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Sample records for membranes preferential interaction

  1. Is There a Preferential Interaction between Cholesterol and Tryptophan Residues in Membrane Proteins?†

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Andrea; de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Nyholm, Thomas K. M.; Loura, Luís M. S.; Daily, Anna E.; Staffhorst, Rutger W. H. M.; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Koeppe, Roger E.; Prieto, Manuel; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2008-01-01

    Recently, several indications have been found that suggest a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophan residues located near the membrane–water interface. The aim of this study was to investigate by direct methods how tryptophan and cholesterol interact with each other and what the possible consequences are for membrane organization. For this purpose, we used cholesterol-containing model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) in which a transmembrane model peptide with flanking tryptophans [acetyl-GWW(LA)8LWWA-amide], called WALP23, was incorporated to mimic interfacial tryptophans of membrane proteins. These model systems were studied with two complementary methods. (1) Steady-state and time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments employing the fluorescent cholesterol analogue dehydroergosterol (DHE) in combination with a competition experiment with cholesterol were used to obtain information about the distribution of cholesterol in the bilayer in the presence of WALP23. The results were consistent with a random distribution of cholesterol which indicates that cholesterol and interfacial tryptophans are not preferentially located next to each other in these bilayer systems. (2) Solid-state 2H NMR experiments employing either deuterated cholesterol or indole ring-deuterated WALP23 peptides were performed to study the orientation and dynamics of both molecules. The results showed that the quadrupolar splittings of labeled cholesterol were not affected by an interaction with tryptophan-flanked peptides and, vice versa, that the quadrupolar splittings of labeled indole rings in WALP23 are not significantly influenced by addition of cholesterol to the bilayer. Therefore, both NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy results independently show that, at least in the model systems studied here, there is no evidence for a preferential interaction between cholesterol and tryptophans located at the bilayer interface. PMID

  2. Preferential Interactions and the Effect of Protein PEGylation

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter W.; Kasimova, Marina R.; van de Weert, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. Methodology/Principal Findings The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and preferentially bound guanine hydrochloride. Structural characterization by far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy was supplemented by investigation of protein thermal stability with the use of differential scanning calorimetry, far and near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that PEGylated lysozyme was stabilized by the preferentially excluded excipient and destabilized by the preferentially bound excipient in a similar manner as lysozyme. However, compared to lysozyme in all cases the melting transition was lower by up to a few degrees and the calorimetric melting enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van’t Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer. Conclusion/Significance The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins. PMID:26230338

  3. Emergence of global preferential attachment from local interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Menghui; Gao, Liang; Fan, Ying; Wu, Jinshan; Di, Zengru

    2010-04-01

    Global degree/strength-based preferential attachment is widely used as an evolution mechanism of networks. But it is hard to believe that any individual can get global information and shape the network architecture based on it. In this paper, it is found that the global preferential attachment emerges from the local interaction models, including the distance-dependent preferential attachment (DDPA) evolving model of weighted networks (Li et al 2006 New J. Phys. 8 72), the acquaintance network model (Davidsen et al 2002 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 128701) and the connecting nearest-neighbor (CNN) model (Vázquez 2003 Phys. Rev. E 67 056104). For the DDPA model and the CNN model, the attachment rate depends linearly on the degree or vertex strength, whereas for the acquaintance network model, the dependence follows a sublinear power law. It implies that for the evolution of social networks, local contact could be more fundamental than the presumed global preferential attachment.

  4. C8-glycosphingolipids preferentially insert into tumor cell membranes and promote chemotherapeutic drug uptake.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro Pedrosa, Lília R; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Steurer, Barbara; Ciceri, Dalila; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Verheij, Marcel; Goñi, Felix María; Koning, Gerben A; Contreras, F-Xabier

    2015-08-01

    Insufficient drug delivery into tumor cells limits the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapy. Co-delivery of liposome-encapsulated drug and synthetic short-chain glycosphingolipids (SC-GSLs) significantly improved drug bioavailability by enhancing intracellular drug uptake. Investigating the mechanisms underlying this SC-GSL-mediated drug uptake enhancement is the aim of this study. Fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize the cell membrane lipid transfer intracellular fate of fluorescently labeled C6-NBD-GalCer incorporated in liposomes in tumor and non-tumor cells. Additionally click chemistry was applied to image and quantify native SC-GSLs in tumor and non-tumor cell membranes. SC-GSL-mediated flip-flop was investigated in model membranes to confirm membrane-incorporation of SC-GSL and its effect on membrane remodeling. SC-GSL enriched liposomes containing doxorubicin (Dox) were incubated at 4°C and 37°C and intracellular drug uptake was studied in comparison to standard liposomes and free Dox. SC-GSL transfer to the cell membrane was independent of liposomal uptake and the majority of the transferred lipid remained in the plasma membrane. The transfer of SC-GSL was tumor cell-specific and induced membrane rearrangement as evidenced by a transbilayer flip-flop of pyrene-SM. However, pore formation was measured, as leakage of hydrophilic fluorescent probes was not observed. Moreover, drug uptake appeared to be mediated by SC-GSLs. SC-GSLs enhanced the interaction of doxorubicin (Dox) with the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane of tumor cells at 4°C. Our results demonstrate that SC-GSLs preferentially insert into tumor cell plasma membranes enhancing cell intrinsic capacity to translocate amphiphilic drugs such as Dox across the membrane via a biophysical process. PMID:25917957

  5. A Pairwise Preferential Interaction Model for Understanding Peptide Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Myungshim

    2010-01-01

    A pairwise preferential interaction model (PPIM), based on Kirkwood–Buff integrals, is developed to quantify and characterize the interactions between some of the functional groups commonly observed in peptides. The existing experimental data are analyzed to determine the preferential interaction (PI) parameters for different amino acid and small peptide systems in aqueous solutions. The PIs between the different functional groups present in the peptides are then isolated and quantified by assuming simple pairwise additivity. The PPIM approach provides consistent estimates for the pair interactions between the same functional groups obtained from different solute molecules. Furthermore, these interactions appear to be chemically intuitive. It is argued that this type of approach can provide valuable information concerning specific functional group correlations which could give rise to peptide aggregation. PMID:20694045

  6. LAPTM5: A novel lysosomal-associated multispanning membrane protein preferentially expressed in hematopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adra, C.N.; Zhu, Shaochun; Ko, Jone-Long

    1996-07-15

    While a large body of knowledge about cell membrane proteins exists, much less is known about the repertoire and function of integral membrane proteins of intracellular organelles. In looking for novel classes of genes that are functionally important to hematopoietic cells, we have cloned the cDNA for a gene preferentially expressed in adult hematopoietic tissues. During embryonic development the gene is expressed in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tissues. In cell lines the gene is expressed specifically in hematopoietic lineages, whereas in normal adult tissues the mRNA is preferentially detected at high levels in lymphoid and myeloid tissues. The predicted protein is a pentaspanner with no homology to known genes and conserved across evolution. Immunocytological and cell fractionation studies with a specific antibody revealed a protein localizing in lysosomes. The gene, provisionally named LAPTM5, maps to chromosome 1p34. The expression pattern of the gene together with preliminary evidence that the protein interacts with ubiquitin indicates that the protein may have a special functional role during embryogenesis and in adult hematopoietic cells. 53 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D

    2016-07-11

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind cells to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally "undruggable" regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein-protein, protein-lipid, and protein-nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art of high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  8. Drugging Membrane Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang; Flynn, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of therapeutics target membrane proteins, accessible on the surface of cells, to alter cellular signaling. Cells use membrane proteins to transduce signals into cells, transport ions and molecules, bind the cell to a surface or substrate, and catalyze reactions. Newly devised technologies allow us to drug conventionally “undruggable” regions of membrane proteins, enabling modulation of protein–protein, protein–lipid, and protein–nucleic acid interactions. In this review, we survey the state of the art in high-throughput screening and rational design in drug discovery, and we evaluate the advances in biological understanding and technological capacity that will drive pharmacotherapy forward against unorthodox membrane protein targets. PMID:26863923

  9. GS32, a novel Golgi SNARE of 32 kDa, interacts preferentially with syntaxin 6.

    PubMed

    Wong, S H; Xu, Y; Zhang, T; Griffiths, G; Lowe, S L; Subramaniam, V N; Seow, K T; Hong, W

    1999-01-01

    Syntaxin 1, synaptobrevins or vesicle-associated membrane proteins, and the synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are key molecules involved in the docking and fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. We report here the molecular, cell biological, and biochemical characterization of a 32-kDa protein homologous to both SNAP-25 (20% amino acid sequence identity) and the recently identified SNAP-23 (19% amino acid sequence identity). Northern blot analysis shows that the mRNA for this protein is widely expressed. Polyclonal antibodies against this protein detect a 32-kDa protein present in both cytosol and membrane fractions. The membrane-bound form of this protein is revealed to be primarily localized to the Golgi apparatus by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, a finding that is further established by electron microscopy immunogold labeling showing that this protein is present in tubular-vesicular structures of the Golgi apparatus. Biochemical characterizations establish that this protein behaves like a SNAP receptor and is thus named Golgi SNARE of 32 kDa (GS32). GS32 in the Golgi extract is preferentially retained by the immobilized GST-syntaxin 6 fusion protein. The coimmunoprecipitation of syntaxin 6 but not syntaxin 5 or GS28 from the Golgi extract by antibodies against GS32 further sustains the preferential interaction of GS32 with Golgi syntaxin 6. PMID:9880331

  10. Steric effects and preferential interactions in supercritical carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Saquing, C.D.; Lucien, F.P.; Foster, N.R

    1998-10-01

    Solubility data are presented for a mixture of o-hydroxybenzoic acid (o-HBA) and m-HBA in supercritical CO{sub 2} doped with 3.5 mol% methanol. The data were measured at 318 and 328 K and for pressures in the range of 101--201 bar. Some new data for the solubility of pure m-HBA in methanol-doped supercritical CO{sub 2} are also presented. The solubilities of the HBA isomers are enhanced considerably with the addition of methanol to supercritical CO{sub 2}. However, the solubility enhancement is strongly affected by the spatial arrangement of their functional groups (steric effect). There appears to be preferential interaction between the solutes and the cosolvent in the quaternary system, and this phenomenon is consistent with thermodynamic modeling of the system.

  11. Deciphering preferential interactions within supramolecular protein complexes: the proteasome case

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Garrigues, Luc; Amalric, François; Vigneron, Nathalie; Menneteau, Thomas; Stella, Alexandre; Monsarrat, Bernard; Van den Eynde, Benoît; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, intracellular protein breakdown is mainly performed by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Proteasomes are supramolecular protein complexes formed by the association of multiple sub-complexes and interacting proteins. Therefore, they exhibit a very high heterogeneity whose function is still not well understood. Here, using a newly developed method based on the combination of affinity purification and protein correlation profiling associated with high-resolution mass spectrometry, we comprehensively characterized proteasome heterogeneity and identified previously unknown preferential associations within proteasome sub-complexes. In particular, we showed for the first time that the two main proteasome subtypes, standard proteasome and immunoproteasome, interact with a different subset of important regulators. This trend was observed in very diverse human cell types and was confirmed by changing the relative proportions of both 20S proteasome forms using interferon-γ. The new method developed here constitutes an innovative and powerful strategy that could be broadly applied for unraveling the dynamic and heterogeneous nature of other biologically relevant supramolecular protein complexes. PMID:25561571

  12. Preferential Interaction of Na+ over K+ to Carboxylate-functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elucidating mechanistic interactions between specific ions (Na+/ K+) and nanoparticle surfaces to alter particle stability in polar media has received little attention. We investigated relative preferential binding of Na+ and K+ to carboxylate-functionalized silver nanoparticles ...

  13. Multipronged interaction of the COG complex with intracellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Rose; Pokrovskaya, Irina; Kudlyk, Tetyana; Lupashin, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi complex is a peripheral membrane protein complex that orchestrates the tethering and fusion of intra-Golgi transport carriers with Golgi membranes. In this study we have investigated the membrane attachment of the COG complex and it’s on/off dynamic on Golgi membranes. Several complimentary approaches including knock-sideways depletion, FRAP, and FLIP revealed that assembled COG complex is not diffusing from Golgi periphery in live HeLa cells. Moreover, COG subunits remained membrane-associated even in COG4 and COG7 depleted cells when Golgi architecture was severely affected. Overexpression of myc-tagged COG sub-complexes revealed that different membrane-associated COG partners including β-COP, p115 and SNARE STX5 preferentially bind to different COG assemblies, indicating that COG subunits interact with Golgi membranes in a multipronged fashion. PMID:24649395

  14. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approaches continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.

  15. The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with biological membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Johs, Alexander; Whited, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of peripheral proteins with membrane surfaces are critical to many biological processes, including signaling, recognition, membrane trafficking, cell division and cell structure. On a molecular level, peripheral membrane proteins can modulate lipid composition, membrane dynamics and protein-protein interactions. Biochemical and biophysical studies have shown that these interactions are in fact highly complex, dominated by several different types of interactions, and have an interdependent effect on both the protein and membrane. Here we examine three major mechanisms underlying the interactions between peripheral membrane proteins and membranes: electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, and fatty acid modification of proteins. While experimental approachesmore » continue to provide critical insights into specific interaction mechanisms, emerging bioinformatics resources and tools contribute to a systems-level picture of protein-lipid interactions. Through these recent advances, we begin to understand the pivotal role of protein-lipid interactions underlying complex biological functions at membrane interfaces.« less

  16. Preferential interactions determine protein solubility in three-component solutions: the MgCl2 system.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, T; Bhat, R; Timasheff, S N

    1990-02-20

    The correlation between protein solubility and the preferential interactions of proteins with solvent components was critically examined with aqueous MgCl2 as the solvent system. Preferential interaction and solubility measurements with three proteins, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin, and lysozyme, resulted in similar patterns of interaction. At acid pH (pH 2-3) and lower salt concentrations (less than 2 M), the proteins were preferentially hydrated, while at higher salt concentrations, the interaction was either that of preferential salt binding or low salt exclusion. At pH 4.5-5, all three proteins exhibited either very low preferential hydration or preferential binding of MgCl2. These results were analyzed in terms of the balance between salt binding and salt exclusion attributed to the increase in the surface tension of water by salts, which is invariant with conditions. It was shown that the increase in salt binding at high salt concentration is a reflection of mass action, while its decrease at acid pH is due to the electrostatic repulsion between Mg2+ ions and the high net positive charge on the protein. The preferential interaction pattern was paralleled by the variation of protein solubility with solvent conditions. Calculation of the transfer free energies from water to the salt solutions for proteins in solution and in the precipitate showed dependencies on salt concentration. This indicates that the nature of interactions between proteins and solvent components is the same in solution and in the solid state, which implies no change in protein structure during precipitation. Analysis of the transfer free energies and preferential interaction parameter in terms of the salting-in, salting-out, and weak ion binding contributions has led to the conclusions that, when the weak ion binding contribution is small, the predominant protein-salt interaction must be that of preferential salt exclusion most probably caused by the increase of the surface

  17. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baul, Upayan; Kuroda, Kenichi; Vemparala, Satyavani

    2014-08-01

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  18. Interaction of multiple biomimetic antimicrobial polymers with model bacterial membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Baul, Upayan Vemparala, Satyavani; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2014-08-28

    Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, interaction of multiple synthetic random copolymers based on methacrylates on prototypical bacterial membranes is investigated. The simulations show that the cationic polymers form a micellar aggregate in water phase and the aggregate, when interacting with the bacterial membrane, induces clustering of oppositely charged anionic lipid molecules to form clusters and enhances ordering of lipid chains. The model bacterial membrane, consequently, develops lateral inhomogeneity in membrane thickness profile compared to polymer-free system. The individual polymers in the aggregate are released into the bacterial membrane in a phased manner and the simulations suggest that the most probable location of the partitioned polymers is near the 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol (POPG) clusters. The partitioned polymers preferentially adopt facially amphiphilic conformations at lipid-water interface, despite lacking intrinsic secondary structures such as α-helix or β-sheet found in naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides.

  19. ENaC–Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Awayda, Mouhamed S.; Shao, Weijian; Guo, Fengli; Zeidel, Mark; Hill, Warren G.

    2004-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) is regulated by temperature (Askwith, C.C., C.J. Benson, M.J. Welsh, and P.M. Snyder. 2001. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 98:6459–6463). As these changes of temperature affect membrane lipid order and lipid–protein interactions, we tested the hypothesis that ENaC activity can be modulated by membrane lipid interactions. Two approaches were used to modulate membrane anisotropy, a lipid order–dependent parameter. The nonpharmacological approach used temperature changes, while the pharmacological one used chlorpromazine (CPZ), an agent known to decrease membrane order, and Gd+3. Experiments used Xenopus oocytes expressing human ENaC. Methods of impedance analysis were used to determine whether the effects of changing lipid order indirectly altered ENaC conductance via changes of membrane area. These data were further corroborated with quantitative morphology on micrographs from oocytes membranes studied via electron microscopy. We report biphasic effects of cooling (stimulation followed by inhibition) on hENaC conductance. These effects were relatively slow (minutes) and were delayed from the actual bath temperature changes. Peak stimulation occurred at a calculated Tmax of 15.2. At temperatures below Tmax, ENaC conductance was inhibited with cooling. The effects of temperature on gNa were distinct from those observed on ion channels endogenous to Xenopus oocytes, where the membrane conductance decreased monoexponentially with temperature (t = 6.2°C). Similar effects were also observed in oocytes with reduced intra- and extracellular [Na+], thereby ruling out effects of self or feedback inhibition. Addition of CPZ or the mechanosensitive channel blocker, Gd+3, caused inhibition of ENaC. The effects of Gd+3 were also attributed to its ability to partition into the outer membrane leaflet and to decrease anisotropy. None of the effects of temperature, CPZ, or Gd+3 were accompanied by changes of

  20. Effective interactions between fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S , we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d ≪√{S } but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d ≫√{S } , whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ , which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ . Moreover, σ scales as d for d ≪√{S } but saturates at √{kBT S /κ } for d ≫√{S } . In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions.

  1. Effective interactions between fluid membranes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bing-Sui; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2015-08-01

    A self-consistent theory is proposed for the general problem of interacting undulating fluid membranes subject to the constraint that they do not interpenetrate. We implement the steric constraint via an exact functional integral representation and, through the use of a saddle-point approximation, transform it into a novel effective steric potential. The steric potential is found to consist of two contributions: one generated by zero-mode fluctuations of the membranes and the other by thermal bending fluctuations. For membranes of cross-sectional area S, we find that the bending fluctuation part scales with the intermembrane separation d as d-2 for d≪√S but crosses over to d-4 scaling for d≫√S, whereas the zero-mode part of the steric potential always scales as d-2. For membranes interacting exclusively via the steric potential, we obtain closed-form expressions for the effective interaction potential and for the rms undulation amplitude σ, which becomes small at low temperatures T and/or large bending stiffnesses κ. Moreover, σ scales as d for d≪√S but saturates at √kBTS/κ for d≫√S. In addition, using variational Gaussian theory, we apply our self-consistent treatment to study intermembrane interactions subject to different types of potentials: (i) the Moreira-Netz potential for a pair of strongly charged membranes with an intervening solution of multivalent counterions, (ii) an attractive square well, (iii) the Morse potential, and (iv) a combination of hydration and van der Waals interactions. PMID:26382349

  2. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Robert A.; Vogt, Volker M.

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses – MA, CA, and NC – provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding. PMID:24808894

  3. Chemical potential derivatives and preferential interaction parameters in biological systems from Kirkwood-Buff theory.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul E

    2006-08-01

    New expressions for chemical potential derivatives and preferential interaction parameters for ternary mixtures are derived for open, semiopen, and closed ensembles in terms of Kirkwood-Buff integrals, where all three components are present at finite concentrations. This is achieved using a simple approach that avoids the use of the general matrix formulation of Kirkwood-Buff theory. The resulting expressions provide a rigorous foundation for the analysis of experimental and simulation data. Using the results, a simple model is developed and used to investigate the possible effects of finite protein concentrations on the corresponding cosolvent dependent chemical potential and denaturation thermodynamics. PMID:16679363

  4. Elg1, an alternative subunit of the RFC clamp loader, preferentially interacts with SUMOylated PCNA

    PubMed Central

    Parnas, Oren; Zipin-Roitman, Adi; Pfander, Boris; Liefshitz, Batia; Mazor, Yuval; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Jentsch, Stefan; Kupiec, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Replication-factor C (RFC) is a protein complex that loads the processivity clamp PCNA onto DNA. Elg1 is a conserved protein with homology to the largest subunit of RFC, but its function remained enigmatic. Here, we show that yeast Elg1 interacts physically and genetically with PCNA, in a manner that depends on PCNA modification, and exhibits preferential affinity for SUMOylated PCNA. This interaction is mediated by three small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-interacting motifs and a PCNA-interacting protein box close to the N-terminus of Elg1. These motifs are important for the ability of Elg1 to maintain genomic stability. SUMOylated PCNA is known to recruit the helicase Srs2, and in the absence of Elg1, Srs2 and SUMOylated PCNA accumulate on chromatin. Strains carrying mutations in both ELG1 and SRS2 exhibit a synthetic fitness defect that depends on PCNA modification. Our results underscore the importance of Elg1, Srs2 and SUMOylated PCNA in the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:20571511

  5. Interactions of surfactants with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Heerklotz, Heiko

    2008-01-01

    Surfactants are surface-active, amphiphilic compounds that are water-soluble in the micro- to millimolar range, and self-assemble to form micelles or other aggregates above a critical concentration. This definition comprises synthetic detergents as well as amphiphilic peptides and lipopeptides, bile salts and many other compounds. This paper reviews the biophysics of the interactions of surfactants with membranes of insoluble, naturally occurring lipids. It discusses structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of membrane-water partitioning, changes in membrane properties induced by surfactants, membrane solubilisation to micelles and other phases formed by lipid-surfactant systems. Each section defines and derives key parameters, mentions experimental methods for their measurement and compiles and discusses published data. Additionally, a brief overview is given of surfactant-like effects in biological systems, technical applications of surfactants that involve membrane interactions, and surfactant-based protocols to study biological membranes. PMID:19079805

  6. Systematic prediction of human membrane receptor interactions

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yanjun; Dhiman, Harpreet K.; Bhola, Neil; Budyak, Ivan; Kar, Siddhartha; Man, David; Dutta, Arpana; Tirupula, Kalyan; Carr, Brian I.; Grandis, Jennifer; Bar-Joseph, Ziv; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Membrane receptor-activated signal transduction pathways are integral to cellular functions and disease mechanisms in humans. Identification of the full set of proteins interacting with membrane receptors by high throughput experimental means is difficult because methods to directly identify protein interactions are largely not applicable to membrane proteins. Unlike prior approaches that attempted to predict the global human interactome we used a computational strategy that only focused on discovering the interacting partners of human membrane receptors leading to improved results for these proteins. We predict specific interactions based on statistical integration of biological data containing highly informative direct and indirect evidences together with feedback from experts. The predicted membrane receptor interactome provides a system-wide view, and generates new biological hypotheses regarding interactions between membrane receptors and other proteins. We have experimentally validated a number of these interactions. The results suggest that a framework of systematically integrating computational predictions, global analyses, biological experimentation and expert feedback is a feasible strategy to study the human membrane receptor interactome. PMID:19798668

  7. Interaction of arginine oligomer with model membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Dandan . E-mail: yi_dandan@yahoo.com.cn; Guoming, Li; Gao, Li; Wei, Liang

    2007-08-10

    Short oligomers of arginine (R8) have been shown to cross readily a variety of biological barriers. A hypothesis was put forward that inverted micelles form in biological membranes in the presence of arginine oligomer peptides, facilitating their transfer through the membranes. In order to define the role of peptide-lipid interaction in this mechanism, we prepared liposomes as the model membrane to study the ability of R8 inducing calcein release from liposomes, the fusion of liposomes, R8 binding to liposomes and membrane disturbing activity of the bound R8. The results show that R8 binding to liposome membrane depends on lipid compositions, negative surface charge density and interior water phase pH values of liposomes. R8 has no activity to induce the leakage of calcein from liposomes or improve liposome fusion. R8 does not permeabilize through the membrane spontaneously. These peptides delivering drugs through membranes may depend on receptors and energy.

  8. Membrane-mediated interaction between retroviral capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rui; Nguyen, Toan

    2012-02-01

    A retrovirus is an RNA virus that is replicated through a unique strategy of reverse transcription. Unlike regular enveloped viruses which are assembled inside the host cells, the assembly of retroviral capsids happens right on the cell membrane. During the assembly process, the partially formed capsids deform the membrane, giving rise to an elastic energy. When two such partial capsids approach each other, this elastic energy changes. Or in other words, the two partial capsids interact with each other via the membrane. This membrane mediated interaction between partial capsids plays an important role in the kinetics of the assembly process. In this work, this membrane mediated interaction is calculated both analytically and numerically. It is worth noting that the diferential equation determining the membrane shape in general nonlinear and cannot be solved analytically,except in the linear region of small deformations. And it is exactly the nonlinear regime that is important for the assembly kinetics of retroviruses as it provides a large energy barrier. The theory developed here is applicable to more generic cases of membrane mediated interactions between two membrane-embedded proteins.

  9. Preferential perpendicular acceleration of heavy ionospheric ions by interactions with electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.; Sojka, J. J.

    1983-05-01

    Observations in recent years indicate the presence of energetic ions of ionospheric origin in various parts of the magnetosphere. These energetic ions have been found at all latitudes. Observations from the S3-3 satellite have made a great contribution toward an understanding of the energization of ionospheric ions. One of the most interesting observations is related to the finding that ion beams and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves are highly correlated and that they show an abrupt increase in their occurrence rate at an altitude of about 5000 km. A statistical survey of upward flowing ion (UFI) events occurring between 6000 and 8000 km has shown that the average energy of O(+) has a strong correlation with that of the H(+) ions. The present investigation has the objective to examine critically the energetics of UFI events in view of the theory of the interaction of a single coherent EHC wave with O(+), He(+), and H(+) ions. It is found that preferential acceleration of heavy ions occurs when such ions interact with an EHC wave.

  10. Sticholysin I-membrane interaction: an interplay between the presence of sphingomyelin and membrane fluidity.

    PubMed

    Pedrera, Lohans; Fanani, Maria Laura; Ros, Uris; Lanio, María E; Maggio, Bruno; Alvarez, Carlos

    2014-07-01

    Sticholysin I (St I) is a pore-forming toxin (PFT) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin protein family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFT exclusively found in sea anemones. As for actinoporins, it has been proposed that the presence of sphingomyelin (SM) and the coexistence of lipid phases increase binding to the target membrane. However, little is known about the role of membrane structure and dynamics (phase state, fluidity, presence of lipid domains) on actinoporins' activity or which regions of the membrane are the most favorable platforms for protein insertion. To gain insight into the role of SM on the interaction of St I to lipid membranes we studied their binding to monolayers of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and SM in different proportions. Additionally, the effect of acyl chain length and unsaturation, two features related to membrane fluidity, was evaluated on St I binding to monolayers. This study revealed that St I binds and penetrates preferentially and with a faster kinetic to liquid-expanded films with high lateral mobility and moderately enriched in SM. A high content of SM induces a lower lateral diffusion and/or liquid-condensed phases, which hinder St I binding and penetration to the lipid monolayer. Furthermore, the presence of lipid domain borders does not appear as an important factor for St I binding to the lipid monolayer. PMID:24680653

  11. Dynamic simulations of membranes with cytoskeletal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lawrence C.-L.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2005-07-01

    We describe a simulation algorithm for the dynamics of elastic membrane sheets over long length and time scales. Our model includes implicit hydrodynamic coupling between membrane and surrounding solvent and allows for arbitrary external forces acting on the membrane surface. In particular, the methodology is well suited to studying membranes in interaction with cytoskeletal filaments. We present results for the thermal undulations of a lipid bilayer attached to a regular network of spectrin filaments as a model for the red blood cell membrane. The dynamic fluctuations of the bilayer over the spectrin network are quantified and used to predict the macroscopic diffusion constant of band 3 on the surface of the red blood cell. We find that thermal undulations likely play a role in the mobility of band 3 in the plane of the erythrocyte membrane.

  12. DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes.

    PubMed

    Langecker, Martin; Arnaut, Vera; List, Jonathan; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA has been previously shown to be useful as a material for the fabrication of static nanoscale objects, and also for the realization of dynamic molecular devices and machines. In many cases, nucleic acid assemblies directly mimic biological structures, for example, cytoskeletal filaments, enzyme scaffolds, or molecular motors, and many of the applications envisioned for such structures involve the study or imitation of biological processes, and even the interaction with living cells and organisms. An essential feature of biological systems is their elaborate structural organization and compartmentalization, and this most often involves membranous structures that are formed by dynamic assemblies of lipid molecules. Imitation of or interaction with biological systems using the tools of DNA nanotechnology thus ultimately and necessarily also involves interactions with lipid membrane structures, and thus the creation of DNA-lipid hybrid assemblies. Due to their differing chemical nature, however, highly charged nucleic acids and amphiphilic lipids do not seem the best match for the construction of such systems, and in fact they are rarely found in nature. In recent years, however, a large variety of lipid-interacting DNA conjugates were developed, which are now increasingly being applied also for the realization of DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we will present the current state of this emerging class of nanosystems. After a brief overview of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of lipids and lipid bilayer membranes, we will discuss how DNA molecules can interact with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions or via covalent modification with hydrophobic moieties. We will then show how such DNA-lipid interactions have been utilized for the realization of DNA nanostructures attached to or embedded within lipid bilayer membranes. Under certain conditions, DNA nanostructures remain mobile on

  13. Live cell imaging of membrane / cytoskeleton interactions and membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chierico, Luca; Joseph, Adrian S.; Lewis, Andrew L.; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2014-09-01

    We elucidate the interaction between actin and specific membrane components, using real time live cell imaging, by delivering probes that enable access to components, that cannot be accessed genetically. We initially investigated the close interplay between Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and the F-actin network. We show that, during the early stage of cell adhesion, PIP2 forms domains within the filopodia membrane. We studied these domains alongside cell spreading and observed that these very closely follow the actin tread-milling. We show that this mechanism is associated with an active transport of PIP2 rich organelles from the cell perinuclear area to the edge, along actin fibers. Finally, mapping other phospholipids and membrane components we observed that the PIP2 domains formation is correlated with sphingosine and cholesterol rafts.

  14. Pervaporation from a dense membrane: roles of permeant-membrane interactions, Kelvin effect, and membrane swelling.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Thampi, Sumesh P; Suggala, Satyanarayana V; Bhattacharya, Prashant K

    2004-05-25

    Dense polymeric membranes with extremely small pores in the form of free volume are used widely in the pervaporative separation of liquid mixtures. The membrane permeation of a component followed by its vaporization on the opposite face is governed by the solubility and downstream pressure. We measured the evaporative flux of pure methanol and 2-propanol using dense membranes with different free volumes and different affinities (wettabilities and solubilities) for the permeant. Interestingly, the evaporative flux for different membranes vanished substantially (10-75%) below the equilibrium vapor pressure in the bulk. The discrepancy was larger for a smaller pore size and for more wettable membranes (higher positive spreading coefficients). This observation, which cannot be explained by the existing (mostly solution-diffusion type) models ofpervaporation, suggests an important role for the membrane-permeant interactions in nanopores that can lower the equilibrium vapor pressure. The pore sizes, as estimated from the positron annihilation, ranged from 0.2 to 0.6 nm for the dry membranes. Solubilities of methanol in different composite membranes were estimated from the Flory-Huggins theory. The interaction parameter was obtained from the surface properties measured by the contact angle goniometry in conjunction with the acid-base theory of polar surface interactions. For the membranes examined, the increase in the "wet" pore volume due to membrane swelling correlates almost linearly with the solubility of methanol in these membranes. Indeed, the observations are found to be consistent with the lowering of the equilibrium vapor pressure on the basis of the Kelvin equation. Thus, a higher solubility or selectivity of a membrane also implies stronger permeant-membrane interactions and a greater retention of the permeant by the membrane, thus decreasing its evaporative flux. This observation has important implications for the interpretation of existing experiments and in

  15. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. Thismore » includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.« less

  16. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, C. Patrick

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. This includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces. Lastly, model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.

  17. Biophysical studies of the interaction of squalamine and other cationic amphiphilic molecules with bacterial and eukaryotic membranes: importance of the distribution coefficient in membrane selectivity.

    PubMed

    Di Pasquale, Eric; Salmi-Smail, Chanaz; Brunel, Jean-Michel; Sanchez, Patrick; Fantini, Jacques; Maresca, Marc

    2010-02-01

    The interaction of squalamine (SQ) with eukaryotic and prokaryotic membranes was studied and compared with the interaction of two other cationic amphipathic antimicrobials (CAAs), i.e. the antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) and the detergent hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Whole cell experiments showed that the three CAA have in common the ability to interact with lipopolysaccharide-containing membranes through a divalent cation sensitive process. Differences were found regarding their kinetics of membrane permeabilisation and their selectivity for bacteria, with a preferential permeabilisation of bacteria by PMB>SQ and no selectivity for CTAB. Experiments with lipid monolayers and bilayers showed that this selectivity did not correlate with a preferential interaction of the CAAs with lipids but rather relies on differences in their ability to penetrate lipid bilayers and to cause electrically active lesions. Incidentally, our results also suggest that the distribution coefficient of CAAs could be used to predict their selectivity for bacteria. PMID:19883637

  18. Functionalized nanoparticle interactions with polymeric membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ladner, D.A.; Steele, M.; Weir, A.; Hristovski, K.; Westerhoff, P.

    2011-01-01

    A series of experiments was performed to measure the retention of a class of functionalized nanoparticles (NPs) onporous (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) membranes. The findings impact engineered water and wastewater treatment using membrane technology, characterization and analytical schemes for NP detection, and the use of NPs in waste treatment scenarios. The NPs studied were composed of silver, titanium dioxide, and gold; had organic coatings to yield either positive or negative surface charge; and were between 2 and 10 nm in diameter. NP solutions were applied to polymeric membranes composed of different materials and pore sizes (ranging from ~2 nm [3 kDa molecular weight cutoff] to 0.2 μm). Greater than 99% rejection was observed of positively charged NPs by negatively charged membranes even though pore diameters were up to 20 times the NP diameter; thus, sorption caused rejection. Negatively charged NPs were less well rejected, but behavior was dependant not only on surface functionality but on NP core material (Ag, TiO2, or Au). NP rejection depended more upon NP properties than membrane properties; all of the negatively charged polymeric membranes behaved similarly. The NP-membrane interaction behavior fell into four categories, which are defined and described here. PMID:22177020

  19. Self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional version of the generalized Smoluchowski equation is used to analyze the time (or distance) dependent self diffusion of interacting membrane proteins in concentrated membrane systems. This equation provides a well established starting point for descriptions of the diffusion of particles that interact through both direct and hydrodynamic forces; in this initial work only the effects of direct interactions are explicitly considered. Data describing diffusion in the presence of hard-core repulsions, soft repulsions, and soft repulsions with weak attractions are presented. The effect that interactions have on the self-diffusion coefficient of a real protein molecule from mouse liver gap junctions is also calculated. The results indicate that self diffusion is always inhibited by direct interactions; this observation is interpreted in terms of the caging that will exist at finite protein concentration. It is also noted that, over small distance scales, the diffusion coefficient is determined entirely by the very strong Brownian forces; therefore, as a function of displacement the self-diffusion coefficient decays (rapidly) from its value at infinite dilution to its steady-state interaction-averaged value. The steady-state self-diffusion coefficient describes motion over distance scales that range from approximately 10 nm to cellular dimensions and is the quantity measured in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. The short-ranged behavior of the diffusion coefficient is important on the interparticle-distance scale and may therefore influence the rate at which nearest-neighbor collisional processes take place. The hard-disk theoretical results presented here are in excellent agreement with lattice Monte-Carlo results obtained by other workers. The concentration dependence of experimentally measured diffusion coefficients of antibody-hapten complexes bound to the membrane surface is consistent with that predicted by the theory. The

  20. Membrane interactions of a novel viral enterotoxin: rotavirus nonstructural glycoprotein NSP4.

    PubMed

    Huang, H; Schroeder, F; Zeng, C; Estes, M K; Schoer, J K; Ball, J M

    2001-04-01

    The rotavirus enterotoxin, NSP4, is a novel secretory agonist that also plays a role in the unique rotavirus morphogenesis that involves a transient budding of newly made immature viral particles into the endoplasmic reticulum. NSP4 and an active peptide corresponding to NSP4 residues 114 to 135 (NSP4(114-135)) mobilize intracellular calcium and induce secretory chloride currents when added exogenously to intestinal cells or mucosa. Membrane-NSP4 interactions may contribute to these alterations; however, details of a lipid-binding domain are unresolved. Therefore, circular dichroism was used to determine (i) the interaction(s) of NSP4 and NSP4(114-135) with model membranes, (ii) the conformational changes elicited in NSP4 upon interacting with membranes, (iii) if NSP4(114-135) is a membrane interacting domain, and (iv) the molar dissociation constant (K(d)) of NSP4(114-135) with defined lipid vesicles. Circular dichroism revealed for the first time that NSP4 and NSP4(114-135) undergo secondary structural changes upon interaction with membrane vesicles. This interaction was highly dependent on both the membrane surface curvature and the lipid composition. NSP4 and NSP4(114-135) preferentially interacted with highly curved, small unilamellar vesicle membranes (SUV), but significantly less with low-curvature, large unilamellar vesicle membranes (LUV). Binding to SUV, but not LUV, was greatly enhanced by negatively charged phospholipids. Increasing the SUV cholesterol content, concomitant with the presence of negatively charged phospholipids, further potentiated the interaction of NSP4(114-135) with the SUV membrane. The K(d) of NSP4(114-135) was determined as well as partitioning of NSP4(114-135) with SUVs in a filtration-binding assay. These data confirmed NSP4 and its active peptide interact with model membranes that mimic caveolae. PMID:11300798

  1. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria Del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein-protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  2. Mutual Interactions between Aquaporins and Membrane Components

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Ballesta, Maria del Carmen; Carvajal, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have been focused on the structural evaluation of protein complexes in order to get mechanistic insights into how proteins communicate at the molecular level within the cell. Specific sites of protein-aquaporin interaction have been evaluated and new forms of regulation of aquaporins described, based on these associations. Heterotetramerizations of aquaporin isoforms are considered as novel regulatory mechanisms for plasma membrane (PIPs) and tonoplast (TIPs) proteins, influencing their intrinsic permeability and trafficking dynamics in the adaptive response to changing environmental conditions. However, protein–protein interaction is an extensive theme that is difficult to tackle and new methodologies are being used to study the physical interactions involved. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and the identification of cross-linked peptides based on tandem mass spectra, that are complementary to other methodologies such as heterologous expression, co-precipitation assays or confocal fluorescence microscopy, are discussed in this review. The chemical composition and the physical characteristics of the lipid bilayer also influence many aspects of membrane aquaporins, including their functionality. The molecular driving forces stabilizing the positions of the lipids around aquaporins could define their activity, thereby altering the conformational properties. Therefore, an integrative approach to the relevance of the membrane-aquaporin interaction to different processes related to plant cell physiology is provided. Finally, it is described how the interactions between aquaporins and copolymer matrixes or biological compounds offer an opportunity for the functional incorporation of aquaporins into new biotechnological advances. PMID:27625676

  3. Interaction of peptides with cell membranes: insights from molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen-lu; Ding, Hong-ming; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2016-03-01

    The investigation of the interaction of peptides with cell membranes is the focus of active research. It can enhance the understanding of basic membrane functions such as membrane transport, fusion, and signaling processes, and it may shed light on potential applications of peptides in biomedicine. In this review, we will present current advances in computational studies on the interaction of different types of peptides with the cell membrane. Depending on the properties of the peptide, membrane, and external environment, the peptide-membrane interaction shows a variety of different forms. Here, on the basis of recent computational progress, we will discuss how different peptides could initiate membrane pores, translocate across the membrane, induce membrane endocytosis, produce membrane curvature, form fibrils on the membrane surface, as well as interact with functional membrane proteins. Finally, we will present a conclusion summarizing recent progress and providing some specific insights into future developments in this field.

  4. Photo-crosslinking analysis of preferential interactions between a transmembrane peptide and matching lipids.

    PubMed

    Ridder, Anja N J A; Spelbrink, Robin E J; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; Brunner, Josef; Heck, Albert J R; de Kruijff, Ben; Killian, J Antoinette

    2004-04-20

    In this study, a novel method is presented by which the molecular environment of a transmembrane peptide can be investigated directly. This was achieved by incorporating a photoactivatable crosslinking probe in the hydrophobic segment of a model transmembrane peptide. When this peptide was incorporated into lipid bilayers and irradiated with UV light, a covalent bond was formed between the crosslinking probe and a lipid. This crosslinking reaction could be visualized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the resulting product could be characterized by mass spectrometry. By use of phospholipases, it was demonstrated that the peptide crosslinks to both acyl chains of the lipids. The peptide showed a clear preference to partition into fluid lipids and was excluded from lipids in the gel phase. However, when the peptide was incorporated into bilayers containing two lipid species with different acyl chain lengths, molecular sorting of the lipids around the peptide based on hydrophobic matching was not observed. It is proposed that the size of the transmembrane part plays an important role in the dynamic interactions of membrane proteins with the surrounding lipids and hence in determining whether molecular sorting can occur. PMID:15078094

  5. Interaction of Mastoparan with Model Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haloot, Justin

    2010-10-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents began during the 20th century to reduce the effects of infectious diseases. Since the 1990s, antimicrobial resistance has become an ever-increasing global problem. Our laboratory recently found that small antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have potent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms including antibiotic resistant organisms. These AMPs are potential therapeutic agents against the growing problem of antimicrobial resistance. AMPs are small peptides produced by plants, insects and animals. Several hypotheses concede that these peptides cause some type of structural perturbations and increased membrane permeability in bacteria however, how AMPs kill bacteria remains unclear. The goal of this study was to design an assay that would allow us to evaluate and monitor the pore forming ability of an AMP, Mastoparan, on model membrane structures called liposomes. Development of this model will facilitate the study of how mastoparan and related AMPs interact with the bacterial membrane.

  6. Isoniazid interaction with phosphatidylcholine-based membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Amanda Vicente; Marengo Trindade, Paulo; Marques, Sheylla; Brum, Tainá; Harte, Etienne; Rodrigues, Marieli Oliveira; D'Oca, Marcelo Gonçalves Montes; da Silva, Pedro Almeida; Pohlmann, Adriana R.; Alves, Isabel Dantas; de Lima, Vânia Rodrigues

    2013-11-01

    Interaction between the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid (INH) and phosphatidylcholine membranes was investigated in terms of: (i) drug affinity to a lipid bilayer and (ii) drug-induced changes in the dynamic properties of liposomes, such as membrane hydration state, polar head and non-polar acyl chain order and lipid phase transition behavior. These parameters were studied by plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy (PWR), UV-visible, horizontal attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (HATR-FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. PWR measurements showed an INH membrane dissociation constant value of 0.031 μM to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. INH induced higher membrane perturbation in the plane which is perpendicular to the membrane plane. The INH saturation concentration in phosphatidylcholine liposomes was 170 μM. At this concentration, HATR-FTIR and NMR findings showed that INH may interact with the lipid polar head, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds in the phosphate region and enhancing the choline motional freedom. DSC measurements showed that, at 115 μM, INH was responsible for a decrease in lipid phase transition temperature of approximately 2 °C and had no influence in the lipid enthalpy variation (ΔH). However, at 170 μM, INH induced the reduction of the ΔH by approximately 52%, suggesting that the drug may increase the distance among lipid molecules and enhance the freedom of the lipid acyl chains methylene groups. This paper provides information on the effects of INH on membrane dynamics which is important to understand liposome targeting of the drug and for the development of anti-TB pharmacologic systems that not only are less susceptible to resistance but also have low toxicity.

  7. Interactions of Model Cell Membranes with Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Angelo, S. M.; Camesano, T. A.; Nagarajan, R.

    2011-12-01

    The same properties that give nanoparticles their enhanced function, such as high surface area, small size, and better conductivity, can also alter the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials. Ultimately, many of these nanomaterials will be released into the environment, and can cause cytotoxic effects to environmental bacteria, aquatic organisms, and humans. Previous results from our laboratory suggest that nanoparticles can have a detrimental effect on cells, depending on nanoparticle size. It is our goal to characterize the properties of nanomaterials that can result in membrane destabilization. We tested the effects of nanoparticle size and chemical functionalization on nanoparticle-membrane interactions. Gold nanoparticles at 2, 5,10, and 80 nm were investigated, with a concentration of 1.1x1010 particles/mL. Model cell membranes were constructed of of L-α-phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), which has negatively charged lipid headgroups. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to measure frequency changes at different overtones, which were related to mass changes corresponding to nanoparticle interaction with the model membrane. In QCM-D, a lipid bilayer is constructed on a silicon dioxide crystal. The crystals, oscillate at different harmonic frequencies depending upon changes in mass or energy dissipation. When mass is added to the crystal surface, such as through addition of a lipid vesicle solution, the frequency change decreases. By monitoring the frequency and dissipation, we could verify that a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formed on the silica surface. After formation of the SLB, the nanoparticles can be added to the system, and the changes in frequency and dissipation are monitored in order to build a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell membrane interactions. For all of the smaller nanoparticles (2, 5, and 10 nm), nanoparticle addition caused a loss of mass from the lipid bilayer, which appears to be due to the formation of holes

  8. Curvature-mediated interactions between membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K S; Neu, J; Oster, G

    1998-01-01

    Membrane proteins can deform the lipid bilayer in which they are embedded. If the bilayer is treated as an elastic medium, then these deformations will generate elastic interactions between the proteins. The interaction between a single pair is repulsive. However, for three or more proteins, we show that there are nonpairwise forces whose magnitude is similar to the pairwise forces. When there are five or more proteins, we show that the nonpairwise forces permit the existence of stable protein aggregates, despite their pairwise repulsions. PMID:9788923

  9. Preferential interactions between protein and arginine: effects of arginine on tertiary conformational and colloidal stability of protein solution.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lili; Chen, Yan; Liao, Jie; Zheng, Xianxian; Yin, Zongning

    2015-01-30

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the preferential binding behavior of arginine to protein as well as the impact of arginine on the conformational and colloidal stability of protein solution. Physical stabilities of model proteins, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA), were investigated by fluorescence-based and dynamic light scattering techniques in the absence and presence of arginine. We investigated the interactions between arginine and tryptophan or tyrosine residues by conducting solubility and fluorescence studies of two amino acid derivatives, N-acetyl-l-tryptophanamide (NATA) and N-acetyl-l-tyrosinamide (NAYA), in arginine solutions. The result showed that arginine preferentially bond to the aromatic amino acids of proteins mainly through hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals' forces, while the binding constant K of arginine with BSA and OVA at 298K was 41.92 and 5.77L/mol, respectively. The fluorescence quenching, the decreased fluorescence lifetime and the red-shifted ANS peak position revealed that arginine perturbed the local environment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues. We also found the attenuated electrostatic repulsion among BSA and OVA molecules after adding arginine. These findings provided strong evidence that arginine possessed negative effects on tertiary conformational and colloidal stability of BSA and OVA during the preferential binding process. PMID:25529432

  10. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  11. Investigation of Dendrimer-Membrane Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecke, Almut; Hessler, Jessica; Lee, Inhan; Banaszak Holl, Mark; Orr, Bradford; Patri, Anil K.; Baker, J. R.

    2003-03-01

    Modified Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers show great promise as targeted drug transport agents. Current research efforts point to the possibility of dramatic improvements to conventional chemotherapy by selectively delivering a therapeutic to antigen bearing tumor cells. In order to better understand the uptake mechanism of such devices into cells we are investigating dendrimer-surface adsorption and dendrimer-membrane interactions using atomic force microscopy, light scattering and computer simulations. Model systems consisting of supported DMPC lipid bilayers have shown interesting results suggesting the shape and architecture of nano-devices play an important role for their biologic activity. We are also investigating the effect of targeted drug vehicles on cells in vitro.

  12. Structural elucidation of the interaction between neurodegenerative disease-related tau protein with model lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Emmalee M.

    A protein's sequence of amino acids determines how it folds. That folded structure is linked to protein function, and misfolding to dysfunction. Protein misfolding and aggregation into beta-sheet rich fibrillar aggregates is connected with over 20 neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized in part by misfolding, aggregation and deposition of the microtubule associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). However, two questions remain: What is tau's fibrillization mechanism, and what is tau's cytotoxicity mechanism? Tau is prone to heterogeneous interactions, including with lipid membranes. Lipids have been found in NFTs, anionic lipid vesicles induced aggregation of the microtubule binding domain of tau, and other protein aggregates induced ion permeability in cells. This evidence prompted our investigation of tau's interaction with model lipid membranes to elucidate the structural perturbations those interactions induced in tau protein and in the membrane. We show that although tau is highly charged and soluble, it is highly surface active and preferentially interacts with anionic membranes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of tau and model membranes, we utilized X-ray and neutron scattering techniques. X-ray reflectivity indicated tau aggregated at air/water and anionic lipid membrane interfaces and penetrated into membranes. More significantly, membrane interfaces induced tau protein to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to folded protein and ordered structure characteristic of beta-sheet formation. This suggests possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation. Membrane morphological changes were seen using fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques showed tau completely disrupts anionic membranes, suggesting an aggregate-based cytotoxicity mechanism. Further investigation of protein constructs and a "hyperphosphorylation" disease mimic helped

  13. Membrane interactions of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carriers of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Braun, Katharina; Pochert, Alexander; Lindén, Mika; Davoudi, Mina; Schmidtchen, Artur; Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Membrane interactions are critical for the successful use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). In order to elucidate these, we here investigate effects of nanoparticle charge and porosity on AMP loading and release, as well as consequences of this for membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects. Anionic mesoporous silica particles were found to incorporate considerable amounts of the cationic AMP LLGDFFRKSKEKIGKEFKRIVQRIKDFLRNLVPRTES (LL-37), whereas loading is much lower for non-porous or positively charged silica nanoparticles. Due to preferential pore localization, anionic mesoporous particles, but not the other particles, protect LL-37 from degradation by infection-related proteases. For anionic mesoporous nanoparticles, membrane disruption is mediated almost exclusively by peptide release. In contrast, non-porous silica particles build up a resilient LL-37 surface coating due to their higher negative surface charge, and display largely particle-mediated membrane interactions and antimicrobial effects. For positively charged mesoporous silica nanoparticles, LL-37 incorporation promotes the membrane binding and disruption displayed by the particles in the absence of peptide, but also causes toxicity against human erythrocytes. Thus, the use of mesoporous silica nanoparticles as AMP delivery systems requires consideration of membrane interactions and selectivity of both free peptide and the peptide-loaded nanoparticles, the latter critically dependent on nanoparticle properties. PMID:27174622

  14. Mutual diffusion of interacting membrane proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Abney, J R; Scalettar, B A; Owicki, J C

    1989-01-01

    The generalized Stokes-Einstein equation is used, together with the two-dimensional pressure equation, to analyze mutual diffusion in concentrated membrane systems. These equations can be used to investigate the role that both direct and hydrodynamic interactions play in determining diffusive behavior. Here only direct interactions are explicitly incorporated into the theory at high densities; however, both direct and hydrodynamic interactions are analyzed for some dilute solutions. We look at diffusion in the presence of weak attractions, soft repulsions, and hard-core repulsions. It is found that, at low densities, attractions retard mutual diffusion while repulsions enhance it. Mechanistically, attractions tend to tether particles together and oppose the dissipation of gradients or fluctuations in concentration, while repulsions provide a driving force that pushes particles apart. At higher concentrations, changes in the structure of the fluid enhance mutual diffusion even in the presence of attractions. It is shown that the theoretical description of postelectrophoresis relaxation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy experiments must be modified if interacting systems are studied. The effects of interactions on mutual diffusion coefficients have probably already been seen in postelectrophoresis relaxation experiments. PMID:2775829

  15. Delineating solute-solvent interactions in binary mixtures of ionic liquids in molecular solvents and preferential solvation approach.

    PubMed

    Khupse, Nageshwar D; Kumar, Anil

    2011-02-01

    The effect of solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions on the preferential solvation of solvatochromic indicators in binary mixtures of ionic liquids with molecular solvents has been investigated. The binary mixtures of the pyridinium-based ionic liquids 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([BP][BF4]), 1-butyl-3-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([3-MBP][BF4]), and 1-butyl-4-methylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate ([4-MBP][BF4]) with molecular solvents like water, methanol, and dichloromethane have been selected for this investigation. The effect of addition of ionic liquids to molecular solvents on the polarity parameters E(T)(N), Kamlet-Taft parameters, hydrogen bond donor ability (HBD) (α), hydrogen bond acceptor ability (HBA) (β), and polarizability (π*) was obtained. The polarity parameters of the mixture display nonideality on addition of ionic liquids to water and dichloromethane. On the other hand, strong synergetic effects were seen in the ionic liquid-methanol binary mixtures. The preferential solvation models have been employed to analyze the collected data in order to achieve information on solute-solvent interactions in these binary mixtures. PMID:21142058

  16. Proteins interacting with Membranes: Protein Sorting and Membrane Shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Membrane-bound transport in cells requires generating membrane curvature. In addition, transport is selective, in order to establish spatial gradients of membrane components in the cell. The mechanisms underlying cell membrane shaping by proteins and the influence of curvature on membrane composition are active areas of study in cell biophysics. In vitro approaches using Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) are a useful tool to identify the physical mechanisms that drive sorting of membrane components and membrane shape change by proteins. I will present recent work on the curvature sensing and generation of IRSp53, a protein belonging to the BAR family, whose members, sharing a banana-shaped backbone, are involved in endocytosis. Pulling membrane tubes with 10-100 nm radii from GUVs containing encapsulated IRSp53 have, unexpectedly, revealed a non-monotonic dependence of the protein concentration on the tube as a function of curvature. Experiments also show that bound proteins alter the tube mechanics and that protein phase separation along the tube occurs at low tensions. I will present accompanying theoretical work that can explain these findings based on the competition between the protein's intrinsic curvature and the effective rigidity of a membrane-protein patch.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of PotA, a membrane-associated ATPase of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Shigeru; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Kakinouchi, Keisuke; Tomitori, Hideyuki; Kanai, Ken; Murata, Michio; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2014-01-01

    A membrane-associated ATPase, PotA, is a component of the spermidine-preferential uptake system in prokaryotes that plays an important role in normal cell growth by regulating the cellular polyamine concentration. No three-dimensional structures of membrane-associated ATPases in polyamine-uptake systems have been determined to date. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of PotA from Thermotoga maritima are reported. Diffraction data were collected and processed to 2.7 Å resolution from both native and selenomethionine-labelled crystals. Preliminary crystallographic analysis revealed that the crystals belonged to the hexagonal space group P3112 (or P3212), with unit-cell parameters a = b = 88.9, c = 221.2 Å, α = 90, β = 90, γ = 120°, indicating that a dimer was present in the asymmetric unit. PMID:24915082

  18. Molecular mechanisms of membrane interaction at implantation.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lien M; Coward, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    Successful pregnancy is dependent upon the implantation of a competent embryo into a receptive endometrium. Despite major advancement in our understanding of reproductive medicine over the last few decades, implantation failure still occurs in both normal pregnancies and those created artificially by assisted reproductive technology (ART). Consequently, there is significant interest in elucidating the etiology of implantation failure. The complex multistep process of implantation begins when the developing embryo first makes contact with the plasma membrane of epithelial cells within the uterine environment. However, although this biological interaction marks the beginning of a fundamental developmental process, our knowledge of the intricate physiological and molecular processes involved remains sparse. In this synopsis, we aim to provide an overview of our current understanding of the morphological changes which occur to the plasma membrane of the uterine endothelium, and the molecular mechanisms that control communication between the early embryo and the endometrium during implantation. A multitude of molecular factors have been implicated in this complex process, including endometrial integrins, extracellular matrix molecules, adhesion molecules, growth factors, and ion channels. We also explore the development of in vitro models for embryo implantation to help researchers investigate mechanisms which may underlie implantation failure. Understanding the precise molecular pathways associated with implantation failure could help us to generate new prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers, and may identify novel therapeutic targets. PMID:26969610

  19. Classifying Membrane Proteins in the Proteome by Using Artificial Neural Networks Based on the Preferential Parameters of Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Subrata K.; Browne, Antony; Kazemian, Hassan; White, Kenneth

    Membrane proteins (MPs) are large set of biological macromolecules that play a fundamental role in physiology and pathophysiology for survival. From a pharma-economical perspective, though it is the fact that MPs constitute ˜75% of possible targets for novel drugs but MPs are one of the most understudied groups of proteins in biochemical research. This is mainly because of the technical difficulties of obtaining structural information about trans-membrane regions (these are small sequences that crossways the bilayer lipid membrane). It is quite useful to predict the location of transmembrane segments down the sequence, since these are the elementary structural building blocks defining their topology. There have been several attempts over the last 20 years to develop tools for predicting membrane-spanning regions but current tools are far away from achieving a considerable reliability in prediction. This study aims to exploit the knowledge and current understanding in the field of artificial neural networks (ANNs) in particular data representation through the development of a system to identify and predict membrane-spanning regions by analysing primary amino acids sequence. In this paper we present a novel neural network (NNs) architecture and algorithms for predicting membrane spanning regions from primary amino acids sequences by using their preference parameters.

  20. Preferential domain orientation of HMGB2 determined by the weak intramolecular interactions mediated by the interdomain linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uewaki, Jun-ichi; Kamikubo, Hironari; Kurita, Jun-ichi; Hiroguchi, Noriteru; Moriuchi, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Michiteru; Kataoka, Mikio; Utsunomiya-Tate, Naoko; Tate, Shin-ichi

    2013-06-01

    High mobility group box protein 2 (HMGB2) contains homologous tandem HMG box DNA-binding domains, boxes A and B. These two boxes are linked by a short basic linker having a sequence characteristic of an intrinsically disordered element. The combined use of NMR and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) showed that the two boxes assume a preferred orientation to make their DNA binding surface in opposite directions, although the linker does not keep any specific conformation. A series of site directed mutations to the residues in the linker showed that a network of CH-π interactions connects the N-terminal part of the linker to box A. The mutants having impaired intramolecular CH-π interactions changed the interdomain dynamics and their dynamic averaged orientation relative to the wild-type. This work demonstrates that the apparently unstructured linker plays a role in defining the preferential domain orientation through the intramolecular CH-π interactions, even though the interactions are weak and transient.

  1. NMR Characterization and Membrane Interactions of the Loop Region of Kindlin-3 F1 Subdomain.

    PubMed

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Kindlins-1,2 and 3 are FERM domain-containing cytosolic proteins involved in the activation and regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Apart from binding to integrin β cytosolic tails, kindlins and the well characterized integrin-activator talin bind membrane phospholipids. The ubiquitin-like F1 sub-domain of the FERM domain of talin contains a short loop that binds to the lipid membrane. By contrast, the F1 sub-domain of kindlins contains a long loop demonstrated binding to the membrane. Here, we report structural characterization and lipid interactions of the 83-residue F1 loop of kindlin-3 using NMR and optical spectroscopy methods. NMR studies demonstrated that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 is globally unfolded but stretches of residues assuming transient helical conformations could be detected in aqueous solution. We mapped membrane binding interactions of the F1 loop with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing either zwitterionic lipids or negatively charged lipids using 15N-1H HSQC titrations. These experiments revealed that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 preferentially interacted with the negatively charged SUVs employing almost all of the residues. By contrast, only fewer residues appeared to be interacted with SUVs containing neutral lipids. Further, CD and NMR data suggested stabilization of helical conformations and predominant resonance perturbations of the F1 loop in detergent containing solutions. Conformations of an isolated N-terminal peptide fragment, or EK21, of the F1 loop, containing a poly-Lys sequence motif, important for membrane interactions, were also investigated in detergent solutions. EK21 adopted a rather extended or β-type conformations in complex with negatively charged SDS micelles. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the conformations and residue-specific interactions of kindlin F1 loop with lipids. These data therefore provide important insights into the interactions of kindlin FERM domain with membrane

  2. NMR Characterization and Membrane Interactions of the Loop Region of Kindlin-3 F1 Subdomain

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2016-01-01

    Kindlins-1,2 and 3 are FERM domain-containing cytosolic proteins involved in the activation and regulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion. Apart from binding to integrin β cytosolic tails, kindlins and the well characterized integrin-activator talin bind membrane phospholipids. The ubiquitin-like F1 sub-domain of the FERM domain of talin contains a short loop that binds to the lipid membrane. By contrast, the F1 sub-domain of kindlins contains a long loop demonstrated binding to the membrane. Here, we report structural characterization and lipid interactions of the 83-residue F1 loop of kindlin-3 using NMR and optical spectroscopy methods. NMR studies demonstrated that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 is globally unfolded but stretches of residues assuming transient helical conformations could be detected in aqueous solution. We mapped membrane binding interactions of the F1 loop with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) containing either zwitterionic lipids or negatively charged lipids using 15N-1H HSQC titrations. These experiments revealed that the F1 loop of kindlin-3 preferentially interacted with the negatively charged SUVs employing almost all of the residues. By contrast, only fewer residues appeared to be interacted with SUVs containing neutral lipids. Further, CD and NMR data suggested stabilization of helical conformations and predominant resonance perturbations of the F1 loop in detergent containing solutions. Conformations of an isolated N-terminal peptide fragment, or EK21, of the F1 loop, containing a poly-Lys sequence motif, important for membrane interactions, were also investigated in detergent solutions. EK21 adopted a rather extended or β-type conformations in complex with negatively charged SDS micelles. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the conformations and residue-specific interactions of kindlin F1 loop with lipids. These data therefore provide important insights into the interactions of kindlin FERM domain with membrane

  3. Conopeptide Vt3.1 Preferentially Inhibits BK Potassium Channels Containing β4 Subunits via Electrostatic Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Chang, Shan; Yang, Longjin; Shi, Jingyi; McFarland, Kelli; Yang, Xiao; Moller, Alyssa; Wang, Chunguang; Zou, Xiaoqin; Chi, Chengwu; Cui, Jianmin

    2014-01-01

    BK channel β subunits (β1–β4) modulate the function of channels formed by slo1 subunits to produce tissue-specific phenotypes. The molecular mechanism of how the homologous β subunits differentially alter BK channel functions and the role of different BK channel functions in various physiologic processes remain unclear. By studying channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we show a novel disulfide-cross-linked dimer conopeptide, Vt3.1 that preferentially inhibits BK channels containing the β4 subunit, which is most abundantly expressed in brain and important for neuronal functions. Vt3.1 inhibits the currents by a maximum of 71%, shifts the G-V relation by 45 mV approximately half-saturation concentrations, and alters both open and closed time of single channel activities, indicating that the toxin alters voltage dependence of the channel. Vt3.1 contains basic residues and inhibits voltage-dependent activation by electrostatic interactions with acidic residues in the extracellular loops of the slo1 and β4 subunits. These results suggest a large interaction surface between the slo1 subunit of BK channels and the β4 subunit, providing structural insight into the molecular interactions between slo1 and β4 subunits. The results also suggest that Vt3.1 is an excellent tool for studying β subunit modulation of BK channels and for understanding the physiological roles of BK channels in neurophysiology. PMID:24398688

  4. Membrane-Mediated Interaction between Strongly Anisotropic Protein Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Yonatan; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Specialized proteins serve as scaffolds sculpting strongly curved membranes of intracellular organelles. Effective membrane shaping requires segregation of these proteins into domains and is, therefore, critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction. Interactions mediated by membrane elastic deformations have been extensively analyzed within approximations of large inter-protein distances, small extents of the protein-mediated membrane bending and small deviations of the protein shapes from isotropic spherical segments. At the same time, important classes of the realistic membrane-shaping proteins have strongly elongated shapes with large and highly anisotropic curvature. Here we investigated, computationally, the membrane mediated interaction between proteins or protein oligomers representing membrane scaffolds with strongly anisotropic curvature, and addressed, quantitatively, a specific case of the scaffold geometrical parameters characterizing BAR domains, which are crucial for membrane shaping in endocytosis. In addition to the previously analyzed contributions to the interaction, we considered a repulsive force stemming from the entropy of the scaffold orientation. We computed this interaction to be of the same order of magnitude as the well-known attractive force related to the entropy of membrane undulations. We demonstrated the scaffold shape anisotropy to cause a mutual aligning of the scaffolds and to generate a strong attractive interaction bringing the scaffolds close to each other to equilibrium distances much smaller than the scaffold size. We computed the energy of interaction between scaffolds of a realistic geometry to constitute tens of kBT, which guarantees a robust segregation of the scaffolds into domains. PMID:25710602

  5. Kinetics membrane disruption due to drug interactions of chlorpromazine hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Nussio, Matthew R; Sykes, Matthew J; Miners, John O; Shapter, Joseph G

    2009-01-20

    Drug-membrane interactions assume considerable importance in pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism. Here, we present the interaction of chlorpromazine hydrochloride (CPZ) with supported phospholipid bilayers. It was demonstrated that CPZ binds rapidly to phospholipid bilayers, disturbing the molecular ordering of the phospholipids. These interactions were observed to follow first order kinetics, with an activation energy of approximately 420 kJ mol(-1). Time-dependent membrane disruption was also observed for the interaction with CPZ, such that holes appeared in the phospholipid bilayer after the interaction of CPZ. For this process of membrane disruption, "lag-burst" kinetics was demonstrated. PMID:19093750

  6. Influence of membrane surface roughness on interfacial interactions with sludge flocs in a submerged membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Hong, Huachang; Lin, Hongjun

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the interfacial interactions between sludge flocs and a rough membrane surface in a submerged membrane bioreactor were investigated. Models describing these interfacial interactions were firstly proposed based on the surface element integration (SEI) method. Surface properties of sludge flocs and membrane were experimentally determined to simulate the models through composite Simpson's rule. It was found that, roughness on membrane surface significantly decreased interaction strength, which enabled the sludge flocs to more easily attach on and detach from the rough membrane surface. Further analysis showed that the value of total interaction energy increased with asperity radius, while the strength of total interaction energy decreased with asperity height. Results also demonstrated that increase in floc size would significantly decrease the attractive specific total interaction with rough membrane surface. It was revealed that there existed a critical asperity radius above which the total interaction energy in certain separation distance coverage was continuously repulsive, facilitating membrane fouling control in MBRs. This study demonstrated the possibility to mitigate membrane fouling by "tailoring" membrane surface roughness. PMID:25660708

  7. Flavonoid-membrane Interactions: A Protective Role of Flavonoids at the Membrane Surface?

    PubMed Central

    Oteiza, Patricia I.; Erlejman, Alejandra G.; Verstraeten, Sandra V.; Keen, Carl L.; Fraga, César G.

    2005-01-01

    Flavonoids can exert beneficial health effects through multiple mechanisms. In this paper, we address the important, although not fully understood, capacity of flavonoids to interact with cell membranes. The interactions of polyphenols with bilayers include: (a) the partition of the more non-polar compounds in the hydrophobic interior of the membrane, and (b) the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polar head groups of lipids and the more hydrophilic flavonoids at the membrane interface. The consequences of these interactions are discussed. The induction of changes in membrane physical properties can affect the rates of membrane lipid and protein oxidation. The partition of certain flavonoids in the hydrophobic core can result in a chain breaking antioxidant activity. We suggest that interactions of polyphenols at the surface of bilayers through hydrogen bonding, can act to reduce the access of deleterious molecules (i.e. oxidants), thus protecting the structure and function of membranes. PMID:15712595

  8. Dynamics of Membrane Tethers Reveal Novel Aspects of Cytoskeleton-Membrane Interactions in Axons

    PubMed Central

    Datar, Anagha; Bornschlögl, Thomas; Bassereau, Patricia; Prost, Jacques; Pullarkat, Pramod A.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical properties of cell membranes are known to be significantly influenced by the underlying cortical cytoskeleton. The technique of pulling membrane tethers from cells is one of the most effective ways of studying the membrane mechanics and the membrane-cortex interaction. In this article, we show that axon membranes make an interesting system to explore as they exhibit both free membrane-like behavior where the tether-membrane junction is movable on the surface of the axons (unlike many other cell membranes) as well as cell-like behavior where there are transient and spontaneous eruptions in the tether force that vanish when F-actin is depolymerized. We analyze the passive and spontaneous responses of axonal membrane tethers and propose theoretical models to explain the observed behavior. PMID:25650917

  9. Preferential inhibition of the plasma membrane NADH oxidase (NOX) activity by diphenyleneiodonium chloride with NADPH as donor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morre, D. James

    2002-01-01

    The cell-surface NADH oxidase (NOX) protein of plant and animal cells will utilize both NADH and NADPH as reduced electron donors for activity. The two activities are distinguished by a differential inhibition by the redox inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI). Using both plasma membranes and cells, activity with NADPH as donor was markedly inhibited by DPI at submicromolar concentrations, whereas with NADH as donor, DPI was much less effective or had no effect on the activity. The possibility of the inhibition being the result of two different enzymes was eliminated by the use of a recombinant NOX protein. The findings support the concept that NOX proteins serve as terminal oxidases for plasma membrane electron transport involving cytosolic reduced pyridine nucleotides as the natural electron donors and with molecular oxygen as the electron acceptor.

  10. Outer membrane proteins preferentially load MHC class II peptides: Implications for as a Chlamydia trachomatis T cell vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Karunakaran, Karuna P.; Yu, Hong; Jiang, Xiaozhou; Chan, Queenie; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J.; Brunham, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    CD4 T cell immune responses such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α secretion are necessary for Chlamydia immunity. We used an immunoproteomic approach in which Chlamydia trachomatis and Chlamydia muridarum-derived peptides presented by MHC class II molecules on the surface of infected dendritic cells (DCs) were identified by tandem mass spectrometry using bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) from mice of different MHC background. We first compared the C. muridarum immunoproteome in C3H mice to that previously identified in C57BL/6 mice. Fourteen MHC class II binding peptides from 11 Chlamydia proteins were identified from C3H infected BMDCs. Two C. muridarum proteins overlapped between C3H and C57B/6 mice and both were polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) which presented distinct class II binding peptides. Next we studied DCs from C57BL/6 mice infected with the human strain, C. trachomatis serovar D. Sixty MHC class II binding peptides derived from 27 C. trachomatis proteins were identified. Nine proteins were orthologous T cell antigens between C. trachomatis and C. muridarum and 2 of the nine were Pmps which generated MHC class II binding epitopes at distinct sequences within the proteins. As determined by antigen specific splenocyte responses outer membrane proteins PmpF, -G and -H and the major outer membrane protein (MOMP) were antigenic in mice previously infected with C. muridarum or C. trachomatis. Furthermore a recombinant protein vaccine consisting of the four Pmps (PmpEFGH) with MOMP formulated with a Th1 polarizing adjuvant significantly accelerated (p < 0.001) clearance in the C57BL/6 mice C. trachomatis transcervical infection model. We conclude that Chlamydia outer membrane proteins are important T cell antigens useful in the development of a C. trachomatis subunit vaccine. PMID:25738816

  11. Vortex Interaction on Low Aspect Ratio Membrane Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldman, Rye M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2013-11-01

    Inspired by the flight of bats and by recent interest in Micro Air Vehicles, we present measurements on the steady and unsteady behavior of low aspect ratio membrane wings. We conduct wind tunnel experiments with coupled force, kinematic, and flow field measurements, both on the wing and in the near wake. Membrane wings interact strongly with the vortices shed from the leading- and trailing-edges and the wing tips, and the details of the membrane support play an important role in the fluid-structure interaction. Membranes that are supported at the wing tip exhibit less membrane flutter, more coherent tip vortices, and enhanced lift. The interior wake can exhibit organized spanwise vortex shedding, and shows little influence from the tip vortex. In contrast, membranes with an unsupported wing tip show exaggerated static deformation, significant membrane fluttering and a diffuse, unsteady tip vortex. The unsteady tip vortex modifies the behavior of the interior wake, disrupting the wake coherence.

  12. Aqua-vanadyl ion interaction with Nafion® membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Govind, Niranjan; Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Nie, Zimin; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-23

    Lack of comprehensive understanding about the interactions between Nafion membrane and battery electrolytes prevents the straightforward tailoring of optimal materials for redox flow battery applications. In this work, we analyzed the interaction between aqua-vanadyl cation and sulfonic sites within the pores of Nafion membranes using combined theoretical and experimental X-ray spectroscopic methods. Molecular level interactions, namely, solvent share and contact pair mechanisms are discussed based on Vanadium and Sulfur K-edge spectroscopic analysis.

  13. Solid State NMR and Protein-Protein Interactions in Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  14. Solid state NMR and protein-protein interactions in membranes.

    PubMed

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A

    2013-12-01

    Solid state NMR spectroscopy has evolved rapidly in recent years into an excellent tool for the characterization of membrane proteins and their complexes. In the past few years it has also become clear that the structure of membrane proteins, especially helical membrane proteins is determined, in part, by the membrane environment. Therefore, the modeling of this environment by a liquid crystalline lipid bilayer for solid state NMR has generated a unique tool for the characterization of native conformational states, local and global dynamics, and high-resolution structure for these proteins. Protein-protein interactions can also benefit from this solid state NMR capability to characterize membrane proteins in a native-like environment. These complexes take the form of oligomeric structures and hetero-protein interactions both with water-soluble proteins and other membrane proteins. PMID:24034903

  15. Influence of membrane-solvent-solute interactions on solute permeation in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Dias, Monica; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2007-05-01

    The interaction of the components of topical formulations with the skin is an important consideration for effective drug delivery and efficacy. The relative importance of solubility parameters and other solvent properties on membrane diffusion processes has not been fully elucidated in the literature. In this paper, the effect of different vehicles on the permeation of caffeine, salicylic acid and benzoic acid through silicone membranes was evaluated. Polydimethylsiloxane membranes were used as model membranes for comparing the release characteristics of saturated solutions of model permeants because of their homogeneity and uniformity. Log P (octanol-water partition coefficient) and solubility parameter values were calculated for the compounds under study. In vitro diffusion studies indicated that the permeation profiles of all solutes showed a similar pattern. The permeation rates of benzoic acid and salicylic acid through silicone membrane from saturated solutions were higher than those for caffeine reflecting the more lipophilic nature of these compounds in comparison with caffeine. Solvent uptake studies confirmed that the vehicles that were highly sorbed by the membrane altered its properties and hence the flux. Vehicles that were not sorbed by the membrane showed similar steady-state fluxes for the model drugs. This suggests that the diffusion process is mainly influenced by the interactions between the vehicles and the membrane. Solubility parameter alone cannot explain the interactions between the membrane and the vehicles in all cases. Rather, it is likely that membrane flux reflects a combination of different solvent and solute characteristics, such as size, shape and charge distribution. PMID:17204382

  16. The relevance of membrane models to understand nanoparticles-cell membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascol, Estelle; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Chopineau, Joël

    2016-02-01

    Over the past two decades, numerous types of nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed for medical applications; however only a few nanomedicines are actually available on the market. One reason is the lack of understanding and data concerning the NP fate and their behavior upon contact with biological media and cell membranes. Biomimetic membrane models are interesting tools to approach and understand NPs-cell membrane interactions. The use of these models permits one to control physical and chemical parameters and to rapidly compare membrane types and the influence of different media conditions. The interactions between NPs and cell membranes can be qualified and quantified using analytical and modeling methods. In this review, the major studies concerning NPs-cell membrane models and associated methods are described. The advantages and drawbacks for each method are compared for the different models. The key mechanisms of interactions between NPs and cell membranes are revealed using cell membrane models and are interrogated in comparison with the NP behavior in cellulo or in vivo. Investigating the interactions between NPs and cell membrane models is now proposed as an intermediate step between physicochemical characterization of NPs and biological assays.

  17. Interaction of a Helical Peptide with Membrane: Study of Alamethicin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yili

    Alamethicin is a transmembrane ion channel at low concentration, and a lytic agent of cell membrane at high concentration. It is a small size polypeptide (20 amino residues), and contains a large section of amphiphilic alpha-helix, which is an often-encountered secondary structure motif in membrane active peptides and proteins. Its membrane-active functions, typical secondary structure, and relatively small size made this peptide be an ideal model for studying the interaction of proteins with membranes. This thesis provides two novel methods to obtain structural information of such a peptide-lipid system. By the method of oriented circular dichroism (OCD), we are able to determine the orientation of the alamethicin with respect to the membrane bilayer. Depending on the alamethicin concentration and the water content in the membrane, alamethicin either perpendicularly inserts into the bilayer or binds parallel to the membrane surface. By the method of lamellar x-ray diffraction, we found the membrane bilayer thickness reduced by increasing concentration of alamethicin and decreasing relative humidity. From these two mutually complementary studies we constructed a consistent picture for the interaction between alamethicin and the membrane. When alamethicin concentration is low, the peptide molecules adsorb near the area of lipid head group, which effectively expands the average cross sectional area of the lipid molecules and makes the hydrocarbon chains more disordered, so that the lipid bilayer becomes thinner than pure lipid membrane. When alamethicin concentration reaches the critical point, where membrane structure becomes favorable for the insertion of alamethicin, alamethicin undergoes a transition from the surface state to the insertion state. The insertion of alamethicin would introduce much water into membrane, so the transition would happen only when relative humidity is high. Our alamethicin-lipid interaction model explains the spontaneous insertion of

  18. Modeling of Fluid-Membrane Interaction in Cellular Microinjection Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karzar-Jeddi, Mehdi; Diaz, Jhon; Olgac, Nejat; Fan, Tai-Hsi

    2009-11-01

    Cellular microinjection is a well-accepted method to deliver matters such as sperm, nucleus, or macromolecules into biological cells. To improve the success rate of in vitro fertilization and to establish the ideal operating conditions for a novel computer controlled rotationally oscillating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) technology, we investigate the fluid-membrane interactions in the ICSI procedure. The procedure consists of anchoring the oocyte (a developing egg) using a holding pipette, penetrating oocyte's zona pellucida (the outer membrane) and the oolemma (the plasma or inner membrane) using an injection micropipette, and finally to deliver sperm into the oocyte for fertilization. To predict the large deformation of the oocyte membranes up to the piercing of the oolemma and the motion of fluids across both membranes, the dynamic fluid-pipette-membrane interactions are formulated by the coupled Stokes' equations and the continuum membrane model based on Helfrich's energy theory. A boundary integral model is developed to simulate the transient membrane deformation and the local membrane stress induced by the longitudinal motion of the injection pipette. The model captures the essential features of the membranes shown on optical images of ICSI experiments, and is capable of suggesting the optimal deformation level of the oolemma to start the rotational oscillations for piercing into the oolemma.

  19. Methods for Mapping of Interaction Networks Involving Membrane Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Hooker, Brian S.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Lin, Chiann Tso

    2007-11-23

    Numerous approaches have been taken to study protein interactions, such as tagged protein complex isolation followed by mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid methods, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, surface plasmon resonance, site-directed mutagenesis, and crystallography. Membrane protein interactions pose significant challenges due to the need to solubilize membranes without disrupting protein-protein interactions. Traditionally, analysis of isolated protein complexes by high-resolution 2D gel electrophoresis has been the main method used to obtain an overall picture of proteome constituents and interactions. However, this method is time consuming, labor intensive, detects only abundant proteins and is not suitable for the coverage required to elucidate large interaction networks. In this review, we discuss the application of various methods to elucidate interactions involving membrane proteins. These techniques include methods for the direct isolation of single complexes or interactors as well as methods for characterization of entire subcellular and cellular interactomes.

  20. The Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis Preferentially Interacts with Oral Epithelial Cells in S Phase of the Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Al-Taweel, Firas B; Douglas, C W Ian; Whawell, Simon A

    2016-07-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis, a key periodontal pathogen, is capable of invading a variety of cells, including oral keratinocytes, by exploiting host cell receptors, including alpha-5 beta-1 (α5β1) integrin. Previous studies have shown that P. gingivalis accelerates the cell cycle and prevents apoptosis of host cells, but it is not known whether the cell cycle phases influence bacterium-cell interactions. The cell cycle distribution of oral keratinocytes was characterized by flow cytometry and BrdU (5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine) staining following synchronization of cultures by serum starvation. The effect of cell cycle phases on P. gingivalis invasion was measured by using antibiotic protection assays and flow cytometry, and these results were correlated with gene and surface expression levels of α5 integrin and urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR). There was a positive correlation (R = 0.98) between the number of cells in S phase and P. gingivalis invasion, the organism was more highly associated with cells in S phase than with cells in G2 and G1 phases, and S-phase cells contained 10 times more bacteria than did cells that were not in S phase. Our findings also show that α5 integrin, but not uPAR, was positively correlated with cells in S phase, which is consistent with previous reports indicating that P. gingivalis invasion of cells is mediated by α5 integrin. This study shows for the first time that P. gingivalis preferentially associates with and invades cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. The mechanism of targeting stable dividing cells may have implications for the treatment of periodontal diseases and may partly explain the persistence of this organism at subgingival sites. PMID:27091929

  1. A conserved regulatory mode in exocytic membrane fusion revealed by Mso1p membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Zhao, Hongxia; Aro, Nina; Yuan, Qiang; Chernov, Konstantin; Peränen, Johan; Lappalainen, Pekka; Jäntti, Jussi

    2013-01-01

    Sec1/Munc18 family proteins are important components of soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex–mediated membrane fusion processes. However, the molecular interactions and the mechanisms involved in Sec1p/Munc18 control and SNARE complex assembly are not well understood. We provide evidence that Mso1p, a Sec1p- and Sec4p-binding protein, interacts with membranes to regulate membrane fusion. We identify two membrane-binding sites on Mso1p. The N-terminal region inserts into the lipid bilayer and appears to interact with the plasma membrane, whereas the C-terminal region of the protein binds phospholipids mainly through electrostatic interactions and may associate with secretory vesicles. The Mso1p membrane interactions are essential for correct subcellular localization of Mso1p–Sec1p complexes and for membrane fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These characteristics are conserved in the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of β-amyloid precursor protein–binding Mint1, the mammalian homologue of Mso1p. Both Mint1 PTB domain and Mso1p induce vesicle aggregation/clustering in vitro, supporting a role in a membrane-associated process. The results identify Mso1p as a novel lipid-interacting protein in the SNARE complex assembly machinery. Furthermore, our data suggest that a general mode of interaction, consisting of a lipid-binding protein, a Rab family GTPase, and a Sec1/Munc18 family protein, is important in all SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events. PMID:23197474

  2. A conserved regulatory mode in exocytic membrane fusion revealed by Mso1p membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Zhao, Hongxia; Aro, Nina; Yuan, Qiang; Chernov, Konstantin; Peränen, Johan; Lappalainen, Pekka; Jäntti, Jussi

    2013-02-01

    Sec1/Munc18 family proteins are important components of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex-mediated membrane fusion processes. However, the molecular interactions and the mechanisms involved in Sec1p/Munc18 control and SNARE complex assembly are not well understood. We provide evidence that Mso1p, a Sec1p- and Sec4p-binding protein, interacts with membranes to regulate membrane fusion. We identify two membrane-binding sites on Mso1p. The N-terminal region inserts into the lipid bilayer and appears to interact with the plasma membrane, whereas the C-terminal region of the protein binds phospholipids mainly through electrostatic interactions and may associate with secretory vesicles. The Mso1p membrane interactions are essential for correct subcellular localization of Mso1p-Sec1p complexes and for membrane fusion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These characteristics are conserved in the phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain of β-amyloid precursor protein-binding Mint1, the mammalian homologue of Mso1p. Both Mint1 PTB domain and Mso1p induce vesicle aggregation/clustering in vitro, supporting a role in a membrane-associated process. The results identify Mso1p as a novel lipid-interacting protein in the SNARE complex assembly machinery. Furthermore, our data suggest that a general mode of interaction, consisting of a lipid-binding protein, a Rab family GTPase, and a Sec1/Munc18 family protein, is important in all SNARE-mediated membrane fusion events. PMID:23197474

  3. The Role of Cholesterol in Driving IAPP-Membrane Interactions.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Michele F M; Lolicato, Fabio; Di Mauro, Giacomo; Milardi, Danilo; D'Urso, Luisa; Satriano, Cristina; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; La Rosa, Carmelo

    2016-07-12

    Our knowledge of the molecular events underlying type 2 diabetes mellitus-a protein conformational disease characterized by the aggregation of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) in pancreatic β cells-is limited. However, amyloid-mediated membrane damage is known to play a key role in IAPP cytotoxicity, and therefore the effects of lipid composition on modulating IAPP-membrane interactions have been the focus of intense research. In particular, membrane cholesterol content varies with aging and consequently with adverse environmental factors such as diet and lifestyle, but its role in the development of the disease is controversial. In this study, we employ a combination of experimental techniques and in silico molecular simulations to shed light on the role of cholesterol in IAPP aggregation and the related membrane disruption. We show that if anionic POPC/POPS vesicles are used as model membranes, cholesterol has a negligible effect on the kinetics of IAPP fibril growth on the surface of the bilayer. In addition, cholesterol inhibits membrane damage by amyloid-induced poration on membranes, but enhances leakage through fiber growth on the membrane surface. Conversely, if 1:2 DOPC/DPPC raft-like model membranes are used, cholesterol accelerates fiber growth. Next, it enhances pore formation and suppresses fiber growth on the membrane surface, leading to leakage. Our results highlight a twofold effect of cholesterol on the amyloidogenicity of IAPP and help explain its debated role in type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27410742

  4. Interaction of injectable neurotropic drugs with the red cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Reinhart, Walter H; Lubszky, Szabina; Thöny, Sandra; Schulzki, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    The normal red blood cell (RBC) shape is a biconcave discocyte. An intercalation of a drug in the outer half of the membrane lipid bilayer leads to echinocytosis, an intercalation in the inner half to stomatocytosis. We have used the shape transforming capacity of RBCs as a model to analyse the membrane interaction potential of various neurotropic drugs. Chlorpromazine, clomipramine, citalopram, clonazepam, and diazepam induced a reversible stomatocytosis, phenytoin induced echinocytosis, while the anticonvulsants levetiracetam, valproic acid and phenobarbital had no effect. This diversity of RBC shape transformations suggests that the pharmacological action is not linked to the membrane interaction. We conclude that this simple RBC shape transformation assay could be a useful tool to screen for potential drug interactions with cell membranes. PMID:24997296

  5. Influences of acid-base property of membrane on interfacial interactions related with membrane fouling in a membrane bioreactor based on thermodynamic assessment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Qu, Xiaolu; Zhang, Meijia; Lin, Hongjun; Zhou, Xiaoling; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Mei, Rongwu; Hong, Huachang

    2016-08-01

    Failure of membrane hydrophobicity in predicting membrane fouling requires a more reliable indicator. In this study, influences of membrane acid base (AB) property on interfacial interactions in two different interaction scenarios in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were studied according to thermodynamic approaches. It was found that both the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane and foulant samples in the MBR had relatively high electron donor (γ(-)) component and low electron acceptor (γ(+)) component. For both of interaction scenarios, AB interaction was the major component of the total interaction. The results showed that, the total interaction monotonically decreased with membrane γ(-), while was marginally affected by membrane γ(+), suggesting that γ(-) could act as a reliable indicator for membrane fouling prediction. This study suggested that membrane modification for fouling mitigation should orient to improving membrane surface γ(-) component rather than hydrophilicity. PMID:27155263

  6. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J; White, Stephen

    2014-12-16

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  7. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J.; White, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  8. [Interaction of melittin with ion channels of excitable membranes].

    PubMed

    Zherelova, O M; Kabanova, N V; Kazachenko, V N; Chaĭlakhian, L M

    2007-01-01

    The effect of the neurotoxin melittin on the activation of ion channels of excitable membrane, the plasmalemma of Characeae algae cells, isolated membrane patches of neurons of mollusc L. stagnalis and Vero cells was studied by the method of intracellular perfusion and the patch-clamp technique in inside-out configuration. It was shown that melittin disturbs the conductivity of plasmalemma and modifieds Ca(2+)-channels of plant membrane. The leakage current that appears by the action of melittin can be restored by substituting calmodulin for melittin. Melittin modifies K(+)-channels of animal cell membrane by disrupting the phospholipid matrix and forms conductive structures in the membrane by interacting with channel proteins, which is evidenced by the appearance of additional ion channels. PMID:17477057

  9. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  10. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D.; Klug, William S.; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  11. Membrane Interactions of S100A12 (Calgranulin C)

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Filho, Antonio J.; Wallace, Bonnie A.; Araujo, Ana P. U.

    2013-01-01

    S100A12 (Calgranulin C) is a small acidic calcium-binding peripheral membrane protein with two EF-hand structural motifs. It is expressed in macrophages and lymphocytes and highly up-regulated in several human inflammatory diseases. In pigs, S100A12 is abundant in the cytosol of granulocytes, where it is believed to be involved in signal modulation of inflammatory process. In this study, we investigated the interaction of the porcine S100A12 with phospholipid bilayers and the effect that ions (Ca2+, Zn2+ or both together) have in modifying protein-lipid interactions. More specifically, we intended to address issues such as: (1) is the protein-membrane interaction modulated by the presence of ions? (2) is the protein overall structure affected by the presence of the ions and membrane models simultaneously? (3) what are the specific conformational changes taking place when ions and membranes are both present? (4) does the protein have any kind of molecular preferences for a specific lipid component? To provide insight into membrane interactions and answer those questions, synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and surface plasmon resonance were used. The use of these combined techniques demonstrated that this protein was capable of interacting both with lipids and with ions in solution, and enabled examination of changes that occur at different levels of structure organization. The presence of both Ca2+ and Zn2+ ions modify the binding, conformation and thermal stability of the protein in the presence of lipids. Hence, these studies examining molecular interactions of porcine S100A12 in solution complement the previously determined crystal structure information on this family of proteins, enhancing our understanding of its dynamics of interaction with membranes. PMID:24367524

  12. Interactions of Polyethylenimines with Zwitterionic and Anionic Lipid Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kwolek, Urszula; Jamróz, Dorota; Janiczek, Małgorzata; Nowakowska, Maria; Wydro, Paweł; Kepczynski, Mariusz

    2016-05-17

    Interactions between polyethylenimines (PEIs) and phospholipid membranes are of fundamental importance for various biophysical applications of these polymers such as gene delivery. Despite investigations into the nature of these interactions, their molecular basis remains poorly understood. In this article, we combined experimental methods and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain comprehensive insight into the effect of linear and branched PEIs on zwitterionic and anionic bilayers used as simple models of mammalian cellular membranes. Our results show that PEIs adsorb only partially on the surface of zwitterionic membranes by forming hydrogen bonds to the lipid headgroups, whereas a large part of the polymer chains dangles freely in the aqueous phase. In contrast, PEIs readily adhere to and insert into the anionic membrane. The attraction of the polymer chains to the membrane is due to electrostatic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding between the amine groups of PEI and the phosphate groups of lipids. These interactions were found to induce a substantial reorganization of the bilayer in the polymer vicinity due to the reorientation of lipid molecules. The lipid headgroups were pulled toward the center of the membrane, which can facilitate transmembrane translocations of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the PEI-lipid interactions affect the stability of liposomal dispersions, but we did not see any evidence of disruption of the vesicular structures into small fragments at polymer concentrations typically used in gene therapy. Our results provide a detailed molecular-level description of the lipid organization in the membrane in the presence of polycations that can be useful in understanding their mechanisms of in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity. PMID:27115556

  13. Curvature Forces in Membrane Lipid-Protein Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael F.

    2012-02-01

    Membrane protein conformational changes, folding, and stability may all involve elastic deformation of the bilayer. Non-specific properties of the bilayer play a significant role in modulating protein conformational energetics. A flexible-surface model (FSM) describes the balance of curvature and hydrophobic forces in lipid-protein interactions. The FSM describes elastic coupling of membrane lipids to integral membrane proteins. Curvature and hydrophobic matching to the lipid bilayer entails a stress field that explains membrane protein stability. Rhodopsin provides an important example, where solid-state NMR and FTIR spectroscopy characterize the energy landscape of the dynamically activated receptor. Time-resolved UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopic studies show how membrane lipids affect the metarhodopsin equilibrium due to non-specific material properties. Influences of bilayer thickness, nonlamellar-forming lipids, detergents, and osmotic stress on rhodopsin function are all explained by the new biomembrane model. By contrast, the older fluid-mosaic model fails to account for such effects on membrane protein activity. According to the FSM proteins are regulated by membrane lipids whose spontaneous curvature most closely matches the activated state within the lipid membrane.

  14. Interaction of chiral rafts in self-assembled colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Sheng; Hagan, Michael F.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal membranes are monolayer assemblies of rodlike particles that capture the long-wavelength properties of lipid bilayer membranes on the colloidal scale. Recent experiments on colloidal membranes formed by chiral rodlike viruses showed that introducing a second species of virus with different length and opposite chirality leads to the formation of rafts—micron-sized domains of one virus species floating in a background of the other viruses [Sharma et al., Nature (London) 513, 77 (2014), 10.1038/nature13694]. In this article we study the interaction of such rafts using liquid crystal elasticity theory. By numerically minimizing the director elastic free energy, we predict the tilt angle profile for both a single raft and two rafts in a background membrane, and the interaction between two rafts as a function of their separation. We find that the chiral penetration depth in the background membrane sets the scale for the range of the interaction. We compare our results with the experimental data and find good agreement for the strength and range of the interaction. Unlike the experiments, however, we do not observe a complete collapse of the data when rescaled by the tilt angle at the raft edge.

  15. Molecular interactions between gold nanoparticles and model cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Peipei; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Chi; Chen, Zhan

    2015-04-21

    The interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and cells are of huge interest because NPs have been extensively researched for biomedical applications. For the cellular entry of NPs, it remains unclear how the cell membrane molecules respond to the exposure of NPs due to a lack of appropriate surface/interface-sensitive techniques to study NP-cell membrane interactions in situ in real time. In this study, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was employed to examine the interactions between lipid bilayers (serving as model mammalian cell membranes) and Au NPs of four different sizes with the same mass, or the same NP number, or the same NP surface area. It was found that lipid flip-flop was induced by Au NPs of all four sizes. Interestingly, the lipid flip-flop rate was found to increase as the Au NP size increased with respect to the same particle number or the same NP surface area. However, the induced lipid flip-flop rate was the same for Au NPs with different sizes with the same mass, which was interpreted by the same "effective surface contact area" between Au NPs and the model cell membrane. We believe that this study provided the first direct observation of the lipid flip-flop induced by the interactions between Au NPs and the model mammalian cell membrane. PMID:25776800

  16. Interaction of mammalian Hsp22 with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, Tirumala Kumar; Raman, Bakthisaran; Ramakrishna, Tangirala; Rao, Ch. Mohan

    2006-01-01

    Hsp22/HspB8 is a member of the small heat-shock protein family, whose function is not yet completely understood. Our immunolocalization studies in a human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH, using confocal microscopy show that a significant fraction of Hsp22 is localized to the plasma membrane. We therefore investigated its interactions with lipid vesicles in vitro. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence is quenched in the presence of lipid vesicles derived from either bovine brain lipid extract or purified lipids. Time-resolved fluorescence studies show a decrease in the lifetimes of the tryptophan residues. Both of these results indicate burial of some tryptophan residues of Hsp22 upon interaction with lipid vesicles. Membrane interactions also lead to increase in fluorescence polarization of Hsp22. Gel-filtration chromatography shows that Hsp22 binds stably with lipid vesicles; the extent of binding depends on the nature of the lipid. Hsp22 binds more strongly to vesicles made of lipids containing a phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol or phosphatidylserine headgroup (known to be present in the inner leaflet of plasma membrane) compared with lipid vesicles made of a phosphatidylcholine head-group alone. Far-UV CD spectra reveal conformational changes upon binding to the lipid vesicles or in membrane-mimetic solvent, trifluoroethanol. Thus our fluorescence, CD and gel-filtration studies show that Hsp22 interacts with membrane and this interaction leads to stable binding and conformational changes. The present study therefore clearly demonstrates that Hsp22 exhibits potential membrane interaction that may play an important role in its cellular functions. PMID:17020537

  17. A C-terminal Membrane Anchor Affects the Interactions of Prion Proteins with Lipid Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Nam K.; Shabbir, Waheed; Bove-Fenderson, Erin; Araman, Can; Lemmens-Gruber, Rosa; Harris, David A.; Becker, Christian F. W.

    2014-01-01

    Membrane attachment via a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor is critical for conversion of PrPC into pathogenic PrPSc. Therefore the effects of the anchor on PrP structure and function need to be deciphered. Three PrP variants, including full-length PrP (residues 23–231, FL_PrP), N-terminally truncated PrP (residues 90–231, T_PrP), and PrP missing its central hydrophobic region (Δ105–125, ΔCR_PrP), were equipped with a C-terminal membrane anchor via a semisynthesis strategy. Analyses of the interactions of lipidated PrPs with phospholipid membranes demonstrated that C-terminal membrane attachment induces a different binding mode of PrP to membranes, distinct from that of non-lipidated PrPs, and influences the biochemical and conformational properties of PrPs. Additionally, fluorescence-based assays indicated pore formation by lipidated ΔCR_PrP, a variant that is known to be highly neurotoxic in transgenic mice. This finding was supported by using patch clamp electrophysiological measurements of cultured cells. These results provide new evidence for the role of the membrane anchor in PrP-lipid interactions, highlighting the importance of the N-terminal and the central hydrophobic domain in these interactions. PMID:25217642

  18. The cellular membrane as a mediator for small molecule interaction with membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Mayne, Christopher G; Arcario, Mark J; Mahinthichaichan, Paween; Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Navidpour, Latifeh; Wen, Po-Chao; Thangapandian, Sundarapandian; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-10-01

    The cellular membrane constitutes the first element that encounters a wide variety of molecular species to which a cell might be exposed. Hosting a large number of structurally and functionally diverse proteins associated with this key metabolic compartment, the membrane not only directly controls the traffic of various molecules in and out of the cell, it also participates in such diverse and important processes as signal transduction and chemical processing of incoming molecular species. In this article, we present a number of cases where details of interaction of small molecular species such as drugs with the membrane, which are often experimentally inaccessible, have been studied using advanced molecular simulation techniques. We have selected systems in which partitioning of the small molecule with the membrane constitutes a key step for its final biological function, often binding to and interacting with a protein associated with the membrane. These examples demonstrate that membrane partitioning is not only important for the overall distribution of drugs and other small molecules into different compartments of the body, it may also play a key role in determining the efficiency and the mode of interaction of the drug with its target protein. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biosimulations edited by Ilpo Vattulainen and Tomasz Róg. PMID:27163493

  19. A Phase 1 Study of a Vaccine Targeting Preferentially Expressed Antigen in Melanoma and Prostate-specific Membrane Antigen in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey S.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Goodman, Oscar B.; Cranmer, Lee D.; Marshall, John L.; Miles, Sabrina; Rosario, Dar; Diamond, David C.; Qiu, Zhiyong; Obrocea, Mihail; Bot, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preferentially expressed antigen in melanoma (PRAME) and prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) are tumor-associated antigens implicated in cellular differentiation, genetic stability, and angiogenesis. MKC1106-PP is an immunotherapeutic regimen cotargeting PRAME and PSMA, comprised of a recombinant plasmid (pPRA-PSM encoding fragments derived from both antigens) and 2 peptides (E-PRA and E-PSM derived from PRAME and PSMA, respectively). This multicenter study evaluated MKC1106-PP with a fixed plasmid dose and 2 different peptide doses, administered by intralymph node injection in a prime-boost sequence in human leukocyte antigen-A*0201 and tumor-antigen-positive patients with progressing metastatic solid tumors who had failed standard therapy. Immune monitoring was done by tetramer and enzymatic-linked immune spot analysis. The treatment was well tolerated, with no significant differences in safety, immune response, and clinical outcome relative to peptide doses. Fifteen of 24 evaluable patients showed an immune response, as defined by the expansion of PRAME-specific or PSMA-specific T cells in the blood. There were no partial or complete responses by the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Seven patients showed stable disease (SD) for 6 months or longer, or prostate specific antigen decline: 4 of 10 with prostate carcinoma, 2 of 2 with renal clear cell carcinoma, and 1 of 10 with metastatic melanoma. In addition, there was an association between the induction and persistence of antigen-specific T cells in blood above baseline levels and disease control, defined as SD for 6 months or longer. These results support further development of MKC1106-PP in specific clinical indications. PMID:21760528

  20. Membrane interactions of proline-rich antimicrobial peptide, Chex1-Arg20, multimers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyi; Sani, Marc-Antoine; Jamasbi, Elaheh; Otvos, Laszlo; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Wade, John D; Separovic, Frances

    2016-06-01

    The increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens requires the development of new antibiotics. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides (PrAMPs), including native apidaecins, Bac7, and oncocins or designed A3APO, show multi-modal actions against pathogens together with immunostimulatory activities. The interactions of the designed PrAMP, Chex1-Arg20, and its dimeric and tetrameric oligomers with different model membranes were investigated by circular dichroism spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, differential scanning calorimetry, and dye leakage. Chex1-Arg20 oligomers showed stronger affinity and preferential binding to negatively charged phospholipid bilayers and led to lipid aggregation and neutralization. Fluorescence microscopy of negatively charged giant unilamellar vesicles with AlexFluor-647-labeled Chex1-Arg20 dimers and tetramers displayed aggregation at a peptide/lipid low ratio of 1:200 and at higher peptide concentrations (1:100/1:50) for Chex1-Arg20 monomer. Such interactions, aggregation, and neutralization of PrAMP oligomers additionally showed the importance of interactions of PrAMPs with negatively charged membranes. PMID:26926423

  1. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca2+ sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca2+-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca2+. Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14211.001 PMID:27083046

  2. Synaptotagmin-1 C2B domain interacts simultaneously with SNAREs and membranes to promote membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shen; Li, Yun; Ma, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) acts as a Ca(2+) sensor for neurotransmitter release through its C2 domains. It has been proposed that Syt1 promotes SNARE-dependent fusion mainly through its C2B domain, but the underlying mechanism is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the C2B domain interacts simultaneously with acidic membranes and SNARE complexes via the top Ca(2+)-binding loops, the side polybasic patch, and the bottom face in response to Ca(2+). Disruption of the simultaneous interactions completely abrogates the triggering activity of the C2B domain in liposome fusion. We hypothesize that the simultaneous interactions endow the C2B domain with an ability to deform local membranes, and this membrane-deformation activity might underlie the functional significance of the Syt1 C2B domain in vivo. PMID:27083046

  3. Direct simulation of amphiphilic nanoparticle mediated membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, Mukarram; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    Membrane fusion is a critical step in the transport of biological cargo through membrane-bound compartments like vesicles. Membrane proteins that alleviate energy barriers for initial stalk formation and eventual rupture of the hemifusion intermediate during fusion generally assist this process. Gold nanoparticles functionalized with a combination of hydrophobic and hydrophilic alkanethiol ligands have recently been shown to induce membrane re-arrangements that are similar to those associated with these fusion proteins. In this work, we utilize molecular dynamics simulation to systematically design nanoparticles that exhibit targeted interactions with membranes. We introduce a method for rapidly parameterizing nanoparticle topology for the MARTINI biomolecular force field to permit long timescale simulation of their interactions with lipid bilayers. We leverage this model to investigate how ligand chemistry governs the nanoparticle's insertion efficacy and the perturbations it generates in the membrane environment. We further demonstrate through unbiased simulations that these nanoparticles can direct the fusion of lipid assemblies such as micelles and vesicles in a manner that mimics the function of biological fusion peptides and SNARE proteins.

  4. Spectral studies of Lanthanide interactions with membrane surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Karukstis, K.K.; Kao, M.Y.; Savin, D.A.; Bittker, R.A.; Kaphengst, K.J.; Emetarom, C.M.; Naito, N.R.; Takamoto, D.Y.

    1995-03-23

    We have monitored the interactions of the series of trivalent lanthanide cations with the thylakoid membrane surface of spinach chloroplasts using two complementary spectral techniques. Measurements of the fluorescence emission of the extrinsic probe 2-p-toluidinonaphthalene-6-sulfonate (TNS) and the absorbance of the intrinsic chromophore chlorophyll provide two sensitive means of characterizing the dependence of the cation-membrane interaction on the nature of the cation. In these systems, added lanthanide cations adsorb onto the membrane surface to neutralize exposed segments of membrane-embedded protein complexes. The lanthanide-induced charge neutralization increases the proximity of added TNS anion to the membrane surface as evidenced by variations in the TNS fluorescence level and wavelength of maximum emission. Our results reveal a strong dependence of TNS fluorescence parameters on both lanthanide size and total orbital angular momentum L value. Lanthanides with greater charge density (small size and/or low L value) enhance the TNS fluorescence level to a greater extent. A possible origin for the lanthanide-dependent TNS fluorescence levels is suggested in terms of a heterogeneity in the number and type of TNS binding sites. The data are consistent with the proposal that larger lanthanides with smaller enthalpies of hydration induce more significant membrane appression. 59 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Probing DNA-lipid membrane interactions with a lipopeptide nanopore.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Andrey; Takemoto, Jon Y; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-04-24

    Association of DNA molecules with lipid bilayer membranes is of considerable interest for a large variety of applications in biotechnology. Here we introduce syringomycin E (SRE), a small pore-forming lipopeptide produced by the bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, as a facile sensor for the detection of DNA interactions with lipid membranes. SRE forms highly reproducible pores in cellular and artificial membranes. The pore structure involves bilayer lipids, which have a pronounced influence on open channel conductance and gating. SRE channels act as ionic diodes that serve as current rectifiers sensitive to the charge of the bilayer. We employ this intrinsic property to electronically monitor the association of DNA molecules with the membrane in a variety of different settings. We show that SRE can be used for quantitatively probing electrostatic interactions of DNA and DNA-cholesterol conjugates with a lipid membrane. Furthermore, we demonstrate that SRE channels allow monitoring of hybridization reactions between lipid-anchored probe strands and complementary strands in solution. In the presence of double-stranded DNA, SRE channels display a particularly high degree of rectification. Finally, the formation of multilayered structures assembled from poly-(L)-lysine and DNA oligonucleotides on the membrane was precisely monitored with SRE. PMID:22424398

  6. Cis and trans interactions between atlastin molecules during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tina Y.; Bian, Xin; Romano, Fabian B.; Shemesh, Tom; Rapoport, Tom A.; Hu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Atlastin (ATL), a membrane-anchored GTPase that mediates homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, is required for formation of the tubular network of the peripheral ER. How exactly ATL mediates membrane fusion is only poorly understood. Here we show that fusion is preceded by the transient tethering of ATL-containing vesicles caused by the dimerization of ATL molecules in opposing membranes. Tethering requires GTP hydrolysis, not just GTP binding, because the two ATL molecules are pulled together most strongly in the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Most tethering events are futile, so that multiple rounds of GTP hydrolysis are required for successful fusion. Supported lipid bilayer experiments show that ATL molecules sitting on the same (cis) membrane can also undergo nucleotide-dependent dimerization. These results suggest that GTP hydrolysis is required to dissociate cis dimers, generating a pool of ATL monomers that can dimerize with molecules on a different (trans) membrane. In addition, tethering and fusion require the cooperation of multiple ATL molecules in each membrane. We propose a comprehensive model for ATL-mediated fusion that takes into account futile tethering and competition between cis and trans interactions. PMID:25825753

  7. Effects of surface charge on interfacial interactions related to membrane fouling in a submerged membrane bioreactor based on thermodynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huihui; Fan, Hao; Zhao, Leihong; Hong, Huachang; Shen, Liguo; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun; Chen, Jianrong

    2016-03-01

    Effects of both membrane and sludge foulant surface zeta potentials on interfacial interactions between membrane and sludge foulant in different interaction scenarios were systematically investigated based on thermodynamic methods. Under conditions in this study, it was found that zeta potential had marginal effects on total interfacial interaction between two infinite planar surfaces, and the total interfacial interaction between foulant particles and membrane would be more repulsive with increase of absolute value of zeta potential. Adhesion of foulant particles on membrane surface should overcome an energy barrier. There exists a critical zeta potential below which energy barrier would disappear. Results also showed that rough surface membrane corresponded to significantly low strength of interfacial interactions. This study not only provided a series of methods to quantitatively assess the interfacial interactions between membrane and sludge foulants, but also reconciled the contradictory conclusions regarding effects of zeta potential in literature, giving important implications for membrane fouling mitigation. PMID:26641562

  8. Interaction measurement of particles bound to a lipid membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarfati, Raphael; Dufresne, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The local shape and dynamics of the plasma membrane play important roles in many cellular processes. Local membrane deformations are often mediated by the adsorption of proteins (notably from the BAR family), and their subsequent self-assembly. The emerging hypothesis is that self-assembly arises from long-range interactions of individual proteins through the membrane's deformation field. We study these interactions in a model system of micron-sized colloidal particles adsorbed onto a lipid bilayer. We use fluorescent microscopy, optical tweezers and particle tracking to measure dissipative and conservative forces as a function of the separation between the particles. We find that particles are driven together with forces of order 100 fN and remain bound in a potential well with a stiffness of order 100 fN/micron.

  9. Membrane-mediated interactions and the dynamics of dynamin oligomers on membrane tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlomovitz, R.; Gov, N. S.; Roux, A.

    2011-06-01

    Dynamin is a protein that plays a key role in the transport and recycling of membrane tubes and vesicles within a living cell. This protein adsorbs from solution to PIP2-containing membranes, and on these tubes it forms curved oligomers that condense into tight helical domains of uniform radius. The dynamics of this process is treated here in terms of the linear stability of a continuum model, whereby membrane-mediated interactions are shown to drive the spontaneous nucleation of condensed dynamin domains. We furthermore show that the deformation of the membrane outside the dynamin domains induces an energy barrier that can hinder the full coalescence of neighboring growing domains. We compare these calculations to experimental observations on dynamin dynamics in vitro.

  10. Galactocerebroside-phospholipid interactions in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Ruocco, M J; Shipley, G G; Oldfield, E

    1983-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and x-ray diffraction have been used to study the interaction of hydrated N-palmitoylgalactosylsphingosine (NPGS) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). For mixtures containing less than 23 mol% NPGS, complete miscibility of NPGS into hydrated DPPC bilayers is observed in both the bilayer gel and liquid-crystal phases. X-ray diffraction data demonstrate insignificant differences in the DPPC-bilayer gel-phase parameters on incorporation of up to 23 mol% NPGS. At greater than 23 mol% NPGS, additional high-temperature transitions occur, indicating phase separation of cerebroside. For these cerebroside concentrations, at 20 degrees C, x-ray diffraction shows two lamellar phases, hydrated DPPC-NPGS gel bilayers (d = 64 A) containing 23 mol% NPGS, and NPGS "crystal" bilayers (d = 55 A). On heating to temperatures greater than 45 degrees C, the mixed DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase undergoes chain melting, and on further increasing the temperature progressively more NPGS is incorporated into the liquid-crystal DPPC-NPGS bilayer phase. At temperatures greater than 82 degrees C (the transition temperature of hydrated NPGS), complete lipid miscibility is observed at all DPPC/NPGS molar ratios. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:6688367

  11. Calculating hydrodynamic interactions for membrane-embedded objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noruzifar, Ehsan; Camley, Brian A.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2014-09-01

    A recently introduced numerical scheme for calculating self-diffusion coefficients of solid objects embedded in lipid bilayer membranes is extended to enable calculation of hydrodynamic interactions between multiple objects. The method is used to validate recent analytical predictions by Oppenheimer and Diamant [Biophys. J. 96, 3041 2009] related to the coupled diffusion of membrane embedded proteins and is shown to converge to known near-field lubrication results as objects closely approach one another; however, the present methodology also applies outside of the limiting regimes where analytical results are available. Multiple different examples involving pairs of disk-like objects with various constraints imposed on their relative motions demonstrate the importance of hydrodynamic interactions in the dynamics of proteins and lipid domains on membrane surfaces. It is demonstrated that the relative change in self-diffusion of a membrane embedded object upon perturbation by a similar proximal solid object displays a maximum for object sizes comparable to the Saffman-Delbrück length of the membrane.

  12. Electrostatic interaction of neutral semi-permeable membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradova, Olga I.; Bocquet, Lyderic; Bogdanov, Artem N.; Tsekov, Roumen; Lobaskin, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    We consider an osmotic equilibrium between bulk solutions of polyelectrolyte bounded by semi-permeable membranes and separated by a thin film of salt-free liquid. Although the membranes are neutral, the counter-ions of the polyelectrolyte molecules permeate into the gap and lead to a steric charge separation. This gives rise to a distance-dependent membrane potential, which translates into a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure. From the solution of the nonlinear Poisson-Boltzmann equation, we obtain the distribution of the potential and of ions. We then derive an explicit formula for the pressure exerted on the membranes and show that it deviates from the classical van't Hoff expression for the osmotic pressure. This difference is interpreted in terms of a repulsive electrostatic disjoining pressure originating from the overlap of counterion clouds inside the gap. We also develop a simplified theory based on a linearized Poisson-Boltzmann approach. A comparison with simulation of a primitive model for the electrolyte is provided and does confirm the validity of the theoretical predictions. Beyond the fundamental result that the neutral surfaces can repel, this mechanism not only helps to control the adhesion and long-range interactions of living cells, bacteria, and vesicles, but also allows us to argue that electrostatic interactions should play enormous role in determining behavior and functions of systems bounded by semi-permeable membranes.

  13. Peptide-membrane Interactions by Spin-labeling EPR

    PubMed Central

    Smirnova, Tatyana I.; Smirnov, Alex I.

    2016-01-01

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) in combination with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is a well-established method that has recently grown in popularity as an experimental technique, with multiple applications in protein and peptide science. The growth is driven by development of labeling strategies, as well as by considerable technical advances in the field, that are paralleled by an increased availability of EPR instrumentation. While the method requires an introduction of a paramagnetic probe at a well-defined position in a peptide sequence, it has been shown to be minimally destructive to the peptide structure and energetics of the peptide-membrane interactions. In this chapter, we describe basic approaches for using SDSL EPR spectroscopy to study interactions between small peptides and biological membranes or membrane mimetic systems. We focus on experimental approaches to quantify peptide-membrane binding, topology of bound peptides, and characterize peptide aggregation. Sample preparation protocols including spin-labeling methods and preparation of membrane mimetic systems are also described. PMID:26477253

  14. Tetanus neurotoxin utilizes two sequential membrane interactions for channel formation.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joshua R; Baldwin, Michael R

    2014-08-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) causes neuroparalytic disease by entering the neuronal soma to block the release of neurotransmitters. However, the mechanism by which TeNT translocates its enzymatic domain (light chain) across endosomal membranes remains unclear. We found that TeNT and a truncated protein devoid of the receptor binding domain (TeNT-LHN) associated with membranes enriched in acidic phospholipids in a pH-dependent manner. Thus, in contrast to diphtheria toxin, the formation of a membrane-competent state of TeNT requires the membrane interface and is modulated by the bilayer composition. Channel formation is further enhanced by tethering of TeNT to the membrane through ganglioside co-receptors prior to acidification. Thus, TeNT channel formation can be resolved into two sequential steps: 1) interaction of the receptor binding domain (heavy chain receptor binding domain) with ganglioside co-receptors orients the translocation domain (heavy chain translocation domain) as the lumen of the endosome is acidified and 2) low pH, in conjunction with acidic lipids within the membrane drives the conformational changes in TeNT necessary for channel formation. PMID:24973217

  15. Interaction of clonixin with EPC liposomes used as membrane models.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Helena; Lúcio, Marlene; Lima, José L F C; Matos, Carla; Reis, Salette

    2005-06-01

    In this work, an overall analysis of clonixin interaction with liposomes was achieved using different techniques, which allowed the evaluation of the change in different membrane's characteristics as well as the possible location of the drug in the membrane. Clonixin acidity constants were obtained and the values are 5.5 +/- 0.08 and 2.2 +/- 0.04. Clonixin partition coefficient (K(p)) between liposomes and water was also determined using derivative spectrophotometry, fluorescence quenching, and zeta-potential (zeta-potential). These three techniques yielded similar results. zeta-potential measurements were performed and an increase of the membrane negative charge with an increase of drug concentration was observed. Drug location within the bilayer was performed by fluorescence quenching using a set of n-(9-anthroyloxy) fatty acid probes (n = 2, 6, 9, and 12). The fluorescence intensity of all probes was quenched by the drug. This effect is more noticeable for the outer located probe, indicating that the drug is positioning in the external part of the membrane. These same probes were used for steady-state anisotropy measurements to determine the perturbation in membrane structure induced by clonixin. Clonixin increased membrane fluidity in a concentration dependent manner, with the highest perturbation occurring nearby the 2-AS probe, closely located to the bilayer surface. PMID:15858845

  16. Structures of the EphA2 Receptor at the Membrane: Role of Lipid Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chavent, Matthieu; Seiradake, Elena; Jones, E. Yvonne; Sansom, Mark S.P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ephs are transmembrane receptors that mediate cell-cell signaling. The N-terminal ectodomain binds ligands and enables receptor clustering, which activates the intracellular kinase. Relatively little is known about the function of the membrane-proximal fibronectin domain 2 (FN2) of the ectodomain. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations reveal that FN2 interacts with lipid bilayers via a site comprising K441, R443, R465, Q462, S464, S491, W467, F490, and P459–461. FN2 preferentially binds anionic lipids, a preference that is reduced in the mutant K441E + R443E. We confirm these results by measuring the binding of wild-type and mutant FN2 domains to lipid vesicles. In simulations of the complete EphA2 ectodomain plus the transmembrane region, we show that FN2 anchors the otherwise flexible ectodomain at the surface of the bilayer. Altogether, our data suggest that FN2 serves a dual function of interacting with anionic lipids and constraining the structure of the EphA2 ectodomain to adopt membrane-proximal configurations. PMID:26724997

  17. Is There Any Preferential Interaction of Ions of Ionic Liquids with DMSO and H2O? A Comparative Study from MD Simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuling; Wang, Jianji; Wang, Huiyong; Li, Zhiyong; Liu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Suojiang

    2015-06-01

    Recently, some binary ionic liquid (IL)/cosolvent systems have shown better performance than the pure ILs in fields such as CO2 absorption, catalysis, cellulose dissolution, and electrochemistry. However, interactions of ILs with cosolvents are still not well understood at the molecular level. In this work, H2O and DMSO were chosen as the representative protic and aprotic solvents to study the effect of cosolvent nature on solvation of a series of ILs by molecular dynamics simulations and quantum chemistry calculations. The concept of preferential interaction of ions was proposed to describe the interaction of cosolvent with cation and anion of the ILs. By comparing the interaction energies between IL and different cosolvents, it was found that there were significantly preferential interactions of anions of the ILs with water, but the same was not true for the interactions of cations/anions of the ILs with DMSO. Then, a detailed analysis and comparison of the interactions in IL/cosolvent systems, hydrogen bonds between cations and anions of the ILs, and the structure of the first coordination shells of the cations and the anions were performed to reveal the existing state of ions at different molar ratios of the cosolvent to a given IL. Furthermore, a systematic knowledge for the solvation of ions of the ILs in DMSO was given to understand cellulose dissolution in IL/cosolvent systems. The conclusions drawn from this study may provide new insight into the ionic solvation of ILs in cosolvents, and motivate further studies in the related applications. PMID:25970011

  18. Interactions of a hydrophobically modified polycation with zwitterionic lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kepczynski, Mariusz; Jamróz, Dorota; Wytrwal, Magdalena; Bednar, Jan; Rzad, Ewa; Nowakowska, Maria

    2012-01-10

    The interactions between synthetic polycations and phospholipid bilayers play an important role in some biophysical applications such as gene delivery or antibacterial usage. Despite extensive investigation into the nature of these interactions, their physical and molecular bases remain poorly understood. In this Article, we present the results of our studies on the impact of a hydrophobically modified strong polycation on the properties of a zwitterionic bilayer used as a model of the mammalian cellular membrane. The study was carried out using a set of complementary experimental methods and molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. A new polycation, poly(allyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-hexylammonium chloride) (polymer 3), was synthesized, and its interactions with liposomes composed of 2-oleoyl-1-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) were examined using dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential measurements, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Our results have shown that polymer 3 can efficiently associate with and insert into the POPC membrane. However, it does not change its lamellar structure, as was demonstrated by cryo-TEM. The influence of polymer 3 on the membrane functionality was studied by leakage experiments applying a fluorescence dye (calcein) encapsulated in the phospholipid vesicles. The MD simulations of model systems reveal that polymer 3 promotes formation of hydrophilic pores in the membrane, thus increasing considerably its permeability. PMID:22085465

  19. Coarse-Grained Models for Protein-Cell Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Ryan; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    The physiological properties of biological soft matter are the product of collective interactions, which span many time and length scales. Recent computational modeling efforts have helped illuminate experiments that characterize the ways in which proteins modulate membrane physics. Linking these models across time and length scales in a multiscale model explains how atomistic information propagates to larger scales. This paper reviews continuum modeling and coarse-grained molecular dynamics methods, which connect atomistic simulations and single-molecule experiments with the observed microscopic or mesoscale properties of soft-matter systems essential to our understanding of cells, particularly those involved in sculpting and remodeling cell membranes. PMID:26613047

  20. Phosphocreatine Interacts with Phospholipids, Affects Membrane Properties and Exerts Membrane-Protective Effects

    PubMed Central

    Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Epand, Raquel F.; Meiler, Flurina; Zandomeneghi, Giorgia; Neumann, Dietbert; Widmer, Hans R.; Meier, Beat H.; Epand, Richard M.; Saks, Valdur; Wallimann, Theo; Schlattner, Uwe

    2012-01-01

    A broad spectrum of beneficial effects has been ascribed to creatine (Cr), phosphocreatine (PCr) and their cyclic analogues cyclo-(cCr) and phospho-cyclocreatine (PcCr). Cr is widely used as nutritional supplement in sports and increasingly also as adjuvant treatment for pathologies such as myopathies and a plethora of neurodegenerative diseases. Additionally, Cr and its cyclic analogues have been proposed for anti-cancer treatment. The mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects are still controversial and far from being understood. The reversible conversion of Cr and ATP into PCr and ADP by creatine kinase, generating highly diffusible PCr energy reserves, is certainly an important element. However, some protective effects of Cr and analogues cannot be satisfactorily explained solely by effects on the cellular energy state. Here we used mainly liposome model systems to provide evidence for interaction of PCr and PcCr with different zwitterionic phospholipids by applying four independent, complementary biochemical and biophysical assays: (i) chemical binding assay, (ii) surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR), (iii) solid-state 31P-NMR, and (iv) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SPR revealed low affinity PCr/phospholipid interaction that additionally induced changes in liposome shape as indicated by NMR and SPR. Additionally, DSC revealed evidence for membrane packing effects by PCr, as seen by altered lipid phase transition. Finally, PCr efficiently protected against membrane permeabilization in two different model systems: liposome-permeabilization by the membrane-active peptide melittin, and erythrocyte hemolysis by the oxidative drug doxorubicin, hypoosmotic stress or the mild detergent saponin. These findings suggest a new molecular basis for non-energy related functions of PCr and its cyclic analogue. PCr/phospholipid interaction and alteration of membrane structure may not only protect cellular membranes against various insults, but could

  1. Interaction of Boron Nitride Nanosheets with Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Hilder, Tamsyn A; Gaston, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Boron nitride nanomaterials have attracted attention for biomedical applications, due to their improved biocompatibility when compared with carbon nanomaterials. Recently, graphene and graphene oxide nanosheets have been shown, both experimentally and computationally, to destructively extract phospholipids from Escherichia coli. Boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs) have exciting potential biological and environmental applications, for example the ability to remove oil from water. These applications are likely to increase the exposure of prokaryotes and eukaryotes to BNNSs. Yet, despite their promise, the interaction between BNNSs and cell membranes has not yet been investigated. Here, all-atom molecular dynamics simulations were used to demonstrate that BNNSs are spontaneously attracted to the polar headgroups of the lipid bilayer. The BNNSs do not passively cross the lipid bilayer, most likely due to the large forces experienced by the BNNSs. This study provides insight into the interaction of BNNSs with cell membranes and may aid our understanding of their improved biocompatibility. PMID:26934705

  2. The membrane dipole potential in a total membrane potential model. Applications to hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, R F; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    The total potential energy profile for hydrophobic ion interactions with lipid bilayers can be written as the sum of four terms: the electrical Born, image and dipole contributions, and a neutral energy term. We introduce a specific model for the membrane dipole potential, treating it as a two-dimensional array of point dipoles located near each membrane-water interface. Together with specific theoretical models for the other energy terms, a total potential profile is developed that successfully describes the complete set of thermodynamic parameters for binding and translocation for the two hydrophobic ion structural analogues, tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) and tetraphenylboron (TPB-). A reasonable fit to the data is possible if the dipole potential energy has a magnitude of 5.5 + 0.5 kcal/mol (240 + 20 mV), positive inside, and if the neutral energy contribution for TPP+ and TPB- is -7.0 + 1.0 kcal/mol. These results may also have important implications for small ion interactions with membranes and the energetics of charged groups in membrane proteins. PMID:3955184

  3. Membrane and inhibitor interactions of intracellular phospholipases A2.

    PubMed

    Mouchlis, Varnavas D; Dennis, Edward A

    2016-05-01

    Studying phospholipases A2 (PLA2s) is a challenging task since they act on membrane-like aggregated substrates and not on monomeric phospholipids. Multidisciplinary approaches that include hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS) and computational techniques have been employed with great success in order to address important questions about the mode of interactions of PLA2 enzymes with membranes, phospholipid substrates and inhibitors. Understanding the interactions of PLA2s is crucial since these enzymes are the upstream regulators of the eicosanoid pathway liberating free arachidonic acid (AA) and other polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The liberation of AA by PLA2 enzymes sets off a cascade of molecular events that involves downstream regulators such as cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) metabolites leading to inflammation. Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) work by inhibiting COX, while Zileuton inhibits LOX and both rely on PLA2 enzymes to provide them with AA. That means PLA2 enzymes can potentially also be targeted to diminish inflammation at an earlier point in the process. In this review we describe extensive efforts reported in the past to define the interactions of PLA2 enzymes with membranes, substrate phospholipids and inhibitors using DXMS, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:26774606

  4. Influence of nanoparticle-membrane electrostatic interactions on membrane fluidity and bending elasticity.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Velikonja, Aljaž; Perutkova, Šarka; Gongadze, Ekaterina; Kulkarni, Mukta; Genova, Julia; Eleršič, Kristina; Iglič, Aleš; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between the nanoparticles and the membrane lipids on altering the physical properties of the liposomal membrane such as fluidity and bending elasticity. For this purpose, we have used nanoparticles and lipids with different surface charges. Positively charged iron oxide (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles, neutral and negatively charged cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles were encapsulated in neutral lipid 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-L-serine lipid mixture. Membrane fluidity was assessed through the anisotropy measurements using the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. Though the interaction of both the types of nanoparticles reduced the membrane fluidity, the results were more pronounced in the negatively charged liposomes encapsulated with positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles due to strong electrostatic attractions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results also confirmed the presence of significant quantity of positively charged iron oxide nanoparticles in negatively charged liposomes. Through thermally induced shape fluctuation measurements of the giant liposomes, a considerable reduction in the bending elasticity modulus was observed for cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. The experimental results were supported by the simulation studies using modified Langevin-Poisson-Boltzmann model. PMID:24309194

  5. Modulation and interactions of charged biomimetic membranes with bivalent ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazadi Badiambile, Adolphe

    The biological membrane of an eukaryotic cell is a two-dimensional structure of mostly phospholipids with embedded proteins. This two-dimensional structure plays many key roles in the life of a cell. Transmembrane proteins, for example, play the role of a gate for different ions (such as Ca2+). Also found are peripheral proteins that are used as enzymes for different purposes in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Phospholipids, in particular play three key roles. Firstly, some members of this group are used to store energy. Secondly, the hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties inherent to phospholipids enable them to be used as building blocks of the cell membrane by forming an asymmetric bilayer. This provides a shielding protection against the outer environment while at the same time keeping the organelles and cytosol from leaking out of the cell. Finally lipids are involved in regulating the aggregation of proteins in the membrane. In addition, some subspecies such as phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) are second messenger molecules in their own right, thus playing an important role in cellular signaling events. In my work presented in this thesis, I am focusing on the role of some phospholipids as signaling molecules and in particular the physicochemical underpinnings that could be used in their spatiotemporal organization in the cellular plasma membrane. I am specifically concerned with the important family of phosphatidylinositol lipids. PtdIns are very well known for their role as signaling molecules in numerous cell events. They are located in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane as well as part of the membrane of other organelles. Studies of these signaling molecules in their in vivo environment present many challenges: Firstly, the complexity of interactions due to the numerous entities present in eukaryotic cell membranes makes it difficult to establish clear cause and effect relationships. Secondly, due to their size, our inability to probe these

  6. Interactions of anesthetics with the membrane-water interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, A.; Cieplak, P.; Wilson, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Although the potency of conventional anesthetics correlates with lipophilicity, an affinity to water also is essential. It was recently found that compounds with very low affinities to water do not produce anesthesia regardless of their lipophilicity. This finding implies that clinical anesthesia might arise because of interactions at molecular sites near the interface of neuronal membranes with the aqueous environment and, therefore, might require increased concentrations of anesthetic molecules at membrane interfaces. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we calculated in molecular dynamics simulations the free energy profiles for the transfer of anesthetic 1,1,2-trifluoroethane and nonanesthetic perfluoroethane across water-membrane and water-hexane interfaces. Consistent with the hypothesis, it was found that trifluoroethane, but not perfluoroethane, exhibits a free energy minimum and, therefore, increased concentrations at both interfaces. The transfer of trifluoroethane from water to the nonpolar hexane or interior of the membrane is accompanied by a considerable, solvent-induced shift in the conformational equilibrium around the C-C bond.

  7. On the Importance of Hydrodynamic Interactions in Lipid Membrane Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Tadashi; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions (HI) give rise to collective motions between molecules, which are known to be important in the dynamics of random coil polymers and colloids. However, their role in the biological self-assembly of many molecule systems has not been investigated. Here, using Brownian dynamics simulations, we evaluate the importance of HI on the kinetics of self-assembly of lipid membranes. One-thousand coarse-grained lipid molecules in periodic simulation boxes were allowed to assemble into stable bilayers in the presence and absence of intermolecular HI. Hydrodynamic interactions reduce the monomer-monomer association rate by 50%. In contrast, the rate of association of lipid clusters is much faster in the presence of intermolecular HI. In fact, with intermolecular HI, the membrane self-assembly rate is 3–10 times faster than that without intermolecular HI. We introduce an analytical model to describe the size dependence of the diffusive encounter rate of particle clusters, which can qualitatively explain our simulation results for the early stage of the membrane self-assembly process. These results clearly suggest that HI greatly affects the kinetics of self-assembly and that simulations without HI will significantly underestimate the kinetic parameters of such processes. PMID:23332062

  8. Benchmarking of Force Fields for Molecule-Membrane Interactions.

    PubMed

    Paloncýová, Markéta; Fabre, Gabin; DeVane, Russell H; Trouillas, Patrick; Berka, Karel; Otyepka, Michal

    2014-09-01

    Studies of drug-membrane interactions witness an ever-growing interest, as penetration, accumulation, and positioning of drugs play a crucial role in drug delivery and metabolism in human body. Molecular dynamics simulations complement nicely experimental measurements and provide us with new insight into drug-membrane interactions; however, the quality of the theoretical data dramatically depends on the quality of the force field used. We calculated the free energy profiles of 11 molecules through a model dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membrane bilayer using five force fields, namely Berger, Slipids, CHARMM36, GAFFlipids, and GROMOS 43A1-S3. For the sake of comparison, we also employed the semicontinuous tool COSMOmic. High correlation was observed between theoretical and experimental partition coefficients (log K). Partition coefficients calculated by all-atomic force fields (Slipids, CHARMM36, and GAFFlipids) and COSMOmic differed by less than 0.75 log units from the experiment and Slipids emerged as the best performing force field. This work provides the following recommendations (i) for a global, systematic and high throughput thermodynamic evaluations (e.g., log K) of drugs COSMOmic is a tool of choice due to low computational costs; (ii) for studies of the hydrophilic molecules CHARMM36 should be considered; and (iii) for studies of more complex systems, taking into account all pros and cons, Slipids is the force field of choice. PMID:26588554

  9. Interaction of highly charged ions with carbon nano membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, Elisabeth; Wilhelm, Richard A.; Smejkal, Valerie; Heller, René; Facsko, Stefan; Aumayr, Friedrich

    2015-09-01

    Charge state and energy loss measurements of slow highly charged ions (HCIs) after transmission through nanometer and sub-nanometer thin membranes are presented. Direct transmission measurements through carbon nano membranes (CNMs) show an unexpected bimodal exit charge state distribution, accompanied by charge exchange dependent energy loss. The energy loss of ions in CNMs with large charge loss shows a quadratic dependency on the incident charge state, indicating charge state dependent stopping force values. Another access to the exit charge state distribution is given by irradiating stacks of CNMs and investigating each layer of the stack with high resolution imaging techniques like transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and helium ion microscopy (HIM) independently. The observation of pores created in all of the layers confirms the assumption derived from the transmission measurements that the two separated charge state distributions reflect two different impact parameter regimes, i.e. close collision with large charge exchange and distant collisions with weak ion-target interaction.

  10. Oviductosome-Sperm Membrane Interaction in Cargo Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dossary, Amal A.; Bathala, Pradeepthi; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Oviductosomes ((OVS), exosomes/microvesicles), which deliver the Ca2+ efflux pump, plasma membrane Ca2+ATPase 4 (PMCA4), to sperm are likely to play an important role in sperm fertilizing ability (Al-Dossary, A. A., Strehler, E. E., and Martin-DeLeon, P. A. (2013) PloS one 8, e80181). It is unknown how exosomes/microvesicles deliver transmembrane proteins such as PMCA4 to sperm. Here we define a novel experimental approach for the assessment of the interaction of OVS with sperm at a nanoscale level, using a lipophilic dye (FM4–64FX) and three-dimensional SR/SIM, which has an 8-fold increase in volumetric resolution, compared with conventional confocal microscopy. Coincubation assays detected fusion of prelabeled OVS with sperm, primarily over the head and midpiece. Immunofluorescence revealed oviductosomal delivery of PMCA4a to WT and Pmca4 KO sperm, and also endogenous PMCA4a on the inner acrosomal membrane. Fusion was confirmed by transmission immunoelectron microscopy, showing immunogold particles in OVS, and fusion stalks on sperm membrane. Immunofluorescence colocalized OVS with the αv integrin subunit which, along with CD9, resides primarily on the sperm head and midpiece. In capacitated and acrosome reacted sperm, fusion was significantly (p < 0.001) inhibited by blocking integrin/ligand interactions via antibodies, exogenous ligands (vitronectin and fibronectin), and their RGD recognition motif. Our results provide evidence that receptor/ligand interactions, involving αvβ3 and α5β1integrins on sperm and OVS, facilitate fusion of OVS in the delivery of transmembrane proteins to sperm. The mechanism uncovered is likely to be also involved in cargo delivery of prostasomes, epididymosomes, and uterosomes. PMID:26023236

  11. Studies on the interactions between parabens and lipid membrane components in monolayers at the air/aqueous solution interface.

    PubMed

    Flasiński, Michał; Gawryś, Maciej; Broniatowski, Marcin; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The interactions between parabens (PBs) and lipid components of mammalian and bacterial cell membranes were investigated in model systems of Langmuir monolayers. Me-, Et-, Pr- and Bu-paraben studied in this paper are frequently applied as cosmetics and food preservatives, since they possess broad antimicrobial activity. The mode of PB action is connected with their incorporation into the membrane of bacterial organisms, however; it is not known what is the role of the respective lipid species in this mechanism. This problem is crucial to understand the differences in paraben activity toward individual microorganisms and to shed the light onto the problem of PB cytotoxicity reported in studies on mammalian cells. In this paper, the mentioned aspects were investigated with application of the Langmuir monolayer technique complemented with BAM and GIXD. Our experiments revealed that the influence of PBs depends on their chemical structure, solution concentration and on the class of lipid. The strongest modification of the monolayer characteristics, leading to its collapse at low surface pressure, occurred in the presence of BuPB, having the largest chain. PBs interact preferentially with the monolayers possessing low degree of condensation, whereas for LC state, the effect was weaker and observed only as modification of the 2D unit cells. In the model systems, PBs interact with phospholipids characteristic for mammalian membranes (phosphatidylcholine) stronger than with bacterial (phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin). This strong influence of parabens on the model systems composed of animal lipids may explain cytotoxic activity of these preservatives. PMID:26777770

  12. Quantitative assessment of interfacial interactions with rough membrane surface and its implications for membrane selection and fabrication in a MBR.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianrong; Mei, Rongwu; Shen, Liguo; Ding, Linxian; He, Yiming; Lin, Hongjun; Hong, Huachang

    2015-03-01

    The interfacial interactions between a foulant particle and rough membrane surface in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) were quantitatively assessed by using a new-developed method. It was found that the profile of total interaction versus separation distance was complicated. There were an energy barrier and two negative energy ranges in the profile. Further analysis showed that roughness scale significantly affected the strength and properties of interfacial interactions. It was revealed that there existed a critical range of roughness scale within which the total energy in the separation distance ranged from 0 to several nanometers was continually repulsive. Decrease in foulant size would increase the strength of specific interaction energy, but did not change the existence of a critical roughness scale range. These findings suggested the possibility to "tailor" membrane surface morphology for membrane fouling mitigation, and thus gave significant implications for membrane selection and fabrication in MBRs. PMID:25553567

  13. [Multiparticle computer simulation of protein interactions in the photosynthetic membrane].

    PubMed

    Riznichenko, G Iu; Kovalenko, I B; Abaturova, A M; D'iakonova, A N; Kniazeva, O S; Ustinin, D M; Khrushchev, S S; Rubin, A B

    2011-01-01

    The basic principles of the design of direct multiparticle models and the results of multiparticle computer simulation of electron transfer by mobile protein carriers in the photosynthetic membrane of a chloroplast thylakoid are presented. The reactions of complex formation of the protein plastocyanin with the protein cytochrome f and the pigment-protein complex of photosystem I, as well as of the protein ferredoxin with the protein FNR and photosystem 1 are considered. The role of diffusion and electrostatic interactions is discussed, and the effect of the shape of the reaction volume and ionic strength on the rate of electron transport are discussed. PMID:22117434

  14. Thermal proteome profiling monitors ligand interactions with cellular membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Friedrich B M; Eberhard, Dirk; Werner, Thilo; Franken, Holger; Childs, Dorothee; Doce, Carola; Savitski, Maria Fälth; Huber, Wolfgang; Bantscheff, Marcus; Savitski, Mikhail M; Drewes, Gerard

    2015-12-01

    We extended thermal proteome profiling to detect transmembrane protein-small molecule interactions in cultured human cells. When we assessed the effects of detergents on ATP-binding profiles, we observed shifts in denaturation temperature for ATP-binding transmembrane proteins. We also observed cellular thermal shifts in pervanadate-induced T cell-receptor signaling, delineating the membrane target CD45 and components of the downstream pathway, and with drugs affecting the transmembrane transporters ATP1A1 and MDR1. PMID:26524241

  15. Detection of molecular interactions at membrane surfaces through colloid phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baksh, Michael M.; Jaros, Michal; Groves, Jay T.

    2004-01-01

    The molecular architecture of-and biochemical processes within-cell membranes play important roles in all living organisms, with many drugs and infectious disease agents targeting membranes. Experimental studies of biochemical reactions on membrane surfaces are challenging, as they require a membrane environment that is fluid (like cell membranes) but nevertheless allows for the efficient detection and characterization of molecular interactions. One approach uses lipid membranes supported on solid substrates such as silica or polymers: although the membrane is trapped near the solid interface, it retains natural fluidity and biological functionality and can be implanted with membrane proteins for functional studies. But the detection of molecular interactions involving membrane-bound species generally requires elaborate techniques, such as surface plasmon resonance or total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Here we demonstrate that colloidal phase transitions of membrane-coated silica beads provide a simple and label-free method for monitoring molecular interactions on lipid membrane surfaces. By adjusting the lipid membrane composition and hence the pair interaction potential between the membrane-supporting silica beads, we poise our system near a phase transition so that small perturbations on the membrane surface induce dramatic changes in the macroscopic organization of the colloid. We expect that this approach, used here to probe with high sensitivity protein binding events at membrane surfaces, can be applied to study a broad range of cell membrane processes.

  16. MinC Protein Shortens FtsZ Protofilaments by Preferentially Interacting with GDP-bound Subunits*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Rocamora, Víctor M.; García-Montañés, Concepción; Reija, Belén; Monterroso, Begoña; Margolin, William; Alfonso, Carlos; Zorrilla, Silvia; Rivas, Germán

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of MinC with FtsZ and its effects on FtsZ polymerization were studied under close to physiological conditions by a combination of biophysical methods. The Min system is a widely conserved mechanism in bacteria that ensures the correct placement of the division machinery at midcell. MinC is the component of this system that effectively interacts with FtsZ and inhibits the formation of the Z-ring. Here we report that MinC produces a concentration-dependent reduction in the size of GTP-induced FtsZ protofilaments (FtsZ-GTP) as demonstrated by analytical ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Our experiments show that, despite being shorter, FtsZ protofilaments maintain their narrow distribution in size in the presence of MinC. The protein had the same effect regardless of its addition prior to or after FtsZ polymerization. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicated that MinC bound to FtsZ-GDP with a moderate affinity (apparent KD ∼10 μm at 100 mm KCl and pH 7.5) very close to the MinC concentration corresponding to the midpoint of the inhibition of FtsZ assembly. Only marginal binding of MinC to FtsZ-GTP protofilaments was observed by analytical ultracentrifugation and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Remarkably, MinC effects on FtsZ-GTP protofilaments and binding affinity to FtsZ-GDP were strongly dependent on ionic strength, being severely reduced at 500 mm KCl compared with 100 mm KCl. Our results support a mechanism in which MinC interacts with FtsZ-GDP, resulting in smaller protofilaments of defined size and having the same effect on both preassembled and growing FtsZ protofilaments. PMID:23853099

  17. Effects of cholesterol concentration on the interaction of cytarabine with lipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Karami, Leila; Jalili, Seifollah

    2015-01-01

    Liposomal cytarabine, DepoCyt, is a chemotherapy agent which is used in cancer treatment. This form of cytarabine has more efficacy and fewer side effects relative to the other forms. Since DepoCyt contains the cytarabine encapsulated within phosphatidylcholine and the sterol molecules, we modeled dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol bilayer membrane as a carrier for cytarabine to study drug-bilayer interactions. For this purpose, we performed a series of united-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for 25 ns to investigate the interactions between cytarabine and cholesterol-containing DOPC lipid bilayers. Only the uncharged form of cytarabine molecule was investigated. In this study, different levels of the cholesterol content (0, 20, and 40%) were used. MD simulations allowed us to determine dynamical and structural properties of the bilayer membrane and to estimate the preferred location and orientation of the cytarabine molecule inside the bilayer membrane. Properties such as membrane thickness, area per lipid, diffusion coefficient, mass density, bilayer packing, order parameters, and intermolecular interactions were examined. The results show that by increasing the cholesterol concentration in the lipid bilayers, the bilayer thickness increases and area per lipid decreases. Moreover, in accordance with the experiments, our calculations show that cholesterol molecules have ordering effect on the hydrocarbon acyl chains. Furthermore, the cytarabine molecule preferentially occupies the polar region of the lipid head groups to form specific interactions (hydrogen bonds). Our results fully support the experimental data. Our finding about drug-bilayer interaction is crucial for the liposomal drug design. PMID:25068451

  18. Interactions of lauryl gallate with phospholipid components of biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Małgorzata; Miñones, José

    2016-08-01

    The effect of different amounts of lauryl gallate (LG) on properties of the model membranes of phosphatidylcholines (PC), differing in the presence of double bonds in the hydrocarbon chains, and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) was described in terms of phase behaviour of mixtures, interactions between both components, monolayers stability and their organization. The Langmuir monolayer technique was used to monitor the surface thermodynamics (i.e. the excess area and excess Gibbs energy of mixing) on the basis of surface pressure-area per molecule (π-A) isotherms. Simultaneously, morphology of the studied monolayers was visualized by the Brewster angle microscopy (BAM). This allowed evaluating the kind and magnitude of interactions which influence on the phase behaviour and structural properties of the monolayers. The obtained results can be helpful to reveal the mechanism of phospholipid antioxidant protection and important pharmacological (antimicrobial) role of lauryl gallate for production of effective therapeutic substances. PMID:27117642

  19. Protein-lipid interactions in bilayer membranes: A lattice model

    PubMed Central

    Pink, David A.; Chapman, Dennis

    1979-01-01

    A lattice model has been developed to study the effects of intrinsic membrane proteins upon the thermodynamic properties of a lipid bilayer membrane. We assume that only nearest-neighbor van der Waals and steric interactions are important and that the polar group interactions can be represented by effective pressure—area terms. Phase diagrams, the temperature T0, which locates the gel—fluid melting, the transition enthalpy, and correlations were calculated by mean field and cluster approximations. Average lipid chain areas and chain areas when the lipid is in a given protein environment were obtained. Proteins that have a “smooth” homogeneous surface (“cholesterol-like”) and those that have inhomogeneous surfaces or that bind lipids specifically were considered. We find that T0 can vary depending upon the interactions and that another peak can appear upon the shoulder of the main peak which reflects the melting of a eutectic mixture. The transition enthalpy decreases generally, as was found before, but when a second peak appears departures from this behavior reflect aspects of the eutectic mixture. We find that proteins have significant nonzero probabilities for being adjacent to one another so that no unbroken “annulus” of lipid necessarily exists around a protein. If T0 does not increase much, or decreases, with increasing c, then lipids adjacent to a protein cannot all be all-trans on the time scale (10-7 sec) of our system. Around a protein the lipid correlation depth is about one lipid layer, and this increases with c. Possible consequences of ignoring changes in polar group interactions due to clustering of proteins are discussed. PMID:286996

  20. Membrane structure and interactions of a short Lycotoxin I analogue.

    PubMed

    Adão, R; Seixas, R; Gomes, P; Pessoa, J Costa; Bastos, M

    2008-04-01

    Lycotoxin I and Lycotoxin II are natural anti-microbial peptides that were identified in the venom of the Wolf Spider Lycosa carolinensis. These peptides were found to be potent growth inhibitors for bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Candida glabrata) at micromolar concentrations. Recently, shortened analogues of LycoI and LycoII have been reported to have decreased haemolytic effects. A shorter Lyco-I analogue studied, LycoI 1-15 (H-IWLTALKFLGKHAAK-NH2), was active only above 10 microM, but was also the least haemolytic. On the basis of these findings, we became interested in obtaining a deeper insight into the membrane activity of LycoI 1-15, as this peptide may represent the first major step for the future development of selective, i.e. non-haemolytic, Lycotoxin-based antibiotics. The interaction of this peptide with liposomes of different composition was studied by microcalorimetry [differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC)] and CD. The results obtained from the calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques were jointly discussed in an attempt to further understand the interaction of this peptide with model membranes. PMID:18098329

  1. Chiral separation of amino acids in ultrafiltration through DNA-immobilized cellulose membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuchi, Akon; Hayashi, Akiyuki; Kanda, Naoki; Sanui, Kohei; Kitamura, Hanako

    2005-04-01

    Ultrafiltration experiments for the chiral separation of racemic tryptophan, phenylglycine and phenylalanine were investigated through immobilized DNA membranes having various pore sizes. L-tryptophan preferentially permeated through immobilized DNA membranes with a pore size<2.0 nm (molecular weight cut-off (MWCO)<5000) while D-tryptophan preferentially permeated through immobilized DNA membranes with a pore size>2.0 nm (MWCO>5000). These results are completely opposite tendency in the ultrafiltration of racemic phenylalanine through the immobilized DNA membranes. This may be originated from the different interaction between DNA and tryptophan compared to that between DNA and phenylalanine. However, in both cases the pore size of the immobilized DNA membranes regulated preferential permeation of the enantiomer through the membranes. The immobilized DNA membranes are categorized as channel type membranes and not as affinity membranes. Chiral separation models were proposed from using the chiral separation results of racemic amino acids, preferential adsorption of amino acid enantiomers and EPMA results.

  2. Role of Lipid Composition on the Interaction between a Tryptophan-Rich Protein and Model Bacterial Membranes.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Michael R; Clifton, Luke A; Frazier, Richard A; Green, Rebecca J

    2016-03-01

    The interaction between tryptophan-rich puroindoline proteins and model bacterial membranes at the air-liquid interface has been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy, surface pressure measurements, and Brewster angle microscopy. The role of different lipid constituents on the interactions between lipid membrane and protein was studied using wild type (Pin-b) and mutant (Trp44 to Arg44 mutant, Pin-bs) puroindoline proteins. The results show differences in the lipid selectivity of the two proteins in terms of preferential binding to specific lipid head groups in mixed lipid systems. Pin-b wild type was able to penetrate mixed layers of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) head groups more deeply compared to the mutant Pin-bs. Increasing saturation of the lipid tails increased penetration and adsorption of Pin-b wild type, but again the response of the mutant form differed. The results provide insight as to the role of membrane architecture, lipid composition, and fluidity on antimicrobial activity of proteins. Data show distinct differences in the lipid binding behavior of Pin-b as a result of a single residue mutation, highlighting the importance of hydrophobic and charged amino acids in antimicrobial protein and peptide activity. PMID:26813886

  3. Similarities and differences of serotonin and its precursors in their interactions with model membranes studied by molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Irene; Martini, M. Florencia; Pickholz, Mónica

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report a molecular dynamics (MD) simulations study of relevant biological molecules as serotonin (neutral and protonated) and its precursors, tryptophan and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan, in a fully hydrated bilayer of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-choline (POPC). The simulations were carried out at the fluid lamellar phase of POPC at constant pressure and temperature conditions. Two guest molecules of each type were initially placed at the water phase. We have analyzed, the main localization, preferential orientation and specific interactions of the guest molecules within the bilayer. During the simulation run, the four molecules were preferentially found at the water-lipid interphase. We found that the interactions that stabilized the systems are essentially hydrogen bonds, salt bridges and cation-π. None of the guest molecules have access to the hydrophobic region of the bilayer. Besides, zwitterionic molecules have access to the water phase, while protonated serotonin is anchored in the interphase. Even taking into account that these simulations were done using a model membrane, our results suggest that the studied molecules could not cross the blood brain barrier by diffusion. These results are in good agreement with works that show that serotonin and Trp do not cross the BBB by simple diffusion.

  4. Interaction of aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation and membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pizzimenti, Stefania; Ciamporcero, Eric; Daga, Martina; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Arcaro, Alessia; Cetrangolo, Gianpaolo; Minelli, Rosalba; Dianzani, Chiara; Lepore, Alessio; Gentile, Fabrizio; Barrera, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA) and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24027536

  5. Ionic channels and nerve membrane lipids. Cholesterol-tetrodotoxin interaction.

    PubMed

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V; Camejo, G

    1970-04-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate possible interactions of tetrodotoxin (TTX) with lipid molecules isolated from nerve fiber plasma membranes of the squid Dosidicus gigas. TTX has a highly selective ability to block the channel normally used by Na(+) to cross the axolemma during nervous impulse conduction. In order to investigate the interaction each lipid sample was spread on 5 x 10(-7)M TTX and TTX-free 0.15 M NaCl solutions adjusted to pH 7.4 with 7 x 10(-3)M phosphate buffer. The surface pressure-area diagrams of the lipid monolayers revealed that TTX interacts only with cholesterol. The expansion of the cholesterol monolayers at 5 x 10(-7)M TTX was 2 A(2)/molecule at zero pressure for the experiments at 20 degrees C and 2.5 A(2)/molecule for those at 25 degrees C. Similar results were obtained in KCl subphases. The apparent dissociation constant of the cholesterol-TTX complex calculated from dose-response experiments is 2.6 x 10(-7)M. Experiments at pH 10.1 revealed that the zwitter ionic form of TTX is less active. Experiments with cholesterol derivatives (cholesteryl acetate, cholesterol methyl ether, cholestanol, and cholestanyl acetate) indicate that for the interaction with TTX a partial negatively charged group at C-3 and a double bond between C-5 and C-6 on the steroid nucleus are required. Tetrodonic acid, a biologically inactive derivative of TTX, does not interact with cholesterol. The results lead us to propose that cholesterol is part of the Na(+) channel. PMID:5435784

  6. A new method for modeling rough membrane surface and calculation of interfacial interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Leihong; Zhang, Meijia; He, Yiming; Chen, Jianrong; Hong, Huachang; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Membrane fouling control necessitates the establishment of an effective method to assess interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. This study proposed a new method which includes a rigorous mathematical equation for modeling membrane surface morphology, and combination of surface element integration (SEI) method and the composite Simpson's approach for assessment of interfacial interactions. The new method provides a complete solution to quantitatively calculate interfacial interactions between foulants and rough surface membrane. Application of this method in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) showed that, high calculation accuracy could be achieved by setting high segment number, and moreover, the strength of three energy components and energy barrier was remarkably impaired by the existence of roughness on the membrane surface, indicating that membrane surface morphology exerted profound effects on membrane fouling in the MBR. Good agreement between calculation prediction and fouling phenomena was found, suggesting the feasibility of this method. PMID:26519696

  7. Cholesterol prevents interaction of the cell-penetrating peptide transportan with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Nemec, Marjana; Schara, Milan; Johansson, Henrik; Langel, Ulo; Zorko, Matjaz

    2008-12-01

    Interaction of the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) cysteine-transportan (Cys-TP) with model lipid membranes was examined by spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes were labeled with lipophilic spin probes and the influence of Cys-TP on membrane structure was studied. The influence of Cys-TP on membrane permeability was monitored by the reduction of a liposome-trapped water-soluble spin probe. Cys-TP caused lipid ordering in membranes prepared from pure dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and in DMPC membranes with moderate cholesterol concentration. In addition, Cys-TP caused a large increase in permeation of DMPC membranes. In contrast, with high cholesterol content, at which model lipid membranes are in the so-called liquid-ordered phase, no effect of Cys-TP was observed, either on the membrane structure or on the membrane permeability. The interaction between Cys-TP and the lipid membrane therefore depends on the lipid phase. This could be of great importance for understanding of the CPP-lipid interaction in laterally heterogeneous membranes, while it implies that the CPP-lipid interaction can be different at different points along the membrane. PMID:18683276

  8. Understanding Miltefosine-Membrane Interactions Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Matheus Malta; Sresht, Vishnu; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota Oliveira; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2015-04-21

    Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations are used to calculate the free energies of transfer of miltefosine, an alkylphosphocholine anticancer agent, from water to lipid bilayers to study its mechanism of interaction with biological membranes. We consider bilayers containing lipids with different degrees of unsaturation: dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, saturated, containing 0%, 10%, and 30% cholesterol), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC, diunsaturated), palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC, monounsaturated), diarachidonoylphosphatidylcholine (DAPC, polyunsaturated), and dilinoleylphosphatidylcholine (DUPC, polyunsaturated). These free energies, calculated using umbrella sampling, were used to compute the partition coefficients (K) of miltefosine between water and the lipid bilayers. The K values for the bilayers relative to that of pure DPPC were found to be 5.3 (DOPC), 7.0 (POPC), 1.0 (DAPC), 2.2 (DUPC), 14.9 (10% cholesterol), and 76.2 (30% cholesterol). Additionally, we calculated the free energy of formation of miltefosine-cholesterol complexes by pulling the surfactant laterally in the DPPC + 30% cholesterol system. The free energy profile that we obtained provides further evidence that miltefosine tends to associate with cholesterol and has a propensity to partition into lipid rafts. We also quantified the kinetics of the transport of miltefosine through the various bilayers by computing permeance values. The highest permeance was observed in DUPC bilayers (2.28 × 10(-2) m/s) and the lowest permeance in the DPPC bilayer with 30% cholesterol (1.10 × 10(-7) m/s). Our simulation results show that miltefosine does indeed interact with lipid rafts, has a higher permeability in polyunsaturated, loosely organized bilayers, and has higher flip-flop rates in specific regions of cellular membranes. PMID:25819781

  9. Atomic-level description of protein-lipid interactions using an accelerated membrane model.

    PubMed

    Baylon, Javier L; Vermaas, Josh V; Muller, Melanie P; Arcario, Mark J; Pogorelov, Taras V; Tajkhorshid, Emad

    2016-07-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins are structurally diverse proteins that are involved in fundamental cellular processes. Their activity of these proteins is frequently modulated through their interaction with cellular membranes, and as a result techniques to study the interfacial interaction between peripheral proteins and the membrane are in high demand. Due to the fluid nature of the membrane and the reversibility of protein-membrane interactions, the experimental study of these systems remains a challenging task. Molecular dynamics simulations offer a suitable approach to study protein-lipid interactions; however, the slow dynamics of the lipids often prevents sufficient sampling of specific membrane-protein interactions in atomistic simulations. To increase lipid dynamics while preserving the atomistic detail of protein-lipid interactions, in the highly mobile membrane-mimetic (HMMM) model the membrane core is replaced by an organic solvent, while short-tailed lipids provide a nearly complete representation of natural lipids at the organic solvent/water interface. Here, we present a brief introduction and a summary of recent applications of the HMMM to study different membrane proteins, complementing the experimental characterization of the presented systems, and we offer a perspective of future applications of the HMMM to study other classes of membrane proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26940626

  10. Formation of functional cell membrane domains: the interplay of lipid- and protein-mediated interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Numerous cell membrane associated processes, including signal transduction, membrane sorting, protein processing and virus trafficking take place in membrane subdomains. Protein-protein interactions provide the frameworks necessary to generate biologically functional membrane domains. For example, coat proteins define membrane areas destined for sorting processes, viral proteins self-assemble to generate a budding virus, and adapter molecules organize multimolecular signalling assemblies, which catalyse downstream reactions. The concept of raft lipid-based membrane domains provides a different principle for compartmentalization and segregation of membrane constituents. Accordingly, rafts are defined by the physical properties of the lipid bilayer and function by selective partitioning of membrane lipids and proteins into membrane domains of specific phase behaviour and lipid packing. Here, I will discuss the interplay of these independent principles of protein scaffolds and raft lipid microdomains leading to the generation of biologically functional membrane domains. PMID:12803918

  11. Interaction of murine macrophage-membrane proteins with components of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M L; Duarte-Escalante, E; Reyes-Montes, M R; Elizondo, N; Maldonado, G; Zenteno, E

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin, a crude antigen of the pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum, was studied using murine peritoneal macrophages. Membrane proteins were purified via membrane attachment to polycationic beads and solubilized in Tris–HCl/SDS/DTT/glycerol for protein extraction; afterwards they were adsorbed or not with H. capsulatum yeast or lectin binding-enriched by affinity chromatography. Membrane proteins and histoplasmin interactions were detected by ELISA and immunoblotting assays using anti-H. capsulatum human or mouse serum and biotinylated goat anti-human or anti-mouse IgG/streptavidin-peroxidase system to reveal the interaction. Results indicate that macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components interact in a dose-dependent reaction, and adsorption of macrophage-membrane proteins by yeast cells induces a critical decrease in the interaction. Macrophage-membrane glycoproteins with terminal d-galactosyl residues, purified by chromatography with Abrus precatorius lectin, bound to histoplasmin; and two bands of 68 kD and 180 kD of transferred membrane protein samples interacted with histoplasmin components, as revealed by immunoblot assays. Specificity for β-galactoside residues on the macrophage-membrane was confirmed by galactose inhibition of the interaction between macrophage-membrane proteins and histoplasmin components, in competitive ELISA using sugars, as well as by enzymatic cleavage of the galactoside residues. PMID:9737672

  12. Preferential hydrophobic interactions are responsible for a preference of D-amino acids in the aminoacylation of 5'-AMP with hydrophobic amino acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C. Jr; Wickramasinghe, N. S.; Sabatini, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the chemistry of aminoacyl AMP to model reactions at the 3' terminus of aminoacyl tRNA for the purpose of understanding the origin of protein synthesis. The present studies relate to the D, L preference in the esterification of 5'-AMP. All N-acetyl amino acids we studied showed faster reaction of the D-isomer, with a generally decreasing preference for D-isomer as the hydrophobicity of the amino acid decreased. The beta-branched amino acids, Ile and Val, showed an extreme preference for D-isomer. Ac-Leu, the gamma-branched amino acid, showed a slightly low D/L ratio relative to its hydrophobicity. The molecular basis for these preferences for D-isomer is understandable in the light of our previous studies and seems to be due to preferential hydrophobic interaction of the D-isomer with adenine. The preference for hydrophobic D-amino acids can be decreased by addition of an organic solvent to the reaction medium. Conversely, peptidylation with Ac-PhePhe shows a preference for the LL isomer over the DD isomer.

  13. Interactions among Cytochromes P450 in Microsomal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitri R.; Davydova, Nadezhda Y.; Sineva, Elena V.; Halpert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The body of evidence of physiologically relevant P450-P450 interactions in microsomal membranes continues to grow. Here we probe oligomerization of human CYP3A4, CYP3A5, and CYP2E1 in microsomal membranes. Using a technique based on luminescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrate that all three proteins are subject to a concentration-dependent equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric states. We also observed the formation of mixed oligomers in CYP3A4/CYP3A5, CYP3A4/CYP2E1, and CYP3A5/CYP2E1 pairs and demonstrated that the association of either CYP3A4 or CYP3A5 with CYP2E1 causes activation of the latter enzyme. Earlier we hypothesized that the intersubunit interface in CYP3A4 oligomers is similar to that observed in the crystallographic dimers of some microsomal drug-metabolizing cytochromes P450 (Davydov, D. R., Davydova, N. Y., Sineva, E. V., Kufareva, I., and Halpert, J. R. (2013) Pivotal role of P450-P450 interactions in CYP3A4 allostery: the case of α-naphthoflavone. Biochem. J. 453, 219–230). Here we report the results of intermolecular cross-linking of CYP3A4 oligomers with thiol-reactive bifunctional reagents as well as the luminescence resonance energy transfer measurements of interprobe distances in the oligomers of labeled CYP3A4 single-cysteine mutants. The results provide compelling support for the physiological relevance of the dimer-specific peripheral ligand-binding site observed in certain CYP3A4 structures. According to our interpretation, these results reveal an important general mechanism that regulates the activity and substrate specificity of the cytochrome P450 ensemble through interactions between multiple P450 species. As a result of P450-P450 cross-talk, the catalytic properties of the cytochrome P450 ensemble cannot be predicted by simple summation of the properties of the individual P450 species. PMID:25533469

  14. The adrenal specific toxicant mitotane directly interacts with lipid membranes and alters membrane properties depending on lipid composition.

    PubMed

    Scheidt, Holger A; Haralampiev, Ivan; Theisgen, Stephan; Schirbel, Andreas; Sbiera, Silviu; Huster, Daniel; Kroiss, Matthias; Müller, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Mitotane (o,p'.-DDD) is an orphan drug approved for the treatment of adrenocortical carcinoma. The mechanisms, which are responsible for this activity of the drug, are not completely understood. It can be hypothesized that an impact of mitotane is mediated by the interaction with cellular membranes. However, an interaction of mitotane with (lipid) membranes has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we characterized the interaction of mitotane and its main metabolite o,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroacetic acid (o,p'-DDA) with lipid membranes by applying a variety of biophysical approaches of nuclear magnetic resonance, electron spin resonance, and fluorescence spectroscopy. We found that mitotane and o,p'-DDA bind to lipid membranes by inserting into the lipid-water interface of the bilayer. Mitotane but not o,p'-DDA directly causes a disturbance of bilayer structure leading to an increased permeability of the membrane for polar molecules. Mitotane induced alterations of the membrane integrity required the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and/or cholesterol. Collectively, our data for the first time characterize the impact of mitotane on the lipid membrane structure and dynamics, which may contribute to a better understanding of specific mitotane effects and side effects. PMID:27002491

  15. Membrane Adhesion via Homophilic Saccharide-Saccharide Interactions Investigated by Neutron Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Emanuel; Demé, Bruno; Gege, Christian; Tanaka, Motomu

    2011-01-01

    Solid-supported membrane multilayers doped with membrane-anchored oligosaccharides bearing the LewisX motif (LeX lipid) were utilized as a model system of membrane adhesion mediated via homophilic carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions. Specular and off-specular neutron scattering in bulk aqueous electrolytes allowed us to study multilayer structure and membrane mechanics at full hydration at various Ca2+ concentrations, indicating that membrane-anchored LeX cross-links the adjacent membranes. To estimate forces and energies required for cross-linking, we theoretically modeled the interactions between phospholipid membranes and compared this model with our experimental results on membranes doped with LeX lipids. We demonstrated that the bending rigidity, extracted from the off-specular scattering signals, is not significantly influenced by the molar fraction of LeX lipids, while the vertical compression modulus (and thus the intermembrane confinement) increases with the molar fraction of LeX lipids. PMID:21539782

  16. Interaction of the Intermembrane Space Domain of Tim23 Protein with Mitochondrial Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Munari, Francesca; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tim23 mediates protein translocation into mitochondria. Although inserted into the inner membrane, the dynamic association of its intermembrane space (IMS) domain with the outer membrane promotes protein import. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the IMS domain of Tim23 tightly associates with both inner and outer mitochondrial membrane-like membranes through a hydrophobic anchor at its N terminus. The structure of membrane-bound Tim23IMS is highly dynamic, allowing recognition of both the incoming presequence and other translocase components at the translocation contact. Cardiolipin enhances Tim23 membrane attachment, suggesting that cardiolipin can influence preprotein import. PMID:25349212

  17. Characterization of glycolytic enzyme interactions with murine erythrocyte membranes in wild-type and membrane protein knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Campanella, M. Estela; Chu, Haiyan; Wandersee, Nancy J.; Peters, Luanne L.; Mohandas, Narla; Gilligan, Diana M.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has shown that glycolytic enzymes (GEs) exist as multienzyme complexes on the inner surface of human erythrocyte membranes. Because GE binding sites have been mapped to sequences on the membrane protein, band 3, that are not conserved in other mammalian homologs, the question arose whether GEs can organize into complexes on other mammalian erythrocyte membranes. To address this, murine erythrocytes were stained with antibodies to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase, phosphofructokinase, lactate dehydrogenase, and pyruvate kinase and analyzed by confocal microscopy. GEs were found to localize to the membrane in oxygenated erythrocytes but redistributed to the cytoplasm upon deoxygenation, as seen in human erythrocytes. To identify membrane proteins involved in GE assembly, erythrocytes from mice lacking each of the major erythrocyte membrane proteins were examined for GE localization. GEs from band 3 knockout mice were not membrane associated but distributed throughout the cytoplasm, regardless of erythrocyte oxygenation state. In contrast, erythrocytes from mice lacking α-spectrin, ankyrin, protein 4.2, protein 4.1, β-adducin, or dematin headpiece exhibited GEs bound to the membrane. These data suggest that oxygenation-dependent assembly of GEs on the membrane could be a general phenomenon of mammalian erythrocytes and that stability of these interactions depends primarily on band 3. PMID:18698006

  18. Formation of micro-domains as functional regions in biomembranes: specific interactions inferred by differential scanning calorimetry and microscopic imaging of membrane fluidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Kazuo

    2005-08-01

    Using differential scanning calorimetry, preferential interaction between melittin and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine was observed in various binary mixtures of phospholipids. It is shown that matching of the hydrophobic regions between melittin and fatty acyl chains of phospholipids is the most important factor. Using a microscopic imaging instrument for membrane fluidity, specific interaction between cholesterol and sphingomyelin in rafts was confirmed in living CHO cells. An environment sensitive fluorescence dye, laurdan, was used in this home-built instrument. The membrane fluidity of the cells was scarcely affected with the treatment of sphingomyelinase up to 0.1 U ml-1. On the other hand, increase of the membrane fluidity was observed in CHO cells treated with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, which removes cholesterol molecules from biomembranes of the cells in a concentration dependent manner up to 10 mM. But a low concentration of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (1 mM) did not raise the membrane fluidity. However, increase of membrane fluidity was observed in CHO cells treated with sphingomyelinase and then with 1 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. These results suggest specific interaction between sphingomyelin and cholesterol in the rafts.

  19. Conformational Changes and Association of Membrane-Interacting Peptides in Myelin Membrane Models: A Case of the C-Terminal Peptide of Proteolipid Protein and the Antimicrobial Peptide Melittin.

    PubMed

    Appadu, Ashtina; Jelokhani-Niaraki, Masoud; DeBruin, Lillian

    2015-11-25

    Model membranes composed of various lipid mixtures can segregate into liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases. In this study, lipid vesicles composed of mainly Lo or Ld phases as well as complex lipid systems representing the cytosolic leaflet of the myelin membrane were characterized by fluorescence resonance energy transfer with a donor/acceptor pair that preferentially partitioned into Lo or Ld phases, respectively. The fluidity of the lipid systems containing >30% cholesterol was modulated in the presence of the amphipathic peptide melittin. With all the studied lipid systems, melittin attained an α-helical conformation as determined by CD spectroscopy and attained varying degrees of membrane association and penetration as determined by intrinsic Trp fluorescence. The other protein domain utilized was a putative amphipathic helical peptide derived from the cytosolic C-terminal sequence of proteolipid protein (PLP) which is the most abundant protein in the myelin membrane. The C-terminal PLP peptide transitioned from a random coil to an α-helix in the presence of trifluoroethanol. Upon interacting with each of lipid vesicle system, the PLP peptide also folded into a helix; however, at high concentrations of the peptide with fluid lipid systems, associated helices transmuted into a β-sheet conformer. The membrane-associated aggregation of the cytosolic C-termini could be a mechanism by which the transmembrane PLP multimerizes in the myelin membrane. PMID:26561987

  20. Interaction of fullerene nanoparticles with biomembranes: from the partition in lipid membranes to effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sandra M; Dinis, Augusto M; Peixoto, Francisco; Ferreira, Lino; Jurado, Amália S; Videira, Romeu A

    2014-03-01

    Partition and localization of C60 and its derivative C60(OH)18-22 in lipid membranes and their impact on mitochondrial activity were studied, attempting to correlate those events with fullerene characteristics (size, surface chemistry, and surface charge). Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that C60(OH)18-22 preferentially populated the outer regions of the bilayer, whereas C60 preferred to localize in deeper regions of the bilayer. Partition coefficient values indicated that C60 exhibited higher affinity for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and mitochondrial membranes than C60(OH)18-22. Both fullerenes affected the mitochondrial function, but the inhibitory effects promoted by C60 were more pronounced than those induced by C60(OH)18-22 (up to 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein). State 3 and p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone-uncoupled respirations are inhibited by both fullerenes when glutamate/malate or succinate was used as substrate. Phosphorylation system and electron transport chain of mitochondria are affected by both fullerenes, but only C60 increased the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability to protons, suggesting perturbations in the structure and dynamics of that membrane. At concentrations of C60(OH)18-22 above 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, the activity of FoF1-ATP synthase was also decreased. The evaluation of transmembrane potential showed that the mitochondria phosphorylation cycle decreased upon adenosine diphosphate addition with increasing fullerenes concentration and the time of the repolarization phase increased as a function of C60(OH)18-22 concentration. Our results suggest that the balance between hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity resulting from the surface chemistry of fullerene nanoparticles, rather than the cluster size or the surface charge acquired by fullerenes in water, influences their membrane interactions and consequently their effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics. PMID:24361870

  1. Amyloidβ Peptides in interaction with raft-mime model membranes: a neutron reflectivity insight

    PubMed Central

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Motta, Simona; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Fragneto, Giovanna; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The role of first-stage β–amyloid aggregation in the development of the Alzheimer disease, is widely accepted but still unclear. Intimate interaction with the cell membrane is invoked. We designed Neutron Reflectometry experiments to reveal the existence and extent of the interaction between β–amyloid (Aβ) peptides and a lone customized biomimetic membrane, and their dependence on the aggregation state of the peptide. The membrane, asymmetrically containing phospholipids, GM1 and cholesterol in biosimilar proportion, is a model for a raft, a putative site for amyloid-cell membrane interaction. We found that the structured-oligomer of Aβ(1-42), its most acknowledged membrane-active state, is embedded as such into the external leaflet of the membrane. Conversely, the Aβ(1-42) unstructured early-oligomers deeply penetrate the membrane, likely mimicking the interaction at neuronal cell surfaces, when the Aβ(1-42) is cleaved from APP protein and the membrane constitutes a template for its further structural evolution. Moreover, the smaller Aβ(1-6) fragment, the N-terminal portion of Aβ, was also used. Aβ N-terminal is usually considered as involved in oligomer stabilization but not in the peptide-membrane interaction. Instead, it was seen to remove lipids from the bilayer, thus suggesting its role, once in the whole peptide, in membrane leakage, favouring peptide recruitment. PMID:26880066

  2. Amyloid-β peptides in interaction with raft-mime model membranes: a neutron reflectivity insight.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Motta, Simona; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Fragneto, Giovanna; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The role of first-stage β-amyloid aggregation in the development of the Alzheimer disease, is widely accepted but still unclear. Intimate interaction with the cell membrane is invoked. We designed Neutron Reflectometry experiments to reveal the existence and extent of the interaction between β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides and a lone customized biomimetic membrane, and their dependence on the aggregation state of the peptide. The membrane, asymmetrically containing phospholipids, GM1 and cholesterol in biosimilar proportion, is a model for a raft, a putative site for amyloid-cell membrane interaction. We found that the structured-oligomer of Aβ(1-42), its most acknowledged membrane-active state, is embedded as such into the external leaflet of the membrane. Conversely, the Aβ(1-42) unstructured early-oligomers deeply penetrate the membrane, likely mimicking the interaction at neuronal cell surfaces, when the Aβ(1-42) is cleaved from APP protein and the membrane constitutes a template for its further structural evolution. Moreover, the smaller Aβ(1-6) fragment, the N-terminal portion of Aβ, was also used. Aβ N-terminal is usually considered as involved in oligomer stabilization but not in the peptide-membrane interaction. Instead, it was seen to remove lipids from the bilayer, thus suggesting its role, once in the whole peptide, in membrane leakage, favouring peptide recruitment. PMID:26880066

  3. Kinetics of small molecule interactions with membrane proteins in single cells measured with mechanical amplification

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yan; Shan, Xiaonan; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Hong-Yuan; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-01

    Measuring small molecule interactions with membrane proteins in single cells is critical for understanding many cellular processes and for screening drugs. However, developing such a capability has been a difficult challenge. We show that molecular interactions with membrane proteins induce a mechanical deformation in the cellular membrane, and real-time monitoring of the deformation with subnanometer resolution allows quantitative analysis of small molecule–membrane protein interaction kinetics in single cells. This new strategy provides mechanical amplification of small binding signals, making it possible to detect small molecule interactions with membrane proteins. This capability, together with spatial resolution, also allows the study of the heterogeneous nature of cells by analyzing the interaction kinetics variability between different cells and between different regions of a single cell. PMID:26601298

  4. The effect of solute-membrane interaction on solute permeation under supersaturated conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingsi; Sun, Mingjing; Fan, Aiping; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Yanjun

    2013-01-30

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the effect of solute-membrane interaction under supersaturated conditions on the transport of model solute (salicylic acid) across poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane. Supersaturated systems with a degree of saturation (DS) up to 8 were prepared using a molecular form technique with water as the vehicle to minimize the vehicle-membrane interaction. The spectroscopic and thermal analysis revealed the presence of both hydrogen bonding and nonpolar interaction between the solute and PDMS. Upon treatment by supersaturated solutions the degree of solute-membrane interaction increased with increasing DS. This enhanced the barrier property of PDMS and thus led to the flux attenuation compared to that calculated by Higuchi equation. This work highlighted the importance of solute-membrane interaction under supersaturation in the flux reduction, which should be considered when designing, and optimizing supersaturated topical and transdermal drug delivery systems. PMID:23178214

  5. Membrane Interaction of Antimicrobial Peptides Using E. coli Lipid Extract as Model Bacterial Cell Membranes and SFG Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Soblosky, Lauren; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy; Chen, Zhan

    2015-01-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are used as a convenient model cell membrane system to study biologically important molecule-lipid interactions in situ. However, the lipid bilayer models are often simple and the acquired results with these models may not provide all pertinent information related to a real cell membrane. In this work, we use sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to study molecular-level interactions between the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) MSI-594, ovispirin-1 G18, magainin 2 and a simple 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (dDPPG)-1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) bilayer. We compared such interactions to those between the AMPs and a more complex dDPPG/E. coli polar lipid extract bilayer. We show that to fully understand more complex aspects of peptide-bilayer interaction, such as interaction kinetics, a heterogeneous lipid composition is required, such as the E. coli polar lipid extract. The discrepancy in peptide-bilayer interaction is likely due in part to the difference in bilayer charge between the two systems since highly negative charged lipids can promote more favorable electrostatic interactions between the peptide and lipid bilayer. Results presented in this paper indicate that more complex model bilayers are needed to accurately analyze peptide-cell membrane interactions and demonstrates the importance of using an appropriate lipid composition to study AMP interaction properties. PMID:25707312

  6. Nonbonded interactions in membrane active cyclic biopolymers. IV - Cation dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Srinivasan, S.; Prasad, C. V.; Brinda, S. R.; Macelroy, R. D.; Sundaram, K.

    1980-01-01

    Interactions of valinomycin and form of its analogs in several conformations with the central ions Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+) and Cs(+) are investigated as part of a study of the specific preference of valinomycin for potassium and the mechanisms of carrier-mediated ion transport across membranes. Ion binding energies and conformational potential energies are calculated taking into account polarization energy formulas and repulsive energy between the central ion and the ligand atoms for conformations representing various stages in ion capture and release for each of the two ring chiralities of valinomycin and its analogs. Results allow the prediction of the chirality and conformation most likely to be observed for a given analog, and may be used to synthesize analogs with a desired rigidity or flexibility. The binding energies with the alkali metal cations are found to decrease with increasing ion size, and to be smaller than the corresponding ion hydration energies. It is pointed out that the observed potassium preference may be explainable in terms of differences between binding and hydration energies. Binding energies are also noted to depend on ligand conformation.

  7. Interaction between bending and tension forces in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, T W

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the bending mechanics of a membrane consisting of two tightly-coupled leaflets, each of which shears and bends readily but strongly resists area changes. Structures of this type have been proposed to model biological membranes such as red blood cell membrane. It is shown that when such a membrane is bent, anisotropic components of resultant membrane tension (shear stresses) are induced, even when the tension in each leaflet is isotropic. The induced shear stresses increase as the square of the membrane curvature, and become significant for moderate curvatures (when the radius of curvature is much larger than the distance between the leaflets). This effect has implications for the analysis of shape and deformation of freely suspended and flowing red blood cells. PMID:3224154

  8. Biophysical interactions with model lipid membranes: applications in drug discovery and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Stine, Andrew; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The transport of drugs or drug delivery systems across the cell membrane is a complex biological process, often difficult to understand because of its dynamic nature. In this regard, model lipid membranes, which mimic many aspects of cell-membrane lipids, have been very useful in helping investigators to discern the roles of lipids in cellular interactions. One can use drug-lipid interactions to predict pharmacokinetic properties of drugs, such as their transport, biodistribution, accumulation, and hence efficacy. These interactions can also be used to study the mechanisms of transport, based on the structure and hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of drug molecules. In recent years, model lipid membranes have also been explored to understand their mechanisms of interactions with peptides, polymers, and nanocarriers. These interaction studies can be used to design and develop efficient drug delivery systems. Changes in the lipid composition of cells and tissue in certain disease conditions may alter biophysical interactions, which could be explored to develop target-specific drugs and drug delivery systems. In this review, we discuss different model membranes, drug-lipid interactions and their significance, studies of model membrane interactions with nanocarriers, and how biophysical interaction studies with lipid model membranes could play an important role in drug discovery and drug delivery. PMID:19432455

  9. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Hoch, M.M.

    1997-06-10

    Method is described for controlling the supply of air to a PROX (PReferential OXidation for CO cleanup) reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference there between correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference. 2 figs.

  10. Application of the local-bulk partitioning and competitive binding models to interpret preferential interactions of glycine betaine and urea with protein surface.

    PubMed

    Felitsky, Daniel J; Record, M Thomas

    2004-07-20

    Two thermodynamic models have been developed to interpret the preferential accumulation or exclusion of solutes in the vicinity of biopolymer surface and the effects of these solutes on protein processes. The local-bulk partitioning model treats solute (and water) as partitioning between the region at/or near the protein surface (the local domain) and the bulk solution. The solvent exchange model analyzes a 1:1 competition between water and solute molecules for independent surface sites. Here we apply each of these models to interpret thermodynamic data for the interactions of urea and the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine; GB) with the surface exposed in unfolding the marginally stable lacI HTH DNA binding domain. The partition coefficient K(P) quantifying accumulation of urea at this protein surface (K(P) approximately equal 1.1) is only weakly dependent on urea concentration up to 6 M urea. However, K(P) quantifying exclusion of GB from the vicinity of this protein surface increases from 0.83 (extrapolated to 0 M GB) to 1.0 (indicating that local and bulk GB concentrations are equal) at 4 M GB (activity > 40 M). We interpret the significant concentration dependence of K(P) for GB, predicted to be general for excluded, nonideal solutes such as GB, as a modest (8%) attenuation of the GB concentration dependence of solute nonideality in the local domain relative to that in the bulk solution. Above 4 M, K(P) for the interaction of GB with the surface exposed in protein unfolding is predicted to exceed unity, which explains the maximum in thermal stability observed for RNase and lysozyme at 4 M GB (Santoro, M. M., Liu, Y. F., Khan, S. M. A., Hou, L. X., and Bolen, D. W. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 5278-5283). Both thermodynamic models provide good two-parameter fits to GB and urea data for lacI HTH unfolding over a wide concentration range. The solute partitioning model allows for a full spectrum of attenuation effects in the local domain

  11. Establishing the importance of oil-membrane interactions on the transmembrane diffusion of physicochemically diverse compounds.

    PubMed

    Najib, Omaima N; Martin, Gary P; Kirton, Stewart B; Sallam, Al-Sayed; Murnane, Darragh

    2016-06-15

    The diffusion process through a non-porous barrier membrane depends on the properties of the drug, vehicle and membrane. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether a series of oily vehicles might have the potential to interact to varying degrees with synthetic membranes and to determine whether any such interaction might affect the permeation of co-formulated permeants: methylparaben (MP); butylparaben (BP) or caffeine (CF). The oils (isopropyl myristate (IPM), isohexadecane (IHD), hexadecane (HD), oleic acid (OA) and liquid paraffin (LP)) and membranes (silicone, high density polyethylene and polyurethane) employed in the study were selected such that they displayed a range of different structural, and physicochemical properties. Diffusion studies showed that many of the vehicles were not inert and did interact with the membranes resulting in a modification of the permeants' flux when corrected for membrane thickness (e.g. normalized flux of MP increased from 1.25±0.13μgcm(-1)h(-1) in LP to 17.94±0.25μgcm(-1)h(-1)in IPM). The oils were sorbed differently to membranes (range of weight gain: 2.2±0.2% for polyurethane with LP to 105.6±1.1% for silicone with IHD). Membrane interaction was apparently dependent upon the physicochemical properties including; size, shape, flexibility and the Hansen solubility parameter values of both the membranes and oils. Sorbed oils resulted in modified permeant diffusion through the membranes. No simple correlation was found to exist between the Hansen solubility parameters of the oils or swelling of the membrane and the normalized fluxes of the three compounds investigated. More sophisticated modelling would appear to be required to delineate and quantify the key molecular parameters of membrane, permeant and vehicle compatibility and their interactions of relevance to membrane permeation. PMID:27012979

  12. Membrane-Protein Interactions in a Generic Coarse-Grained Model for Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    West, Beate; Brown, Frank L.H.; Schmid, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We study membrane-protein interactions and membrane-mediated protein-protein interactions by Monte Carlo simulations of a generic coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers with cylindrical hydrophobic inclusions. The strength of the hydrophobic force and the hydrophobic thickness of the proteins are systematically varied. The results are compared with analytical predictions of two popular analytical theories: The Landau-de Gennes theory and the elastic theory. The elastic theory provides an excellent description of the fluctuation spectra of pure membranes and successfully reproduces the deformation profiles of membranes around single proteins. However, its prediction for the potential of mean force between proteins is not compatible with the simulation data for large distances. The simulations show that the lipid-mediated interactions are governed by five competing factors: direct interactions; lipid-induced depletion interactions; lipid bridging; lipid packing; and a smooth long-range contribution. The mechanisms leading to hydrophobic mismatch interactions are critically analyzed. PMID:18835907

  13. rBPI21 interacts with negative membranes endothermically promoting the formation of rigid multilamellar structures.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Marco M; Bianconi, M Lucia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Santiago, Patrícia S; Tabak, Marcel; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Itri, Rosangela; Santos, Nuno C

    2013-11-01

    rBPI21 belongs to the antimicrobial peptide and protein (AMP) family. It has high affinity for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), acting mainly against Gram-negative bacteria. This work intends to elucidate the mechanism of action of rBPI21 at the membrane level. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, we observed that rBPI21 interaction occurs only with negatively charged membranes (mimicking bacterial membranes) and is entropically driven. Differential scanning calorimetry shows that membrane interaction with rBPI21 is followed by an increase of rigidity on negatively charged membrane, which is corroborated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Additionally, SAXS data reveal that rBPI21 promotes the multilamellarization of negatively charged membranes. The results support the proposed model for rBPI21 action: first it may interact with LPS at the bacterial surface. This entropic interaction could cause the release of ions that maintain the packed structure of LPS, ensuring peptide penetration. Then, rBPI21 may interact with the negatively charged leaflets of the outer and inner membranes, promoting the interaction between the two bacterial membranes, ultimately leading to cell death. PMID:23792068

  14. Effect of lipid head group interactions on membrane properties and membrane-induced cationic β-hairpin folding.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Sai J; Xu, Hongcheng; Matysiak, Silvina

    2016-07-21

    Stages in POPS membrane induced SVS-1 folding. One key characteristic of mIFs is the dielectric gradient and subsequently, electrostatic potential that arises from dipolar interactions in the head group region. In this work, we present a coarse-grained (CG) model for anionic and zwitterionic lipids that accounts for dipolar intricacies in the head group region. Prior work on adding dipolar interactions in a coarse grained (CG) model for peptides enabled us to achieve α/β secondary structure content de novo, without any added bias. We have now extended this idea to lipids. To mimic dipolar interactions, two dummy particles with opposite charges are added to CG polar beads. These two dummy charges represent a fluctuating dipole that introduces structural polarization into the head group region. We have used POPC (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and POPS (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-l-serine) as our model lipids. We characterize structural, dynamic, and dielectric properties of our CG bilayer, along with the effect of monovalent ions. We observe head group dipoles to play a significant role in membrane dielectric gradient and lipid clustering induced by dipole-dipole interactions in POPS lipids. In addition, we studied membrane-induced peptide folding of a cationic antimicrobial peptide with anticancer activity, SVS-1. We find that membrane-induced peptide folding is driven by both (a) cooperativity in peptide self-interaction and (b) cooperativity in membrane-peptide interaction. In particular, dipolar interactions between the peptide backbone and lipid head groups contribute to stabilizing folded conformations. PMID:27165814

  15. Biophysics in cancer: The relevance of drug-membrane interaction studies.

    PubMed

    Alves, Ana Catarina; Ribeiro, Daniela; Nunes, Cláudia; Reis, Salette

    2016-09-01

    Lipidomics has been proving that membrane lipids play a crucial role in several cell functions and are involved in several pathologies, including cancer. In fact, beyond a scaffold where proteins and other components are embedded, the cell membrane can also act as a barrier or a target for anticancer drugs. From this point of view, the development of new chemotherapeutic agents should also take into account the role of the membrane in their activity. This Review aims to highlight the importance of anticancer drug-membrane interactions as a powerful strategy to improve cancer therapy. Biophysical techniques emerge, therefore, as essential tools to unveil such interactions. PMID:27368477

  16. Interactions of normal and mutant vesicular stomatitis virus matrix proteins with the plasma membrane and nucleocapsids.

    PubMed Central

    Chong, L D; Rose, J K

    1994-01-01

    We demonstrated recently that a fraction of the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) binds tightly to cellular membranes in vivo when expressed in the absence of other VSV proteins. This membrane-associated M protein was functional in binding purified VSV nucleocapsids in vitro. Here we show that the membrane-associated M protein is largely associated with a membrane fraction having the density of plasma membranes, indicating membrane specificity in the binding. In addition, we analyzed truncated forms of M protein to identify regions responsible for membrane association and nucleocapsid binding. Truncated M protein lacking the amino-terminal basic domain still associated with cellular membranes, although not as tightly as wild-type M protein, and could not bind nucleocapsids. In contrast, deletion of the carboxy-terminal 14 amino acids did not disrupt stable membrane association or nucleocapsid interaction. These results suggest that the amino terminus of M protein either interacts directly with membranes and nucleocapsids or stabilizes a conformation that is required for M protein to mediate both of these interactions. Images PMID:8254754

  17. EB-virus latent membrane protein 1 potentiates the stemness of nasopharyngeal carcinoma via preferential activation of PI3K/AKT pathway by a positive feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Yang, C-F; Yang, G-D; Huang, T-J; Li, R; Chu, Q-Q; Xu, L; Wang, M-S; Cai, M-D; Zhong, L; Wei, H-J; Huang, H-B; Huang, J-L; Qian, C-N; Huang, B-J

    2016-06-30

    Our previous study reported that Epstein-Barr virus(EBV)-encoded latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) could induce development of CD44(+/High) stem-like cells in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie modulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in NPC remain unclear. Here, we show that LMP1 induced CSC-like properties through promotion of the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like cellular markers and through alterations in differentiation markers. Furthermore, LMP1 activated and triggered phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/AKT) pathway, which subsequently stimulated expression of CSC markers, development of side population and tumor sphere formation. This suggests that PI3K/AKT pathway has an important role in the induction and maintenance of CSC properties in NPC. Similarly, PI3K/AKT pathway was also activated by phosphorylase in LMP1-induced CD44(+/High) cells. In addition, LMP1 greatly increased expression of miR-21 and downregulated expression of the miR-21 target, PTEN. Overexpression of miR-21 by transfection of miR-21 mimics into LMP1-transformed cells led to phosphorylase-mediated activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and induction of CSCs. On the contrary, phosphorylation of the PI3K/AKT pathway and the expression of CSC were reversed by an miR-21 inhibitor. The specific inhibitor (Ly294002) of PI3K/AKT pathway significantly decreased expression of miR-21 and CSC markers and upregulated the expression of PTEN, which indicates that miR-21 and PTEN are the downstream effectors of PI3K/AKT and that expression of these two effectors are related to the development of NPC CSCs. Taken together, our novel findings indicate that LMP1, PI3K/AKT, miR-21 and PTEN constitute a positive feedback loop and have a key role in LMP1-induced CSCs in NPC. PMID:26568302

  18. Fluorescence interference contrast based approach to study real time interaction of melittin with plasma membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Gui, Dong; Zandi, Roya; Gill, Sarjeet; Mohideen, Umar

    2014-03-01

    Melittin is an anti-bacterial and hemolytic toxic peptide found in bee venom. Cell lysis behavior of peptides has been widely investigated, but the exact interaction mechanism of lytic peptides with lipid membranes and its constituents has not been understood completely. In this paper we study the melittin interaction with lipid plasma membranes in real time using non-invasive and non-contact fluorescence interference contrast microscopy (FLIC). Particularly the interaction of melittin with plasma membranes was studied in a controlled molecular environment, where these plasma membrane were composed of saturated lipid, 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) and unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine(DOPC) with and without cholesterol. We found out that melittin starts to form nanometer size pores in the plasma membranes shortly after interacting with membranes. But the addition of cholesterol in plasma membrane slows down the pore formation process. Our results show that inclusion of cholesterol to the plasma membranes make them more resilient towards pore formation and lysis of membrane.

  19. Rafts, little caves and large potholes: how lipid structure interacts with membrane proteins to create functionally diverse membrane environments.

    PubMed

    Morris, Roger; Cox, Helen; Mombelli, Enrico; Quinn, Peter J

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews how diverse lipid microdomains form in the membrane and partition proteins into different functional units that regulate cell trafficking, signalling and movement. We will concentrate upon five major issues: 1. the diversity of lipid structure that produces diverse microenvironments into which different subsets of proteins partition; 2. why ordered lipid domains exclude proteins, and the conditions required for select subsets of proteins to enter these domains; 3. the coupling of the inner and outer leaflets within ordered microdomains; 4. the effect of ordered lipid domains upon membrane properties including curvature and hydrophobicity that affect membrane fission, fusion and extension of filopodia; 5. the biological effects of these structural constraints; in particular how the properties of these domains combine to provide a very different signalling, trafficking and membrane fusion environment to that found in disordered (fluid mosaic) membrane. In addressing these problems, the review draws upon studies ranging from molecular dynamic modelling of lipid interactions, through physical studies of model membrane systems to structural and biological studies of whole cells, examining in the process problems inherent in visualising and purifying these microdomains. While the diversity of structure and function of ordered lipid microdomains is emphasised, some general roles emerge. In particular, the basis for having quite different, non-interacting ordered lipid domains on the same membrane is evident in the diversity of lipid structure and plays a key role in sorting signalling systems. The exclusion of ordered membrane from coated pits, and hence rapid endocytosis, is suggested to underlie the ability of highly ordered domains to establish stable secondary signalling systems required, for instance, in T cell receptor, insulin and neurotrophin signalling. PMID:15376618

  20. Plasmonic nanoparticle interaction with cell membrane for diagnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumana; Arikady, Akshata; Vasireddi, Ramakrishna; Harika Villa, Krishna; Konnur, Manish C.; Hegde, Gopalkrishna M.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2014-03-01

    Optofluidic schemes of inhibition, transport and activation by carrier molecules through cell membrane have interesting applications. Through plasmonic excitation of nanoparticles integrated in microfluidic channel, we observe cell membrane structural changes. Related phenomena are studied in situ in a microfluidic channel via fluorescence imaging. Detailed analysis is carried out to understand the possible application of this scheme in optically induced transport and expression of cell membrane protein. Optical properties of the cells undergoing plasmonic transport are monitored and correlated to cell expression assay. Plasmonic charge transport and optical transmission are measured in the microfluidic lab-on-chip along with in-situ imaging.

  1. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  2. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  3. Nanoengineered field induced charge separation membranes manufacture thereof

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Kevin C.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Bourcier, William L.; Floyd, III, William Clary

    2016-08-02

    A device according to one embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge and pore configuration characterized by a double layer overlap effect being present in pores of the membrane, where the porous membrane includes functional groups that preferentially interact with either cations or anions. A device according to another embodiment includes a porous membrane having a surface charge in pores thereof sufficient to impart anion or cation selectivity in the pores. Additional devices, systems and methods are also presented.

  4. Proteomic Response of Bacillus subtilis to Lantibiotics Reflects Differences in Interaction with the Cytoplasmic Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel, Michaela; Kohl, Bastian; Münch, Daniela; Raatschen, Nadja; Albada, H. Bauke; Hamoen, Leendert; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    Mersacidin, gallidermin, and nisin are lantibiotics, antimicrobial peptides containing lanthionine. They show potent antibacterial activity. All three interfere with cell wall biosynthesis by binding lipid II, but they display different levels of interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane. On one end of the spectrum, mersacidin interferes with cell wall biosynthesis by binding lipid II without integrating into bacterial membranes. On the other end of the spectrum, nisin readily integrates into membranes, where it forms large pores. It destroys the membrane potential and causes leakage of nutrients and ions. Gallidermin, in an intermediate position, also readily integrates into membranes. However, pore formation occurs only in some bacteria and depends on membrane composition. In this study, we investigated the impact of nisin, gallidermin, and mersacidin on cell wall integrity, membrane pore formation, and membrane depolarization in Bacillus subtilis. The impact of the lantibiotics on the cell envelope was correlated to the proteomic response they elicit in B. subtilis. By drawing on a proteomic response library, including other envelope-targeting antibiotics such as bacitracin, vancomycin, gramicidin S, or valinomycin, YtrE could be identified as the most reliable marker protein for interfering with membrane-bound steps of cell wall biosynthesis. NadE and PspA were identified as markers for antibiotics interacting with the cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:22926563

  5. INTERACTION OF INORGANIC MERCURY SALTS WITH MODEL AND RED CELL MEMBRANES: IMPORTANCE OF LIPID BINDING SALTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect induced by two mercury salts, HgCl2 and Hg(NO3)2, on the thermotropic properties of PS model membranes (multilamellar vesicles) and rat red cell membranes was investigated employing 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence polarization. ercury(II) interacts wit...

  6. Conformational transitions of duplex and triplex nucleic acid helices: thermodynamic analysis of effects of salt concentration on stability using preferential interaction coefficients.

    PubMed Central

    Bond, J. P.; Anderson, C. F.; Record, M. T.

    1994-01-01

    For order-disorder transitions of double- and triple-stranded nucleic acid helices, the midpoint temperatures Tm depend strongly on a +/-, the mean ionic activity of uniunivalent salt. Experimental determinations of dTm/d ln a +/- and of the enthalpy change (delta H(o)) accompanying the transition in excess salt permit evaluation of delta gamma, the stoichiometrically weighted combination of preferential interaction coefficients, each of which reflects thermodynamic effects of interactions of salt ions with a reactant or product of the conformational transition (formula; see text) Here delta H(o) is defined per mole of nucleotide by analogy to delta gamma. Application of Eq. 1 to experimental values of delta H(o) and Tm yields values of delta gamma for the denaturation of B-DNA over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-0.20 M (Privalov et al. (1969), Biopolymers 8,559) and for each of four order-disorder transitions of poly rA.(poly rU)n, n = 1, 2 over the range of NaCl concentrations 0.01-1.0 M (Krakauer and Sturtevant (1968), Biopolymers 6, 491). For denaturation of duplexes and triplexes, delta gamma is negative and not significantly dependent on a +/-, but delta gamma is positive and dependent on a +/- for the disproportionation transition of poly rA.poly rU duplexes. Quantitative interpretations of these trends and magnitudes of delta gamma in terms of coulombic and excluded volume effects are obtained by fitting separately each of the two sets of thermodynamic data using Eq. 1 with delta gamma PB evaluated from the cylindrically symmetric Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) equation for a standard model of salt-polyelectrolyte solutions. The only structural parameters required by this model are: b, the mean axial distance between the projections of adjacent polyion charges onto the cylindrical axis; and a, the mean distance of closest approach between a salt ion center and the cylindrical axis. Fixing bMS and aMS for the multi-stranded (ordered) conformations, we

  7. The influence of isoleucine and arginine on biological activity and peptide-membrane interactions of antimicrobial peptides from the bactericidal domain of AvBD4.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wan-Ning; Jiao, Wen-Jing; Ma, Zhi; Dong, Na; Ma, Qing-Quan; Shao, Chang-Xuan; Shan, An-Shan

    2013-11-01

    In this study, the influence of isoleucine and arginine on the biological activity and peptide-membrane interactions of linear avian β-defensin-4 (RL38) analogs was investigated. Results of biological activities showed that the antimicrobial activities of AvBD-4 analogs were closely related to hydrophobicity and amphipathicity. The peptide GLI19 with high hydrophobicity value and amphipathicity displayed broad spectrum antimicrobial activity against both gram-negative and gram-positive, whereas GLR19 with increasing multiple charges only exhibited activity against gram-negative. The interaction between peptides and the liposome membrane demonstrated that the peptides preferentially bound to negatively charged phospholipids over zwitterionic phospholipids, which supported the antimicrobial activity data. The outer membranes assay further demonstrated that GLI19 had a greater capacity than the other tested peptides to penetrate the cell membrane at a low concentration. Collectively, the peptides derived from the bactericidal domain of linear β- defensins by truncation and hydrophobic amino acid substitution may be effective high-potential antibacterial agents. PMID:23746111

  8. Computational analysis of the tether pulling experiment to probe plasma membrane - cytoskeleton interaction in cells

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Kristopher R.; Popel, Aleksander S.; Anvari, Bahman; Brownell, William E.; Spector, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Tethers are thin membrane tubes that can be formed when relatively small and localized forces are applied to cellular membranes and lipid bilayers. Tether pulling experiments have been used to better understand the fine membrane properties. These include the interaction between the plasma membrane and the underlying cytoskeleton, which is an important factor affecting membrane mechanics. We use a computational method aimed at the interpretation and design of tether pulling experiments in cells with a strong membrane-cytoskeleton attachment. In our model, we take into account the detailed information on the topology of bonds connecting the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. We compute the force-dependent piecewise membrane deflection and bending as well as modes of stored energy in three major regions of the system: body of the tether, membrane-cytoskeleton attachment zone, and the transition zone between the two. We apply our method to three cells: cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs), human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells, and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. OHCs have a special system of pillars connecting the membrane and the cytoskeleton, and HEK and CHO cells have a bond arrangement via bonds (e.g., PIP2) which is common to many other cells. We also present a validation of our model by using experimental data on CHO and HEK cells. The proposed method can be an effective tool in the analyses of experiments to probe the properties of cellular membranes. PMID:19905340

  9. Kinetics of Endophilin N-BAR Domain Dimerization and Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Benjamin R.; Shi, Zheng; Wu, Tingting; Chen, Zhiming; Dunn, Joanna M.; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Baumgart, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    The recruitment to plasma membrane invaginations of the protein endophilin is a temporally regulated step in clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Endophilin is believed to sense or stabilize membrane curvature, which in turn likely depends on the dimeric structure of the protein. The dynamic nature of the membrane association and dimerization of endophilin is thus functionally important and is illuminated herein. Using subunit exchange Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we determine dimer dissociation kinetics and find a dimerization equilibrium constant orders of magnitude lower than previously published values. We characterize N-BAR domain membrane association kinetics under conditions where the dimeric species predominates, by stopped flow, observing prominent electrostatic sensitivity of membrane interaction kinetics. Relative to membrane binding, we find that protein monomer/dimer species equilibrate with far slower kinetics. Complementary optical microscopy studies reveal strikingly slow membrane dissociation and an increase of dissociation rate constant for a construct lacking the amphipathic segment helix 0 (H0). We attribute the slow dissociation kinetics to higher-order protein oligomerization on the membrane. We incorporate our findings into a kinetic scheme for endophilin N-BAR membrane binding and find a significant separation of time scales for endophilin membrane binding and subsequent oligomerization. This separation may facilitate the regulation of membrane trafficking phenomena. PMID:23482561

  10. The role of vehicle interactions on permeation of an active through model membranes and human skin.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, G; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2012-12-01

    Previous work from this group has focused on the molecular mechanism of alcohol interaction with model membranes, by conducting thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of alcohol uptake, membrane partitioning and transport studies of a model compound (i.e. methyl paraben) in silicone membranes. In this article, similar membrane transport and partitioning studies were conducted in silicone membranes to further extend the proposed model of alcohol interactions with silicone membranes to include other vehicles more commonly used in dermal formulations, that is, isopropyl myristate (IPM), dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), polyethylene glycol (PEG) 200, PEG 400 and Transcutol P® (TC). More importantly, membrane partitioning studies were conducted using human SC to evaluate the application of the proposed model of solvent-enhanced permeation in simple model membranes for the more complex biological tissue. The findings support a model of vehicle interactions with model membranes and skin where high solvent uptake promotes drug partitioning (i.e. K) by enabling the solute to exist within the solvent fraction/solvent-rich areas inside the membrane or skin in a concentration equivalent to that in the bulk solvent/vehicle. High solvent sorption may also ultimately impact on the membrane diffusional characteristics, and thus the diffusion coefficient of the solute across the membrane. The implications for skin transport are that increased partitioning of a drug into the SC may be achieved by (i) selecting vehicles that are highly taken up by the skin and also (ii) by having a relatively high concentration (i.e. molar fraction) of the drug in the vehicle. It follows that, in cases where significant co-transport of the solvent into and across the skin may occur, its depletion from the formulation and ultimately from the skin may lead to drug crystallization, thus affecting dermal absorption. PMID:22928552

  11. Radiation Interaction with Therapeutic Drugs and Cell Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Diana I.; Manaila, Elena N.; Matei, Constantin I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Moisescu, Mihaela I.; Savopol, Tudor D.; Kovacs, Eugenia A.; Cinca, Sabin A.; Margaritescu, Irina D.

    2007-04-23

    This transient permeabilized state of the cell membrane, named the 'cell electroporation' (CE) can be used to increase cells uptake of drugs that do not readily pass cell membrane, thus enabling their cytotoxicity. The anticancer drugs, such as bleomycin (BL) and cisplatin, are the most candidates for the combined use with ionizing and non-ionizing radiation fields. The methods and installations for the cell electroporation by electron beam (EB) and microwave (MW) irradiation are presented. The viability tests of the human leukocytes under EB and MW exposure with/without the BL in the cell cultures are discussed.

  12. The Role of Membrane-Mediated Interactions in the Assembly and Architecture of Chemoreceptor Lattices

    PubMed Central

    Haselwandter, Christoph A.; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2014-01-01

    In vivo fluorescence microscopy and electron cryo-tomography have revealed that chemoreceptors self-assemble into extended honeycomb lattices of chemoreceptor trimers with a well-defined relative orientation of trimers. The signaling response of the observed chemoreceptor lattices is remarkable for its extreme sensitivity, which relies crucially on cooperative interactions among chemoreceptor trimers. In common with other membrane proteins, chemoreceptor trimers are expected to deform the surrounding lipid bilayer, inducing membrane-mediated anisotropic interactions between neighboring trimers. Here we introduce a biophysical model of bilayer-chemoreceptor interactions, which allows us to quantify the role of membrane-mediated interactions in the assembly and architecture of chemoreceptor lattices. We find that, even in the absence of direct protein-protein interactions, membrane-mediated interactions can yield assembly of chemoreceptor lattices at very dilute trimer concentrations. The model correctly predicts the observed honeycomb architecture of chemoreceptor lattices as well as the observed relative orientation of chemoreceptor trimers, suggests a series of “gateway” states for chemoreceptor lattice assembly, and provides a simple mechanism for the localization of large chemoreceptor lattices to the cell poles. Our model of bilayer-chemoreceptor interactions also helps to explain the observed dependence of chemotactic signaling on lipid bilayer properties. Finally, we consider the possibility that membrane-mediated interactions might contribute to cooperativity among neighboring chemoreceptor trimers. PMID:25503274

  13. Studies on the interactions of bisphenols with anionic phospholipids of decomposer membranes in model systems.

    PubMed

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Sobolewska, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) and other bisphenols constitute a class of organic pollutants, which because of their estrogenic properties, low dose activity and bioaccumulation pose considerable risk for public health as well as for the environment. Accumulated in the sediment bisphenols can endanger the decomposers' populations being incorporated into their cellular membranes; however, the mechanism of their membrane activity is unknown. Therefore, to study these phenomena we applied anionic phospholipid Langmuir monolayers as simple but versatile models of decomposers biomembranes. Phosphatidylglycerols and cardiolipins are not only the main components of bacterial membranes but also of crucial importance in mitochondrial and thylakoid membranes in eukaryotic cells. In our investigations we applied five compounds of the bisphenol class most commonly detected in the environment. To characterize the bisphenols-model membrane interactions we applied multiple mutually independent methods of physical chemistry; namely: the Langmuir monolayer technique, surface potential measurements, Brewster angle microscopy for the visualization of the monolayers' texture and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction for the discussion of the phospholipids packing within the monolayers. Our studies indicated that all the investigated bisphenols interact with the model membrane, but the strength of the interactions is dependent on the bisphenol structure and hydrophobicity and the fluidity of the model membranes. We proved that bisphenol S often treated as the least toxic BPA analog can also be incorporated to the model membranes changing their structure and fluidity. PMID:26806160

  14. Interaction of the NMDA receptor noncompetitive antagonist MK-801 with model and native membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Moring, J; Niego, L A; Ganley, L M; Trumbore, M W; Herbette, L G

    1994-01-01

    MK-801, a noncompetitive antagonist of the NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor, has protective effects against excitotoxicity and ethanol withdrawal seizures. We have determined membrane/buffer partition coefficients (Kp[mem]) of MK-801 and its rates of association with and dissociation from membranes. Kp[mem] (+/- SD) = 1137 (+/- 320) in DOPC membranes and 485 (+/- 99) in synaptoneurosomal (SNM) lipid membranes from rat cerebral cortex (unilamellar vesicles). In multilamellar vesicles, Kp[mem] was higher: 3374 (+/- 253) in DOPC and 6879 (+/- 947) in SNM. In cholesterol/DOPC membranes, Kp[mem] decreased as the cholesterol content increased. MK-801 associated with and dissociated from membranes rapidly. Addition of ethanol to SNM did not affect Kp[mem]. MK-801 decreased the cooperative unit size of DMPC membranes. The decrease was smaller than that caused by 1,4-dihydropyridine drugs, indicating a weaker interaction with the hydrocarbon core. Small angle x-ray diffraction, with multilayer autocorrelation difference function modeling, indicated that MK-801 in a cholesterol/DOPC membrane (mole ratio = 0.6) causes a perturbation at approximately 16.0 A from the bilayer center. In bilayers of cholesterol/DOPC = 0.15 (mole ratio) or pure DOPC, the perturbation caused by MK-801 was more complex. The physical chemical interactions of MK-801 with membranes in vitro are consistent with a fast onset and short duration of action in vivo. PMID:7696477

  15. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, André M; Figueiredo, Duarte D; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B F; Quail, Peter H; Margarida Oliveira, M; Saibo, Nelson J M

    2016-02-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a yeast one-hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a phytochrome interacting factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  16. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIF14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of Phytochrome B

    PubMed Central

    Cordeiro, André M.; Figueiredo, Duarte D.; Tepperman, James; Borba, Ana Rita; Lourenço, Tiago; Abreu, Isabel A.; Ouwerkerk, Pieter B.F.; Quail, Peter H.; Oliveira, M. Margarida; Saibo, Nelson J. M.

    2016-01-01

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bind to hexameric E-box (CANNTG) or N-box (CACG(A/C)G) motifs, depending on transcriptional activity. We have shown that OsPIF14 binds to the OsDREB1B promoter through two N-boxes and that the flanking regions of the hexameric core are essential for protein-DNA interaction and stability. We also showed that OsPIF14 down-regulates OsDREB1B gene expression in rice protoplasts, corroborating the OsPIF14 repressor activity observed in the transactivation assays using Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, we showed that OsPIF14 is indeed a Phytochrome Interacting Factor, which preferentially binds to the active form (Pfr) of rice phytochrome B. This raises the possibility that OsPIF14 activity might be modulated by light. However, we did not observe any regulation of the OsDREB1B gene expression by light under control conditions. Moreover, OsPIF14 gene expression was shown to be modulated by different treatments, such as drought, salt, cold and ABA. Interestingly, OsPIF14 showed also a specific cold-induced alternative splicing. All together, these results suggest the possibility that OsPIF14 is involved in cross-talk between light and stress signaling through interaction with the OsDREB1B promoter. Although in the absence of stress, OsDREB1B gene expression was not regulated by light, given previous reports, it remains possible that OsPIF14 has a role in light modulation of stress responses. PMID:26732823

  17. Detergent interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes for protein reconstitution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broccio, Matteo; Zan Goh, Haw; Loesche, Mathias

    2009-03-01

    Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs) are self-assembled biomimetic structures in which the membrane is separated from a solid substrate by a nm-thick hydrated submembrane space. These model systems are being used in binding studies of peripheral proteins and exotoxins. Here we aim at their application for the reconstitution of water-insoluble integral membrane proteins. As an alternative to fusion of preformed proteoliposomes we study the direct reconstitution of such proteins for applications in biosensing and pharmaceutical screening. For reconstitution, highly insulating tBLMs (R˜10^5-10^6 φ) were temporarily incubated with a detergent to screen for conditions that keep the detergent-saturated membranestable and ready to incorporate detergent-solubilized proteins. We assess the electrical characteristics, i.e. specific resistance and capacitance, by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) under timed incubation with decylmaltoside and dodecylmaltoside detergents in a regime around their critical micelle concentration, 1.8 mM and 0.17 mM respectively and demonstrate the restoration of the tBLM upon detergent removal. Thereby a range of concentration and incubation times was identified, that represents optimal conditions for the subsequent membrane protein reconstitution.

  18. Interaction of Lamb modes with two-level systems in amorphous nanoscopic membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, T.; Anghel, D. V.; Galperin, Y. M.; Manninen, M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. Jyvaskyla; National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering; Bogolivbov Lab. Theoretical Physics; Univ. Oslo; Russian Academy of Sciences

    2007-01-01

    Using a generalized model of interaction between a two-level system (TLS) and an arbitrary deformation of the material, we calculate the interaction of Lamb modes with TLSs in amorphous nanoscopic membranes. We compare the mean free paths of the Lamb modes of different symmetries and calculate the heat conductivity {kappa}. In the limit of an infinitely wide membrane, the heat conductivity is divergent. Nevertheless, the finite size of the membrane imposes a lower cutoff for the phonon frequencies, which leads to the temperature dependence {kappa}{alpha}T(a+b ln T). This temperature dependence is a hallmark of the TLS-limited heat conductance at low temperature.

  19. Deconstructing the DGAT1 Enzyme: Membrane Interactions at Substrate Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Jose L. S.; Beltramini, Leila M.; Wallace, Bonnie A.; Araujo, Ana P. U.

    2015-01-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is a key enzyme in the triacylglyceride synthesis pathway. Bovine DGAT1 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane-bound protein associated with the regulation of fat content in milk and meat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the interaction of DGAT1 peptides corresponding to putative substrate binding sites with different types of model membranes. Whilst these peptides are predicted to be located in an extramembranous loop of the membrane-bound protein, their hydrophobic substrates are membrane-bound molecules. In this study, peptides corresponding to the binding sites of the two substrates involved in the reaction were examined in the presence of model membranes in order to probe potential interactions between them that might influence the subsequent binding of the substrates. Whilst the conformation of one of the peptides changed upon binding several types of micelles regardless of their surface charge, suggesting binding to hydrophobic domains, the other peptide bound strongly to negatively-charged model membranes. This binding was accompanied by a change in conformation, and produced leakage of the liposome-entrapped dye calcein. The different hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions observed suggest the peptides may be involved in the interactions of the enzyme with membrane surfaces, facilitating access of the catalytic histidine to the triacylglycerol substrates. PMID:25719207

  20. Measuring selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM)-membrane interactions with second harmonic generation.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Grace Y; Conboy, John C

    2014-01-29

    The interaction of selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) with lipid membranes has been measured at clinically relevant serum concentrations using the label-free technique of second harmonic generation (SHG). The SERMs investigated in this study include raloxifene, tamoxifen, and the tamoxifen metabolites 4-hydroxytamoxifen, N-desmethyltamoxifen, and endoxifen. Equilibrium association constants (Ka) were measured for SERMs using varying lipid compositions to examine how lipid phase, packing density, and cholesterol content impact SERM-membrane interactions. Membrane-binding properties of tamoxifen and its metabolites were compared on the basis of hydroxyl group substitution and amine ionization to elucidate how the degree of drug ionization impacts membrane partitioning. SERM-membrane interactions were probed under multiple pH conditions, and drug adsorption was observed to vary with the concentration of soluble neutral species. The agreement between Ka values derived from SHG measurements of the interactions between SERMs and artificial cell membranes and independent observations of the SERMs efficacy from clinical studies suggests that quantifying membrane adsorption properties may be important for understanding SERM action in vivo. PMID:24410282

  1. Electrostatic interaction effects on tension-induced pore formation in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Levadnyy, Victor; Tsuboi, Taka-aki; Belaya, Marina; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the effects of electrostatic interactions on the rate constant (kp) for tension-induced pore formation in lipid membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles under constant applied tension. A decrease in salt concentration in solution as well as an increase in surface charge density of the membranes increased kp. These data indicate that kp increases as the extent of electrostatic interaction increases. We developed a theory on the effect of the electrostatic interactions on the free energy profile of the membrane containing a prepore and also on the values of kp; this theory explains the experimental results and fits the experimental data reasonably well in the presence of weak electrostatic interactions. Based on these results, we conclude that a decrease in the free energy barrier of the prepore state due to electrostatic interactions is the main factor causing an increase in kp.

  2. Polar interactions trump hydrophobicity in stabilizing the self-inserting membrane protein Mistic.

    PubMed

    Broecker, Jana; Fiedler, Sebastian; Gimpl, Katharina; Keller, Sandro

    2014-10-01

    Canonical integral membrane proteins are attached to lipid bilayers through hydrophobic transmembrane helices, whose topogenesis requires sophisticated insertion machineries. By contrast, membrane proteins that, for evolutionary or functional reasons, cannot rely on these machineries need to resort to driving forces other than hydrophobicity. A striking example is the self-inserting Bacillus subtilis protein Mistic, which is involved in biofilm formation and has found application as a fusion tag supporting the recombinant production and bilayer insertion of other membrane proteins. Although this unusual protein contains numerous polar and charged residues and lacks characteristic membrane-interaction motifs, it is tightly bound to membranes in vivo and membrane-mimetic systems in vitro. Therefore, we set out to quantify the contributions from polar and nonpolar interactions to the coupled folding and insertion of Mistic. To this end, we defined conditions under which the protein can be unfolded completely and reversibly from various detergent micelles by urea in a two-state equilibrium and where the unfolded state is independent of the detergent used for solubilizing the folded state. This enabled equilibrium unfolding experiments previously used for soluble and β-barrel membrane proteins, revealing that polar interactions with ionic and zwitterionic headgroups and, presumably, the interfacial dipole potential stabilize the protein much more efficiently than nonpolar interactions with the micelle core. These findings unveil the forces that allow a protein to tightly interact with a membrane-mimetic environment without major hydrophobic contributions and rationalize the differential suitability of detergents for the extraction and solubilization of Mistic-tagged membrane proteins. PMID:25177765

  3. Controlled CO preferential oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark A.; Hoch, Martin M.

    1997-01-01

    Method for controlling the supply of air to a PROX reactor for the preferential oxidation in the presence of hydrogen wherein the concentration of the hydrogen entering and exiting the PROX reactor is monitored, the difference therebetween correlated to the amount of air needed to minimize such difference, and based thereon the air supply to the PROX reactor adjusted to provide such amount and minimize such difference.

  4. Uncovering homo-and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane using single particle tracking approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.

    2016-03-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is responsible for a myriad of functions that regulate cell physiology and plays a crucial role in a multitude of processes that include adhesion, migration, signaling recognition and cell-cell communication. This is accomplished by specific interactions between different membrane components such as lipids and proteins on the lipid bilayer but also through interactions with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton on the intracellular side and the glycocalyx matrix in close proximity to the extracellular side. Advanced biophysical techniques, including single particle tracking (SPT) have revealed that the lateral diffusion of molecular components on the plasma membrane represents a landmark manifestation of such interactions. Indeed, by studying changes in the diffusivity of individual membrane molecules, including sub-diffusion, confined diffusion and/or transient arrest of molecules in membrane compartments, it has been possible to gain insight on the nature of molecular interactions and to infer on its functional role for cell response. In this review, we will revise some exciting results where SPT has been crucial to reveal homo- and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane.

  5. Polymeric blend nanocomposite membranes for ethanol dehydration-effect of morphology and membrane-solvent interactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanocomposite membranes (NCMs) of sodium alginate/poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) blend polymers incorporated with varying concentrations of phosphotungstic acid (H3PW12O40) (PWA) nanoparticles have been prepared and used in ethanol dehydration by the pervaporation (PV) technique. Effe...

  6. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  7. Assessing the effect of surface modification of polyamide RO membrane by l-DOPA on the short range physiochemical interactions with biopolymer fouling on the membrane.

    PubMed

    Azari, Sara; Zou, Linda; Cornelissen, Emile

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical predictions of interaction energies for membrane-biopolymer foulant pairs were used to compare the fouling tendencies of a virgin commercial polyamide reverse osmosis (RO) membrane with a amino acid 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-l-alanine (l-DOPA) coated RO membrane. Lifshitz-van der Waals (LW) and Lewis acid-base (AB) surface tension components of the membranes were determined based on contact angle results using the van Oss approach. From these values, the LW and AB components of the free energy of adhesion between membrane and foulants were calculated. Electrostatic (EL) double layer interaction energies between the membrane and foulants were also estimated using the measured surface charge data of the membranes and fouling agents. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and alginic acid sodium salt (alginate) were used as model biopolymers causing membrane fouling. Based on the calculated adhesion free energies, acid-base interactions were found to have the strongest impact on the adhesion of both BSA and alginate to the either membranes surfaces. It was found that l-DOPA modification has significantly lowered acid-base interaction affinity toward the adhesion of both foulants studied. On the basis of calculated free energies of adhesion, lower fouling tendency of the l-DOPA modified membrane was expected. The accelerated fouling tests indicated a lower flux decline rate for the modified membrane and confirmed the results obtained from theory. PMID:24916284

  8. Liquid crystals and their interactions with colloidal particles and phospholipid membranes: Molecular simulation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Evelina B.

    Experimentally, liquid crystals (LC) can be used as the basis for optical biomolecular sensors that rely on LC ordering. Recently, the use of LC as a reporting medium has been extended to investigations of molecular scale processes at lipid laden aqueous-LC interfaces and at biological cell membranes. In this thesis, we present two related studies where liquid crystals are modelled at different length scales. We examine (a) the behavior of nanoscopic colloidal particles in LC systems, using Monte Carlo (MC) molecular simulations and a mesoscopic dynamic field theory (DyFT); and (b) specific interactions of two types of mesogens with a model phospholipid bilayer, using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) at the A-nm scale. In (a), we consider colloidal particles suspended in a LC, confined between two walls. We calculate the colloid-substrate and colloid-colloid potentials of mean force (PMF). For the MC simulations, we developed a new technique (ExEDOS or Expanded Ensemble Density Of States) that ensures good sampling of phase space without prior knowledge of the energy landscape of the system. Both results, simulation and DyFT, indicate a repulsive force acting between a colloid and a wall. In contrast, both techniques indicate an overall colloid-colloid attraction and predict a new topology of the disclination lines that arises when the particles approach each other. In (b), we find that mesogens (pentylcyanobiphenyl [5CB] or difluorophenyl-pentylbicyclohexyl [5CF]) preferentially partition from the aqueous phase into a dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer. We find highly favorable free energy differences for partitioning (-18kBT for 5CB, -26k BT for 5CF). We also simulated fully hydrated bilayers with embedded 5CB or 5CF at concentrations used in recent experiments (6 mol% and 20 mol%). The presence of mesogens in the bilayer enhances the order of lipid acyl tails and changes the spatial and orientational arrangement of lipid headgroup atoms. A stronger

  9. Lipid Interaction Networks of Peripheral Membrane Proteins Revealed by Data-Driven Micelle Docking

    PubMed Central

    Dancea, Felician; Kami, Keiichiro; Overduin, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Many signaling and trafficking proteins contain modular domains that bind reversibly to cellular membranes. The structural basis of the intermolecular interactions which mediate these membrane-targeting events remains elusive since protein-membrane complexes are not directly accessible to standard structural biology techniques. Here we report a fast protein-micelle docking methodology that yields three-dimensional model structures of proteins inserted into micelles, revealing energetically favorable orientations, convergent insertion angles, and an array of protein-lipid interactions at atomic resolution. The method is applied to two peripheral membrane proteins, the early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1) FYVE (a zinc finger domain found in the proteins Fab1, YOTB/ZK632.12, Vac1, and EEA1) and Vam7p phagocyte oxidase homology domains, which are revealed to form extensive networks of interactions with multiple phospholipid headgroups and acyl chains. The resulting structural models explain extensive published mutagenesis data and reveal novel binding determinants. The docking restraints used here were based on NMR data, but can be derived from any technique that detects insertion of protein residues into a membrane, and can be applied to virtually any peripheral membrane protein or membrane-like structure. PMID:17890395

  10. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amyloid β-Peptide (1-42): Tetramer Formation and Membrane Interactions.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anne M; Bevan, David R

    2016-09-01

    The aggregation cascade and peptide-membrane interactions of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) have been implicated as toxic events in the development and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ42 forms oligomers and ultimately plaques, and it has been hypothesized that these oligomeric species are the main toxic species contributing to neuronal cell death. To better understand oligomerization events and subsequent oligomer-membrane interactions of Aβ42, we performed atomistic molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize both interpeptide interactions and perturbation of model membranes by the peptides. MD simulations were utilized to first show the formation of a tetramer unit by four separate Aβ42 peptides. Aβ42 tetramers adopted an oblate ellipsoid shape and showed a significant increase in β-strand formation in the final tetramer unit relative to the monomers, indicative of on-pathway events for fibril formation. The Aβ42 tetramer unit that formed in the initial simulations was used in subsequent MD simulations in the presence of a pure POPC or cholesterol-rich raft model membrane. Tetramer-membrane simulations resulted in elongation of the tetramer in the presence of both model membranes, with tetramer-raft interactions giving rise to the rearrangement of key hydrophobic regions in the tetramer and the formation of a more rod-like structure indicative of a fibril-seeding aggregate. Membrane perturbation by the tetramer was manifested in the form of more ordered, rigid membranes, with the pure POPC being affected to a greater extent than the raft membrane. These results provide critical atomistic insight into the aggregation pathway of Aβ42 and a putative toxic mechanism in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27602722

  11. Interaction of Spin-Labeled Lipid Membranes with Transition Metal Ions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The large values of spin relaxation enhancement (RE) for PC spin-labels in the phospholipid membrane induced by paramagnetic metal salts dissolved in the aqueous phase can be explained by Heisenberg spin exchange due to conformational fluctuations of the nitroxide group as a result of membrane fluidity, flexibility of lipid chains, and, possibly, amphiphilic nature of the nitroxide label. Whether the magnetic interaction occurs predominantly via Heisenberg spin exchange (Ni) or by the dipole–dipole (Gd) mechanism, it is essential for the paramagnetic ion to get into close proximity to the nitroxide moiety for efficient RE. For different salts of Ni the RE in phosphatidylcholine membranes follows the anionic Hofmeister series and reflects anion adsorption followed by anion-driven attraction of paramagnetic cations on the choline groups. This adsorption is higher for chaotropic ions, e.g., perchlorate. (A chaotropic agent is a molecule in water solution that can disrupt the hydrogen bonding network between water molecules.) However, there is no anionic dependence of RE for model membranes made from negatively charged lipids devoid of choline groups. We used Ni-induced RE to study the thermodynamics and electrostatics of ion/membrane interactions. We also studied the effect of membrane composition and the phase state on the RE values. In membranes with cholesterol a significant difference is observed between PC labels with nitroxide tethers long enough vs not long enough to reach deep into the membrane hydrophobic core behind the area of fused cholesterol rings. This study indicates one must be cautious in interpreting data obtained by PC labels in fluid membranes in terms of probing membrane properties at different immersion depths when it can be affected by paramagnetic species at the membrane surface. PMID:26490692

  12. Colloidal interactions and fouling of NF and RO membranes: a review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chuyang Y; Chong, T H; Fane, Anthony G

    2011-05-11

    Colloids are fine particles whose characteristic size falls within the rough size range of 1-1000 nm. In pressure-driven membrane systems, these fine particles have a strong tendency to foul the membranes, causing a significant loss in water permeability and often a deteriorated product water quality. There have been a large number of systematic studies on colloidal fouling of reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membranes in the last three decades, and the understanding of colloidal fouling has been significantly advanced. The current paper reviews the mechanisms and factors controlling colloidal fouling of both RO and NF membranes. Major colloidal foulants (including both rigid inorganic colloids and organic macromolecules) and their properties are summarized. The deposition of such colloidal particles on an RO or NF membrane forms a cake layer, which can adversely affect the membrane flux due to 1) the cake layer hydraulic resistance and/or 2) the cake-enhanced osmotic pressure. The effects of feedwater compositions, membrane properties, and hydrodynamic conditions are discussed in detail for inorganic colloids, natural organic matter, polysaccharides, and proteins. In general, these effects can be readily explained by considering the mass transfer near the membrane surface and the colloid-membrane (or colloid-colloid) interaction. The critical flux and limiting flux concepts, originally developed for colloidal fouling of porous membranes, are also applicable to RO and NF membranes. For small colloids (diameter≪100 nm), the limiting flux can result from two different mechanisms: 1) the diffusion-solubility (gel formation) controlled mechanism and 2) the surface interaction controlled mechanism. The former mechanism probably dominates for concentrated solutions, while the latter mechanism may be more important for dilute solutions. Future research needs on RO and NF colloidal fouling are also identified in the current paper. PMID:21094487

  13. Atomic Force Microscopy: A Multifaceted Tool to Study Membrane Proteins and Their Interactions with Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Whited, Allison M.; Park, Paul S.-H.

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins are embedded in lipid bilayers and facilitate the communication between the external environment and the interior of the cell. This communication is often mediated by the binding of ligands to the membrane protein. Understanding the nature of the interaction between a ligand and membrane protein is required to both understand the mechanism of action of these proteins and for the development of novel pharmacological drugs. The highly hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins and the requirement of a lipid bilayer for native function have hampered the structural and molecular characterization of these proteins under physiologically relevant conditions. Atomic force microscopy offers a solution to studying membrane proteins and their interactions with ligands under physiologically relevant conditions and can provide novel insights about the nature of these critical molecular interactions that facilitate cellular communication. In this review, we provide an overview of the atomic force microscopy technique and discuss its application in the study of a variety of questions related to the interaction between a membrane protein and a ligand. PMID:23603221

  14. Lipid Interactions and Organization in Complex Bilayer Membranes.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Oskar; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Hautala, Victor; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Murata, Michio; Slotte, J Peter

    2016-04-12

    Bilayer lipids influence the lateral structure of the membranes, but the relationship between lipid properties and the lateral structure formed is not always understood. Model membrane studies on bilayers containing cholesterol and various phospholipids (PLs) suggest that high and low temperature melting PLs may segregate, especially in the presence of cholesterol. The effect of different PL headgroups on lateral structure of bilayers is also not clear. Here, we have examined the formation of lateral heterogeneity in increasingly complex (up to five-component) multilamellar bilayers. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy with domain-selective fluorescent probes (PL-conjugated trans-parinaric acid), and (2)H NMR spectroscopy with site or perdeuterated PLs. We have measured changes in bilayer order using such domain-selective probes both as a function of temperature and composition. Our results from time-resolved fluorescence and (2)H NMR showed that in ternary bilayers, acyl chain order and thermostability in sphingomyelin-rich domains were not affected to any greater extent by the headgroup structure of the monounsaturated PLs (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, or phosphatidylserine) in the bilayer. In the complex five-component bilayers, we could not detect major differences between the different monounsaturated PLs regarding cholesterol-induced ordering. However, cholesterol clearly influenced deuterated N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin differently than the other deuterated PLs, suggesting that cholesterol favored N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin over the other PLs. Taken together, both the fluorescence spectroscopy and (2)H NMR data suggest that the complex five-component membranes displayed lateral heterogeneity, at least in the lower temperature regimen examined. PMID:27074681

  15. Visualization of electron transfer interactions of membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawato, Suguru

    1991-08-01

    To visualize electron transfer interactions of proteins in the cellular nieinbrane, we have developed a polarized laser flash-induced anisotropy decay imaging. The time-resolved anisotropy is particularly sensitive to protein-protein interactions. This technique has been successfully applied to examine formation and dissociation of electron transfer complex in adrenal cortex and liver. Electron transfer plays a significant role for steroid hormone synthesis from cholesterol in adrenalcortex and for drug metabolism in liver such as detoxification of chemical compounds. Several redox partners perticipate in dynamic electron transfer interactions. The terminal enzyme cytochrome P-450 receives electrons to activate molecular oxygen, resulting in hydroxylation of various substrates.

  16. Mapping membrane protein interactions in cell signaling systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Light, Yooli Kim; Hadi, Masood Z.; Lane, Pamela; Jacobsen, Richard B.; Hong, Joohee; Ayson, Marites J.; Wood, Nichole L.; Schoeniger, Joseph S.; Young, Malin M.

    2003-12-01

    We proposed to apply a chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and modeling method called MS3D to the structure determination of the rhodopsin-transducin membrane protein complex (RTC). Herein we describe experimental progress made to adapt the MS3D approach for characterizing membrane protein systems, and computational progress in experimental design, data analysis and protein structure modeling. Over the past three years, we have developed tailored experimental methods for all steps in the MS3D method for rhodopsin, including protein purification, a functional assay, cross-linking, proteolysis and mass spectrometry. In support of the experimental effort. we have out a data analysis pipeline in place that automatically selects the monoisotopic peaks in a mass spectrometric spectrum, assigns them and stores the results in a database. Theoretical calculations using 24 experimentally-derived distance constraints have resulted in a backbone-level model of the activated form of rhodopsin, which is a critical first step towards building a model of the RTC. Cross-linked rhodopsin-transducin complexes have been isolated via gel electrophoresis and further mass spectrometric characterization of the cross-links is underway.

  17. Interactions between earthworm hemolysins and sheep red blood cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Roch, P; Canicatti, C; Valembois, P

    1989-08-01

    The hemolytic activity exhibited by the coelomic fluid of the Annelid Eisenia fetida andrei is mediated by two lipoproteins of mass 40 and 45 kDa, each of them capable of hemolysis. Such an activity is not inhibited by zymosan, inulin or lipopolysaccharide (LPS), nor by hydrazine or methylamine, suggesting that earthworm hemolysins are not related to C3 or C3b complement components. Among the membrane lipids tested (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, sphingomyelin and cholesterol) only sphingomyelin inhibited hemolysis. The analysis of E.f. andrei proteins bound to sphingomyelin microvesicles, as well as to sheep red blood cell (SRBC) membranes, revealed a polymerization of E.f. andrei 40 kDa and/or 45 kDa hemolysins. Consequently, sphingomyelin appears a likely candidate for hemolytic complex receptor. Electron microscopy observations suggested that the polymerization causes an open channel through the lipid bilayer. As demonstrated using metal ions, heparin, chondroitin sulfate, poly(L-lysine) and protamine chloride, the mode of action of earthworm hemolytic complex is not analogous to that of C9 or perforine. PMID:2758056

  18. Membrane-membrane interactions in a lipid-containing bacteriophage system. Progress report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Snipes, W

    1981-05-01

    Virus-cell interactions and the mechanism of viral entry have been the major focal points of this research. A method of analysis was perfected to investigate the entry process for herpes simplex virus. This technique makes use of a photosensitizing dye, FITC, that covalently binds to viral envelope proteins. Treated virions remain photosensitive until the envelope is shed during the process of infection. Our data strongly support an entry mechanism in which the viral envelope fuses with the cell plasma membrane. Other related projects have involved studies of the virucidal properties of retinoids, plaque development characteristics for viruses surviving treatment with membrane perturbers, and a large plaque effect that occurs when virus are plated on cells pretreated with uv light. In addition, we have characterized a new bacteriophage, investigated the interactions of divalent cations and proteins with phospholipid vesicles, extended our studies of the effects of hydrophobic photosensitizers on cell membranes, and used the spin-trapping technique to elucidate the reaction mechanism for an enzyme-like activity in soil extracts.

  19. Structure-dependent interactions of polyphenols with a biomimetic membrane system.

    PubMed

    Phan, Huong T T; Yoda, Tsuyoshi; Chahal, Bindu; Morita, Masamune; Takagi, Masahiro; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji C

    2014-10-01

    Polyphenols are naturally-occurring compounds, reported to be biologically active, and through their interactions with cell membranes. Although association of the polyphenols with the bilayer has been reported, the detailed mechanism of interaction is not yet well elucidated. We report on spatio-temporal real-time membrane dynamics observed in the presence of polyphenols. Two distinct membrane dynamics, corresponding to the two classes of polyphenols used, were observed. Flavonoids (epi-gallocatechin-3-gallate, gallocatechin, theaflavin and theaflavin-3-gallate) caused lipid membrane aggregation and rigidification. As simple structural modification through opening of the aromatic C-ring into an olefin bond, present in trans-stilbenes (resveratrol and picead), completely changed the membrane properties, increasing fluidity and inducing fluctuation. There were differences in the membrane transformations within the same class of polyphenols. Structure-dependent classification of membrane dynamics may contribute to a better understanding of the physicochemical mechanism involved in the bioactivity of polyphenols. In general, an increase in the number of hydrophilic side chains (galloyl, hydroxyl, glucoside, gallate) increased the reactivity of the polyphenols. Most notable was the difference observed through a simple addition of the gallate group. Unraveling the importance of these polyphenols, at a functional group level further opens the key to tailored design of bioactive compounds as potential drug candidates. PMID:25016053

  20. Protein–protein interactions and the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kleanthous, Colin; Rassam, Patrice; Baumann, Christoph G

    2015-01-01

    It has until recently been unclear whether outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria are organized or distributed randomly. Studies now suggest promiscuous protein–protein interactions (PPIs) between β-barrel OMPs in Escherichia coli govern their local and global dynamics, engender spatiotemporal patterning of the outer membrane into micro-domains and are the basis of β-barrel protein turnover. We contextualize these latest advances, speculate on areas of bacterial cell biology that might be influenced by the organization of OMPs into supramolecular assemblies, and highlight the new questions and controversies this revised view of the bacterial outer membrane raises. PMID:26629934

  1. Wrapping of nanoparticles by the cell membrane: the role of interactions between the nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huayuan; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Hongwu; Zheng, Yonggang

    2015-11-28

    A fundamental understanding of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the cell membrane is essential to improve the performance of the NP-based biomedical applications and assess the potential toxicity of NPs. Despite the great progress in understanding the interaction between individual NP and the membrane, little is known about the interaction between multiple NPs and the membrane. In this work, we investigate the wrapping of two parallel elongated NPs by the membrane, taking the NP-NP electrostatic interaction and van der Waals (vdW) interaction into consideration. Three types of NPs, namely the rigid NPs with circular and elliptic cross-sections and the deformable NPs, are systematically investigated. The results show that the electrostatic interaction would enhance the tendency of the independent wrapping and inhibit the rotation of the elongated and equally charged NPs with elliptic cross-sections. Under the vdW interaction, the competition of the NP-NP adhesion and the membrane elastic energies with the NP-membrane adhesion energy leads the NPs to be wrapped cooperatively or independently. For the system with elongated NPs with elliptic cross-sections, the NPs are more likely to be wrapped independently as the shapes become more anisotropic and the NPs would rotate to contact each other with the flat sides in the cooperative wrapping configuration. Moreover, the soft NPs are more likely to be wrapped cooperatively compared with the stiff NPs. These results may provide guidelines to control the internalization pathway of NPs and improve the efficiency of NP-based drug delivery systems. PMID:26381589

  2. Interaction of MDM33 with mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis pathways in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Klecker, Till; Wemmer, Megan; Haag, Mathias; Weig, Alfons; Böckler, Stefan; Langer, Thomas; Nunnari, Jodi; Westermann, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Membrane homeostasis affects mitochondrial dynamics, morphology, and function. Here we report genetic and proteomic data that reveal multiple interactions of Mdm33, a protein essential for normal mitochondrial structure, with components of phospholipid metabolism and mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. We screened for suppressors of MDM33 overexpression-induced growth arrest and isolated binding partners by immunoprecipitation of cross-linked cell extracts. These approaches revealed genetic and proteomic interactions of Mdm33 with prohibitins, Phb1 and Phb2, which are key components of mitochondrial inner membrane homeostasis. Lipid profiling by mass spectrometry of mitochondria isolated from Mdm33-overexpressing cells revealed that high levels of Mdm33 affect the levels of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin, the two key inner membrane phospholipids. Furthermore, we show that cells lacking Mdm33 show strongly decreased mitochondrial fission activity indicating that Mdm33 is critical for mitochondrial membrane dynamics. Our data suggest that MDM33 functionally interacts with components important for inner membrane homeostasis and thereby supports mitochondrial division. PMID:26669658

  3. Molecular determinants of α–synuclein mutants’ oligomerization and membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tsigelny, Igor F.; Sharikov, Yuriy; Kouznetsova, Valentina L.; Greenberg, Jerry P.; Wrasidlo, Wolf; Overk, Cassia; Gonzalez, Tania; Trejo, Margarita; Spencer, Brian; Kosberg, Kori; Masliah, Eliezer

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with the formation of toxic α-synuclein oligomers and their penetration the cell membrane. Familial forms of PD are caused by the point mutations A53T, A30P, E46K, and H50Q. Artificial point mutations E35K and E57K also increase oligomerization and pore formation. We generated structural conformations of α-synuclein and the abovementioned mutants using molecular dynamics. We elucidated four main regions in these conformers contacting the membrane and found that the region including residues 37–45 (Zone2) may have maximum membrane penetration. E57K mutant had the highest rate of interaction with the membrane by Zone2, followed by A53T, E46K, E35K mutants, and wt α-synuclein. The mutant A30P had the smallest percentage of conformers that contact the membrane than all other mutants and wt α-synuclein. These results were confirmed by experiments. We identified the key amino acids that can interact with the membrane (Y38, E62, and N65 (1st hydrophilic layer); E104, E105, and D115 (2nd hydrophilic layer), and V15 and V26 (central hydrophobic layer)) and the residues that are involved in the interprotein contacts (L38, V48, V49, Q62, and T64). Understanding the molecular interactions of α-synuclein mutants is important for the design of compounds blocking the formation of toxic oligomers. PMID:25561023

  4. Biochemical Characterization of Rous Sarcoma Virus MA Protein Interaction with Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Amanda K.; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.

    2005-01-01

    The MA domain of retroviral Gag proteins mediates association with the host cell membrane during assembly. The biochemical nature of this interaction is not well understood. We have used an in vitro flotation assay to directly measure Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) MA-membrane interaction in the absence of host cell factors. The association of purified MA and MA-containing proteins with liposomes of defined composition was electrostatic in nature and depended upon the presence of a biologically relevant concentration of negatively charged lipids. A mutant MA protein known to be unable to promote Gag membrane association and budding in vivo failed to bind to liposomes. These results were supported by computational modeling. The intrinsic affinity of RSV MA for negatively charged membranes appears insufficient to promote efficient plasma membrane binding during assembly. However, an artificially dimerized form of MA bound to liposomes by at least an order of magnitude more tightly than monomeric MA. This result suggests that the clustering of MA domains, via Gag-Gag interactions during virus assembly, drives membrane association in vivo. PMID:15858007

  5. Tamoxifen-model membrane interactions: an FT-IR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyar, Handan; Severcan, Feride

    1997-06-01

    The temperature- and concentration-induced effects of tamoxifen (TAM) on dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) model membranes were investigated by the Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic technique. An investigation of the C-H stretching region and the CO mode reveals that the inclusion of TAM changes the physical properties of the DPPC multibilayers by (i) shifting the main phase transition to lower temperatures; (ii) broadening the transition profile slightly; (iii) disordering the system in the gel and in the liquid crystalline phases; (iv) increasing the dynamics in the gel phase and decreasing the dynamics of the acyl chains in the liquid crystalline phase; (v) increasing the mobility of the terminal methyl group region of the bilayer in the gel phase and decreasing it in the liquid crystalline phase; (vi) increasing the frequency of the CO stretching mode both in the gel and in the liquid crystalline phases, i.e. non-bonding with carbonyl groups.

  6. The Structural Dynamics of the Flavivirus Fusion Peptide–Membrane Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Theo L. F.; Sousa, Ivanildo P.; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Bernardi, Rafael C.; Pascutti, Pedro G.; Silva, Jerson L.; Gomes, Andre M. O.; Oliveira, Andréa C.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane fusion is a crucial step in flavivirus infections and a potential target for antiviral strategies. Lipids and proteins play cooperative roles in the fusion process, which is triggered by the acidic pH inside the endosome. This acidic environment induces many changes in glycoprotein conformation and allows the action of a highly conserved hydrophobic sequence, the fusion peptide (FP). Despite the large volume of information available on the virus-triggered fusion process, little is known regarding the mechanisms behind flavivirus–cell membrane fusion. Here, we evaluated the contribution of a natural single amino acid difference on two flavivirus FPs, FLAG (98DRGWGNGCGLFGK110) and FLAH (98DRGWGNHCGLFGK110), and investigated the role of the charge of the target membrane on the fusion process. We used an in silico approach to simulate the interaction of the FPs with a lipid bilayer in a complementary way and used spectroscopic approaches to collect conformation information. We found that both peptides interact with neutral and anionic micelles, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed the interaction of the FPs with the lipid bilayer. The participation of the indole ring of Trp appeared to be important for the anchoring of both peptides in the membrane model, as indicated by MD simulations and spectroscopic analyses. Mild differences between FLAG and FLAH were observed according to the pH and the charge of the target membrane model. The MD simulations of the membrane showed that both peptides adopted a bend structure, and an interaction between the aromatic residues was strongly suggested, which was also observed by circular dichroism in the presence of micelles. As the FPs of viral fusion proteins play a key role in the mechanism of viral fusion, understanding the interactions between peptides and membranes is crucial for medical science and biology and may contribute to the design of new antiviral drugs. PMID:23094066

  7. PTEN interaction with tethered bilayer lipid membranes containing PI(4,5)P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, R.; Shenoy, S.; Shekhar, P.; Kalinowski, A.; Gericke, A.; Heinrich, F.; Loesche, M.

    2009-03-01

    Synthetic lipid membrane models are frequently used for the study of biophysical processes at cell membranes. We use a robust membrane model, the tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM), based on a (C14)2-(PEO)6-thiol anchor, WC14 [1]. Such membranes can be prepared to contain single phospholipids or complex lipid mixtures [2], including functional lipids involved in cell signaling, such as the highly charged phosphatidylinositol phosphates (PIPs). To study the interaction between the tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) and model membranes we have incorporated phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) in tBLMs and use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), neutron reflectometry (NR) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) for their characterization. NR shows that tBLMs formed with PI(4,5)P2 are complete. FCS of labeled PI(4,5)P2 shows that diffusion occurs at the time scale characteristic of membrane-incorporated lipid. Finally, SPR shows specific binding of PTEN to the model membrane thus confirming the incorporation of PI(4,5)P2 into the tBLM. [1] McGillivray et al, Biointerphases 2, 21-33 (2007) [2] Heinrich et al, Langmuir, submitted

  8. Interactions between magainin 2 and Salmonella typhimurium outer membranes: Effect of lipopolysaccharide structure

    SciTech Connect

    Rana, F.R.; Macias, E.A.; Sultany, C.M.; Modzrakowski, M.C.; Blazyk, J. )

    1991-06-18

    The role of the outer membrane and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the interaction between the small cationic antimicrobial peptide magainin 2 and the Gram-negative cell envelope was studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. Magainin 2 alters the thermotropic properties of the outer membrane-peptidoglycan complexes from wild-type Salmonella typhimurium and a series of LPS mutants which display differential susceptibility to the bactericidal activity of cationic antibiotics. These results are correlated with the LPS phosphorylation pattern and charge (characterized by high-resolution {sup 31}P NMR) and outer membrane lipid composition, and are compared to the bactericidal susceptibility. LPS mutants show a progressive loss of resistance to killing by magainin 2 as the length of the LPS polysaccharide moiety decreases. Disordering of the outer membrane lipid fatty acyl chains by magainin 2, however, depends primarily upon the magnitude of PLS charge rather than the length of the LPS polysaccharide. While disruption of outer membrane structure most likely is not the primary factor leading to cell death, the susceptibility of Gram-negative cells to magainin 2 is associated with factors that facilitate the transport of the peptide across the outer membrane, such as the magnitude and location of LPS charge, and concentration of LPS in the outer membrane, outer membrane molecular architecture, and the presence or absence of the O-antigen side chain.

  9. The membrane as the gatekeeper of infection: Cholesterol in host-pathogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G Aditya; Jafurulla, Md; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-09-01

    The cellular plasma membrane serves as a portal for the entry of intracellular pathogens. An essential step for an intracellular pathogen to gain entry into a host cell therefore is to be able to cross the cell membrane. In this review, we highlight the role of host membrane cholesterol in regulating the entry of intracellular pathogens using insights obtained from work on the interaction of Leishmania and Mycobacterium with host cells. The entry of these pathogens is known to be dependent on host membrane cholesterol. Importantly, pathogen entry is inhibited either upon depletion (or complexation), or enrichment of membrane cholesterol. In other words, an optimum level of host membrane cholesterol is necessary for efficient infection by pathogens. In this overall context, we propose a general mechanism, based on cholesterol-induced conformational changes, involving cholesterol binding sites in host cell surface receptors that are implicated in this process. A therapeutic strategy targeting modulation of membrane cholesterol would have the advantage of avoiding the commonly encountered problem of drug resistance in tackling infection by intracellular pathogens. Insights into the role of host membrane cholesterol in pathogen entry would be instrumental in the development of novel therapeutic strategies to effectively tackle intracellular pathogenesis. PMID:26902688

  10. Minimalist Model Systems Reveal Similarities and Differences between Membrane Interaction Modes of MCL1 and BAK*

    PubMed Central

    Landeta, Olatz; Landajuela, Ane; Garcia-Saez, Ana; Basañez, Gorka

    2015-01-01

    Proteins belonging to the BCL2 family are key modulators of apoptosis that establish a complex network of interactions among themselves and with other cellular factors to regulate cell fate. It is well established that mitochondrial membranes are the main locus of action of all BCL2 family proteins, but it is difficult to obtain a precise view of how BCL2 family members operate at the native mitochondrial membrane environment during apoptosis. Here, we used minimalist model systems and multiple fluorescence-based techniques to examine selected membrane activities of MCL1 and BAK under apoptotic-like conditions. We show that three distinct apoptosis-related factors (i.e. the BCL2 homology 3 ligand cBID, the mitochondrion-specific lipid cardiolipin, and membrane geometrical curvature) all promote membrane association of BCL2-like structural folds belonging to both MCL1 and BAK. However, at the same time, the two proteins exhibited distinguishing features in their membrane association modes under apoptotic-like conditions. In addition, scanning fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy and FRET measurements revealed that the BCL2-like structural fold of MCL1, but not that of BAK, forms stable heterodimeric complexes with cBID in a manner adjustable by membrane cardiolipin content and curvature degree. Our results add significantly to a growing body of evidence indicating that the mitochondrial membrane environment plays a complex and active role in the mode of action of BCL2 family proteins. PMID:25987560

  11. The Self-Interaction of a Nodavirus Replicase Is Enhanced by Mitochondrial Membrane Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yang; Wang, Zhaowei; Liu, Yongxiang; Han, Yajuan; Miao, Meng; Qi, Nan; Yang, Jie; Xia, Hongjie; Li, Xiaofeng; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2014-01-01

    RNA replication of positive-strand (+)RNA viruses requires the protein-protein interactions among viral replicases and the association of viral replicases with intracellular membranes. Protein A from Wuhan nodavirus (WhNV), which closely associate with mitochondrial membranes, is the sole replicase required for viral RNA replication. Here, we studied the direct effects of mitochondrial membrane lipids (MMLs) on WhNV protein A activity in vitro. Our investigations revealed the self-interaction of WhNV protein A is accomplished via two different patterns (i.e., homotypic and heterotypic self-interactions via different interfaces). MMLs stimulated the protein A self-interaction, and this stimulation exhibited selectivity for specific phospholipids. Moreover, we found that specific phospholipids differently favor the two self-interaction patterns. Furthermore, manipulating specific phospholipid metabolism affected protein A self-interaction and the activity of protein A to replicate RNA in cells. Taken together, our findings reveal the direct effects of membrane lipids on a nodaviral RNA replicase. PMID:24586921

  12. Investigating the effects of L- to D-amino acid substitution and deamidation on the activity and membrane interactions of antimicrobial peptide anoplin.

    PubMed

    Won, Amy; Khan, Mourin; Gustin, Sorin; Akpawu, Akuvi; Seebun, Deeptee; Avis, Tyler J; Leung, Bonnie O; Hitchcock, Adam P; Ianoul, Anatoli

    2011-06-01

    Isolated from the venom sac of solitary spider wasp, Anoplius samariensis, anoplin is the smallest linear α-helical antimicrobial peptide found naturally with broad spectrum activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and little hemolytic activity toward human erythrocytes. Deamidation was found to decrease the peptide's antibacterial properties. In the present work, interactions of amidated (Ano-NH2) and deamidated (Ano-OH) forms of anoplin as well as Ano-NH2 composed of all D-amino acids (D-Ano-NH2) with model cell membranes were investigated by means of Langmuir Blodgett (LB) technique, atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and carboxyfluorescein leakage assay in order to gain a better understanding of the effect of these peptide modifications on membrane binding and lytic properties. According to LB, all three peptides form stable monolayers at the air/water interface with Ano-NH2 occupying a slightly greater area per molecule than Ano-OH. All three forms of the peptide interact preferentially with anionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (DPPG), rather than zwitterionic 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) lipid monolayer. Peptides form nanoscale clusters in zwitterionic but not in anionic monolayers. Finally, membrane lytic activity of all derivatives was found to depend strongly on membrane composition and lipid/peptide ratio. The results suggest that amidated forms of peptides are likely to possess higher membrane binding affinity due to the increased charge. PMID:21078293

  13. The Interaction of Melittin with Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylcholine-Dimyristoyl Phosphatidylserine Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Rai, Durgesh K.; Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T.

    2016-08-13

    We report that membrane-active peptides (MAPs), which interact directly with the lipid bilayer of a cell and include toxins and host defense peptides, display lipid composition-dependent activity. Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids are anionic lipids that are found throughout the cellular membranes of most eukaryotic organisms where they serve as both a functional component and as a precursor to phosphatidylethanolamine lipids. The inner leaflet of the plasma membrane contains more PS than the outer one, and the asymmetry is actively maintained. Here, the impact of the MAP melittin on the structure of lipid bilayer vesicles made of a mixture of phosphatidylcholine andmore » phosphatidylserine was studied. Small-angle neutron scattering of the MAP associated with selectively deuterium-labeled lipid bilayer vesicles revealed how the thickness and lipid composition of phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles change in response to melittin. The peptide thickens the lipid bilayer for concentrations up to P/L = 1/500, but membrane thinning results when P/L = 1/200. The thickness transition is accompanied by a large change in the distribution of DMPS between the leaflets of the bilayer. The change in composition is driven by electrostatic interactions, while the change in bilayer thickness is driven by changes in the interaction of the peptide with the headgroup region of the lipid bilayer. Lastly, the results provide new information about lipid-specific interactions that take place in mixed composition lipid bilayer membranes.« less

  14. Interaction study between maltose-modified PPI dendrimers and lipidic model membranes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Appelhans, Dietmar; Signorelli, Marco; Wiesner, Brigitte; Fessas, Dimitrios; Scheler, Ulrich; Voit, Brigitte; Maly, Jan

    2015-07-01

    The influence of maltose-modified poly(propylene imine) (PPI) dendrimers on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPC/DMPG) (3%) liposomes was studied. Fourth generation (G4) PPI dendrimers with primary amino surface groups were partially (open shell glycodendrimers - OS) or completely (dense shell glycodendrimers - DS) modified with maltose residues. As a model membrane, two types of 100nm diameter liposomes were used to observe differences in the interactions between neutral DMPC and negatively charged DMPC/DMPG bilayers. Interactions were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy to evaluate the membrane fluidity of both the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of the lipid bilayer and using differential scanning calorimetry to investigate thermodynamic parameter changes. Pulsed-filed gradient NMR experiments were carried out to evaluate common diffusion coefficient of DMPG and DS PPI in D2O when using below critical micelle concentration of DMPG. Both OS and DS PPI G4 dendrimers show interactions with liposomes. Neutral DS dendrimers exhibit stronger changes in membrane fluidity compared to OS dendrimers. The bilayer structure seems more rigid in the case of anionic DMPC/DMPG liposomes in comparison to pure and neutral DMPC liposomes. Generally, interactions of dendrimers with anionic DMPC/DMPG and neutral DMPC liposomes were at the same level. Higher concentrations of positively charged OS dendrimers induced the aggregation process with negatively charged liposomes. For all types of experiments, the presence of NaCl decreased the strength of the interactions between glycodendrimers and liposomes. Based on NMR diffusion experiments we suggest that apart from electrostatic interactions for OS PPI hydrogen bonds play a major role in maltose-modified PPI dendrimer interactions with anionic and neutral model membranes where a contact surface is needed for undergoing multiple H-bond interactions between

  15. Membrane Interaction of the Glycosyltransferase MurG: a Special Role for Cardiolipin

    PubMed Central

    van den Brink-van der Laan, Els; Boots, Jan-Willem P.; Spelbrink, Robin E. J.; Kool, Gerda M.; Breukink, Eefjan; Killian, J. Antoinette; de Kruijff, Ben

    2003-01-01

    MurG is a peripheral membrane protein that is one of the key enzymes in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli MurG (S. Ha, D. Walker, Y. Shi, and S. Walker, Protein Sci. 9:1045-1052, 2000) contains a hydrophobic patch surrounded by basic residues that may represent a membrane association site. To allow investigation of the membrane interaction of MurG on a molecular level, we expressed and purified MurG from E. coli in the absence of detergent. Surprisingly, we found that lipid vesicles copurify with MurG. Freeze fracture electron microscopy of whole cells and lysates suggested that these vesicles are derived from vesicular intracellular membranes that are formed during overexpression. This is the first study which shows that overexpression of a peripheral membrane protein results in formation of additional membranes within the cell. The cardiolipin content of cells overexpressing MurG was increased from 1 ± 1 to 7 ± 1 mol% compared to nonoverexpressing cells. The lipids that copurify with MurG were even further enriched in cardiolipin (13 ± 4 mol%). MurG activity measurements of lipid I, its natural substrate, incorporated in pure lipid vesicles showed that the MurG activity is higher for vesicles containing cardiolipin than for vesicles with phosphatidylglycerol. These findings support the suggestion that MurG interacts with phospholipids of the bacterial membrane. In addition, the results show a special role for cardiolipin in the MurG-membrane interaction. PMID:12813070

  16. Characterization of membrane protein interactions in plasma membrane derived vesicles with quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Del Piccolo, Nuala; Hristova, Kalina

    2015-08-18

    Here we describe an experimental tool, termed quantitative imaging Förster resonance energy transfer (QI-FRET), that enables the quantitative characterization of membrane protein interactions. The QI-FRET methodology allows us to acquire binding curves and calculate association constants for complex membrane proteins in the native plasma membrane environment. The method utilizes FRET detection, and thus requires that the proteins of interest are labeled with florescent proteins, either FRET donors or FRET acceptors. Since plasma membranes of cells have complex topologies precluding the acquisition of two-dimensional binding curves, the FRET measurements are performed in plasma membrane derived vesicles that bud off cells as a result of chemical or osmotic stress. The results overviewed here are acquired in vesicles produced with an osmotic vesiculation buffer developed in our laboratory, which does not utilize harsh chemicals. The concentrations of the donor-labeled and the acceptor-labeled proteins are determined, along with the FRET efficiencies, in each vesicle. The experiments utilize transient transfection, such that a wide variety of concentrations is sampled. Then, data from hundreds of vesicles are combined to yield dimerization curves. Here we discuss recent findings about the dimerization of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), membrane proteins that control cell growth and differentiation via lateral dimerization in the plasma membrane. We focus on the dimerization of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3), a RTK that plays a critically important role in skeletal development. We study the role of different FGFR3 domains in FGFR3 dimerization in the absence of ligand, and we show that FGFR3 extracellular domains inhibit unliganded dimerization, while contacts between the juxtamembrane domains, which connect the transmembrane domains to the kinase domains, stabilize the unliganded FGFR3 dimers. Since FGFR3 has been documented to harbor many pathogenic

  17. Electrostatic Interactions Drive Membrane Association of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag MA Domain▿

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Amanda K.; Ako-Adjei, Danso; Murray, Paul S.; Murray, Diana; Vogt, Volker M.

    2007-01-01

    The assembly of most retroviruses occurs at the plasma membrane. Membrane association is directed by MA, the N-terminal domain of the Gag structural protein. For human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), this association is mediated in part by a myristate fatty acid modification. Conflicting evidence has been presented on the relative importance of myristoylation, of ionic interactions between protein and membrane, and of Gag multimerization in membrane association in vivo. We addressed these questions biochemically by determining the affinity of purified myristoylated HIV-1 MA for liposomes of defined composition, both for monomeric and for dimeric forms of the protein. Myristoylation increases the barely detectable intrinsic affinity of the apo-protein for liposomes by only 10-fold, and the resulting affinity is still weak, similar to that of the naturally nonmyristoylated MA of Rous sarcoma virus. Membrane binding of HIV-1 MA is absolutely dependent on the presence of negatively charged lipid and is abrogated at high ionic strength. Forced dimerization of MA increases its membrane affinity by several orders of magnitude. When green fluorescent protein fusions of monomeric or dimeric MA are expressed in cells, the dimeric but not the monomeric protein becomes strongly membrane associated. Computational modeling supports these results and suggests a molecular mechanism for the modest effect of myristoylation on binding, wherein the membrane provides a hydrophobic environment for the myristate that is energetically similar to that provided by the protein. Overall, the results imply that the driving force for membrane association stems largely from ionic interactions between multimerized Gag and negatively charged phospholipids. PMID:17392361

  18. Phospholipid interactions in model membrane systems. I. Experiments on monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Mingins, J; Stigter, D; Dill, K A

    1992-01-01

    We study the lateral headgroup interactions among phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules and among phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) molecules in monolayers and extend our previous models. In this paper, we present an extensive set of pressure-area isotherms and surface potential experiments on monolayers of phospholipids ranging from 14 to 22 carbons in length at the n-heptane/water interface, over a wide range of temperature, salt concentration, and pH on the acid side. The pressure data presented here are a considerable extension of previous data (1) to higher surface densities, comprehensively checked for monolayer loss, and include new data on PE molecules. We explore surface densities ranging from extremely low to intermediate, near to the main phase transition, in which range the surface pressures and potentials are found to be independent of the chain length. Thus, these data bear directly on the headgroup interactions. These interactions are observed to be independent of ionic strength. PC and PE molecules differ strongly in two respects: (a) the lateral repulsion among PC molecules is much stronger than for PE, and (b) the lateral repulsion among PC molecules increases strongly with temperature whereas PE interactions are almost independent of temperature. Similarly, the surface potential for PC is found to increase with temperature whereas for PE it does not. In this and the following paper we show that these data from dilute to semidilute monolayers are consistent with a theoretical model that predicts that, independent of coverage, for PC the P-N+ dipole is oriented slightly into the oil phase because of the hydrophobicity of the methyl groups, increasingly so with temperature, whereas for PE the P-N+ dipole is directed into the water phase. PMID:1617140

  19. A Laboratory Exercise to Illustrate Protein-Membrane Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weers, Paul M. M.; Prenner, Elmar J.; Curic, Spomenka; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory protocol presented here takes about 3 hours to perform and investigates protein and lipid interactions. Students first purify His6-tagged human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) with Ni-NTA affinity resin in a simple batch protocol and prepare multilamellar vesicles (MLV) from pre-dried phospholipid films. When apoA-I is added to the MLV,…

  20. HCMV vCXCL1 Binds Several Chemokine Receptors and Preferentially Attracts Neutrophils over NK Cells by Interacting with CXCR2.

    PubMed

    Yamin, Rachel; Lecker, Laura S M; Weisblum, Yiska; Vitenshtein, Alon; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh; Wolf, Dana G; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-05-17

    HCMV is a highly sophisticated virus that has developed various mechanisms for immune evasion and viral dissemination throughout the body (partially mediated by neutrophils). NK cells play an important role in elimination of HCMV-infected cells. Both neutrophils and NK cells utilize similar sets of chemokine receptors to traffic, to and from, various organs. However, the mechanisms by which HCMV attracts neutrophils and not NK cells are largely unknown. Here, we show a unique viral protein, vCXCL1, which targets three chemokine receptors: CXCR1 and CXCR2 expressed on neutrophils and CXCR1 and CX3CR1 expressed on NK cells. Although vCXCL1 attracted both cell types, neutrophils migrated faster and more efficiently than NK cells through the binding of CXCR2. Therefore, we propose that HCMV has developed vCXCL1 to orchestrate its rapid systemic dissemination through preferential attraction of neutrophils and uses alternative mechanisms to counteract the later attraction of NK cells. PMID:27160907

  1. Effects of Membrane Mimetics on Cytochrome P450-Cytochrome b5 Interactions Characterized by NMR Spectroscopy*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Huang, Rui; Im, Sang-Choul; Waskell, Lucy; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cytochrome P450 (P450) is a membrane-bound monooxygenase whose catalytic activities require two electrons to be sequentially delivered from its redox partners: cytochrome b5 (cytb5) and cytochrome P450 reductase, both of which are membrane proteins. Although P450 functional activities are known to be affected by lipids, experimental evidence to reveal the effect of membrane on P450-cytb5 interactions is still lacking. Here, we present evidence for the influence of phospholipid bilayers on complex formation between rabbit P450 2B4 (CYP2B4) and rabbit cytb5 at the atomic level, utilizing NMR techniques. General line broadening and modest chemical shift perturbations of cytb5 resonances characterize CYP2B4-cytb5 interactions on the intermediate time scale. More significant intensity attenuation and a more specific protein-protein binding interface are observed in bicelles as compared with lipid-free solution, highlighting the importance of the lipid bilayer in stabilizing stronger and more specific interactions between CYP2B4 and cytb5, which may lead to a more efficient electron transfer. Similar results observed for the interactions between CYP2B4 lacking the transmembrane domain (tr-CYP2B4) and cytb5 imply interactions between tr-CYP2B4 and the membrane surface, which might assist in CYP2B4-cytb5 complex formation by orienting tr-CYP2B4 for efficient contact with cytb5. Furthermore, the observation of weak and nonspecific interactions between CYP2B4 and cytb5 in micelles suggests that lipid bilayer structures and low curvature membrane surface are preferable for CYP2B4-cytb5 complex formation. Results presented in this study provide structural insights into the mechanism behind the important role that the lipid bilayer plays in the interactions between P450s and their redox partners. PMID:25795780

  2. [The study on the characters of membrane protein interaction and its network based on integrated intelligence method].

    PubMed

    Shen, Yizhen; Ding, Yongsheng; Hao, Kuangrong

    2011-08-01

    Membrane protein and its interaction network have become a novel research direction in bioinformatics. In this paper, a novel membrane protein interaction network simulator is proposed for system biology studies by integrated intelligence method including spectrum analysis, fuzzy K-Nearest Neighbor(KNN) algorithm and so on. We consider biological system as a set of active computational components interacting with each other and with the external environment. Then we can use the network simulator to construct membrane protein interaction networks. Based on the proposed approach, we found that the membrane protein interaction network almost has some dynamic and collective characteristics, such as small-world network, scale free distributing, and hierarchical module structure. These properties are similar to those of other extensively studied protein interaction networks. The present studies on the characteristics of the membrane protein interaction network will be valuable for its relatively biological and medical studies. PMID:21936357

  3. Optical detection of aqueous phase analytes via host-guest interactions on a lipid membrane surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Waggoner, Tina Y.

    1999-06-01

    The organization and assembly of molecules in cellular membranes is orchestrated through the recognition and binding of specific chemical signals. A simplified version of the cellular membrane system has been developed using a synthetically prepared membrane receptor incorporated into a biologically derived lipid bilayer. Through an interplay of electrostatic and van der Waals interactions, aggregation or dispersion of molecular components could be executed on command using a specific chemical signal. A pyrene fluorophore was used as an optical probe to monitor the aggregational state of the membrane receptors in the bilayer matrix. The pyrene excimer emission to monomer emission (E/M) intensity ratio gave a relative assessment of the local concentration of receptors in the membrane. Bilayers were prepared with receptors selective for the divalent metal ions of copper, mercury, and lead. Addition of the metal ions produced a rapid dispersion of aggregated receptor components at nano- to micro-molar concentrations. The process was reversible by sequestering the metal ions with EDTA. Receptors for proteins and polyhistidine were also prepared and incorporated into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. In this case, the guest molecules bound to the membrane through multiple points of interaction causing aggregation of initially dispersed receptor molecules. The rapid, selective, and sensitive fluorescence optical response of these lipid assemblies make them attractive in sensor applications for aqueous phase metal ions and polypeptides.

  4. Optical Detection of Aqueous Phase Analytes via Host-Guest Interactions on a Lipid Membrane Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, D.Y.; Waggoner, T.A.

    1999-01-11

    The organization and assembly of molecules in cellular membranes is orchestrated through the recognition and binding of specific chemical signals. A simplified version of the cellular membrane system has been developed using a synthetically prepared membrane receptor incorporated into a biologically derived lipid bilayer. Through an interplay of electrostatic and van der Wards interactions, aggregation or dispersion of molecular components could be executed on command using a specific chemical signal. A pyrene fluorophore was used as an optical probe to monitor the aggregational state of the membrane receptors in the bilayer matrix. The pyrene excimer emission to monomer emission (E/M) intensity ratio gave a relative assessment of the local concentration of receptors in the membrane. Bilayers were prepared with receptors selective for the divalent metal ions of copper, mercury, and lead. Addition of the metal ions produced a rapid dispersion of aggregated receptor components at nano- to micro-molar concentrations. The process was reversible by sequestering the metal ions with EDTA. Receptors for proteins and polyhistidine were also prepared and incorporated into phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. In this case, the guest molecules bound to the membrane through multiple points of interaction causing aggregation of initially dispersed receptor molecules. The rapid, selective, and sensitive fluorescence optical response of these lipid assemblies make them attractive in sensor applications for aqueous phase metal ions and polypeptides.

  5. Probing the membrane interface-interacting proteome using photoactivatable lipid cross-linkers.

    PubMed

    Gubbens, Jacob; Vader, Pieter; Damen, J Mirjam A; O'Flaherty, Martina C; Slijper, Monique; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2007-05-01

    To analyze proteins interacting at the membrane interface, a phospholipid analogue was used with a photoactivatable headgroup (ASA-DLPE, N-(4-azidosalicylamidyl)-1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) for selective cross-linking. The peripheral membrane protein cytochrome c from the inner mitochondrial membrane was rendered carbonate wash-resistant by cross-linking to ASA-DLPE in a model membrane system, validating our approach. Cross-link products of cytochrome c and its precursor apocytochrome c were demonstrated by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and were specifically detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), taking advantage of the intrinsic UV absorbance of the cross-linker. Application of the method to inner mitochondrial membranes from Saccharomyces cerevisae revealed cross-link products of both exogenously added apocytochrome c and endogenous proteins with molecular weights around 34 and 72 kDa. Liquid chromatograpy (LC)-MS/MS was performed to identify these proteins, resulting in a list of candidate proteins potentially cross-linked at the membrane interface. The approach described here provides methodology for capturing phospholipid-protein interactions in their native environment of the biomembrane using modern proteomics techniques. PMID:17375948

  6. The Role of Protein-Protein and Protein-Membrane Interactions on P450 Function.

    PubMed

    Scott, Emily E; Wolf, C Roland; Otyepka, Michal; Humphreys, Sara C; Reed, James R; Henderson, Colin J; McLaughlin, Lesley A; Paloncýová, Markéta; Navrátilová, Veronika; Berka, Karel; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Dahal, Upendra P; Barnaba, Carlo; Brozik, James A; Jones, Jeffrey P; Estrada, D Fernando; Laurence, Jennifer S; Park, Ji Won; Backes, Wayne L

    2016-04-01

    This symposium summary, sponsored by the ASPET, was held at Experimental Biology 2015 on March 29, 2015, in Boston, Massachusetts. The symposium focused on: 1) the interactions of cytochrome P450s (P450s) with their redox partners; and 2) the role of the lipid membrane in their orientation and stabilization. Two presentations discussed the interactions of P450s with NADPH-P450 reductase (CPR) and cytochrome b5. First, solution nuclear magnetic resonance was used to compare the protein interactions that facilitated either the hydroxylase or lyase activities of CYP17A1. The lyase interaction was stimulated by the presence of b5 and 17α-hydroxypregnenolone, whereas the hydroxylase reaction was predominant in the absence of b5. The role of b5 was also shown in vivo by selective hepatic knockout of b5 from mice expressing CYP3A4 and CYP2D6; the lack of b5 caused a decrease in the clearance of several substrates. The role of the membrane on P450 orientation was examined using computational methods, showing that the proximal region of the P450 molecule faced the aqueous phase. The distal region, containing the substrate-access channel, was associated with the membrane. The interaction of NADPH-P450 reductase (CPR) with the membrane was also described, showing the ability of CPR to "helicopter" above the membrane. Finally, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was shown to be heterogeneous, having ordered membrane regions containing cholesterol and more disordered regions. Interestingly, two closely related P450s, CYP1A1 and CYP1A2, resided in different regions of the ER. The structural characteristics of their localization were examined. These studies emphasize the importance of P450 protein organization to their function. PMID:26851242

  7. Influence of Trifluoroethanol on Membrane Interfacial Anchoring Interactions of Transmembrane α-Helical Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Özdirekcan, Suat; Nyholm, Thomas K. M.; Raja, Mobeen; Rijkers, Dirk T. S.; Liskamp, Rob M. J.; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2008-01-01

    Interfacial anchoring interactions between aromatic amino acid residues and the lipid-water interface are believed to be important determinants for membrane protein structure and function. Thus, it is possible that molecules that partition into the lipid-water interface can influence membrane protein activity simply by interfering with these anchoring interactions. Here we tested this hypothesis by investigating the effects of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) on the interaction of a Trp-flanked synthetic transmembrane peptide (acetyl-GW2(LA)8LW2A-NH2) with model membranes of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Two striking observations were made. First, using 2H nuclear magnetic resonance on acyl chain deuterated lipids, we found that addition of 4 or 8 vol % of TFE completely abolishes the ability of the peptide to order and stretch the lipid acyl chains in these relatively thin bilayers. Second, we observed that addition of 8 vol % TFE reduces the tilt angle of the peptide from 5.3° to 2.5°, as measured by 2H NMR on Ala-d4 labeled peptides. The “straightening” of the peptide was accompanied by an increased exposure of Trp to the aqueous phase, as shown by Trp-fluorescence quenching experiments using acrylamide. The observation of a reduced tilt angle was surprising because we also found that TFE partioning results in a significant thinning of the membrane, which would increase the extent of hydrophobic mismatch. In contrast to the Trp-flanked peptide, no effect of TFE was observed on the interaction of a Lys-flanked analog (acetyl-GK2(LA)8LK2A-NH2) with the lipid bilayer. These results emphasize the importance of interfacial anchoring interactions for membrane organization and provide new insights into how molecules such as TFE that can act as anesthetics may affect the behavior of membrane proteins that are enriched in aromatic amino acids at the lipid-water interface. PMID:17905843

  8. A mirror code for protein-cholesterol interactions in the two leaflets of biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Evans, Luke S; Williamson, Philip T F; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol controls the activity of a wide range of membrane receptors through specific interactions and identifying cholesterol recognition motifs is therefore critical for understanding signaling receptor function. The membrane-spanning domains of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor for acetylcholine (AChR) display a series of cholesterol consensus domains (referred to as "CARC"). Here we use a combination of molecular modeling, lipid monolayer/mutational approaches and NMR spectroscopy to study the binding of cholesterol to a synthetic CARC peptide. The CARC-cholesterol interaction is of high affinity, lipid-specific, concentration-dependent, and sensitive to single-point mutations. The CARC motif is generally located in the outer membrane leaflet and its reverse sequence CRAC in the inner one. Their simultaneous presence within the same transmembrane domain obeys a "mirror code" controlling protein-cholesterol interactions in the outer and inner membrane leaflets. Deciphering this code enabled us to elaborate guidelines for the detection of cholesterol-binding motifs in any membrane protein. Several representative examples of neurotransmitter receptors and ABC transporters with the dual CARC/CRAC motifs are presented. The biological significance and potential clinical applications of the mirror code are discussed. PMID:26915987

  9. A mirror code for protein-cholesterol interactions in the two leaflets of biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Evans, Luke S.; Williamson, Philip T. F.; Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol controls the activity of a wide range of membrane receptors through specific interactions and identifying cholesterol recognition motifs is therefore critical for understanding signaling receptor function. The membrane-spanning domains of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor for acetylcholine (AChR) display a series of cholesterol consensus domains (referred to as “CARC”). Here we use a combination of molecular modeling, lipid monolayer/mutational approaches and NMR spectroscopy to study the binding of cholesterol to a synthetic CARC peptide. The CARC-cholesterol interaction is of high affinity, lipid-specific, concentration-dependent, and sensitive to single-point mutations. The CARC motif is generally located in the outer membrane leaflet and its reverse sequence CRAC in the inner one. Their simultaneous presence within the same transmembrane domain obeys a “mirror code” controlling protein-cholesterol interactions in the outer and inner membrane leaflets. Deciphering this code enabled us to elaborate guidelines for the detection of cholesterol-binding motifs in any membrane protein. Several representative examples of neurotransmitter receptors and ABC transporters with the dual CARC/CRAC motifs are presented. The biological significance and potential clinical applications of the mirror code are discussed. PMID:26915987

  10. Cholesterol facilitates interactions between α-synuclein oligomers and charge-neutral membranes.

    PubMed

    van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Vetri, Valeria; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-09-14

    Oligomeric species formed during α-synuclein fibrillation are suggested to be membrane-disrupting agents, and have been associated with cytotoxicity in Parkinson's disease. The majority of studies, however, have revealed that the effect of α-synuclein oligomers is only noticeable on systems composed of anionic lipids, while the more physiologically relevant zwitterionic lipids remain intact. We present experimental evidence for significant morphological changes in zwitterionic membranes containing cholesterol, induced by α-synuclein oligomers. Depending on the lipid composition, model membranes are either unperturbed, disrupt, or undergo dramatic morphological changes and segregate into structurally different components, which we visualize by 2-photon fluorescence microscopy and generalized polarization analysis using the fluorescent probe Laurdan. Our results highlight the crucial role of cholesterol for mediating interactions between physiologically relevant membranes and α-synuclein. PMID:26297828

  11. A possible molecular mechanism for the interaction of defensin with the sensory neuron membrane.

    PubMed

    Plakhova, V B; Shchegolev, B F; Rogachevskii, I V; Nozdrachev, A D; Krylov, B V; Podzorova, S A; Kokryakov, V N

    2002-01-01

    A local membrane potential clamping method was used to study the effects of defensin NP-1 on the membranes of rat spinal ganglion neurons. NP-1 led to decreases in the effective charge for the activation gating system. This process depended on the NP-1 concentration. Use of the Hill equation showed that Kd was 2.10(-12) M and the Hill coefficient was 0.9. The structure of the defensin molecule was optimized using quantum chemical calculations based on a molecular mechanics method. The results obtained from these calculations suggested that a single hydroxyl group directed towards the outer part of thedefensin molecule and forming the carboxyl group of amino acid Glu14 could form a hydrogen bond with the active center of the membrane receptor. This explains the experimentally observed 1:1 stoichiometry of the ligand-receptor binding interaction between the defensin and the sensory neuron membrane. PMID:12243262

  12. Fluctuation Limit for Interacting Diffusions with Partial Annihilations Through Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-Qing; Fan, Wai-Tong Louis

    2016-06-01

    We study fluctuations of the empirical processes of a non-equilibrium interacting particle system consisting of two species over a domain that is recently introduced in Chen and Fan (Ann Probab, to appear) and establish its functional central limit theorem. This fluctuation limit is a distribution-valued Gaussian Markov process which can be represented as a mild solution of a stochastic partial differential equation. The drift of our fluctuation limit involves a new partial differential equation with nonlinear coupled term on the interface that characterized the hydrodynamic limit of the system. The covariance structure of the Gaussian part consists two parts, one involving the spatial motion of the particles inside the domain and other involving a boundary integral term that captures the boundary interactions between two species. The key is to show that the Boltzmann-Gibbs principle holds for our non-equilibrium system. Our proof relies on generalizing the usual correlation functions to the join correlations at two different times.

  13. Fluctuation Limit for Interacting Diffusions with Partial Annihilations Through Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen-Qing; Fan, Wai-Tong Louis

    2016-08-01

    We study fluctuations of the empirical processes of a non-equilibrium interacting particle system consisting of two species over a domain that is recently introduced in Chen and Fan (Ann Probab, to appear) and establish its functional central limit theorem. This fluctuation limit is a distribution-valued Gaussian Markov process which can be represented as a mild solution of a stochastic partial differential equation. The drift of our fluctuation limit involves a new partial differential equation with nonlinear coupled term on the interface that characterized the hydrodynamic limit of the system. The covariance structure of the Gaussian part consists two parts, one involving the spatial motion of the particles inside the domain and other involving a boundary integral term that captures the boundary interactions between two species. The key is to show that the Boltzmann-Gibbs principle holds for our non-equilibrium system. Our proof relies on generalizing the usual correlation functions to the join correlations at two different times.

  14. Analysis of the interactions of sulfur-containing amino acids in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Tamayo, José C; Cordomí, Arnau; Olivella, Mireia; Mayol, Eduardo; Fourmy, Daniel; Pardo, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    The interactions of Met and Cys with other amino acid side chains have received little attention, in contrast to aromatic-aromatic, aromatic-aliphatic or/and aliphatic-aliphatic interactions. Precisely, these are the only amino acids that contain a sulfur atom, which is highly polarizable and, thus, likely to participate in strong Van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the interactions present in membrane protein crystal structures, together with the characterization of their strength in small-molecule model systems at the ab-initio level, predicts that Met-Met interactions are stronger than Met-Cys ≈ Met-Phe ≈ Cys-Phe interactions, stronger than Phe-Phe ≈ Phe-Leu interactions, stronger than the Met-Leu interaction, and stronger than Leu-Leu ≈ Cys-Leu interactions. These results show that sulfur-containing amino acids form stronger interactions than aromatic or aliphatic amino acids. Thus, these amino acids may provide additional driving forces for maintaining the 3D structure of membrane proteins and may provide functional specificity. PMID:27240306

  15. Does a methionine-to-norleucine substitution in PGLa influence peptide-membrane interactions?

    PubMed

    Radchenko, Dmytro S; Kattge, Saskia; Kara, Sezgin; Ulrich, Anne S; Afonin, Sergii

    2016-09-01

    Yes. To understand the molecular mechanisms of amphiphilic membrane-active peptides, it is essential to study their interactions with lipid bilayers under near-native conditions. Amino acid composition largely determines the non-specific properties of peptides, on the basis of the physicochemical properties of the side chains. The resultant effects on peptides' functional properties include influences on the conformation, structural dynamics and binding affinities within the peptide interactome. Here, we studied the effect of substituting oxidation-prone methionine (Met) with non-oxidizable norleucine (Nle) in the model α-helical antimicrobial peptide PGLa, through systematic comparison of PGLa with the (2)Met/(2)Nle mutant. Both peptides were evaluated for their bacteriostatic and hemolytic activities (using in situ assays), for their conformational preferences in isotropic solutions (using circular dichroism spectropolarimetry) and for their abilities to modulate membrane curvature (using a solid-state (31)P NMR assay). We determined the membrane-bound states in detail and characterized the orientational dynamics of both peptides in oriented phospholipid membranes by solid-state (19)F NMR spectroscopy. On the one hand, the bioactivity results, the structure in the diluted membrane-mimicking environments and the strong inhibition of the negative membrane curvature were comparable between PGLa and the mutant. On the other hand, the alignments in DMPC bilayer were qualitatively the same but differed in absolute values - the more hydrophobic Nle residue inserted deeper in the membrane core. Furthermore, the mutant peptide displayed a significantly reduced ability to re-orient from the monomeric, surficial to the putative dimeric, tilted state. Overall, these results confirm the functional isosterism of Nle and Met in the helical membrane-active peptides but highlight differences in the ways in which the two residues affect non-specific binding to the lipid bilayer

  16. Quantitative time-resolved measurement of membrane protein-ligand interactions using microcantilever array sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Thomas; Ghatkesar, Murali Krishna; Backmann, Natalija; Grange, Wilfried; Boulanger, Pascale; Letellier, Lucienne; Lang, Hans-Peter; Bietsch, Alex; Gerber, Christoph; Hegner, Martin

    2009-03-01

    Membrane proteins are central to many biological processes, and the interactions between transmembrane protein receptors and their ligands are of fundamental importance in medical research. However, measuring and characterizing these interactions is challenging. Here we report that sensors based on arrays of resonating microcantilevers can measure such interactions under physiological conditions. A protein receptor-the FhuA receptor of Escherichia coli-is crystallized in liposomes, and the proteoliposomes then immobilized on the chemically activated gold-coated surface of the sensor by ink-jet spotting in a humid environment, thus keeping the receptors functional. Quantitative mass-binding measurements of the bacterial virus T5 at subpicomolar concentrations are performed. These experiments demonstrate the potential of resonating microcantilevers for the specific, label-free and time-resolved detection of membrane protein-ligand interactions in a micro-array format.

  17. Direct interaction between cholesterol and phosphatidylcholines in hydrated membranes revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2007-11-01

    By using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and curve fitting we have examined temperature dependence and composition dependence of the shape of the carbonyl band in phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol model membranes. Membranes were hydrated either in excess water or in excess deuterated water. The studied binary mixtures exhibit different lipid phases at appropriate temperature and amount of cholesterol, among them also the so-called liquid-ordered phase. The results confirm that cholesterol has a significant indirect influence on the carbonyl band through conformational and hydration effects. This influence was interpreted in view of the known temperature composition phase diagrams for inspected binary mixtures. In addition, direct interaction was observed, which could point to the presence of hydrogen bond between cholesterol and carbonyl group. This direct interaction, though weak, might play at least a partial role in the stabilization of cholesterol-rich lipid domains in model and biological membranes. PMID:17662974

  18. Mechanism of ESAT-6 membrane interaction and its roles in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiuli; Sun, Jianjun

    2016-06-15

    The 6-kDa early secreted antigenic target (ESAT-6; EsxA) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was first identified as a potent T-cell antigen, and it is now recognized as a pore-forming toxin that is essential for virulence of M. tuberculosis. ESAT-6 is secreted through the ESX-1 secretion system (Type VII) of M. tuberculosis and has been implicated to mediate mycobacterial cytosolic translocation within the host macrophages by rupturing the phagosomal membranes. Recent studies have made significant progresses in understanding of the mechanism of ESAT-6 membrane interaction and its role in M. tuberculosis pathogenesis, but important questions still remain to be answered. Here, we summarize the current progress in study of ESAT-6 membrane interaction and its roles in pathogenesis and discuss some of the key remaining questions for future investigation. PMID:26456678

  19. The interaction of polyglutamine peptides with lipid membranes is regulated by flanking sequences associated with huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Burke, Kathleen A; Kauffman, Karlina J; Umbaugh, C Samuel; Frey, Shelli L; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-05-24

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (poly(Q)) repeat near the N terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded poly(Q) facilitates formation of htt aggregates, eventually leading to deposition of cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies containing htt. Flanking sequences directly adjacent to the poly(Q) domain, such as the first 17 amino acids on the N terminus (Nt17) and the polyproline (poly(P)) domain on the C-terminal side of the poly(Q) domain, heavily influence aggregation. Additionally, htt interacts with a variety of membraneous structures within the cell, and Nt17 is implicated in lipid binding. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid membranes, a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy, Langmuir trough techniques, and vesicle permeability assays were used to directly monitor the interaction of a variety of synthetic poly(Q) peptides with different combinations of flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q35-P10-KK, Nt17-Q35-KK, and Nt17-Q35-P10-KK) on model membranes and surfaces. Each peptide aggregated on mica, predominately forming extended, fibrillar aggregates. In contrast, poly(Q) peptides that lacked the Nt17 domain did not appreciably aggregate on or insert into lipid membranes. Nt17 facilitated the interaction of peptides with lipid surfaces, whereas the poly(P) region enhanced this interaction. The aggregation of Nt17-Q35-P10-KK on the lipid bilayer closely resembled that of a htt exon1 construct containing 35 repeat glutamines. Collectively, this data suggests that the Nt17 domain plays a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes, and this lipid/htt interaction can be further modulated by the presence of the poly(P) domain. PMID:23572526

  20. The Interaction of Polyglutamine Peptides with Lipid Membranes Is Regulated by Flanking Sequences Associated with Huntingtin*

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Kauffman, Karlina J.; Umbaugh, C. Samuel; Frey, Shelli L.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by an expanded polyglutamine (poly(Q)) repeat near the N terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded poly(Q) facilitates formation of htt aggregates, eventually leading to deposition of cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusion bodies containing htt. Flanking sequences directly adjacent to the poly(Q) domain, such as the first 17 amino acids on the N terminus (Nt17) and the polyproline (poly(P)) domain on the C-terminal side of the poly(Q) domain, heavily influence aggregation. Additionally, htt interacts with a variety of membraneous structures within the cell, and Nt17 is implicated in lipid binding. To investigate the interaction between htt exon1 and lipid membranes, a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy, Langmuir trough techniques, and vesicle permeability assays were used to directly monitor the interaction of a variety of synthetic poly(Q) peptides with different combinations of flanking sequences (KK-Q35-KK, KK-Q35-P10-KK, Nt17-Q35-KK, and Nt17-Q35-P10-KK) on model membranes and surfaces. Each peptide aggregated on mica, predominately forming extended, fibrillar aggregates. In contrast, poly(Q) peptides that lacked the Nt17 domain did not appreciably aggregate on or insert into lipid membranes. Nt17 facilitated the interaction of peptides with lipid surfaces, whereas the poly(P) region enhanced this interaction. The aggregation of Nt17-Q35-P10-KK on the lipid bilayer closely resembled that of a htt exon1 construct containing 35 repeat glutamines. Collectively, this data suggests that the Nt17 domain plays a critical role in htt binding and aggregation on lipid membranes, and this lipid/htt interaction can be further modulated by the presence of the poly(P) domain. PMID:23572526

  1. Application of virus-like particles (VLP) to NMR characterization of viral membrane protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Antanasijevic, Aleksandar; Kingsley, Carolyn; Basu, Arnab; Bowlin, Terry L; Rong, Lijun; Caffrey, Michael

    2016-03-01

    The membrane proteins of viruses play critical roles in the virus life cycle and are attractive targets for therapeutic intervention. Virus-like particles (VLP) present the possibility to study the biochemical and biophysical properties of viral membrane proteins in their native environment. Specifically, the VLP constructs contain the entire protein sequence and are comprised of native membrane components including lipids, cholesterol, carbohydrates and cellular proteins. In this study we prepare VLP containing full-length hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA) from influenza and characterize their interactions with small molecule inhibitors. Using HA-VLP, we first show that VLP samples prepared using the standard sucrose gradient purification scheme contain significant amounts of serum proteins, which exhibit high potential for non-specific interactions, thereby complicating NMR studies of ligand-target interactions. We then show that the serum contaminants may be largely removed with the addition of a gel filtration chromatography step. Next, using HA-VLP we demonstrate that WaterLOGSY NMR is significantly more sensitive than Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) NMR for the study of ligand interactions with membrane bound targets. In addition, we compare the ligand orientation to HA embedded in VLP with that of recombinant HA by STD NMR. In a subsequent step, using NA-VLP we characterize the kinetic and binding properties of substrate analogs and inhibitors of NA, including study of the H274Y-NA mutant, which leads to wide spread resistance to current influenza antivirals. In summary, our work suggests that VLP have high potential to become standard tools in biochemical and biophysical studies of viral membrane proteins, particularly when VLP are highly purified and combined with control VLP containing native membrane proteins. PMID:26921030

  2. Interaction between jet flow and motion of two consecutive membranes in a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudin, Olivier; Gutmark, Ephraim

    1999-11-01

    Pressure oscillations induced by combustion in a rocket motor generate coherent turbulence, which excites the structure of the rocket. In particular, it leads to the vibration of inhibitors, which endangers the mechanical integrity of the rocket. To model the phenomenon, the following facility has been set up: a blower followed by a settling chamber from where the flow exits into a cylindrical pipe; at the middle a membrane is inserted with a centered hole; another membrane is installed at the end of the pipe. The main purposes are to find how the shape of the membrane hole affects the nature of the outlet flow and how two consecutive membranes interact. In addition to experimental measurements, numerical simulations of the membrane influence on the flow have been performed. Unsteady and steady CFD models have been used to analyze the influence of the hole shape. A hot wire system and a laser gave experimental data that allow us to explain phenomena observed with flow visualizations. An amplification of the amplitude of the vibrations from the first to the second membrane was observed principally through visualizations. It also appears that the vibration mode of the membranes is different from one to another for the same excitation frequency. The study of oscillation amplitude performed with the laser has showed that the membrane, which vibrates less, is the one with a circular hole. It has also detected a difference in amplitude between the long and the small edges of the rectangular hole membrane. Moreover unsteady simulations run with Fluent have described the influence of hole shape on vortex time evolution.

  3. Amphipathic solvation of indole: implications for the role of tryptophan in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Andrew J; Zhang, Yapei Rosie; Busch, Sebastian; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Imberti, Silvia; McLain, Sylvia E

    2015-05-14

    The microscopic structure of the tryptophan side chain, indole, in an amphiphilic environment has been investigated using a combination of neutron diffraction measurements and simulations in solution. The results show that indole is preferentially solvated by hydrogen bonding interactions between water and alcohol -OH groups rather than the interaction being dominated by indole-methyl interactions. This has implications for understanding how tryptophan interacts with the amphipathic membrane environment to anchor proteins into membranes, where the results here suggest that the benzene ring of tryptophan interacts directly with the interfacial water at the membrane surface rather than being buried into the hydrophobic regions of the membrane bilayer. PMID:25893741

  4. Toward a Molecular Understanding of the Mechanism of Cryopreservation by Polyampholytes: Cell Membrane Interactions and Hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Robin; Hayashi, Fumiaki; Nagashima, Toshio; Matsumura, Kazuaki

    2016-05-01

    Cryopreservation enables long-term preservation of cells at ultralow temperatures. Current cryoprotective agents (CPAs) have several limitations, making it imperative to develop CPAs with advanced properties. Previously, we developed a novel synthetic polyampholyte-based CPA, copolymer of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and methacrylic acid(MAA) (poly(MAA-DMAEMA)), which showed excellent efficiency and biocompatibility. Introduction of hydrophobicity increased its efficiency significantly. Herein, we investigated the activity of other polyampholytes. We prepared two zwitterionic polymers, poly(sulfobetaine) (SPB) and poly(carboxymethyl betaine) (CMB), and compared their efficiency with poly(MAA-DMAEMA). Poly-SPB showed only intermediate property and poly-CMB showed no cryoprotective property. These data suggested that the polymer structure strongly influences cryoprotection, providing an impetus to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cryopreservation. We investigated the mechanism by studying the interaction of polymers with cell membrane, which allowed us to identify the interactions responsible for imparting different properties. Results unambiguously demonstrated that polyampholytes cryopreserve cells by strongly interacting with cell membrane, with hydrophobicity increasing the affinity for membrane interaction, which enables it to protect the membrane from various freezing-induced damages. Additionally, cryoprotective polymers, especially their hydrophobic derivatives, inhibit the recrystallization of ice, thus averting cell death. Hence, our results provide an important insight into the complex mechanism of cryopreservation, which might facilitate the rational design of polymeric CPAs with improved efficiency. PMID:27077533

  5. Rapid mobilization of membrane lipids in wheat leaf-sheathes during incompatible interactions with hessian fly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hessian fly (Mayetiola destructor) is a biotrophic parasitic insect that interacts with wheat on a typical gene-for-gene basis. In this study, we systematically profiled changes in membrane lipids in two isogenic wheat lines: a susceptible line and its backcrossed offspring containing resistance ge...

  6. Molecular Dynamics Study on the Biophysical Interactions of Seven Green Tea Catechins with Cell Membranes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the interactions of bioactive catechins (flavonoids) commonly found in green tea with lipid bilayers, as model for cell membranes. Previously, a number of experimental studies rationalized catechin’s anticarcinogenic, antibacterial, and other be...

  7. Foldameric probes for membrane interactions by induced β-sheet folding.

    PubMed

    Hegedüs, Zsófia; Makra, Ildikó; Imre, Norbert; Hetényi, Anasztázia; Mándity, István M; Monostori, Éva; Martinek, Tamás A

    2016-01-31

    Design strategies were devised for α/β-peptide foldameric analogues of the antiangiogenic anginex with the goal of mimicking the diverse structural features from the unordered conformation to a folded β-sheet in response to membrane interactions. Structure-activity relationships were investigated in the light of different β-sheet folding levels. PMID:26672754

  8. New insights into retroviral Gag–Gag and Gag–membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, José O.; Martin, Jessica L.; Mueller, Joachim D.; Zhang, Wei; Mansky, Louis M.

    2014-01-01

    A critical aspect of viral replication is the assembly of virus particles, which are subsequently released as progeny virus. While a great deal of attention has been focused on better understanding this phase of the viral life cycle, many aspects of the molecular details remain poorly understood. This is certainly true for retroviruses, including that of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1; a lentivirus) as well as for human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1; a deltaretrovirus). This review discusses the retroviral Gag protein and its interactions with itself, the plasma membrane and the role of lipids in targeting Gag to virus assembly sites. Recent progress using sophisticated biophysical approaches to investigate – in a comparative manner – retroviral Gag–Gag and Gag–membrane interactions are discussed. Differences among retroviruses in Gag–Gag and Gag–membrane interactions imply dissimilar molecular aspects of the viral assembly pathway, including the interactions of Gag with lipids at the membrane. PMID:25009535

  9. Interaction of enterocyte FABPs with phospholipid membranes: clues for specific physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Franchini, Gisela R; Guerbi, María Ximena; Storch, Judith; Córsico, Betina

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP and LFABP, respectively) are cytosolic soluble proteins with the capacity to bind and transport hydrophobic ligands between different sub-cellular compartments. Their functions are still not clear but they are supposed to be involved in lipid trafficking and metabolism, cell growth, and regulation of several other processes, like cell differentiation. Here we investigated the interaction of these proteins with different models of phospholipid membrane vesicles in order to achieve further insight into their specificity within the enterocyte. A combination of biophysical and biochemical techniques allowed us to determine affinities of these proteins to membranes, the way phospholipid composition and vesicle size and curvature modulate such interaction, as well as the effect of protein binding on the integrity of the membrane structure. We demonstrate here that, besides their apparently opposite ligand transfer mechanisms, both LFABP and IFABP are able to interact with phospholipid membranes, but the factors that modulate such interactions are different for each protein, further implying different roles for IFABP and LFABP in the intracellular context. These results contribute to the proposed central role of intestinal FABPs in the lipid traffic within enterocytes as well as in the regulation of more complex cellular processes. PMID:21539932

  10. Membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase and inhibits enzyme activity

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Thai Leong; Velayati, Arash; Sidransky, Ellen; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in GBA, the gene encoding glucocerebrosidase, the lysosomal enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease increase the risk for developing Parkinson disease. Recent research suggests a relationship between glucocerebrosidase and the Parkinson disease-related amyloid-forming protein, α-synuclein; however, the specific molecular mechanisms responsible for association remain elusive. Previously, we showed that α-synuclein and glucocerebrosidase interact selectively under lysosomal conditions, and proposed that this newly identified interaction might influence cellular levels of α-synuclein by either promoting protein degradation and/or preventing aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that membrane-bound α-synuclein interacts with glucocerebrosidase, and that this complex formation inhibits enzyme function. Using site-specific fluorescence and Förster energy transfer probes, we mapped the protein-enzyme interacting regions on unilamellar vesicles. Our data suggest that on the membrane surface, the glucocerebrosidase-α-synuclein interaction involves a larger α-synuclein region compared to that found in solution. In addition, α-synuclein acts as a mixed inhibitor with an apparent IC50 in the submicromolar range. Importantly, the membrane-bound, α-helical form of α-synuclein is necessary for inhibition. This glucocerebrosidase interaction and inhibition likely contribute to the mechanism underlying GBA-associated parkinsonism. PMID:23266198

  11. New insights into water-phospholipid model membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Milhaud, Jeannine

    2004-05-27

    Modulating the relative humidity (RH) of the ambient gas phase of a phospholipid/water sample for modifying the activity of phospholipid-sorbed water [humidity-controlled osmotic stress methods, J. Chem. Phys. 92 (1990) 4519 and J. Phys. Chem. 96 (1992) 446] has opened a new field of research of paramount importance. New types of phase transitions, occurring at specific values of this activity, have been then disclosed. Hence, it is become recognized that this activity, like the temperature T, is an intensive parameter of the thermodynamical state of these samples. This state can be therefore changed (phase transition) either, by modulating T at a given water activity (a given hydration level), or, by modulating the water activity, at a given T. The underlying mechanisms of these two types of transition differ, especially when they appear as disorderings of fatty chains. In lyotropic transitions, this disordering follows from two thermodynamical laws. First, acting on the activity (the chemical potential) of water external to a phospholipid/water sample, a transbilayer gradient of water chemical potential is created, leading to a transbilayer flux of water (Fick's law). Second, water molecules present within the hydrocarbon region of this phospholipid bilayer interact with phospholipid molecules through their chemical potential (Gibbs-Duhem relation): the conformational state of fatty chains (the thermodynamical state of the phospholipid molecules) changes. This process is slow, as revealed by osmotic stress time-resolved experiments. In thermal chain-melting transitions, the first rapid step is the disordering of fatty chains of a fraction of phospholipid molecules. It occurs a few degrees before the main transition temperature, T(m), during the pretransition and the sub-main transition. The second step, less rapid, is the redistribution of water molecules between the different parts of the sample, as revealed by T-jump time-resolved experiments. Finally, in

  12. A laboratory exercise to illustrate protein-membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Weers, Paul M M; Prenner, Elmar J; Curic, Spomenka; Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory protocol presented here takes about 3 hours to perform and investigates protein and lipid interactions. Students first purify His6 -tagged human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) with Ni-NTA affinity resin in a simple batch protocol and prepare multilamellar vesicles (MLV) from pre-dried phospholipid films. When apoA-I is added to the MLV, much smaller protein/lipid nanodisc complexes are formed in some instances. Nanodisc formation can be monitored by a decrease in light-scattering intensity at 340 nm using a simple spectrophotometer. Students will observe nanodisc formation with MLV formed from the anionic phospholipid dimyristoylphosphatidyl glycerol, which pack poorly into lipid bilayers, but not with MLV formed from the zwitterionic phospholipid dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, which form stable bilayers. This laboratory exercise is accompanied by questions and exercises that enable students a deeper of the dimensions of apoA-I and nanodiscs as well as the biological relevance of nanodisc formation in the process of reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:26560199

  13. Preferential interactions of glycine betaine and of urea with DNA: implications for DNA hydration and for effects of these solutes on DNA stability.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiang; Capp, Michael W; Anderson, Charles F; Saecker, Ruth M; Felitsky, Daniel J; Anderson, Melissa W; Record, M Thomas

    2004-11-23

    Interactions of the solutes glycine betaine (GB) and urea with mononucleosomal calf thymus DNA in aqueous salt solutions are characterized by vapor pressure osmometry (VPO). Analysis of osmolality as a function of solute and DNA concentration yields the effect of the solute on the chemical potential, mu(2), of the DNA. Although both GB and urea generally are nucleic acid denaturants and therefore must interact favorably with the nucleic acid surface exposed upon melting, VPO demonstrates that neither interacts favorably with duplex DNA. Addition of GB greatly increases mu(2) of DNA, indicating that the average local concentration of GB in the vicinity of the double helix is much less than its bulk concentration. By contrast, addition of urea has almost no effect on mu(2) of duplex DNA, indicating that the average local concentration of urea in the vicinity of duplex DNA is almost the same as in bulk solution. Qualitatively, we conclude that the nonuniform distribution of GB occurs primarily because duplex DNA and GB prefer to interact with water rather than with each other. Comparison with thermodynamic data for the interaction of GB with various protein surfaces (Felitsky et al., Biochemistry, 43, 14732-14743) shows that GB is excluded primarily from anionic DNA surface and that the hydration of anionic DNA phosphate oxygen surface (>or approximately 17 H(2)O per nucleotide or >or approximately 0.22 H(2)O A(-)(2)) involves at least two layers of water. From analysis of literature data for effects of urea and of GB on DNA melting, we propose that urea is an effective nonspecific nucleic acid denaturant because of its favorable interactions with the polar amide-like surface of G, C, and especially T or U bases exposed in denaturation, whereas GB is a specific GC denaturant because of its favorable interaction with G and/or C surface in the single-stranded state. PMID:15544345

  14. Perturbation of polysome - membrane interaction by aflatoxin B/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Erki, L.; Patterson, W.J. Jr.; delRosario, R.; Devlin, T.M.; Ch'ih, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    In this study AFB/sup 1/ was used to assess the interaction between polysomes and the membrane. Hepatocytes treated with 50 ..mu..M AFB/sub 1/ showed no significant quantitative changes in phospholipid, protein, and RNA as compared with untreated cells. Mitochondrial and microsomal fractions isolated from AFB/sub 1/ treated cells showed 10-20% increases in protein and phospholipid. Determinations of membrane components of smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and RER isolated from AFB/sub 1/ treated S-10 reaction gave similar results. To study AFB/sub 1/ activation and modification along with polysome and membrane interactions, SER or RER was incubated in the presence or absence of polysomes. In the presence of 0.25, 1 and 3 mg polysomes, (/sup 3/H)AFB/sub 1/ activation was inhibited by 28, 38, and 59%, respectively. When SER was incubated with (/sup 3/H)AFB/sub 1/ for 20 min in the absence of polysomes, the subsequent addition of varying amounts of polysomes resulted in a concentration dependent modification of polysomes. This concentration dependent modification and inhibition of AFB/sub 1/ activation by polysomes and the lack of changes in membrane components by AFB/sub 1/ indicated that the membrane sites for AFB/sub 1/ activation and polysome attachment are in close proximity.

  15. Structural Plasticity in the Topology of the Membrane-Interacting Domain of HIV-1 gp41

    PubMed Central

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Freites, J. Alfredo; He, Jing; Tobias, Douglas J.; Wimley, William C.; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2014-01-01

    We use a number of computational and experimental approaches to investigate the membrane topology of the membrane-interacting C-terminal domain of the HIV-1 gp41 fusion protein. Several putative transmembrane regions are identified using hydrophobicity analysis based on the Wimley-White scales, including the membrane-proximal external region (MPER). The MPER region is an important target for neutralizing anti-HIV monoclonal antibodies and is believed to have an interfacial topology in the membrane. To assess the possibility of a transmembrane topology of MPER, we examined the membrane interactions of a peptide corresponding to a 22-residue stretch of the MPER sequence (residues 662–683) using fluorescence spectroscopy and oriented circular dichroism. In addition to the previously reported interfacial location, we identify a stable transmembrane conformation of the peptide in synthetic lipid bilayers. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of the MPER-derived peptide in a lipid bilayer demonstrate a stable helical structure with an average tilt of 24 degrees, with the five tryptophan residues sampling different environments inside the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, consistent with the observed spectral properties of intrinsic fluorescence. The degree of lipid bilayer penetration obtained by computer simulation was verified using depth-dependent fluorescence quenching of a selectively attached fluorescence probe. Overall, our data indicate that the MPER sequence can have at least two stable conformations in the lipid bilayer, interfacial and transmembrane, and suggest a possibility that external perturbations can switch the topology during physiological functioning. PMID:24507601

  16. Interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2008-03-01

    Chronic usage of Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) leads to gastrointestinal toxicity and clinical evidences point the cause to direct interactions between NSAIDs and phospholipid membranes. Also, NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipid vesicles are shown to be safer and therapeutically more effective than unmodified ones. Our initial experiments and simulations on the partitioning of Aspirin and Ibuprofen clearly indicate role played by the drug structure in drug-membrane interactions. Those results motivated systematic molecular dynamics simulations of membranes with NSAIDs of different size, structure and pKa values. Our results suggest high partition coefficients for these NSAIDs in the membrane compared to water and thinning effect on the bilayer. Our small angle neutron scattering and reflectivity studies on DMPC-Ibuprofen systems indicate that the drug affects both ˜5 nm thick bilayer and overall ˜100 nm diameter vesicle, indicating that NSAIDs affect vesicles on various length scales. We will discuss the structural perturbations to membranes due to NSAIDs at clinically relevant molar ratios and their implications on the use of vesicles as delivery vehicles for NSAIDs.

  17. Contact studies of weak adhesive interactions in water with membrane enhanced surface acoustic wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brass, David Alan

    The measurement of weak adhesive energies has previously been difficult to obtain. To measure these energies, I designed a technique that uses the combined sensitivities of both a quartz crystal resonator and the inflation of an elastomeric polymer membrane. The surfaces of the quartz crystal and/or the membrane are modified with water swollen polymer brushes, which are used to eliminate nonspecific adhesion. These brushes are then end-modified with adhesive functional groups. An analysis is developed for the frequency response of a quartz crystal resonator as the membrane layer is placed in contact with the surface of these swollen brushes. The shear wave generated at the resonator surface couples into the membrane layer with an efficiency that is strongly dependent on the thickness of the swollen brush layer. The calculated shift decreases substantially for increases in the brush thickness of ten to twenty nanometers, giving a net frequency response that is extremely sensitive to the degree of swelling of the brush. An optimum capping layer thickness is determined by balancing the resonant frequency shift against dissipative effects that weaken the crystal resonance. Detailed calculations are presented for the specific case of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) brushes swollen by water and capped by a poly(styrene-ethylene/butene-styrene) (SEBS) elastomeric, water-permeable membrane. These calculations show that the method is sensitive to the properties of the brush layer. This surface acoustic wave technique was coupled with an inflation method that enabled quantification of the adhesion between the membrane and the brush coated surface. This adhesive interaction is obtained from the contact angle made between the quartz and membrane surfaces and the tension on the membrane. An analysis of the membrane profile based on the numerical solution of the axisymmetric Laplace equation is developed and used to investigate both adhesive and non-adhesive situations with both an

  18. Site of fluorescent label modifies interaction of melittin with live cells and model membranes.

    PubMed

    Jamasbi, Elaheh; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D; Tailhades, Julien; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Ugalde, Cathryn L; Sharples, Robyn A; Patil, Nitin; Wade, John D; Hossain, Mohammed Akhter; Separovic, Frances

    2015-10-01

    The mechanism of membrane disruption by melittin (MLT) of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and live cells was studied using fluorescence microscopy and two fluorescent synthetic analogues of MLT. The N-terminus of one of these was acylated with thiopropionic acid to enable labeling with maleimido-AlexaFluor 430 to study the interaction of MLT with live cells. It was compared with a second analogue labeled at P14C. The results indicated that the fluorescent peptides adhered to the membrane bilayer of phosphatidylcholine GUVs and inserted into the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. Fluorescence and light microscopy revealed changes in cell morphology after exposure to MLT peptides and showed bleb formation in the plasma membrane of HeLa cells. However, the membrane disruptive effect was dependent upon the location of the fluorescent label on the peptide and was greater when MLT was labeled at the N-terminus. Proline at position 14 appeared to be important for antimicrobial activity, hemolysis and cytotoxicity, but not essential for cell membrane disruption. PMID:26051124

  19. Phosphatidylethanolamine Binding Is a Conserved Feature of Cyclotide-Membrane Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Huang, Yen-Hua; Castanho, Miguel A. R. B.; Bagatolli, Luis A.; Sonza, Secondo; Tachedjian, Gilda; Daly, Norelle L.; Craik, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclotides are bioactive cyclic peptides isolated from plants that are characterized by a topologically complex structure and exceptional resistance to enzymatic or thermal degradation. With their sequence diversity, ultra-stable core structural motif, and range of bioactivities, cyclotides are regarded as a combinatorial peptide template with potential applications in drug design. The mode of action of cyclotides remains elusive, but all reported biological activities are consistent with a mechanism involving membrane interactions. In this study, a diverse set of cyclotides from the two major subfamilies, Möbius and bracelet, and an all-d mirror image form, were examined to determine their mode of action. Their lipid selectivity and membrane affinity were determined, as were their toxicities against a range of targets (red blood cells, bacteria, and HIV particles). Although they had different membrane-binding affinities, all of the tested cyclotides targeted membranes through binding to phospholipids containing phosphatidylethanolamine headgroups. Furthermore, the biological potency of the tested cyclotides broadly correlated with their ability to target and disrupt cell membranes. The finding that a broad range of cyclotides target a specific lipid suggests their categorization as a new lipid-binding protein family. Knowledge of their membrane specificity has the potential to assist in the design of novel drugs based on the cyclotide framework, perhaps allowing the targeting of peptide drugs to specific cell types. PMID:22854971

  20. Interaction of divalent metal ions with human translocase of inner membrane of mitochondria Tim23.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Zhang, Yongqiang; Deng, Honghua; Li, Shu Jie

    2016-06-17

    The preprotein translocase of the inner membrane of mitochondria (TIM23 complex) is the main entry gate for proteins of the matrix and the inner membrane. Tim23p, the core component of TIM23 complex, forms the import pore across the inner membrane and exerts a key function in the protein import. However, the interaction of divalent metal ions with Tim23p and the contribution in the interaction of presequence peptide with Tim23p are still unknown. Herein, we investigated the interaction of divalent metal ions with the intermembrane space domain of Tim23p (Tim23IMS) and the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS in presence of Ca(2+) ion by fluorescence spectroscopy in vitro. The static fluorescence quenching indicates the existence of strong binding between divalent metal ions and Tim23IMS. The order of the binding strength is Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+), and Co(2+) (from strong to weak). Moreover, the interaction of presequence peptides with Tim23IMS is weakened in presence of Ca(2+) ion, which implicates that Ca(2+) ion may play an important role in the protein import by TIM23 complex. PMID:27178215

  1. Can Xanthophyll-Membrane Interactions Explain Their Selective Presence in the Retina and Brain?

    PubMed Central

    Widomska, Justyna; Zareba, Mariusz; Subczynski, Witold Karol

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies demonstrate that a high dietary intake of carotenoids may offer protection against age-related macular degeneration, cancer and cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. Humans cannot synthesize carotenoids and depend on their dietary intake. Major carotenoids that have been found in human plasma can be divided into two groups, carotenes (nonpolar molecules, such as β-carotene, α-carotene or lycopene) and xanthophylls (polar carotenoids that include an oxygen atom in their structure, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and β-cryptoxanthin). Only two dietary carotenoids, namely lutein and zeaxanthin (macular xanthophylls), are selectively accumulated in the human retina. A third carotenoid, meso-zeaxanthin, is formed directly in the human retina from lutein. Additionally, xanthophylls account for about 70% of total carotenoids in all brain regions. Some specific properties of these polar carotenoids must explain why they, among other available carotenoids, were selected during evolution to protect the retina and brain. It is also likely that the selective uptake and deposition of macular xanthophylls in the retina and brain are enhanced by specific xanthophyll-binding proteins. We hypothesize that the high membrane solubility and preferential transmembrane orientation of macular xanthophylls distinguish them from other dietary carotenoids, enhance their chemical and physical stability in retina and brain membranes and maximize their protective action in these organs. Most importantly, xanthophylls are selectively concentrated in the most vulnerable regions of lipid bilayer membranes enriched in polyunsaturated lipids. This localization is ideal if macular xanthophylls are to act as lipid-soluble antioxidants, which is the most accepted mechanism through which lutein and zeaxanthin protect neural tissue against degenerative diseases. PMID:27030822

  2. BamA POTRA Domain Interacts with a Native Lipid Membrane Surface.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Patrick J; Patel, Dhilon S; Wu, Emilia L; Qi, Yifei; Yeom, Min Sun; Sousa, Marcelo Carlos; Fleming, Karen G; Im, Wonpil

    2016-06-21

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is an asymmetric membrane with lipopolysaccharides on the external leaflet and phospholipids on the periplasmic leaflet. This outer membrane contains mainly β-barrel transmembrane proteins and lipidated periplasmic proteins (lipoproteins). The multisubunit protein β-barrel assembly machine (BAM) catalyzes the insertion and folding of the β-barrel proteins into this membrane. In Escherichia coli, the BAM complex consists of five subunits, a core transmembrane β-barrel with a long periplasmic domain (BamA) and four lipoproteins (BamB/C/D/E). The BamA periplasmic domain is composed of five globular subdomains in tandem called POTRA motifs that are key to BAM complex formation and interaction with the substrate β-barrel proteins. The BAM complex is believed to undergo conformational cycling while facilitating insertion of client proteins into the outer membrane. Reports describing variable conformations and dynamics of the periplasmic POTRA domain have been published. Therefore, elucidation of the conformational dynamics of the POTRA domain in full-length BamA is important to understand the function of this molecular complex. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we present evidence that the conformational flexibility of the POTRA domain is modulated by binding to the periplasmic surface of a native lipid membrane. Furthermore, membrane binding of the POTRA domain is compatible with both BamB and BamD binding, suggesting that conformational selection of different POTRA domain conformations may be involved in the mechanism of BAM-facilitated insertion of outer membrane β-barrel proteins. PMID:27332128

  3. Interaction of LL-37 with Model Membrane Systems of Different Complexity: Influence of the Lipid Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Sevcsik, E.; Pabst, G.; Richter, W.; Danner, S.; Amenitsch, H.; Lohner, K.

    2008-01-01

    As the main difference between bacterial and mammalian cell membranes is their net charge, the focal point of consideration in many model membrane experiments with antimicrobial peptides is lipid headgroup charge. We studied the interaction of the human multifunctional peptide LL-37 with single phospholipid monolayers, bilayers, and bilayers composed of binary mixtures of the four phospholipid species predominantly used in model membrane experiments (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylserine). We found that 1), the effects on single lipid monolayers are not comparable to those on the corresponding bilayers; 2), there are four different effects of LL-37 on bilayers of the four lipids; 3), the preference of LL-37 for the specific lipids is roughly inversely related to chain packing density; and 4), in the binary lipid mixtures, one lipid—and not necessarily the charged one—generally governs the mode of lipid/peptide interaction. Thus, our results show that lipid net charge is not the decisive factor determining the membrane-perturbing mechanism of LL-37, but only one of several parameters, among them packing density, the ability to form intermolecular H-bonds, and lipid molecular shape, which emphasizes how profoundly the choice of the model system can influence the outcome of a study of lipid/peptide interaction. PMID:18326643

  4. Direct effects of ionizing radiation on integral membrane proteins. Noncovalent energy transfer requires specific interpeptide interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Jhun, E.; Jhun, B.H.; Jones, L.R.; Jung, C.Y. )

    1991-05-25

    The 12 transmembrane alpha helices (TMHs) of human erythrocyte glucose transporter were individually cut by pepsin digestion as membrane-bound 2.5-3.5-kDa peptide fragments. Radiation-induced chemical degradation of these fragments showed an average target size of 34 kDa. This is 10-12 x larger than the average size of an individual TMH, demonstrating that a significant energy transfer occurs among these TMHs in the absence of covalent linkage. Heating this TMH preparation at 100{degree}C for 15 min reduced the target size to 5 kDa or less, suggesting that the noncovalent energy transfer requires specific helix-helix interactions. Purified phospholamban, a small (6-kDa) integral membrane protein containing a single TMH, formed a pentameric assembly in sodium dodecyl sulfate. The chemical degradation target size of this phospholamban pentamer was 5-6 kDa, illustrating that not all integral membrane protein assemblies permit intersubunit energy transfer. These findings together with other published observations suggest strongly that significant noncovalent energy transfer can occur within the tertiary and quaternary structure of membrane proteins and that as yet undefined proper molecular interactions are required for such covalent energy transfer. Our results with pepsin-digested glucose transporter also illustrate the importance of the interhelical interaction as a predominating force in maintaining the tertiary structure of a transmembrane protein.

  5. Ionic channels and nerve membrane constituents. Tetrodotoxin-like interaction of saxitoxin with cholesterol monolayers.

    PubMed

    Villegas, R; Barnola, F V

    1972-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and tetrodotoxin (TTX) have the same striking property of blocking the Na(+) channels in the axolemma. Experiments with nerve plasma membrane components of the squid Dosidicus gigas have shown that TTX interacts with cholesterol monolayers. Similar experiments were carried out with STX. The effect of STX on the surface pressure-area diagrams of lipid monolayers and on the fluorescence emission spectra of sonicated nerve membranes was studied. The results indicate a TTX-like interaction of STX with cholesterol monolayers. The expansion of the monolayers caused by 10(-6)M STX was 2.2 A(2)/cholesterol molecule at 25 degrees C. From surface pressure measurements at constant cholesterol area (39 A(2)/molecule) in media with various STX concentrations, it was calculated that the STX/cholesterol surface concentration ratio is 0.54. The apparent dissociation constant of the STX-cholesterol monolayer complex is 4.0 x 10(-7)M. The STX/cholesterol ratio and the apparent dissociation constant are similar to those determined for TTX. The presence of other lipids in the monolayers affects the STX-cholesterol association. The interactions of STX and TTX with cholesterol monolayers suggest (a) that cholesterol molecules may be part of the nerve membrane Na(+) channels, or (b) that the toxin receptor at the nerve membrane shares similar chemical features with the cholesterol monolayers. PMID:5007264

  6. Appoptosin interacts with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cuilin; Shi, Zhun; Zhang, Lingzhi; Zhou, Zehua; Zheng, Xiaoyuan; Liu, Guiying; Bu, Guojun; Fraser, Paul E; Xu, Huaxi; Zhang, Yun-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondrial morphology is regulated by fusion and fission machinery. Impaired mitochondria dynamics cause various diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. Appoptosin (encoded by SLC25A38) is a mitochondrial carrier protein that is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Appoptosin overexpression causes overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caspase-dependent apoptosis, whereas appoptosin downregulation abolishes β-amyloid-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and neuronal death during Alzheimer's disease. Herein, we found that overexpression of appoptosin resulted in mitochondrial fragmentation in a manner independent of its carrier function, ROS production or caspase activation. Although appoptosin did not affect levels of mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion (MFN1 and MFN2), inner-membrane fusion (OPA1) and fission [DRP1 (also known as DNM1L) and FIS1] proteins, appoptosin interacted with MFN1 and MFN2, as well as with the mitochondrial ubiquitin ligase MITOL (also known as MARCH5) but not OPA1, FIS1 or DRP1. Appoptosin overexpression impaired the interaction between MFN1 and MFN2, and mitochondrial fusion. By contrast, co-expression of MFN1, MITOL and a dominant-negative form of DRP1, DRP1(K38A), partially rescued appoptosin-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and apoptosis, whereas co-expression of FIS1 aggravated appoptosin-induced apoptosis. Together, our results demonstrate that appoptosin can interact with mitochondrial outer-membrane fusion proteins and regulates mitochondrial morphology. PMID:26813789

  7. Selective trans-membrane transport of alkali and alkaline earth cations through graphene oxide membranes based on cation-π interactions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengzhan; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Miao; Song, Zhigong; Wang, Kunlin; Zhong, Minlin; Wu, Dehai; Little, Reginald B; Xu, Zhiping; Zhu, Hongwei

    2014-01-28

    Graphene and graphene oxide (G-O) have been demonstrated to be excellent filters for various gases and liquids, showing potential applications in areas such as molecular sieving and water desalination. In this paper, the selective trans-membrane transport properties of alkali and alkaline earth cations through a membrane composed of stacked and overlapped G-O sheets ("G-O membrane") are investigated. The thermodynamics of the ion transport process reveal that the competition between the generated thermal motions and the interactions of cations with the G-O sheets results in the different penetration behaviors to temperature variations for the considered cations (K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Ba(2+)). The interactions between the studied metal atoms and graphene are quantified by first-principles calculations based on the plane-wave-basis-set density functional theory (DFT) approach. The mechanism of the selective ion trans-membrane transportation is discussed further and found to be consistent with the concept of cation-π interactions involved in biological systems. The balance between cation-π interactions of the cations considered with the sp(2) clusters of G-O membranes and the desolvation effect of the ions is responsible for the selectivity of G-O membranes toward the penetration of different ions. These results help us better understand the ion transport process through G-O membranes, from which the possibility of modeling the ion transport behavior of cellular membrane using G-O can be discussed further. The selectivity toward different ions also makes G-O membrane a promising candidate in areas of membrane separations. PMID:24401025

  8. Preferential Remedies for Employment Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Harry T.; Zaretsky, Barry L.

    1975-01-01

    An overview of the problem of preferential remedies to achieve equal employment opportunities for women and minority groups. Contends that "color blindness" will not end discrimination but that some form of "color conscious" affirmative action program must be employed. Temporary preferential treatment is justified, according to the author, by the…

  9. Preferential interaction of the his pause RNA hairpin with RNA polymerase β subunit residues 904–950 correlates with strong transcriptional pausing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Daguang; Severinov, Konstantin; Landick, Robert

    1997-01-01

    RNA secondary structures (hairpins) that form as the nascent RNA emerges from RNA polymerase are important components of many signals that regulate transcription, including some pause sites, all ρ-independent terminators, and some antiterminators. At the his leader pause site, a 5-bp-stem, 8-nt-loop pause RNA hairpin forms 11 nt from the RNA 3′ end and stabilizes a transcription complex conformation slow to react with NTP substrate. This stabilization appears to depend at least in part on an interaction with RNA polymerase. We tested for RNA hairpin interaction with the paused polymerase by crosslinking 5-iodoUMP positioned specifically in the hairpin loop. In the paused conformation, strong and unusual crosslinking of the pause hairpin to β904–950 replaced crosslinking to β′ and to other parts of β that occurred in nonpaused complexes prior to hairpin formation. These changes in nascent RNA interactions may inhibit reactive alignment of the RNA 3′ end in the paused complex and be related to events at ρ-independent terminators. PMID:9237994

  10. Experiences with nonlinear dynamics of panels and membranes considering fluid-structure interaction and acoustic fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Ferman, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A collection of some highlights of the Author`s experiences with nonlinear dynamics in analyses and tests of Panels and Membranes encountered over the past 40 years is given. The primary focus is placed on a major block of his work since the early 70`s, involving work with fluid-structure interaction with Panels and Membranes, and with efforts in Acoustic Fatigue of Panels. While the Author had encountered nonlinear problems throughout Ins career involving flutter, vibration in general, and dynamic thrust instability; it was the more recent work with panels and membranes that greatly expanded his experience. This was triggered by the advent of highly maneuverable aircraft, powered by large powerful, noisy engines, and new materials in the mid 70`s. The significance of nonlinearity for these applications is most obvious from the results shown here-it simply cannot be ignored for optimal, safe design.

  11. Calcium and protons affect the interaction of neurotransmitters and anesthetics with anionic lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Isidoro, Rosendo; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2016-09-01

    We study how zwitterionic and anionic biomembrane models interact with neurotransmitters (NTs) and anesthetics (ATs) in the presence of Ca(2+) and different pH conditions. As NTs we used acetylcholine (ACh), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and l-glutamic acid (LGlu). As ATs, tetracaine (TC), and pentobarbital (PB) were employed. By using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), we analyzed the changes such molecules produce in the thermal properties of the membranes. We found that calcium and pH play important roles in the interactions of NTs and ATs with the anionic lipid membranes. Changes in pH promote deprotonation of the phosphate groups in anionic phospholipids inducing electrostatic interactions between them and NTs; but if Ca(2+) ions are in the system, these act as bridges. Such interactions impact the physical properties of the membranes in a similar manner that anesthetics do. Beyond the usual biochemical approach, we claim that these effects should be taken into account to understand the excitatory-inhibitory orchestrated balance in the nervous system. PMID:27362370

  12. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  13. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  14. Specificity and mechanism of action of alpha-helical membrane-active peptides interacting with model and biological membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyu; Zhao, Guangxu; Huang, Yibing; Cai, Mingjun; Shan, Yuping; Wang, Hongda; Chen, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to systematically investigate the targeting specificity of membrane-active peptides on different types of cell membranes, we evaluated the effects of peptides on different large unilamellar vesicles mimicking prokaryotic, normal eukaryotic, and cancer cell membranes by single-molecule force spectroscopy and spectrum technology. We revealed that cationic membrane-active peptides can exclusively target negatively charged prokaryotic and cancer cell model membranes rather than normal eukaryotic cell model membranes. Using Acholeplasma laidlawii, 3T3-L1, and HeLa cells to represent prokaryotic cells, normal eukaryotic cells, and cancer cells in atomic force microscopy experiments, respectively, we further studied that the single-molecule targeting interaction between peptides and biological membranes. Antimicrobial and anticancer activities of peptides exhibited strong correlations with the interaction probability determined by single-molecule force spectroscopy, which illustrates strong correlations of peptide biological activities and peptide hydrophobicity and charge. Peptide specificity significantly depends on the lipid compositions of different cell membranes, which validates the de novo design of peptide therapeutics against bacteria and cancers. PMID:27363513

  15. Biochemistry and Biophysics of HIV-1 gp41 – membrane interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Lifeng; Gochin, Miriam; Liu, Keliang

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the pathogen of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), causes ~2 millions death every year and still defies an effective vaccine. HIV-1 infects host cells through envelope protein – mediated virus-cell fusion. The transmembrane subunit of envelope protein, gp41, is the molecular machinery which facilitates fusion. Its ectodomain contains several distinguishing functional domains, fusion peptide (FP), N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR), C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR) and membrane proximal extracellular region (MPER). During the fusion process, FP inserts into the host cell membrane, and an extended gp41 prehairpin conformation bridges the viral and cell membranes through MPER and FP respectively. Subsequent conformational change of the unstable prehairpin results in a coiled-coil 6-helix bundle (6HB) structure formed between NHR and CHR. The energetics of 6HB formation drives membrane apposition and fusion. Drugs targeting gp41 functional domains to prevent 6HB formation inhibit HIV-1 infection. T20 (enfuvirtide, Fuzeon) was approved by the US FDA in 2003 as the first fusion inhibitor. It is a 36-residue peptide from the gp41 CHR, and it inhibits 6HB formation by targeting NHR and lipids. Development of new fusion inhibitors, especially small molecule drugs, is encouraged to overcome the shortcomings of T20 as a peptide drug. Hydrophobic characteristics and membrane association are critical for gp41 function and mechanism of action. Research in gp41-membrane interactions, using peptides corresponding to specific functional domains, or constructs including several interactive domains, are reviewed here to get a better understanding of gp41 mediated virus-cell fusion that can inform or guide the design of new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors. PMID:22044229

  16. Interaction of Aβ(1-42) amyloids with lipids promotes "off-pathway" oligomerization and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Henry, Sarah; Vignaud, Hélène; Bobo, Claude; Decossas, Marion; Lambert, Oliver; Harte, Etienne; Alves, Isabel D; Cullin, Christophe; Lecomte, Sophie

    2015-03-01

    The toxicity of amyloids, as Aβ(1-42) involved in Alzheimer disease, is a subject under intense scrutiny. Many studies link their toxicity to the existence of various intermediate structures prior to fiber formation and/or their specific interaction with membranes. In this study we focused on the interaction between membrane models and Aβ(1-42) peptides and variants (L34T, mG37C) produced in E. coli and purified in monomeric form. We evaluated the interaction of a toxic stable oligomeric form (oG37C) with membranes as comparison. Using various biophysical techniques as fluorescence and plasmon waveguide resonance, we clearly established that the oG37C interacts strongly with membranes leading to its disruption. All the studied peptides destabilized liposomes and accumulated slowly on the membrane (rate constant 0.02 min(-1)). Only the oG37C exhibited a particular pattern of interaction, comprising two steps: the initial binding followed by membrane reorganization. Cryo-TEM was used to visualize the peptide effect on liposome morphologies. Both oG37C and mG37C lead to PG membrane fragmentation. The PG membrane promotes peptide oligomerization, implicated in membrane disruption. WT (Aβ(1-42)) also perturbs liposome organization with membrane deformation rather than disruption. For all the peptides studied, their interaction with the membranes changes their fibrillization process, with less fibers and more small aggregates being formed. These studies allowed to establish, a correlation between toxicity, fiber formation, and membrane disruption. PMID:25689632

  17. Critical Evaluation and Compilation of Physicochemical Determinants and Membrane Interactions of MMGP1 Antifungal Peptide.

    PubMed

    Pushpanathan, Muthuirulan; Pooja, Sharma; Gunasekaran, Paramasamy; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2016-05-01

    A growing issue of pathogen resistance to antibiotics has fostered the development of innovative approaches for novel drug development. Here, we report the physicochemical and biological properties of an antifungal peptide, MMGP1, based on computational analysis. Computation of physicochemical properties has revealed that the natural biological activities of MMGP1 are coordinated by its intrinsic properties such as net positive charge (+5.04), amphipathicity, high hydrophobicity, low hydrophobic moment, and higher isoelectric point (11.915). Prediction of aggregation hot spots in MMGP1 had revealed the presence of potentially aggregation-prone segments that can nucleate in vivo aggregation (on the membrane), whereas no aggregating regions were predicted for in vitro aggregation (in solutions) of MMGP1. This ability of MMGP1 to form oligomeric aggregates on membrane further substantiates its direct-cell penetrating potency. Monte Carlo simulation of the interactions of MMGP1 in the aqueous phase and different membrane environments revealed that increasing the proportion of acidic lipids on membrane had led to increase in the peptide helicity. Furthermore, the peptide adopts energetically favorable transmembrane configuration, by inserting peptide loop and helix termini into the membrane containing >60% of anionic lipids. The charged lipid-based insertion of MMGP1 into membrane might be responsible for the selectivity of peptide toward fungal cells. Additionally, MMGP1 possessed DNA-binding property. Computational docking has identified DNA-binding residues (TRP3, SER4, MET7, ARG8, PHE10, ALA11, GLY20, THR21, ARG22, MET23, TRP34, and LYS36) in MMGP1 crucial for its DNA-binding property. Furthermore, computational mutation analysis revealed that aromatic amino acids are crucial for in vivo aggregation, membrane insertion, and DNA-binding property of MMGP1. These data provide new insight into the molecular determinants of MMGP1 antifungal activity and also serves as

  18. Interaction of saposin D with membranes: effect of anionic phospholipids and sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Tatti, Massimo; Salvioli, Rosa; Vaccaro, Anna Maria

    2003-08-01

    Saposin (Sap) D is an endolysosomal protein that, together with three other similar proteins, Sap A, Sap B and Sap C, is involved in the degradation of sphingolipids and, possibly, in the solubilization and transport of gangliosides. We found that Sap D is able to destabilize and disrupt membranes containing each of the three anionic phospholipids most abundant in the acidic endolysosomal compartment, namely lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylserine (PS). The breakdown of the membranes, which occurs when the Sap D concentration on the lipid surface reaches a critical value, is a slow process that gives rise to small particles. The Sap D-particle complexes formed in an acidic milieu can be dissociated by an increase in pH, suggesting a dynamic association of Sap D with membranes. The presence of anionic phospholipids is required also for the Sap D-induced perturbation and solubilization of membranes containing a neutral sphingolipid such as ceramide or a ganglioside such as G(M1). At appropriate Sap D concentrations Cer and G(M1) are solubilized as constituents of small phospholipid particles. Our findings imply that most functions of Sap D are dependent on its interaction with anionic phospholipids, which mediate the Sap D effect on other components of the membrane such as sphingolipids. On consideration of the properties of Sap D we propose that Sap D might have a role in the definition of the structure and function of membranes, such as the intra-endolysosomal membranes, that are rich in anionic phospholipids. PMID:12733985

  19. Feedback Interactions of Polymerized Actin with the Cell Membrane: Waves, Pulses, and Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Anders

    Polymerized filaments of the protein actin have crucial functions in cell migration, and in bending the cell membrane to drive endocytosis or the formation of protrusions. The nucleation and polymerization of actin filaments are controlled by upstream agents in the cell membrane, including nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) that activate the Arp2/3 complex to form new branches on pre-existing filaments. But polymerized actin (F-actin) also feeds back on the assembly of NPFs. We explore the effects of the resulting feedback loop of F-actin and NPFs on two phenomena: actin pulses that drive endocytosis in yeast, and actin waves traveling along the membrane of several cell types. In our model of endocytosis in yeast, the actin network is grown explicitly in three dimensions, exerts a negative feedback interaction on localized patch of NPFs in the membrane, and bends the membrane by exerting a distribution of forces. This model explains observed actin and NPF pulse dynamics, and the effects of several interventions including i) NPF mutations, ii) inhibition of actin polymerization, and iii) deletion of a protein that allows F-actin to bend the cell membrane. The model predicts that mutation of the active region of an NPF will enhance the accumulation of that NPF, and we confirm this prediction by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. For actin waves, we treat a similar model, with NPFs distributed over a larger region of the cell membrane. This model naturally generates actin waves, and predicts a transition from wave behavior to spatially localized oscillations when NPFs are confined to a small region. We also predict a transition from waves to static polarization as the negative-feedback coupling between F-actin and the NPFs is reduced. Supported by NIGMS Grant R01 GM107667.

  20. Cell Receptor-Basement Membrane Interactions in Health and Disease: A Kidney-Centric View.

    PubMed

    Borza, Corina M; Chen, Xiwu; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2015-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential for tissue development, homeostasis, and response to injury. Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized ECMs that separate epithelial or endothelial cells from stromal components and interact with cells via cellular receptors, including integrins and discoidin domain receptors. Disruption of cell-BM interactions due to either injury or genetic defects in either the ECM components or cellular receptors often lead to irreversible tissue injury and loss of organ function. Animal models that lack specific BM components or receptors either globally or in selective tissues have been used to help with our understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell-BM interactions regulate organ function in physiological and pathological conditions. We review recently published works on animal models that explore how cell-BM interactions regulate kidney homeostasis in both health and disease. PMID:26610916

  1. Nature Utilizes Unusual High London Dispersion Interactions for Compact Membranes Composed of Molecular Ladders.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J Philipp; Schreiner, Peter R

    2014-03-11

    London dispersion interactions play a key role in nature, in particular, in membranes that constitute natural barriers. Here we demonstrate that the spatial alignment of "molecular ladders" ([n]ladderanes), i.e., highly unusual and strained all-trans-fused cyclobutane moieties, leads to much larger attractive dispersion interactions as compared to alkyl chains of the same length. This provides a rationale for the occurrence of peculiar ladderane fatty acids in the dense cell walls of anammox bacteria. Despite the energetic penalty paid for the assembly of such strained polycycles, the advantage lies in significantly higher, dispersion-dominated interaction energies as compared to straight-chain hydrocarbon moieties commonly found in fatty acids. We discern the dispersion contributions to the total interaction energies using a variety of computational methods including modern dispersion-corrected density functional theory and high level ab initio approaches. Utilizing larger assemblies, we also show that the intermolecular interactions behave additively. PMID:26580198

  2. Cell Receptor-Basement Membrane Interactions in Health and Disease: a Kidney-Centric View

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Corina M.; Chen, Xiwu; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are essential for tissue development, homeostasis, and response to injury. Basement membranes (BMs) are specialized ECMs that separate epithelial or endothelial cells from stromal components and interact with cells via cellular receptors, including integrins and discoidin domain receptors. Disruption of cell-BM interactions due to either injury or genetic defects in either the ECM components or cellular receptors often lead to irreversible tissue injury and loss of organ function. Animal models that lack specific BM components or receptors either globally or in selective tissues have been used to help with our understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby cell-BM interactions regulate organ function in physiological and pathological conditions. We review recently published work on animal models that explore how cell-BM interactions regulate kidney homeostasis in both health and disease. PMID:26610916

  3. Selective toxin-lipid membrane interactions of natural, haemolytic Scyphozoan toxins analyzed by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Helmholz, Heike

    2010-10-01

    A comparison of the molecular interaction of natural Scyphozoan lysins with their bioactivity in a haemolytic assay was performed by establishing an efficient, automatable and reproducible procedure for the measurement of protein-membrane interactions. The toxin-membrane interactions were analyzed utilising a chip-based technology with immobilized liposomes as artificial cell membranes. The technique was established with streptolysin O as a cholesterol-selective model toxin and its cholesterol-selectivity has been proven. The haemolytic potency of protein fractions derived from the venom of the jellyfish Aurelia aurita and Cyanea capillata was tested and EC50 values of 35.3mug/mL and 43.1mug/mL against sheep and 13.5mug/mL and 8.8mug/mL against rabbit erythrocytes were measured. Cell membrane binding as a first step in the haemolytic process was analyzed using the Biacore((R)) technology. Major cell membrane lipids (cholesterol, sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine) were immobilized as pure liposomes and in binary mixtures. A preference for cholesterol and sphingomyelin of both jellyfish species was demonstrated. The specificity of the method was proven with a non-haemolytic A. aurita protein fraction that did not express a lipid binding. Additionally, an inactivated C. capillata lysine with negligible haemolytic activity showed a remaining but reduced adsorption onto lipid layers. The binding level of the lytic venom fraction of these dominant boreal jellyfish species increased as a function of protein concentration. The binding strength was expressed in RU50 values ranging from 12.4mug/mL to 35.4mug/mL, which were in the same order of magnitude as the EC50 values in the haemolytic assay. PMID:20599534

  4. Interactions of fatty acids with phosphatidylethanolamine membranes: X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics studies

    PubMed Central

    Cordomí, Arnau; Prades, Jesús; Frau, Juan; Vögler, Oliver; Funari, Sérgio S.; Perez, Juan J.; Escribá, Pablo V.; Barceló, Francisca

    2010-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on 1,2-dielaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DEPE) membranes containing fatty acids (FAs) was performed by means of X-ray diffraction analysis and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The study was aimed at understanding the interactions of several structurally related FAs with biomembranes, which is necessary for further rational lipid drug design in membrane-lipid therapy. The main effect of FAs was to promote the formation of a HII phase, despite a stabilization of the coexisting Lα + HII phases. Derivatives of OA exhibited a specific density profile in the direction perpendicular to the bilayer that reflects differences in the relative localization of the carboxylate group within the polar region of the membrane as well as in the degree of membrane penetration of the FA acyl chain. Hydroxyl and methyl substituents at carbon-2 in the FA acyl chain were identified as effective modulators of the position of carboxylate group in the lipid bilayer. Our data highlight the specific potential of each FA in modulating the membrane structure properties. PMID:19965616

  5. Regulation of CNGA1 Channel Gating by Interactions with the Membrane.

    PubMed

    Aman, Teresa K; Gordon, Sharona E; Zagotta, William N

    2016-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are expressed in rod photoreceptors and open in response to direct binding of cyclic nucleotides. We have previously shown that potentiation of CNGA1 channels by transition metals requires a histidine in the A' helix following the S6 transmembrane segment. Here, we used transition metal ion FRET and patch clamp fluorometry with a fluorescent, noncanonical amino acid (3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap)) to show that the potentiating transition metal Co(2+) binds in or near the A' helix. Adding high-affinity metal-binding sites to the membrane (stearoyl-nitrilotriacetic acid (C18-NTA)) increased potentiation for low Co(2+) concentrations, indicating that the membrane can coordinate metal ions with the A' helix. These results suggest that restraining the A' helix to the plasma membrane potentiates CNGA1 channel opening. Similar interactions between the A' helix and the plasma membrane may underlie regulation of structurally related hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) and voltage-gated potassium subfamily H (KCNH) channels by plasma membrane components. PMID:26969165

  6. Modulation of amphotericin B membrane interaction by cholesterol and ergosterol--a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Czub, Jacek; Baginski, Maciej

    2006-08-24

    Amphotericin B (AmB) is a well-known polyene macrolide antibiotic used to treat systemic fungal infections. According to a well-documented hypothesis, molecules of AmB form ionic membrane channels that are responsible for chemotherapeutic action. These channels disturb the barrier function of the cell membrane which, in consequence, leads to cell death. The presence of sterols in the cell membrane is necessary for full manifestation of the antibiotic's ionophoric activity, at least in vivo. Ergosterol-containing fungal membranes are targeted more efficiently by AmB than mammalian membranes containing cholesterol. However, a similar level of disturbance of fungal and mammalian membranes is responsible for serious toxicity of the antibiotic. Due to the importance of AmB and lack of better antifungal alternatives, the search for new less toxic derivatives of this antibiotic still continues. Therefore, studies of the AmB-membrane interaction are very important. The present work constitutes a continuation of a broad program of study on AmB mode of action in our group. In particular, molecular dynamics simulations of AmB monomers inside the bilayers of three different compositions (pure dimiristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and DMPC bilayer containing approximately 25 mol % of cholesterol or ergosterol) were carried out. In general, analysis of generated trajectories resulted in identifying many significant differences in the behavior of AmB monomers depending on the membrane environment. In particular, it was established that the antibiotic increases the internal order of DMPC bilayer containing 25 mol % of cholesterol, while it has no effect on the order of the bilayer with the same amount of ergosterol. Performed calculations also revealed that relatively rigid and elongated AmB molecules exhibit higher affinity toward the sterol-containing lo phases and, therefore, may be cumulated in ordered membrane domains (e.g., lipid rafts). Since the partition coefficient

  7. Interaction of prenylated chalcones and flavanones from common hop with phosphatidylcholine model membranes.

    PubMed

    Wesołowska, Olga; Gąsiorowska, Justyna; Petrus, Joanna; Czarnik-Matusewicz, Bogusława; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Common hop (Humulus lupulus) constitutes a source of numerous prenylated chalcones such as xanthohumol (XH) and flavanones such as 8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and isoxanthohumol (IXH). Range of their biological activities includes estrogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-infective, anti-cancer, and antioxidant activities. The aim of the present work was to characterize the influence of prenylated polyphenols on model 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) membranes by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), fluorescence and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies. All studied compounds intercalated into DPPC bilayers and decreased its melting temperature as recorded by DSC, Laurdan and Prodan fluorescence, and ATR-FTIR. Polyphenols interacted mainly with glycerol backbone and acyl chain region of membrane. Magnitude of the induced effect correlated both with lipophilicity and molecular shape of the studied compounds. Elbow-shaped 8-PN and IXH were locked at polar-apolar region with their prenyl chains penetrating into hydrophobic part of the bilayer, while relatively planar XH molecule adopted linear shape that resulted in its deeper insertion into hydrophobic region. Additionally, by means of DSC and Laurdan fluorescence IXH was demonstrated to induce lateral phase separation in DPPC bilayers in gel-like state. It was assumed that IXH-rich and IXH-poor microdomains appeared within membrane. Present work constitutes the first experimental report describing interactions of prenylated hop polyphenols with phospholipid model membranes. PMID:24060562

  8. Arabidopsis TWISTED DWARF1 functionally interacts with auxin exporter ABCB1 on the root plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bangjun; Bailly, Aurélien; Zwiewka, Marta; Henrichs, Sina; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Maeshima, Masayoshi; Friml, Jirí; Schulz, Alexander; Geisler, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Plant architecture is influenced by the polar, cell-to-cell transport of auxin that is primarily provided and regulated by plasma membrane efflux catalysts of the PIN-FORMED and B family of ABC transporter (ABCB) classes. The latter were shown to require the functionality of the FK506 binding protein42 TWISTED DWARF1 (TWD1), although underlying mechanisms are unclear. By genetic manipulation of TWD1 expression, we show here that TWD1 affects shootward root auxin reflux and, thus, downstream developmental traits, such as epidermal twisting and gravitropism of the root. Using immunological assays, we demonstrate a predominant lateral, mainly outward-facing, plasma membrane location for TWD1 in the root epidermis characterized by the lateral marker ABC transporter G36/PLEIOTROPIC DRUG-RESISTANCE8/PENETRATION3. At these epidermal plasma membrane domains, TWD1 colocalizes with nonpolar ABCB1. In planta bioluminescence resonance energy transfer analysis was used to verify specific ABC transporter B1 (ABCB1)-TWD1 interaction. Our data support a model in which TWD1 promotes lateral ABCB-mediated auxin efflux via protein-protein interaction at the plasma membrane, minimizing reflux from the root apoplast into the cytoplasm. PMID:23321285

  9. Analysis of Toxic Amyloid Fibril Interactions at Natively Derived Membranes by Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rachel A. S.; Nabok, Aleksey; Blakeman, Ben J. F.; Xue, Wei-Feng; Abell, Benjamin; Smith, David P.

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate regarding the culprits of cytotoxicity associated with amyloid disorders. Although small pre-fibrillar amyloid oligomers have been implicated as the primary toxic species, the fibrillar amyloid material itself can also induce cytotoxicity. To investigate membrane disruption and cytotoxic effects associated with intact and fragmented fibrils, the novel in situ spectroscopic technique of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE) was used. Fibril lipid interactions were monitored using natively derived whole cell membranes as a model of the in vivo environment. We show that fragmented fibrils have an increased ability to disrupt these natively derived membranes by causing a loss of material from the deposited surface when compared with unfragmented fibrils. This effect was corroborated by observations of membrane disruption in live cells, and by dye release assay using synthetic liposomes. Through these studies we demonstrate the use of TIRE for the analysis of protein-lipid interactions on natively derived lipid surfaces, and provide an explanation on how amyloid fibrils can cause a toxic gain of function, while entangled amyloid plaques exert minimal biological activity. PMID:26172440

  10. Interactions of phosphororganic agents with water and components of polyelectrolyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Neimark, Alexander V

    2011-11-24

    Interactions of nerve G-agents (sarin and soman) and their simulants DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate) and DIFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate) with water and components of polyelectrolyte membranes are studied using ab initio calculations in conjunction with thermodynamic modeling using the conductor-like screening model for real solvents (COSMO-RS). To test reliability of COSMO-RS calculations, we measured the vapor-liquid equilibrium in DMMP-water mixtures and found quantitative agreement between computed and experimental results. Using COSMO-RS, we studied the interactions of phosphororganic agents with the characteristic fragments of perfluorinated and sulfonated polystyrene (sPS) polyelectrolytes, which are explored for protective clothing membranes. We found that both simulants, DIFP and DMMP, mimic the thermodynamic properties of G-agents reasonably well; however, there are certain specific differences that are discussed. We also suggested that sPS-based polyelectrolytes have less affinity for phosphorganic agents compared to prefluorinated polyelectrolytes similar to Nafion. PMID:21988501

  11. Fluorescent microscope system to monitor real-time interactions between focused ultrasound, echogenic drug delivery vehicles, and live cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Ibsen, Stuart; Benchimol, Michael; Esener, Sadik

    2013-01-01

    Rapid development in the field of ultrasound triggered drug delivery has made it essential to study the real-time interaction between the membranes of live cells and the membranes of echogenic delivery vehicles under exposure to focused ultrasound. The objective of this work was to design an analysis system that combined fluorescent imagining, high speed videography, and definable pulse sequences of focused ultrasound to allow for real time observations of both cell and vehicle membranes. Documenting the behavior of the membranes themselves has not previously been possible due to limitations with existing optical systems used to understand the basic physics of microbubble/ultrasound interaction and the basic interaction between microbubbles and cells. The performance of this new system to monitor membrane behavior was demonstrated by documenting the modes of vehicle fragmentation at different ultrasound intensity levels. At 1.5MPa the membranes were shown to completely fragment while at intensities below 1MPa the membranes pop open and slowly unfold. The interaction between these vehicles and cell membranes was also documented by the removal of fluorescent particles from the surfaces of live cells out to 20μm from the microbubble location. The fluid flow created by microstreaming around ensonated microbubbles was documented at video recording speeds from 60 to 18,000 frames per second. This information about membrane behavior allows the chemical and physical properties of the drug delivery vehicle to be designed along with the ultrasound pulse sequence to cause the most efficient drug delivery. PMID:22749476

  12. Comparative study on the interaction of cell-penetrating polycationic polymers with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Takechi, Yuki; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Kitayama, Hiroki; Yoshii, Haruka; Tanaka, Masafumi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides are arginine- and lysine-rich cationic peptides that can readily enter cells not only by themselves but also carrying other macromolecular cargos. In fact, we have reported that polycationic polymer such as poly-l-lysine (PLL) and poly-l-arginine (PLA) translocate through negatively charged phospholipid liposome membranes. In this work, we made a comparative study of the interaction of PLL or PLA with lipid membranes consisting of negatively charged phospholipids to understand the role of basic amino acid residue (i.e. arginine and lysine) in the membrane-penetrating activity of polypeptides. PLA and PLL translocated into giant unilamellar vesicle composed of soybean phospholipids. ζ-potential and turbidity measurements demonstrated the electrostatic binding of PLL and PLA to large unilamellar vesicle (LUV). Fluorescence studies using membrane probes revealed that the binding of PLA and PLL to LUV affects the hydration and packing of the membrane interface region, in which the membrane insertion of PLA appeared to be greater than PLL. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the enthalpy of the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition for dipalmitoyl phosphatidylglycerol vesicle was greatly reduced by binding of PLL and PLA, in which the reduction is much larger in PLA than in PLL. Circular dichroism measurements in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol/water mixture or in the presence of LUV indicated that the propensity of PLA to form α-helical structure is greater than PLL. Consistently, attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that there is greater α-helical structure in PLA bound to LUV compared to PLL, which has much less ordered structure. Furthermore, isothermal titration calorimetry measurements demonstrated that the contribution of enthalpy to the energetics of binding to LUV is two-fold larger in PLA than in PLL. These results suggest that the stronger interaction of arginine residue with

  13. First-time rhesus monkey mothers, and mothers of sons, preferentially engage in face-to-face interactions with their infants.

    PubMed

    Dettmer, Amanda M; Kaburu, Stefano S K; Byers, Kristen L; Murphy, Ashley M; Soneson, Emma; Wooddell, Lauren J; Suomi, Stephen J

    2016-02-01

    Face-to-face interactions between mothers and infants occur in both human and non-human primates, but there is large variability in the occurrence of these behaviors and the reason for this variability remains largely unexplored. Other types of maternal investment have been shown to be dependent on infant sex (e.g. milk production and maternal responsiveness) and maternal experience (e.g. symmetrical communication). Thus, we sought to determine whether variability in face-to-face interactions, that is, mutual gazing (MG), which are hypothesized to be important for later socio-cognitive development, could be explained by these variables. We studied 28 semi-free ranging rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) mother-infant dyads (6 primiparous; 12 male infants) born and reared at the Laboratory of Comparative Ethology field station at the NIH Animal Center in Poolesville, MD, across the first 90 postnatal days. Infant sex (i.e. male) was a significant predictor of maternal grooming (β ± SE = 0.359 ± 0.164, Z = 2.19, P = 0.029) whereas both parity (i.e. first time mothers) and infant sex (i.e. male) significantly predicted MG (parity: β ± SE = -0.735 ± 0.223, Z = -3.30, P < 0.001; infant sex: β ± SE = 0.436 ± 0.201, Z = 2.17, P = 0.029). Separation from the mother (outside of arm's reach) was not influenced by parity or infant sex. Together with existing literature, these findings point toward differential maternal investment for sons versus daughters. Mothers may be investing differentially in sons, behaviorally, to ensure their future social competence and thus later reproductive success. Collectively, our findings add to the literature that is beginning to identify early life experiences that may lead to sex differences in neurological and behavioral development. PMID:26581804

  14. Regulation of red cell membrane protein interactions: implications for red cell function.

    PubMed

    Takakuwa, Y

    2001-03-01

    This article presents new insights into the molecular mechanism for regulating red cell membrane protein interactions that are responsible for erythrocyte membrane mechanical properties. For various skeletal proteins, structure-function correlations of protein 4.1R have been studied in detail. Kinetic analysis with the resonant mirror detection method has determined the nature of 4.1R interactions with various binding partners such as band 3, glycophorin C, and p55, and their binding sites. More importantly, calmodulin (CaM) binds to 4.1R in a Ca2+-independent manner to modulate the 4.1R interactions in the presence of Ca2+ at microM. Crystal structure of the 30-kD domain of 4.1R has a cloverleaf-like architecture with three lobes, each of which contains a binding region specific for binding partners. CaM binds to the grooves situated in two regions between the three lobes, possibly leading to conformational changes of the three lobes with a consequent alteration in the capacity of 4.1R to bind to its partners. The present findings on erythrocyte 4.1R should provide a basis for better understanding the membrane functions of nonerythroid cells. PMID:11224681

  15. Specificity of antinuclear autoantibodies recognizing the dense fine speckled nuclear pattern: Preferential targeting of DFS70/LEDGFp75 over its interacting partner MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anamika; Woods-Burnham, Leanne; Ortiz, Greisha; Rios-Colon, Leslimar; Figueroa, Johnny; Albesa, Roger; Andrade, Luis E; Mahler, Michael; Casiano, Carlos A

    2015-12-01

    Human antinuclear autoantibodies (ANAs) targeting the dense fine speckled (DFS) nuclear protein DFS70, commonly known as lens epithelium derived growth factor p75 (LEDGFp75), present a clinical puzzle since their significance remains elusive. While their frequencies are low in ANA-positive autoimmune rheumatic diseases, they are relatively elevated in clinical laboratory referrals, diverse inflammatory conditions, and 'apparently' healthy individuals. We reported previously that DFS70/LEDGFp75 is an autoantigen in prostate cancer that closely interacts with another 70kD DFS nuclear protein, methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). This led us to investigate if anti-DFS sera exclusively target DFS70/LEDGFp75 or also recognize MeCP2. Using several complementary autoantibody detection platforms and cellular/molecular approaches we evaluated 65 human sera producing anti-DFS autoantibodies. Our results show that these antibodies are highly specific for DFS70/LEDGFp75 and do not target MeCP2. Establishing the specificity of anti-DFS autoantibodies has implications for increasing our understanding of their biological significance and clinical utility. PMID:26235378

  16. Valosin-containing protein-interacting membrane protein (VIMP) links the endoplasmic reticulum with microtubules in concert with cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein (CLIMP)-63.

    PubMed

    Noda, Chikano; Kimura, Hana; Arasaki, Kohei; Matsushita, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Wakana, Yuichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2014-08-29

    The distribution and morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in mammalian cells depend on both dynamic and static interactions of ER membrane proteins with microtubules (MTs). Cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein (CLIMP)-63 is exclusively localized in sheet-like ER membranes, typical structures of the rough ER, and plays a pivotal role in the static interaction with MTs. Our previous study showed that the 42-kDa ER-residing form of syntaxin 5 (Syn5L) regulates ER structure through the interactions with both CLIMP-63 and MTs. Here, we extend our previous study and show that the valosin-containing protein/p97-interacting membrane protein (VIMP)/SelS is also a member of the family of proteins that shape the ER by interacting with MTs. Depletion of VIMP causes the spreading of the ER to the cell periphery and affects an MT-dependent process on the ER. Although VIMP can interact with CLIMP-63 and Syn5L, it does not interact with MT-binding ER proteins (such as Reep1) that shape the tubular smooth ER, suggesting that different sets of MT-binding ER proteins are used to organize different ER subdomains. PMID:25008318

  17. Retention of pesticide Endosulfan by nanofiltration: influence of organic matter-pesticide complexation and solute-membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    De Munari, Annalisa; Semiao, Andrea Joana Correia; Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca

    2013-06-15

    Nanofiltration (NF) is a well-established process used in drinking water production to effectively remove Natural Organic Matter (NOM) and organic micropollutants. The presence of NOM has been shown to have contrasting results on micropollutant retention by NF membranes and removal mechanisms are to date poorly understood. The permeate water quality can therefore vary during operation and its decrease would be an undesired outcome for potable water treatment. It is hence important to establish the mechanisms involved in the removal of organic micropollutants by NF membranes in the presence of NOM. In this study, the retention mechanisms of pesticide Endosulfan (ES) in the presence of humic acids (HA) by two NF membranes, TFC-SR2 and TFC-SR3, a "loose" and a "tight" membrane, respectively, were elucidated. The results showed that two mechanisms were involved: (1) the formation of ES-HA complexes (solute-solute interactions), determined from solid-phase micro-extraction (SPME), increased ES retention, and (2) the interactions between HA and the membrane (solute-membrane interactions) increased membrane molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) and decreased ES retention. HA concentration, pH, and the ratio between micropollutant molecular weight (MW) and membrane MWCO were shown to influence ES retention mechanisms. In the absence of HA-membrane interactions at pH 4, an increase of HA concentration increased ES retention from 60% to 80% for the TFC-SR2 and from 80% to 95% for the TFC-SR3 due to ES-HA complex formation. At pH 8, interactions between HA and the loose TFC-SR2 increased the membrane MWCO from 460 to 496 g/mol and ES retention decreased from 55% to 30%, as HA-membrane interactions were the dominant mechanism for ES retention. In contrast, for the "tight" TFC-SR3 membrane the increase in the MWCO (from 165 to 179 g/mol), was not sufficient to decrease ES retention which was dominated by ES-HA interactions. Quantification of the contribution of both solute

  18. Inhibition of Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-interacting Kinase (MNK) Preferentially Affects Translation of mRNAs Containing Both a 5'-Terminal Cap and Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Nadejda L; Song, Anren; Gram, Hermann; Edens, Mary Ann; Rhoads, Robert E

    2016-02-12

    The MAPK-interacting kinases 1 and 2 (MNK1 and MNK2) are activated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) or p38 in response to cellular stress and extracellular stimuli that include growth factors, cytokines, and hormones. Modulation of MNK activity affects translation of mRNAs involved in the cell cycle, cancer progression, and cell survival. However, the mechanism by which MNK selectively affects translation of these mRNAs is not understood. MNK binds eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and phosphorylates the cap-binding protein eIF4E. Using a cell-free translation system from rabbit reticulocytes programmed with mRNAs containing different 5'-ends, we show that an MNK inhibitor, CGP57380, affects translation of only those mRNAs that contain both a cap and a hairpin in the 5'-UTR. Similarly, a C-terminal fragment of human eIF4G-1, eIF4G(1357-1600), which prevents binding of MNK to intact eIF4G, reduces eIF4E phosphorylation and inhibits translation of only capped and hairpin-containing mRNAs. Analysis of proteins bound to m(7)GTP-Sepharose reveals that both CGP and eIF4G(1357-1600) decrease binding of eIF4E to eIF4G. These data suggest that MNK stimulates translation only of mRNAs containing both a cap and 5'-terminal RNA duplex via eIF4E phosphorylation, thereby enhancing the coupled cap-binding and RNA-unwinding activities of eIF4F. PMID:26668315

  19. Interaction of the Alzheimer Aβ(25-35) peptide segment with model membranes.

    PubMed

    Cuco, Andreia; Serro, Ana Paula; Farinha, José Paulo; Saramago, Benilde; da Silva, Amélia Gonçalves

    2016-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the presence of amyloid plaques in the brain. The main components of these plaques are the Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) peptides but the Aβ(25-35) sequence is the most frequently studied fragment because it represents a biologically active region of the longer Aβ peptides. In the present work, the interactions of Aβ(25-35) peptide with model membranes were investigated, taking into consideration the aggregation state of the peptide. Monolayers and liposomes were taken as model membranes with two lipid compositions: the equimolar ternary mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), sphingomyelin (SM), and cholesterol (Chol) and the equimolar POPC/SM binary mixture. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with the monolayers, investigated at low concentrations (0.25-4μM), suggested a three step mechanism: adsorption-monomers or dimers adsorb at the polar region of the lipid monolayer; nucleation-adsorbed peptides act as nucleation sites for higher aggregates; and penetration-these aggregates insert in the hydrophobic region of the monolayer. Chol slightly enhances the peptide-lipid monolayer interaction. The large aggregates nucleated in the bulk solution evidenced a weak interaction with monolayers. The interaction of Aβ(25-35) with liposomes, followed by a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) in a large range of peptide concentrations (10-80μM), was very small, independently of the peptide concentration. PMID:26816349

  20. Role of Cell Membrane-Vector Interactions in Successful Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Sriram; Orr, Bradford G; Banaszak Holl, Mark M

    2016-08-16

    Cationic polymers have been investigated as nonviral vectors for gene delivery due to their favorable safety profile when compared to viral vectors. However, nonviral vectors are limited by poor efficacy in inducing gene expression. The physicochemical properties of cationic polymers enabling successful gene expression have been investigated in order to improve expression efficiency and safety. Studies over the past several years have focused on five possible rate-limiting processes to explain the differences in gene expression: (1) endosomal release, (2) transport within specific intracellular pathways, (3) protection of DNA from nucleases, (4) transport into the nucleus, and (5) DNA release from vectors. However, determining the relative importance of these processes and the vector properties necessary for optimization remain a challenge to the field. In this Account, we describe over a decade of studies focused on understanding the interaction of cationic polymer and cationic polymer/oligonucleotide (polyplex) interactions with model lipid membranes, cell membranes, and cells in culture. In particular, we have been interested in how the interaction between cationic polymers and the membrane influences the intracellular transport of intact DNA to the nucleus. Recent advances in microfluidic patch clamp techniques enabled us to quantify polyplex cell membrane interactions at the cellular level with precise control over material concentrations and exposure times. In attempting to relate these findings to subsequent intracellular transport of DNA and expression of protein, we needed to develop an approach that could distinguish DNA that was intact and potentially functional for gene expression from the much larger pool of degraded, nonfunctional DNA within the cell. We addressed this need by developing a FRET oligonucleotide molecular beacon (OMB) to monitor intact DNA transport. The research highlighted in this Account builds to the conclusion that polyplex

  1. Interactions between oxicams and membrane bilayers: an explanation for their different COX selectivity.

    PubMed

    Lúcio, M; Ferreira, H; Lima, José L F C; Reis, Salette

    2006-09-01

    Meloxicam was launched as a major new NSAID for the treatment of arthritis following extensive published research confirming its selectivity for COX-2. Several studies proposed possible explanations for its effectiveness and superior safety profile. The proposed theories included chemical structural relationships between meloxicam and other effective NSAIDs with low gastrointestinal toxic effects. However, other oxicams have similar chemical groups, but despite this, are not considered COX-2 selective drugs and exhibit less gastric tolerance. Hence, the aim of this work was to investigate the interactions between oxicams and biomembrane models as it could influence their resorption from the upper gastrointestinal tract and may affect their local gastromucosal tolerability. The partition of oxicams within membranes was determined by calculating their partition coefficients between liposomes and water. Moreover, their location within the bilayer was determined by fluorescence quenching. Finally, zeta-potential measurements were made to complete the information about the binding behaviour of the oxicams and steady-state anisotropy measurements were made to determine their induced perturbation in membrane structure. These studies proved that, in spite of structural similarities, oxicams present different interactions with membranes making possible a virtual division of the class in two groups. Tenoxicam and piroxicam known as COX-1 inhibitors demonstrated higher partition capacity in liposomes/water systems together with a smaller ability to change the membrane fluidity and surface potential. In contrast lornoxicam and meloxicam, which demonstrated activity against COX-2, have revealed smaller partition capacity in liposomes/water systems together with a higher ability to change the membrane fluidity and surface potential. PMID:17017983

  2. Snake Cytotoxins Bind to Membranes via Interactions with Phosphatidylserine Head Groups of Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Konshina, Anastasia G.; Boldyrev, Ivan A.; Utkin, Yuri N.; Omel'kov, Anton V.; Efremov, Roman G.

    2011-01-01

    The major representatives of Elapidae snake venom, cytotoxins (CTs), share similar three-fingered fold and exert diverse range of biological activities against various cell types. CT-induced cell death starts from the membrane recognition process, whose molecular details remain unclear. It is known, however, that the presence of anionic lipids in cell membranes is one of the important factors determining CT-membrane binding. In this work, we therefore investigated specific interactions between one of the most abundant of such lipids, phosphatidylserine (PS), and CT 4 of Naja kaouthia using a combined, experimental and modeling, approach. It was shown that incorporation of PS into zwitterionic liposomes greatly increased the membrane-damaging activity of CT 4 measured by the release of the liposome-entrapped calcein fluorescent dye. The CT-induced leakage rate depends on the PS concentration with a maximum at approximately 20% PS. Interestingly, the effects observed for PS were much more pronounced than those measured for another anionic lipid, sulfatide. To delineate the potential PS binding sites on CT 4 and estimate their relative affinities, a series of computer simulations was performed for the systems containing the head group of PS and different spatial models of CT 4 in aqueous solution and in an implicit membrane. This was done using an original hybrid computational protocol implementing docking, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. As a result, at least three putative PS-binding sites with different affinities to PS molecule were delineated. Being located in different parts of the CT molecule, these anion-binding sites can potentially facilitate and modulate the multi-step process of the toxin insertion into lipid bilayers. This feature together with the diverse binding affinities of the sites to a wide variety of anionic targets on the membrane surface appears to be functionally meaningful and may adjust CT action against different types of

  3. Interaction of pyridinium bis-retinoid (A2E) with bilayer lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, V S; Sokolenko, E A; Sokolov, A V; Dontsov, A E; Chizmadzhev, Y A; Ostrovsky, M A

    2007-02-01

    The accumulation of lipofuscin granules within the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells is correlated with the progression of age-related macular degeneration. One of the fluorophores contained in lipofiscin granules is pyridinium bis-retinoid (A2E). To test its membrane-toxic effect, the interaction of A2E with bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) was studied. The incorporation of charged A2E molecules into the membranes has been detected as a change of either zeta-potential of multilayer liposomes or boundary potential of BLM. It was shown that the presence of up to 25mol% of A2E did not destabilize the bilayers made of saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC). However, the destabilizing effect became very significant when BLM contained negatively charged lipids such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylserine. The electrical breakdown measurements revealed that the A2E-induced decrease of BLM stability was primarily associated with the growing probability of lipid pore formation. It was found from the measurements of boundary potential of BLM that exposure of A2E to light initiates its transformation into at least two products. One of them is epoxy-A2E, which, being hydrophilic, moves from the membrane into water solution. The other product is a non-identified hydrophobic substance. Illumination of A2E-containing BLM made from unsaturated PC by visible light caused the membrane damage presumably due to oxidation of these lipids by singlet oxygen generated by excited A2E molecules. However, this effect was very weak compared to the effect of known photosensitizers. The illumination of BLM with A2E also leads to the damage of gramicidin incorporated into the membrane, as was detected by measuring the conductance of channels formed by this peptide. PMID:17070694

  4. Interaction of linear cationic peptides with phospholipid membranes and polymers of sialic acid.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A S; Dubovskii, P V; Vorontsova, O V; Feofanov, A V; Efremov, R G

    2014-05-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a natural anionic polymer typically occurring on the outer surface of cell membranes. PSA is involved in cell signaling and intermolecular interactions with proteins and peptides. The antimicrobial potential of peptides is usually evaluated in model membranes consisting of lipid bilayers but devoid of either PSA or its analogs. The goal of this work was to investigate the possible effect of PSA on the structure of melittin (Mlt) and latarcins Ltc1K, Ltc2a, and the activity of these peptides with respect to model membranes. These peptides are linear cationic ones derived from the venom of bee (Mlt) and spider (both latarcins). The length of each of the peptides is 26 amino acid residues, and they all have antimicrobial activity. However, they differ with respect to conformational mobility, hydrophobic characteristics, and overall charge. In this work, using circular dichroism spectroscopy, we show that the peptides adopt an α-helical conformation upon interaction with either PSA or phospholipid liposomes formed of either zwitterionic or anionic phospholipids or their mixtures. The extent of helicity depends on the amino acid sequence and properties of the medium. Based on small angle X-ray scattering data and the analysis of the fluorescence spectrum of the Trp residue in Mlt, we conclude that the peptide forms an oligomeric complex consisting of α-helical Mlt and several PSA molecules. Both latarcins, unlike Mlt, the most hydrophobic of the peptides, interact weakly with zwitterionic liposomes. However, they bind anionic liposomes or those composed of anionic/zwitterionic lipid mixtures. Latarcin Ltc1K forms associates on liposomes composed of zwitterionic/anionic lipid mixture. The structure of the peptide associates is either disordered or of β-sheet conformation. In all other cases the studied peptides adopt predominately α-helical conformation. In addition, we demonstrate that PSA inhibits membranolytic activity of Mlt and latarcin

  5. Biophysical characterization of genistein-membrane interaction and its correlation with biological effect on cells - The case of EYPC liposomes and human erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowska-Pawlęga, Bożena; Misiak, Lucjan E; Jarosz-Wilkołazka, Anna; Zarzyka, Barbara; Paduch, Roman; Gawron, Antoni; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2014-08-01

    With application of EPR and (1)H NMR techniques genistein interaction with liposomes formed with egg yolk lecithin and with erythrocyte membranes was assessed. The present study addressed the problem of genistein localization and its effects on lipid membrane fluidity and protein conformation. The range of microscopic techniques was employed to study genistein effects on HeLa cells and human erythrocytes. Moreover, DPPH bioassay, superoxide anion radical test and enzymatic measurements were performed in HeLa cells subjected to genistein. The gathered results from both EPR and NMR techniques indicated strong ordering effect of genistein on the motional freedom of lipids in the head group region and the adjacent hydrophobic zone in liposomal as well as in red blood cell membranes. EPR study of human ghost showed also the changes in the erythrocyte membrane protein conformation. The membrane effects of genistein were correlated with the changes in internal membranes arrangement of HeLa cells as it was noticed using transmission electron microscopic and fluorescent techniques. Scanning electron and light microscopy methods showed that one of the aftermaths of genistein incorporation into membranes was creation of echinocytic form of the red blood cells with reduced diameter. Genistein improved redox status of HeLa cells treated with H2O2 by lowering radicals' level. In conclusion, the capacity of genistein to incorporate, to affect membrane organization and to change its biophysical properties is correlated with the changes inside the cells. PMID:24813834

  6. Generic Role of Polymer Supports in the Fine Adjustment of Interfacial Interactions between Solid Substrates and Model Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Fernanda F; Schneck, Emanuel; Fragneto, Giovanna; Konovalov, Oleg V; Tanaka, Motomu

    2015-04-21

    To understand the generic role of soft, hydrated biopolymers in adjusting interfacial interactions at biological interfaces, we designed a defined model of the cell-extracellular matrix contacts based on planar lipid membranes deposited on polymer supports (polymer-supported membranes). Highly uniform polymer supports made out of regenerated cellulose allow for the control of film thickness without changing the surface roughness and without osmotic dehydration. The complementary combination of specular neutron reflectivity and high-energy specular X-ray reflectivity yields the equilibrium membrane-substrate distances, which can quantitatively be modeled by computing the interplay of van der Waals interaction, hydration repulsion, and repulsion caused by the thermal undulation of membranes. The obtained results help to understand the role of a biopolymer in the interfacial interactions of cell membranes from a physical point of view and also open a large potential to generally bridge soft, biological matter and hard inorganic materials. PMID:25794040

  7. The influence of protein-protein interactions on the organization of proteins within thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Tremmel, I G; Weis, E; Farquhar, G D

    2005-04-01

    The influence of attractive protein-protein interactions on the organization of photosynthetic proteins within the thylakoid membrane was investigated. Protein-protein interactions were simulated using Monte Carlo techniques and the influence of different interaction energies was examined. It was found that weak interactions led to protein clusters whereas strong interactions led to ramified chains. An optimum curve for the relationship between interaction energy and the number of contact sites emerged. With increasing particle densities the effect decreased. In a mixture of interacting and noninteracting particles the distance between the noninteracting particles was increased and there seemed to be much more free space around them. In thylakoids, this could lead to a more homogeneous distribution of the noninteracting but rate-limiting cytochrome bf complexes. Due to the increased free space between cytochrome bf, obstruction of binding sites--occurring unavoidably in a random distribution--may be drastically reduced. Furthermore, protein-protein interactions in thylakoids may lead to a decrease in plastoquinone diffusion. PMID:15665125

  8. Mature erythrocyte membrane homeostasis is compromised by loss of the GATA1-FOG1 interaction.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Atsushi; Shimizu, Ritsuko; Mohandas, Narla; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2012-03-15

    GATA1 plays essential roles in erythroid gene expression. The N-terminal finger of GATA1 (GATA1-Nf) is important for association with FOG1. Substitution mutations in GATA1-Nf, such as GATA1(V205M) that diminish the GATA1-FOG1 association, have been identified in human thrombocytopenia and anemia cases. A mouse model of human thrombocytopenia has been established using a transgenic complementation rescue approach; GATA1-deficient mice were successfully rescued from embryonic lethality by excess expression of GATA1(V205G), but rescued adult mice suffered from severe thrombocytopenia. In this study, we examined GATA1-deficient mice rescued with GATA1(V205G) at a comparable level to endogenous GATA1. Mice rescued with this level of GATA1(V205G) rarely survive to adulthood. Rescued newborns suffered from severe anemia and jaundice accompanied with anisocytosis and spherocytosis. Expression of Slc4a1, Spna1, and Aqp1 genes (encoding the membrane proteins band-3, α-spectrin, and aquaporin-1, respectively) were strikingly diminished, whereas expression of other canonical GATA1-target genes, such as Alas2, were little affected. Lack of these membrane proteins provoked perturbation of membrane skeleton. Importantly, the red cells exhibited increased reactive oxygen species accumulation. These results thus demonstrate that the loss of the GATA1-FOG1 interaction causes a unique combination of membrane protein deficiency and disturbs the function of GATA1 in maintaining erythroid homeostasis. PMID:22279059

  9. Probing Polytopic Membrane Protein-Substrate Interactions by Luminescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Musial-Siwek, Monika; Jaffee, Marcie B; Imperiali, Barbara

    2016-03-23

    Integral membrane proteins play essential roles in all living systems; however, major technical hurdles challenge analyses of this class of proteins. Biophysical approaches that provide structural information to complement and leverage experimentally determined and computationally predicted structures are urgently needed. Herein we present the application of luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) for investigating the interactions of the polytopic membrane-bound oligosaccharyl transferases (OTases) with partner substrates. Monomeric OTases, such as the PglBs from Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari, catalyze transfer of glycans from membrane-associated undecaprenol diphosphate-linked substrates to proteins in the bacterial periplasm. LRET-based distance measurements are enabled by the inclusion of an encoded N-terminal lanthanide-binding tag (LBT), and LRET between the luminescent (LBT)-Tb(3+) donor complex and fluorescently labeled peptide and glycan substrates provides discrete distance measurements across the span of the membrane. LRET-based measurements of detergent-solubilized PglB from C. lari allowed direct comparison with the distances based on the previously reported the C. lari PglB crystal structure, thereby validating the approach in a defined system. Distance measurements between peptide and glycan substrates and the C. jejuni PglB offer new experimental information on substrate binding to the related, but structurally uncharacterized, eukaryotic OTase. PMID:26918528

  10. Effects of impaired membrane interactions on α-synuclein aggregation and neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ysselstein, Daniel; Joshi, Mehul; Mishra, Vartika; Griggs, Amy M.; Asiago, Josephat M.; McCabe, George P.; Stanciu, Lia A.; Post, Carol Beth; Rochet, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The post-mortem brains of individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other synucleinopathy disorders are characterized by the presence of aggregated forms of the presynaptic protein α-synuclein (aSyn). Understanding the molecular mechanism of aSyn aggregation is essential for the development of neuroprotective strategies to treat these diseases. In this study, we examined how interactions between aSyn and phospholipid vesicles influence the protein’s aggregation and toxicity to dopaminergic neurons. Two-dimensional NMR data revealed that two familial aSyn mutants, A30P and G51D, populated an exposed, membrane-bound conformer in which the central hydrophobic region was dissociated from the bilayer to a greater extent than in the case of wild-type aSyn. A30P and G51D had a greater propensity to undergo membrane-induced aggregation and elicited greater toxicity to primary dopaminergic neurons compared to the wild-type protein. In contrast, the non-familial aSyn mutant A29E exhibited a weak propensity to aggregate in the presence of phospholipid vesicles or to elicit neurotoxicity, despite adopting a relatively exposed membrane-bound conformation. Our findings suggest that the aggregation of exposed, membrane-bound aSyn conformers plays a key role in the protein’s neurotoxicity in PD and other synucleinopathy disorders. PMID:25931201

  11. Plasma membrane lipid–protein interactions affect signaling processes in sterol-biosynthesis mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Zauber, Henrik; Burgos, Asdrubal; Garapati, Prashanth; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important organelle providing structure, signaling and transport as major biological functions. Being composed of lipids and proteins with different physicochemical properties, the biological functions of membranes depend on specific protein–protein and protein–lipid interactions. Interactions of proteins with their specific sterol and lipid environment were shown to be important factors for protein recruitment into sub-compartmental structures of the plasma membrane. System-wide implications of altered endogenous sterol levels for membrane functions in living cells were not studied in higher plant cells. In particular, little is known how alterations in membrane sterol composition affect protein and lipid organization and interaction within membranes. Here, we conducted a comparative analysis of the plasma membrane protein and lipid composition in Arabidopsis sterol-biosynthesis mutants smt1 and ugt80A2;B1. smt1 shows general alterations in sterol composition while ugt80A2;B1 is significantly impaired in sterol glycosylation. By systematically analyzing different cellular fractions and combining proteomic with lipidomic data we were able to reveal contrasting alterations in lipid–protein interactions in both mutants, with resulting differential changes in plasma membrane signaling status. PMID:24672530

  12. Membrane Targeting of the Spir·Formin Actin Nucleator Complex Requires a Sequential Handshake of Polar Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Tittel, Janine; Welz, Tobias; Czogalla, Aleksander; Dietrich, Susanne; Samol-Wolf, Annette; Schulte, Markos; Schwille, Petra; Weidemann, Thomas; Kerkhoff, Eugen

    2015-01-01

    Spir and formin (FMN)-type actin nucleators initiate actin polymerization at vesicular membranes necessary for long range vesicular transport processes. Here we studied in detail the membrane binding properties and protein/protein interactions that govern the assembly of the membrane-associated Spir·FMN complex. Using biomimetic membrane models we show that binding of the C-terminal Spir-2 FYVE-type zinc finger involves both the presence of negatively charged lipids and hydrophobic contributions from the turret loop that intrudes the lipid bilayer. In solution, we uncovered a yet unknown intramolecular interaction between the Spir-2 FYVE-type domain and the N-terminal kinase non-catalytic C-lobe domain (KIND) that could not be detected in the membrane-bound state. Interestingly, we found that the intramolecular Spir-2 FYVE/KIND and the trans-regulatory Fmn-2-FSI/Spir-2-KIND interactions are competitive. We therefore characterized co-expressed Spir-2 and Fmn-2 fluorescent protein fusions in living cells by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy. The data corroborate a model according to which Spir-2 exists in two different states, a cytosolic monomeric conformation and a membrane-bound state in which the KIND domain is released and accessible for subsequent Fmn-2 recruitment. This sequence of interactions mechanistically couples membrane binding of Spir to the recruitment of FMN, a pivotal step for initiating actin nucleation at vesicular membranes. PMID:25564607

  13. Interaction of syncollin with GP-2, the major membrane protein of pancreatic zymogen granules, and association with lipid microdomains.

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, Ina; Hodel, Alois; Koch, Annett; Kleene, Ralf; Edwardson, J Michael; Schrader, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Syncollin, a novel pancreatic zymogen granule protein, is present on the luminal side of the granule membrane. To address the function of syncollin, we searched for putative binding partners. Cross-linking experiments with purified syncollin, and granule content and membrane proteins revealed a direct interaction between syncollin and GP-2, a major glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane glycoprotein. An interaction was also observed when cross-linking was performed with recombinant GP-2. In addition, syncollin could be cross-linked to itself, supporting the suggestion that it exists as a homo-oligomer. Cleavage of the GPI anchor of GP-2 by treatment of granule membranes with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C had no effect on the membrane attachment of syncollin, indicating that it is not mediated exclusively via an interaction with GP-2. Syncollin was found to be associated with detergent-insoluble cholesterol/glycolipid-enriched complexes. These complexes floated to the lighter fractions of sucrose-density gradients and also contained GP-2, the lectin ZG16p, sulphated matrix proteoglycans and the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) syntaxin 3 and synaptobrevin 2. Our results indicate that membrane-associated syncollin is a component of lipid rafts, where it interacts both with GP-2 and membrane lipids. We suggest that the syncollin-GP-2 complex might play a role in signal transduction across the granule membrane. PMID:11853552

  14. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4: interaction with constitutive nitric oxide synthases in human sperm and prostasomes which carry Ca2+/CaM-dependent serine kinase.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Rachel E; Galileo, Deni S; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2015-11-01

    Deletion of the gene encoding the widely conserved plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4), a major Ca(2+) efflux pump, leads to loss of sperm motility and male infertility in mice. PMCA4's partners in sperm and how its absence exerts its effect on fertility are unknown. We hypothesize that in sperm PMCA4 interacts with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) which are rapidly activated by Ca(2+), and that these fertility-modulating proteins are present in prostasomes, which deliver them to sperm. We show that in human sperm PMCA4 is present on the acrosome, inner acrosomal membrane, posterior head, neck, midpiece and the proximal principal piece. PMCA4 localization showed inter- and intra-individual variation and was most abundant at the posterior head/neck junction, co-localizing with NOSs. Co-immunoprecipitations (Co-IP) revealed a close association of PMCA4 and the NOSs in Ca(2+) ionophore-treated sperm but much less so in uncapacitated untreated sperm. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) showed a similar Ca(2+)-related association: PMCA4 and the NOSs are within 10 nm apart, and preferentially so in capacitated, compared with uncapacitated, sperm. FRET efficiencies varied, being significantly (P < 0.001) higher at high cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) in capacitated sperm than at low [Ca(2+)]c in uncapacitated sperm for the PMCA4-eNOS complex. These dynamic interactions were not seen for PMCA4-nNOS complexes, which had the highest FRET efficiencies. Further, along with Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent serine kinase (CASK), PMCA4 and the NOSs are present in the seminal plasma, specifically in prostasomes where Co-IP showed complexes similar to those in sperm. Finally, flow cytometry demonstrated that following co-incubation of sperm and seminal plasma, PMCA4 and the NOSs can be delivered in vitro to sperm via prostasomes. Our findings indicate that PMCA4 interacts simultaneously with the NOSs preferentially at

  15. Membrane Environment Can Enhance the Interaction of Glycan Binding Protein to Cell Surface Glycan Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The binding of lectins to glycan receptors on the host cell surface is a key step contributing to the virulence and species specificity of most viruses. This is exemplified by the viral protein hemagglutinin (HA) of the influenza A virus, whose binding specificity is modulated by the linkage pattern of terminal sialic acids on glycan receptors of host epithelial cells. Such specificity dictates whether transmission is confined to a particular animal species or jumps between species. Here, we show, using H5N1 avian influenza as a model, that the specific binding of recombinant HA to α2-3 linked sialic acids can be enhanced dramatically by interaction with the surface of the lipid membrane. This effect can be quantitatively accounted for by a two-stage process in which weak association of HA with the membrane surface precedes more specific and tighter binding to the glycan receptor. The weak protein–membrane interaction discovered here in the model system may play an important secondary role in the infection and pathogenesis of the influenza A virus. PMID:24949798

  16. Role of calcium in membrane interactions by PI(4,5)P₂-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Marina E; Sarmento, Maria J; Fernandes, Fábio

    2014-10-01

    Ca²⁺ and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P₂] are key agents in membrane-associated signalling events. Their temporal and spatial regulation is crucial for activation or recruitment of proteins in the plasma membrane. In fact, the interaction of several signalling proteins with PI(4,5)P₂ has been shown to be tightly regulated and dependent on the presence of Ca²⁺, with co-operative binding in some cases. In these proteins, PI(4,5)P₂ and Ca²⁺ binding typically occurs at different binding sites. In addition, several PI(4,5)P₂-binding proteins are known targets of calmodulin (CaM), which, depending on the presence of calcium, can compete with PI(4,5)P₂ for protein interaction, translating Ca²⁺ transient microdomains into variations of PI(4,5)P₂ lateral organization in time and space. The present review highlights different examples of calcium-dependent PI(4,5)P₂-binding proteins and discusses the possible impact of this dual regulation on fine-tuning of protein activity by triggering target membrane binding in the presence of subtle changes in the levels of calcium or PI(4,5)P₂. PMID:25233429

  17. Spin-label electron spin resonance studies on the interactions of lysine peptides with phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Kleinschmidt, J H; Marsh, D

    1997-01-01

    The interactions of lysine oligopeptides with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) bilayer membranes were studied using spin-labeled lipids and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Tetralysine and pentalysine were chosen as models for the basic amino acid clusters found in a variety of cytoplasmic membrane-associating proteins, and polylysine was chosen as representative of highly basic peripherally bound proteins. A greater motional restriction of the lipid chains was found with increasing length of the peptide, while the saturation ratio of lipids per peptide was lower for the shorter peptides. In DMPG and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine host membranes, the perturbation of the lipid chain mobility by polylysine was greater for negatively charged spin-labeled lipids than for zwitterionic lipids, but for the shorter lysine peptides these differences were smaller. In mixed bilayers composed of DMPG and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, little difference was found in selectivity between spin-labeled phospholipid species on binding pentalysine. Surface binding of the basic lysine peptides strongly reduced the interfacial pK of spin-labeled fatty acid incorporated into the DMPG bilayers, to a greater extent for polylysine than for tetralysine or pentalysine at saturation. The results are consistent with a predominantly electrostatic interaction with the shorter lysine peptides, but with a closer surface association with the longer polylysine peptide. PMID:9370448

  18. Alcohol action on a neuronal membrane receptor: evidence for a direct interaction with the receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Peoples, R W; Weight, F F

    1994-01-01

    For almost a century, alcohols have been thought to produce their effects by actions on the membrane lipids of central nervous system neurons--the well known "lipid theory" of alcohol action. The rationale for this theory is the correlation of potency with oil/water or membrane/buffer partition coefficient. Although a number of recent studies have shown that alcohols can affect the function of certain neuronal neurotransmitter receptors, there is no evidence that the alcohols interact directly with these membrane proteins. In the present study, we report that inhibition of a neuronal neurotransmitter receptor, an ATP-gated ion channel, by a series of alcohols exhibits a distinct cutoff effect. For alcohols with a molecular volume of < or = 42.2 ml/mol, potency for inhibiting ATP-activated current was correlated with lipid solubility (order of potency: 1-propanol = trifluoroethanol > monochloroethanol > ethanol > methanol). However, despite increased lipid solubility, alcohols with a molecular volume of > or = 46.1 ml/mol (1-butanol, 1-pentanol, trichloroethanol, and dichloroethanol) were without effect on the ATP-activated current. The results suggest that alcohols inhibit the function of this neurotransmitter receptor by interacting with a small hydrophobic pocket on the receptor protein. PMID:8058780

  19. Interactions of borneol with DPPC phospholipid membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Ding, Haiou; Dai, Xingxing; Wan, Guang; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2014-01-01

    Borneol, known as a "guide" drug in traditional Chinese medicine, is widely used as a natural penetration enhancer in modern clinical applications. Despite a large number of experimental studies on borneol's penetration enhancing effect, the molecular basis of its action on bio-membranes is still unclear. We carried out a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations with the borneol concentration ranging from 3.31% to 54.59% (v/v, lipid-free basis) to study the interactions of borneol with aDPPC(1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine) bilayer membrane, and the temperature effects were also considered. At concentrations below 21.89%, borneol's presence only caused DPPC bilayer thinning and an increase in fluidity; A rise in temperature could promote the diffusing progress of borneol. When the concentration was 21.89% or above, inverted micelle-like structures were formed within the bilayer interior, which led to increased bilayer thickness, and an optimum temperature was found for the interaction of borneol with the DPPC bilayer membrane. These findings revealed that the choice of optimal concentration and temperature is critical for a given application in which borneol is used as a penetration enhancer. Our results not only clarify some molecular basis for borneol's penetration enhancing effects, but also provide some guidance for the development and applications of new preparations containing borneol. PMID:25383679

  20. The effects of non-lamellar forming lipids on membrane protein-lipid interactions.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, C D; Slater, S J

    1996-07-15

    The role of lipid polymorphism in the regulation of membrane-associated protein function is examined, based on recent studies which showed that changes in the levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), cholesterol and phospholipid unsaturation, modulate the activity of the key signal transduction enzyme, protein kinase C (PKC). It is shown that effects of membrane compositional changes on PKC activity involve a perturbation of protein-lipid interactions with the head group region rather than with the hydrophobic interior of the bilayer. A key determinant in the perturbation of these interactions is suggested to be an elastic curvature energy, termed curvature stress, which results from the unfavorable packing of non-lamellar forming lipids in a planar bilayer. PKC activity is shown to be a biphasic function of curvature stress, with an optimum value of this parameter corresponding to an optimally active PKC conformation. Thus, it is shown that the maximal activity of conformationally distinct PKC isoforms may require a different optimum value of curvature stress. Furthermore, it is hypothesized that curvature stress may have differing effects on the conformation of membrane-associated PKC activity induced by diacylglycerols, phorbol esters or other activators, based on recent studies showing that these agents induce the formation of disparate active conformers of the enzyme. PMID:8810048

  1. Exploring the interactions of gliadins with model membranes: effect of confined geometry and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Banc, Amélie; Desbat, Bernard; Renard, Denis; Popineau, Yves; Mangavel, Cécile; Navailles, Laurence

    2009-08-01

    Mechanisms leading to the assembly of wheat storage proteins into proteins bodies within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of endosperm cells are unresolved today. In this work, physical chemistry parameters which could be involved in these processes were explored. To model the confined environment of proteins within the ER, the dynamic behavior of gamma-gliadins inserted inside lyotropic lamellar phases was studied using FRAP experiments. The evolution of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the lamellar periodicity enabled to propose the hypothesis of an interaction between gamma-gliadins and membranes. This interaction was further studied with the help of phospholipid Langmuir monolayers. gamma- and omega-gliadins were injected under DMPC and DMPG monolayers and the two-dimensional (2D) systems were studied by Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), polarization modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS), and surface tension measurements. Results showed that both gliadins adsorbed under phospholipid monolayers, considered as biological membrane models, and formed micrometer-sized domains at equilibrium. However, their thicknesses, probed by reflectance measurements, were different: omega-gliadins aggregates displayed a constant thickness, consistent with a monolayer, while the thickness of gamma-gliadins aggregates increased with the quantity of protein injected. These different behaviors could find some explanations in the difference of aminoacid sequence distribution: an alternate repeated - unrepeated domain within gamma-gliadin sequence, while one unique repeated domain was present within omega-gliadin sequence. All these findings enabled to propose a model of gliadins self-assembly via a membrane interface and to highlight the predominant role of wheat prolamin repeated domain in the membrane interaction. In the biological context, these results would mean that the repeated domain could be considered as an anchor for the interaction with

  2. Effects of structure on the interactions between five natural antimicrobial compounds and phospholipids of bacterial cell membrane on model monolayers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monolayers composed of bacterial phospholipids were used as model membranes to study interactions of naturally occurring phenolic compounds 2,5-dihydroxybenzaldehyde, 2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzaldehyde and the plant essential oil compounds carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde, and geraniol, previously found to be...

  3. Interactions of Pleckstrin Homology Domains with Membranes: Adding Back the Bilayer via High-Throughput Molecular Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Eiji; Kalli, Antreas C; Yasuoka, Kenji; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-08-01

    A molecular simulation pipeline for determining the mode of interaction of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains with phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP)-containing lipid bilayers is presented. We evaluate our methodology for the GRP1 PH domain via comparison with structural and biophysical data. Coarse-grained simulations yield a 2D density landscape for PH/membrane interactions alongside residue contact profiles. Predictions of the membrane localization and interactions of 13 PH domains reveal canonical, non-canonical, and dual PIP-binding sites on the proteins. Thus, the PH domains associate with the PIP molecules in the membrane via a highly positively charged loop. Some PH domains exhibit modes of interaction with PIP-containing membranes additional to this canonical binding mode. All 13 PH domains cause a degree of local clustering of PIP molecules upon binding to the membrane. This provides a global picture of PH domain interactions with membranes. The high-throughput approach could be extended to other families of peripheral membrane proteins. PMID:27427480

  4. Membrane-dependent Interaction of Factor Xa and Prothrombin with Factor Va in the Prothrombinase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Shabir H.; Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Rezaie, Alireza R.

    2009-01-01

    Because all three protein components of prothrombinase, factors (f) Xa and Va and prothrombin, bind to negatively charged membrane phospholipids, the exact role of the membrane in the prothrombinase reaction has not been fully understood. In this study, we prepared deletion derivatives of fXa and prothrombin in which both the Gla and first EGF-like domains of the protease (E2-fXa) as well as the Gla and both kringle domains of the substrate (prethrombin-2) were deleted. The fVa-mediated catalytic activity of E2-fXa toward prethrombin-2 was analyzed in both the absence and presence of phospholipids composed of 80% phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 20% phosphatidylserine (PS). PCPS markedly accelerated the initial rate of prethrombin-2 activation by E2-fXa, with the cofactor exhibiting saturation only in the presence of phospholipids (apparent Kd ∼60 nM). Competitive kinetic studies in the presence of the two exosite-1-specific ligands Tyr63-sulfated hirudin54-65 and TM456 suggested that while both peptides are highly effective inhibitors of the fVa-mediated activation of prethrombin-2 by E2-fXa in the absence of PCPS, they are ineffective competitors in the presence of phospholipids. Since neither E2-fXa nor prethrombin-2 can interact with membranes, these results suggest that fVa interaction with PCPS improves the affinity of the activation complex for the proexosite-1 of the substrate. Direct binding studies employing OG488-EGR-labeled fXa and E2-fXa revealed that the interaction of the Gla-domain of fXa with PCPS also induces conformational changes in the protease to facilitate its high-affinity interaction with fVa. PMID:19378973

  5. A Role for Weak Electrostatic Interactions in Peripheral Membrane Protein Binding.

    PubMed

    Khan, Hanif M; He, Tao; Fuglebakk, Edvin; Grauffel, Cédric; Yang, Boqian; Roberts, Mary F; Gershenson, Anne; Reuter, Nathalie

    2016-03-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (BtPI-PLC) is a secreted virulence factor that binds specifically to phosphatidylcholine (PC) bilayers containing negatively charged phospholipids. BtPI-PLC carries a negative net charge and its interfacial binding site has no obvious cluster of basic residues. Continuum electrostatic calculations show that, as expected, nonspecific electrostatic interactions between BtPI-PLC and membranes vary as a function of the fraction of anionic lipids present in the bilayers. Yet they are strikingly weak, with a calculated ΔGel below 1 kcal/mol, largely due to a single lysine (K44). When K44 is mutated to alanine, the equilibrium dissociation constant for small unilamellar vesicles increases more than 50 times (∼2.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that interactions between K44 and lipids are not merely electrostatic. Comparisons of molecular-dynamics simulations performed using different lipid compositions reveal that the bilayer composition does not affect either hydrogen bonds or hydrophobic contacts between the protein interfacial binding site and bilayers. However, the occupancies of cation-π interactions between PC choline headgroups and protein tyrosines vary as a function of PC content. The overall contribution of basic residues to binding affinity is also context dependent and cannot be approximated by a rule-of-thumb value because these residues can contribute to both nonspecific electrostatic and short-range protein-lipid interactions. Additionally, statistics on the distribution of basic amino acids in a data set of membrane-binding domains reveal that weak electrostatics, as observed for BtPI-PLC, might be a less unusual mechanism for peripheral membrane binding than is generally thought. PMID:27028646

  6. Synthesis, structural characterization, modal membrane interaction and anti-tumor cell line studies of nitrophenyl ferrocenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaf, Ataf Ali; Lal, Bhajan; Badshah, Amin; Usman, Muhammad; Chatterjee, Pabitra B.; Huq, Fazlul; Ullah, Shafiq; Crans, Debbie C.

    2016-06-01

    A series of nitrophenyl ferrocens (A1 - A5) were synthesized and fully characterized in solid state (using CHN analysis, FTIR and single crystal XRD) as well as in solution phase (1H &13C NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy). Micelle interface interactions of these compounds were explored and found to have ability across a micelle membrane interface. Interestingly, these compounds exhibited π-electronic push pull systems and oxidation of ferrocene to ferrocenium on crossing the negative interface of the micelle membrane. Selective compounds were screened for antitumor activity against parental and drug resistant human ovarian tumor models i.e. A2780 and A2780cisR, A2780ZD0473R. Screened compounds were found to overcome resistance factor compared to cisplatin.

  7. Interaction of Daunomycin with Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Model Membranes. A 1H NMR Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolai, Luigi; Gaggelli, Elena; Maccotta, Antonella; Valensin, Gianni

    1996-09-01

    1H NMR parameters were obtained for daunomycin in water solution in the free state as well as in the presence of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine model membranes. Spin-lattice relaxation rates were measured under nonselective, single-selective, and double-selective irradiation modes, and 2D NOESY spectra were obtained at several values of the mixing time. Proton-proton distances were calculated and the motional correlation time was evaluated in both the free and bound states. NMR parameters were used to show that ring A and the glucosamine moiety of daunomycin strongly interact with the external surface of the bilayer, while the rest of the molecule penetrates the membrane without crossing it. The structures of both free and bound daunomycin were obtained and compared by using molecular modeling.

  8. Interactions of dicarboxylic porphyrins with membranes in relation to their ionization state.

    PubMed

    Brault, D; Vever-Bizet, C; Kuzelova, K

    1993-10-01

    The interactions of dicarboxylic porphyrins with membrane systems are discussed with particular emphasis on the effect of the charge of the porphyrin and the nature of the side-chains. The incorporation of hematoporphyrin or related dicarboxylic porphyrins within small unilamellar vesicles as membrane models is favored by a decrease of the pH in the range of physiological pH values. This effect might play an important role in the retention of porphyrins by tumors, which are more acidic than normal tissues. Kinetics studies also show that the partition of the porphyrin between the lipidic bilayer and the aqueous phase is governed by its release rate rather than by its incorporation rate. PMID:8271119

  9. Effects of Naturally Occuring Arginine 14 Deletion on Phospholamban Conformational Dynamics and Membrane Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vostrikov, Vitaly V.; Soller, Kailey J.; Ha, Kim N.; Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    Phospholamban (PLN) is a single-pass membrane protein that regulates the sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA). Phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 reverses its inhibitory function under β-adrenergic stimulation, augmenting Ca2+ uptake in the sarcoplasmic reticulum and muscle contractility. PLN exists in two conformations; a T state, where the cytoplasmic domain is helical and absorbed on the membrane surface, and an R state, where the cytoplasmic domain is unfolded and membrane detached. Previous studies from our group have shown that the PLN conformational equilibrium is crucial to SERCA regulation. Here, we used a combination of solution and solid-state NMR techniques to compare the structural topology and conformational dynamics of monomeric PLN (PLNAFA) with that of the PLNR14del, a naturally occurring deletion mutant that is linked to the progression of dilated cardiomyopathy. We found that the behavior of the inhibitory transmembrane domain of PLNR14del is similar to that of the native sequence. In contrast, the conformational dynamics of R14del both in micelles and lipid membranes are enhanced. We conclude that the deletion of Arg14 in the cytoplasmic region weakens the interactions with the membrane and shifts the conformational equilibrium of PLN toward the disordered R state. This conformational transition is correlated with the loss-of-function character of this mutant and is corroborated by SERCA’s activity assays. These findings further support our hypothesis that SERCA function is fine-tuned by PLN conformational dynamics and begin to explain the aberrant regulation of SERCA by the R14del mutant. PMID:25251363

  10. Alkyl Galactofuranosides Strongly Interact with Leishmania donovani Membrane and Provide Antileishmanial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Muhammad; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Legentil, Laurent; Belaz, Sorya; Cabezas, Yari; Manuel, Christelle; Dureau, Rémy; Sergent, Odile; Burel, Agnès; Daligault, Franck; Ferrières, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro effects of four alkyl-galactofuranoside derivatives, i.e., octyl-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 1), 6-amino-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 2), 6-N-acetamido-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 3), and 6-azido-β-d-galactofuranoside (compound 4), on Leishmania donovani. Their mechanism of action was explored using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and ultrastructural alterations were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Compound 1 showed the most promising effects by inhibiting promastigote growth at a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 8.96 ± 2.5 μM. All compounds exhibit low toxicity toward human macrophages. Compound 1 had a higher selectivity index than the molecule used for comparison, i.e., miltefosine (159.7 versus 37.9, respectively). EPR showed that compound 1 significantly reduced membrane fluidity compared to control promastigotes and to compound 3. The furanose ring was shown to support this effect, since the isomer galactopyranose had no effect on parasite membrane fluidity or growth. NMR showed a direct interaction of all compounds (greatest with compound 1, followed by compounds 2, 3, and 4, in descending order) with the promastigote membrane and with octyl-galactopyranose and octanol, providing evidence that the n-octyl chain was primarily involved in anchoring with the parasite membrane, followed by the putative crucial role of the furanose ring in the antileishmanial activity. A morphological analysis of compound 1-treated promastigotes by TEM revealed profound alterations in the parasite membrane and organelles, but this was not the case with compound 3. Quantification of annexin V binding by flow cytometry confirmed that compound 1 induced apoptosis in >90% of promastigotes. The effect of compound 1 was also assessed on intramacrophagic amastigotes and showed a reduction in amastigote growth associated with an increase of reactive oxygen

  11. Interaction of polyphemusin I and structural analogs with bacterial membranes, lipopolysaccharide, and lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Scott, M G; Yan, H; Mayer, L D; Hancock, R E

    2000-11-28

    Three structural variants (PV5, PV7, and PV8) of the horseshoe crab cationic antimicrobial peptide polyphemusin I were designed with improved amphipathic profiles. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis indicated that in phosphate buffer polyphemusin I, PV7, and PV8 displayed the spectrum of a type II beta-turn-rich structure, but, like polyphemusin I, all three variants adopted a typical beta-sheet structure in an anionic lipid environment. Both polyphemusin I and variants were potent broad spectrum antimicrobials that were clearly bactericidal at their minimal inhibitory concentrations. The variants were moderately less active in vitro but more effective in animal models. Moreover, these variants exhibited delayed bacterial killing, whereas polyphemusin I killed Escherichia coli UB1005 within 5 min at 2.5 microg/mL. All the peptides showed similar abilities to bind to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and permeabilize bacterial outer membranes. Consistent with this was the observation that all peptides significantly inhibited cytokine production by LPS-stimulated macrophages and penetrated polyanionic LPS monolayers to similar extents. None of the peptides had affinity for neutral lipids as evident from both tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy and Langmuir monolayer analysis. As compared to polyphemusin I, all variants showed reduced ability to interact with anionic lipids, and the hemolytic activity of the variants was decreased by 2-4-fold. In contrast, polyphemusin I efficiently depolarized the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, as assessed using a membrane potential sensitive fluorescent dye 3,3-dipropylthiacarbocyanine (diSC(3)5) assay, but the variants showed a substantially delayed and decreased depolarizing ability. The coincident assessment of cell viability indicated that depolarization of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane potential by polyphemusin I occurred prior to lethal damage to cells. Our data suggest that increase of amphipathicity of beta

  12. Determination of apical membrane polarity in mammary epithelial cell cultures: The role of cell-cell, cell-substratum, and membrane-cytoskeleton interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Parry, G.; Beck, J.C.; Moss, L.; Bartley, J. ); Ojakian, G.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The membrane glycoprotein, PAS-O, is a major differentiation antigen on mammary epithelial cells and is located exclusively in the apical domain of the plasma membrane. The authors have used 734B cultured human mammary carcinoma cells as a model system to study the role of tight junctions, cell-substratum contacts, and submembranous cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O to the apical membrane. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectronmicroscopy experiments demonstrated that while tight junctions demarcate PAS-O distribution in confluent cultures, apical polarity could be established at low culture densities when cells could not form tight junctions with neighboring cells. They suggest, then, that interactions between vitronectin and its receptor, are responsible for establishment of membrane domains in the absence of tight junctions. The role of cytoskeletal elements in restricting PAS-O distribution was examined by treating cultures with cytochalasin D, colchicine, or acrylamide. Cytochalasin D led to a redistribution of PAS0O while colchicine and acrylamide did not. They hypothesize that PAS-O is restricted to the apical membrane by interactions with a microfilament network and that the cytoskeletal organization is dependent upon cell-cell and cell-substratum interactions.

  13. Photocrosslinking and click chemistry enable the specific detection of proteins interacting with phospholipids at the membrane interface.

    PubMed

    Gubbens, Jacob; Ruijter, Eelco; de Fays, Laurence E V; Damen, J Mirjam A; de Kruijff, Ben; Slijper, Monique; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2009-01-30

    New lipid analogs mimicking the abundant membrane phospholipid phosphatidylcholine were developed to photocrosslink proteins interacting with phospholipid headgroups at the membrane interface. In addition to either a phenylazide or benzophenone photoactivatable moiety attached to the headgroup, the lipid analogs contained azides attached as baits to the acyl chains. After photocrosslinking in situ in the biomembrane, these baits were used for the attachment of a fluorescent tetramethylrhodamine-alkyne conjugate or a biotin-alkyne conjugate using click chemistry, allowing for the selective detection and purification of crosslink products, respectively. Proteins crosslinked to the lipid analogs in inner mitochondrial membranes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were detected and subsequently identified by mass spectrometry. Established interaction partners of phosphatidylcholine were found, as well as known integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins, and proteins that were not previously considered mitochondrial inner membrane proteins. PMID:19171301

  14. Protein corona mitigates the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide by reducing its physical interaction with cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Guangxin; Kang, Seung-Gu; Tian, Xin; Garate, Jose Antonio; Zhao, Lin; Ge, Cuicui; Zhou, Ruhong

    2015-09-01

    Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called ``protein corona'' formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical to understand how absorbed proteins on the surfaces of nanoparticles alter their biological effects. In this work, we have demonstrated with both experimental and theoretical approaches that protein BSA coating can mitigate the cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by reducing its cell membrane penetration. Our cell viability and cellular uptake experiments showed that protein corona decreased cellular uptake of GO, thus significantly mitigating the potential cytotoxicity of GO. The electron microscopy images also confirmed that protein corona reduced the cellular morphological damage by limiting GO penetration into the cell membrane. Further molecular dynamics (MD) simulations validated the experimental results and revealed that the adsorbed BSA in effect weakened the interaction between the phospholipids and graphene surface due to a reduction of the available surface area plus an unfavorable steric effect, thus significantly reducing the graphene penetration and lipid bilayer damaging. These findings provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of this important graphene protein corona interaction with cell membranes, and should have implications in future development of graphene-based biomedical applications.Many recent studies have shown that the way nanoparticles interact with cells and biological molecules can vary greatly in the serum-containing or serum-free culture medium. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of how the so-called ``protein corona'' formed in serum medium affects nanoparticles' biological responses are still largely unresolved. Thus, it is critical

  15. Headgroup-dependent membrane catalysis of apelin-receptor interactions is likely.

    PubMed

    Langelaan, David N; Rainey, Jan K

    2009-07-30

    Apelin is the peptidic ligand for the G-protein-coupled receptor APJ. The apelin-APJ system is important in cardiovascular regulation, fluid homeostasis, and angiogenesis, among other roles. In this study, we investigate interactions between apelin and membrane-mimetic micelles of the detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG). Far-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy indicate that apelin peptides bind to micelles of the anionic detergents SDS and LPPG much more favorably than to zwitterionic DPC micelles. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy allowed full characterization of the interactions of apelin-17 with SDS micelles. Titration with paramagnetic agents and structural determination of apelin-17 in SDS indicate that R6-K12 is highly structured, with R6-L9 directly interacting with headgroups of the micelle. Type I beta-turns are initiated between R6 and L9, and a well-defined type IV beta-turn is initiated at S10. Furthermore, binding of apelin-17 to SDS micelles causes structuring of M15-F17, with no evidence for direct binding of this region to the micelles. These results are placed into the context of the membrane catalysis hypothesis for peptide-receptor binding, and a hypothetical mechanism of APJ binding and activation by apelin is advanced. PMID:19708686

  16. Headgroup-Dependent Membrane Catalysis of Apelin−Receptor Interactions Is Likely

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Apelin is the peptidic ligand for the G-protein-coupled receptor APJ. The apelin−APJ system is important in cardiovascular regulation, fluid homeostasis, and angiogenesis, among other roles. In this study, we investigate interactions between apelin and membrane-mimetic micelles of the detergents sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), and 1-palmitoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (LPPG). Far-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy indicate that apelin peptides bind to micelles of the anionic detergents SDS and LPPG much more favorably than to zwitterionic DPC micelles. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy allowed full characterization of the interactions of apelin-17 with SDS micelles. Titration with paramagnetic agents and structural determination of apelin-17 in SDS indicate that R6−K12 is highly structured, with R6−L9 directly interacting with headgroups of the micelle. Type I β-turns are initiated between R6 and L9, and a well-defined type IV β-turn is initiated at S10. Furthermore, binding of apelin-17 to SDS micelles causes structuring of M15-F17, with no evidence for direct binding of this region to the micelles. These results are placed into the context of the membrane catalysis hypothesis for peptide−receptor binding, and a hypothetical mechanism of APJ binding and activation by apelin is advanced. PMID:19708686

  17. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Lopes, José Luiz; Hissa, Denise Cavalcante; Melo, Vânia Maria Maciel; Beltramini, Leila Maria

    2013-01-01

    The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide’s antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5%) until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 μM and 155 μM to Plantaricin149a, respectively) but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide. PMID:24688525

  18. Effect of pre-strain and excess length on unsteady fluid-structure interactions of membrane airfoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojratsirikul, P.; Wang, Z.; Gursul, I.

    2010-04-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics of two-dimensional membrane airfoils were experimentally investigated in a wind tunnel. The effects of the membrane pre-strain and excess length on the unsteady aspects of the fluid-structure interaction were studied. The deformation of the membrane as a function of angle of attack and free-stream velocity was measured using a high-speed camera. These measurements were complemented by the measurements of unsteady velocity field with a high frame-rate Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system as well as smoke visualization. Membrane airfoils with excess length exhibit higher vibration modes, earlier roll-up of vortices, and smaller separated flow regions, whereas the membranes with pre-strain generally behave more similarly to a rigid airfoil. Measured frequencies of the membrane vibrations suggest a possible coupling with the wake instabilities at high incidences for all airfoils.

  19. U-box protein carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP) mediates poly-ubiquitylation preferentially on four-repeat Tau and is involved in neurodegeneration of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu; Matsumoto, Masaki; Kamura, Takumi; Murayama, Miyuki; Chui, Du-Hua; Planel, Emmanuel; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Takashima, Akihiko

    2004-10-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which are composed of hyperphosphorylated and ubiquitylated tau, are exhibited at regions where neuronal loss occurs in neurodegenerative diseases; however, the mechanisms of NFT formation remain unknown. Molecular studies of frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism-17 demonstrated that increasing the ratio of tau with exon 10 insertion induced fibrillar tau accumulation. Here, we show that carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), a U-box protein, recognizes the microtubule-binding repeat region of tau and preferentially ubiquitylates four-repeat tau compared with three-repeat tau. Overexpression of CHIP induced the prompt degradation of tau, reduced the formation of detergent-insoluble tau and inhibited proteasome inhibitor-induced cell death. NFT bearing neurons in progressive supranuclear palsy, in which four-repeat tau is a component, showed the accumulation of CHIP. Thus, CHIP is a ubiquitin ligase for four-repeat tau and maintains neuronal survival by regulating the quality control of tau in neurons. PMID:15447663

  20. Protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions in pharmacology: the case of the translocator protein (TSPO).

    PubMed

    Hatty, Claire R; Banati, Richard B

    2015-10-01

    The targets of many small molecule drugs are membrane proteins, and traditionally the focus of pharmacology is on the interaction between such receptors and their small molecule drug ligands. However, the lipid membranes of cells and organelles are increasingly appreciated as diverse and dynamic structures that also specifically interact with small molecule drugs and peptides, causing profound changes in the properties of these membranes, and modulating the function of the membrane and the proteins within it. Drug-membrane interactions are likely to have a role in both the therapeutic and toxic activity of a variety of compounds, and their role in the overall pharmacological effect of a drug needs to be understood more clearly. This is the case for the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) and its ligands, where functions that were established based on pharmacological studies are being called into question. Re-examining the putative functions of the TSPO and the effects of its ligands reveals a need to consider in more detail the interplay between protein-ligand and membrane-ligand interactions, and the modulatory relationship between TSPO and the lipid membrane. PMID:26238176

  1. FRAP to Characterize Molecular Diffusion and Interaction in Various Membrane Environments.

    PubMed

    Pincet, Frédéric; Adrien, Vladimir; Yang, Rong; Delacotte, Jérôme; Rothman, James E; Urbach, Wladimir; Tareste, David

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is a standard method used to study the dynamics of lipids and proteins in artificial and cellular membrane systems. The advent of confocal microscopy two decades ago has made quantitative FRAP easily available to most laboratories. Usually, a single bleaching pattern/area is used and the corresponding recovery time is assumed to directly provide a diffusion coefficient, although this is only true in the case of unrestricted Brownian motion. Here, we propose some general guidelines to perform FRAP experiments under a confocal microscope with different bleaching patterns and area, allowing the experimentalist to establish whether the molecules undergo Brownian motion (free diffusion) or whether they have restricted or directed movements. Using in silico simulations of FRAP measurements, we further indicate the data acquisition criteria that have to be verified in order to obtain accurate values for the diffusion coefficient and to be able to distinguish between different diffusive species. Using this approach, we compare the behavior of lipids in three different membrane platforms (supported lipid bilayers, giant liposomes and sponge phases), and we demonstrate that FRAP measurements are consistent with results obtained using other techniques such as Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) or Single Particle Tracking (SPT). Finally, we apply this method to show that the presence of the synaptic protein Munc18-1 inhibits the interaction between the synaptic vesicle SNARE protein, VAMP2, and its partner from the plasma membrane, Syn1A. PMID:27387979

  2. The interaction of the carbon nanoparticles with human cell plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overchuk, M.; Prylutska, S.; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Prylutsky, Yu.; Ritter, U.

    2013-09-01

    The study of carbon nanostructures is a highly topical branch of bionanotechnology because of their potential application in biomedicine. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are known for their ability to kill tumor cells causing hyperthermia shock and can be used in photothermal therapy respectively. Also chemically modified CNTs can be used for drug delivery. The needle-like shape of CNTs allows them to penetrate into the cell plasma membrane without killing the cell. C60 fullerenes are regarded as valuable nanocarriers for different hydrophobic molecules as well as potential antiviral agents or photosensitizers. In our previous studies we have demonstrated that all types of carbon nanoparticles cause externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) from the inner to the outer layer of the cell membrane in the small local patches (points of contact), leaving the other parts of plasma membrane PS-negative. In the current work there were studied the interactions of pristine C60 fullerenes and different types of CNTs with human blood cells (erythrocytes and Jurkat T-cells). We have shown, that carbon nanoparticles do not have any hemolytic effects, if judged by the dynamics of acidic hemolysis, although they are capable of permeabilizating the cells and facilitating the internalization of propidium iodide into the nuclei.

  3. FRAP to Characterize Molecular Diffusion and Interaction in Various Membrane Environments

    PubMed Central

    Pincet, Frédéric; Adrien, Vladimir; Yang, Rong; Delacotte, Jérôme; Rothman, James E.; Urbach, Wladimir

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is a standard method used to study the dynamics of lipids and proteins in artificial and cellular membrane systems. The advent of confocal microscopy two decades ago has made quantitative FRAP easily available to most laboratories. Usually, a single bleaching pattern/area is used and the corresponding recovery time is assumed to directly provide a diffusion coefficient, although this is only true in the case of unrestricted Brownian motion. Here, we propose some general guidelines to perform FRAP experiments under a confocal microscope with different bleaching patterns and area, allowing the experimentalist to establish whether the molecules undergo Brownian motion (free diffusion) or whether they have restricted or directed movements. Using in silico simulations of FRAP measurements, we further indicate the data acquisition criteria that have to be verified in order to obtain accurate values for the diffusion coefficient and to be able to distinguish between different diffusive species. Using this approach, we compare the behavior of lipids in three different membrane platforms (supported lipid bilayers, giant liposomes and sponge phases), and we demonstrate that FRAP measurements are consistent with results obtained using other techniques such as Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) or Single Particle Tracking (SPT). Finally, we apply this method to show that the presence of the synaptic protein Munc18-1 inhibits the interaction between the synaptic vesicle SNARE protein, VAMP2, and its partner from the plasma membrane, Syn1A. PMID:27387979

  4. Role of LHCII organization in the interaction of substituted 1,4-anthraquinones with thylakoid membranes.

    PubMed

    Apostolova, Emilia; Krumova, Sashka; Markova, Tzvetelina; Filipova, Tzvetanka; Molina, Maria T; Petkanchin, Ivana; Taneva, Stefka G

    2005-02-01

    The chlorophyll fluorescence, photochemical activity and surface electric properties of thylakoid membranes with different stoichiometry of pigment-protein complexes and organization of the light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHCII) were studied in the presence of substituted 1,4-anthraquinones. Data show strong dependence of the quenching of the chlorophyll fluorescence on the structural organization of LHCII. The increase of the LHCII oligomerization, which is associated with significant reduction of the transmembrane electric charge asymmetry and electric polarizability of the membrane, correlates with enhanced quenching effect of substituted 1,4-athraquinones. Crucial for the large quinone-induced changes in the membrane electric dipole moments is the structure of the quinone molecule. The strongest reduction in the values of the dipole moments is observed after interaction of thylakoids with 3-chloro-9-hydroxy-1,4-anthraquinone (TF33) which has the highest quenching efficiency. The quinone induced changes in the photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) correlate with the total amount of the supramolecular LHCII-PSII complex and depend on the number of substituents in the 1,4-anthraquinone molecule. PMID:15664498

  5. Interactions of sarin with polyelectrolyte membranes: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-01-10

    Nanostructured polyelectrolyte membranes (PEMs), which are widely used as permselective diffusion barriers in fuel cell technologies and electrochemical processing, are considered as protective membranes suitable for blocking warfare toxins, including water-soluble nerve agents such as sarin. In this article, we examine the mechanisms of sorption and diffusion of sarin in hydrated PEMs by means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Three PEMs are considered: Nafion, sulfonated polystyrene (sPS) that forms the hydrophilic subphase of segregated sPS-polyolefin block copolymers, and random sPS-polyethylene copolymer. We found that sarin concentrates at the interface between the hydrophilic and hydrophobic subphases of hydrated Nafion acting as a surfactant. In hydrated sPS, where the scale of water-polymer segregation is much smaller (1-2 nm), sarin also interacts favorably with hydrophobic and hydrophilic components. Water diffusion slows as the sarin content increases despite the overall increase in solvent content, which suggests that sarin and water have somewhat different pathways through the segregated membrane. Upon replacement of counterions of monovalent potassium with those of divalent calcium, sarin diffusion slows but remains substantial in all ionomers considered, especially at high sarin concentrations. The behavior of sarin is similar to that of its common simulant, dimethyl methylphosphonate. PMID:23205740

  6. Fluorescence quenching in β-cyclodextrin vesicles: membrane confinement and host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Schibilla, Frauke; Stegemann, Linda; Strassert, Cristian A; Rizzo, Fabio; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent β-cyclodextrin vesicles (β-CDV) that display host cavities available for host-guest interactions at the vesicle surface were prepared by incorporation of the hydrophobic spirobifluorene-based dye 1 into the membrane of unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence quenching of dye 1 was observed in the presence of different quenchers. Methyl viologen 2 does not quench dye 1 because it does not bind to β-CDV. 4-Nitrophenol 3 and 4-nitrophenol covalently connected to adamantane 4 quench the fluorescence of dye 1 in neutral solution, but by different mechanisms according to lifetime measurements. The quenching efficiency of 3 is pH dependent due to the presence of the phenolate form. Competition experiments with excess host and guest showed that 3 is likely to diffuse in and out of the membrane, while 4 forms an inclusion complex with β-CDV leading to close contact and efficient quenching. Our findings confirm that this dynamic supramolecular system is a versatile model to investigate quenching and recognition processes in bilayer membranes. PMID:26777315

  7. Phospholipid-cationic lipid interactions: influences on membrane and vesicle properties.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R B; Balasubramanian, S V; Straubinger, R M

    2001-05-01

    Liposomes composed of synthetic dialkyl cationic lipids and zwitterionic phospholipids such as dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine have been studied extensively as vehicles for gene delivery, but the broader potentials of these cationic liposomes for drug delivery have not. An understanding of phospholipid-cationic lipid interactions is essential for rational development of this potential. We evaluated the effect of the cationic lipid DOTAP (N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium) on liposome physical properties such as size and membrane domain structure. DSC (differential scanning calorimetry) showed progressive decrease and broadening of the phase transition temperature of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) with increasing fraction of DOTAP, in the range of 0.4-20 mol%. Laurdan (6-dodecanolyldimethylamino-naphthalene), a fluorescent probe of membrane domain structure, showed that DOTAP and DPPC remained miscible at all ratios tested. DOTAP reduced the size of spontaneously-forming PC-containing liposomes, regardless of the acyl chain length and degree of saturation. The anionic lipid DOPG (dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol) had similar effects on DPPC membrane fluidity and size. However, DOTAP/DOPC (50/50) vesicles were taken up avidly by OVCAR-3 human ovarian tumor cells, in contrast to DOPG/DOPC (50/50) liposomes. Overall, DOTAP exerts potent effects on bilayer physical properties, and may provide advantages for drug delivery. PMID:11334622

  8. Interaction of Bile Salts with Model Membranes Mimicking the Gastrointestinal Epithelium: A Study by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Coreta-Gomes, Filipe M; Martins, Patrícia A T; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrián; Vaz, Winchil L C; Geraldes, Carlos F G; Moreno, Maria João

    2015-08-25

    Bile salts (BS) are biosurfactants synthesized in the liver and secreted into the intestinal lumen where they solubilize cholesterol and other hydrophobic compounds facilitating their gastrointestinal absorption. Partition of BS toward biomembranes is an important step in both processes. Depending on the loading of the secreted BS micelles with endogeneous cholesterol and on the amount of cholesterol from diet, this may lead to the excretion or absorption of cholesterol, from cholesterol-saturated membranes in the liver or to gastrointestinal membranes, respectively. The partition of BS toward the gastrointestinal membranes may also affect the barrier properties of those membranes affecting the permeability for hydrophobic and amphiphilic compounds. Two important parameters in the interaction of the distinct BS with biomembranes are their partition coefficient and the rate of diffusion through the membrane. Altogether, they allow the calculation of BS local concentrations in the membrane as well as their asymmetry in both membrane leaflets. The local concentration and, most importantly, its asymmetric distribution in the bilayer are a measure of induced membrane perturbation, which is expected to significantly affect its properties as a cholesterol donor and hydrophobic barrier. In this work we have characterized the partition of several BS, nonconjugated and conjugated with glycine, to large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) in the liquid-disordered phase and with liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase coexistence, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The partition into the liquid-disordered bilayer was characterized by large partition coefficients and favored by enthalpy, while association with the more ordered membrane was weak and driven only by the hydrophobic effect. The trihydroxy BS partitions less efficiently toward the membranes but shows faster translocation rates, in agreement with a membrane protective effect of those BS. The rate of translocation

  9. Application of a membrane model to the sorptive interactions of humic substances.

    PubMed Central

    Wershaw, R L

    1989-01-01

    Humic substances, the dark-colored, natural organic polyelectrolytes that are found in practically all soils, sediments, and natural water, strongly interact with both inorganic and organic pollutants. Inorganic cationic species generally undergo complexation reactions with humic substances. The binding of cations, such as cupric ions, by humic substances often markedly reduces their toxicity to aquatic organisms. Some inorganic anionic species, in the presence of metal ions, are sorbed by humic substances. In these instances the metal ions appear to form bridges between the humic substances and the anions. Several different types of interactions take place between organic compounds and humic materials. Hydrophobic organic species partition into either insoluble or soluble humic substances. The insoluble humic substances will remove hydrophobic organic compounds from the aqueous phase, thereby rendering them less mobile. However, soluble humic substances will solubilize hydrophobic organics, increasing their mobility. Other types of interactions between humic substances and organic compounds, such as adsorption and ion exchange, also have been observed. These various interactions between humic substances and pollutants are important in governing their fate and movement in natural water systems, and, for this reason, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the interaction is important. A recently developed membrane model of the structure of humic substances is described; this model enables one to better understand the physical-chemical properties of these materials. Images FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. PMID:2533555

  10. Interactions of dendritic glycopolymer with erythrocytes, red blood cell ghosts and membrane enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Dominika; Janaszewska, Anna; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte; Bryszewska, Maria; Maly, Jan

    2015-12-30

    Interactions between maltose functionalized hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s (95% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI A; 33% maltose decoration denoted as Mal-PEI B) and red blood cells (RBCs) and between red blood cell membranes were investigated. We monitored the degree of hemolysis, the change in cell shape, the influence of polymers on the fluidity of the cell membrane and some cell membrane enzymes to determine their possible cytotoxic impact on them. To observe the extent of hemolysis, the RBCs were incubated with different concentrations of Mal-PEIs. The first significant lysis of RBCs was observed after 6h of incubation. Prolongation of the incubation time increased the number of ruptured cells. Moreover, we observed that Mal-PEI B was more hemolytic than Mal-PEI A in buffer solution. In contrast, an incubation of RBCs with Mal-PEIs in human plasma significantly decreased the hemolytic process and showed higher hemolytic property of Mal-PEI A compared to Mal-PEI B. Also several changes in the shape of the RBCs occurred after incubation with Mal-PEIs. Some of the erythrocytes shrank (echinocytes), but their morphology generally remained unchanged during the incubation. As shown by fluorescence experiments, both polymers induced the increase of fluidity of RBCs membranes. In summary, both types of hyperbranched poly(ethylene imine)s were practically non-hemolytic even at high polymer concentrations. Mal-PEI B was slightly more noxious than the Mal-PEI A in a buffer solution, while in blood plasma, the situation was opposite. Decrease of Na+/K+ ATPase and total ATPase enzymes activity was related with molecule size and number of maltose groups on the surface of molecule. The low hemolytic properties only observed at higher concentration (100μM and 400μM) indicated that Mal-PEIs are promising macromolecules in the area of drug delivery systems. PMID:26498371

  11. Viral potassium channels as a robust model system for studies of membrane-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christian J; Lachnit, Christine; Becker, Patrick; Henkes, Leonhard M; Arrigoni, Cristina; Kast, Stefan M; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Schroeder, Indra

    2014-04-01

    The viral channel KcvNTS belongs to the smallest K(+) channels known so far. A monomer of a functional homotetramer contains only 82 amino acids. As a consequence of the small size the protein is almost fully submerged into the membrane. This suggests that the channel is presumably sensitive to its lipid environment. Here we perform a comparative analysis for the function of the channel protein embedded in three different membrane environments. 1. Single-channel currents of KcvNTS were recorded with the patch clamp method on the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells. 2. They were also measured after reconstitution of recombinant channel protein into classical planar lipid bilayers and 3. into horizontal bilayers derived from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). The recombinant channel protein was either expressed and purified from Pichia pastoris or from a cell-free expression system; for the latter a new approach with nanolipoprotein particles was used. The data show that single-channel activity can be recorded under all experimental conditions. The main functional features of the channel like a large single-channel conductance (80pS), high open-probability (>50%) and the approximate duration of open and closed dwell times are maintained in all experimental systems. An apparent difference between the approaches was only observed with respect to the unitary conductance, which was ca. 35% lower in HEK293 cells than in the other systems. The reason for this might be explained by the fact that the channel is tagged by GFP when expressed in HEK293 cells. Collectively the data demonstrate that the small viral channel exhibits a robust function in different experimental systems. This justifies an extrapolation of functional data from these systems to the potential performance of the channel in the virus/host interaction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Viral Membrane Proteins-Channels for Cellular Networking. PMID:23791706

  12. Cation Interactions and Membrane Potential Induce Conformational Changes in NaPi-IIb.

    PubMed

    Patti, Monica; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Werner, Andreas; Forrest, Lucy R; Forster, Ian C

    2016-09-01

    Voltage-dependence of Na(+)-coupled phosphate cotransporters of the SLC34 family arises from displacement of charges intrinsic to the protein and the binding/release of one Na(+) ion in response to changes in the transmembrane electric field. Candidate coordination residues for the cation at the Na1 site were previously predicted by structural modeling using the x-ray structure of dicarboxylate transporter VcINDY as template and confirmed by functional studies. Mutations at Na1 resulted in altered steady-state and presteady-state characteristics that should be mirrored in the conformational changes induced by membrane potential changes. To test this hypothesis by functional analysis, double mutants of the flounder SLC34A2 protein were constructed that contain one of the Na1-site perturbing mutations together with a substituted cysteine for fluorophore labeling, as expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The locations of the mutations were mapped onto a homology model of the flounder protein. The effects of the mutagenesis were characterized by steady-state, presteady-state, and fluorometric assays. Changes in fluorescence intensity (ΔF) in response to membrane potential steps were resolved at three previously identified positions. These fluorescence data corroborated the altered presteady-state kinetics upon perturbation of Na1, and furthermore indicated concomitant changes in the microenvironment of the respective fluorophores, as evidenced by changes in the voltage dependence and time course of ΔF. Moreover, iodide quenching experiments indicated that the aqueous nature of the fluorophore microenvironment depended on the membrane potential. These findings provide compelling evidence that membrane potential and cation interactions induce significant large-scale structural rearrangements of the protein. PMID:27602725

  13. Endobrevin, a novel synaptobrevin/VAMP-like protein preferentially associated with the early endosome.

    PubMed

    Wong, S H; Zhang, T; Xu, Y; Subramaniam, V N; Griffiths, G; Hong, W

    1998-06-01

    Synaptobrevins/vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs) together with syntaxins and a synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) are the main components of a protein complex involved in the docking and/or fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic membrane. We report here the molecular, biochemical, and cell biological characterization of a novel member of the synaptobrevin/VAMP family. The amino acid sequence of endobrevin has 32, 33, and 31% identity to those of synaptobrevin/VAMP-1, synaptobrevin/VAMP-2, and cellubrevin, respectively. Membrane fractionation studies demonstrate that endobrevin is enriched in membrane fractions that are also enriched in the asialoglycoprotein receptor. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy establishes that endobrevin is primarily associated with the perinuclear vesicular structures of the early endocytic compartment. The preferential association of endobrevin with the early endosome was further established by electron microscopy (EM) immunogold labeling. In vitro binding assays show that endobrevin interacts with immobilized recombinant alpha-SNAP fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST). Our results highlight the general importance of members of the synaptobrevin/VAMP protein family in membrane traffic and provide new avenues for future functional and mechanistic studies of this protein as well as the endocytotic pathway. PMID:9614193

  14. Homo- and heteromeric interaction strengths of the synergistic antimicrobial peptides PGLa and magainin 2 in membranes.

    PubMed

    Zerweck, Jonathan; Strandberg, Erik; Bürck, Jochen; Reichert, Johannes; Wadhwani, Parvesh; Kukharenko, Olga; Ulrich, Anne S

    2016-09-01

    PGLa and magainin 2 (MAG2) are amphiphilic α-helical frog peptides with synergistic antimicrobial activity. In vesicle leakage assays we observed the strongest synergy for equimolar mixtures of PGLa and MAG2. This result was consistent with solid-state (15)N-NMR data on the helix alignment in model membranes. The Hill coefficients determined from the vesicle leakage data showed that the heterodimeric (PGLa-MAG2) interactions were stronger than the homodimeric (PGLa-PGLa and MAG2-MAG2) interactions. This result was also reflected in the free energy of dimerization determined from oriented circular dichroism and quantitative solid-state (19)F-NMR analysis. PMID:27052218

  15. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  16. Interaction of the Antimicrobial Peptide Polymyxin B1 with Both Membranes of E. coli: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Jefferies, Damien; Sessions, Richard B.; Bond, Peter J.; Khalid, Syma

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are small, cationic proteins that can induce lysis of bacterial cells through interaction with their membranes. Different mechanisms for cell lysis have been proposed, but these models tend to neglect the role of the chemical composition of the membrane, which differs between bacterial species and can be heterogeneous even within a single cell. Moreover, the cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria such as E. coli contains two membranes with differing compositions. To this end, we report the first molecular dynamics simulation study of the interaction of the antimicrobial peptide, polymyxin B1 with complex models of both the inner and outer membranes of E. coli. The results of >16 microseconds of simulation predict that polymyxin B1 is likely to interact with the membranes via distinct mechanisms. The lipopeptides aggregate in the lipopolysaccharide headgroup region of the outer membrane with limited tendency for insertion within the lipid A tails. In contrast, the lipopeptides readily insert into the inner membrane core, and the concomitant increased hydration may be responsible for bilayer destabilization and antimicrobial function. Given the urgent need to develop novel, potent antibiotics, the results presented here reveal key mechanistic details that may be exploited for future rational drug development. PMID:25885324

  17. The lipid composition of Legionella dumoffii membrane modulates the interaction with Galleria mellonella apolipophorin III.

    PubMed

    Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Reszczyńska, Emilia; Luchowski, Rafał; Kania, Magdalena; Gisch, Nicolas; Waldow, Franziska; Mak, Paweł; Danikiewicz, Witold; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Cytryńska, Małgorzata

    2016-07-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III), an insect homologue of human apolipoprotein E (apoE), is a widely used model protein in studies on protein-lipid interactions, and anti-Legionella activity of Galleria mellonella apoLp-III has been documented. Interestingly, exogenous choline-cultured Legionella dumoffii cells are considerably more susceptible to apoLp-III than non-supplemented bacteria. In order to explain these differences, we performed, for the first time, a detailed analysis of L. dumoffii lipids and a comparative lipidomic analysis of membranes of bacteria grown without and in the presence of exogenous choline. (31)P NMR analysis of L. dumoffii phospholipids (PLs) revealed a considerable increase in the phosphatidylcholine (PC) content in bacteria cultured on choline medium and a decrease in the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) content in approximately the same range. The interactions of G. mellonella apoLp-III with lipid bilayer membranes prepared from PLs extracted from non- and choline-supplemented L. dumoffii cells were examined in detail by means of attenuated total reflection- and linear dichroism-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the kinetics of apoLp-III binding to liposomes formed from L. dumoffii PLs was analysed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy using fluorescently labelled G. mellonella apoLp-III. Our results indicated enhanced binding of apoLp-III to and deeper penetration into lipid membranes formed from PLs extracted from the choline-supplemented bacteria, i.e. characterized by an increased PC/PE ratio. This could explain, at least in part, the higher susceptibility of choline-cultured L. dumoffii to G. mellonella apoLp-III. PMID:27094351

  18. Interaction of antitumor alpha-lactalbumin-oleic acid complexes with artificial and natural membranes.

    PubMed

    Zherelova, Olga M; Kataev, Anatoly A; Grishchenko, Valery M; Knyazeva, Ekaterina L; Permyakov, Sergei E; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2009-06-01

    The specific complexes of human alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) with oleic acid (OA), HAMLET and LA-OA-17 (OA-complexes), possess cytotoxic activity against tumor cells but the mechanism of their cell penetration remains unclear. To explore the molecular mechanisms underlying interaction of the OA-complexes with the cell membrane, their interactions with small unilamellar dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles and electroexcitable plasma membrane of internodal native and perfused cells of the green alga Chara corallina have been studied. The fractionation (Sephadex G-200) of mixtures of the OA-complexes with the vesicles shows that OA-binding increases the affinity of alpha-LA to DPPC vesicles. Calcium association decreases protein affinity to the vesicles; the effect being less pronounced for LA-OA-17. The voltage clamp technique studies show that LA-OA-17, HAMLET, and their constituents produce different modifying effects on the plasmalemmal ionic channels of the Chara corallina cells. The irreversible binding of OA-complexes to the plasmalemma is accompanied by changes in the activation-inactivation kinetics of developing integral transmembrane currents, suppression of the Ca(2+) current and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current, and by increase in the nonspecific K(+) leakage currents. The latter reflects development of nonselective permeability of the plasma membrane. The HAMLET-induced effects on the plasmalemmal currents are less pronounced and potentiated by LA-OA-17. The control experiments with OA and intact alpha-LA show their qualitatively different and much less pronounced effects on the transmembrane ionic currents. Thus, the modification of alpha-LA by OA results in an increase in the protein association with the model lipid bilayer and in drastic irreversible changes in permeability of several types of the plasmalemmal ionic channels. PMID:19588235

  19. Rpe65 Isomerase Associates with Membranes through an Electrostatic Interaction with Acidic Phospholipid Headgroups*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Quan; Kaylor, Joanna J.; Miu, Anh; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Travis, Gabriel H.

    2010-01-01

    Opsins are light-sensitive pigments in the vertebrate retina, comprising a G protein-coupled receptor and an 11-cis-retinaldehyde chromophore. Absorption of a photon by an opsin pigment induces isomerization of its chromophore to all-trans-retinaldehyde. After a brief period of activation, opsin releases all-trans-retinaldehyde and becomes insensitive to light. Restoration of light sensitivity to the apo-opsin involves the conversion of all-trans-retinaldehyde back to 11-cis-retinaldehyde via an enzyme pathway called the visual cycle. The critical isomerization step in this pathway is catalyzed by Rpe65. Rpe65 is strongly associated with membranes but contains no membrane-spanning segments. It was previously suggested that the affinity of Rpe65 for membranes is due to palmitoylation of one or more Cys residues. In this study, we re-examined this hypothesis. By two independent strategies involving mass spectrometry, we show that Rpe65 is not palmitoylated nor does it appear to undergo other post-translational modifications at significant stoichiometry. Instead, we show that Rpe65 binds the acidic phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cardiolipin, but not phosphatidic acid. No binding of Rpe65 to basic phospholipids or neutral lipids was observed. The affinity of Rpe65 to acidic phospholipids was strongly pH-dependent, suggesting an electrostatic interaction of basic residues in Rpe65 with negatively charged phospholipid headgroups. Binding of Rpe65 to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine or phosphatidylglycerol, but not the basic or neutral phospholipids, allowed the enzyme to extract its insoluble substrate, all-trans-retinyl palmitate, from the lipid bilayer for synthesis of 11-cis-retinol. The interaction of Rpe65 with acidic phospholipids is therefore biologically relevant. PMID:19892706

  20. Monitoring drug-lipid membrane interactions via a molecular rotor probe.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qinqin; Zhao, Tao; Sun, Zhihua

    2016-08-01

    Molecular rotors are fluorescent molecules with a viscosity-sensitive fluorescence quantum yield that are often used to measure viscosity changes in biological membranes. Herein, we report the use of a lipophilic molecular rotor probe to monitor the interactions between the local anesthetic tetracaine (TTC) and small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) in a label-free manner. The probe was developed by modifying the fluorescent molecular rotor CCVJ with an amphiphilic anchor group that enables adequate integration of the rotor group into the hydrophobic core of lipid bilayers. The temperature-dependent profile of the quantum yield of the probe clearly exhibited the subtransition, pretransition and main phase transition of the lipid bilayers as drastic changes in the activation energies. The temperature-TTC phase diagrams were determined based on an Arrhenius fitting. The results show that TTC has a significant chain ordering effect on liquid-crystalline phase lipids compared to solid-gel phase lipids, especially subgel phase lipids. A TTC-induced interdigitated gel (LβI) phase appeared at the pretransition temperature. The LβI phase spread both its ends in a TTC-dependent fashion, and the low-temperature end merged to the subtransition at a TTC concentration of 25 mM. Adding cholesterol (CHOL) to the SUVs stabilizes the LβI phase and reduces the insertion of TTC into the bilayers. The paper demonstrates that our method is highly sensitive to the microenvironment of the lipid membrane, providing a facile and efficient new tool to study drug-membrane interactions. Also, molecular rotors may potentially be exploited as screen probes for drug development and analysis. PMID:27243370

  1. Tetra- and Penta-Cyclic Triterpenes Interaction with Lipid Bilayer Membrane: A Structural Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Rola; Charcosset, Catherine; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    The effect of tetracyclic (cortisol, prednisolone, and 9-fluorocortisol acetate) and pentacyclic (uvaol and erythrodiol) triterpenes (TTPs) on the fluidity of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC) liposome membrane was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, Raman spectroscopy, and fluorescence polarization of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Liposomes were prepared in the absence and presence of TTPs at molar ratios DPPC:TTP 100:1, 100:2.5, and 100:10. All the studied TTPs abolished the pre-transition and modified the intensity of the Raman peak at 715 cm(-1) proving the interaction of TTP molecules with the choline head group of phospholipids. An increase in the Raman height intensity ratios of the peaks I 2935/2880, I 2844/2880, and I 1090/1130, giving information about the ratio disorder/order of the alkyl chains, and a decrease of the main transition temperature demonstrated the interaction of TTPs with the alkyl chains. The tetracyclic TTPs produced broadening of the phase transition profile. Besides, a scarcely splitting of the main transition peak was obtained with prednisolone and 9-fluorocortisol acetate. The results of fluorescence depolarization of DPH showed that the studied molecules fluidized the liposomal membrane at 25, 41, and 50 °C. Pentacyclic TTPs, being more hydrophobic than tetracyclic ones, demonstrated higher fluidizing effect than tetracyclic TTPs in the liquid crystalline phase suggesting a deeper incorporation in the lipid bilayer. The presence of a free polar head group at the ring D seems to control the TTP incorporation in the bilayer and consequently its effect on the membrane fluidity. PMID:26759229

  2. Molecular targets of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG): specificity and interaction with membrane lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Patra, S K; Rizzi, F; Silva, A; Rugina, D O; Bettuzzi, S

    2008-12-01

    Proteomic studies on anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins (specifically EGCG) are suggesting a large set of protein targets that may directly interact with EGCG and alter the physiology of diseased cells, including cancer. Of notice, benign cells are usually left untouched. Lipid rafts have been recently recognized as signal processing hubs and suggested to be involved in drug uptake by means of endocytosis. These findings are suggesting new insights on the molecular mechanisms of anticancer drugs action. In the membrane, EGCG is hijacked by the laminin receptor (LamR), a lipid raft protein. Similar to aplidin and edelfosin, EGCG alters membrane domains composition also preventing EGF binding to EGFR, imerization of EGFR and relocation of phosphorylated EGFR to lipid rafts. In vitro studies have recently shown that EGCG also binds both DNA and RNA in GpC-rich regions. This event may importantly affect genes function. Moreover, EGCG was shown to inhibit telomerase, topoisomerase II and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), thus ultimately affecting chromatin maintenance and remodeling. But another important alternative pathway besides interaction with specific proteins may play an important role in EGCG action: direct targeting of bioactive membrane platforms, lipid rafts. Structural alteration of the platforms deeply impact (and often inactivates) important pathways involving MAP kinases. The key issue is that, important and specific differences in lipid rafts composition have been found in transformed versus benign cells and apoptotic versus non-apoptotic cells. We suggest here that the anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins against different kind of cancers may find an explanation in direct targeting of lipid rafts by EGCG. PMID:19261982

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal specific interactions of post-translational palmitoyl modifications with rhodopsin in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Bjoern E.S.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Brown, Michael F.; Feller, Scott E.; Vogel, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the behavior of the highly flexible post-translational lipid modifications of rhodopsin from multiple-microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Rhodopsin was studied in a realistic membrane environment that includes cholesterol, as well as saturated and polyunsaturated lipids with phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine headgroups. The simulation reveals striking differences between the palmitoylations at Cys322 and Cys323 as well as between the palmitoyl chains and the neighboring lipids. Notably the palmitoyl group at Cys322 shows considerably greater contact with helix H1 of rhodopsin, yielding frequent chain upturns with longer reorientational correlation times, and relatively low order parameters. While the palmitoylation at Cys323 makes fewer protein contacts and has increased order compared to Cys322, it nevertheless exhibits greater flexibility with smaller order parameters than the stearoyl chains of the surrounding lipids. The dynamical structure of the palmitoylations—as well as their extensive fluctuations—suggests a complex function for the post-translational modifications in rhodopsin and potentially other G protein-coupled receptors, going beyond their role as membrane anchoring elements. Rather, we propose that the palmitoylation at Cys323 has a potential role as a lipid anchor, whereas the palmitoyl-protein interaction observed for Cys322 suggests a more specific interaction that affects the stability of the dark state of rhodopsin. PMID:22280374

  4. Interaction of VP3(110-121) Peptide with Hepatocyte and Erythrocyte Membrane Models.

    PubMed

    Sospedra; Alsina; Haro; Mestres; Busquets

    1999-03-01

    The use of synthetic peptides in the goal of developing a new, inexpensive vaccine against hepatitis A virus is one of the encouraging approaches followed by many laboratories. These peptides have to be well characterized, being their physicochemical properties one of the most relevant points to control. In that sense, one can consider the study of the peptide interaction with lipid monolayers by means of the Wilhelmy plate method, to gain insight into the possible mechanism of action at the membrane level. The peptide chosen corresponds to the lineal epitope of hepatitis A virus VP3(110-121). As far as the lipids used are concerned, they were selected according to the composition of hepatocytes and erythrocytes because these structures seem to play an important role in hepatitis proliferation and infection. The peptide was able to accommodate into lipid monolayers. Interaction was slightly lower in the hepatocyte model than in the erythrocyte model, probably due to the presence of cholesterol in the hepatocyte membrane. Copyright 1999 Academic Press. PMID:9929444

  5. Dynamic assessment of Amyloid oligomers - cell membrane interaction by advanced impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, M.; David, S.; Polonschii, C.; Bratu, D.; Gheorghiu, E.

    2013-04-01

    The amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are believed to be pivotal in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis and onset of vascular dysfunction. Recent studies indicate that Aβ1-42 treatment influences the expression of tight junction protein complexes, stress fibre formation, disruption and aggregation of actin filaments and cellular gap formation. Aiming for functional characterization of model cells upon Aβ1-42 treatment, we deployed an advanced Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing for monitoring cell evolution. A precision Impedance Analyzer with a multiplexing module developed in house was used for recording individual electrode sets in the 40 Hz - 100 KHz frequency range. In a step forward from the classical ECIS assays, we report on a novel data analysis algorithm that enables access to cellular and paracellular electrical parameters and cell surface interaction with fully developed cell monolayers. The evolution of the impedance at selected frequencies provides evidence for a dual effect of Aβ42 exposure, at both paracellular permeability and cell adherence level, with intricate dynamics that open up new perspectives on Aβ1-42 oligomers - cell membrane interaction. Validation of electrical impedance assays of the amyloid fibrils effect on cell membrane structure is achieved by both AFM analysis and Surface Plasmon Resonance studies. The capabilities of this noninvasive, real time platform for cell analysis in a wider applicative context are outlined.

  6. Hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. Thermodynamic analysis of tetraphenylphosphonium binding to vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Flewelling, R F; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties for the interaction of the hydrophobic ion tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP+) with egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles were studied in detail by equilibrium dialysis and spin label techniques. A partition coefficient of beta = 4.2 + 0.4 x 10(-6) cm (K congruent to 100) was determined. Electrostatic saturation sets in at approximately 600 microM (about one absorbed TPP+ molecule per 100 lipids), and is not screened by salt. The temperature dependence of binding was determined, which reveals that the binding is entropy-driven with a positive (repulsive) enthalpy of binding, a result to be compared with hydrophobic anions in which the binding enthalpy is negative. The membrane dipole potential may be responsible for this binding difference. Activity coefficients are determined and shown to be significantly different from those of most common salts, an important result that should be considered in all hydrophobic ion studies. Comparison of the TPP+ results with those of its anionic structural analogue, tetraphenylboron (TPB-), permits a general analysis of hydrophobic ion interactions with membranes. A theoretical model consistent with the entire set of data is developed in an accompanying article. PMID:3006814

  7. Structural and thermodynamic characterization of doxycycline/β-cyclodextrin supramolecular complex and its bacterial membrane interactions.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Diego F; Consuegra, Jessika; Trajano, Vivianne C; Gontijo, Sávio M L; Guimarães, Pedro P G; Cortés, Maria E; Denadai, Ângelo L; Sinisterra, Rubén D

    2014-06-01

    Doxycycline is a semi-synthetic antibiotic commonly used for the treatment of many aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. It inhibits the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and affects cell proliferation. In this study, the structural and thermodynamic parameters of free DOX and a DOX/βCD complex were investigated, as well as their interactions and effects on Staphylococcus aureus cells and cellular cytotoxicity. Complexation of DOX and βCD was confirmed to be an enthalpy- and entropy-driven process, and a low equilibrium constant was obtained. Treatment of S. aureus with higher concentrations of DOX or DOX/βCD resulted in an exponential decrease in S. aureus cell size, as well as a gradual neutralization of zeta potential. These thermodynamic profiles suggest that ion-pairing and hydrogen bonding interactions occur between DOX and the membrane of S. aureus. In addition, the adhesion of βCD to the cell membrane via hydrogen bonding is hypothesized to mediate a synergistic effect which accounts for the higher activity of DOX/βCD against S. aureus compared to pure DOX. Lower cytotoxicity and induction of osteoblast proliferation was also associated with DOX/βCD compared with free DOX. These promising findings demonstrate the potential for DOX/βCD to mediate antimicrobial activity at lower concentrations, and provides a strategy for the development of other antimicrobial formulations. PMID:24816509

  8. Demonstration of the interactions between aromatic compound-loaded lipid nanocapsules and Acinetobacter baumannii bacterial membrane.

    PubMed

    Montagu, A; Joly-Guillou, M-L; Guillet, C; Bejaud, J; Rossines, E; Saulnier, P

    2016-06-15

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important nosocomial pathogen that is resistant to many commonly-used antibiotics. One strategy for treatment is the use of aromatic compounds (carvacrol, cinnamaldehyde) against A. baumannii. The aim of this study was to determine the interactions between bacteria and lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) over time based on the fluorescence of 3,3'-Dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine Perchlorate-LNCs (DiO-LNCs) and the properties of trypan blue to analyse the physicochemical mechanisms occurring at the level of the biological membrane. The results demonstrated the capacity of carvacrol-loaded LNCs to interact with and penetrate the bacterial membrane in comparison with cinnamaldehyde-loaded LNCs and unloaded LNCs. Modifications of carvacrol after substitution of hydroxyl functional groups by fatty acids demonstrated the crucial role of hydroxyl functions in antibacterial activity. Finally, after contact with the efflux pump inhibitor, carbonylcyanide-3-chlorophenyl hydrazine (CCCP), the results indicated the total synergistic antibacterial effect with Car-LNCs, showing that CCCP is associated with the action mechanism of carvacrol, especially at the level of the efflux pump mechanism. PMID:27039148

  9. Protein-lipid interactions and non-lamellar lipidic structures in membrane pore formation and membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Robert J C

    2016-03-01

    Pore-forming proteins and peptides act on their targeted lipid bilayer membranes to increase permeability. This approach to the modulation of biological function is relevant to a great number of living processes, including; infection, parasitism, immunity, apoptosis, development and neurodegeneration. While some pore-forming proteins/peptides assemble into rings of subunits to generate discrete, well-defined pore-forming structures, an increasing number is recognised to form pores via mechanisms which co-opt membrane lipids themselves. Among these, membrane attack complex-perforin/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) family proteins, Bax/colicin family proteins and actinoporins are especially prominent and among the mechanisms believed to apply are the formation of non-lamellar (semi-toroidal or toroidal) lipidic structures. In this review I focus on the ways in which lipids contribute to pore formation and contrast this with the ways in which lipids are co-opted also in membrane fusion and fission events. A variety of mechanisms for pore formation that involve lipids exists, but they consistently result in stable hybrid proteolipidic structures. These structures are stabilised by mechanisms in which pore-forming proteins modify the innate capacity of lipid membranes to respond to their environment, changing shape and/or phase and binding individual lipid molecules directly. In contrast, and despite the diversity in fusion protein types, mechanisms for membrane fusion are rather similar to each other, mapping out a pathway from pairs of separated compartments to fully confluent fused membranes. Fusion proteins generate metastable structures along the way which, like long-lived proteolipidic pore-forming complexes, rely on the basic physical properties of lipid bilayers. Membrane fission involves similar intermediates, in the reverse order. I conclude by considering the possibility that at least some pore-forming and fusion proteins are evolutionarily related

  10. Interaction of the Spo20 Membrane-Sensor Motif with Phosphatidic Acid and Other Anionic Lipids, and Influence of the Membrane Environment

    PubMed Central

    Horchani, Habib; de Saint-Jean, Maud; Barelli, Hélène; Antonny, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    The yeast protein Spo20 contains a regulatory amphipathic motif that has been suggested to recognize phosphatidic acid, a lipid involved in signal transduction, lipid metabolism and membrane fusion. We have investigated the interaction of the Spo20 amphipathic motif with lipid membranes using a bioprobe strategy that consists in appending this motif to the end of a long coiled-coil, which can be coupled to a GFP reporter for visualization in cells. The resulting construct is amenable to in vitro and in vivo experiments and allows unbiased comparison between amphipathic helices of different chemistry. In vitro, the Spo20 bioprobe responded to small variations in the amount of phosphatidic acid. However, this response was not specific. The membrane binding of the probe depended on the presence of phosphatidylethanolamine and also integrated the contribution of other anionic lipids, including phosphatidylserine and phosphatidyl-inositol-(4,5)bisphosphate. Inverting the sequence of the Spo20 motif neither affected the ability of the probe to interact with anionic liposomes nor did it modify its cellular localization, making a stereo-specific mode of phosphatidic acid recognition unlikely. Nevertheless, the lipid binding properties and the cellular localization of the Spo20 alpha-helix differed markedly from that of another amphipathic motif, Amphipathic Lipid Packing Sensor (ALPS), suggesting that even in the absence of stereo specific interactions, amphipathic helices can act as subcellular membrane targeting determinants in a cellular context. PMID:25426975

  11. Elisidepsin Interacts Directly with Glycosylceramides in the Plasma Membrane of Tumor Cells to Induce Necrotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Guijarro, José Manuel; García, Carolina; Macías, Álvaro; García-Fernández, Luis Francisco; Moreno, Cristina; Reyes, Fernando; Martínez-Leal, Juan Fernando; Fernández, Rogelio; Martínez, Valentín; Valenzuela, Carmen; Lillo, M. Pilar; Galmarini, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Plasma membrane integrity is essential for cell life. Any major break on it immediately induces the death of the affected cell. Different molecules were described as disrupting this cell structure and thus showing antitumor activity. We have previously defined that elisidepsin (Irvalec®, PM02734) inserts and self-organizes in the plasma membrane of tumor cells, inducing a rapid loss of membrane integrity, cell permeabilization and necrotic death. Here we show that, in sensitive HCT-116 colorectal cells, all these effects are consequence of the interaction of elisidepsin with glycosylceramides in the cell membrane. Of note, an elisidepsin-resistant subline (HCT-116-Irv) presented reduced levels of glycosylceramides and no accumulation of elisidepsin in the plasma membrane. Consequently, drug treatment did not induce the characteristic necrotic cell death. Furthermore, GM95, a mutant derivative from B16 mouse melanoma cells lacking ceramide glucosyltransferase (UGCG) activity and thus the synthesis of glycosylceramides, was also resistant to elisidepsin. Over-expression of UGCG gene in these deficient cells restored glycosylceramides synthesis, rendering them sensitive to elisidepsin, at a similar level than parental B16 cells. These results indicate that glycosylceramides act as membrane targets of elisidepsin, facilitating its insertion in the plasma membrane and the subsequent membrane permeabilization that leads to drug-induced cell death. They also indicate that cell membrane lipids are a plausible target for antineoplastic therapy. PMID:26474061

  12. Computational study of the RGD-peptide interactions with perovskite-type BFO-(1 1 1) membranes under aqueous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hai-long; Bian, Liang; Hou, Wen-ping; Dong, Fa-Qin; Song, Mian-Xin; Zhang, Xiao-yan; Wang, Li-sheng

    2016-07-01

    We elucidated a number of facets regarding arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-bismuth ferrite (BFO)-(1 1 1) membrane interactions and reactivity that have previously remained unexplored on a molecular level. Results demonstrate the intra-molecular interaction facilitates a "horseshoe" structure of RGD adsorbed onto the BFO-(1 1 1) membrane, through the electrostatic (Asp-cation-Fe) and water-bridge (Osbnd H2O and H2Osbnd NH2) interactions. The effect of structural and electron-transfer interactions is attributed to the cation-valences, indicating that the divalent cations are electron-acceptors and the monovalent cations as electron-donors. Notably, the strongly bound Ca2+ ion exerts a "gluing" effect on the Asp-side-chain, indicating a tightly packed RGD-BFO configuration. Thus, modulating the biological response of BFO-(1 1 1) membrane will allow us to design more appropriate interfaces for implantable diagnostic and therapeutic perovskite-type micro-devices.

  13. Biomechanics and Thermodynamics of Nanoparticle Interactions with Plasma and Endosomal Membrane Lipids in Cellular Uptake and Endosomal Escape

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To be effective for cytoplasmic delivery of therapeutics, nanoparticles (NPs) taken up via endocytic pathways must efficiently transport across the cell membrane and subsequently escape from the secondary endosomes. We hypothesized that the biomechanical and thermodynamic interactions of NPs with plasma and endosomal membrane lipids are involved in these processes. Using model plasma and endosomal lipid membranes, we compared the interactions of cationic NPs composed of poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) modified with the dichain surfactant didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) or the single-chain surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) vs anionic unmodified NPs of similar size. We validated our hypothesis in doxorubicin-sensitive (MCF-7, with relatively fluid membranes) and resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR, with rigid membranes). Despite their cationic surface charges, DMAB- and CTAB-modified NPs showed different patterns of biophysical interaction: DMAB-modified NPs induced bending of the model plasma membrane, whereas CTAB-modified NPs condensed the membrane, thereby resisted bending. Unmodified NPs showed no effects on bending. DMAB-modified NPs also induced thermodynamic instability of the model endosomal membrane, whereas CTAB-modified and unmodified NPs had no effect. Since bending of the plasma membrane and destabilization of the endosomal membrane are critical biophysical processes in NP cellular uptake and endosomal escape, respectively, we tested these NPs for cellular uptake and drug efficacy. Confocal imaging showed that in both sensitive and resistant cells DMAB-modified NPs exhibited greater cellular uptake and escape from endosomes than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs. Further, paclitaxel-loaded DMAB-modified NPs induced greater cytotoxicity even in resistant cells than CTAB-modified or unmodified NPs or drug in solution, demonstrating the potential of DMAB-modified NPs to overcome the transport barrier in resistant cells. In

  14. Application of a membrane model to the sorptive interactions of humic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Wershaw, R.L. )

    1989-11-01

    Humic substances, the dark-colored, natural organic polyelectrolytes that are found in practically all soils, sediments, and natural water, strongly interact with both inorganic and organic pollutants. Inorganic cationic species generally undergo complexation reactions with humic substances. The binding of cations, such as cupric ions, by humic substances often markedly reduces their toxicity to aquatic organisms. Some inorganic anionic species, in the presence of metal ions, are sorbed by humic substances. In these instances the metal ions appear to form bridges between the humic substances and the anions. Several different types of interactions take place between organic compounds and humic materials. Hydrophobic organic species partition into either insoluble or soluble humic substances. The insoluble humic substances will remove hydrophobic organic compounds from the aqueous phase, thereby rendering them less mobile. However, soluble humic substances will solubilize hydrophobic organics, increasing their mobility. These various interactions between humic substances and pollutants are important in governing their fate and movement in natural water systems, and, for this reason, a detailed understanding of the mechanisms of the interaction is important. A recently developed membrane model of the structure of humic substances is described.

  15. NMR studies on interaction of lauryl maltoside with cytochrome c oxidase: a model for surfactant interaction with the membrane protein.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda; Das, Tapan Kanti; Majumdar, Ananya; Mazumdar, Shyamalava

    2002-07-25

    Interaction of lauryl maltoside (LM) surfactant with bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) has been studied by NMR techniques. Detailed 2-D (1)H and (13)C NMR techniques were used to assign the NMR signals of the surfactant nuclei. Paramagnetic dipolar shift of the surfactant (13)C NMR signals were used to identify the atoms close to the enzyme. The diamagnetic carbon monoxide complex of CcO did not cause any shift in the surfactant NMR spectra suggesting that the paramagnetic centres of the native CcO cause the shifts by dipolar interactions. The results showed that the polar head groups of the surfactant comprised of two maltoside rings are more affected, while the hydrophobic tail groups did not show any significant change on binding of the surfactant to the enzyme. This indicated that surfactant head groups possibly bind to the enzyme surface and the hydrophobic tail of the surfactant forms micelles and remains away from the enzyme. Based on the results, we propose that the membrane bound enzyme is possibly stabilised in aqueous solution by association with the micelles of the neutral surfactant so that the polar heads of the micelles bind to the polar surface of the enzyme. These micelles might form a 'belt like' structure around the enzyme helping it to remain monodispersed in the active form. PMID:12121768

  16. Thermodynamic evidence of non-muscle myosin II-lipid-membrane interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Schewkunow, Vitali; Sharma, Karan P.; Diez, Gerold; Klemm, Anna H.; Sharma, Pal C.; Goldmann, Wolfgang H.

    2008-02-08

    A unique feature of protein networks in living cells is that they can generate their own force. Proteins such as non-muscle myosin II are an integral part of the cytoskeleton and have the capacity to convert the energy of ATP hydrolysis into directional movement. Non-muscle myosin II can move actin filaments against each other, and depending on the orientation of the filaments and the way in which they are linked together, it can produce contraction, bending, extension, and stiffening. Our measurements with differential scanning calorimetry showed that non-muscle myosin II inserts into negatively charged phospholipid membranes. Using lipid vesicles made of DMPG/DMPC at a molar ratio of 1:1 at 10 mg/ml in the presence of different non-muscle myosin II concentrations showed a variation of the main phase transition of the lipid vesicle at around 23 deg. C. With increasing concentrations of non-muscle myosin II the thermotropic properties of the lipid vesicle changed, which is indicative of protein-lipid interaction/insertion. We hypothesize that myosin tail binds to acidic phospholipids through an electrostatic interaction using the basic side groups of positive residues; the flexible, amphipathic helix then may partially penetrate into the bilayer to form an anchor. Using the stopped-flow method, we determined the binding affinity of non-muscle myosin II when anchored to lipid vesicles with actin, which was similar to a pure actin-non-muscle myosin II system. Insertion of myosin tail into the hydrophobic region of lipid membranes, a model known as the lever arm mechanism, might explain how its interaction with actin generates cellular movement.

  17. Thymosin α1 Interacts with Exposed Phosphatidylserine in Membrane Models and in Cells and Uses Serum Albumin as a Carrier.

    PubMed

    Mandaliti, Walter; Nepravishta, Ridvan; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola; Pica, Francesca; Garaci, Enrico; Paci, Maurizio

    2016-03-15

    Thymosin α1 is a peptidic hormone with pleiotropic activity and is used in the therapy of several diseases. It is unstructured in water solution and interacts with negative regions of vesicles by assuming two tracts of helical conformation with a structural break between them. This study reports on Thymosin α1's interaction with mixed phospholipids phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine, the negative component of the membranes, by ¹H and natural abundance ¹⁵N nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results indicate that interaction occurs when the membrane is negatively charged by exposing phosphatidylserine. Moreover, the direct interaction of Thymosin α1 with K562 cells with an overexposure of phosphatidylserine as a consequence of resveratrol-induced apoptosis was conducted. Thymosin α1's interaction with human serum albumin was also investigated by NMR spectroscopy. Steady-state saturation transfer, transfer nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy, and diffusion-ordered spectroscopy methodologies all reveal that the C-terminal region of Thymosin α1 is involved in the interaction with serum albumin. These results may shed more light on Thymosin α1's mechanism of action by its insertion in negative regions of membranes due to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. Once Thymosin α1's N-terminus has been inserted into the membrane, the rest may interact with nearby proteins and/or receptors acting as effectors and causing a biological signaling cascade, thus exerting thymosin α1's pleiotropy. PMID:26909491

  18. Chromaffin granule membrane-F-actin interactions and spectrin-like protein of subcellular organelles: a possible relationship.

    PubMed

    Aunis, D; Perrin, D

    1984-06-01

    The membrane of chromaffin granule, the secretory vesicle of adrenal medullary cells storing catecholamines, enkephalins, and many other components, interacts with F-actin. Using low shear falling ball viscometry to estimate actin binding to membranes, we demonstrated that mitochondrial and plasma membranes from chromaffin cells also provoked large increases in viscosity of F-actin solutions. Mitochondrial membranes also had the capacity to cause complete gelation of F-actin. In addition, vasopressin-containing granules from neurohypophysial tissue were shown to bind F-actin and to increase the viscosity of F-actin solutions. Using an antibody directed against human erythrocyte spectrin, it was found that a spectrin-like protein was associated with secretory granule membrane, mitochondrial membrane, and plasma membrane. The chromaffin granule membrane-associated spectrin-like protein faces the cytoplasmic side, is composed of two subunits (240 kD and 235kD ), the alpha-subunit (240 kD, pHi5 .5) being recognized by the antibody. Nonionic detergents such as Triton X-100 or Nonidet P40 failed to release fully active spectrin-like protein. In contrast, Kyro EOB , a different nonionic detergent, was found to release spectrin-like protein while keeping intact F-actin binding capacity, at least below 0.5% Kyro EOB concentration. Chromaffin cells in culture were stained with antispectrin antibody, showing the presence of spectrin-like protein in the cell periphery close to the cell membrane but also in the cytoplasm. We conclude that in living cells the interaction of F-actin with chromaffin granule membrane spectrin observed in vitro is important in controlling the potential function of secretory vesicles. PMID:6374036

  19. Interaction between Soluble and Membrane-Embedded Potassium Channel Peptides Monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.; Ramesh, Bala; Srai, Surjit K.

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have explored the utility of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in dynamic monitoring of soluble protein-protein interactions. Here, we investigated the applicability of FTIR to detect interaction between synthetic soluble and phospholipid-embedded peptides corresponding to, respectively, a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel inactivation domain (ID) and S4–S6 of the Shaker Kv channel (KV1; including the S4–S5 linker “pre-inactivation” ID binding site). KV1 was predominantly α-helical at 30°C when incorporated into dimyristoyl-l-α-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers. Cooling to induce a shift in DMPC from liquid crystalline to gel phase reversibly decreased KV1 helicity, and was previously shown to partially extrude a synthetic S4 peptide. While no interaction was detected in liquid crystalline DMPC, upon cooling to induce the DMPC gel phase a reversible amide I peak (1633 cm−1) consistent with novel hydrogen bond formation was detected. This spectral shift was not observed for KV1 in the absence of ID (or vice versa), nor when the non-inactivating mutant V7E ID was applied to KV1 under similar conditions. Alteration of salt or redox conditions affected KV1-ID hydrogen bonding in a manner suggesting electrostatic KV1-ID interaction favored by a hairpin conformation for the ID and requiring extrusion of one or more KV1 domains from DMPC, consistent with ID binding to S4–S5. These findings support the utility of FTIR in detecting reversible interactions between soluble and membrane-embedded proteins, with lipid state-sensitivity of the conformation of the latter facilitating control of the interaction. PMID:23145073

  20. Mitochondrial morphology, topology, and membrane interactions in skeletal muscle: a quantitative three-dimensional electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Picard, Martin; White, Kathryn; Turnbull, Douglass M

    2013-01-15

    Dynamic remodeling of mitochondrial morphology through membrane dynamics are linked to changes in mitochondrial and cellular function. Although mitochondrial membrane fusion/fission events are frequent in cell culture models, whether mitochondrial membranes dynamically interact in postmitotic muscle fibers in vivo remains unclear. Furthermore, a quantitative assessment of mitochondrial morphology in intact muscle is lacking. Here, using electron microscopy (EM), we provide evidence of interacting membranes from adjacent mitochondria in intact mouse skeletal muscle. Electron-dense mitochondrial contact sites consistent with events of outer mitochondrial membrane tethering are also described. These data suggest that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo among mitochondria, possibly to induce morphology transitions, for kiss-and-run behavior, or other processes involving contact between mitochondrial membranes. Furthermore, a combination of freeze-fracture scanning EM and transmission EM in orthogonal planes was used to characterize and quantify mitochondrial morphology. Two subpopulations of mitochondria were studied: subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF), which exhibited significant differences in morphological descriptors, including form factor (means ± SD for SS: 1.41 ± 0.45 vs. IMF: 2.89 ± 1.76, P < 0.01) and aspect ratio (1.97 ± 0.83 vs. 3.63 ± 2.13, P < 0.01) and circularity (0.75 ± 0.16 vs. 0.45 ± 0.22, P < 0.01) but not size (0.28 ± 0.31 vs. 0.27 ± 0.20 μm(2)). Frequency distributions for mitochondrial size and morphological parameters were highly skewed, suggesting the presence of mechanisms to influence mitochondrial size and shape. In addition, physical continuities between SS and IMF mitochondria indicated mixing of both subpopulations. These data provide evidence that mitochondrial membranes interact in vivo in mouse skeletal muscle and that factors may be involved in regulating skeletal muscle mitochondrial morphology. PMID

  1. Investigating lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions in model membranes by ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, L.; McQuaw, C. M.; Baker, M. J.; Lockyer, N. P.; Vickerman, J. C.; Ewing, A. G.; Winograd, N.

    2008-12-01

    With the chemical imaging capability of ToF-SIMS, biological molecules are identified and localized in membranes without any chemical labels. We have developed a model membrane system made with supported Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers. This simplified model can be used with different combinations of molecules to form a membrane, and thus represents a bottom-up approach to study individual lipid-lipid or lipid-protein interactions. We have used ternary mixtures of sphingomyelin (SM), phosphatidylcholine (PC), and cholesterol (CH) in the model membrane to study the mechanism of domain formation and interactions between phospholipids and cholesterol. Domain structures are observed only when the acyl chain saturation is different for SM and PC in the mixture. The saturated lipid, whether it is SM or PC, is found to be localized with cholesterol, while the unsaturated one is excluded from the domain area. More complicated model membranes which involve a functional membrane protein glycophorin are also investigated and different membrane properties are observed compared to the systems without glycophorin.

  2. Development of modifications to the material point method for the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their interactions

    SciTech Connect

    York, A.R. II

    1997-07-01

    The material point method (MPM) is an evolution of the particle in cell method where Lagrangian particles or material points are used to discretize the volume of a material. The particles carry properties such as mass, velocity, stress, and strain and move through a Eulerian or spatial mesh. The momentum equation is solved on the Eulerian mesh. Modifications to the material point method are developed that allow the simulation of thin membranes, compressible fluids, and their dynamic interactions. A single layer of material points through the thickness is used to represent a membrane. The constitutive equation for the membrane is applied in the local coordinate system of each material point. Validation problems are presented and numerical convergence is demonstrated. Fluid simulation is achieved by implementing a constitutive equation for a compressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid and by solution of the energy equation. The fluid formulation is validated by simulating a traveling shock wave in a compressible fluid. Interactions of the fluid and membrane are handled naturally with the method. The fluid and membrane communicate through the Eulerian grid on which forces are calculated due to the fluid and membrane stress states. Validation problems include simulating a projectile impacting an inflated airbag. In some impact simulations with the MPM, bodies may tend to stick together when separating. Several algorithms are proposed and tested that allow bodies to separate from each other after impact. In addition, several methods are investigated to determine the local coordinate system of a membrane material point without relying upon connectivity data.

  3. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  4. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller – and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  5. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Sietsma, J; Offerman, S E

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR's) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR's with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR's. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material. PMID:27484579

  6. Effects of solvents interacting favorably with hydrophilic segments of the membrane surface of phosphatidylcholine on their gel-phase membranes in water.

    PubMed

    Li, S J; Kinoshita, K; Furuike, S; Yamazaki, M

    1999-10-25

    We have investigated the effects of two kinds of solvents forming the lamellar liquid-crystalline (L(alpha)) phase in phosphatidylcholine (PC) membranes in neat condition, such as formamide and 1,3-propanediol, on phase behaviors of multilamellar vesicle (MLV) of DPPC (DPPC-MLV). These solvents induced the interdigitated gel (L(beta)I) phase in DPPC-MLV in excess water above their critical concentrations. Solubility measurement indicates that these solvents interact favorably with the hydrophilic segment of the PC membrane but interact unfavorably with the alkyl chains. Based on these results, we propose the mechanism of the induction of the L(beta)I phase by these solvents. PMID:17030334

  7. Plant gamma-tubulin interacts with alphabeta-tubulin dimers and forms membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Dryková, Denisa; Cenklová, Vēra; Sulimenko, Vadym; Volc, Jindrich; Dráber, Pavel; Binarová, Pavla

    2003-02-01

    gamma-Tubulin is assumed to participate in microtubule nucleation in acentrosomal plant cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we show that gamma-tubulin is present in protein complexes of various sizes and different subcellular locations in Arabidopsis and fava bean. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association of gamma-tubulin with alphabeta-tubulin dimers. gamma-Tubulin cosedimented with microtubules polymerized in vitro and localized along their whole length. Large gamma-tubulin complexes resistant to salt treatment were found to be associated with a high-speed microsomal fraction. Blue native electrophoresis of detergent-solubilized microsomes showed that the molecular mass of the complexes was >1 MD. Large gamma-tubulin complexes were active in microtubule nucleation, but nucleation activity was not observed for the smaller complexes. Punctate gamma-tubulin staining was associated with microtubule arrays, accumulated with short kinetochore microtubules interacting in polar regions with membranes, and localized in the vicinity of nuclei and in the area of cell plate formation. Our results indicate that the association of gamma-tubulin complexes with dynamic membranes might ensure the flexibility of noncentrosomal microtubule nucleation. Moreover, the presence of other molecular forms of gamma-tubulin suggests additional roles for this protein species in microtubule organization. PMID:12566585

  8. Interactions of Graphene Oxide with Model Cell Membranes: Probing Nanoparticle Attachment and Lipid Bilayer Disruption.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xitong; Chen, Kai Loon

    2015-11-10

    With the rapid growth in the application of graphene oxide (GO) in diverse fields, the toxicity of GO toward bacterial and mammalian cells has recently attracted extensive research attention. While several mechanisms have been proposed for the cytotoxicity of GO, the attachment of GO to cell membranes is expected to be the key initial process that precedes these mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the propensity for GO to attach to and disrupt model cell membranes using supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) and supported vesicular layers (SVLs) that are composed of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). The deposition kinetics of GO on SLBs were determined using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and were observed to increase with increasing electrolyte (NaCl and CaCl2) concentrations, indicating that GO attachment to SLBs was controlled by electrostatic interactions. The GO deposition kinetics measured at elevated electrolyte concentrations were lower than mass-transfer-limited kinetics, likely due to the presence of hydration forces between GO and SLBs. Upon the attachment of GO to supported vesicles that were encapsulated with a fluorescent dye, dye leakage was detected, thus indicating that the lipid vesicles were disrupted. When the exposure of the SVL to the GO suspension was terminated, the leakage of dye decreased significantly, demonstrating that the pores on the lipid bilayers have a self-healing ability. PMID:26466194

  9. Physical studies of the interactions of acetylcholine chloride with membrane constituents.

    PubMed

    Hauser, H; Phillips, M C; Marchbanks, R M

    1970-11-01

    The binding of acetylcholine to pure lipids, and lipids, proteins and lipoproteins extracted from synaptic membranes, was investigated by monolayer and n.m.r. techniques. No specific binding of acetylcholine could be detected at the concentration used, although its muscarinic and nicotinic antagonists [atropine and (+)-tubocurarine respectively] could be shown to interact with the membrane components. It is concluded that the binding of the nicotinic and muscarinic antagonists of acetylcholine is not necessarily indicative of the existence of a specific acetylcholine receptor. Measurements of the displacement of (45)Ca(2+) from monolayers of phosphatidylserine by acetylcholine and the variation of electrophoretic mobility of phosphatidylserine particles with concentration of acetylcholine indicated that in these systems acetylcholine was acting as a counterion at the negatively charged lipid interface. But studies of the salting-in and salting-out of negatively charged lipid aggregates showed that acetylcholine and other quaternary ammonium compounds did not here behave simply as counterions. Electrostrictively hydrated cations such as Na(+) and K(+) were found to salt out, whereas hydrophobically hydrated cations such as acetylcholine salted in such aggregates. The possible role of the hydration of acetylcholine in synaptic transmission is discussed. PMID:4321895

  10. Effects of PEGylation on membrane and lipopolysaccharide interactions of host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shalini; Papareddy, Praveen; Mörgelin, Matthias; Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2014-04-14

    Effects of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) conjugation on peptide interactions with lipid membranes and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were investigated for KYE28 (KYEITTIHNLFRKLTHRLFRRNFGYTLR), an antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptide derived from human heparin cofactor II. In particular, effects of PEG length and localization was investigated by ellipsometry, circular dichroism, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and fluorescence/electron microscopy. PEGylation of KYE28 reduces peptide binding to lipid membranes, an effect accentuated at increasing PEG length, but less sensitive to conjugation site. The reduced binding causes suppressed liposome leakage induction, as well as bacterial lysis. As a result of this, the antimicrobial effects of KYE28 is partially lost with increasing PEG length, but hemolysis also strongly suppressed and selecticity improved. Through this, conditions can be found, at which the PEGylated peptide displays simultaneously efficient antimicrobial affects and low hemolysis in blood. Importantly, PEGylation does not markedly affect the anti-inflammatory effects of KYE28. The combination of reduced toxicity, increased selectivity, and retained anti-inflammatory effect after PEGylation, as well as reduced scavenging by serum proteins, thus shows that PEG conjugation may offer opportunities in the development of effective and selective anti-inflammatory peptides. PMID:24588750

  11. Molecular Structure, Membrane Interactions, and Toxicity of the Islet Amyloid Polypeptide in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Caillon, Lucie; Hoffmann, Anais R. F.; Botz, Alexandra; Khemtemourian, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) is the major component of the amyloid deposits found in the pancreatic islets of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Mature hIAPP, a 37-aa peptide, is natively unfolded in its monomeric state but forms islet amyloid in T2DM. In common with other misfolded and aggregated proteins, amyloid formation involves aggregation of monomers of hIAPP into oligomers, fibrils, and ultimately mature amyloid deposits. hIAPP is coproduced and stored with insulin by the pancreatic islet β-cells and is released in response to the stimuli that lead to insulin secretion. Accumulating evidence suggests that hIAPP amyloid deposits that accompany T2DM are not just an insignificant phenomenon derived from the disease progression but that hIAPP aggregation induces processes that impair the functionality and the viability of β-cells. In this review, we particularly focus on hIAPP structure, hIAPP aggregation, and hIAPP-membrane interactions. We will also discuss recent findings on the mechanism of hIAPP-membrane damage and on hIAPP-induced cell death. Finally, the development of successful antiamyloidogenic agents that prevent hIAPP fibril formation will be examined. PMID:26636105

  12. Discriminating Lipid- from Protein-Calcium Binding To Understand the Interaction between Recoverin and Phosphatidylglycerol Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Potvin-Fournier, Kim; Lefèvre, Thierry; Picard-Lafond, Audrey; Marcotte, Catherine; Dufresne, Caroline; Cantin, Line; Salesse, Christian; Auger, Michèle

    2016-06-21

    Recoverin is a protein involved in the phototransduction cascade by regulating the activity of rhodopsin kinase through a calcium-dependent binding process at the surface of rod outer segment disk membranes. Understanding how calcium modulates these interactions and how it interacts with anionic lipid membranes is necessary to gain insights into the function of recoverin. In this work, infrared spectroscopy allowed us to show that the availability of calcium to recoverin is modulated by the presence of complexes involving phosphatidylglycerol (PG), which in turn regulates its interactions with this negatively charged lipid. Calcium can indeed be sequestered into strongly bound complexes with PG and is thus sparingly available to recoverin. The thermal stability of recoverin then decreases, which results in weakened interactions with PG. By contrast, when calcium is fully available to recoverin, the protein is thermally stable, indicating that it binds two calcium ions, which results in favorable interactions with negatively charged lipids. Consequently, the protein induces an increase in the chain-melting phase transition temperature of PG, which is indicative of an enhanced lipid chain packing resulting from the peripheral location of the protein. The secondary structure of recoverin is not affected by its interactions with anionic membrane lipids. Similar results have been obtained with saturated and unsaturated anionic lipids. This work shows that the recruitment of recoverin at the surface of anionic lipid membranes is dependent on the availability of calcium. PMID:27240971

  13. Drug-Membrane Interactions Studied in Phospholipid Monolayers Adsorbed on Non-porous Alkylated Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    LUKACOVA, VIERA; PENG, MING; FANUCCI, GAIL; TANDLICH, ROMAN; HINDERLITER, ANNE; MAITY, BIKASH; MANIVANNAN, ETHIRAJAN; COOK, GREGORY R.; BALAZ, STEFAN

    2008-01-01

    Characterization of interactions with phospholipids is an integral part of the in vitro profiling of drug candidates because of the roles the interactions play in tissue accumulation and passive diffusion. Currently used test systems may inadequately emulate the bilayer core solvation properties (immobilized artificial membranes - IAM), suffer from potentially slow transport of some chemicals (liposomes in free or immobilized forms), and require a tedious separation (if used for free liposomes). Here we introduce a well-defined system overcoming these drawbacks: nonporous octadecylsilica particles coated with a self-assembled phospholipid monolayer. The coating mimics the structure of the headgroup region, as well as the thickness and properties of the hydrocarbon core more closely than IAM. The monolayer has a similar transition temperature pattern as the corresponding bilayer. The particles can be separated by filtration or a mild centrifugation. The partitioning equilibria of 81 tested chemicals were dissected into the headgroup and core contributions, the latter using the alkane/water partition coefficients. The deconvolution allowed a successful prediction of the bilayer/water partition coefficients with the standard deviation of 0.26 log units. The plate-friendly assay is suitable for high-throughput profiling of drug candidates without sacrificing the quality of analysis or details of the drug-phospholipid interactions. PMID:17218665

  14. Regulation of Latent Membrane Protein 1 Signaling through Interaction with Cytoskeletal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Holthusen, Kirsten; Talaty, Pooja

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces constitutive signaling in EBV-infected cells to ensure the survival of the latently infected cells. LMP1 is localized to lipid raft domains to induce signaling. In the present study, a genome-wide screen based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) was performed to identify LMP1-binding proteins. Several actin cytoskeleton-associated proteins were identified in the screen. Overexpression of these proteins affected LMP1-induced signaling. BiFC between the identified proteins and LMP1 was localized to lipid raft domains and was dependent on LMP1-induced signaling. Proximity biotinylation assays with LMP1 induced biotinylation of the actin-associated proteins, which were shifted in molecular mass. Together, the findings of this study suggest that the association of LMP1 with lipid rafts is mediated at least in part through interactions with the actin cytoskeleton. IMPORTANCE LMP1 signaling requires oligomerization, lipid raft partitioning, and binding to cellular adaptors. The current study utilized a genome-wide screen to identify several actin-associated proteins as candidate LMP1-binding proteins. The interaction between LMP1 and these proteins was localized to lipid rafts and dependent on LMP1 signaling. This suggests that the association of LMP1 with lipid rafts is mediated through interactions with actin-associated proteins. PMID:25948738

  15. The Effective Field Theory approach towards membrane-mediated interactions between particles.

    PubMed

    Yolcu, Cem; Haussman, Robert C; Deserno, Markus

    2014-06-01

    Fluid lipid membranes can mediate forces between particles bound to them: A local deformation of the surface geometry created by some object spreads to distant regions, where other objects can respond to it. The physical characteristics of these geometric interactions, and how they are affected by thermal fluctuations, are well described by the simple continuum curvature-elastic Hamiltonian proposed 40 years ago by Wolfgang Helfrich. Unfortunately, while the underlying principles are conceptually straightforward, the corresponding calculations are not-largely because one must enforce boundary conditions for finite-sized objects. This challenge has inspired several heuristic approaches for expressing the problem in a point particle language. While streamlining the calculations of leading order results and enabling predictions for higher order corrections, the ad hoc nature of the reformulation leaves its domain of validity unclear. In contrast, the framework of Effective Field Theory (EFT) provides a systematic way to construct a completely equivalent point particle description. In this review we present a detailed account for how this is accomplished. In particular, we use a familiar example from electrostatics as an analogy to motivate the key steps needed to construct an EFT, most notably capturing finite size information in point-like "polarizabilities," and determining their value through a suitable "matching procedure." The interaction (free) energy then emerges as a systematic cumulant expansion, for which powerful diagrammatic techniques exist, which we also briefly revisit. We then apply this formalism to derive series expansions for interactions between flat and curved particle pairs, multibody interactions, as well as corrections to all these interactions due to thermal fluctuations. PMID:24685271

  16. Structure and Dynamics of Antifreeze Protein--Model Membrane Interactions: A Combined Spectroscopic and Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Kar, Rajiv K; Mroue, Kamal H; Kumar, Dinesh; Tejo, Bimo A; Bhunia, Anirban

    2016-02-11

    Antifreeze proteins (AFPs) are the key biomolecules that enable species to survive under subzero temperature conditions. The physiologically relevant activities of AFPs are based on the adsorption to ice crystals, followed by the inhibition of subsequent crystal layer growth of ice, routed with depression in freezing point in a noncolligative manner. The functional attributes governing the mechanism by which AFPs inhibit freezing of body fluids in bacteria, fungi, plants, and fishes are mainly attributed to their adsorption onto the surface of ice within the physiological system. Importantly, AFPs are also known for their application in cryopreservation of biological samples that might be related to membrane interaction. To date, there is a paucity of information detailing the interaction of AFPs with membrane structures. Here, we focus on elucidating the biophysical properties of the interactions between AFPs and micelle models that mimic the membrane system. Micelle model systems of zwitterionic DPC and negatively charged SDS were utilized in this study, against which a significant interaction is experienced by two AFP molecules, namely, Peptide 1m and wfAFP (the popular AFP sourced from winter flounder). Using low- and high-resolution biophysical characterization techniques, such as circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy, a strong evidence for the interactions of these AFPs with the membrane models is revealed in detail and is corroborated by in-depth residue-specific information derived from molecular dynamics simulation. Altogether, these results not only strengthen the fact that AFPs interact actively with membrane systems, but also demonstrate that membrane-associated AFPs are dynamic and capable of adopting a number of conformations rendering fluidity to the system. PMID:26785292

  17. Monitoring Protein-Protein Interactions between the Mammalian Integral Membrane Transporters and PDZ-interacting Partners Using a Modified Split-ubiquitin Membrane Yeast Two-hybrid System*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gisler, Serge M.; Kittanakom, Saranya; Fuster, Daniel; Wong, Victoria; Bertic, Mia; Radanovic, Tamara; Hall, Randy A.; Murer, Heini; Biber, Jürg; Markovich, Daniel; Moe, Orson W.; Stagljar, Igor

    2008-01-01

    PDZ-binding motifs are found in the C-terminal tails of numerous integral membrane proteins where they mediate specific protein-protein interactions by binding to PDZ-containing proteins. Conventional yeast two-hybrid screens have been used to probe protein-protein interactions of these soluble C termini. However, to date no in vivo technology has been available to study interactions between the full-length integral membrane proteins and their cognate PDZ-interacting partners. We previously developed a split-ubiquitin membrane yeast two-hybrid (MYTH) system to test interactions between such integral membrane proteins by using a transcriptional output based on cleavage of a transcription factor from the C terminus of membrane-inserted baits. Here we modified MYTH to permit detection of C-terminal PDZ domain interactions by redirecting the transcription factor moiety from the C to the N terminus of a given integral membrane protein thus liberating their native C termini. We successfully applied this “MYTH 2.0” system to five different mammalian full-length renal transporters and identified novel PDZ domain-containing partners of the phosphate (NaPi-IIa) and sulfate (NaS1) transporters that would have otherwise not been detectable. Furthermore this assay was applied to locate the PDZ-binding domain on the NaS1 protein. We showed that the PDZ-binding domain for PDZK1 on NaS1 is upstream of its C terminus, whereas the two interacting proteins, NHERF-1 and NHERF-2, bind at a location closer to the N terminus of NaS1. Moreover NHERF-1 and NHERF-2 increased functional sulfate uptake in Xenopus oocytes when co-expressed with NaS1. Finally we used MYTH 2.0 to demonstrate that the NaPi-IIa transporter homodimerizes via protein-protein interactions within the lipid bilayer. In summary, our study establishes the MYTH 2.0 system as a novel tool for interactive proteomics studies of membrane protein complexes. PMID:18407958

  18. The Relationship between Glycan Binding and Direct Membrane Interactions in Vibrio cholerae Cytolysin, a Channel-forming Toxin.

    PubMed

    De, Swastik; Bubnys, Adele; Alonzo, Francis; Hyun, Jinsol; Lary, Jeffrey W; Cole, James L; Torres, Victor J; Olson, Rich

    2015-11-20

    Bacterial pore-forming toxins (PFTs) are structurally diverse pathogen-secreted proteins that form cell-damaging channels in the membranes of host cells. Most PFTs are released as water-soluble monomers that first oligomerize on the membrane before inserting a transmembrane channel. To modulate specificity and increase potency, many PFTs recognize specific cell surface receptors that increase the local toxin concentration on cell membranes, thereby facilitating channel formation. Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a toxin secreted by the human pathogen responsible for pandemic cholera disease and acts as a defensive agent against the host immune system. Although it has been shown that VCC utilizes specific glycan receptors on the cell surface, additional direct contacts with the membrane must also play a role in toxin binding. To better understand the nature of these interactions, we conducted a systematic investigation of the membrane-binding surface of VCC to identify additional membrane interactions important in cell targeting. Through cell-based assays on several human-derived cell lines, we show that VCC is unlikely to utilize high affinity protein receptors as do structurally similar toxins from Staphylococcus aureus. Next, we identified a number of specific amino acid residues that greatly diminish the VCC potency against cells and investigated the interplay between glycan binding and these direct lipid contacts. Finally, we used model membranes to parse the importance of these key residues in lipid and cholesterol binding. Our study provides a complete functional map of the VCC membrane-binding surface and insights into the integration of sugar, lipid, and cholesterol binding interactions. PMID:26416894

  19. Acyl chain length and charge effect on Tamoxifen-lipid model membrane interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilge, Duygu; Kazanci, Nadide; Severcan, Feride

    2013-05-01

    Tamoxifen (TAM), which is an antiestrogenic agent, is widely used during chemotherapy of breast, pancreas, brain and liver cancers. In this study, TAM and model membrane interactions in the form of multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) were studied for lipids containing different acyl chain length and different charge status as a function of different TAM (1, 6, 9 and 15 mol%) concentrations. Zwitterionic lipids namely dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids were used to see the acyl chain length effect and anionic dipalmitoyl phosphtidylglycerol (DPPG) lipid was used to see the charge effect. For this purpose Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) techniques have been conducted. For zwitterionic lipid, concentration dependent different action of TAM was observed both in the gel and liquid crystalline phases by significantly increasing the lipid order and decreasing the dynamics for 1 mol% TAM, while decreasing the lipid order and increasing the dynamics of the lipids for higher concentrations (6, 9 and 15 mol%). However, different than neutral lipids, the dynamics and disorder of DPPG liposome increased for all TAM concentrations. The interactions between TAM and head group of multilamellar liposomes was monitored by analyzing the Cdbnd O stretching and PO2- antisymmetric double bond stretching bands. Increasing Tamoxifen concentrations led to a dehydration around these functional groups in the polar part of the lipids. DSC studies showed that for all types of lipids, TAM eliminates the pre-transition, shifts the main phase transition to lower temperatures and broadened the phase transition curve. The results indicate that not the acyl chain length but the charge status of the polar head group induces different effects on lipid membranes order and dynamics.

  20. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion

    PubMed Central

    Sengers, Bram G.; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z.; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  1. Modeling bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two cell membrane targets indicates the importance of surface diffusion.

    PubMed

    Sengers, Bram G; McGinty, Sean; Nouri, Fatma Z; Argungu, Maryam; Hawkins, Emma; Hadji, Aymen; Weber, Andrew; Taylor, Adam; Sepp, Armin

    2016-07-01

    We have developed a mathematical framework for describing a bispecific monoclonal antibody interaction with two independent membrane-bound targets that are expressed on the same cell surface. The bispecific antibody in solution binds either of the two targets first, and then cross-links with the second one while on the cell surface, subject to rate-limiting lateral diffusion step within the lifetime of the monovalently engaged antibody-antigen complex. At experimental densities, only a small fraction of the free targets is expected to lie within the reach of the antibody binding sites at any time. Using ordinary differential equation and Monte Carlo simulation-based models, we validated this approach against an independently published anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab experimental data set. As a result of dimensional reduction, the cell surface reaction is expected to be so rapid that, in agreement with the experimental data, no monovalently bound bispecific antibody binary complexes accumulate until cross-linking is complete. The dissociation of the bispecific antibody from the ternary cross-linked complex is expected to be significantly slower than that from either of the monovalently bound variants. We estimate that the effective affinity of the bivalently bound bispecific antibody is enhanced for about 4 orders of magnitude over that of the monovalently bound species. This avidity enhancement allows for the highly specific binding of anti-CD4/CD70 DuetMab to the cells that are positive for both target antigens over those that express only one or the other We suggest that the lateral diffusion of target antigens in the cell membrane also plays a key role in the avidity effect of natural antibodies and other bivalent ligands in their interactions with their respective cell surface receptors. PMID:27097222

  2. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protien OsPIFff14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bi...

  3. Rice phytochrome-interacting factor protein OsPIFff14 represses OsDREB1B gene expression through an extended N-box and interacts preferentially with the active form of phytochrome B

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DREB1/CBF genes, known as major regulators of plant stress responses, are rapidly and transiently induced by low temperatures. Using a Yeast one Hybrid screening, we identified a putative Phytochrome-Interacting bHLH Factor (OsPIF14), as binding to the OsDREB1B promoter. bHLH proteins are able to bi...

  4. Lipid-Free Antigen B Subunits from Echinococcus granulosus: Oligomerization, Ligand Binding, and Membrane Interaction Properties

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Franchini, Gisela R.; Pórfido, Jorge L.; Kennedy, Malcolm W.; Ferreira, Ana M.; Córsico, Betina

    2015-01-01

    Background The hydatid disease parasite Echinococcus granulosus has a restricted lipid metabolism, and needs to harvest essential lipids from the host. Antigen B (EgAgB), an abundant lipoprotein of the larval stage (hydatid cyst), is thought to be important in lipid storage and transport. It contains a wide variety of lipid classes, from highly hydrophobic compounds to phospholipids. Its protein component belongs to the cestode-specific Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein family, which includes five 8-kDa isoforms encoded by a multigene family (EgAgB1-EgAgB5). How lipid and protein components are assembled into EgAgB particles remains unknown. EgAgB apolipoproteins self-associate into large oligomers, but the functional contribution of lipids to oligomerization is uncertain. Furthermore, binding of fatty acids to some EgAgB subunits has been reported, but their ability to bind other lipids and transfer them to acceptor membranes has not been studied. Methodology/Principal Findings Lipid-free EgAgB subunits obtained by reverse-phase HPLC were used to analyse their oligomerization, ligand binding and membrane interaction properties. Size exclusion chromatography and cross-linking experiments showed that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 can self-associate, suggesting that lipids are not required for oligomerization. Furthermore, using fluorescent probes, both subunits were found to bind fatty acids, but not cholesterol analogues. Analysis of fatty acid transfer to phospholipid vesicles demonstrated that EgAgB8/2 and EgAgB8/3 are potentially capable of transferring fatty acids to membranes, and that the efficiency of transfer is dependent on the surface charge of the vesicles. Conclusions/Significance We show that EgAgB apolipoproteins can oligomerize in the absence of lipids, and can bind and transfer fatty acids to phospholipid membranes. Since imported fatty acids are essential for Echinococcus granulosus, these findings provide a mechanism whereby EgAgB could engage in lipid

  5. The use of cardiolipin-containing liposomes as a model system to study the interaction between proteins and the inner mitochondrial membrane.

    PubMed

    Marom, Milit; Azem, Abdussalam

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of proteins with biological membranes is a key factor in their biogenesis and proper function. Hence, unraveling the properties of this interaction is very important and constitutes an essential step in deciphering the structural and functional characteristics of a membrane protein. Here we describe the use of cardiolipin-containing liposomes to analyze the interaction of the import protein Tim44 with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Using this system we showed that Tim44 is peripherally attached to the membrane and we detected the membrane binding site of the protein. The cardiolipin-containing liposomes serve as an excellent in vitro model system to the inner mitochondrial membrane and thus provide a good tool to analyze the interaction of various mitochondrial proteins with the inner membrane. PMID:23996176

  6. Interactions of histatin 5 and histatin 5-derived peptides with liposome membranes: surface effects, translocation and permeabilization.

    PubMed Central

    Den Hertog, Alice L; Wong Fong Sang, Harro W; Kraayenhof, Ruud; Bolscher, Jan G M; Van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I; Nieuw Amerongen, Arie V

    2004-01-01

    A number of cationic antimicrobial peptides, among which are histatin 5 and the derived peptides dhvar4 and dhvar5, enter their target cells and interact with internal organelles. There still are questions about the mechanisms by which antimicrobial peptides translocate across the membrane. We used a liposome model to study membrane binding, translocation and membrane-perturbing capacities of histatin 5, dhvar4 and dhvar5. Despite the differences in amphipathic characters of these peptides, they bound equally well to liposomes, whereas their membrane activities differed remarkably: dhvar4 translocated at the fastest rate, followed by dhvar5, whereas the histatin 5 translocation rate was much lower. The same pattern was seen for the extent of calcein release: highest with dhvar4, less with dhvar5 and almost none with histatin 5. The translocation and disruptive actions of dhvar5 did not seem to be coupled, because translocation occurred on a much longer timescale than calcein release, which ended within a few minutes. We conclude that peptide translocation can occur through peptide-phospholipid interactions, and that this is a possible mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides enter cells. However, the translocation rate was much lower in this model membrane system than that seen in yeast cells. Thus it is likely that, at least for some peptides, additional features promoting the translocation across biological membranes are involved as well. PMID:14733612

  7. De novo design of transmembrane helix-helix interactions and measurement of stability in a biological membrane.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Notman, Rebecca; Dixon, Ann M

    2015-05-01

    Membrane proteins regulate a large number of cellular functions, and have great potential as tools for manipulation of biological systems. Developing these tools requires a robust and quantitative understanding of membrane protein folding and interactions within the bilayer. With this in mind, we have designed a series of proteins to probe the net thermodynamic contribution of well-known sequence motifs to transmembrane helix-helix association in a biological membrane. The proteins were designed from first principles (de novo) using current knowledge about membrane insertion and stabilizing interaction motifs. A simple poly-Leu "scaffold" was decorated with individual helix interaction motifs (G-XXX-G, polar residues, heptad repeat) to create transmembrane helix-helix interactions of increasing strength. The GALLEX assay, an in vivo assay for measurement of transmembrane helix self-association, was combined with computational methods to characterize the relative strength and mode of interaction for each sequence. In addition, the apparent free energy contribution (ΔΔGapp) of each motif to transmembrane helix self-association was measured in a biological membrane, results that are the first of their kind for these de novo designed sequences, and suggest that the free energy barrier to overcoming weak association is quite small (<1.4 kcal mol(-1)) in a natural membrane. By quantifying and rationalizing the contribution of key motifs to transmembrane helix association, our work offers a route to direct the design of novel sequences for use in biotechnology or synthetic biology (e.g. molecular switches) and to predict the effects of sequence modification in known transmembrane domains (for control of cellular processes). PMID:25732028

  8. Interaction of three-finger toxins with phospholipid membranes: comparison of S- and P-type cytotoxins

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The CTs (cytotoxins) I and II are positively charged three-finger folded proteins from venom of Naja oxiana (the Central Asian cobra). They belong to S- and P-type respectively based on Ser-28 and Pro-30 residues within a putative phospholipid bilayer binding site. Previously, we investigated the interaction of CTII with multilamellar liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol by wide-line 31P-NMR spectroscopy. To compare interactions of these proteins with phospholipids, we investigated the interaction of CTI with the multilamellar liposomes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol analogously. The effect of CTI on the chemical shielding anisotropy and deformation of the liposomes in the magnetic field was determined at different temperatures and lipid/protein ratios. It was found that both the proteins do not affect lipid organization in the gel state. In the liquid crystalline state of the bilayer they disturb lipid packing. To get insight into the interactions of the toxins with membranes, Monte Carlo simulations of CTI and CTII in the presence of the bilayer membrane were performed. It was found that both the toxins penetrate into the bilayer with the tips of all the three loops. However, the free-energy gain on membrane insertion of CTI is smaller (by ≈7 kcal/mol; 1 kcal≡4.184 kJ) when compared with CTII, because of the lower hydrophobicity of the membrane-binding site of CTI. These results clearly demonstrate that the P-type cytotoxins interact with membranes stronger than those of the S-type, although the mode of the membrane insertion is similar for both the types. PMID:15584897

  9. The Structure of Herpesvirus Fusion Glycoprotein B-Bilayer Complex Reveals the Protein-Membrane and Lateral Protein-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Ulrike E.; Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Pandurangan, Arun Prasad; Cairns, Tina M.; Hannah, Brian P.; Whitbeck, J. Charles; Eisenberg, Roselyn J.; Cohen, Gary H.; Topf, Maya; Huiskonen, Juha T.; Grünewald, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Summary Glycoprotein B (gB) is a key component of the complex herpesvirus fusion machinery. We studied membrane interaction of two gB ectodomain forms and present an electron cryotomography structure of the gB-bilayer complex. The two forms differed in presence or absence of the membrane proximal region (MPR) but showed an overall similar trimeric shape. The presence of the MPR impeded interaction with liposomes. In contrast, the MPR-lacking form interacted efficiently with liposomes. Lateral interaction resulted in coat formation on the membranes. The structure revealed that interaction of gB with membranes was mediated by the fusion loops and limited to the outer membrane leaflet. The observed intrinsic propensity of gB to cluster on membranes indicates an additional role of gB in driving the fusion process forward beyond the transient fusion pore opening and subsequently leading to fusion pore expansion. PMID:23850455

  10. Deciphering the role of charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity for cytotoxic activities and membrane interactions of bile acid based facial amphiphiles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manish; Singh, Ashima; Kundu, Somanath; Bansal, Sandhya; Bajaj, Avinash

    2013-08-01

    We synthesized four cationic bile acid based facial amphiphiles featuring trimethyl ammonium head groups. We evaluated the role of these amphiphiles for cytotoxic activities against colon cancer cells and their membrane interactions by varying charge, hydration and hydrophobicity. The singly charged cationic Lithocholic acid based amphiphile (LCA-TMA1) is most cytotoxic, whereas the triply charged cationic Cholic acid based amphiphile (CA-TMA3) is least cytotoxic. Light microscopy and Annexin-FITC assay revealed that these facial amphiphiles caused late apoptosis. In addition, we studied the interactions of these amphiphiles with model membrane systems by Prodan-based hydration, DPH-based anisotropy, and differential scanning calorimetry. LCA-TMA1 is most hydrophobic with a hard charge causing efficient dehydration and maximum perturbations of membranes thereby facilitating translocation and high cytotoxicity against colon cancer cells. In contrast, the highly hydrated and multiple charged CA-TMA3 caused least membrane perturbations leading to low translocation and less cytotoxicity. As expected, Chenodeoxycholic acid and Deoxycholic acid based amphiphiles (CDCA-TMA2, DCA-TMA2) featuring two charged head groups showed intermediate behavior. Thus, we deciphered that charge, hydration, and hydrophobicity of these amphiphiles govern membrane interactions, translocation, and resulting cytoxicity against colon cancer cells. PMID:23590996

  11. Preferential Flow in Fractured Welded Tuffs

    SciTech Connect

    Salve, Rohit

    2004-08-15

    To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This experiment involved the release of {approx} 22 m3 of ponded water (at a pressure head of {approx} 0.04 m) over a period of 7 months, directly onto a 12 m2 infiltration plot located on a fractured welded tuff surface. As water was released, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation {approx} 19-22 m below. Distinct flow zones, varying in flow velocity, wetted cross-sectional area, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the monitoring boreholes. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggest that isolated conduits, each encompassing a large number of fractures, develop within the fractured rock formation to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. In addition, in fractured welded tuffs the propensity for fracture-matrix interactions is significantly greater than that suggested by existing conceptual models,in which flow occurs along a section of fracture surfaces. An overriding conclusion is that field investigations at spatial scales of tens of meters provide data critical to the fundamental understanding of flow in fractured rock.

  12. Accelerating networks: Effects of preferential connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Y.-P.; McCoy, B. J.

    2007-12-01

    Networks are commonly observed structures in complex systems with interacting and interdependent parts that self-organize. For nonlinearly growing networks, when the total number of connections increases faster than the total number of nodes, the network is said to accelerate. We propose a systematic model for the dynamics of growing networks represented by distribution kinetics equations. We define the nodal-linkage distribution, construct a population dynamics equation based on the association-dissociation process, and perform the moment calculations to describe the dynamics of such networks. For nondirectional networks with finite numbers of nodes and connections, the moments are the total number of nodes, the total number of connections, and the degree (the average number of connections per node), represented by the average moment. Size independent rate coefficients yield an exponential network describing the network without preferential attachment, and size dependent rate coefficients produce a power law network with preferential attachment. The model quantitatively describes accelerating network growth data for a supercomputer (Earth Simulator), for regulatory gene networks, and for the Internet.

  13. Quantum dot effects upon the interaction between porphyrins and phospholipids in cell membrane models.

    PubMed

    Parra, Gustavo G; Borissevitch, Galina; Borissevitch, Iouri; Ramos, Ana P

    2016-04-01

    This study employed surface pressure isotherms and spectroscopic techniques to investigate the effect of quantum dots on the interaction between porphyrins and phospholipids using Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett films formed from negatively charged DMPA (the sodium salt of dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-phosphatidyl acid) and zwitterionic DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) as cell membrane models in the presence of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-N-tetradecyl-pyridyl) porphyrin (TMPyP), 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(p-sulfonato-phenyl) porphyrin (TPPS4) and PEG-coated CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QD). The porphyrins present at the monolayer subphase affected the organization of the lipids at the air/liquid interface, as shown by the changes in the surface pressure-surface area isotherms. QDs enhanced the interaction of TMPyP with DMPA, improving their transference from the liquid monolayers to solid supports. A higher amount of TMPyP was transferred to DMPA-Langmuir-Blodgett films when the QDs were present in the subphase as evidenced by the UV-Vis data. For DPPC the surface effects due to the presence of QDs are less evident. PMID:26518694

  14. Microfabrication of a tunable collagen/alginate-chitosan hydrogel membrane for controlling cell-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Yizhe; Zhang, Demeng; Lv, Yan; Guo, Xin; Lou, Ruyun; Wang, Shujun; Wang, Xiuli; Yu, Weiting; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-11-20

    Indirect cell contact co-culture system is increasingly becoming more attractable owing to their advantages of easy cell separation and desirable outcomes for cell-cell interactions. However, how to precisely control the spatial position of cells within multicellular co-cultures is still experimentally challenging due to the incapability of the conventional methods in vitro. In the present study, a tunable collagen/alginate-chitosan (Col/Alg-Chi) membrane was established, which was capable of controlling intercellular distance between the neighboring cells at a level of micrometer resolution. It was showed that intercellular distance between the hepatocytes and the fibroblasts exerted significant influence on hepatic function in vitro. In particular, maintenance of the functionality of primary hepatocytes requires direct contact between the hepatocytes and their supportive stromal cells, and their effective contact distance is within 30μm. This technical platform would potentially enable investigations of dynamic cell-cell interaction in a multitude of applications including organogenesis, development or even neoplastic transformation. PMID:27561537

  15. Temperature-controlled interaction of thermosensitive polymer-modified cationic liposomes with negatively charged phospholipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Kono, K; Henmi, A; Takagishi, T

    1999-09-21

    To obtain cationic liposomes of which affinity to negatively charged membranes can be controlled by temperature, cationic liposomes consisting of 3beta-[N-(N', N'-dimethylaminoethane)carbamoyl]cholesterol and dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine were modified with poly(N-acryloylpyrrolidine), which is a thermosensitive polymer exhibiting a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) at ca. 52 degrees C. The unmodified cationic liposomes did not change its zeta potential between 20-60 degrees C. The polymer-modified cationic liposomes revealed much lower zeta potential values below the LCST of the polymer than the unmodified cationic liposomes. However, their zeta potential increased significantly above this temperature. The unmodified cationic liposomes formed aggregates and fused intensively with anionic liposomes consisting of egg yolk phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidic acid in the region of 20-60 degrees C, due to the electrostatic interaction. In contrast, aggregation and fusion of the polymer-modified cationic liposomes with the anionic liposomes were strongly suppressed below the LCST. However, these interactions were enhanced remarkably above the LCST. In addition, the polymer-modified cationic liposomes did not cause leakage of calcein from the anionic liposomes below the LCST, but promoted the leakage above this temperature as the unmodified cationic liposomes did. Temperature-induced conformational change of the polymer chains from a hydrated coil to a dehydrated globule might affect the affinity of the polymer-modified cationic liposomes to the anionic liposomes. PMID:10561483

  16. Membrane interactions of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers and encapsulation efficiencies of a RIP II protein.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, V; Winkler, K; Bunjes, V; Neub, A; Schubert, R; Bugarski, B; Leneweit, G

    2008-07-15

    Membrane interactions of liposomes of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers are investigated. These interactions lead to discoidal deformations and regular aggregations and are strongly enhanced by the presence of mistletoe lectin (ML), a RIP II type protein. The encapsulation of ML into liposomal nanocapsules is studied with a systematic variation of the lipid composition to monitor its effect on the physical properties: entrapment, mean size, morphology, and stability. Extrusion of multilamellar vesicles through filters 80 nm pore size was used for the generation of liposomes. The mean sizes of liposomes ranged between 120 and 200 nm in diameter with narrow size distributions. The increase in flow rate with pressure for three dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol (Chol)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid mixtures was linear and allowed to extrapolate to the minimum burst pressure of the liposomal bilayers. From the minimum pressures P(min), the bilayer lysis tensions gamma(l) were determined. The increase in P(min) and gamma(l) with an increasing content of a saturated phosopholipid (DPPC) indicates that DPPC increases the mechanical strength of lipid bilayers. Apparently, DPPC, like cholesterol, leads to a less compressible surface and a more cohesive membrane. After preparation, vesicle solutions were purified by gel permeation chromatography to separate encapsulated ML from free ML in the extravesicular solution. Purified liposomes were then characterized. The content of entrapped and adsorbed ML was measured using ELISA. Repetitive freezing/thawing cycles prior to extrusion significantly increased ML uptake. On the contrary, adsorption was not affected neither by lipid composition, nor concentration and preparation. Differences in experimental encapsulation efficiency only reflect the differences in the mean vesicle sizes of the different samples as is revealed by a comparison to a theoretical estimate. Cryo-transmission electron

  17. The membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomains.

    PubMed

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Honvo Houéto, Edith; Pigat, Natascha; Chat, Sophie; Leonil, Joëlle; Chanat, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Caseins, the main milk proteins, interact with colloidal calcium phosphate to form the casein micelle. The mesostructure of this supramolecular assembly markedly influences its nutritional and technological functionalities. However, its detailed molecular organization and the cellular mechanisms involved in its biogenesis have been only partially established. There is a growing body of evidence to support the concept that α(s1)-casein takes center stage in casein micelle building and transport in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. Here we have investigated the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein in rat mammary epithelial cells. Using metabolic labelling we show that α(s1)-casein becomes associated with membranes at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum, with no subsequent increase at the level of the Golgi apparatus. From morphological and biochemical data, it appears that caseins are in a tight relationship with membranes throughout the secretory pathway. On the other hand, we have observed that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein co-purified with detergent-resistant membranes. It was poorly solubilised by Tween 20, partially insoluble in Lubrol WX, and substantially insoluble in Triton X-100. Finally, we found that cholesterol depletion results in the release of the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein. These experiments reveal that the insolubility of α(s1)-casein reflects its partial association with a cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant microdomain. We propose that the membrane-associated form of α(s1)-casein interacts with the lipid microdomain, or lipid raft, that forms within the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum, for efficient forward transport and sorting in the secretory pathway of mammary epithelial cells. PMID:25549363

  18. Interactions between Plasmodium falciparum skeleton-binding protein 1 and the membrane skeleton of malaria-infected red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Donna W.; Blanc, Lionel; Hale, John; Guo, Xinhua; Pei, Xinhong; Herrmann, Susann; Hanssen, Eric G.; Coppel, Ross L.; Mohandas, Narla; An, Xiuli; Cooke, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    During development inside red blood cells (RBCs), Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites export proteins that associate with the RBC membrane skeleton. These interactions cause profound changes to the biophysical properties of RBCs that underpin the often severe and fatal clinical manifestations of falciparum malaria. P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) is one such exported parasite protein that plays a major role in malaria pathogenesis since its exposure on the parasitised RBC surface mediates their adhesion to vascular endothelium and placental syncytioblasts. En route to the RBC membrane skeleton, PfEMP1 transiently associates with Maurer's clefts (MCs), parasite-derived membranous structures in the RBC cytoplasm. We have previously shown that a resident MC protein, skeleton-binding protein 1 (SBP1), is essential for the placement of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface and hypothesised that the function of SBP1 may be to target MCs to the RBC membrane. Since this would require additional protein interactions, we set out to identify binding partners for SBP1. Using a combination of approaches, we have defined the region of SBP1 that binds specifically to defined subdomains of two major components of the RBC membrane skeleton, protein 4.1R and spectrin. We show that these interactions serve as one mechanism to anchor MCs to the RBC membrane skeleton, however, while they appear to be necessary, they are not sufficient for the translocation of PfEMP1 onto the RBC surface. The N-terminal domain of SBP1 that resides within the lumen of MCs clearly plays an essential, but presently unknown role in this process. PMID:25883090

  19. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Truschel, S.T.; Heroux, A.; Sengupta, D.; Foote, A.; Macbeth, M. R.; Linstedt, A. D.

    2011-06-10

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  20. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    S Truschel; D Sengupta; A Foote; A Heroux; M Macbeth; A Linstedt

    2011-12-31

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae.

  1. Structure of the Membrane-tethering GRASP Domain Reveals a Unique PDZ Ligand Interaction That Mediates Golgi Biogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Truschel, Steven T.; Sengupta, Debrup; Foote, Adam; Heroux, Annie; Macbeth, Mark R.; Linstedt, Adam D.

    2011-01-01

    Biogenesis of the ribbon-like membrane network of the mammalian Golgi requires membrane tethering by the conserved GRASP domain in GRASP65 and GRASP55, yet the tethering mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we report the crystal structure of the GRASP55 GRASP domain, which revealed an unusual arrangement of two tandem PDZ folds that more closely resemble prokaryotic PDZ domains. Biochemical and functional data indicated that the interaction between the ligand-binding pocket of PDZ1 and an internal ligand on PDZ2 mediates the GRASP self-interaction, and structural analyses suggest that this occurs via a unique mode of internal PDZ ligand recognition. Our data uncover the structural basis for ligand specificity and provide insight into the mechanism of GRASP-dependent membrane tethering of analogous Golgi cisternae. PMID:21515684

  2. Toward More Free-Floating Model Cell Membranes: Method Development and Application to Their Interaction with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Nariman; Wargenau, Andreas; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2016-06-15

    Identifying the mechanisms of nanoparticle (NP) interactions with cell membranes is key to understanding potential NP cytotoxicity and applications as nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery. To elucidate these mechanisms of interaction, supported phospholipid bilayers (SPBs) are commonly used as models of cell membranes. However, SPBs are soft thin films, and, as such, their properties can be significantly affected by the underlying substrate. Free-floating cell membranes would be best modeled by weakly adhered SPBs; thus, we propose a method for tailoring the interfacial interaction of an electrically charged SPB-substrate system based on modulations in the solution chemistry. Using the dissipation signal of the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), we show that the method can be used to tailor SPB-substrate interactions without the loss of its structural integrity. To demonstrate the application of the method, SPBs are exposed to cationic and anionic polystyrene latex NPs. These studies reveal that the bilayer response to the modulations in the interfacial interaction with its underlying substrate can be used as a sensitive tool to probe the integrity of SPBs upon exposure to NPs. As expected, anionic NPs tend to impart no significant damage to the anionic bilayers, whereas cationic NPs can be detrimental to bilayer integrity. This is the first report of a QCM-D based method to probe bilayer integrity following exposure to NPs. Importantly, the degree of SPB interaction with its underlying substrate is shown to be a critical factor in the kinetics of bilayer disruption by cationic NPs, whereby weakly adhered bilayers are prone to significantly faster breakup. Since free-floating cell membranes are better represented by a weakly adhered SPB, the results of this work critically influence paradigms in experimental studies involving SPBs as models for cell membranes. PMID:27211513

  3. FRET imaging in living maize cells reveals that plasma membrane aquaporins interact to regulate their subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Zelazny, Enric; Borst, Jan Willem; Muylaert, Mélanie; Batoko, Henri; Hemminga, Marcus A; Chaumont, François

    2007-07-24

    Zea mays plasma membrane intrinsic proteins (ZmPIPs) fall into two groups, ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s, that exhibit different water channel activities when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. ZmPIP1s are inactive, whereas ZmPIP2s induce a marked increase in the membrane osmotic water permeability coefficient, P(f). We previously showed that, in Xenopus oocytes, ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 interact to increase the cell P(f). Here, we report the localization and interaction of ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s in living maize cells. ZmPIPs were fused to monomeric yellow fluorescent protein and/or monomeric cyan fluorescent protein and expressed transiently in maize mesophyll protoplasts. When expressed alone, ZmPIP1 fusion proteins were retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas ZmPIP2s were found in the plasma membrane. Interestingly, when coexpressed with ZmPIP2s, ZmPIP1s were relocalized to the plasma membrane. Using FRET/fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we demonstrated that this relocalization results from interaction between ZmPIP1s and ZmPIP2s. Immunoprecipitation experiments provided additional evidence for the association of ZmPIP1;2 and ZmPIP2;1 in maize roots and suspension cells. These data suggest that PIP1-PIP2 interaction is required for in planta PIP1 trafficking to the plasma membrane to modulate plasma membrane permeability. PMID:17636130

  4. Altered response of fibroblasts from human tympanosclerotic membrane to interacting mast cells: implication for tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pawelczyk, Tadeusz; Sakowicz-Burkiewicz, Monika; Wesserling, Martyna; Grden, Marzena; Kuczkowski, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that a tympanosclerotic (TMS) lesion often develops secondary to acute and chronic otitis media. Histological findings indicate that fibroblasts and inflammatory cells, including mast cells, play a key role in the tympanosclerotic plaque formation. However, details on the functional characteristics of tympanosclerotic fibroblasts (Fs(TMS)) are scanty. Therefore the aim of our study was to examine the activity of human fibroblasts from tympanosclerotic lesions and to evaluate the influence of stimulated by crosslinking of IgE receptor mast cells (HMC-1(FcɛRI)) on fibroblast functional behavior. We observed that fibroblasts from normal tympanic membrane (Fs(TM)) released less TNF-α, TGF-β1 and IL-6 compared to Fs(TMS). Fs(TMS) but not Fs(TM) upon interaction with HMC-1(FcɛRI) released increased quantities of TNF-α and TGF-β1. Exposing the fibroblast to HMC-1(FcɛRI) cells resulted in an increased synthesis of proteins including collagen. We noted that the COL2A1 transcript level increased ∼5- and ∼12-fold in Fs(TM) and Fs(TMS) co-cultured with HMC-1(FcɛRI), respectively. Both Fs(TM) and Fs(TMS) upon maintenance in the primary culture released significant quantities of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9). However, Fs(TMS) released ∼5-fold more MMP-9 activity compared to the Fs(TM) cultures. The mast cell-induced release of TNF-α, TGF-β1 and MMP-9 sustained for a longer time in Fs(TMS) cultures compared to Fs(TM). Concluding, our data strongly indicate that increased fibroblast sensitivity to mast cell stimulation greatly contributes to the excessive fibrosis and pathological remodeling of the tympanic membrane. We postulate that the persistency of the Fs(TMS) activated state could be an important factor in the pathogenesis of tympanosclerosis. PMID:25310903

  5. Dynamin-related Protein 1 Oligomerization in Solution Impairs Functional Interactions with Membrane-anchored Mitochondrial Fission Factor.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Ryan W; Francy, Christopher A; Ramachandran, Rajesh; Qi, Xin; Mears, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission is a crucial cellular process mediated by the mechanoenzymatic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). During mitochondrial division, Drp1 is recruited from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane by one, or several, integral membrane proteins. One such Drp1 partner protein, mitochondrial fission factor (Mff), is essential for mitochondrial division, but its mechanism of action remains unexplored. Previous studies have been limited by a weak interaction between Drp1 and Mff in vitro. Through refined in vitro reconstitution approaches and multiple independent assays, we show that removal of the regulatory variable domain (VD) in Drp1 enhances formation of a functional Drp1-Mff copolymer. This protein assembly exhibits greatly stimulated cooperative GTPase activity in solution. Moreover, when Mff was anchored to a lipid template, to mimic a more physiologic environment, significant stimulation of GTPase activity was observed with both WT and ΔVD Drp1. Contrary to recent findings, we show that premature Drp1 self-assembly in solution impairs functional interactions with membrane-anchored Mff. Instead, dimeric Drp1 species are selectively recruited by Mff to initiate assembly of a functional fission complex. Correspondingly, we also found that the coiled-coil motif in Mff is not essential for Drp1 interactions, but rather serves to augment cooperative self-assembly of Drp1 proximal to the membrane. Taken together, our findings provide a mechanism wherein the multimeric states of both Mff and Drp1 regulate their collaborative interaction. PMID:26578514

  6. Membrane contacts between endosomes and ER provide sites for PTP1B-epidermal growth factor receptor interaction.

    PubMed

    Eden, Emily R; White, Ian J; Tsapara, Anna; Futter, Clare E

    2010-03-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a critical determinator of cell fate. Signalling from this receptor tyrosine kinase is spatially regulated by progression through the endocytic pathway, governing receptor half-life and accessibility to signalling proteins and phosphatases. Endocytosis of EGFR is required for interaction with the protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B (ref. 1), which localizes to the cytoplasmic face of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), raising the question of how PTP1B comes into contact with endosomal EGFR. We show that EGFR-PTP1B interaction occurs by means of direct membrane contacts between the perimeter membrane of multivesicular bodies (MVBs) and the ER. The population of EGFR interacting with PTP1B is the same population that undergo ESCRT-mediated (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) sorting within MVBs, and PTP1B activity promotes the sequestration of EGFR on to MVB internal vesicles. Membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER form in both the presence and absence of stimulation by EGF. Thus membrane contacts between endosomes and the ER may represent a global mechanism for direct interaction between proteins on these two organelles. PMID:20118922

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion membrane protein CT850 interacts with the dynein light chain DYNLT1 (Tctex1).

    PubMed

    Mital, Jeffrey; Lutter, Erika I; Barger, Alexandra C; Dooley, Cheryl A; Hackstadt, Ted

    2015-06-26

    Chlamydia trachomatis actively subverts the minus-end directed microtubule motor, dynein, to traffic along microtubule tracks to the Microtubule Organizing Center (MTOC) where it remains within a membrane bound replicative vacuole for the duration of its intracellular development. Unlike most substrates of the dynein motor, disruption of the dynactin cargo-linking complex by over-expression of the p50 dynamitin subunit does not inhibit C. trachomatis transport. A requirement for chlamydial protein synthesis to initiate this process suggests that a chlamydial product supersedes a requirement for p50 dynamitin. A yeast 2-hybrid system was used to screen the chlamydia inclusion membrane protein CT850 against a HeLa cell cDNA library and identified an interaction with the dynein light chain DYNLT1 (Tctex1). This interaction was at least partially dependent upon an (R/K-R/K-X-X-R/K) motif that is characteristic of DYNLT1 binding domains. CT850 expressed ectopically in HeLa cells localized at the MTOC and this localization is similarly dependent upon the predicted DYNLT1 binding domain. Furthermore, DYNLT1 is enriched at focal concentrations of CT850 on the chlamydial inclusion membrane that are known to interact with dynein and microtubules. Depletion of DYNLT1 disrupts the characteristic association of the inclusion membrane with centrosomes. Collectively, the results suggest that CT850 interacts with DYNLT1 to promote appropriate positioning of the inclusion at the MTOC. PMID:25944661

  8. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-01-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. PMID:24652590

  9. Membrane protein stability can be compromised by detergent interactions with the extramembranous soluble domains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengrong; Wang, Chi; Zhou, Qingxian; An, Jianli; Hildebrandt, Ellen; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Kappes, John C; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Riordan, John R; Urbatsch, Ina L; Hunt, John F; Brouillette, Christie G

    2014-06-01

    Detergent interaction with extramembranous soluble domains (ESDs) is not commonly considered an important determinant of integral membrane protein (IMP) behavior during purification and crystallization, even though ESDs contribute to the stability of many IMPs. Here we demonstrate that some generally nondenaturing detergents critically destabilize a model ESD, the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) from the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a model IMP. Notably, the detergents show equivalent trends in their influence on the stability of isolated NBD1 and full-length CFTR. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy to monitor changes in NBD1 stability and secondary structure, respectively, during titration with a series of detergents. Their effective harshness in these assays mirrors that widely accepted for their interaction with IMPs, i.e., anionic > zwitterionic > nonionic. It is noteworthy that including lipids or nonionic detergents is shown to mitigate detergent harshness, as will limiting contact time. We infer three thermodynamic mechanisms from the observed thermal destabilization by monomer or micelle: (i) binding to the unfolded state with no change in the native structure (all detergent classes); (ii) native state binding that alters thermodynamic properties and perhaps conformation (nonionic detergents); and (iii) detergent binding that directly leads to denaturation of the native state (anionic and zwitterionic). These results demonstrate that the accepted model for the harshness of detergents applies to their interaction with an ESD. It is concluded that destabilization of extramembranous soluble domains by specific detergents will influence the stability of some IMPs during purification. PMID:24652590

  10. Plasma Membrane Calcium ATPase Activity Is Regulated by Actin Oligomers through Direct Interaction*

    PubMed Central

    Dalghi, Marianela G.; Fernández, Marisa M.; Ferreira-Gomes, Mariela; Mangialavori, Irene C.; Malchiodi, Emilio L.; Strehler, Emanuel E.; Rossi, Juan Pablo F. C.

    2013-01-01

    As recently described by our group, plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) activity can be regulated by the actin cytoskeleton. In this study, we characterize the interaction of purified G-actin with isolated PMCA and examine the effect of G-actin during the first polymerization steps. As measured by surface plasmon resonance, G-actin directly interacts with PMCA with an apparent 1:1 stoichiometry in the presence of Ca2+ with an apparent affinity in the micromolar range. As assessed by the photoactivatable probe 1-O-hexadecanoyl-2-O-[9-[[[2-[125I]iodo-4-(trifluoromethyl-3H-diazirin-3-yl)benzyl]oxy]carbonyl]nonanoyl]-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, the association of PMCA to actin produced a shift in the distribution of the conformers of the pump toward a calmodulin-activated conformation. G-actin stimulates Ca2+-ATPase activity of the enzyme when incubated under polymerizing conditions, displaying a cooperative behavior. The increase in the Ca2+-ATPase activity was related to an increase in the apparent affinity for Ca2+ and an increase in the phosphoenzyme levels at steady state. Although surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed only one binding site for G-actin, results clearly indicate that more than one molecule of G-actin was needed for a regulatory effect on the pump. Polymerization studies showed that the experimental conditions are compatible with the presence of actin in the first stages of assembly. Altogether, these observations suggest that the stimulatory effect is exerted by short oligomers of actin. The functional interaction between actin oligomers and PMCA represents a novel regulatory pathway by which the cortical actin cytoskeleton participates in the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23803603