FMPC suspended production operations, but remains on standby for certain segments of production. The FMPC also manages the storage of some radioactive and hazardous materials. As part of its operations, the FMPC continuously monitors the environment to determine that it is operating within federal and state standards and guidelines regarding emission of radioactive and nonradioactive materials. Data collected from the FMPC monitoring program are used to calculate estimates of radiation dose for residents due to FMPC operations. For 1989, the estimate of dose through the air pathway, excluding radon, indicated that people in the area were exposed to less than 6% of the DOE guideline established to protect the public from radiation exposure. When radon emissions are included, the dose from FMPC operations during 1989 was less than 22% of the annual background radiation dose in the Greater Cincinnati area. This report is a summary of FMPC's environmental activities and monitoring program for 1989. An Environmental Compliance Self-Assessment presents the FMPC's efforts to comply with environmental regulations through June 1990. 44 refs., 48 figs.

  13. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

    2006-08-08

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  14. Advanced biomolecular materials based on membrane-protein/polymer complexation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.S.; Nowak, A.; Safinya, C.

    1998-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project was to apply neutron reflectometry and atomic force microscopy to the study of lipid membranes containing proteins. Standard sample preparation techniques were used to produce thin films of these materials appropriate for these techniques. However, these films were not stable, and a new sample preparation technique was required. Toward this goal, the authors have developed a new capability to produce large, freely suspended films of lipid multi-bilayers appropriate for these studies. This system includes a controlled temperature/humidity oven in which the films 5-cm x 5-cm are remotely drawn. The first neutron scattering experiments were then performed using this oven.

  15. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate Annual Report 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz de la Rubia, T; Shang, S P; Kitrinos, G A; Fluss, M; Westbrook, C; Rennie, G

    2004-04-21

    Evolving challenges and solid accomplishments define the year 2003 for us. Our scientific breakthroughs validate our strategic directions and reaffirm our critical role in fulfilling the Laboratory's missions. Our growth continues in new research projects and significant new programmatic support. Our mission is clear: to enable the Laboratory to accomplish its primary mission through excellence in the chemical and materials sciences. The directorate's common theme and determination has remained constant: Deliver on our commitments, while anticipating and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. In this, the 2003 Annual Report, we describe how our science is built around a strategic plan with four organizing themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Our strategic plan is synergistic with the Laboratory's Long-Range Science and Technology Plan, which identifies six areas of institutional research and development strategy. This 2003 CMS Annual Report is organized into two major sections: research themes and dynamic teams. The research-theme section addresses challenges, achievements, and new frontiers within each of the four research themes. The dynamic-teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that supports a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with the institutional strategy. Our organizational structure offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, an environment that attracts and retains the best and the brightest from across the Laboratory and around the world.

  16. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual Technical Report, Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2001-07-31

    The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee Annual Report (attached, DOE/SC-0040) provides an annual summary of non-classified materials-related research programs supported by various elements within the Department of Energy. The EMaCC Annual Report is a useful working tool for project managers who want to know what is happening in other divisions, and it provides a guide for persons in industry and academia to the materials program within the Department. The major task of EMaCC this year was to make the Annual Report a more user-friendly document by removing redundant program information and shortening the project summaries.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF MESOPOROUS MEMBRANE MATERIALS FOR CO2 SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Heng Shih; Tejas Patil; Qiang Zhao

    2003-03-25

    The huge emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel fired power plants and industrial plants over the last century have resulted in an increase of the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. Climatological modeling work has predicted severe climate disruption as a result of the trapping of heat due to CO{sub 2}. As an attempt to address this global warming effect, DOE has initiated the Vision 21 concept for future power plants. We first synthesized mesoporous aluminosilicates that have high surface area and parallel pore channels for membrane support materials. Later we synthesized microporous aluminosilicates as the potential thin membrane materials for selective CO{sub 2} adsorption. The pore size is controlled to be less that 1 nm so that the adsorption of CO{sub 2} on the pore wall will block the passage of N{sub 2}. Mesoporous and precipitated alumina were synthesized as the base material for CO{sub 2} adsorbent. The porous alumina is doped with Ba to enhance its CO{sub 2} affinity due to the basicity of Ba. It is shown by gas chromatograph (GC) that the addition of Ba enhances the separation CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}. It was found that mesoporous alumina has larger specific surface area and better selectivity of CO{sub 2} than precipitated alumina. Ba improves the affinity of mesoporous alumina with CO{sub 2}. Phase may play an important role in selective adsorption of CO{sub 2}. It is speculated that mesoporous alumina is more reactive than precipitated alumina creating the xBaO {center_dot}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase that may be more affinitive to CO{sub 2} than N{sub 2}. On the other hand, the barium aluminates phase (Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}) in the mesoporous sample does not help the adsorption of CO{sub 2}. Microporous aluminosilicate was chosen as a suitable candidate for CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation because the pore size is less than 10 {angstrom}. If a CO{sub 2} adsorbent is added to the microporous silica, the adsorption of CO{sub 2} can block the

  18. High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program: 19th Annual Report, October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, Arvid

    2007-08-01

    Annual Report contains overview of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program and includes selected highlights of user activities for FY2006. Report is submitted to individuals within sponsoring DOE agency and to other interested individuals.

  19. Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  20. FY2009 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2010-01-16

    The Propulsion Materials program focuses on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines. Projects within the Propulsion Materials Program address materials concerns that directly impact the critical technical barriers in each of these programs—barriers such as fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, and reduced manufacturing costs.

  1. Mixed anion materials and compounds for novel proton conducting membranes

    DOEpatents

    Poling, Steven Andrew; Nelson, Carly R.; Martin, Steve W.

    2006-09-05

    The present invention provides new amorphous or partially crystalline mixed anion chalcogenide compounds for use in proton exchange membranes which are able to operate over a wide variety of temperature ranges, including in the intermediate temperature range of about 100 .degree. C. to 300.degree. C., and new uses for crystalline mixed anion chalcogenide compounds in such proton exchange membranes. In one embodiment, the proton conductivity of the compounds is between about 10.sup.-8 S/cm and 10.sup.-1 S/cm within a temperature range of between about -60 and 300.degree. C. and a relative humidity of less than about 12%..

  2. Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization.

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, E.; Dranow, D.; Laible, P. D.; Christensen, J.; Nollert, P.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization of membrane proteins in amphiphile-rich materials such as lipidic cubic phases is an established methodology in many structural biology laboratories. The standard procedure employed with this methodology requires the generation of a highly viscous lipidic material by mixing lipid, for instance monoolein, with a solution of the detergent solubilized membrane protein. This preparation is often carried out with specialized mixing tools that allow handling of the highly viscous materials while minimizing dead volume to save precious membrane protein sample. The processes that occur during the initial mixing of the lipid with the membrane protein are not well understood. Here we show that the formation of the lipidic phases and the incorporation of the membrane protein into such materials can be separated experimentally. Specifically, we have investigated the effect of different initial monoolein-based lipid phase states on the crystallization behavior of the colored photosynthetic reaction center from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We find that the detergent solubilized photosynthetic reaction center spontaneously inserts into and concentrates in the lipid matrix without any mixing, and that the initial lipid material phase state is irrelevant for productive crystallization. A substantial in-situ enrichment of the membrane protein to concentration levels that are otherwise unobtainable occurs in a thin layer on the surface of the lipidic material. These results have important practical applications and hence we suggest a simplified protocol for membrane protein crystallization within amphiphile rich materials, eliminating any specialized mixing tools to prepare crystallization experiments within lipidic cubic phases. Furthermore, by virtue of sampling a membrane protein concentration gradient within a single crystallization experiment, this crystallization technique is more robust and increases the efficiency of identifying productive crystallization

  3. FY2008 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2009-01-01

    This program focuses on enabling and innovative materials technologies that are critical in improving the efficiency of advanced engines providing enabling materials support for combustion, hybrid, and power electronics development.

  4. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Patrick B.; Schutte, Carol L.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Materials Technology actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of the Vehicle Technologies Program by developing advanced materials that enable development of higher efficiency powertrains for ground transportation. Propulsion Materials works closely with the other disciplines within the VT Program to identify the materials properties essential for the development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light duty powertrains.

  5. ABSTRACTS: Seventh annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    Objective of the Advanced Research and Technology Development materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications (coal processing, coal liquefaction, gasification, heat engines and recovery, combustion systems, fuel cells). Research is aimed at better understanding of materials in fossil energy environments and development of new materials for improvement of plant operations and reliability. Abstracts are given of 37 papers on ceramics/composites, intermetallics (iron aluminides, etc.), and advanced austenitics. (DLC)

  6. ABSTRACTS: Seventh annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    Objective of the Advanced Research and Technology Development materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications (coal processing, coal liquefaction, gasification, heat engines and recovery, combustion systems, fuel cells). Research is aimed at better understanding of materials in fossil energy environments and development of new materials for improvement of plant operations and reliability. Abstracts are given of 37 papers on ceramics/composites, intermetallics (iron aluminides, etc.), and advanced austenitics. (DLC)

  7. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Searcy, A.W.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

    1984-07-01

    Progress is reported in the following fields: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid-state physics, materials chemistry), chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques), actinide chemistry, fossil energy, electrochemical energy storage systems, superconducting magnets, semiconductor materials and devices, and work for others. (DLC)

  8. Trusted materials using orthogonal testing. 2015 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to prove (or disprove) that a reasonable number of simple tests can be used to provide a unique data signature for materials, changes in which could serve as a harbinger of material deviation, prompting further evaluations. The routine tests are mutually orthogonal to any currently required materials specification tests.

  9. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee, fiscal year 1997. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-07-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1997 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  10. Proceedings of the eleventh annual conference on fossil energy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. These proceedings contain 34 papers organized under the following topical sections: Ceramic composites and functional materials; Ceramics, new alloys, and functional materials; and New alloys. Also included is a summary of a workshop on materials issues in low emission boilers and in high efficiency coal-fired cycles. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1995-05-01

    SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

  12. Thermal/chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurgo, A.; Wood, B.J.

    1993-09-01

    The specific objectives of this program are to (1) identify and evaluate long-term degradation mechanisms for inorganic membranes exposed to hot coal gasification and combustion gas streams using data from the existing literature, (2) quantify the extent of the degradation process for the most serious mechanisms by performing experiments under laboratory-scale conditions, and (3) develop a predictive model that allows estimation of membrane degradation under operating conditions. To achieve the above objectives, the program is divided into the following tasks: (1) Development of evaluation methodology; (2) evaluation of potential long-term degradation mechanism; (3) submission of a topical report and a plan for experimental testing; (4) experimental testing; and (5) model development. Tasks 4 and 5 are separate options that may be exercised by the US Department of Energy at the conclusion of Task 3. Accomplishments are presented for Tasks 1, 2 and 3.

  13. Membrane materials for addressing energy and environmental challenges.

    PubMed

    Drioli, Enrico; Fontananova, Enrica

    2012-01-01

    Our modern society must solve various severe problems to maintain and increase our quality of life: from water stress to global warming, to fossil fuel depletion, to environmental pollution. The process intensification (PI) strategy is expected to contribute to overcoming many of these issues by facilitating the transition from a resource-intensive to a knowledge-intensive industrial system that will guarantee sustainable growth. Membrane operations, which respond efficiently to the requirements of the PI strategy, have the potential to replace conventional energy-intensive separation techniques, which will boost the efficiency and reduce the environmental impact of separations as well as conversion processes. This work critically reviews the current status and emerging applications of (integrated) membrane operations with a special focus on energy and environmental applications. PMID:22483262

  14. FY2014 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2015-05-01

    The Propulsion Materials Program actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of VTO by investigating and identifying the materials properties that are most essential for continued development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light-duty powertrains. The technical approaches available to enhance propulsion systems focus on improvements in both vehicle efficiency and fuel substitution, both of which must overcome the performance limitations of the materials currently in use. Propulsion Materials Program activities work with national laboratories, industry experts, and VTO powertrain systems (e.g., Advanced Combustion Engines [ACE], Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines [APEEM], and fuels) teams to develop strategies that overcome materials limitations in future powertrain performance. The technical maturity of the portfolio of funded projects ranges from basic science to subsystem prototype validation. Projects within a Propulsion Materials Program activity address materials concerns that directly impact critical technology barriers within each of the above programs, including barriers that impact fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, improved reliability, and reduced manufacturing costs. The program engages only the barriers that result from material property limitations and represent fundamental, high-risk materials issues.

  15. Advanced Industrial Materials Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Stooksbury, F.

    1994-06-01

    Mission of the AIM program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDAs. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

  16. FY2010 Annual Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-01-15

    The Lightweight Materials activity (LM) within the Vehicle Technologies Program focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  17. FY2013 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Vehicle Technologies Program (VTO), the Lightweight Materials (LM) activity focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce light and heavy duty vehicle weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost.

  18. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management.

  19. FY2014 Lightweight Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    The Lightweight Materials research and development (R&D) area within the DOE Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) provides support and guidance for many cutting-edge automotive technologies under development. Research focuses on addressing critical barriers to commercializing lightweight materials for passenger and commercial vehicles.

  20. Proceedings of the 4th Annual Workshop: Advances in Smart Materials for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, Robin C. (Editor); Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the Fourth Annual Conference on Advances in Smart Materials for Aerospace Applications was to provide a forum for technical dialogue on numerous topics in the area of smart materials. The proceedings presented herein represent the technical contributions of the participants of the workshop. Topics addressed include shape memory alloys, ferroelectrics, fiber optics, finite element simulation, and active control.

  1. Membrane materials for storing biological samples intended for comparative nanotoxicological testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    The study is aimed at identifying the samples of most promising membrane materials for storing dry specimens of biological fluids (Dried Blood Spots, DBS technology). Existing sampling systems using cellulose fiber filter paper have a number of drawbacks such as uneven distribution of the sample spot, dependence of the spot spreading area on the individual biosample properties, incomplete washing-off of the sample due to partially inconvertible sorption of blood components on cellulose fibers, etc. Samples of membrane materials based on cellulose, polymers and glass fiber with applied biosamples were studied using methods of scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy and surface-wetting measurement. It was discovered that cellulose-based membrane materials sorb components of biological fluids inside their structure, while membranes based on glass fiber display almost no interaction with the samples and biological fluid components dry to films in the membrane pores between the structural fibers. This characteristic, together with the fact that membrane materials based on glass fiber possess sufficient strength, high wetting properties and good storage capacity, attests them as promising material for dry samples of biological fluids storage systems.

  2. Uniaxial and biaxial tensioning effects on thin membrane materials. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinson, W. F.; Goslee, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    Thin laminated membranes are being considered for various surface applications on future large space structural systems. Some of the thin membranes would be stretched across or between structural members with the requirement that the membrane be maintained within specified limits of smoothness which would be dictated by the particular applications such as antenna reflector requirements. The multiaxial tensile force required to maintain the smoothness in the membrane needs to be determined for use in the structure design. Therefore, several types of thicknesses of thin membrane materials have been subjected to varied levels of uniaxial and biaxial tensile loads. During the biaxial tests, deviations of the material surface smoothness were measured by a noncontacting capacitance probe. Basic materials consisted of composites of vacuum deposited aluminum on Mylar and Kapton ranging in thickness from 0.00025 in (0.000635 cm) to 0.002 in (0.00508 cm). Some of the material was reinforced with Kevlar and Nomex scrim. The uniaxial tests determined the material elongation and tensile forces up to ultimate conditions. Biaxial tests indicated that a relatively smooth material surface could be achieved with tensile force of approximately 1 to 15 Newtons per centimeter, depending upon the material thickness and/or reinforcement.

  3. Hydration induced material transfer in membranes of osmotic pump tablets measured by synchrotron radiation based FTIR.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Yin, Xianzhen; Guo, Zhen; Tong, Yajun; Feng, Jing; York, Peter; Xiao, Tiqiao; Chen, Min; Gu, Jingkai; Zhang, Jiwen

    2016-03-10

    Osmotic pump tablets are reliable oral controlled drug delivery systems based on their semipermeable membrane coating. This research used synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) microspectroscopy and imaging to investigate the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets. SR-FTIR was applied to record and map the chemical information of a micro-region of the membranes, composed of cellulose acetate (CA, as the water insoluble matrix) and polyethylene glycol (PEG, as the soluble pore forming agent and plasticizing agent). The microstructure and chemical change of membranes hydrated for 0, 5, 10 and 30min were measured using SR-FTIR, combined with scanning electronic microscopy and atom force microscopy. The SR-FTIR microspectroscopy results indicated that there was a major change at the absorption range of 2700-3100cm(-1) in the membranes after different periods of hydration time. The absorption bands at 2870-2880cm(-1) and 2950-2960cm(-1) were assigned to represent CA and PEG, respectively. The chemical group signal distribution illustrated by the ratio of PEG to CA demonstrated that the trigger of drug release in the preliminary stage was due to the rapid transfer of PEG into liquid medium with a sharp decrease of PEG in the membranes. The SR-FTIR mapping results have demonstrated the hydration induced material transfer in the membranes of osmotic pump tablets and enabled reassessment of the drug release mechanism of membrane controlled osmotic pump systems. PMID:26802550

  4. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  5. Proceedings of the Eight Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1994-08-01

    Objective of the meeting was to conduct R and D on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The work is divided into ceramics, new alloys, corrosion, and technology assessment/transfer. The 39 papers are arranged under the session headings: ceramics, ceramics and new alloys, and intermetallics and advanced austenitics; a workshop on new materials development and applications is summarized briefly. The papers are processed separately for the data base.

  6. Chemistry and Materials Science, 1990--1991. [Second annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, T.T.; Bruner, J.M.; McElroy, L.A.

    1991-12-31

    This 2-year (FY 1990-91) contains 49 technical articles in ten sections: research sampler, metals and alloys, energetic materials, chemistry and physics of advanced materials, bonding and reactions at surfaces and interfaces, superconductivity, energy R and D, waste processing and management, characterization and analysis, and facilities and instrumentation. Two more sections list department personnel, their publications etc., consultants, and summary of department budgets. The articles are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

  7. Imidazolium-Based Polymeric Materials as Alkaline Anion-Exchange Fuel Cell Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayan, Sri R.; Yen, Shiao-Ping S.; Reddy, Prakash V.; Nair, Nanditha

    2012-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membranes that conduct hydroxide ions have potential use in fuel cells. A variety of polystyrene-based quaternary ammonium hydroxides have been reported as anion exchange fuel cell membranes. However, the hydrolytic stability and conductivity of the commercially available membranes are not adequate to meet the requirements of fuel cell applications. When compared with commercially available membranes, polystyrene-imidazolium alkaline membrane electrolytes are more stable and more highly conducting. At the time of this reporting, this has been the first such usage for imidazolium-based polymeric materials for fuel cells. Imidazolium salts are known to be electrochemically stable over wide potential ranges. By controlling the relative ratio of imidazolium groups in polystyrene-imidazolium salts, their physiochemical properties could be modulated. Alkaline anion exchange membranes based on polystyrene-imidazolium hydroxide materials have been developed. The first step was to synthesize the poly(styrene-co-(1-((4-vinyl)methyl)-3- methylimidazolium) chloride through a free-radical polymerization. Casting of this material followed by in situ treatment of the membranes with sodium hydroxide solutions provided the corresponding hydroxide salts. Various ratios of the monomers 4-chloromoethylvinylbenzine (CMVB) and vinylbenzine (VB) provided various compositions of the polymer. The preferred material, due to the relative ease of casting the film, and its relatively low hygroscopic nature, was a 2:1 ratio of CMVB to VB. Testing confirmed that at room temperature, the new membranes outperformed commercially available membranes by a large margin. With fuel cells now in use at NASA and in transportation, and with defense potential, any improvement to fuel cell efficiency is a significant development.

  8. Interfacial and Mechanical Characterization of Soft Materials Using Polymer Membranes Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laprade, Evan J.

    Polymer membranes have found their way in to a wide range of applications including selective barriers, protective coatings, packaging, sensors, and medical implants, becom- ing more pervasive in our lives every day. Their importance is derived not only from their unique mechanical and interfacial properties, but also from the versatility of their geometry. In this thesis, several polymer membrane geometries are employed to interfacially and mechanically characterize the properties of soft materials and polymer thin films. This thesis is organized in to two sections, the first deals with interfacial characterization using a membrane contact geometry. The centerpiece of this section, and this thesis, was the development of a sensitive membrane peel test to measure adhesion. A model membrane-contact system was used to evaluate an analytical model of large deformation contact and ultimately develop a simple protocol for measuring an adhesion energy using a membrane peel geometry. A second investigation in the section looked at the multiple harmonic behavior of quartz crystal resonators during contact mechanics experiments. An analytical solution to the radial mass sensitivity function was calculated and compared to experimentally measured sensitivity profiles from growing water drop and membrane contact experiments. The second half of this thesis deals with non-contact membrane geometries for mechanically characterizing two novel polymer membranes. The first is a highly water permeable sulfonated pentablock copolymer, designed for water purification applications. In this work these membranes were mechanically characterized with a biaxial creep test to investigate the affect of sulfonation level and processing conditions on their deformation behavior. Lastly pendant drop membranes were fabricated by ionically crosslinking amphiphilic gradient copolymers at an oil/water interface. These robust, self healing membranes were modeled with both an elastic and liquid

  9. Characterization of commercial proton exchange membrane materials after exposure to beta and gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, S.N.; Carson, R.; Muirhead, C.; Li, H.; Castillo, I.; Boniface, H.; Suppiah, S.; Ratnayake, A.; Robinson, J.

    2015-03-15

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) type electrolysis cells have a potential use for tritium removal and heavy water upgrading. AECL is currently exposing various commercial PEM materials to both gamma (Cobalt-60 source) and beta (tritiated water) radiation to study the effects of radiation on these materials. This paper summarizes the testing methods and results that have been collected to date. The PEM materials that are or have been exposed to radiation are: Nafion 112, 212, 117 and 1110. Membrane characterization pre- and post- exposure consists of non-destructive inspection (FTIR, SEM/XPS), mechanical (tensile strength, percentage elongation, and modulus), electrical (resistance), or chemical (ion-exchange capacity - IEC). It has appeared that the best characterization techniques to compare exposed versus unexposed membranes were IEC, ultimate tensile strength and percent elongation. These testing techniques are easy and cheap to perform. The non-destructive tests, such as SEM and FTIR did not provide particularly useful information on radiation-induced degradation. Where changes in material properties were measured after radiation exposure, they would be expected to result in poorer cell performance. However, for modest γ-radiation exposure, all membranes showed a slight decrease in cell voltage (better performance). In contrast, the one β-radiation exposed membrane did show the expected increase in cell voltage. The counterintuitive trend for γ-radiation exposed membranes is not yet understood. Based on these preliminary results, it appears that γ- and β-radiation exposures have different effects.

  10. Synthetic Two-Dimensional Materials: A New Paradigm of Membranes for Ultimate Separation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhikun; Grünker, Ronny; Feng, Xinliang

    2016-08-01

    Microporous membranes act as selective barriers and play an important role in industrial gas separation and water purification. The permeability of such membranes is inversely proportional to their thickness. Synthetic two-dimensional materials (2DMs), with a thickness of one to a few atoms or monomer units are ideal candidates for developing separation membranes. Here, groundbreaking advances in the design, synthesis, processing, and application of 2DMs for gas and ion separations, as well as water desalination are presented. This report describes the syntheses, structures, and mechanical properties of 2DMs. The established methods for processing 2DMs into selective permeation membranes are also discussed and the separation mechanism and their performances addressed. Current challenges and emerging research directions, which need to be addressed for developing next-generation separation membranes, are summarized. PMID:27214781

  11. Task 9 - centrifugal membrane filtration. Semi-annual report April 1--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan, D.J.; Moe, T.A.; Collings, M.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report assesses a centrifugal membrane filtration technology developed by SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc. The technology uses supported microporous membranes rotating at high rpm, under pressure, to separate suspended and colloidal solids from liquid streams, yielding a solids-free permeate stream and a highly concentrated solids stream. The Tank Waste Focus Area was chosen for study. Membrane-screening tests were performed with the STC-X4 static test cell filtration unit, using five ceramic membranes with different pore size and composition. Based on permeate flux, a 0.25-{mu}m TiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane was selected for detailed performance evaluation using the centrifugal membrane filtration unit with a surrogate tank waste solution. The performance of the unit was evaluated with a statistical test design that determined the effect of temperature, pressure, membrane rotational speed, and solids loading on permeate flux. All four variables were found to be statistically significant, with the magnitude of the effect in the order of temperature, solids loading, rotor speed, and pressure. Temperature, rotor speed, and pressure had an increasing effect on flux with increasing value, while increases in solids loading showed a decrease in permeate flux. Significant interactions between rotor speed and solids loading and pressure and solids loading were also observed. The regression equation derived from test data had a correlation coefficient of 0.934, which represents a useful predictive capability for integrating the technology into DOE cleanup efforts. An extended test run performed on surrogate waste showed some deterioration in filtration performance, based on flux, apparently due to the buildup of solids near the inner portion of the membrane where relative membrane velocities were low. Continued testing of the system will focus on modifications to the shear pattern across the entire membrane surface to affect improved long-term performance.

  12. Materials for use as proton conducting membranes for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Einsla, Brian R.; McGrath, James E.

    2009-01-06

    A family of polymers having pendent sulfonate moieties connected to polymeric main chain phenyl groups are described. These polymers are prepared by the steps of polymerization (using a monomer with a phenyl with an alkoxy substitution), deportation by converting the alkoxy to a hydroxyl, and functionalization of the polymer with a pendant sulfonate group. As an example, sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) copolymers with pendent sulfonic acid groups are synthesized by the direct copolymerization of methoxy-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, then converting the methoxy groups to the reactive hydroxyl form, and finally functionalizing the hydroxyl form with proton-conducting sites through nucleophilic substitution. The family of polymers may have application in proton exchange membranes and in other applications.

  13. Cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2014-01-28

    Novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials are disclosed that operate at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes based on oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  14. Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    This report is divided into: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced isotope separation technology (AISI), energy storage, magnetic fusion energy (MFE), nuclear waste management, and work for others (WFO). Separate abstracts have been prepared for all except AIST, MFE, and WFO. (DLC)

  15. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

  16. Materials and Molecular Research Division. Annual report 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced (laser) isotope separation technology, energy storage, superconducting magnets, and nuclear waste management. Work for others included phase equilibria for coal gasification products and ..beta..-alumina electrolytes for storage batteries. (DLC)

  17. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  18. Selectivity characteristics of potentiometric carbon dioxide sensors with various gas membrane materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kobos, R.K.; Parks, S.J.; Meyerhoff, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    The selectivity characteristics of potentiometric carbon dioxide sensors with regard to various organic and inorganic acid interferences have been systematically examined. When used in conjunction with a standard silicone rubber CO/sub 2/ permeable membrane, the sensor displays surprisingly large response to several organic acids having low volatility, e.g., benzoic, cinnamic, and salicylic acids. If the outer membrane is changed to a microporous Teflon material, the response to these substances is diminished, but poor selectivity over volatile organics and acidic gases results. The use of a new homogeneous Teflon-like membrane meterial is shown to offer dramatic improvement in selectivity for CO/sub 2/ over all of the compounds tested. The mechanistic reasons for this enhanced selectivity are discussed as are alternate methods for reducing organic acid interferences when using more conventional membrane materials. 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Comparing graphene, carbon nanotubes, and superfine powdered activated carbon as adsorptive coating materials for microfiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Ellerie, Jaclyn R; Apul, Onur G; Karanfil, Tanju; Ladner, David A

    2013-10-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), nano-graphene platelets (NGPs), and superfine powdered activated carbon (S-PAC) were comparatively evaluated for their applicability as adsorptive coatings on microfiltration membranes. The objective was to determine which materials were capable of contaminant removal while causing minimal flux reduction. Methylene blue and atrazine were the model contaminants. When applied as membrane coatings, MWCNTs had minimal retention capabilities for the model contaminants, and S-PAC had the fastest removal. The membrane coating approach was also compared with a stirred vessel configuration, in which the adsorbent was added to a stirred flask preceding the membrane cell. Direct application of the adsorbent to the membrane constituted a greater initial reduction in permeate concentrations of the model contaminants than with the stirred flask setup. All adsorbents except S-PAC showed flux reductions less than 5% after application as thin-layer membrane coatings, and flux recovery after membrane backwashing was greater than 90% for all materials and masses tested. PMID:23911830

  20. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2010.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.

    2011-03-14

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen using OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  1. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes. Annual report for FY 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

    2010-04-20

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation without using an external power supply or circuitry. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  2. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes - annual report for FY 2008.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Lu, Y.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-25

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew from an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen production by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1993: Nonrenewable organic materials. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Cantrell, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    The U.S. nonrenewable organics industry ranks third in terms of value in the United States behind the automotive and petroleum industries, in respective order of importance. In 1993, the organics industry--including feedstocks and salable nonfuel petroleum byproducts--was valued at more than $90 billion, f.o.b. plant, according to the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC). Basic raw material feedstock costs calculated from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) information were about $12.5 billion, based on point-of-origin prices for crude petroleum, dry natural gas, and liquid fractions, plus coal and salable downstream residual byproducts.

  4. Impact of ultrafiltration membrane material on Peptide separation from a snow crab byproduct hydrolysate by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Doyen, Alain; Beaulieu, Lucie; Saucier, Linda; Pouliot, Yves; Bazinet, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membrane (EDUF) is a technology based on the separation of molecules according to their charge and molecular mass. Some works have already successfully demonstrated the recovery of bioactive peptide fractions. However, the impact of ultrafiltration membrane (UFM) material, used in the EDUF system, on the peptide migration has never been studied. Consequently, the objectives of this work were (1) to evaluate the effect of two different UFM materials on the selective separation of peptides from a snow crab byproduct hydrolysate by electrodialysis with ultrafiltration membranes and (2) to determine the effect of UFM material on their potential fouling by peptides. It appeared that, after 6 h of EDUF separation using polyether sulfone (PES) and cellulose acetate (CA) UFM, peptides with low molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da represented the most abundant population in the KCl1 (compartment located near the anode for the recovery of anionic/acid peptide fractions) and KCl2 (compartment located near the cathode for the recovery of cationic/basic peptide fractions) permeates. Peptides with molecular weights ranging from 700 to 900 Da did not migrate during the EDUF treatment. Moreover, only CA UFM allowed the recovery of high molecular weight molecules (900-20000 Da) in both KCl compartments. Peptides desorbed from PES and CA UFM after 6 h of EDUF separation had low molecular weights and belonged mainly to the 600-700 Da molecular weight range. These peptides represented a low proportion of the peptides initially present in the snow crab byproduct hydrolysate with individual molecular weight range proportions from 1.52 ± 0.31 to 10.2 ± 2.32%. PMID:21254777

  5. Radiation-grafted, chemically modified membranes part I - Synthesis of a selective aluminum material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazante-Yamaguishi, Renata; Moura, Eduardo; Manzoli, José E.; Geraldo, Aurea B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric membranes were styrene grafted by irradiation methods and the obtained material was chemically modified to become aluminum selective. For this purpose, polymeric substrates of PVC (polyvinyl chloride) and PP (polypropylene) were styrene grafted mutually by gamma and electron beam irradiation. The modification process includes three basic reaction paths: Friedel-Crafts acylation, 2-methylanisole coupling and a final oxidation to achieve aluminum selectivity. Although this specific chemical modification in derivatives of polystyrene is not new, the new challenge is to obtain a selective material where original membrane characteristics (physical shape and mechanical resistance) are minimally conserved after such an aggressive treatment.

  6. 76 FR 55160 - Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge Rehabilitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... Federal Highway Administration Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge.... L. 109-59; 119 Stat. 1144) continued the highway bridge program to enable States to improve the condition of their highway bridges over waterways, other topographical barriers, other highways,...

  7. 75 FR 62181 - Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge Rehabilitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge.... L. 109-59; 119 Stat. 1144) continued the highway bridge program to enable States to improve the condition of their highway bridges over waterways, other topographical barriers, other highways,...

  8. 77 FR 53251 - Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge Rehabilitation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-31

    ... Federal Highway Administration Annual Materials Report on New Bridge Construction and Bridge.... L. 109-59; 119 Stat. 1144) continued the highway bridge program to enable States to improve the condition of their highway bridges over waterways, other topographical barriers, other highways,...

  9. Methane to syngas conversion. Part I. Equilibrium conditions and stability requirements of membrane materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frade, J. R.; Kharton, V. V.; Yaremchenko, A.; Naumovich, E.

    Thermodynamic data have been used to predict the dependence of methane conversion on temperature and oxygen partial pressure in mixed conducting membrane reactors, and the corresponding fractions of water vapor, H 2, CO and CO 2. The relations between methane conversion, gas composition and oxygen partial pressure were also used to formulate the oxygen balance in mixed conducting membrane reactors, with tubular reactor and continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) configurations. A single dimensionless parameter accounts for the combined effects of geometric parameters of the membrane reactor, the permeability of the membrane material, and flow rate at the entry of the reactor. Selected examples were calculated to illustrate the effects of steam to methane and inert to methane ratios in the gas entering the reactor. The values of oxygen partial pressure required to attain the highest yield of CO and H 2 were also used to estimate the stability requirements to be met by mixed conducting membrane materials. Suitable membrane designs might be needed to bridge the difference between the conditions inside the reactors and the stability limits of known mixed conductors.

  10. Hydrogen production by water dissociation using ceramic membranes. Annual report for FY 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Balachandran, U.; Chen, L.; Dorris, S. E.; Emerson, J. E.; Lee, T. H.; Park, C. Y.; Picciolo, J. J.; Song, S. J.; Energy Systems

    2008-03-04

    The objective of this project is to develop dense ceramic membranes that, without using an external power supply or circuitry, can produce hydrogen via coal/coal gas-assisted water dissociation. This project grew out of an effort to develop a dense ceramic membrane for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures such as those generated during coal gasification, methane partial oxidation, and water-gas shift reactions [1]. That effort led to the development of various cermet (i.e., ceramic/metal composite) membranes that enable hydrogen to be produced by two methods. In one method, a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) selectively removes hydrogen from a gas mixture by transporting it through either a mixed protonic/electronic conductor or a hydrogen transport metal. In the other method, an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) generates hydrogen mixed with steam by removing oxygen that is generated through water splitting [1, 2]. This project focuses on the development of OTMs that efficiently produce hydrogen via the dissociation of water. Supercritical boilers offer very high-pressure steam that can be decomposed to provide pure hydrogen by means of OTMs. Oxygen resulting from the dissociation of steam can be used for coal gasification, enriched combustion, or synthesis gas production. Hydrogen and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} can be produced from coal and steam by using the membrane being developed in this project. Although hydrogen can also be generated by high-temperature steam electrolysis, producing hydrogen by water splitting with a mixed-conducting membrane requires no electric power or electrical circuitry.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF MESOPOROUS MEMBRANE MATERIALS FOR CO2 SEPARATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wei-Heng Shih; Qiang Zhao; Nanlin Wang

    2002-05-01

    Mesoporous and precipitated alumina were synthesized as the base material for CO{sub 2} adsorbent. The porous alumina is doped with Ba to enhance it CO{sub 2} affinity due to the basicity of Ba. it is shown by gas chromatograph (GC) that the addition of Ba enhances the separation CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}. It was found that mesoporous alumina has larger specific surface area and better selectivity of CO{sub 2} than precipitated alumina. Ba improves the affinity of mesoporous alumina with CO{sub 2}. Phase may play an important role in selective adsorption of CO{sub 2}. It is speculated that mesoporous alumina is more reactive than precipitated alumina creating the xBaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase that may be more affinity to CO{sub 2} than N{sub 2}. On the other hand, the barium aluminate phase (Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6}) in the mesoporous sample does not help the adsorption of CO{sub 2}.

  12. Modified by air plasma polymer tack membranes as drainage material for antiglaucomatous operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryazantseva, T. V.; Kravets, L. I.; Elinson, V. M.

    2014-06-01

    The morphological and clinical studies of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes modified by air plasma as drainage materials for antiglaucomatous operations were performed. It was demonstrated their compatibility with eye tissues. Moreover, it was shown that a new drainage has a good lasting hypotensive effect and can be used as operation for refractory glaucoma surgery.

  13. Amniotic membrane - A Novel material for the root coverage: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anamika; Yadav, Komal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Periodontal plastic surgical procedures aimed at coverage of exposed root surface. Owing to the second surgical donor site and difficulty in procuring a sufficient graft for the treatment of root coverage procedures, various alternative additive membranes have been used. A recent resorbable amniotic membrane, not only maintains the structural and anatomical configuration of regenerated tissues, but also enhances gingival wound healing, provides a rich source of stem cells. Therefore, amniotic membrane is choice of material these days in augmenting the better results in various periodontal procedures. Aim: The aim of this observational case series was to evaluate the effectiveness, predictability and the use of a novel material, amniotic membrane in the treatment of shallow-to-moderate isolated recession defects. Materials and Methods: A total of three cases, showing Miller's Class I or Class II gingival recession, participated in this study. Recession depth, recession width, keratinized gingiva (KG) tissue width, clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded at baseline, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Results: Six months following root coverage procedures, the mean root coverage was found to be 70.2 ± 6.8%. CAL significantly decreased from 6.4 ± 0.54 mm preoperatively to 3.5 ± 0.9 mm postoperatively at 6 months while KG showed significant improvement from 3.2 ± 0.28 mm preoperatively to 5.9 ± 0.74 mm postoperatively at 6 months. Conclusion: Autogenous graft tissue procurement significantly increases patient morbidity while also lengthening the duration of surgery in placing the graft, while self-adherent nature of amniotic membrane significantly reduces surgical time and made the procedure easier to perform, making it membrane of choice. PMID:26392696

  14. Materials and characterization techniques for high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary The performance of high-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFC) is critically dependent on the selection of materials and optimization of individual components. A conventional high-temperature membrane electrode assembly (HT-MEA) primarily consists of a polybenzimidazole (PBI)-type membrane containing phosphoric acid and two gas diffusion electrodes (GDE), the anode and the cathode, attached to the two surfaces of the membrane. This review article provides a survey on the materials implemented in state-of-the-art HT-MEAs. These materials must meet extremely demanding requirements because of the severe operating conditions of HT-PEMFCs. They need to be electrochemically and thermally stable in highly acidic environment. The polymer membranes should exhibit high proton conductivity in low-hydration and even anhydrous states. Of special concern for phosphoric-acid-doped PBI-type membranes is the acid loss and management during operation. The slow oxygen reduction reaction in HT-PEMFCs remains a challenge. Phosphoric acid tends to adsorb onto the surface of the platinum catalyst and therefore hampers the reaction kinetics. Additionally, the binder material plays a key role in regulating the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of the catalyst layer. Subsequently, the binder controls the electrode–membrane interface that establishes the triple phase boundary between proton conductive electrolyte, electron conductive catalyst, and reactant gases. Moreover, the elevated operating temperatures promote carbon corrosion and therefore degrade the integrity of the catalyst support. These are only some examples how materials properties affect the stability and performance of HT-PEMFCs. For this reason, materials characterization techniques for HT-PEMFCs, either in situ or ex situ, are highly beneficial. Significant progress has recently been made in this field, which enables us to gain a better understanding of underlying processes occurring during

  15. Parylene as a new membrane material for BioMEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bo

    The work in this thesis aims to use MEMS and microfabrication technologies to develop two types of parylene membrane devices for biomedical applications. The first device is the parylene membrane filter for cancer detection. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in patient blood is an important sign of cancer metastasis. However, currently there are two big challenges for CTC detection. First, CTCs are extremely rare, especially at the early stage of cancer metastasis. Secondly, CTCs are very fragile, and are very likely to be damaged during the capturing process. By using size-based membrane filtration through the specially designed parylene filters, together with a constant-pressure filtration system, we are able to capture the CTCs from patient blood with high capture efficiency, high viability, moderate enrichment, and high throughput. Both immunofluorescence enumeration and telomerase activity detection have been used to detect and differentiate the captured CTCs. The feasibility of further cell culture of the captured CTCs has also been demonstrated, which could be a useful way to increase the number of CTCs for future studies. Models of the time-dependent cell membrane damage are developed to predict and prevent CTC damage during this detection process. The results of clinical trials further demonstrate that the parylene membrane filter is a promising device for cancer detection. The second device is the parylene artificial Bruch's membrane for age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AMD is usually characterized by an impaired Bruch's membrane with much lowered permeability, which impedes the transportation of nutrients from choroid vessels to nourish the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and photoreceptors. Parylene is selected as a substitute material because of its good mechanical properties, transparency, biocompatibility, and machinability. More importantly, it is found that the permeability of submicron parylene is very similar to that of

  16. Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells; Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storate

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal Rao, MRS Web-Editor; Yury Gogotsi, Drexel University; Karen Swider-Lyons, Naval Research Laboratory

    2010-08-05

    Symposium T: Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are under intense investigation worldwide for applications ranging from transportation to portable power. The purpose of this seminar is to focus on the nanomaterials and nanostructures inherent to polymer fuel cells. Symposium topics will range from high-activity cathode and anode catalysts, to theory and new analytical methods. Symposium U: Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storage Electricity, which can be generated in a variety of ways, offers a great potential for meeting future energy demands as a clean and efficient energy source. However, the use of electricity generated from renewable sources, such as wind or sunlight, requires efficient electrical energy storage. This symposium will cover the latest material developments for batteries, advanced capacitors, and related technologies, with a focus on new or emerging materials science challenges.

  17. Chemical vapor deposition of atomically thin materials for membrane dialysis applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidambi, Piran; Mok, Alexander; Jang, Doojoon; Boutilier, Michael; Wang, Luda; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Atomically thin 2D materials like graphene and h-BN represent a new class of membranes materials. They offer the possibility of minimum theoretical membrane transport resistance along with the opportunity to tune pore sizes at the nanometer scale. Chemical vapor deposition has emerged as the preferable route towards scalable, cost effective synthesis of 2D materials. Here we show selective molecular transport through sub-nanometer diameter pores in graphene grown via chemical vapor deposition processes. A combination of pressure driven and diffusive transport measurements shows evidence for size selective transport behavior which can be used for separation by dialysis for applications such as desalting of biomolecular or chemical solutions. Principal Investigator

  18. Task 9 -- Centrifugal membrane filtration. Semi-annual report, April 1--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan, D.J.; Grafsgaard, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    This project is designed to establish the utility of a novel centrifugal membrane filtration technology for the remediation of liquid mixed waste streams at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities in support of the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. The Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) has teamed with SpinTek Membrane Systems, Inc., a small business and owner of the novel centrifugal membrane filtration technology, to establish the applicability of the technology to DOE site remediation and the commercial viability of the technology for liquid mixed waste stream remediation. The technology is a uniquely configured process that makes use of ultrafiltration and centrifugal force to separate suspended and dissolved solids from liquid waste streams, producing a filtered water stream and a low-volume contaminated concentrate stream. This technology has the potential for effective and efficient waste volume minimization, the treatment of liquid tank wastes, the remediation of contaminated groundwater plumes, and the treatment of secondary liquid waste streams from other remediation processes, as well as the liquid waste stream generated during decontamination and decommissioning activities.

  19. Synthesis of proton conducting mesoporous materials and composite membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Fangxia

    Tungstosilicate mesoporous materials (WMM) were synthesized using the ionic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16H33N +(CH3)3Br- CTMABr) and non-ionic surfactants, including C12H25(OCH2CH 2)10OH (Brij 22, C12EO10OH), C 16H33(OCH2CH2)10OH (Brij 56, C16EO10OH), and C18H37(OCH 2CH2)10OH (Brij 76, C18EO10OH). The proton conductivities were measured by AC impedance spectroscopy. Using CTMABr, the highest W/Si ratio achieved for the molecular sieve product was 0.03. The conductivity ranged from 0.5 to 2.2 x 10-2 S/cm, where the highest conductivity was observed with the H3PO 4 based preparation. Non-ionic surfactants produced materials with a W/Si ratio as high as 0.05 without any dense WO3 impurities. These samples showed thicker pore walls (39A), higher thermal stability, and higher proton conductivity (4.0 x 10-2 S/cm). The WMMs were also employed to make a composite membrane with linear polyethyleneimine (PEI), 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GLYMO), bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (HTFSI). At 100°C and 100% relative humidity, the composite membrane with 30 wt.% calcined (at 500°C) WMM showed the highest conductivity of 6.1 x 10-2 S/cm. At 130°C and 20% relative humidity, the highest conductivity of 6.4 x 10-3 S/cm was obtained for the composite membrane with 30 wt.% as-synthesized WMM. Transparent free-standing mesoporous silica (MS) films were synthesized from a system of TMOS-Brij-Acid-H2O. The non-ionic surfactants used included Brij 22 (Cl2EO10OH), Brij 56 (C16EO 10OH), and Brij 76 (C18EO10OH). The acids used include HCl, H3PO4, and CF3SO3H. The effect of synthesis parameters on the synthesis and the proton conductivity of mesoporous silica were investigated. The Brij 56/CF3SO 3H based product showed the highest conductivity of 6.5 x 10 -2 S/cm at room temperature. Composite was prepared by combing TMOS, Brij surfactant, acid (HCl, H3PO4, or CF 3SO3H), N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]-ethylenediamine (EDATMS), 3-glycidoxypropylmethoxysilane (GLYMO

  20. A projection method to extract biological membrane models from 3D material models.

    PubMed

    Roohbakhshan, Farshad; Duong, Thang X; Sauer, Roger A

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a projection method for deriving membrane models from the corresponding three-dimensional material models. As a particular example the anisotropic Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden model is considered. The projection procedure is based on the kinematical and constitutive assumptions of a general membrane theory, considering the membrane to be a general two-dimensional manifold. By assuming zero transverse stress, the Lagrange multiplier associated with the incompressibility constraint can be eliminated from the formulation. The resulting nonlinear model is discretized and linearized within the finite element method. Several numerical examples are shown, considering quadratic Lagrange and NURBS finite elements. These show that the proposed model is in very good agreement with analytical solutions and with full 3D finite element computations. PMID:26455810

  1. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1991, Volume 12

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Doty, K.; Congemi, J.

    1994-05-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1991 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1991 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data Covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  2. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Volume 11: Annual report, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Doty, K.; Congemi, J.

    1993-10-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1990 have been compiled and reported. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1990 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  3. Radioactive materials released from nuclear power plants. Annual report 1989: Volume 10

    SciTech Connect

    Tichler, J.; Norden, K.; Congemi, J.

    1992-09-01

    Releases of radioactive materials in airborne and liquid effluents from commercial light water reactors during 1989 have been compiled and reported. The summary data for the years 1970 through 1988 are included for comparison. Data on solid waste shipments as well as selected operating information have been included. This report supplements earlier annual reports issued by the former Atomic Energy Commission and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The 1989 release data are summarized in tabular form. Data covering specific radionuclides are summarized.

  4. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Fiscal year 1996. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his or her capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1996 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  5. Fabrication of GaN nanotubular material using MOCVD with aluminum oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Gwang; Jung, Se-Hyuck; Kung, Patrick; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2006-02-01

    GaN nanotubular material is fabricated with aluminum oxide membrane in MOCVD. SEM, XRD, TEM and PL are employed to characterize the fabricated GaN nanotubular material. An aluminum oxide membrane with ordered nano holes is used as template. Gallium nitride is deposited at the inner wall of the nano holes in aluminum oxide template, and the nanotubular material with high aspect ratio is synthesized using the precursors of TMG and ammonia gas. Optimal synthesis condition in MOCVD is obtained successfully for the gallium nitride nanotubular material in this research. The diameter of GaN nanotube fabricated is approximately 200 ~ 250 nm and the wall thickness is about 40 ~ 50 nm. GaN nanotubular material consists of numerous fine GaN particulates with sizes ranging 15 to 30 nm. The composition of gallium nitride is confirmed to be stoichiometrically 1:1 for Ga and N by EDS. XRD and TEM analyses indicate that grains in GaN nanotubular material have nano-crystalline structure. No blue shift is found in the PL spectrum on the GaN nanotubular material fabricated in aluminum oxide template.

  6. Fabrication of GaN nanotubular material using MOCVD with an aluminium oxide membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Woo-Gwang; Jung, Se-Hyuck; Kung, Patrick; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2006-01-01

    GaN nanotubular material is fabricated with an aluminium oxide membrane in MOCVD. SEM, XRD, TEM and PL are employed to characterize the fabricated GaN nanotubular material. An aluminium oxide membrane with ordered nanoholes is used as a template. Gallium nitride is deposited at the inner wall of the nanoholes in the aluminium oxide template, and the nanotubular material with high aspect ratio is synthesized using the precursors of TMG and ammonia gas. Optimal synthesis conditions in MOCVD are obtained successfully for the gallium nitride nanotubular material in this research. The diameter of the GaN nanotube fabricated is approximately 200-250 nm and the wall thickness is about 40-50 nm. GaN nanotubular material consists of numerous fine GaN particulates with size range 15-30 nm. The composition of gallium nitride is confirmed to be stoichiometrically 1:1 for Ga and N by EDS. XRD and TEM analyses indicate that the grains in GaN nanotubular material have a nano-crystalline structure. No blue shift is found in the PL spectrum on the GaN nanotubular material fabricated in an aluminium oxide template.

  7. Proceedings of the 18th Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, RR

    2004-11-02

    The 18th Annual conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Knoxville, Tennessee, on June 2 through June 4, 2004. The meeting was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research Materials Program (ARM). The objective of the ARM Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications, as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the program has been decentralized to the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) structural, ceramics, (2) new alloys and coatings, (3) functional materials, and (4) technology development and transfer.

  8. 10 CFR 171.16 - Annual fees: Materials licensees, holders of certificates of compliance, holders of sealed source...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Annual fees: Materials licensees, holders of certificates of compliance, holders of sealed source and device registrations, holders of quality assurance program approvals, and government agencies licensed by the NRC. 171.16 Section 171.16 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ANNUAL FEES...

  9. Development of modifications to the material point method for the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their interactions

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II

    1997-07-01

    The material point method (MPM) is an evolution of the particle in cell method where Lagrangian particles or material points are used to discretize the volume of a material. The particles carry properties such as mass, velocity, stress, and strain and move through a Eulerian or spatial mesh. The momentum equation is solved on the Eulerian mesh. Modifications to the material point method are developed that allow the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their dynamic interactions. A single layer of material points through the thickness is used to represent a membrane. The constitutive equation for the membrane is applied in the local coordinate system of each material point. Validation problems are presented and numerical convergence is demonstrated. Fluid simulation is achieved by implementing a constitutive equation for a compressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid and by solution of the energy equation. The fluid formulation is validated by simulating a traveling shock wave in a compressible fluid. Interactions of the fluid and membrane are handled naturally with the method. The fluid and membrane communicate through the Eulerian grid on which forces are calculated due to the fluid and membrane stress states. Validation problems include simulating a projectile impacting an inflated airbag. In some impact simulations with the MPM, bodies may tend to stick together when separating. Several algorithms are proposed and tested that allow bodies to separate from each other after impact. In addition, several methods are investigated to determine the local coordinate system of a membrane material point without relying upon connectivity data.

  10. Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dusek, Joseph T.; Kleefisch, Mark S.; Kobylinski, Thadeus P.

    1996-01-01

    A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials.

  11. Functionally gradient material for membrane reactors to convert methane gas into value-added products

    DOEpatents

    Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Kobylinski, T.P.

    1996-11-12

    A functionally gradient material for a membrane reactor for converting methane gas into value-added-products includes an outer tube of perovskite, which contacts air; an inner tube which contacts methane gas, of zirconium oxide, and a bonding layer between the perovskite and zirconium oxide layers. The bonding layer has one or more layers of a mixture of perovskite and zirconium oxide, with the layers transitioning from an excess of perovskite to an excess of zirconium oxide. The transition layers match thermal expansion coefficients and other physical properties between the two different materials. 7 figs.

  12. Treatment of nitrate-rich water in a baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) employing waste derived materials.

    PubMed

    Basu, Subhankar; Singh, Saurabh K; Tewari, Prahlad K; Batra, Vidya S; Balakrishnan, Malini

    2014-12-15

    Nitrate removal in submerged membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is limited as intensive aeration (for maintaining adequate dissolved oxygen levels and for membrane scouring) deters the formation of anoxic zones essential for biological denitrification. The present study employs baffled membrane bioreactor (BMBR) to overcome this constraint. Treatment of nitrate rich water (synthetic and real groundwater) was investigated. Sludge separation was achieved using ceramic membrane filters prepared from waste sugarcane bagasse ash. A complex external carbon source (leachate from anaerobic digestion of food waste) was used to maintain an appropriate C/N ratio. Over 90% COD and 95% NO3-N reduction was obtained. The bagasse ash filters produced a clear permeate, free of suspended solids. Sludge aggregates were observed in the reactor and were linked to the high extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) content. Lower sludge volume index (40 mL/g compared to 150 mL/g for seed sludge), higher settling velocity (47 m/h compared to 10 m/h for seed sludge) and sludge aggregates (0.7 mm aggregates compared to <0.2 mm for seed sludge) was observed. The results demonstrate the potential of waste-derived materials viz. food waste leachate and bagasse ash filters in water treatment. PMID:25151111

  13. A review of composite and metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Materials, fabrication, and material selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taherian, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer exceptional potential for a clean, efficient, and reliable power source. The bipolar plate (BP) is a key component in this device, as it connects each cell electrically, supplies reactant gases to both anode and cathode, and removes reaction products from the cell. BPs have primarily been fabricated from high-density graphite, but in recent years, much attention has been paid to develop the cost-effective and feasible alternative materials. Recently, two different classes of materials have been attracted attention: metals and composite materials. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the current researches being carried out on the metallic and composite BPs, covering materials and fabrication methods. In this research, the phenomenon of ionic contamination due to the release of the corrosion products of metallic BP and relative impact on the durability as well as performance of PEM fuel cells is extensively investigated. Furthermore, in this paper, upon several effective parameters on commercialization of PEM fuel cells, such as stack cost, weight, volume, durability, strength, ohmic resistance, and ionic contamination, a material selection is performed among the most common BPs currently being used. This material selection is conducted by using Simple Additive Weighting Method (SAWM).

  14. Membrane Bioreactor Technology for the Development of Functional Materials from Sea-Food Processing Wastes and Their Potential Health Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Se-Kwon; Senevirathne, Mahinda

    2011-01-01

    Sea-food processing wastes and underutilized species of fish are a potential source of functional and bioactive compounds. A large number of bioactive substances can be produced through enzyme-mediated hydrolysis. Suitable enzymes and the appropriate bioreactor system are needed to incubate the waste materials. Membrane separation is a useful technique to extract, concentrate, separate or fractionate the compounds. The use of membrane bioreactors to integrate a reaction vessel with a membrane separation unit is emerging as a beneficial method for producing bioactive materials such as peptides, chitooligosaccharides and polyunsaturated fatty acids from diverse seafood-related wastes. These bioactive compounds from membrane bioreactor technology show diverse biological activities such as antihypertensive, antimicrobial, antitumor, anticoagulant, antioxidant and radical scavenging properties. This review discusses the application of membrane bioreactor technology for the production of value-added functional materials from sea-food processing wastes and their biological activities in relation to health benefits. PMID:24957872

  15. [Clinical and radiological study on tissue regeneration after alveolar bone augmentation with various osteoplastic materials and membranes].

    PubMed

    Mikhaĭlovskiĭ, A A; Kulakov, A A; Korolev, V M; Vinnichenko, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficiency of alveolar bone augmentation using a variety of osteoplastic materials and collagen membrane and healing under a clot. The study included patients undergoing the extraction of symmetric teeth. After extraction one of the sockets were filled with osteoplastic materials while symmetrically located socket with no bone grafting served as a control. In group 1 augmentation was performed using Bio-Oss Collagen Bio-Gide membrane, in group 2 - Osteodent-M and Collost membranes, in group 3 - BIOPLAST-dent and BIOPLAST-dent-MK membranes. Clinical and radiological evaluation revealed positive impact of bioplastic materials on the bone tissue healing and recovery rates. The best results showed Bio-Oss Collagen with barrier bioresorbable membrane Bio-Gide allowing the creation of the most favorable conditions for delayed implantation. PMID:25377579

  16. Lateral acoustic wave resonator comprising a suspended membrane of low damping resonator material

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Roy H.; El-Kady; , Ihab F.; Ziaei-Moayyed, Maryam; Branch; , Darren W.; Su; Mehmet F.,; Reinke; Charles M.,

    2013-09-03

    A very high-Q, low insertion loss resonator can be achieved by storing many overtone cycles of a lateral acoustic wave (i.e., Lamb wave) in a lithographically defined suspended membrane comprising a low damping resonator material, such as silicon carbide. The high-Q resonator can sets up a Fabry-Perot cavity in a low-damping resonator material using high-reflectivity acoustic end mirrors, which can comprise phononic crystals. The lateral overtone acoustic wave resonator can be electrically transduced by piezoelectric couplers. The resonator Q can be increased without increasing the impedance or insertion loss by storing many cycles or wavelengths in the high-Q resonator material, with much lower damping than the piezoelectric transducer material.

  17. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  18. Fiscal Year 1993 annual report for the Bubble Membrane Radiator Project

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.; Pauley, K.A.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Sambrook, J.M.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities conducted on the Bubble Membrane Radiator (BMR) Project during Fiscal Year (FY) 1993 at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in Richland, Washington. Funding for this work has been provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC), Crew and Thermal Sciences Division. The BMR Project was initiated at PNL in March 1988 to continue development of promising thermal management concepts for space applications. In FY 1992 work was refocused from the BMR to fabrication and testing of ultralight fabric reflux tubes (UFRT) because of progress in this area and the desire to incorporate this concept in thermal management for a lunar colony. Development, optimization, and testing of UFRTs continued in FY 1993 under five tasks. Task B, Radiative Properties, and Task D, Development of Tough Metal UFRT Technology, were initiated in FY 1992 and completed this year. Three additional tasks were initiated: Task 1, Fabricate Tubes; Task 2, Heat Transfer Optimization; and Task 3, Analyses Follow-On. A summary of the activities under these tasks and conclusions are provided below.

  19. Annual metallic flows in roof runoff from different materials: test-bed scale in Paris conurbation.

    PubMed

    Robert-Sainte, P; Gromaire, M C; De Gouvello, B; Saad, M; Chebbo, G

    2009-08-01

    A substantial database of annual metal runoff loads, obtained from a 14-month field exposure campaign on 12 different metal roofing materials at two sites within Paris conurbation, is presented herein. Thirteen metallic species have been considered. A comparison among the various roofing materials yields a ranking of their runoff pollution potential, which highlights that aluminum, coated products, and stainless steel display the lower emission levels, before zinc and copper materials. Lead materials appear to release more metallic species, and tend to do so in quite large quantities. Whatever the material family considered, older materials apparently release more metallic species with higher levels of emission. In considering zinc emissions from zinc-based materials, it is clear that surface coatings significantly reduce zinc emissions (40% less for the Zn3(PO4)2 surface-treated Anthra zinc, compared to natural zinc; and 99% less for prepainted galvanized steel compared to standard galvanized steel). In the case of Anthra zinc however, surface treatment induces the release of Ni into the runoff, and Ni constitutes a priority pollutant in the European Water Framework Directive (2000/60 CE). A high level of consistency with literature data has been found for Zn runoff when considering runoff rates reported at the same inclination. PMID:19731652

  20. Schiff's Bases and Crown Ethers as Supramolecular Sensing Materials in the Construction of Potentiometric Membrane Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Faridbod, Farnoush; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Norouzi, Parviz; Riahi, Siavash

    2008-01-01

    Ionophore incorporated PVC membrane sensors are well-established analytical tools routinely used for the selective and direct measurement of a wide variety of different ions in complex biological and environmental samples. Potentiometric sensors have some outstanding advantages including simple design and operation, wide linear dynamic range, relatively fast response and rational selectivity. The vital component of such plasticized PVC members is the ionophore involved, defining the selectivity of the electrodes' complex formation. Molecular recognition causes the formation of many different supramolecules. Different types of supramolecules, like calixarenes, cyclodextrins and podands, have been used as a sensing material in the construction of ion selective sensors. Schiff's bases and crown ethers, which feature prominently in supramolecular chemistry, can be used as sensing materials in the construction of potentiometric ion selective electrodes. Up to now, more than 200 potentiometric membrane sensors for cations and anions based on Schiff's bases and crown ethers have been reported. In this review cation binding and anion complexes will be described. Liquid membrane sensors based on Schiff's bases and crown ethers will then be discussed.

  1. Bridged polysilsesquioxanes: Hybrid organic-inorganic materials as fuel cell polyelectrolyte membranes and functional nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khiterer, Mariya

    2007-05-01

    This dissertation describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of organic-inorganic hybrid materials. Several classes of bridged polysilsesquioxanes are presented. The first class is a membrane material suitable for fuel cell technology as a proton conducting polyelectrolyte. The second class includes hybrid nanoparticles for display device applications and chromatographic media. Chapter 1 is an introduction to hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Sol-gel chemistry is discussed, followed by a survey of prominent examples of silica hybrids. Examples of physical organic-silica blends and covalent organo-silicas, including ORMOCERSRTM, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes, and bridged polysilsesquioxanes are discussed. Bridged polysilsesquioxanes are described in great detail. Monomer synthesis, sol-gel chemistry, processing, characterization, and physical properties are included. Chapter 2 describes the design of polyelectrolyte bridged polysilsesquioxane membranes. The materials contain covalently bound sulfonic acid groups originating from the corresponding disulfides. These organic-inorganic hybrid materials integrate a network supporting component which is systematically changed to fine-tune their physical properties. The membranes are characterized as PEM fuel cell electrolytes, where proton conductivities of 4-6 mS cm-1 were measured. In Chapter 3 techniques for the preparation of bridged polysilsesquioxane nanoparticles are described. An inverse water-in-oil microemulsion polymerization method is developed to prepare cationic nanoparticles, including viologen-bridged materials with applications in electrochromic display devices. An aqueous ammonia system is used to prepare neutral nanoparticles containing hydrocarbon bridging groups, which have potential applications as chromatographic media. Chapter 4 describes electrochromic devices developed in collaboration with the Heflin group of Virginia Tech, which incorporate viologen bridged nanoparticles

  2. A Novel Approach to Materials Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Annual Report for Year 1

    SciTech Connect

    Was, G.S.; Atzmon, M.; Wang, L.

    2000-09-28

    OAK B188 A Novel Approach to Materials Development for Advanced Reactor Systems. Annual Report for Year 1 Year one of this project had three major goals. First, to specify, order and install a new high current ion source for more rapid and stable proton irradiation. Second, to assess the use of chromium pre-enrichment and the combination of cold-work and irradiation hardening in an effort to assess the role of radiation damage in IASCC without the effects of RIS. Third, to initiate irradiation of reactor pressure vessel steel and Zircaloy. Program Achievements for Year One: Progress was made on all 4 tasks in year one.

  3. Amphiphilic polyphosphazenes as membrane materials: influence of side group on radiation cross-linking.

    PubMed

    Allcock, H R; Gebura, M; Kwon, S; Neenan, T X

    1988-11-01

    The amphiphilic mixed-substituent polyphosphazenes, [NP(OCH2CF3)x (NHCH3)y)]n and [NP(OC6H5)x (NHCH3)y]n, have been prepared by the sequential replacement of chlorine in [NPCI2]n by trifluorethoxide or phenoxide and methylamine. Thin films of these species were cross-linked by exposure to gamma radiation and the semipermeability of the resultant membranes was monitored. The radiation-induced cross-linking and membrane-forming properties of these polymers were compared with those of the single substituent polymers, [NP(OCH2CF3)2]n, [NP(OC6H5)2]n, and [NP(NHCH3)2]n. The radiation-cross-linking and appeared to involve free radical reactions at the methyl groups of the methylamino substituents. The possible utility of these materials in biomedical research is discussed. PMID:3224137

  4. Green materials science and engineering reduces biofouling: approaches for medical and membrane-based technologies

    PubMed Central

    Dobosz, Kerianne M.; Kolewe, Kristopher W.; Schiffman, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous engineered and natural environments suffer deleterious effects from biofouling and/or biofilm formation. For instance, bacterial contamination on biomedical devices pose serious health concerns. In membrane-based technologies, such as desalination and wastewater reuse, biofouling decreases membrane lifetime, and increases the energy required to produce clean water. Traditionally, approaches have combatted bacteria using bactericidal agents. However, due to globalization, a decline in antibiotic discovery, and the widespread resistance of microbes to many commercial antibiotics and metallic nanoparticles, new materials, and approaches to reduce biofilm formation are needed. In this mini-review, we cover the recent strategies that have been explored to combat microbial contamination without exerting evolutionary pressure on microorganisms. Renewable feedstocks, relying on structure-property relationships, bioinspired/nature-derived compounds, and green processing methods are discussed. Greener strategies that mitigate biofouling hold great potential to positively impact human health and safety. PMID:25852659

  5. Annual replenishment of bed material by sediment transport in the Wind River near Riverton, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smalley, M.L.; Emmett, W.W.; Wacker, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Transportation, conducted a study during 1985-87 to determine the annual replenishment of sand and gravel along a point bar in the Wind River near Riverton, Wyoming. Hydraulic- geometry relations determined from streamflow measurements; streamflow characteristics determined from 45 years of record at the study site; and analyses of suspended-sediment, bedload, and bed- material samples were used to describe river transport characteristics and to estimate the annual replenishment of sand and gravel. The Wind River is a perennial, snowmelt-fed stream. Average daily discharge at the study site is about 734 cubic feet per second, and bankfull discharge (recurrence interval about 1.5 years) is about 5,000 cubic feet per second. At bankfull discharge, the river is about 136 feet wide and has an average depth of about 5.5 feet and average velocity of about 6.7 feet per second. Streams slope is about 0.0010 foot per foot. Bed material sampled on the point bar before the 1986 high flows ranged from sand to cobbles, with a median diameter of about 22 millimeters. Data for sediment samples collected during water year 1986 were used to develop regression equations between suspended-sediment load and water discharge and between bedload and water discharge. Average annual suspended-sediment load was computed to be about 561,000 tons per year using the regression equation in combination with flow-duration data. The regression equation for estimating bedload was not used; instead, average annual bedload was computed as 1.5 percent of average annual suspended load about 8,410 tons per year. This amount of bedload material is estimated to be in temporary storage along a reach containing seven riffles--a length of approximately 1 river mile. On the basis of bedload material sampled during the 1986 high flows, about 75 percent (by weight) is sand (2 millimeters in diameter or finer); median particle size is

  6. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMACC) Fiscal Year 1982. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1983-03-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/ workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, the EMaCC aids in obtaining materials - related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Membership in the EMaCC is open to any Department organizational unit; participants are appointed by Division or Office Directors. The current membership is listed in Table 1. The EMACC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMACC terms of reference. In this report are described 1) EMACC activities for FY 1982; 2) a summary of materials funding in the Department from FY 1978 to the present; and 3) on-going materials programs in the Department.

  7. Extraction of proteins and membrane lipids during low temperature embedding of biological material for electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weibull, C; Christiansson, A

    1986-04-01

    The extraction of proteins and membrane lipids from biological materials during embedding procedures for electron microscopy carried out at temperatures down to 223 K was studied. Glutaraldehyde-fixed cells of Acholeplasma laidlawii mainly served as test material. More than 99% of the protein and 88% of the lipid of these cells were retained after dehydration with ethanol or acetone between 277 and 223 K and infiltration with methacrylate at 223 K. When methanol was used for dehydration, only 54% of the lipid was retained. The amount of extracted lipid was essentially independent of the ratio between volume of extraction liquid and amount of material subjected to extraction. The cytoplasmic membrane of sectioned Acholeplasma-cells dehydrated and infiltrated as described above appeared more diffuse than that of cells fixed with glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide in epoxy resin at room temperature. Glutaraldehyde-fixed erythrocyte ghosts retained 85% of their phospholipid content when dehydrated with ethanol between 277 and 223 K and infiltrated with methacrylate at 223 K. Spinach chloroplasts and thylakoid vesicles retained 61% and 35%, respectively, of their chlorophyll content. PMID:3712423

  8. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, fiscal year 1988

    SciTech Connect

    1989-06-30

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees are established and are continuing their own programs: Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Superconductivity (established in FY 1987). In addition, the EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Membership in the EMaCC is open to any Department organizational unit; participants are appointed by Division or Office Directors. The current active membership is listed on the following four pages. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1988 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  9. Estimation of diffusion anisotropy in microporous crystalline materials and optimization of crystal orientation in membranes.

    PubMed

    Gounaris, Chrysanthos E; First, Eric L; Floudas, Christodoulos A

    2013-09-28

    The complex nature of the porous networks in microporous materials is primarily responsible for a high degree of intracrystalline diffusion anisotropy. Although this is a well-understood phenomenon, little attention has been paid in the literature with regards to classifying such anisotropy and elucidating its effect on the performance of membrane-based separation systems. In this paper, we develop a novel methodology to estimate full diffusion tensors based on the detailed description of the porous network geometry through our recent advances for the characterization of such networks. The proposed approach explicitly accounts for the tortuosity and complex connectivity of the porous framework, as well as for the variety of diffusion regimes that may be experienced by a guest molecule while it travels through the different localities of the crystal. Results on the diffusion of light gases in silicalite demonstrate good agreement with results from experiments and other computational techniques that have been reported in the literature. A comprehensive computational study involving 183 zeolite frameworks classifies these structures in terms of a number of anisotropy metrics. Finally, we utilize the computed diffusion tensors in a membrane optimization model that determines optimal crystal orientations. Application of the model in the context of separating carbon dioxide from nitrogen demonstrates that optimizing crystal orientation can offer significant benefit to membrane-based separation processes. PMID:24089791

  10. Curriculum Materials 1983. A Guide to the Exhibit of Curriculum Materials at the ASCD Annual Conference (38th, Houston, Texas, March 5-8, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, Alexandria, VA.

    This catalog was prepared as a guide for conference participants to use while examining curriculum materials displayed during the 38th Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development annual conference. Materials are listed by the following subject areas: art; bilingual/English as a second language; career/vocational education; computer…

  11. Novel naturally crosslinked electrospun nanofibrous chitosan mats for guided bone regeneration membranes: material characterization and cytocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Norowski, Peter A; Fujiwara, Tomoko; Clem, William C; Adatrow, Pradeep C; Eckstein, Eugene C; Haggard, Warren O; Bumgardner, Joel D

    2015-05-01

    Guided bone regeneration (GBR) barrier membranes are used to prevent soft tissue infiltration into the graft space during dental procedures that involve bone grafting. Chitosan materials have shown promise as GBR barrier membranes, due to their biocompatibility and predictable biodegradability, but degradation rates may still be too high for clinical applications. In this study, chitosan GBR membranes were electrospun using chitosan (70% deacetylated, 312 kDa, 5.5 w/v%), with or without the addition of 5 or 10 mm genipin, a natural crosslinking agent, in order to extend the degradation to meet the clinical target time frame of 4-6 months. Membranes were evaluated for fibre diameter, tensile strength, biodegradation rate, bond structure and cytocompatibility. Genipin addition, at 5 or 10 mm, resulted in median fibre diameters 184, 144 and 154 nm for uncrosslinked, 5 mm and 10 mm crosslinked, respectively. Crosslinking, examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, showed a decrease in N-H stretch as genipin levels were increased. Genipin-crosslinked mats exhibited only 22% degradation based on mass loss, as compared to 34% for uncrosslinked mats at 16 weeks in vitro. The ultimate tensile strength of the mats was increased by 165% to 32 MPa with 10 mm crosslinking as compared to the uncrosslinked mats. Finally, genipin-crosslinked mats supported the proliferation of SAOS-2 cells in a 5 day growth study, similar to uncrosslinked mats. These results suggest that electrospun chitosan mats may benefit from genipin crosslinking and have the potential to meet clinical degradation time frames for GBR applications. PMID:23166109

  12. The Subsequent Dissemination of Material Presented in Sessions of the Metallurgical Society at the 96th AIME Annual Meeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. Center for Research in Scientific Communication.

    Studies of 255 authors of program material at the Metallurgical Society session of the 96th American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers (AIME) Annual Meeting yielded data on the subsequent dissemination of presented material during the year following the meeting. Data showed that three-fourths of the authors who made…

  13. Preparation and photoelectrocatalytic performance of N-doped TiO2/NaY zeolite membrane composite electrode material.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhi-Lin; Han, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    A novel composite electrode material based on a N-doped TiO2-loaded NaY zeolite membrane (N-doped TiO2/NaY zeolite membrane) for photoelectrocatalysis was presented. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-visible (UV-vis) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization techniques were used to analyze the structure of the N-doped TiO2/NaY zeolite membrane. The XRD and SEM results verified that the N-doped TiO2 nanoparticles with the size of ca. 20 nm have been successfully loaded on the porous stainless steel-supported NaY zeolite membrane. The UV-vis result showed that the N-doped TiO2/NaY zeolite membrane exhibited a more obvious red-shift than that of N-TiO2 nanoparticles. The XPS characterization revealed that the doping of N element into TiO2 was successfully achieved. The photoelectrocatalysis performance of the N-doped TiO2/NaY zeolite membrane composite electrode material was evaluated by phenol removal and also the effects of reaction conditions on the catalytic performance were investigated. Owing to exhibiting an excellent catalytic activity and good recycling stability, the N-doped TiO2/NaY zeolite membrane composite electrode material was of promising application for photoelectrocatalysis in wastewater treatment. PMID:26877029

  14. Preparation of lipid nanoemulsions by premix membrane emulsification with disposable materials.

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Sandra; Bunjes, Heike

    2016-09-25

    The possibility to prepare nanoemulsions as drug carrier systems on small scale was investigated with disposable materials. For this purpose premix membrane emulsification (premix ME) as a preparation method for nanoemulsions with narrow particle size distributions on small scale was used. The basic principle of premix ME is that the droplets of a coarse pre-emulsion get disrupted by the extrusion through a porous membrane. In order to implement the common preparation setup for premix ME with disposable materials, the suitability of different syringe filters (made from polyethersulfone, cellulose acetate, cellulose ester and nylon) and different pharmaceutically relevant emulsifiers (phospholipids, polysorbate 80 and sucrose laurate) for the preparation of nanoemulsions was investigated. Already the preparation of the premix could be realized by emulsification with the help of two disposable syringes. As shown for a phospholipid-stabilized emulsion, the polyethersulfone filter was the most appropriate one and was used for the study with different emulsifiers. With this syringe filter, the median particle size of all investigated emulsions was below 500nm after 21 extrusion cycles through a 200nm filter and a subsequent extrusion cycle through a 100nm filter. Furthermore, the particle size distribution of the polysorbate 80- and sucrose laurate-stabilized emulsions prepared this way was very narrow (span value of 0.7). PMID:27477104

  15. Methods for using novel cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Allan J.; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

    2016-01-12

    Methods using novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials operating at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes include oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

  16. Proton exchange membrane materials for the advancement of direct methanol fuel-cell technology

    DOEpatents

    Cornelius, Christopher J.

    2006-04-04

    A new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials, and methods of synthesis, that can be used as a proton exchange membrane in a direct methanol fuel cell. In contrast with Nafion.RTM. PEM materials, which have random sulfonation, the new class of materials have ordered sulfonation achieved through self-assembly of alternating polyimide segments of different molecular weights comprising, for example, highly sulfonated hydrophilic PDA-DASA polyimide segment alternating with an unsulfonated hydrophobic 6FDA-DAS polyimide segment. An inorganic phase, e.g., 0.5 5 wt % TEOS, can be incorporated in the sulfonated polyimide copolymer to further improve its properties. The new materials exhibit reduced swelling when exposed to water, increased thermal stability, and decreased O.sub.2 and H.sub.2 gas permeability, while retaining proton conductivities similar to Nafion.RTM.. These improved properties may allow direct methanol fuel cells to operate at higher temperatures and with higher efficiencies due to reduced methanol crossover.

  17. Materials selection guidelines for membranes that remove CO 2 from gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Haiqing; Freeman, Benny D.

    2005-04-01

    Membrane technology has been investigated for removing CO 2 from mixtures with light gases such as CH 4, N 2 and H 2, and optimal membranes with high CO 2 permeability and high CO 2/light gas selectivity are of great interest. This overview describes the material science approaches to achieve high CO 2 solubility and CO 2/light gas solubility selectivity by introducing polar groups in polymers. CO 2 solubility and CO 2/N 2 solubility selectivity in both liquid solvents and solid polymers containing a variety of polar groups are discussed. Optimum materials appear to have a solubility parameter of about 21.8 MPa 0.5 to achieve both high solubility and high solubility selectivity. However, the introduction of polar groups can decrease CO 2 diffusion coefficients and can make a material more size-selective, which is detrimental to, for example, CO 2/H 2 separation properties. So far, ether oxygens in ethylene oxide (EO) units appear to provide a good balance of CO 2 separation and permeation properties. One drawback of using pure poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) is its strong tendency to crystallize. This report reviews strategies for incorporating high concentrations of EO units into polymers while suppressing crystallization. A simple model, based on free volume theory, is used to correlate a wide range of CO 2 permeability coefficients in PEO containing materials, and the results are satisfactory, particularly given the simplicity of the model. Crosslinked poly(ethylene glycol) acrylate (XLPEO) containing branches with methoxy end groups exhibit the highest CO 2 permeability (i.e. 570 Barrers) and highest CO 2/H 2 selectivity (i.e. 12) at 35 °C and infinite dilution among all PEO containing materials reported to date. Because such materials do not crystallize at typically accessible temperatures, CO 2/H 2 selectivity can be further improved by decreasing temperature. For example, at an upstream pressure of 4.4 atm, CO 2/H 2 pure gas selectivity reaches a value of 40 at

  18. Protein-releasing conductive anodized alumina membranes for nerve-interface materials.

    PubMed

    Altuntas, Sevde; Buyukserin, Fatih; Haider, Ali; Altinok, Buket; Biyikli, Necmi; Aslim, Belma

    2016-10-01

    Nanoporous anodized alumina membranes (AAMs) have numerous biomedical applications spanning from biosensors to controlled drug delivery and implant coatings. Although the use of AAM as an alternative bone implant surface has been successful, its potential as a neural implant coating remains unclear. Here, we introduce conductive and nerve growth factor-releasing AAM substrates that not only provide the native nanoporous morphology for cell adhesion, but also induce neural differentiation. We recently reported the fabrication of such conductive membranes by coating AAMs with a thin C layer. In this study, we investigated the influence of electrical stimulus, surface topography, and chemistry on cell adhesion, neurite extension, and density by using PC 12 pheochromocytoma cells in a custom-made glass microwell setup. The conductive AAMs showed enhanced neurite extension and generation with the electrical stimulus, but cell adhesion on these substrates was poorer compared to the naked AAMs. The latter nanoporous material presents chemical and topographical features for superior neuronal cell adhesion, but, more importantly, when loaded with nerve growth factor, it can provide neurite extension similar to an electrically stimulated CAAM counterpart. PMID:27287158

  19. Enhancement in biological response of Ag-nano composite polymer membranes using plasma treatment for fabrication of efficient bio materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Narendra Kumar; Sharma, Tamanna Kumari; Chauhan, Manish; Agarwal, Ravi; Vijay, Y. K.; Swami, K. C.

    2016-05-01

    Biomaterials are nonviable material used in medical devices, intended to interact with biological systems, which are becoming necessary for the development of artificial material for biological systems such as artificial skin diaphragm, valves for heart and kidney, lenses for eye etc. Polymers having novel properties like antibacterial, antimicrobial, high adhesion, blood compatibility and wettability are most suitable for synthesis of biomaterial, but all of these properties does not exist in any natural or artificial polymeric material. Nano particles and plasma treatment can offer these properties to the polymers. Hence a new nano-biomaterial has been developed by modifying the surface and chemical properties of Ag nanocomposite polymer membranes (NCPM) by Argon ion plasma treatment. These membranes were characterized using different techniques for surface and chemical modifications occurred. Bacterial adhesion and wettability were also tested for these membranes, to show direct use of this new class of nano-biomaterial for biomedical applications.

  20. Continuum theory of swelling material surfaces with applications to thermo-responsive gel membranes and surface mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Teresi, Luciano; DeSimone, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Soft membranes are commonly employed in shape-morphing applications, where the material is programmed to achieve a target shape upon activation by an external trigger, and as coating layers that alter the surface characteristics of bulk materials, such as the properties of spreading and absorption of liquids. In particular, polymer gel membranes experience swelling or shrinking when their solvent content change, and the non-homogeneous swelling field may be exploited to control their shape. Here, we develop a theory of swelling material surfaces to model polymer gel membranes and demonstrate its features by numerically studying applications in the contexts of biomedicine, micro-motility, and coating technology. We also specialize the theory to thermo-responsive gels, which are made of polymers that change their affinity with a solvent when temperature varies.

  1. Luminescent Nafion membranes dyed with ruthenium(II) complexes as sensing materials for dissolved oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Fresnadillo, D.; Orellana, G.; Marazuela, M.D.; Moreno-Bondi, M.C.

    1999-09-14

    The absorption spectroscopy, photophysics, and dioxygen quenching of [RuL{sub 3}]{sup 2+} luminescent probes, where L stands for 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 5-octadecanamide-1,10-phenanthroline, and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (dip), electrostatically loaded onto Nafion ionomer membrane have been investigated in air and in organic solvents and water, with the aim of developing rugged materials for optical sensing of molecular oxygen. The significant differences in size and hydrophobicity of the Ru(II) dyes have been used to probe their location within the perfluorinated ionomer pore network, as well as to gain insight into the oxygen accessibility to its microcrystalline and interfacial domains. While the absorption maximums of the probes (444--458nm) remain relative unchanged, their emission wavelengths (578--622 nm) are extremely sensitive to the degree of Nafion swelling by the solvent. This feature has been characterized by measuring the density (1.19--2.04 g cm{sup {minus}3}) of the solvent-saturated ionomer and the mass and volume fractions of solvents (0.0--0.7) uptake by the original acidic Nafion and Li{sup +}-, Na{sup +}-, or K{sup +}-exchanged films. The excited-state lifetimes of the [RuL{sub 3}]{sup 2+} complexes (0.03--4.9{micro}s) reflect important variations of the microenvironment around the luminescent probes, which are rationalized in terms of their location and oxygen accessibility when loaded onto the polysulfonated material. Emission quenching rate constants of 1.7 {+-} 0.3 M{sup {minus}1}s{sup {minus}1} have been measured for the [Ru(dip){sub 3}]{sup 2+}-dyed films dipped in methanol; their oxygen sensitivity turns out to be independent of the Ru(II) loading and counterion of Nafion. Highly oxygen-sensitive luminescent membranes, suitable for continuous monitoring in organic solvents, water, or gas phase, have been prepared by immobilization of [Ru(dip){sub 3}]{sup 2+} indicator in 178-{micro}m thick Nafion, with response

  2. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  3. [Research of performances for the organic membrane modified by inorganic material].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yan; Yu, Shui-Li; Sun, Xian-Da; Cai, Bao-Xiang

    2007-02-01

    Nano-sized alumina particles as inorganic additive were dispersed in the poly (vinylidene fluoride) uniformly to prepare organic-inorganic composite membranes. Contact angle between water and the membrane surface were measured by contact angle measurement in order to characterize the hydrophilicity changing of the membrane surface. The membrane surface structures, porous distribution on the membrane surface, the cross-sectional structures and nanometer particles distribution were examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) respectively. Membrane properties were characterized by ultrafiltration (UF) experiments in terms of water flux and antifouling properties. Membranes mechanical performances were measured by omnipotence electronic intensity measuring instrument (W-56). Experiments indicate that Al2 O3 -PVDF composite membranes exhibit significant differences in surface hydrophilicity properties, flux, and intensity and antifouling performances due to nano-sized particles addition. PMID:17489200

  4. Materials, design, and modeling for bipolar/end plates in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Atul

    New vehicle technologies are required to improve upon conventional internal combustion engine technologies. In this regard, the development of fuel cell (polymer electrolyte membrane type) vehicles with improved efficiency and reliability seems promising. However, some technical issues exist that hinder the commercialization of this technology. One such issue is the high cost, volume, and mass of the bipolar/end plates in the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. This research, therefore, focuses on materials, design, and modeling for bipolar/end plates in PEMFC stack. Alternative materials were tested that can replace the conventionally used graphite in the PEMFC stack. With regards to these, a two-cell PEMFC stack was fabricated with SS-316 multi-parallel flow-field (MPFF) designed bipolar/end plates. The stack was run for over 1000 hours and showed no appreciable drop in performance. To enhance the understanding and for determining the effect of operating parameters in PEMFC, a single cell model was developed. The model results agree well with the experimental data. The gas flow-field in bipolar/end plates of the PEMFC was optimized with respect to channel dimensions, channel shape, flow-field design, and flow-field permeability. It was seen that lower the flow-field permeability better is the fuel cell performance. Based on this, the concept of use of metal foams in the gas flow-field was proposed. Experiments were carried out to test the feasibility of metal foams in the gas flow-field of bipolar/end plates in PEMFC stack. Three different porous materials, viz. Ni-Cr metal foam (50 P PI, pores per inch), S S-316 metal foam (20 PPI), and carbon cloth were tested, and the results were compared to the conventional MPFF channel design concept. It was seen that the performance with Ni-Cr metal foam was highest, and decreased in the order of SS-316 metal foam, conventional MPFF design, and carbon cloth. This trend was explained based on the effective

  5. High Temperature Materials Laboratory, Eleventh Annual Report: October 1997 through September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

    2000-03-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its eleventh year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation.A total of 522 agreements (351 industry,156 university,and 15 other federal agency) are now in effect (452 nonproprietary and 70 proprietary). This represents an increase of 75 user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1997). A state-by-state summary of the nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A. Forty-six states are represented. During FY 1998, the HTML User Program evaluated 80 nonproprietary proposals (32 from industry, 45 from universities, and 3 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. Appendix B provides a detailed breakdown of the nonproprietary proposals received during FY 1998. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1998.

  6. High Temperature Materials Laboratory seventh annual report, October 1993--September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Teague, P.A.

    1994-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its seventh year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the User Program has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements since the HTML began operation in 1987. A total of 193 nonproprietary agreements (91 industry and 102 university) and 41 proprietary agreements (39 industry and two university) are now in effect. This represents an increase of 21 nonproprietary user agreements during FY 1994. Forty-one states are represented by these users. During FY 1994, the HTML User Program evaluated 106 nonproprietary proposals (46 from industry, 52 from universities, and 8 from other government facilities) and 8 proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about ninety-five percent of those evaluated proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the Committee. This annual report discusses FY 1994 activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users and their proposals and FY 1994 publications, and summarizes nonproprietary research projects active in FY 1994.

  7. High Temperature Materials Laboratory eight and ninth annual reports, October 1994 through September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

    1997-10-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its ninth year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements, and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation. A total of 276 nonproprietary agreements (135 industry, 135 university, and 6 other federal agency) and 56 proprietary agreements are now in effect. This represents an increase of 70 nonproprietary user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1994). A state-by-state summary of these nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A, and an alphabetical listing is provided in Appendix B. Forty-four states are represented by these users. During FY 1995 and 1996, the HTML User Program evaluated 145 nonproprietary proposals (62 from industry, 82 from universities, and 1 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, frequently after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1995 and 1996.

  8. High Temperature Materials Laboratory Thirteenth Annual Report: October 1999 Through September 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, AE

    2001-11-07

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program continued to work with industrial, academic, and governmental users this year, accepting 86 new projects and developing 50 new user agreements. The table on the following page presents the breakdown of these statistics. The figure on page 2 depicts the continued growth in user agreements and user projects. You may note that our total number of proposals is nearing 1000, and we expect to achieve this number in our first proposal review meeting of FY 2001. The large number of new agreements bodes well for the future. A list of proposals to the HTML follows this section; at the end of the report, we present a list of agreements between HTML and universities and industries, broken down by state. Program highlights this year included several outstanding user projects (some of which are discussed in later sections), the annual meeting of the HTML Programs Senior Advisory Committee, the completion of a formal Multiyear Program Plan (MYPP), and finalization of a purchase agreement with JEOL for a new-generation electron microscope.

  9. Proton-exchange membrane materials based on blends of poly(ether ketone ketone) and poly(ether imide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swier, S.; Gasa, J.; Shaw, M. T.; Weiss, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    The development of materials for proton-exchange membranes (PEM) involves finding a compromise between high proton conductivities and sufficient mechanical and chemical stability to withstand the conditions in the fuel cell. The currently used perfluorinated polymer electrolyte membranes tend to be expensive and have problems in case of extensive application. New polymer electrolytes based on hydrocarbon polymers are therefore the focus of a considerable research effort. Blends of sulfonated poly(ether ketone ketone) (SPEKK) and poly(ether imide) (PEI) were evaluated as PEMs. Sulfonation of PEKK was achieved by using a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and fuming sulfuric acid, and blend membranes were prepared by casting a solution of the two polymers in N-methyl-2- pyrrolidone. The hydration level of the membrane decreased with increasing PEI concentration, but a proton conductivity comparable to NafionTM was obtained for blends containing less than 20 wt% PEI. The fuel cell performance of the membranes was affected by the sulfonation level of the PEKK, the blend composition and the casting procedure employed. The state of water in the membrane was evaluated from the depression of the glass transition and from the melting endotherms associated with water. Proton conductivity depended strongly on the hydration number (water molecules per sulfonate group), which depended on the sulfonation level of the PEKK and the blend morphology. Sorption data from gravimetric techniques provided important transport information like the solubility and diffusivity of water and methanol.

  10. Binary and ternary nano-catalysts as cathode materials in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimm, Bryan Dunning

    The need for alternative energy, in order to reduce dependence on petroleum based fuels, has increased in recent years. Public demand is at an all-time high for low emitting or none polluting energy sources, driving the research for cleaner technology. Lithium batteries and fuel cells have the ability to produce this alternative energy with much cleaner standards, while allowing for portability and high energy densities. This work focuses on the performance of nanocatalysts in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell or PEMFC. A key technical challenge is the sluggish rate for oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode of PEMFC, which requires highly-active and stable catalysts. Our investigation is directed at increasing stability and durability as well as reducing high loading of noble metals in these catalyst materials. Binary and ternary structured nanomaterials, e.g., Pt51V1Co48/C and Pd xCu1-x/C, have been synthesized and tested in a PEMFC, in order to gain a better understanding of their durability and efficiency. In addition to electrochemical characterization, synchrotron x-ray techniques at the Advance Photon Source in Argonne National Lab have also been used for the structural characterization.

  11. Material properties of the Pt electrode deposited on nafion membrane by the impregnation-reduction method.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Muhammad; Jun, Tae-Sun; Kim, Yong Shin

    2013-05-01

    Platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs) were chemically deposited on a Nafion polymer electrolyte membrane by the impregnation-reduction (I-R) procedure to prepare an active electrode for solid electrochemical sensors. Various analysis methods such as SEM, EDX, XRD and cyclic voltammogram (CV) measurements were employed in order to characterize microstructures and electrochemical properties of the Pt layer. At the conditions ([Pt(NH3)4Cl2] = 10 mM, [NaBH4] = 60 mM, 50 degrees C), the porous Pt thin-film, consisting of sphere-like particles formed by the agglomeration of primary polycrystalline Pt NPs with an average crystal size of 13-18 nm, was obtained and confirmed to have a large surface area (roughness factor = 267) and strong adhesion due to the formation of interfacial Pt-Nafion composites. The secondary globular particles were found to have an average diameter of 215 nm and irregular protuberances on the surface. Furthermore, this electrode exhibited well-resolved CV peaks for the hydrogen redox reactions in an acid solution, suggesting the existence of different adsorption sites and good electrochemical behaviors. Pt/Nafion electrodes were prepared under different conditions in [Pt(NH3)4Cl2], [NaBH4] and reaction temperature, and their material properties were discussed from the viewpoint of a Pt growth mechanism. PMID:23858916

  12. Histological assessment of augmented jaw bone utilizing a new collagen barrier membrane compared to a standard barrier membrane to protect a granular bone substitute material.

    PubMed

    Friedmann, Anton; Strietzel, Frank Peter; Maretzki, Burghard; Pitaru, Sandu; Bernimoulin, Jean-Pierre

    2002-12-01

    Successful bone augmentation requires predictable space maintenance and adequate exclusion of those cells that lack osteogenetic potential from the defect area. Natural bone mineral is considered to be osteoconductive and is used as space maker in combination with membrane barrier techniques. The aim of this study was to compare qualitative histological results achieved by using deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) as a space maintainer and a new collagen barrier (Ossix, test group) vs. the same bone substitute and the standard e-PTFE membrane (Gore-Tex), control group). Twenty-eight patients were randomly assigned to the test or the control group. Seven months after augmentation procedures, biopsies were obtained at reentry and were analysed histomorphometrically. In all, 14 specimens of group I (test group, Ossix) and 13 specimens of group II (controls, PTFE-membranes) showed close qualitative similarity of their histologies. Histomorphometrically, total mineralized bone area was 42% +/- 18% in group I vs. 39% +/- 15% in group II. The unmineralized tissue area was 44% +/- 15% vs. 46% +/- 12% and the area of DBBM remnants 14% +/- 9% and 15% +/- 12%, respectively. The differences were statistically nonsignificant (Mann-Whitney test). The occurrence of barrier exposure did not interfere with the histological outcome either in the test or in the control group. The new collagen barrier combined with the DBBM provided qualitative bone regeneration comparable to the standard e-PTFE material combined with the same mineral. PMID:12519332

  13. Novel ceramic-polymer composite membranes for the separation of hazardous liquid waste. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, Y.

    1998-06-01

    'This report summarizes the work progress over the last 1.75 years of a 3 year project. The objectives of the project have been to develop a new class of ceramic-supported polymeric membranes that could be tailored-designed for a wide-range of applications in remediation and pollution prevention. To date, a new class of chemically-modified ceramic membranes was developed for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsions and for the pervaporation removal of volatile organics from aqueous systems. These new ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membranes are fabricated by modifying the pore surface of a ceramic membrane support by a graft polymerization process (Chaimberg and Cohen, 1994). The graft polymerization process consists of activating the membrane surface with alkoxy vinyl silanes onto which vinyl monomers are added via free-radical graft polymerization resulting in a thin surface layer of terminally anchored polymer chains. Reaction conditions are selected based on knowledge of the graft polymerization kinetics for the specific polymer/substrate system. The resultant ceramic-supported polymer (CSP) membrane is a composite structure in which mechanical strength is provided by the ceramic support and the selectivity is determined by the covalently bonded polymer brush layer. Thus, one of the unique attributes of the CSP membrane is that it can be used in environments where the polymer layer is swollen (or even completely miscible) in the mixture to be separated (Castro et al., 1993). It is important to note that the above modification process is carried out under mild conditions (e.g., temperature of about 70 C) and is well suited for large scale commercial application. In a series of studies, the applicability of a polyvinylpyrrolidone CSP membrane was demonstrated for the treatment of oil-in-water emulsion under a variety of flow conditions (Castro et al.,1996). Improved membrane performance was achieved due to minimization of surface adsorption of the oil components

  14. Development of a membrane-based process for the treatment of oily waste waters. Annual report, March 4, 1993--March 5, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    McCray, S.B.

    1995-08-30

    The goal of this program was to develop an economical oily-water treatment system based on reverse-osmosis (RO) membrane technology. The RO system would be used to: (1) reduce oil-production costs by reducing the volume of waste water for which disposal is required; (2) form the basis of a generic waste-water treatment system that can easily be integrated into oil-field operations, especially at production facilities that are small or in remote locations: and (3) produce water clean enough to meet current and anticipated environmental regulations. The specific focus of this program was to develop a hollow-fiber membrane module capable of treating oily waste waters. Typically, the organics in oily waste water swell or dissolve the materials used in conventional polymeric membranes and modules. Our goal was to develop hollow-fiber membranes and modules that were more solvent-resistant than conventional membrane modules. We successfully achieved this goal. During the course of this program. we developed thin-film-composite (TFC) membranes, which consisted of a solvent-resistant selective coating placed on a solvent-resistant hollow-fiber support. These TFC membranes were used in low-cost, hollow-fiber modules, which were made using solvent-resistant components. The modules were tube-side-feed modules, in which the oily waste water travels down the inside (lumen) of the hollow fiber. The selective coating allows water to pass freely through the wall of the fiber, but restricts the transport of oil and grease and some of the dissolved organics and salts in the feed. Using these modules, more than 90% of the oily waste water can be recovered as clean permeate (suitable for discharge), while the remaining 10% is removed as oily-water concentrate (which can be recycled for recovery of the oil or disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner).

  15. Lactose electroisomerization into lactulose: effect of the electrode material, active membrane surface area-to-electrode surface area ratio, and interelectrode-membrane distance.

    PubMed

    Aït-Aissa, Amara; Aïder, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to study and develop an innovative, clean, and environmentally friendly process for lactulose synthesis by electroactivation of lactose. In this work, the electrode material (type 304 stainless steel, titanium, and copper), dimensionless interelectrode-membrane distance at the cathodic compartment (0.36, 0.68, and 1), and the membrane:electrode surface area ratio (0.23, 0.06, and 0.015) were considered to be the factors that could affect the kinetic conversion of lactose into lactulose. The reactions were conducted under an initial lactose concentration of 0.15mol/L at 10°C, Froude number (mixing speed) of 2.05×10(-2), and electric current intensity of 300mA for 30min. The highest lactulose formation yield of 32.50% (0.05mol/L) was obtained by using a copper electrode, interelectrode-membrane distance of 0.36, and membrane:electrode surface area ratio of 0.23. The 2-parameter Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherm models were used for the prediction of the lactose isomerization kinetics as well as the 3-parameter Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model. It was shown that the lactose isomerization kinetics into lactulose followed the Temkin and Langmuir-Freundlich models with coefficients of determination of 0.99 and 0.90 and a relative error of 1.42 to 1.56% and 4.27 to 4.37%, respectively. PMID:24931526

  16. Effect of gas adsorption on acoustic wave propagation in MFI zeolite membrane materials: experiment and molecular simulation.

    PubMed

    Manga, Etoungh D; Blasco, Hugues; Da-Costa, Philippe; Drobek, Martin; Ayral, André; Le Clezio, Emmanuel; Despaux, Gilles; Coasne, Benoit; Julbe, Anne

    2014-09-01

    The present study reports on the development of a characterization method of porous membrane materials which consists of considering their acoustic properties upon gas adsorption. Using acoustic microscopy experiments and atomistic molecular simulations for helium adsorbed in a silicalite-1 zeolite membrane layer, we showed that acoustic wave propagation could be used, in principle, for controlling the membranes operando. Molecular simulations, which were found to fit experimental data, showed that the compressional modulus of the composite system consisting of silicalite-1 with adsorbed He increases linearly with the He adsorbed amount while its shear modulus remains constant in a large range of applied pressures. These results suggest that the longitudinal and Rayleigh wave velocities (VL and VR) depend on the He adsorbed amount whereas the transverse wave velocity VT remains constant. PMID:25089584

  17. Nanostructured TiOx as a catalyst support material for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Richard S.

    Recent interest in the development of new catalyst support materials for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) has stimulated research into the viability of TiO2-based support structures. Specifically, substoichiometric TiO2 (TiOx) has been reported to exhibit a combination of high conductivity, stability, and corrosion resistance. These properties make TiOx-based support materials a promising prospect when considering the inferior corrosion resistance of traditional carbon-based supports. This document presents an investigation into the formation of conductive and stable TiOx thin films employing atomic layer deposition (ALD) and a post deposition oxygen reducing anneal (PDORA). Techniques for manufacturing TiOx-based catalyst support nanostructures by means of ALD in conjunction with carbon black (CB), anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) and silicon nanowires (SiNWs) will also be presented. The composition and thickness of resulting TiOx thin films was determined with the aid of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Film crystal structure was determined with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Film conductivity was calculated using four-point probe (4-PP) and film thickness measurement data. Resulting thin films show a significant decrease of oxygen in ALD TiOx films corresponding with a great increase in conductivity following the PDORA. The effectiveness of the PDORA was also found to be highly dependent on ALD process parameters. TiOx-based nanostructures were coated with platinum using one of three Pt deposition techniques. First, liquid phase deposition (LPD), which was performed at room temperature, provided equal access to catalyst support material surfaces which were suspended in solution. Second, plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD), which was performed at 450°C, provided good Pt

  18. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Sadler, Mary E; Greiner, Anthony D; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Min, Kyungnan; Zhang, Kai; Arabi, Sara; Burbano, Marie S; Kent, Fraser; Shoaf, Robert

    2015-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2014, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, fixed film and anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:26420079

  19. Membrane Processes.

    PubMed

    Pellegrin, Marie-Laure; Burbano, Marie S; Sadler, Mary E; Diamond, Jason; Baker, Simon; Greiner, Anthony D; Arabi, Sara; Wong, Joseph; Doody, Alexandra; Padhye, Lokesh P; Sears, Keith; Kistenmacher, Peter; Kent, Fraser; Tootchi, Leila; Aguinaldo, Jorge; Saddredini, Sara; Schilling, Bill; Min, Kyungnan; McCandless, Robert; Danker, Bryce; Gamage, Neranga P; Wang, Sunny; Aerts, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This review, for literature published in 2015, contains information related to membrane processes for municipal and industrial applications. This review is a subsection of the Treatment Systems section of the annual Water Environment Federation literature review and covers the following topics: pretreatment, membrane bioreactor (MBR) configuration, design, nutrient removal, operation, industrial treatment, anaerobic membrane systems, reuse, microconstituents removal, membrane technology advances, membrane fouling, and modeling. Other sub-sections of the Treatment Systems section that might relate to this literature review include: Biological Fixed-Film Systems, Activated Sludge and Other Aerobic Suspended Culture Processes, Anaerobic Processes, Water Reclamation and Reuse. The following sections might also have related information on membrane processes: Industrial Wastes, Hazardous Wastes, and Fate and Effects of Pollutants. PMID:27620084

  20. Ultra-thin porous glass membranes--an innovative material for the immobilization of active species for optical chemosensors.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Anders, N; Titus, J; Enke, D

    2013-03-30

    In addition to polymers, porous glasses can be used for the immobilization of indicators, chromoionophores or enzymes. Advantages of these materials include, among others, the photochemical and thermal stability. Porous glass membranes (CPG) based on phase-separated alkali borosilicate glasses with thicknesses of 250-300 μm and dimensions of approximately 9-13 mm² were used in this work. The average pore diameter was found to be between 12 and 112 nm. Initially, the membrane permeability for water was determined. Furthermore, the absorption spectra for the water-soaked membranes were recorded optically. CPG membranes which are pH-sensitive were prepared based on the covalent immobilization of thymol blue and a derivative of styryl acridine. In each case, the absorption spectra of the immobilized indicators are shown. The t90-times vary between 4 and 20 min and were determined for the thermodynamic equilibrium. The influence of the ionic strength on the characteristic curve is discussed and detailed results are given. After the storage time of about 900 days a pH-sensitivity for a CPG membrane styryl acridine derivative sample was still detectable. PMID:23598220

  1. Research and development to overcome fouling of membranes. First annual report, October 1, 1989--October 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, S.C.; Sharma, S.K.; Ventura, S.C.; Roberts, D.L.; Ahner, N.

    1992-06-01

    During this first year of the program, we have successfully accomplished the main objective of demonstrating the feasibility of using piezoelectrically assisted ultrafiltration to reduce membrane fouling and enhance the flux through ultrafiltration membranes. A preliminary economic evaluation, accounting for the power consumption of the piezoelectric driver and the extent of permeate flow rate enhancement, has also shown that piezoelectrically assisted ultrafiltration is cost effective and economically competitive with traditional separation processes. Piezoelectric transducers, such as a piezoelectric lead zirconate titanate (PZT) disc or a piezoelectric horn, driven by moderate power, significantly enhance the permeate flux on fouled membranes, presumably because they promote local turbulence. Several experiments were conducted on polysulfone and regenerated cellulose UF membranes fouled during filtration of model feed solutions. Solutions of poly(ethylene glycol) and of high-molecular weight dextran were used as models. We found that we could significantly increase the permeate flux by periodically driving the piezoelectric transducer, horn, or PZT disc, by application of moderate power over short periods of time, from 20 to 90 seconds. Enhancements as high as a factor of 8 were recorded with a few seconds, and enhanced permeate fluxes were maintained over a prolonged period (up to 3 hours). The prolonged flux enhancement makes it feasible to drive the piezoelectric transducer intermittently, thereby reducing the power consumption of the piezoelectric driver.

  2. Probing microscopic material properties inside simulated membranes through spatially resolved three-dimensional local pressure fields and surface tensions

    PubMed Central

    Kasson, Peter M.; Hess, Berk; Lindahl, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Cellular lipid membranes are spatially inhomogeneous soft materials. Materials properties such as pressure and surface tension thus show important microscopic-scale variation that is critical to many biological functions. We present a means to calculate pressure and surface tension in a 3D-resolved manner within molecular-dynamics simulations and show how such measurements can yield important insight. We also present the first corrections to local virial and pressure fields to account for the constraints typically used in lipid simulations that otherwise cause problems in highly oriented systems such as bilayers. Based on simulations of an asymmetric bacterial ion channel in a POPC bilayer, we demonstrate how 3D-resolved pressure can probe for both short-range and long-range effects from the protein on the membrane environment. We also show how surface tension is a sensitive metric for inter-leaflet equilibrium and can be used to detect even subtle imbalances between bilayer leaflets in a membrane-protein simulation. Since surface tension is known to modulate the function of many proteins, this effect is an important consideration for predictions of ion channel function. We outline a strategy by which our local pressure measurements, which we make available within a version of the GROMACS simulation package, may be used to design optimally equilibrated membrane-protein simulations. PMID:23318532

  3. Production of an ion-exchange membrane-catalytic electrode bonded material for electrolytic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takenaka, H.; Torikai, E.

    1986-01-01

    A good bond is achieved by placing a metal salt in solution on one side of a membrane and a reducing agent on the other side so that the reducing agent penetrates the membrane and reduces the metal. Thus, a solution containing Pt, Rh, etc., is placed on one side of the membrane and a reducing agent such as NaBH, is placed on the other side. The bonded metal layer obtained is superior in catalytic activity and is suitable as an electrode in a cell such as for solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis.

  4. Multifunctional-layered materials for creating membrane-restricted nanodomains and nanoscale imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, P.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental platform that allows precise spatial positioning of biomolecules with an exquisite control at nanometer length scales is a valuable tool to study the molecular mechanisms of membrane bound signaling. Using micromachined thin film gold (Au) in layered architecture, it is possible to add both optical and biochemical functionalities in in vitro. Towards this goal, here, I show that docking of complementary DNA tethered giant phospholiposomes on Au surface can create membrane-restricted nanodomains. These nanodomains are critical features to dissect molecular choreography of membrane signaling complexes. The excited surface plasmon resonance modes of Au allow label-free imaging at diffraction-limited resolution of stably docked DNA tethered phospholiposomes, and lipid-detergent bicelle structures. Such multifunctional building block enables realizing rigorously controlled in vitro set-up to model membrane anchored biological signaling, besides serving as an optical tool for nanoscale imaging.

  5. Novel polymer and inorganic/organic hybrid composite materials for proton exchange membrane applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiwei

    In this study, various novel proton exchange membranes (PEM) have been synthesized and investigated for high temperature PEM applications. Sulfonic acid functionalized polysilsesquioxane hybrid membranes with the empirical formula of R-Si-(O)1.5 consist of a highly cross-linked Si-O backbone and pendant organic side chain R, which is terminated in a proton conducting functional group (i.e., sulfonic acid). The membranes exhibited excellent proton conductivities (sigma) of >10-2 S/cm under low humidity conditions and a wide range of temperatures. The fuel cell (FC) performance of the membranes under low humidity conditions has been evaluated. Acid-doped linear meta-polyaniline membranes have been prepared through solution casting of m-PANI. The obtained membrane shows good proton conductivities at temperatures above 100°C, achieving 10-2.7 S/cm under 120°C and practically no humidity conditions. The effects of doping acids, doping levels and humidity on the conductivity are discussed. Polyethylenimine (PEI)/SiO2 nanocomposites membranes have been synthesized through sol-gel processes. The introduction of SiO2 clusters into high molecule weight, linear PEI greatly improved its thermal stability at high temperatures and O2 atmosphere. During the sol-gel processes, trifluoromethanesulfonimide (HTFSI) was added to dope the amine groups of PEI and form immobilized proton-conducting ionic liquids, which provide the hybrid membranes with proton-conducting behavior. The resultant membranes show good proton conductivities at high temperatures and low to zero humidity conditions. The effects of temperature, humidity and mobility of active groups on the conductivity are discussed. Various organic amine/HTFSI ionic group functionalized polysilsesquioxane hybrid membranes have been prepared. The Si-O backbone provides excellent thermal/chemical/mechanical properties and the HTFSI-doped amine end groups provide the proton conducting properties. The membranes exhibited proton

  6. Pressure retarded osmosis for energy production: membrane materials and operating conditions.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Choi, J-S; Lee, S

    2012-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a novel membrane process to produce energy. PRO has the potential to convert the osmotic pressure difference between fresh water (i.e. river water) and seawater to electricity. Moreover, it can recover energy from highly concentrated brine in seawater desalination. Nevertheless, relatively little research has been undertaken for fundamental understanding of the PRO process. In this study, the characteristics of the PRO process were examined using a proof-of-concept device. Forward osmosis (FO), reverse osmosis (RO), and nanofiltration (NF) membranes were compared in terms of flux rate and concentration polarization ratio. The results indicated that the theoretical energy production by PRO depends on the membrane type as well as operating conditions (i.e. back pressure). The FO membrane had the highest energy efficiency while the NF membrane had the lowest efficiency. However, the energy production rate was low due to high internal concentration polarization (ICP) in the PRO membrane. This finding suggests that the control of the ICP is essential for practical application of PRO for energy production. PMID:22546793

  7. Hydrophilicity and antifouling property of membrane materials from cellulose acetate/polyethersulfone in DMAc.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhonghua; Chen, Fushan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, cellulose acetate (CA) was blended with polyethersulfone (PES) to endow the ultrafiltration membrane with the improved hydrophilicity and antifouling property by using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) as the solvent. The effects of blend composition and evaporation time on the mechanical strength and pure water flux were investigated. It was found that the optimal composition of the casting solution was: 18wt% (PES), 4wt% (Polyvinylpyrrolidone K30), 3wt% (CA) and 20s (Evaporation time). The characteristics of CA-PES blend membranes were investigated through the methods of contact angle goniometer, antifouling property, compatibility, thermo gravimetric analysis and SEM. The results showed that the hydrophilicity and antifouling property of CA-PES ultrafiltration membranes were enhanced in comparison with the pure PES membranes. The CA-PES membranes exhibited semi-compatibility and good thermal stability below 270°C. This study provided a potential industrial application prospect of CA-PES membranes prepared in DMAc. PMID:27211301

  8. A Plug-Based Microfluidic System for Dispensing Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) Material Validated by Crystallizing Membrane Proteins in Lipidic Mesophases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Fu, Qiang; Kors, Christopher A.; Stewart, Lance; Nollert, Peter; Laible, Philip D.; Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a plug-based microfluidic system to dispense nanoliter-volume plugs of Lipidic Cubic Phase (LCP) material and subsequently merge the LCP plugs with aqueous plugs. This system was validated by crystallizing membrane proteins in lipidic mesophases, including LCP. This system allows for accurate dispensing of LCP material in nanoliter volumes, prevents inadvertent phase transitions that may occur due to dehydration by enclosing LCP in plugs, and is compatible with the traditional method of forming LCP material using a membrane protein sample, as shown by the successful crystallization of bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium salinarum. Conditions for the formation of LCP plugs were characterized and presented in a phase diagram. This system was also implemented using two different methods of introducing the membrane protein: 1) the traditional method of generating the LCP material using a membrane protein sample and 2) Post LCP-formation Incorporation (PLI), which involves making LCP material without protein, adding the membrane protein sample externally to the LCP material, and allowing the protein to diffuse into the LCP material or into other lipidic mesophases that may result from phase transitions. Crystals of bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Blastochloris viridis were obtained using PLI. The plug-based, LCP-assisted microfluidic system, combined with the PLI method for introducing membrane protein into LCP, should be useful for minimizing consumption of samples and broadening the screening of parameter space in membrane protein crystallization. PMID:20473353

  9. Amphiphilic block copolymers as flexible membrane materials generating structural and functional mimics of green bacterial antenna complexes.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Timlin, J A; Anthony, S M; Montaño, G A

    2016-08-11

    We describe the ability of a short-chain amphiphilic block copolymer to self-assemble to form an artificial supramolecular light-harvesting system. Specifically, we demonstrate that the 2.5 kDa, poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(butadiene) (PEO-b-PBD), exhibits sufficient morphological flexibility as a membrane material and enables generation of mimics of three-dimensional chlorosomes as well as supported membrane bilayers containing energy acceptors. This overall architecture replicates green bacterial light-harvesting function whereby these assemblies exhibit long-range order and three-dimensional morphology similar to native chlorosomes and are capable of energy transfer internally and to external acceptors, located in a supporting biomimetic polymer membrane. Unlike native green bacterial systems that use multiple lipids as a matrix to generate the appropriate environment for chlorosome assembly and function, the described system matrix is comprised entirely of a single polymer amphiphile. This work demonstrates the potential of short-chain amphiphilic block copolymers in generating self-assembled, bio-mimetic membrane architectures, and in doing so, generates scalable, spatial-energetic landscapes for photonic applications. Finally, the results presented provide evidence of minimal requirements to induce chlorosome-like organization and function. PMID:27481550

  10. Insights into the flexibility of ZrMxOy (M = Na, Mg, Al) nanofibrous membranes as promising infrared stealth materials.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xue; Bai, Ying; Yu, Jianyong; Ding, Bin

    2016-04-21

    A surprising brittle to flexible transition in ZrMxOy (M = Na, Mg, Al) nanofibrous membranes was found by varying the undersized dopant species and content. The fiber morphology, crystalline structure, and pore structure of the ZrMxOy nanofibrous membranes can be significantly modulated by varying the dopant valence from +1 to 3 and the dopant content from 1 to 20 mol%, respectively. Meanwhile, a classical Hall-Petch effect was revealed for the ZrMxOy nanofibrous membranes systems, which corresponded to a nanocrystalline size of 22.8 nm and an enhanced flexibility of 23 mN. Moreover, the substitutional solid solution and interstitial solid solution dissolution processes of Na, Mg, and Al into ZrO2 were analyzed using vacancy compensation and dopant interstitial compensation mechanisms, respectively. Most importantly, the flexible Al doped zirconia nanofibrous membranes exhibit a low infrared emissivity of 0.589 and 0.703 in the 3-5 μm and 8-14 μm wavebands, respectively, which suggests them to be a promising candidate for infrared stealth materials in the confrontation strategy field for personnel, aircraft, missiles, satellites, etc. PMID:26974663

  11. Theoretical and computational studies of renewable energy materials: Room temperature ionic liquids and proton exchange membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shulu

    2011-12-01

    Two kinds of renewable energy materials, room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and proton exchange membranes (PEMs), especially Nafion, are studied by computational and theoretical approaches. The ultimate purpose of the present research is to design novel materials to meet the future energy demands. To elucidate the effect of alkyl side chain length and anion on the structure and dynamics of the mixtures, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three RTILs/water mixtures at various water mole fractions: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium (BMIM+)/BF4-, 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium (OMIM+)/BF4-, and OMIM +/Cl- are performed. Replacing the BMIM + cation with OMIM+ results in stronger aggregation of the cations as well as a slower diffusion of the anions, and replacing the BF4- anion with Cl- alters the water distribution at low water mole fractions and slows diffusion of the mixtures. Potential experimental manifestations of these behaviors in both cases are provided. Proton solvation properties and transport mechanisms are studied in hydrated Nafion, by using the self-consistent multistate empirical valence bond (SCI-MS-EVB) method. It is found that by stabilizing a more Zundel-like (H5O 2+) structure in the first solvation shells, the solvation of excess protons, as well as the proton hydration structure are both influenced by the sulfonate groups. Hydrate proton-related hydrogen bond networks are observed to be more stable than those with water alone. In order to characterize the nature of the proton transport (PT), diffusive motion, Arrhenius activation energies, and transport pathways are calculated and analyzed. Analysis of diffusive motion suggests that (1) a proton-hopping mechanism dominates the proton transport for the studied water loading levels and (2) there is an obvious degree of anti-correlation between the proton hopping and the vehicular transport. The activation energy drops rapidly with an increasing water content when the water loading level is smaller

  12. Electrospun Polycaprolactone Membrane Incorporated with Biosynthesized Silver Nanoparticles as Effective Wound Dressing Material.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Roshmi; Soumya, K R; Mathew, Jyothis; Radhakrishnan, E K

    2015-08-01

    Biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) incorporated polycaprolactone (PCL) nanomembrane was prepared by electrospinning as a cost-effective nanocomposite for application as an antimicrobial agent against wound infection. The nanocomposite membrane was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Scanning Electron microscopy (SEM). The hydrophilicity analysis of electrospun membranes as evaluated by water contact angle measurement showed the change of hydrophobicity of PCL to hydrophilic upon incorporation of silver nanoparticles. Better mechanical properties were also observed for PCL membrane due to the incorporation of silver nanoparticles and are highly supportive to explore its biomedical applications. Further antibacterial analysis of silver nanoparticle-incorporated PCL membrane against common wound pathogens coagulase-negative Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus showed remarkable activity. As biosynthesized AgNPs are least explored for clinical applications, the current study is a promising cost-effective method to explore the development of silver nanoparticle-based electrospun nanocomposite to resist wound-associated infection. PMID:26113218

  13. Ultrathin spinel membrane-encapsulated layered lithium-rich cathode material for advanced Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Li, Ning; Su, Yuefeng; Zhang, Linjing; Bao, Liying; Wang, Jing; Chen, Lai; Zheng, Yu; Dai, Liqin; Peng, Jingyuan; Chen, Shi

    2014-06-11

    Lack of high-performance cathode materials has become a technological bottleneck for the commercial development of advanced Li-ion batteries. We have proposed a biomimetic design and versatile synthesis of ultrathin spinel membrane-encapsulated layered lithium-rich cathode, a modification by nanocoating. The ultrathin spinel membrane is attributed to the superior high reversible capacity (over 290 mAh g(-1)), outstanding rate capability, and excellent cycling ability of this cathode, and even the stubborn illnesses of the layered lithium-rich cathode, such as voltage decay and thermal instability, are found to be relieved as well. This cathode is feasible to construct high-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries. PMID:24844948

  14. Proceedings of the Seventh Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials. Fossil Energy AR and TD Materials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1993-07-01

    Objective of the AR&TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The 37 papers are arranged into 3 sessions: ceramics, new alloys/intermetallics, and new alloys/advanced austenitics. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  15. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-08-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations.

  16. Educators Guide to Free Science Materials, 11th Annual Edition--1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saterstrom, Mary Horkheimer; Renner, John W.

    This eleventh edition of the Educators Guide to Free Science Materials is devoted exclusively to free science materials, based on the cross-media approach. It is designed to provide a continuing means of identifying existing materials that are currently available. It is a complete, up-to-date, annotated schedule of selected free or inexpensive…

  17. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) Fiscal Year 1999 annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    2000-10-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1999 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

  18. A trans-well-based cellular model for the rapid pre-evaluation of tympanic membrane repair materials.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Han; Su, Chin-Hui; Tseng, How

    2016-08-01

    It is important to have a standardized tympanic membrane (TM) perforation platform to evaluate the various myringoplasty materials that have been studied and developed extensively during recent years. However, currently there are no cellular models specifically designed for this purpose, and animal models remain unsatisfactory. The purpose of this study is to propose an inexpensive, readily available, well-controlled, and easy-to-create cellular model as a substitute for use in the evaluation of TM repairing materials. A trans-well model was created using a cell culture insert with a round hole created at the center of the polycarbonate membrane. HaCaT cells were cultured on the fenestrated culture insert, and the desired myringoplasty graft was placed at the center of the window for one week and observed by fluorescent microscopy under vital staining. Under this cellular model, there was notable migration of HaCaT cells onto the positive control graft (rabbit fascia), while only a few cell clusters were observed on the negative control graft (paper). Model validation showed that the cell migration ratio for the PLLA + 1% hyaluronic acid (HA) graft is significantly higher than using myringoplasty paper, poly L-lactide (PLLA), or PLLA + 0.5% HA (p < 0.05). This trans-well-based cellular model might be a useful pre-evaluation platform for the evaluation of TM repairing materials. The model is inexpensive, readily available, easy to create, and standardized for use. PMID:26335291

  19. Materials Presented at the MU-SPIN Tenth Annual Users' Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James L., Jr.; Shukla, Pooja

    2000-01-01

    The Minority University-Space Interdisciplinary Network (MU-SPIN) Program and NASA's Minority University Research and Education Division (MURED) both reached their 10th anniversaries. In honor of this occasion, the 2000 Annual Users' Conference held at Morris Brown College in Atlanta, Georgia, September 11-15, 2000, was the first to be jointly hosted by MU-SPIN and MURED. With the theme 'Celebrating Our Tenth Year With Our Eyes on the Prize,' the conference provided a national forum for showcasing successful MU-SPIN and MURED Program (MUREP) experiences to enhance faculty/student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education.

  20. Materials Presented at the MU-SPIN Ninth Annual Users' Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, James, Jr.; Brown, Robin L.

    2000-01-01

    MU-SPIN's Ninth Annual Users' Conference was held from September 21-25, 1999, and hosted by Florida International University, a predominantly Hispanic-serving institution located in Miami, Florida. Its theme was A New MU-SPIN for the New Millennium. The MU-SPIN conference focused on showcasing successful experiences with information technology to enhance faculty and student development in areas of scientific and technical research and education. And, it provided a forum for discussing increased participation of MU-SPIN schools in NASA Flight Missions and NASA Educational and Public Outreach activities.

  1. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1993 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department. The program descriptions consist of a funding summary for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research, and detailed project summaries with project goals and accomplishments. The FY 1993 budget summary table for DOE Materials Activities in each of the programs is presented.

  2. The role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry part II: The effect of bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials on angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Asatourian, Armen; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Background In implant dentistry, bone substitute materials and barrier membranes are used in different treatments including guided bone regeneration (GBR), socket preservation, alveolar ridge augmentation, maxillary sinus elevation, and filling bony defects around the inserted dental implant. One of the most important factors in prognosis of treatments using these materials is the growth of new blood vessels in applied areas. Present review was performed to evaluate the effect of the bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials on angiogenesis events. Material and Methods An electronic search was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases via OVID using the keywords mentioned in the PubMed and MeSH headings regarding the role of angiogenesis in implant dentistry from January 2000-April 2014. Results Of the 5,622 articles identified in our initial search results, only 33 met the inclusion criteria set for this review. Among bone substitute materials the autogenous bone-grafts, and among the barrier membranes the collagenous membranes, had the highest angiogenic potentials. Other bone-grafting materials or membranes were mostly used with pro-angiogenic factors to enhance their angiogenic properties. Conclusions Angiogenesis is one of the key factors, which plays a critical role in success rate of GBR technique and is seriously considered in manufacturing bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials. However, there is still lack of clinical and in-vivo studies addressing the effect of angiogenesis in treatments using bone-grafting and barrier membrane materials. Key words:Angiogenesis, bone-grafting materials, GBR, ridge augmentation, sinus elevation, socket preservation. PMID:27031074

  3. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) annual technical report, fiscal year 1984 with fiscal year 1985 data

    SciTech Connect

    1985-07-01

    The Department of Energy funded about 374 million dollars of materials science and technology activities in both fiscal years 1984 and 1985. These funds and the commensurate program management responsibilities resided in 21 DOE program offices, each of which has its own mission and responsibilities. The Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) provides a formal mechanism to insure coordinated planning and maximum programmatic effectiveness for the Department's 374 million dollar per year materials effort. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research who in turn has oversight responsibilities for proper coordination of the technical programs of the Department. In carrying out this responsibility, EMaCC hosts meetings, organizes working groups, and publishes an annual technical report. This report is mandated by the EMaCC Terms of Reference. Its purpose is to disseminate information on the DOE materials programs for more effective coordination. It describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department for FY 1984, contains funding information for FYs 1984 and 1985, and summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1985.

  4. Abstracts: Eighth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials. Fossil Energy Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    Abstracts are presented for about 40 papers. The Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials program is an integrated materials research activity of the fossil energy coal program, whose objective is to conduct R and D for all advanced coal conversion and utilization technologies. The program is aimed at understanding materials behavior in coal system environments and the development of new materials for improving plant operations and reliability. A generic approach is used for addressing multiple coal technologies; for example, the hot-gas particulate filter development is applicable to pressurized fluidized bed combustion, integrated coal gasification combined-cycle, coal combustion, and indirectly fired combined-cycle systems.

  5. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials: FY 2014 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.

    2014-10-01

    This annual reports presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project is divided into three tasks: 1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; 2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and 3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonproportionality, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the three tasks is provided in this Annual Report. Furthermore, peer-reviewed articles published this FY or currently under review and presentations given this FY are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  6. Development and function of membrane systems in plant tissue. Annual technical progress report, 15 September 1981-15 August 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, J B

    1982-01-01

    Over the past 11 months we have continued investigation of ion transport mechanisms in corn roots and mitochondria. In mitochondria we find that only citrate and isocitrate are transported by the H/sup +//citrate symporter. However, the in vivo function of this carrier remains in doubt because citrate does not appear to be an effective substrate for corn mitochondria. Studies with roots have been directed to why various types of injury or shock all result in temporary blockage of the H/sup +/-efflux pump in the plasmamembrane. It appears this may be due to an injury-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ influx into the tissue, which by raising free Ca/sup 2 +/ in the cytosal activates calmodulin (CaM). In turn, the Ca.CaM complex appears to activate protein kinase, phosphorylating membrane proteins. It is possible that one of these phosphorylated proteins is responsible for inactivation of the H/sup +/-ATPase. Future work is planned around the consequences of Ca/sup 2 +/ influx into the root cell subsequent to injury, investigating the recovery of the H/sup +/-ATPase and the initiation of the biosyntheses which lead to augmented ion transport.

  7. ENZYMES FOR DEGRADATION OF ENERGETIC MATERIALS AND DEMILITARIZATION OF EXPLOSIVES STOCKPILES, SERDP ANNUAL (INTERIM) REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The current stockpile of energetic materials requiring disposal contains about half a million tons. Through 2001. over 2.1 million tons are expected to pass through the stockpile for disposal. Safe and environmentally acceptable methods for disposing of these materials are needed...

  8. Sulfur-tolerant anode materials: Annual report, September 1986-September 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Remick, R.J.; Osif, T,; Lawson, M.

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of the first year's technical effort performed on a program identifying and evaluating alternative anode materials for use in molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) operating with high levels of sulfur contaminants in the fuel. A literature survey was performed on materials for use in the MCFC and on materials exhibiting good electrical conductivity at high temperature. A list candidate materials having a reported electrical conductivity in excess of 0.1 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ was compiled. 19 candidate materials were selected, and nine have been tested for electrical conductivity and for stability in the molten eletrolyte. To date, only cobalt metal has proved to be stable under all test conditions. Several water-gas shift catalysts were also evaluated for their catalytic activity and sulfur resistance under conditions prevailing in the MCFC anode. 19 refs., 24 figs., 21 tabs

  9. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-10-18

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed.

  10. Metallic Membrane Materials Development for Hydrogen Production from Coal Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Dogan; B.H. Howard; D.E. Alman

    2012-02-26

    The goals of Office of Clean Coal are: (1) Improved energy security; (2) Reduced green house gas emissions; (3) High tech job creation; and (4) Reduced energy costs. The goals of the Hydrogen from Coal Program are: (1) Prove the feasibility of a 40% efficient, near zero emissions IGCC plant that uses membrane separation technology and other advanced technologies to reduce the cost of electricity by at least 35%; and (2) Develop H{sub 2} production and processing technologies that will contribute {approx}3% in improved efficiency and 12% reduction in cost of electricity.

  11. Eggshell membrane biomaterial as a platform for applications in materials science.

    PubMed

    Baláž, Matej

    2014-09-01

    Eggshell membrane (ESM) is a unique biomaterial, which is generally considered as waste. However, it has extraordinary properties which can be utilized in various fields and its potential applications are therefore now being widely studied. The first part of this review focuses on the chemical composition and morphology of ESM. The main areas of ESM application are discussed in the second part. These applications include its utilization as a biotemplate for the synthesis of nanoparticles; as a sorbent of heavy metals, organics, dyes, sulfonates and fluorides; as the main component of biosensors; in medicine; and various other applications. For each area of interest, a detailed literature survey is given. PMID:24681370

  12. Membranes for periodontal regeneration: From commercially available to spatially designed and functionally graded materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottino, Marco Cicero

    The aging of the global population will lead to a considerable increase in the number of surgical and restorative procedures related to oral rehabilitation or periodontal regeneration. Periodontitis is one of the most aggressive pathologies that concern the integrity of the periodontal system that can lead to the destruction of the periodontium. Guided tissue and guided bone regeneration (GTR/GBR) have been used for the repair and regeneration of periodontal tissues by utilizing an occlusive membrane. The goal of this dissertation is to advance the knowledge in the area of periodontal regeneration by investigating the properties of a commercially available freeze-dried collagen-based graft (AlloDermRTM) and by designing/fabricating a functionally graded membrane (FGM) via multilayer electrospinning. The effects of different rehydration times and of a simultaneous rehydration/crosslinking procedure on the biomechanical properties and matrix stability of the commercially available membrane were investigated. The results revealed that there are significant changes on the biomechanical properties of the graft as rehydration time increases. Moreover, it was demonstrated that the simultaneous rehydration/crosslinking protocol has a synergistic effect in terms of enhancing biomechanical properties. A FGM consisting of a core-layer (CL) and two functional surface-layers (SL) was fabricated via sequential electrospinning. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (n-HAp) were incorporated to enhance bone formation (SL facing bone defect), and metronidazole benzoate (MET) was added to prevent bacterial colonization (SL facing the epithelial tissue). Degradation studies performed on both the CL and the FGM confirmed that the design holds promise in terms of providing the required mechanical stability to avoid membrane collapse and, therefore, enhance bone regeneration. Finally, it was demonstrated that MET incorporation into the SL that would face epithelial tissue is effective in

  13. Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials FY 2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Xie, YuLong; Wu, Dangxin; Prange, Micah P.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Campbell, Luke W.; Wang, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    This annual report presents work carried out during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Science-Driven Candidate Search for New Scintillator Materials” (Project number: PL13-SciDriScintMat-PD05) and led by Dr. Fei Gao. This project is divided into three tasks, namely (1) Ab initio calculations of electronic properties, electronic response functions and secondary particle spectra; (2) Intrinsic response properties, theoretical light yield, and microscopic description of ionization tracks; and (3) Kinetics and efficiency of scintillation: nonlinearity, intrinsic energy resolution, and pulse shape discrimination. Detailed information on the findings and insights obtained in each of these three tasks are provided in this report. Additionally, papers published this fiscal year or currently in review are included in Appendix together with presentations given this fiscal year.

  14. High Temperature Materials Laboratory Fourteenth Annual Report: October 2000 through September 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Pasto, A.E.

    2002-05-16

    The HTML User Program continued to work with industrial, academic, and governmental users this year, accepting 92 new projects and developing 48 new user agreements. Table 1 presents the breakdown of these statistics. Figure 1 depicts the continued growth in user agreements and user projects. You will note that the total number of HTML proposals has now exceeded 1000. Also, the large number of new agreements bodes well for the future. At the end of the report, we present a list of proposals to the HTML and a list of agreements between HTML and universities and industries, broken down by state. Program highlights this year included several outstanding user projects (some of which are highlighted in later sections), the annual meeting of the HTML Programs Senior Advisory Committee, and approval by ORNL for the construction of a building to house our new aberration-corrected electron microscope (ACEM) and several other sensitive electron and optical instruments.

  15. Broad spectrum antibacterial and antifungal polymeric paint materials: synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and membrane-active mode of action.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Jiaul; Akkapeddi, Padma; Yadav, Vikas; Manjunath, Goutham B; Uppu, Divakara S S M; Konai, Mohini M; Yarlagadda, Venkateswarlu; Sanyal, Kaustuv; Haldar, Jayanta

    2015-01-28

    Microbial attachment and subsequent colonization onto surfaces lead to the spread of deadly community-acquired and hospital-acquired (nosocomial) infections. Noncovalent immobilization of water insoluble and organo-soluble cationic polymers onto a surface is a facile approach to prevent microbial contamination. In the present study, we described the synthesis of water insoluble and organo-soluble polymeric materials and demonstrated their structure-activity relationship against various human pathogenic bacteria including drug-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE), and beta lactam-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae as well as pathogenic fungi such as Candida spp. and Cryptococcus spp. The polymer coated surfaces completely inactivated both bacteria and fungi upon contact (5 log reduction with respect to control). Linear polymers were more active and found to have a higher killing rate than the branched polymers. The polymer coated surfaces also exhibited significant activity in various complex mammalian fluids such as serum, plasma, and blood and showed negligible hemolysis at an amount much higher than minimum inhibitory amounts (MIAs). These polymers were found to have excellent compatibility with other medically relevant polymers (polylactic acid, PLA) and commercial paint. The cationic hydrophobic polymer coatings disrupted the lipid membrane of both bacteria and fungi and thus showed a membrane-active mode of action. Further, bacteria did not develop resistance against these membrane-active polymers in sharp contrast to conventional antibiotics and lipopeptides, thus the polymers hold great promise to be used as coating materials for developing permanent antimicrobial paint. PMID:25541751

  16. Nb doped TiO2 as a Cathode Catalyst Support Material for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, Alexander W.

    In order to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases and reduce dependence on the use of fossil fuels, it is necessary to pursue alternative sources of energy. Transportation is a major contributor to the emission of greenhouse gases due to the use of fossil fuels in the internal combustion engine. To reduce emission of these pollutants into the atmosphere, research is needed to produce alternative solutions for vehicle transportation. Low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are energy conversion devices that provide an alternative to the internal combustion engine, however, they still have obstacles to overcome to achieve large scale implementation. T he following work presents original research with regards to the development of Nb doped TiO2 as a cathode catalyst support material for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The development of a new process to synthesize nanoparticles of Nb doped TiO2 with controlled compositions is presented as well as methods to scale up the process and optimize the synthesis for the aforementioned application. In addition to this, comparison of both electrochemical activity and durability with current state of the art Pt on high surface area carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) is investigated. Effects of the strong metal-support interaction on the electrochemical behavior of these materials is also observed and discussed.

  17. Proceedings of the sixth annual conference on fossil energy materials. Fossil Energy AR and TD Mateials Program

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R.

    1992-07-01

    The Sixth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials was held in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, on May 12--14, 1992. The meeting was sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Fossil Energy through the Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR&TD) Materials Program, and ASM International. The objective of the AR&TD Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The management of the Program has been decentralized to the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as the technical support contractor. The research is performed by staff members at ORNL and by a substantial number of researchers at other national laboratories, universities, and in private industry. The work is divided into the following categories: (1) ceramics, (2) development and corrosion resistance of iron aluminide, advanced austenitic and chromium-niobium alloys, and (3) technology assessment and technology transfer. This conference is held each year to review the work on all of the projects of the Program. The agenda for the meeting is given in Appendix A, and a list of attendees is presented in Appendix B. ASM International cosponsored the conference, for which we are especially grateful.

  18. Novel Methods of Tritium Sequestration: High Temperature Gettering and Separation Membrane Materials Discovery for Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Franglin; Sholl, David; Brinkman, Kyle; Lyer, Ratnasabapathy; Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2015-01-22

    This project is aimed at addressing critical issues related to tritium sequestration in next generation nuclear energy systems. A technical hurdle to the use of high temperature heat from the exhaust produced in the next generation nuclear processes in commercial applications such as nuclear hydrogen production is the trace level of tritium present in the exhaust gas streams. This presents a significant challenge since the removal of tritium from the high temperature gas stream must be accomplished at elevated temperatures in order to subsequently make use of this heat in downstream processing. One aspect of the current project is to extend the techniques and knowledge base for metal hydride materials being developed for the ''hydrogen economy'' based on low temperature absorption/desorption of hydrogen to develop materials with adequate thermal stability and an affinity for hydrogen at elevated temperatures. The second focus area of this project is to evaluate high temperature proton conducting materials as hydrogen isotope separation membranes. Both computational and experimental approaches will be applied to enhance the knowledge base of hydrogen interactions with metal and metal oxide materials. The common theme between both branches of research is the emphasis on both composition and microstructure influence on the performance of sequestration materials.

  19. Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories annual report, fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.R.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1993. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

  20. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMACC) Fiscal Year 1980. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    This report contains information on the FY 1980 Department of Energy materials research and development programs and on those programs/projects with a significant materials activity. It was compiled by the Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). The previous report in this series summarized the FY 1979 programs (DOE/US-0002-2). The report is separated into sections, each containing programs reporting to one of six Assistant Secretaries of the Department: Conservation and Solar Energy, Defense Programs, Environment, Fossil Energy, Nuclear Energy, and Resource Applications; and one section, Energy Research, responsible to the Director of the Office of Energy Research. For convenience in locating the generic types of materials activities, an Appendix has been added that contains a primary keyword index.

  1. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), Fiscal year 1992. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The DOE EMaCC serves to coordinate the department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the department. This document presents summaries of budgets and of research projects, arranged according to the offices of energy efficiency and renewable energy, energy research, environmental restoration and waste management, nuclear energy, civilian radioactive waste management, defense, and fossil energy. A directory and a keyword index are included.

  2. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 1983

    SciTech Connect

    1984-03-01

    The following text briefly describes the materials research programs of the Department of Energy. It is organized by office and organizational charts are provided to allow easy identification of the materials research programs of each office. These program descriptions have been prepared from inputs submitted by many different EMaCC members. This report is not a comprehensive summary of the Department's programs, but rather a compilation of the programs of those offices that submitted inputs.

  3. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2004

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-08-31

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The FY 2004 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2004 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2004 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  4. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2006-09-29

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The FY 2004 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2004 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2004 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  5. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 2002

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2003-08-08

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. Topical subcommittees of the EMaCC are responsible for conducting seminars and otherwise facilitating information flow between DOE organizational units in materials areas of particular importance to the Department. The EMaCC Terms of Reference were recently modified and developed into a Charter that was approved on June 5, 2003. As a result of this reorganization, the existing subcommittees were disbanded and new subcommittees are being formed. The EMaCC Charter and the memorandum approving it are presented in the Appendix of this report. The FY 2002 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on page 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 10. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 2002 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 2002 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office, the Office of Science, and the National Nuclear Security Administration. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  6. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), fiscal year 1985. Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1986-05-01

    The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department's materials programs and to further the effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meeting/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. Four topical subcommittees on Structural Ceramics, Batteries and Fuel Cells, Radioactive Waste Containment, and Steel are established and are continuing their own program. The FY 1985 and FY 1986 meeting program is given. The EMaCC aids in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and inter-agency compilations. Brief summaries of the materials research programs associated with each office and division are presented, including tables listing individual projects and the FY 1985 budgets for each. More details on the individual projects within the divisions and the specific tasks or subcontracts within the various projects are given in the paragraph descriptions.

  7. Materials studies for preventing corrosion in condensing environments. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.; Sugama, T.

    1991-10-01

    The objective of this project is to determine the fundamental interfacial requirements for low-cost, organic and inorganic materials resistive to corrosion in condensing furnace exhausts. This research effort is being focused to provide information regarding corrosion resistance, heat transfer, material cost, fabrication method and cost, and product reliability since all are important in the final design and production of a heat exchanger. Results to date indicate that organic and inorganic-type polymer coating systems applied to low cost metals such as mild steel and aluminum provide good corrosion protection. The thermal stability of these polymers plus the identification of the interfacial requirements needed to utilize them with reactive filler materials should also make their use as bulk composites feasible.

  8. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 1995

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1996-12-01

    The FY 1995 budget summary table for DOE Materials Activities is presented on pages 6-8. Following the budget summary table is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 1995 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department A mission statement a budget summary table listing the project titles and FY 1995 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project as appropriate.

  9. PREFACE: Annual Conference on Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies - FM&NT 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, Andris; Muzikante, Inta; Zicans, Janis

    2011-06-01

    The International Conference Functional Materials and Nanotechnologies (FM&NT-2011) was held in Riga, 5-8 April 2011 in the Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia (ISSP LU). The conference was organized in co-operation with projects ERANET 'MATERA' and National Research programme in Materials Science and Information Technologies. The purpose of the conference was to bring together scientists, engineers and students from universities, research institutes and related industrial companies active in the field of advanced material science and materials technologies trends and future activities. Scientific themes covered in the conference are: theoretical research and modelling of processes and materials; materials for energetics, renewable energy technologies and phtovoltaics; multifunctional inorganic, organic and hybrid materials for photonic, micro and nanoelectronic applications and innovative methods for research of nanostructures; advanced technologies for synthesis and research of nanostructured materials, nanoparticles, thin films and coatings; application of innovative materials in science and economics. The number of registered participants from 17 countries was nearly 300. During three days of the conference 22 invited, 69 oral reports and 163 posters were presented. 40 papers, based on these reports, are included in this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. Additional information about FM&NT-2011 is available in its homepage http://www.fmnt.lu.lv. The Organizing Committee would like to thank all speakers, contributors, session chairs, referees and meeting staff for their efforts in making the FM&NT-2011 successful. The Organizing Committee sincerely hopes that that the conference gave all participants new insights into the widespread development of functional materials and nanotechnologies and would enhance the circulation of information released at the meeting. Andris Sternberg Inta Muzikante Janis Zicans

  10. Ceramic tube materials and processing development. Annual report Feb-Oct 82

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, D.W.; Green, K.E.; Oliver, R.E.; Rivkin, M.I.

    1983-12-01

    Evaluation of state-of-the-art in ceramic recuperator design and application, including the current requirements (specifications) for reaction bonded SiC tubing. Discussion of the perceived joining problem(s) and comments on possible solutions. Initial examination of low cost raw materials and qualitative discussion of the ceramic produced from selected grades of same.

  11. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P.; Park, Y.; Vaidya, R.U.; Hollis, K.J.; Kung, H.H.

    1999-03-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the US processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive US processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Johns Manville Corporation targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. With Combustion Technology Inc., they are developing silicide-based periscope sight tubes for the direct observation of glass melts. With Accutru International Corporation, they are developing silicide-based protective sheaths for self-verifying temperature sensors which may be used in glass furnaces and other industrial applications. The progress made on the program in this period is summarized.

  12. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.; Schnitzer, H. S.

    1980-07-01

    The goal of this program is to identify, evaluate, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long-life solar cell modules. Technical activities during the past year have covered a number of topics and have emphasized the development of solar module encapsulation technology that employs ethylene/vinyl acetate, copolymer (EVA) as the pottant. These activities have included: (1) continued production of encapsulation grade EVA in sheet form to meet the needs of the photovoltaic industry; (2) investigations of three non-blocking techniques for EVA sheet; (3) performed an economic analysis of the high volume production of each pottant in order to estimate the large volume selling price (EVA, EPDM, aliphatic urethane, PVC plastisol, and butyl acrylate); (4) initiated an experimental corrosion protection program to determine if metal components could be successfully protected by encapsulation; (5) began an investigation to determine the maximum temperature which can be tolerated by the candidate pottant material in the event of hot spot heating or other temperature override; (6) continuation of surveys of potentially useful outer cover materials; and (7) continued with the accelerated artificial weathering of candidate encapsulation materials. Study results are presented. (WHK)

  13. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

    1982-07-01

    Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

  14. Heavy fermion and actinide materials. Annual technical progress report, February 1, 1992--January 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    During this period, 1/N expansions have been systematically applied to the calculation of the properties of highly correlated electron systems. These studies include examinations of (a) the class of materials known as heavy fermion semi-conductors, (b) the high energy spectra of heavy fermion systems, and (c) the doped oxide superconductors.

  15. Energy materials coordinating committee (EMaCC). Annual technical report, fiscal year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1999-07-31

    The FY 1998 budget summary for DOE Materials Activities is presented on pages 7 and 8. The distribution of these funds between DOE laboratories, private industry, academia and other organizations is presented in tabular form on page 9. Following the budget summary is a set of detailed program descriptions for the FY 1998 DOE Materials activities. These descriptions are presented according to the organizational structure of the Department. A mission statement, a budget summary listing the project titles and FY 1998 funding, and detailed project summaries are presented for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research. The project summaries also provide DOE, laboratory, academic and industrial contacts for each project, as appropriate.

  16. An Overview of Polymeric Materials for Propellant Tank Membrane Applications in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valencia Bel, F.; Caramelli, F.

    2004-10-01

    Diaphragms and bladders are used as positive expulsion devices in liquid propulsion systems since the early stages of space flight. This paper presents an identification of the critical properties of polymeric materials for positive expulsion systems and an overview of the applicable mechanical and chemical performance requirements identified and tested in the frame of ESA technology development initiatives either carried out as R&D activities or within specific hardware development programs for Spacecraft projects. A set of requirements based on those experiences is presented. Finally, an approach of modelling and a comparison with experimental results is proposed for the identified critical properties. Materials currently adopted or considered suitable for potential utilisation in Monopropellant (Hydrazine) and Bipropellant systems (UDMH-NTO) have been treated. Possible alternative materials have also been described to provide a wider view of potential technological solutions.

  17. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of the program is to identify and evaluate encapsulation materials and processes for the protection of silicon solar cells for service in a terrestrial environment. Aging and degradation studies were performed including: thermal aging, sunlamp exposures, aging in controlled environment reactors and outdoor photothermal aging devices, and metal catalyzed degradation. Other tests addressed water absorption, primers and adhesives, soiling experiments, and corrosion protection. (LEW)

  18. Pressure driven spinning: A multifaceted approach for preparing nanoscaled functionalized fibers, scaffolds, and membranes with advanced materials

    PubMed Central

    Jayasinghe, Suwan N.; Suter, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning, a flexible jet-based fiber, scaffold, and membrane fabrication approach, has been elucidated as having significance to the heath sciences. Its capabilities have been most impressive as it possesses the ability to spin composite fibers ranging from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. Nonetheless, electrospinning has limitations and hazards, negating its wider exploration, for example, the inability to handle highly conducting suspensions, to its hazardous high voltage. Hence, to date electrospinning has undergone an exhaustive research regime to a point of cliché. Thus, in the work reported herein we unveil a competing technique to electrospinning, which has overcome the above limitations and hazards yet comparable in capabilities. The fiber preparation approach unearthed herein is referred to as “pressure driven spinning (PDS).” The driving mechanism exploited in this fiber spinning process is the pressurized by-pass flow. This mechanism allows the drawing of either micro- or nanosized fibers while processing polymeric suspensions containing a wide range of advanced materials spanning structural, functional, and biological entities. Similar to electrospinning if the collection time of these continuous formed fibers is varied, composite scaffolds and membranes are generated. In keeping with our interests, multicompositional structural entities such as these could have several applications in biology and medicine, for example, ranging from the development of three-dimensional cultures (including disease models) to the development of synthetic tissues and organ structures to advanced approaches for controlled and targeted therapeutics. PMID:20644675

  19. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Zueqian

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  20. Novel: Eggshell membrane template assisted synthesis of Mn2O3 electrode material for supercapacitor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholkappiyan, R.; Naveen, A. Nirmalesh; Vishista, K.

    2015-06-01

    Novel Mn2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized using eggshell membrane as a template. The prepared nanoparticles were calcined at 800 °C and subjected to XRD measurement that reveals the formation of cubic structure with average grain size of 67 nm. From FTIR study, the lower vibrational band appearing in the range of 560-680 cm-1 confirms the presence of Mn2O3 in the synthesized samples. The morphology analysis of the synthesized nanoparticles shows the presence of pores inside the grain boundaries. Electrochemical performances of the synthesized nanoparticles were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and AC impedance analysis. From the results, the prepared nanoparticles show pseudocapacitive characteristics. The maximum specific capacitance of Mn2O3 nanoparticles was found to be 394 F/g at a scan rate of 5 mV s-1. Nyquist plot shows lower value of charge transfer resistance, indicating the good electrical conductivity of the Mn2O3 electrode which accounts for the improved electrochemical performance of the supercapacitors.

  1. Chemical interactions between protein molecules and polymer membrane materials. Annual progress report, August 1, 1992--July 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Belfort, G.; Koehler, J.; Wood, J.

    1993-07-15

    The Surface Force Apparatus is now operable; data collection is automatic. Hen egg lysozyme was chosen as model protein. Protein-protein, protein-mica, protein-polymer, and protein-surfactant interactions were studied. Circular dichroism was used to study changes in protein structure during adsorption.

  2. Comparison of emulsifying properties of milk fat globule membrane materials isolated from different dairy by-products.

    PubMed

    Phan, T T Q; Le, T T; Van der Meeren, P; Dewettinck, K

    2014-01-01

    Emulsifying properties of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) materials isolated from reconstituted buttermilk (BM; i.e., BM-MFGM) and BM whey (i.e., whey-MFGM), individually or in mixtures with BM powder (BMP) were compared with those of a commercial dairy ingredient (Lacprodan PL-20; Arla Foods Ingredients Group P/S, Viby, Denmark), a material rich in milk polar lipids and proteins. The particle size distribution, viscosity, interfacial protein, and polar lipids load of oil-in-water emulsions prepared using soybean oil were examined. Pronounced droplet aggregation was observed with emulsions stabilized with whey-MFGM or with a mixture of whey-MFGM and BMP. No aggregation was observed for emulsions stabilized with BM-MFGM, Lacprodan PL-20, or a mixture of BM-MFGM and BMP. The surface protein load and polar lipids load were lowest in emulsions with BM-MFGM. The highest protein load and polar lipids load were observed for emulsions made with a mixture of whey-MFGM and BMP. The differences in composition of MFGM materials, such as in whey proteins, caseins, MFGM-specific proteins, polar lipids, minerals, and especially their possible interactions determine their emulsifying properties. PMID:24913653

  3. Tectorial Membrane Material Properties in TectaY1870C/+ Heterozygous Mice

    PubMed Central

    Masaki, Kinuko; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Gu, Jianwen Wendy; Richardson, Guy P.; Freeman, Dennis M.; Aranyosi, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The solid component of the tectorial membrane (TM) is a porous matrix made up of the radial collagen fibers and the striated sheet matrix. The striated sheet matrix is believed to contribute to shear impedance in both the radial and longitudinal directions, but the molecular mechanisms involved have not been determined. A missense mutation in Tecta, a gene that encodes for the α-tectorin protein in the striated sheet matrix, causes a 60-dB threshold shift in mice with relatively little reduction in outer hair cell amplification. Here, we show that this threshold shift is coupled to changes in shear impedance, response to osmotic pressure, and concentration of fixed charge of the TM. In TectaY1870C/+ mice, the tectorin content of the TM was reduced, as was the content of glycoconjugates reacting with the lectin wheat germ agglutinin. Charge measurements showed a decrease in fixed charge concentration from −6.4±1.4 mmol/L in wild-types to −2.1±0.7 mmol/L in TectaY1870C/+ TMs. TMs from TectaY1870C/+ mice showed little volume change in response to osmotic pressure compared to those of wild-type mice. The magnitude of both radial and longitudinal TM shear impedance was reduced by 10±1.6 dB in TectaY1870C/+ mice. However, the phase of shear impedance was unchanged. These changes are consistent with an increase in the porosity of the TM and a corresponding decrease of the solid fraction. Mechanisms by which these changes can affect the coupling between outer and inner hair cells are discussed. PMID:21081075

  4. Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Fiscal year 1986, Annual technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1987-05-01

    The first part of the Program Descriptions consists of a funding summary for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research. This is followed by a summary of project titles and objectives, including the program/project manager(s) and principal investigator. The second part of the Program Descriptions consists of more detailed project summaries with project goals and accomplishments. They are for the Offices of Conservation and Renewable Energy, Energy Research, Nuclear Energy, Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, and Fossil Energy. Each of these are numbered for purposes of reference in the Keyword Index. The FY 1986 Budget Summary for materials activities in each of the 29 programs within the DOE are also included.

  5. Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Zaeh, R.A.

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

  6. High Temperature Materials Laboratory fourth annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1991-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its fourth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the user program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions who have executed user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 118 nonproprietary agreements (62 university and 56 industry) and 28 proprietary agreements (2 university, 26 industry) are now in effect. Five other government facilities have also participated in the user program. Sixty-free nonproprietary research proposals (38 from university, 26 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and four proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1991 are summarized.

  7. Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Ninth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported in the areas of: aging and life prediction methodology and devices for solar cell encapsulation; the function of adhesion chemistry, primers, and a new diagnostic technique for estimations of bond durability; a study of fire retardant formulations for decreasing the potential flammability of solar modules; initial studies of the electrical insulating properties of encapsulation materials and measurement of the intrinsic dielectric strength; anti-soiling compounds for the prevention of soil build-up on the outer surface of the module; and low temperature processing encapsulants that permit module fabrication at temperatures less than 100/sup 0/C. Another area of study has been added to determine the degree to which formulation and processes affect the module quality and manufacturing yield.

  8. High Temperature Materials Laboratory fifth annual report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1992-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its fifth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy (DOE) User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Growth of the User Program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions executing user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 145 nonproprietary agreements (77 university and 68 industry) and 30 proprietary agreements (2 university, 28 industry) are now in effect. Five other government facilities have also participated in the User Program. Thirty-six states are represented by these interactions. Eighty-one nonproprietary research proposals (44 from university, 36 from industry, and 1 other government facility) and six proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Research projects active in FY 1992 are summarized.

  9. High Temperature Materials Laboratory sixth annual report, October 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tennery, V.J.; Foust, F.M.

    1993-12-01

    The High Temperature Materials Laboratory has completed its sixth year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the User Program is evidenced by the number of outside institutions executing user agreements since the facility began operation in 1987. A total of 172 nonproprietary agreements (88 university and 84 industry) and 35 proprietary agreements, (2 university, 33 industry) are now in effect. Six other government facilities have also participated in the User Program. Thirty-eight states are represented by these interactions. Ninety-four nonproprietary research proposals (44 from universities, 47 from industry, and 3 from other government facilities) and three proprietary proposals were considered during this reporting period. Nonproprietary research projects active in FY 1993 are summarized.

  10. Crystalline Membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapatsis, Michael (Inventor); Lai, Zhiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    In certain aspects, the invention features methods for forming crystalline membranes (e.g., a membrane of a framework material, such as a zeolite) by inducing secondary growth in a layer of oriented seed crystals. The rate of growth of the seed crystals in the plane of the substrate is controlled to be comparable to the rate of growth out of the plane. As a result, a crystalline membrane can form a substantially continuous layer including grains of uniform crystallographic orientation that extend through the depth of the layer.