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Sample records for memory alloy rod

  1. Modeling and numerical simulation of the pseudoelastic behavior of shape memory alloy circular rods under tension torsion combined loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jong-Ha; Heo, Jin-Seok; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2006-12-01

    Most research on the behavior of shape memory alloys (SMAs) under tension-torsion combined loading has focused on tubular materials. In contrast to tubular SMAs, SMA rods have unique characteristics. When an SMA rod is twisted, the central region remains elastic while the outer layer undergoes a martensite transformation. The nonlinear stress distribution of an SMA rod through the radial direction gives the SMA rod peculiarities, and this is the primary factor that makes analysis of the stress-strain behavior difficult. The authors suggest a material model that can represent the stress-strain behavior of an SMA rod under tension-torsion combined loading. The proposed model is based on Brinson's phase transformation kinetics and the plastic flow rules. Furthermore, the yield is assumed to be in accordance with the Von Mises criterion and the effect of thermal expansion is not considered. The authors also present some numerical solutions of the proposed model in the context of isothermal strain and stress processes (proportional and nonproportional loading) in the pseudoelastic region. According to simulation results, the stress-strain behavior of an SMA solid rod under biaxial loading differs from that of a thin-walled tube or a rod under one-dimensional loading.

  2. Processing of Ni30Pt20Ti50 High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloy Into Thin Rod Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Draper, Susan L.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Leonhardt, Todd

    2005-01-01

    High-temperature shape-memory alloys (HTSMAs) based on nickel-titanium (NiTi) with significant ternary additions of palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt), gold (Au), or hafnium (Hf) have been identified as potential high-temperature actuator materials for use up to 500 C. These materials provide an enabling technology for the development of "smart structures" used to control the noise, emissions, or efficiency of gas turbine engines. The demand for these high-temperature versions of conventional shape-memory alloys also has been growing in the automotive, process control, and energy industries. However these materials, including the NiPtTi alloys being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, will never find widespread acceptance unless they can be readily processed into useable forms.

  3. CONTROL ROD ALLOY CONTAINING NOBLE METAL ADDITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.K.; Ray, W.E.

    1960-05-01

    Silver-base alloys suitable for use in the fabrication of control rods for neutronic reactors are given. The alloy consists of from 0.5 wt.% to about 1.5 wt.% of a noble metal of platinum, ruthenium, rhodium, osmium, or palladium, up to 10 wt.% of cadmium, from 2 to 20 wt.% indium, the balance being silver.

  4. Shape memory alloy actuator

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2001-01-01

    An actuator for cycling between first and second positions includes a first shaped memory alloy (SMA) leg, a second SMA leg. At least one heating/cooling device is thermally connected to at least one of the legs, each heating/cooling device capable of simultaneously heating one leg while cooling the other leg. The heating/cooling devices can include thermoelectric and/or thermoionic elements.

  5. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Martinez, David R.

    1998-01-01

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the Austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states.

  6. ALLOY COMPOSITION FOR NEUTRONIC REACTOR CONTROL RODS

    DOEpatents

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Snyder, H.J.; Eggleston, R.R.

    1963-01-22

    This invention relates to alloy compositons suitable as cortrol rod material consisting of, by weight, from 85% to 85% Ag, from 2% to 20% In, from up to 10% of Cd, from up to 5% Sn, and from up to 1.5% Al, the amount of each element employed being determined by the equation X + 2Y + 3Z + 3W + 4V = 1.4 and less, where X, Y, Z, W, and V represent the atom fractions of the elements Ag, Cd, In, Al and Sn. (AEC)

  7. Technical Seminar "Shape Memory Alloys"

    NASA Video Gallery

    Shape memory alloys are a unique group of materials that remember their original shape and return to that shape after being strained. How could the aerospace, automotive, and energy exploration ind...

  8. Shape memory alloy thaw sensors

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.; Martinez, D.R.

    1998-04-07

    A sensor permanently indicates that it has been exposed to temperatures exceeding a critical temperature for a predetermined time period. An element of the sensor made from shape memory alloy changes shape when exposed, even temporarily, to temperatures above the austenitic temperature of the shape memory alloy. The shape change of the SMA element causes the sensor to change between two readily distinguishable states. 16 figs.

  9. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-22

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)-, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at -150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries. PMID:27463668

  10. A lightweight shape-memory magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Koike, Junichi

    2016-07-01

    Shape-memory alloys (SMAs), which display shape recovery upon heating, as well as superelasticity, offer many technological advantages in various applications. Those distinctive behaviors have been observed in many polycrystalline alloy systems such as nickel titantium (TiNi)–, copper-, iron-, nickel-, cobalt-, and Ti-based alloys but not in lightweight alloys such as magnesium (Mg) and aluminum alloys. Here we present a Mg SMA showing superelasticity of 4.4% at –150°C and shape recovery upon heating. The shape-memory properties are caused by reversible martensitic transformation. This Mg alloy includes lightweight scandium, and its density is about 2 grams per cubic centimeter, which is one-third less than that of practical TiNi SMAs. This finding raises the potential for development and application of lightweight SMAs across a number of industries.

  11. Thermo-Mechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo

    2013-01-01

    This innovation is capable of significantly reducing the amount of time required to stabilize the strain-temperature response of a shape memory alloy (SMA). Unlike traditional stabilization processes that take days to weeks to achieve stabilized response, this innovation accomplishes stabilization in a matter of minutes, thus making it highly useful for the successful and practical implementation of SMA-based technologies in real-world applications. The innovation can also be applied to complex geometry components, not just simple geometries like wires or rods.

  12. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-02-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials.

  13. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials. PMID:26880700

  14. A jumping shape memory alloy under heat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuiyuan; Omori, Toshihiro; Wang, Cuiping; Liu, Yong; Nagasako, Makoto; Ruan, Jingjing; Kainuma, Ryosuke; Ishida, Kiyohito; Liu, Xingjun

    2016-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are typical temperature-sensitive metallic functional materials due to superelasticity and shape recovery characteristics. The conventional shape memory effect involves the formation and deformation of thermally induced martensite and its reverse transformation. The shape recovery process usually takes place over a temperature range, showing relatively low temperature-sensitivity. Here we report novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys. Their stress-strain and shape recovery behaviors are clearly different from the conventional shape memory alloys. In this study, although the Cu-12.2Al-4.3Fe-6.6Mn and Cu-12.9Al-3.8Fe-5.6Mn alloys possess predominantly L21 parent before deformation, the 2H martensite stress-induced from L21 parent could be retained after unloading. Furthermore, their shape recovery response is extremely temperature-sensitive, in which a giant residual strain of about 9% recovers instantly and completely during heating. At the same time, the phenomenon of the jumping of the sample occurs. It is originated from the instantaneous completion of the reverse transformation of the stabilized 2H martensite. This novel Cu-Al-Fe-Mn shape memory alloys have great potentials as new temperature-sensitive functional materials. PMID:26880700

  15. Ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chluba, Christoph; Ge, Wenwei; Lima de Miranda, Rodrigo; Strobel, Julian; Kienle, Lorenz; Quandt, Eckhard; Wuttig, Manfred

    2015-05-01

    Functional shape memory alloys need to operate reversibly and repeatedly. Quantitative measures of reversibility include the relative volume change of the participating phases and compatibility matrices for twinning. But no similar argument is known for repeatability. This is especially crucial for many future applications, such as artificial heart valves or elastocaloric cooling, in which more than 10 million transformation cycles will be required. We report on the discovery of an ultralow-fatigue shape memory alloy film system based on TiNiCu that allows at least 10 million transformation cycles. We found that these films contain Ti2Cu precipitates embedded in the base alloy that serve as sentinels to ensure complete and reproducible transformation in the course of each memory cycle.

  16. Field effect memory alloy heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.D.; Kirkpatrick, P.F.

    1981-08-04

    A heat engine employing a memory alloy and a force field such as gravity for converting heat energy into mechanical work is disclosed. Field effect elements are mounted on the distal ends of flexible spokes which in turn are mounted about a hub to form a rotating wheel. The memory alloy is in the form of a helix disposed about the circumference of the wheel and interconnecting the ends of adjacent spoke pairs. Heat is transferred to segments of the memory alloy on one side of the wheel so that the segments deform toward their memory shape and deflect the associated spokes toward each other. Heat is transferred away from the memory alloy segments on the opposite side so that the segments deform toward their trained shape and permit the spokes to flex apart. The concentration of field effect elements on the first side of the wheel is greater than the concentration on the other side so that the resultant force created by a remote field acts as a torque for rotating the wheel.

  17. Method of increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Ostenson, J.E.; Finnemore, D.K.

    1989-04-04

    This invention comprises a method of increasing the magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron (RFe) magnetostrictive alloy rods by a thermal-magnetic treatment. The rod is heated to a temperature above its Curie temperature, viz. from 400 to 600 C; and, while the rod is at that temperature, a magnetic field is directionally applied and maintained while the rod is cooled, at least below its Curie temperature. 2 figs.

  18. Method of increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; McMasters, O. Dale; Gibson, Edwin D.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Finnemore, Douglas K.

    1989-04-04

    This invention comprises a method of increasing the magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron (RFe) magnetostrictive alloy rods by a thermal-magnetic treatment. The rod is heated to a temperature above its Curie temperature, viz. from 400.degree. to 600.degree. C.; and, while the rod is at that temperature, a magnetic field is directionally applied and maintained while the rod is cooled, at least below its Curie temperature.

  19. Shape-Memory-Alloy Actuator For Flight Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Report proposes use of shape-memory-alloy actuators, instead of hydraulic actuators, for aerodynamic flight-control surfaces. Actuator made of shape-memory alloy converts thermal energy into mechanical work by changing shape as it makes transitions between martensitic and austenitic crystalline phase states of alloy. Because both hot exhaust gases and cryogenic propellant liquids available aboard launch rockets, shape-memory-alloy actuators exceptionally suited for use aboard such rockets.

  20. Precipitation Hardenable High Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald Dean (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Crombie, Edwin A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A composition of the invention is a high temperature shape memory alloy having high work output, and is made from (Ni+Pt+Y),Ti(100-x) wherein x is present in a total amount of 49-55 atomic % Pt is present in a total amount of 10-30 atomic %, Y is one or more of Au, Pd. and Cu and is present in a total amount of 0 to 10 atomic %. The alloy has a matrix phase wherein the total concentration of Ni, Pt, and the one or more of Pd. Au, and Cu is greater than 50 atomic %.

  1. Study to determine peening stress profile of rod peened aluminum structural alloys versus shot peened material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosas, R. E.; Calfin, B. G.

    1976-01-01

    The objective of this program was to determine the peening stress profiles of rod peened aluminum structural alloys versus shot peened material to define the effective depth of the compressed surface layer.

  2. Magnetic circuit design for miniaturized magnetic shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzmacher, C.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic shape memory alloy (MSMA) is a relatively new kind of smart material. Upon application of a large magnetic field, it exhibits actuation strains up to 10% similar to thermal shape memory alloy (SMA) but shows significantly reduced response time in the millisecond range. Currently, application is restricted by the brittleness of the single crystal material, its nonlinear behaviour and the difficulty to generate and apply a magnetic field around 0.6T in order to exploit the full actuation potential. The focus of this work is on the design of miniaturized magnetic circuits for bulk MSMAs. Various circuit designs are compared such as toroidal and series-parallel shapes. Equivalent circuit as well as finite element simulation is used to increase the magnetic field in a characteristic air gap where the smart material is placed. A symmetrical toroid coil layout with the MSMA element at the center that allows easy integration of the actuator in various applications is described. Static characterization results of this actuator are provided. Using the described magnetic circuit and 5M - MSMA rods with dimensions of 20x2.5x1mm3, a peak displacement of 0.8mm and a blocked force of 4.5N was obtained. Further design guidelines for such miniaturized actuators are given.

  3. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  4. 75 FR 21658 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... amended, 67 FR 68036 (Nov. 8, 2002). In accordance with sections 201.16(c) and 207.3 of the Commission's... COMMISSION Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Trinidad and Tobago AGENCY: United States... in the antidumping duty Investigation No. 731-TA-961 concerning carbon and certain alloy steel...

  5. Shape memory alloy/shape memory polymer tools

    DOEpatents

    Seward, Kirk P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2005-03-29

    Micro-electromechanical tools for minimally invasive techniques including microsurgery. These tools utilize composite shape memory alloy (SMA), shape memory polymer (SMP) and combinations of SMA and SMP to produce catheter distal tips, actuators, etc., which are bistable. Applications for these structures include: 1) a method for reversible fine positioning of a catheter tip, 2) a method for reversible fine positioning of tools or therapeutic catheters by a guide catheter, 3) a method for bending articulation through the body's vasculature, 4) methods for controlled stent delivery, deployment, and repositioning, and 5) catheters with variable modulus, with vibration mode, with inchworm capability, and with articulated tips. These actuators and catheter tips are bistable and are opportune for in vivo usage because the materials are biocompatible and convenient for intravascular use as well as other minimal by invasive techniques.

  6. Mechanocaloric effects in shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Mañosa, Lluís; Planes, Antoni

    2016-08-13

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are a class of ferroic materials which undergo a structural (martensitic) transition where the associated ferroic property is a lattice distortion (strain). The sensitiveness of the transition to the conjugated external field (stress), together with the latent heat of the transition, gives rise to giant mechanocaloric effects. In non-magnetic SMA, the lattice distortion is mostly described by a pure shear and the martensitic transition in this family of alloys is strongly affected by uniaxial stress, whereas it is basically insensitive to hydrostatic pressure. As a result, non-magnetic alloys exhibit giant elastocaloric effects but negligible barocaloric effects. By contrast, in a number of magnetic SMA, the lattice distortion at the martensitic transition involves a volume change in addition to the shear strain. Those alloys are affected by both uniaxial stress and hydrostatic pressure and they exhibit giant elastocaloric and barocaloric effects. The paper aims at providing a critical survey of available experimental data on elastocaloric and barocaloric effects in magnetic and non-magnetic SMA.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'. PMID:27402931

  7. Superelastic behavior modeling in shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbab Chirani, S.; Aleong, D.; Dumont, C.; McDowell, D.; Patoor, E.

    2003-10-01

    The superelastic behavior of shape memory alloys is useful for several industrial applications. To dimension the SMA structures, the development of specified phenomenological constitutive models are necessary. In this case the identification of a transformation criterion is required. Unfortunately, accurate determination of the loading surface which characterizes the behavior during the martensitic transformation is experimentally difficult. A numerical simulation of this surface is proposed from a micromechanical model based on the self-consistent scale transition method. The effect of the various crystallographic textures on the shape of these surfaces is studied in CuZnAl alloys. The obtained results permit to choose the best texture according to the loading type. The validity of the normality law has been verified during the transformation procedure for studied textures.

  8. Shape memory alloy seals for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Friske, Warren H.; Schwartzbart, Harry

    1982-10-08

    Rockwell International's Energy Systems Group, under contract to Brookhaven National Laboratory, has completed a 2-year program to develop a novel temperature-actuated seal concept for geothermal applications. This seal concept uses the unique properties of a shape memory alloy (Nitinol) to perform the sealing function. The several advantages of the concept are discussed in the paper. Demonstration tests of both face and shaft seals have shown that leaktight seals are feasible. Supporting materials studies have included corrosion tests in geothermal fluids, elevated temperature tensile tests, experimental electroplating and metallographic evaluations of microstructures.

  9. Fastening apparatus having shape memory alloy actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckinnis, Darin N. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A releasable fastening apparatus is presented. The device includes a connecting member and a housing. The housing supports a gripping mechanism that is adapted to engage the connecting member. A triggering member is movable within the housing between a first position in which it constrains the gripping mechanism in locked engagement with the connecting member, and a second position in which the gripping mechanism is disengaged from the connecting member. A shaped memory alloy actuator is employed for translating the triggering member from its first to its second position. The actuator is designed to expand longitudinally when transitioned from a martensitic to an austenitic state.

  10. Constitutive Models for Shape Memory Alloy Polycrystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, R. J., Jr.; Somerday, M.; Wert, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) exhibiting the superelastic or one-way effects can produce large recoverable strains upon application of a stress. In single crystals this stress and resulting strain are very orientation dependent. We show experimental stress/strain curves for a Ni-Al single crystal for various loading orientations. Also shown are model predictions; the open and closed circles indicate recoverable strains obtained at various stages in the transformation process. Because of the strong orientation dependence of shape memory properties, crystallographic texture can be expected to play an important role in the mechanical behavior of polycrystalline SMA. It is desirable to formulate a constitutive model to better understand and exploit the unique properties of SMA.

  11. Shape-memory alloy micro-actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, John D. (Inventor); Johnson, Alfred D. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A method of producing an integral piece of thermo-sensitive material, which is responsive to a shift in temperature from below to above a phase transformation temperature range to alter the material's condition to a shape-memory condition and move from one position to another. The method is characterized by depositing a thin film of shape-memory material, such as Nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) onto a substrate by vacuum deposition process such that the alloy exhibits an amorphous non-crystalline structure. The coated substrate is then annealed in a vacuum or in the presence of an inert atmosphere at a selected temperature, time and cool down rate to produce an ordered, partially disordered or fully disordered BCC structure such that the alloy undergoes thermoelastic, martinsetic phase transformation in response to alteration in temperature to pass from a martinsetic phase when at a temperature below a phase transformation range and capable of a high level of recoverable strain to a parent austenitic phase in a memory shape when at a temperature above the phase transformation range. Also disclosed are actuator devices employing shape-memory material actuators that deform from a set shape toward an original shape when subjected to a critical temperature level after having been initially deformed from the original shape into the set shape while at a lower temperature. The actuators are mechanically coupled to one or more movable elements such that the temperature-induce deformation of the actuators exerts a force or generates a motion of the mechanical element(s).

  12. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    McMasters, O.D.

    1986-09-02

    Rods of magnetostrictive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube. 5 figs.

  13. Method of forming magnetostrictive rods from rare earth-iron alloys

    DOEpatents

    McMasters, O. Dale

    1986-09-02

    Rods of magnetrostructive alloys of iron with rare earth elements are formed by flowing a body of rare earth-iron alloy in a crucible enclosed in a chamber maintained under an inert gas atmosphere, forcing such molten rare-earth-iron alloy into a hollow mold tube of refractory material positioned with its lower end portion within the molten body by means of a pressure differential between the chamber and mold tube and maintaining a portion of the molten alloy in the crucible extending to a level above the lower end of the mold tube so that solid particles of higher melting impurities present in the alloy collect at the surface of the molten body and remain within the crucible as the rod is formed in the mold tube.

  14. Method for fabricating uranium alloy articles without shape memory effects

    DOEpatents

    Banker, John G.

    1985-01-01

    Uranium-rich niobium and niobium-zirconium alloys possess a characteristic known as shape memory effect wherein shaped articles of these alloys recover their original shape when heated. The present invention circumvents this memory behavior by forming the alloys into the desired configuration at elevated temperatures with "cold" matched dies and maintaining the shaped articles between the dies until the articles cool to ambient temperature.

  15. Method for fabricating uranium alloy articles without shape memory effects

    DOEpatents

    Banker, J.G.

    1980-05-21

    Uranium-rich niobium and niobium-zirconium alloys possess a characteristic known as shape memory effect wherein shaped articles of these alloys recover their original shape when heated. The present invention circumvents this memory behavior by forming the alloys into the desired configuration at elevated temperatures with cold matched dies and maintaining the shaped articles between the dies until the articles cool to ambient temperature.

  16. Method of preparing a two-way shape memory alloy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, A.D.

    1984-03-06

    A two-way shape memory alloy, a method of training a shape memory alloy, and a heat engine employing the two-way shape memory alloy to do external work during both heating and cooling phases are disclosed. The alloy is heated under a first training stress to a temperature which is above the upper operating temperature of the alloy, then cooled to a cold temperature below the zero-force transition temperature of the alloy, then deformed while applying a second training stress which is greater in magnitude than the stress at which the alloy is to be operated, then heated back to the hot temperature, changing from the second training stress back to the first training stress. 8 figs.

  17. Method of preparing a two-way shape memory alloy

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Alfred D.

    1984-01-01

    A two-way shape memory alloy, a method of training a shape memory alloy, and a heat engine employing the two-way shape memory alloy to do external work during both heating and cooling phases. The alloy is heated under a first training stress to a temperature which is above the upper operating temperature of the alloy, then cooled to a cold temperature below the zero-force transition temperature of the alloy, then deformed while applying a second training stress which is greater in magnitude than the stress at which the alloy is to be operated, then heated back to the hot temperature, changing from the second training stress back to the first training stress.

  18. Phenomenological Modeling of Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buravalla, Vidyashankar; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2008-07-01

    Shape memory alloys exhibit two characteristic effects, viz., shape memory and superelasticity or pseudoelasticity, due to a reversible solid-solid transformation brought about by either temperature or stress or both. The two important aspects involved in modeling the macroscopic SMA behavior are the constitutive equation describing the stress-strain-temperature relationship and the evolution kinetics describing the phase transformation as a function of the driving forces. Phenomenological models for macroscopic behavior of SMAs are frequently used wherein the aforementioned aspects of SMA behavior are treated independently. Using empirical data, a phase diagram is constructed to describe evolution of martensitic phase fraction (ξ) as a function of stress and temperature. A constitutive equation is derived using the appropriate form of free energy. In this paper, salient aspects in phenomenological models are discussed and a robust model for SMA behavior is presented. Using a distance based memory parameter, rate based kinetics is provided along with a differential form of constitutive equation. Also, several critical issues in phenomenological modeling like prescribing consistent kinetics and catering to arbitrary thermomechanical loading are highlighted. Through numerical studies, it is shown that the proposed model provides consistent kinetics and caters to arbitrary thermomechanical loading.

  19. Mechanical properties of alloy Mg-Li rod in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Cao, Yang; Yue, Baocheng

    2009-12-01

    Light-weight metal or alloy was widespread in aerospace and aeronautical engineering. Alloy Li-Mg was the lightest metal structural materials. Focus was recently on this alloy. Static mechanical properties were important for materials before they were applied into practical use. Static Testing of a new alloy Li-Mg was accomplished in this paper by universal materials testing system Model INSTRON 5500R. Stress-strain curve was acquired. And ultimate stress, yield stress, elongation in percentage and reduce of area in percentage were measured in detail. The result showed that alloy had higher strength to 250MPa in tension. But the deformation was hardly changed in length or section before it cracked. All the experimental result proved that this material was typical brittle materials. Fractography had been observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM Photos were also verified alloy Li-Mg was ductile material.

  20. Mechanical properties of alloy Mg-Li rod in tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueyi; Zou, Guangping; Cao, Yang; Yue, Baocheng

    2010-03-01

    Light-weight metal or alloy was widespread in aerospace and aeronautical engineering. Alloy Li-Mg was the lightest metal structural materials. Focus was recently on this alloy. Static mechanical properties were important for materials before they were applied into practical use. Static Testing of a new alloy Li-Mg was accomplished in this paper by universal materials testing system Model INSTRON 5500R. Stress-strain curve was acquired. And ultimate stress, yield stress, elongation in percentage and reduce of area in percentage were measured in detail. The result showed that alloy had higher strength to 250MPa in tension. But the deformation was hardly changed in length or section before it cracked. All the experimental result proved that this material was typical brittle materials. Fractography had been observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). SEM Photos were also verified alloy Li-Mg was ductile material.

  1. 78 FR 60850 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of the Expedited Second Sunset...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Brazil, 67 FR 55805 (August 30, 2002). \\2\\ See Initiation of Five-Year (``Sunset'') Review, 78 FR 33063 (June 3, 2013). On June 18, 2013, the Department received a notice of... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil: Final Results of...

  2. Design of energy absorbing materials and composite structures based on porous shape memory alloys (SE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying

    Recently, attention has been paid to porous shape memory alloys. This is because the alloys show large and recoverable deformation, i.e. superelasticity and shape memory effect. Due to their light weight and potential large deformations, porous shape memory alloys have been considered as excellent candidates for energy absorption materials. In the present study, porous NiTi alloy with several different porosities are processed by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The compression behavior of the porous NiTi is examined with an aim of using it for a possible high energy absorbing material. Two models for the macroscopic compression behavior of porous shape memory alloy (SMA) are presented in this work, where Eshelby's inhomogeneous inclusion method is used to predict the effective elastic and superelastic behavior of a porous SMA based on the assumption of stress-strain curve. The analytical results are compared with experimental data for porous NiTi with 13% porosity, resulting in a reasonably good agreement. Based on the study upon porous NiTi, an energy absorbing composite structure made of a concentric NiTi spring and a porous NiTi rod is presented in this PhD dissertation. Both NiTi spring and porous NiTi rod are of superelastic grade. Ductile porous NiTi cylindrical specimens are fabricated by spark plasma sintering. The composite structure exhibits not only high reversible force-displacement behavior for small to intermediate loading but also high energy absorbing property when subjected to large compressive loads. A model for the compressive force-displacement curve of the composite structure is presented. The predicted curve is compared to the experimental data, resulting in a reasonably good agreement.

  3. Standard specification for nickel-molybdenum alloy rod. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 335-58T. Last previous edition was B 335-95.

  4. Nickel-chromium-iron-molybdenum-copper alloy rod. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Oct. 10, 1997. Published February 1998. Originally published as B581-73. Last previous edition B581-93.

  5. Shape memory alloys: New materials for future engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornbogen, E.

    1988-01-01

    Shape memory is a new material property. An alloy which experiences relative severe plastic deformation resumes its original shape again after heating by 10 to 100 C. Besides simple shape memory, in similar alloys there is the second effect where the change in shape is caused exclusively by little temperature change. In pseudo-elasticity, the alloy exhibits a rubber-like behavior, i.e., large, reversible deformation at little change in tension. Beta Cu and beta NiTi alloys have been used in practice. The probability is that soon alloys based on Fe will become available. Recently increasing applications for this alloy were found in various areas of technology, even medical technology. A review with 24 references is given, including properties, production, applications and fundamental principles of the shape memory effect.

  6. Nondestructive evaluation of Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Meir, S.; Gordon, S.; Karsh, M.; Ayers, R.; Olson, D. L.; Wiezman, A.

    2011-06-23

    The nondestructive evaluation of nickel titanium (Ni-Ti) alloys for applications such as heat treatment for biomaterials applications (dental) and welding was investigated. Ni-Ti alloys and its ternary alloys are valued for mechanical properties in addition to the shape memory effect. Two analytical approaches were perused in this work. Assessment of the microstructure of the alloy that determines the martensitic start temperature (Ms) of Ni-Ti alloy as a function of heat treatment, and secondly, an attempt to evaluate a Friction Stir Welding, which involves thermo-mechanical processing of the alloy.

  7. Combinatorial investigation of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro; Famodu, Olugbenga; Aronova, Maria; Jaworski, Allan; Craciunescu, Corneliu; Wuttig, Manfred; Wellstood, Fred

    2002-03-01

    We have established a comprehensive methodology for rapidly exploring and mapping novel materials phases of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. A UHV multi-gun magnetron co-sputtering system designed for fabricating composition spreads is used to map out different regions of a variety of ternary phase diagrams on 3 inch Si wafers. A scanning SQUID microscope is used to identify composition regions displaying strong ferromagnetism at room temperature on the spread samples, and magnetization mapping is obtained. In order to quickly characterize the martensitic transition temperatures, composition spreads are directly fabricated on micromachined cantilever libraries. All wafers are deposited at 400 450 C. A novel optical detection method is used to rapidly identify cantilevers undergoing martensitic transitions by visual inspection as a function of temperature. A scanning x-ray microdiffractometer is also used to detect regions displaying structural phase transitions. We have mapped out the ternary phase diagram of the Ni-Mn-Ga system.

  8. Fabrication of a helical coil shape memory alloy actuator

    SciTech Connect

    O`Donnell, R.E.

    1992-02-01

    A fabrication process was developed to form, heat treat, and join NiTi shape memory alloy helical coils for use as mechanical actuators. Tooling and procedures were developed to wind both extension and compression-type coils on a manual lathe. Heat treating fixtures and techniques were used to set the ``memory`` of the NiTi alloy to the desired configuration. A swaging process was devised to fasten shape memory alloy extension coils to end fittings for use in actuator testing and for potential attachment to mechanical devices. The strength of this mechanical joint was evaluated.

  9. Fabrication of a helical coil shape memory alloy actuator

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, R.E.

    1992-02-01

    A fabrication process was developed to form, heat treat, and join NiTi shape memory alloy helical coils for use as mechanical actuators. Tooling and procedures were developed to wind both extension and compression-type coils on a manual lathe. Heat treating fixtures and techniques were used to set the memory'' of the NiTi alloy to the desired configuration. A swaging process was devised to fasten shape memory alloy extension coils to end fittings for use in actuator testing and for potential attachment to mechanical devices. The strength of this mechanical joint was evaluated.

  10. High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, C. A.; Tuissi, A.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, an experimental study of laser micro-processing on a Cu-Zr-based shape memory alloy (SMA), which is suitable for high-temperature (HT) applications, is discussed. A first evaluation of the interaction between a laser beam and Zr50Cu28Ni7Co15 HT SMA is highlighted. Single laser pulses at various levels of power and pulse duration were applied to evaluate their effect on the sample surfaces. Blind and through microholes were produced with sizes on the order of a few hundreds of microns; the results were characterized from the morphological viewpoint using a scanning electron microscope. The high beam quality allows the holes to be created with good circularity and little melted material around the hole periphery. An analysis of the chemical composition was performed using energy dispersive spectroscopy, revealing that compositional changes were limited, while important oxidation occurred on the hole surfaces. Additionally, laser micro-cutting tests were also proposed to evaluate the cut edge morphology and dimensions. The main result of this paper concerned the good behavior of the material upon interaction with the laser beam, which suggests that microfeatures can be successfully produced in this alloy.

  11. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; McMasters, O.D.

    1989-07-18

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900 to 1,000 C for 20 minutes to six hours.

  12. Thermal treatment for increasing magnetostrictive response of rare earth-iron alloy rods

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; McMasters, O. D.

    1989-07-18

    Magnetostrictive rods formed from rare earth-iron alloys are subjected to a short time heat treatment to increase their Magnetostrictive response under compression. The heat treatment is preferably carried out at a temperature of from 900.degree. to 1000.degree. C. for 20 minutes to six hours.

  13. Final Technical Report: Nanostructured Shape Memory ALloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wendy Crone; Walter Drugan; Arthur Ellis; John Perepezko

    2005-07-28

    With this grant we explored the properties that result from combining the effects of nanostructuring and shape memory using both experimental and theoretical approaches. We developed new methods to make nanostructured NiTi by melt-spinning and cold rolling fabrication strategies, which elicited significantly different behavior. A template synthesis method was also used to created nanoparticles. In order to characterize the particles we created, we developed a new magnetically-assisted particle manipulation technique to manipulate and position nanoscale samples for testing. Beyond characterization, this technique has broader implications for assembly of nanoscale devices and we demonstrated promising applications for optical switching through magnetically-controlled scattering and polarization capabilities. Nanoparticles of nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy were also produced using thin film deposition technology and nanosphere lithography. Our work revealed the first direct evidence that the thermally-induced martensitic transformation of these films allows for partial indent recovery on the nanoscale. In addition to thoroughly characterizing and modeling the nanoindentation behavior in NiTi thin films, we demonstrated the feasibility of using nanoindentation on an SMA film for write-read-erase schemes for data storage.

  14. Multi-range force sensors utilizing shape memory alloys

    DOEpatents

    Varma, Venugopal K.

    2003-04-15

    The present invention provides a multi-range force sensor comprising a load cell made of a shape memory alloy, a strain sensing system, a temperature modulating system, and a temperature monitoring system. The ability of the force sensor to measure contact forces in multiple ranges is effected by the change in temperature of the shape memory alloy. The heating and cooling system functions to place the shape memory alloy of the load cell in either a low temperature, low strength phase for measuring small contact forces, or a high temperature, high strength phase for measuring large contact forces. Once the load cell is in the desired phase, the strain sensing system is utilized to obtain the applied contact force. The temperature monitoring system is utilized to ensure that the shape memory alloy is in one phase or the other.

  15. Strain intermittency in shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandraud, Xavier; Barrera, Noemi; Biscari, Paolo; Grédiac, Michel; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-05-01

    We study experimentally the intermittent progress of the mechanically induced martensitic transformation in a Cu-Al-Be single crystal through a full-field measurement technique: the grid method. We utilize an in-house, specially designed gravity-based device, wherein a system controlled by water pumps applies a perfectly monotonic uniaxial load through very small force increments. The sample exhibits hysteretic superelastic behavior during the forward and reverse cubic-monoclinic transformation, produced by the evolution of the strain field of the phase microstructures. The in-plane linear strain components are measured on the sample surface during the loading cycle, and we characterize the strain intermittency in a number of ways, showing the emergence of power-law behavior for the strain avalanching over almost six decades of magnitude. We also describe the nonstationarity and the asymmetry observed in the forward versus reverse transformation. The present experimental approach, which allows for the monitoring of the reversible martensitic transformation both locally and globally in the crystal, proves useful and enhances our capabilities in the analysis and possible control of transition-related phenomena in shape-memory alloys.

  16. Stress analysis of shape memory alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulong; Zhou, Limin; Wang, Zhenqing; Huang, Haitao; Ye, Lin

    2009-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs), when in the form of wires or short fibers, can be embedded into a host material to form SMA-composite for satisfying a wide variety of engineering requirements. Due to the weak interface strength between the SMA wire and the matrix, the interface debonding often happens when the SMA composites act by external force or actuation temperature or combination of them. It is, therefore, very important to understand the stress transfers between the SMA fibers and matrix and the distributions of internal stresses in the SMA composite in order to improve its properties. In this paper, a theoretical model incorporated with Brinson's constitutive law of SMA for the prediction of internal stresses has been successfully developed. The assumed stress functions which satisfy equilibrium equations in the fiber and matrix respectively and the principle of minimum complementary energy are utilized to analyze the internal stress distributions during fiber pull-out and/or thermal loading processes. The complete axisymmetric states of stresses in the SMA fiber and matrix have been developed. A finite element analysis has been also conducted to compare with the theoretical results.

  17. Thermomechanical fatigue of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagoudas, D. C.; Miller, D. A.; Rong, L.; Kumar, P. K.

    2009-08-01

    As shape memory alloys (SMAs) gain popularity as high energy density actuators, one characteristic that becomes particularly important is the thermomechanical transformation fatigue life, in addition to maximum transformation strain and stability of actuation cycles. In this paper, a novel test frame design and testing protocol are discussed, for investigating the thermally activated transformation fatigue characteristics of SMAs under various applied loads for both complete and partial phase transformation. A Ni50Ti40Cu10 (at.%) SMA was chosen for this investigation and the effects of various heat treatments on the transformation temperatures and the transformation fatigue lives of actuators were studied. For selected heat treatments, the evolution of recoverable and irrecoverable strains up to failure under different applied stress levels was studied in detail. The influence of complete and partial transformation on the fatigue life is also presented. The irrecoverable strain accumulation as a function of the number of cycles to failure for different stress levels is presented by a relationship similar to the Manson-Coffin law for both partial and complete transformations.

  18. 77 FR 66954 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... Rod from Mexico: Affirmative Final Determination of Circumvention of the Antidumping Duty Order, 77 FR... of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico, 67 FR 55800..., Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine, 67 FR 65945 (October 29, 2002), remains dispositive. On October 1,...

  19. 76 FR 67407 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Preliminary Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico, (76 FR 45509 (July 29, 2011)). We preliminarily determine that, during..., Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine, 67 FR 65945 (October 29, 2002) (Wire Rod... FR 60733 (October 1, 2010). On October 29, 2010, in accordance with 19 CFR 351.213(b), the...

  20. Shape Memory Effect and Superelasticity in a Strain Glass Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Ren, Xiaobing; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    2006-12-01

    The shape memory effect and superelasticity are usually found in alloys exhibiting spontaneous martensitic transformation. Thus it is hard to imagine that such interesting effects can appear in a system without a martensitic transformation. In this Letter we show shape memory and the superelasticity effect in a nonmartensitic Ti48.5Ni51.5 alloy, which has no martensitic transformation but undergoes a “strain glass” transition. In situ x-ray diffraction experiment showed that the shape memory and superelasticity in strain glass stem from a stress-induced strain glass to martensite transformation and its reverse transformation. The new shape memory and superelasticity in strain glass extends the regime of the shape memory effect and superelasticity and may lead to novel applications.

  1. Cavitation erosion mechanism of titanium alloy radiation rods in aluminum melt.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fang; Li, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Lihua; Ma, Liyong; Li, Ruiqing

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound radiation rods play a key role in introducing ultrasonic to the grain refinement of large-size cast aluminum ingots (with diameter over 800 mm), but the severe cavitation corrosion of radiation rods limit the wide application of ultrasonic in the metallurgy field. In this paper, the cavitation erosion of Ti alloy radiation rod (TARR) in the semi-continuous direct-chill casting of 7050 Al alloy was investigated using a 20 kHz ultrasonic vibrator. The macro/micro characterization of Ti alloy was performed using an optical digital microscopy and a scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results indicated that the cavitation erosion and the chemical reaction play different roles throughout different corrosion periods. Meanwhile, the relationship between mass-loss and time during cavitation erosion was measured and analyzed. According to the rate of mass-loss to time, the whole cavitation erosion process was divided into four individual periods and the mechanism in each period was studied accordingly. PMID:26964935

  2. Shape memory properties of an iron modified nickel aluminide alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, J.A.; Liu, C.T.; George, E.P.

    1994-12-31

    The ordered intermetallic NiAl with aluminum levels near 36% undergoes a B2 to martensite transformation. Shape memory alloys based on NiAl + Fe have the potential for transition temperatures of greater than 150 C. While binary alloys appear inherently brittle, alloying with iron and boron results in two phase alloys with L1{sub 2} and B2 phases and with about 7% room temperature tensile ductility. These alloys show a two-way shape memory effect over a range of transition temperatures with austenite peak temperature, Ap, between 100 to 200 C based on composition. Unfortunately, the B2 phase and its low temperature body centered tetragonal martensitic form are not stable and both can transform to Ni{sub 5}Al{sub 3} with a loss in ductility. These alloys with a constant tensile load show a two way shape recovery of up to 0.6% during temperature cycling between 100 and 200 C. A thorough survey of the shape memory properties of one such alloy with a composition of Ni-25.5 Al-16 Fe-0.12 B (at.%) as a function of prior cold work, tensile loading and other training steps is presented. Nanoindentation was used to independently measure the mechanical properties of the two phases.

  3. Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, II, Santo A (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for stabilizing the strain-temperature response for a shape memory alloy are provided. To perform stabilization of a second sample of the shape memory alloy, a first sample of the shape memory alloy is selected for isobaric treatment and the second sample is selected for isothermal treatment. When applying the isobaric treatment to the first sample, a constant stress is applied to the first sample. Temperature is also cycled from a minimum temperature to a maximum temperature until a strain on the first sample stabilizes. Once the strain on the first sample stabilizes, the isothermal treatment is performed on the second sample. During isothermal treatment, different levels of stress on the second sample are applied until a strain on the second sample matches the stabilized strain on the first sample.

  4. Periodic Cellular Structure Technology for Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Edward Y.

    2015-01-01

    Shape memory alloys are being considered for a wide variety of adaptive components for engine and airframe applications because they can undergo large amounts of strain and then revert to their original shape upon heating or unloading. Transition45 Technologies, Inc., has developed an innovative periodic cellular structure (PCS) technology for shape memory alloys that enables fabrication of complex bulk configurations, such as lattice block structures. These innovative structures are manufactured using an advanced reactive metal casting technology that offers a relatively low cost and established approach for constructing near-net shape aerospace components. Transition45 is continuing to characterize these structures to determine how best to design a PCS to better exploit the use of shape memory alloys in aerospace applications.

  5. Thermomechanical Methodology for Stabilizing Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padula, Santo A., II (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods and apparatuses for stabilizing the strain-temperature response for a shape memory alloy are provided. To perform stabilization of a second sample of the shape memory alloy, a first sample of the shape memory alloy is selected for isobaric treatment and the second sample is selected for isothermal treatment. When applying the isobaric treatment to the first sample, a constant stress is applied to the first sample. Temperature is also cycled from a minimum temperature to a maximum temperature until a strain on the first sample stabilizes. Once the strain on the first sample stabilizes, the isothermal treatment is performed on the second sample. During isothermal treatment, different levels of stress on the second sample are applied until a strain on the second sample matches the stabilized strain on the first sample.

  6. Spooled packaging of shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, John A.

    A vast cross-section of transportation, manufacturing, consumer product, and medical technologies rely heavily on actuation. Accordingly, progress in these industries is often strongly coupled to the advancement of actuation technologies. As the field of actuation continues to evolve, smart materials show significant promise for satisfying the growing needs of industry. In particular, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators present an opportunity for low-cost, high performance actuation, but until now, they have been limited or restricted from use in many otherwise suitable applications by the difficulty in packaging the SMA wires within tight or unusually shaped form constraints. To address this packaging problem, SMA wires can be spool-packaged by wrapping around mandrels to make the actuator more compact or by redirecting around multiple mandrels to customize SMA wire pathways to unusual form factors. The goal of this dissertation is to develop the scientific knowledge base for spooled packaging of low-cost SMA wire actuators that enables high, predictable performance within compact, customizable form factors. In developing the scientific knowledge base, this dissertation defines a systematic general representation of single and multiple mandrel spool-packaged SMA actuators and provides tools for their analysis, understanding, and synthesis. A quasi-static analytical model distills the underlying mechanics down to the three effects of friction, bending, and binding, which enables prediction of the behavior of generic spool-packaged SMA actuators with specifiable geometric, loading, frictional, and SMA material parameters. An extensive experimental and simulation-based parameter study establishes the necessary understanding of how primary design tradeoffs between performance, packaging, and cost are governed by the underlying mechanics of spooled actuators. A design methodology outlines a systematic approach to synthesizing high performance SMA wire actuators

  7. Shape Memory Behavior of Porous NiTi Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Mehmet; Çakmak, Ömer

    2016-04-01

    Shape memory behavior of porous NiTi alloy is dependent on the phases, and mechanical or thermal background. The phases change with solution heat treatment and aging. Fully reversible shape memory behavior was observed during thermal cycling, and recoverable strains increased with the increasing stress from 2 to 50 MPa. The porous NiTi sample shows recoverable transformation strain response under lower constant load.

  8. Fatigue Resistance of Liquid-assisted Self-repairing Aluminum Alloys Reinforced with Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, M. Clara; Manuel, Michele; Wallace, Terryl

    2013-01-01

    A self-repairing aluminum-based composite system has been developed using a liquid-assisted healing theory in conjunction with the shape memory effect of wire reinforcements. The metal-metal composite was thermodynamically designed to have a matrix with a relatively even dispersion of a low-melting eutectic phase, allowing for repair of cracks at a predetermined temperature. Additionally, shape memory alloy (SMA) wire reinforcements were used within the composite to provide crack closure. Investigators focused the research on fatigue cracks propagating through the matrix in order to show a proof-of-concept Shape Memory Alloy Self-Healing (SMASH) technology for aeronautical applications.

  9. A rotating arm using shape-memory alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Phillip P.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Mars Pathfinder mission, to be launched in 1996, reflects a new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost and accelerate the pace of space exploration. One of the experiments on board Pathfinder will demonstrate the first use in space of a multi-cycle, electrically-activated, shape-memory alloy (SMA) actuator. SMA's are metal alloys which, when heated, undergo a crystalline phase change. This change in phase alters the alloy lattice-constant, resulting in a change of dimension. Upon cooling, the alloy returns to its original lattice formation. Wire drawn from an SMA contracts in length when heated. The reversible change in length is 3 percent to 5 percent. The wire used in this actuator is a nickel-titanium alloy known as nitinol.

  10. The combustion synthesis of Ni-Ti shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Yi, H.C. )

    1990-08-01

    Combustion synthesis of Ni-Ti-series shape-memory alloys yields both time and energy savings over conventional production methods. The solidified combustion synthesis process products have been cold-rolled into plates which exhibit the shape-memory effect, and it was noted that shape-memory transition temperatures may be tailored over a -78 to 460 C temperature range through the substitution of a third element for Ni; this element may be Pd or Fe. Accounts are given of the experimental combustion syntheses of Ni-Ti-Fe and Ti-Ni-Pd. 24 refs.

  11. Switchable Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) Thermal Materials Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Fesmire, James

    2014-01-01

    Develop 2-way switchable thermal systems for use in systems that function in cold to hot temperature ranges using different alloy designs for SMA system concepts. In this project, KSC will specifically address designs of two proof of concept SMA systems with transition temperatures in the 65-95 C range and investigate cycle fatigue and "memory loss" due to thermal cycling.

  12. Thermomechanical Modeling of Shape Memory Alloys and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lexcellent, C.; Leclercq, S.

    The aim of the present paper is a general macroscopic description of the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloys (SMA). We use for framework the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This model is efficient for describing the behavior of "smart" structures as a bronchial, a tentacle element and an prosthesis hybrid structure made of Ti Ni SMA wires embedded in a resin epoxy matrix.

  13. Understanding the Shape-Memory Alloys Used in Orthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Daniel J.; Peres, Rafael V.; Mendes, Alvaro M.; Elias, Carlos N.

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape-memory alloys (SMAs) have been used in the manufacture of orthodontic wires due to their shape memory properties, super-elasticity, high ductility, and resistance to corrosion. SMAs have greater strength and lower modulus of elasticity when compared with stainless steel alloys. The pseudoelastic behavior of NiTi wires means that on unloading they return to their original shape by delivering light continuous forces over a wider range of deformation which is claimed to allow dental displacements. The aim of this paper is to discuss the physical, metallurgical, and mechanical properties of NiTi used in Orthodontics in order to analyze the shape memory properties, super-elasticity, and thermomechanical characteristics of SMA. PMID:21991455

  14. Understanding the shape-memory alloys used in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Daniel J; Peres, Rafael V; Mendes, Alvaro M; Elias, Carlos N

    2011-01-01

    Nickel-titanium (NiTi) shape-memory alloys (SMAs) have been used in the manufacture of orthodontic wires due to their shape memory properties, super-elasticity, high ductility, and resistance to corrosion. SMAs have greater strength and lower modulus of elasticity when compared with stainless steel alloys. The pseudoelastic behavior of NiTi wires means that on unloading they return to their original shape by delivering light continuous forces over a wider range of deformation which is claimed to allow dental displacements. The aim of this paper is to discuss the physical, metallurgical, and mechanical properties of NiTi used in Orthodontics in order to analyze the shape memory properties, super-elasticity, and thermomechanical characteristics of SMA. PMID:21991455

  15. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Rod Eutectics and the Surface Roughening Transition in Binary Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentz, Daniel N.; Betush, William; Jackson, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we report on two related topics: Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the steady state growth of rod eutectics from the melt, and a study of the surface roughness of binary alloys. We have implemented a three dimensional kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) simulation with diffusion by pair exchange only in the liquid phase. Entropies of fusion are first chosen to fit the surface roughness of the pure materials, and the bond energies are derived from the equilibrium phase diagram, by treating the solid and liquid as regular and ideal solutions respectively. A simple cubic lattice oriented in the {100} direction is used. Growth of the rods is initiated from columns of pure B material embedded in an A matrix, arranged in a close packed array with semi-periodic boundary conditions. The simulation cells typically have dimensions of 50 by 87 by 200 unit cells. Steady state growth is compliant with the Jackson-Hunt model. In the kMC simulations, using the spin-one Ising model, growth of each phase is faceted or nonfaceted phases depending on the entropy of fusion. There have been many studies of the surface roughening transition in single component systems, but none for binary alloy systems. The location of the surface roughening transition for the phases of a eutectic alloy determines whether the eutectic morphology will be regular or irregular. We have conducted a study of surface roughness on the spin-one Ising Model with diffusion using kMC. The surface roughness was found to scale with the melting temperature of the alloy as given by the liquidus line on the equilibrium phase diagram. The density of missing lateral bonds at the surface was used as a measure of surface roughness.

  16. Design principle of actuators based on ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yuanchang

    2002-09-01

    Recently, attention has been paid to shape memory alloys with ferromagnetic properties, called ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs). This is because the alloys show large and recoverable deformation, i.e. superelasticity and shape memory effect, due to the martensitic transformation. Moreover, the transformation is possibly controlled by an applied magnetic field and the response can be fast. Therefore, FSMAs have been considered as a strong candidate for the fast responsive actuator material. In the present study, NiMnGa and Fe-Pd FSMAs are mainly used. NiMnGa alloys exhibit good shape memory effect with ferromagnetic properties. However, both experimental and analytical results show the magnetic field effect (up to 8 x 105A/m) on the phase transformation of NiMnGa is very small. No martensite structure change can be detected by applying a magnetic field, while the force induced by magnetic field gradient can easily be obtained on the alloys. This force easily induces the martensitic transformation (i.e. decrease of Young's modulus) which leads to large deformation. This process is called "hybrid mechanism" in the present study. The main disadvantage NiMnGa is its brittleness, hence, it is not suitable to be used as an actuator material. On the other hand, shape memory effect and superelasticity of polycrystalline Fe-Pd alloys have been confirmed. The martensite plate has been found consisting of very fine structures. The Young's modulus of the Fe-Pd alloys depends on temperature and has a rapid decline around the transformation temperature. Furthermore, a three dimensional (stress-temperature-magnetic field) phase diagram is constructed to clarify the possible driving mechanisms. Although the results of the present study show that the direct magnetic field effect on the phase transformation and martensite variant change is also very small, the "hybrid mechanism" is still very significant due to the large magnetization of the alloys. A model of stress

  17. Corrosion resistance tests on NiTi shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, G

    1996-10-01

    The corrosion performances of NiTi shape memory alloys (SMA) in human body simulating fluids were evaluated in comparison with other implant materials. As for the passivity current in potentiostatic conditions, taken as an index of ion release, the values are about three times higher for NiTi than for Ti6Al4V and austenitic stainless steels. Regarding the localized corrosion, while plain potentiodynamic scans indicated for NiTi alloy good resistance to pitting attack similar to Ti6Al4V, tests in which the passive film is abruptly damaged (i.e. potentiostatic scratch test and modified ASTM F746) pointed out that the characteristics of the passive film formed on NiTi alloy (whose strength can be related to the alloy's biocompatibility) are not as good as those on Ti6Al4V but are comparable or inferior to those on austenitic stainless steels. PMID:8894095

  18. High-Speed Behavior of Some Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Bragov, Anatoly M.; Lomunov, Andrey K.; Sergeichev, Ivan V.

    2006-07-28

    The results of dynamic tests of shape memory alloys Ti-Ni and Cu-Al-Ni are given. Compressive tests of Ti-Ni alloy were carried out at temperatures 293-573K. Considerable influence of temperature on module of elasticity prior to the dislocation plastic flow and dislocation yield limit has been mentioned in temperature interval of reverse martensitic transformation. For Cu-Al-Ni alloy a strain rate influence on phase yield limit, module of elasticity prior to the phase unelastic flow, module of elasticity prior to the dislocation plastic flow was negligible. The method of determination of duration of reverse martensitic transformation has been realized by the example of Cu-Al-Ni alloy.

  19. Damping of High-temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Kirsten P.; Padula, Santo A., II; Scheiman, Daniel A.

    2008-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Glenn Research Center have been investigating high temperature shape memory alloys as potential damping materials for turbomachinery rotor blades. Analysis shows that a thin layer of SMA with a loss factor of 0.04 or more would be effective at reducing the resonant response of a titanium alloy beam. Two NiTiHf shape memory alloy compositions were tested to determine their loss factors at frequencies from 0.1 to 100 Hz, at temperatures from room temperature to 300 C, and at alternating strain levels of 34-35x10(exp -6). Elevated damping was demonstrated between the M(sub s) and M(sub f) phase transformation temperatures and between the A(sub s) and A(sub f) temperatures. The highest damping occurred at the lowest frequencies, with a loss factor of 0.2-0.26 at 0.1 Hz. However, the peak damping decreased with increasing frequency, and showed significant temperature hysteresis in heating and cooling. Keywords: High-temperature, shape memory alloy, damping, aircraft engine blades, NiTiHf

  20. Grain Constraint and Size Effects in Shape Memory Alloy Microwires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueland, Stian Melhus

    Shape memory alloys exhibit interesting and useful properties, such as the shape memory effect and superelasticity. Among the many alloy families that have been shown to exhibit shape memory properties the ones based on copper are interesting because they are relatively inexpensive and show excellent properties when made as single crystals. However, the performance ofthese alloys is severely compromised by the introduction of grain boundaries, to the point where they are too poor for commercial applications. This thesis studies the mechanical properties of fine Cobased wires with a bamboo microstructure, i.e., where triple junctions are absent and grain boundaries run perpendicular to the wire axis. These microwires are not single crystals, but their microstructure is not as complex as that of polycrystals either: we call this new class of shape memory alloys oligocrystals. This thesis seeks to better understand the relationship between microstructure and properties in these alloys through a combination of mechanical testing, in situ experiments and modeling. First, in situ scanning electron microscopy, together with finite element modeling, is used to understand the role of grain constraint on the martensitic transformation. Grain constraints are observed to be much less severe in oligocrystalline wires as compared to polycrystals. Oligocrystalline microwires are then thermomechanically tested and shown to exhibit excellent properties that approach those of single crystals. Next, property evolution during cycling is investigated, revealing training effects as well as fatigue life and fracture. Finally, size effects in damping and transformation morphology are studied and it is shown that a transition from a many-domain to a single domain martensite morphology takes place when the wire diameter is decreased. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  1. Development of Superelastic Effect in Ferrous Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Scott

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) with high levels of superelasticity are used where there is a need for the application of large levels of force, or high damping. Current commercially available SMAs require expensive fabrication and lack sufficient ductility for many applications. There is a need for a superelastic material with better properties and easier processing. Y. Tanaka et al. have developed a novel iron based shape memory alloy, NCATB. This alloy still requires complex thermomechanical processing, and does not utilize lessons learned in optimizing Nitinol. To develop the properties of this alloy, it was synthesized in lab from its constituent elements, and thermomechanically processed. Samples were prepared for analysis using conventional metallographic techniques, and investigated with light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and mechanical testing. The recrystallization following cold rolling, as well as aging heat treatments, were determined to be critical to increasing the hardness of the NCATB. Overall, smaller grains and longer aging times increased the hardness. The as-cast microstructure exhibits significant tantalum segregation along the dendrite boundaries. Incomplete homogenization of the as-cast microstructure leads to a propensity for a Tarich phase to form along subsequent recrystallized grain boundaries. This phase lead to alloy embrittlement, preventing the NCATB as processed from having the desired superelasticity. An additional high temperature thermomechanical treatment following casting solutionized the tantalum from the dendrite boundaries, and further improved the NCATB hardenability.

  2. Fuel Rod Melt Progression Simulation Using Low-Temperature Melting Metal Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Seung Dong Lee; Suh, Kune Y.; GoonCherl Park; Un Chul Lee

    2002-07-01

    The TMI-2 accident and various severe fuel damage experiments have shown that core damage is likely to proceed through various states before the core slumps into the lower head. Numerous experiments were conducted to address when and how the core can lose its original geometry, what geometries are formed, and in what processes the core materials are transported to the lower plenum of the reactor pressure vessel. Core degradation progresses along the line of clad ballooning, clad oxidation, material interaction, metallic blockage, molten pool formation, melt progression, and relocation to the lower head. Relocation into the lower plenum may occur from the lateral periphery or from the bottom of the core depending upon the thermal and physical states of the pool. Determining the quantities and rate of molten material transfer to the lower head is important since significant amounts of molten material relocated to the lower head can threaten the vessel integrity by steam explosion and thermal and mechanical attack of the melt. In this paper the focus is placed on the melt flow regime on a cylindrical fuel rod utilizing the LAMDA (Lumped Analysis of Melting in Degrading Assemblies) facility at the Seoul National University. The downward relocation of the molten material is a combination of the external film flow and the internal pipe flow. The heater rods are 0.8 m long and are coated by a low-temperature melting metal alloy. The electrical internal heating method is employed during the test. External heating is adopted to simulate the exothermic Zircaloy-steam reaction. Tests are conducted in several quasi-steady-state conditions. Given the variable boundary conditions including the heat flux and the water level, observation is made for the melting location, progression, and the mass of molten material. Finally, the core melt progression model is developed from the visual inspection and quantitative analysis of the experimental data. As the core material relocates

  3. Shape memory in nanostructured metallic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda Vishnu, Karthik

    Materials with nanoscale dimensions show mechanical and structural properties different to those at the macro scale and engineering their nanostructure opens up potential avenues for designing materials tailored for a specific application. This work is focused on shape memory materials, an important class of active materials with wide variety of applications in medical, aerospace and automobile industries, due to their two important properties of super-elasticity and shape memory. These unique properties originate from a solid-solid transformation called martensite transformation and the main objectives of this research are to i) study the atomic mechanisms of the martensite transformation, ii) study the effect of nano-structure on shape memory behavior and iii) computationally explore avenues through which their performance is optimized. A combination of density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is used to achieve this. This approach gives an atomic level description and the effects of size, surfaces and interfaces are explicitly described. Detailed analysis of the atomic mechanisms of the martensite transformation in NiTi using DFT revealed a new phase transformation (B19'-B19'') that sheds light on why the theoretically predicted ground state (BCO) is not observed experimentally and that the experimentally observed martensite phase (B19') can be stabilized by internal stresses. This finding is very important as the theoretically predicted ground state does not allow for shape memory in nanoscale NiTi samples. The size effects caused by the presence of free surfaces and the role of nanostructure in martensite transformation have been investigated in thin NiTi slabs. Surface energies of B2 phase (austenite), B19 (orthorhombic), B19' (martensite) and the body centered orthorhombic phase (BCO) are calculated using DFT. (110)B2 surfaces with in-plane atomic displacements stabilize the austenite phase with respect to B19' and BCO, thus

  4. Three-Dimensional Cellular Structures Enhanced By Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, Michael V.; Krause, David L.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Baker, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    This research effort explored lightweight structural concepts married with advanced smart materials to achieve a wide variety of benefits in airframe and engine components. Lattice block structures were cast from an aerospace structural titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V and a NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA), and preliminary properties have been measured. A finite element-based modeling approach that can rapidly and accurately capture the deformation response of lattice architectures was developed. The Ti-6-4 and SMA material behavior was calibrated via experimental tests of ligaments machined from the lattice. Benchmark testing of complete lattice structures verified the main aspects of the model as well as demonstrated the advantages of the lattice structure. Shape memory behavior of a sample machined from a lattice block was also demonstrated.

  5. Low Temperature Shape Memory Alloys for Adaptive, Autonomous Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Benafan, Othmane; Fesmire, James

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this joint activity between Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) is to develop and evaluate the applicability of 2-way SMAs in proof-of-concept, low-temperature adaptive autonomous systems. As part of this low technology readiness (TRL) activity, we will develop and train low-temperature novel, 2-way shape memory alloys (SMAs) with actuation temperatures ranging from 0 C to 150 C. These experimental alloys will also be preliminary tested to evaluate their performance parameters and transformation (actuation) temperatures in low- temperature or cryogenic adaptive proof-of-concept systems. The challenge will be in the development, design, and training of the alloys for 2-way actuation at those temperatures.

  6. 76 FR 34044 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Extension of Time Limits for the Preliminary...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... Countervailing Duty Administrative Reviews, 75 FR 73036 (November 29, 2010) (``Initiation Notice''). The..., 70 FR 24533 (May 10, 2005). The final results continue to be due 120 days after the publication of... International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Extension of Time...

  7. 78 FR 28190 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico, 67 FR 55800 (August 30, 2002). Notification to Importers This... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2010- 2011, 77 FR 66954 (November 8, 2012) (Preliminary Results... Ukraine, 67 FR 65945 (October 29, 2002), remains dispositive. On October 1, 2012, the Department...

  8. 77 FR 13545 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... Antidumping Duty Administrative Review 76 FR 67407 (November 1, 2011) (Preliminary Results). \\2\\ We determined... Changed Circumstances Review: Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod from Mexico, 76 FR 45509 (July 29... Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003) (Assessment...

  9. 76 FR 16607 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Notice of Partial Rescission of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce....

  10. 78 FR 76653 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... reviews were such that full reviews pursuant to section 751(c)(5) of the Act should proceed (78 FR 60316... Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Brazil, Indonesia, Mexico, Moldova, Trinidad and Tobago, and Ukraine Scheduling of full five-year reviews concerning the countervailing duty order on carbon and certain...

  11. Thermally activated retainer means utilizing shape memory alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); Hartz, Leslie S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A retainer member suitable for retaining a gap filler placed in gaps between adjacent tile members is presented. One edge of the retainer member may be attached to the gap filler and another edge may be provided with a plurality of tab members which in an intermediate position do not interfere with placement or removal of the gap filler between tile members. The retainer member may be fabricated from a shape memory alloy which when heated to a specified memory temperature will thermally activate the tab members to predetermined memory positions engaging the tile members to retain the gap filler in the gap. This invention has particular application to the thermal tiles on space vehicles such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  12. Ricochet of a tungsten heavy alloy long-rod projectile from deformable steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Woong; Lee, Heon-Joo; Shin, Hyunho

    2002-10-01

    Ricochet of a tungsten heavy alloy long-rod projectile from oblique steel plates with a finite thickness was investigated numerically using a full three-dimensional explicit finite element method. Three distinctive regimes resulting from oblique impact depending on the obliquity, namely simple ricochet, critical ricochet and target perforation, were investigated in detail. Critical ricochet angles were calculated for various impact velocities and strengths of the target plates. It was predicted that critical ricochet angle increases with decreasing impact velocities and that higher ricochet angles were expected if higher strength target materials are employed. Numerical predictions were compared with existing two-dimensional analytical models. Experiments were also carried out and the results supported the predictions of the numerical analysis.

  13. Solid state engine using nitinol memory alloy

    DOEpatents

    Golestaneh, Ahmad A.

    1981-01-01

    A device for converting heat energy to mechanical energy includes a reservoir of a hot fluid and a rotor assembly mounted thereabove so a portion of it dips into the hot fluid. The rotor assembly may include a shaft having four spokes extending radially outwardly therefrom at right angles to each other, a floating ring and four flexible elements composed of a thermal memory material having a critical temperature between the temperature of the hot fluid and that of the ambient atmosphere extending between the ends of the spokes and the floating ring. Preferably, the flexible elements are attached to the floating ring through curved leaf springs. Energetic shape recovery of the flexible elements in the hot fluid causes the rotor assembly to rotate.

  14. Solid state engine using nitinol memory alloy

    DOEpatents

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1980-01-21

    A device for converting heat energy to mechanical energy includes a reservoir of a hot fluid and a rotor assembly mounted thereabove so a portion of it dips into the hot fluid. The rotor assembly may include a shaft having four spokes extending radially outwardly therefrom at right angles to each other, a floating ring and four flexible elements composed of a thermal memory material having a critical temperature between the temperature of the hot fluid and that of the ambient atmosphere extending between the ends of the spokes and the floating ring. Preferably, the flexible elements are attached to the floating ring through curved leaf springs. Energetic shape recovery of the flexible elements in the hot fluid causes the rotor assembly to rotate.

  15. Shape memory alloy seals for geothermal applications

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-15

    A shape memory radial seal was fabricated with a ''U'' cross section. Upon heating the seal recovered its original ''V'' shape and produced a high pressure seal. The sealing pressure which can be developed is approximately 41 MPa (60,000 psi), well in excess of the pressure which can be produced in conventional elastomeric seals. The low modulus martensite can conform readily to the sealing surface, and upon recovery produce a seal capable of high pressure fluid or gas confinement. The corrosion resistance of nickel-titanium in a broad range of aggressive fluids has been well established and, as such, there is little doubt that, had time permitted, a geothermal pump of flange fluid tried would have been successful.

  16. Solid state engine using Nitinol memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1981-12-01

    A device for converting heat energy to mechanical energy includes a reservoir of a hot fluid and a rotor assembly mounted thereabove so a portion of it dips into the hot fluid. The rotor assembly may include a shaft having four spokes extending radially outwardly therefrom at right angles to each other, a floating ring and four flexible elements composed of a thermal memory material having a critical temperature between the temperature of the hot fluid and that of the ambient atmosphere extending between the ends of the spokes and the floating ring. Preferably, the flexible elements are attached to the floating ring through curved leaf springs. Energetic shape recovery of the flexible elements in the hot fluid causes the rotor assembly to rotate.

  17. Experimental Evaluation of a Device Prototype Based on Shape Memory Alloys for the Retrofit of Historical Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, Donatello; Sofia, Salvatore

    2012-12-01

    Metallic tie-rods are currently used in many historical buildings for absorbing the out-of-plane horizontal forces of arches, vaults and roof trusses, despite they exhibit several limitations under service and seismic conditions. In this paper, a post-tensioned system based on the superelastic properties of Ni-Ti shape memory alloys is proposed for improving the structural performances of traditional metallic tie-rods. First, the thermal behavior under service conditions is investigated based on the results of numerical and experimental studies. Subsequently, the seismic performances under strong earthquakes are verified trough a number of shaking table tests on a 1:4-scale timber roof truss model. The outcomes of these studies fully confirm the achievement of the design objectives of the proposed prototype device.

  18. Precipitate Phases in Several High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan

    Initiated by the aerospace industry, there has been a great interest to develop high temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) for actuator type of application at elevated temperatures. Several NiTi based ternary systems have been shown to be potential candidates for HTSMAs and this work focuses on one or more alloys in the TiNiPt, TiNiPd, NiTiHf, NiPdTiHf systems. The sheer scope of alloys of varying compositions across all four systems suggests that the questions raised and addressed in this work are just the tip of the iceberg. This work focuses on materials characterization and aims to investigate microstructural evolution of these alloys as a function of heat treatment. The information gained through the study can serve as guidance for future alloy processing. The emphasis of this work is to describe novel precipitate phases that are formed under aging in the ternary systems and one quaternary system. Employing conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), 3D atom probe tomography (3D APT), as well as ab initio calculations, the complete description of the unit cell for the new precipitates was determined. The methodology is summarized in the appendix to help elucidate some basics of such a process.

  19. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  20. Texture memory and strain-texture mapping in a NiTi shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, B.; Majumdar, B. S.; Dutta, I.

    2007-08-06

    The authors report on the near-reversible strain hysteresis during thermal cycling of a polycrystalline NiTi shape memory alloy at a constant stress that is below the yield strength of the martensite. In situ neutron diffraction experiments are used to demonstrate that the strain hysteresis occurs due to a texture memory effect, where the martensite develops a texture when it is cooled under load from the austenite phase and is thereafter ''remembered.'' Further, the authors quantitatively relate the texture to the strain by developing a calculated strain-texture map or pole figure for the martensite phase, and indicate its applicability in other martensitic transformations.

  1. Powder metallurgy technology of NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutkiewicz, J. M.; Maziarz, W.; Czeppe, T.; Lityńska, L.; Nowacki, W. K.; Gadaj, S. P.; Luckner, J.; Pieczyska, E. A.

    2008-05-01

    Powder metallurgy technology was elaborated for consolidation of shape memory NiTi powders. The shape memory alloy was compacted from the prealloyed powder delivered by Memry SA. The powder shows Ms = 10°C and As = -34°C as results from DSC measurements. The samples were hot pressed in the as delivered spherical particle's state. The hot compaction was performed in a specially constructed vacuum press, at temperature of 680°C and pressure of 400 MPa. The alloy powder was encapsulated in copper capsules prior to hot pressing to avoid oxidation or carbides formation. The alloy after hot vacuum compaction at 680°C (i.e. within the B2 NiTi stability range) has shown similar transformation range as the powder. The porosity of samples compacted in the as delivered state was only 1%. The samples tested in compression up to ɛ = 0.06 have shown partial superelastic effect due to martensitic reversible transform- ation which started at the stress above 300 MPa and returned back to ɛ = 0.015 after unloading. They have shown also a high ultimate compression strength of 1600 MPa. Measurements of the samples temperature changes during the process allowed to detect the temperature increase above 12°C for the strain rate 10-2 s-1 accompanied the exothermic martensite transformation during loading and the temperature decrease related to the reverse endothermic transformation during unloading.

  2. Shakedown response of conditioned shape memory alloy wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchill, Christopher B.; Shaw, John A.

    2008-03-01

    A series of experiments is presented examining the thermo-electro-mechanical response of commercially-available, conditioned, shape memory alloy (SMA) wires (Flexinol, from Dynalloy, Corp.) during cyclic thermomechanical loading. A specialized experimental setup enables temperature control via a thermoelectric/heatsink in thermal contact with the wire specimen during various modes of testing. It allows simultaneous measurement of elongation, load, strain and resistivity in a selected gage length. It also allows full-field optical and infrared imaging to be performed during testing. A moderately high transition temperature NiTi-based shape memory wire (90C Flexinol) is characterized first by differential scanning calorimetry and a series of isothermal experiments over a range of temperatures. Subsequent experiments examine the shakedown behavior over a range of dead loading temperature cycles. Results show a significant two-way shape memory effect, suggesting that both residual stresses and locked-in oriented Martensite are considerable in this commercial alloy. Repeatable behavior (little shakedown) is confirmed at relatively low stress levels, but significant evolution in the response (shakedown behavior) exists at higher stress levels during the first several temperature cycles.

  3. Novel tribological systems using shape memory alloys and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yijun

    Shape memory alloys and thin films are shown to have robust indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects. Loading conditions that are similar to indentations are very common in tribological systems. Therefore novel tribological systems that have better wear resistance and stronger coating to substrate adhesion can be engineered using indentation-induced shape memory and superelastic effects. By incorporating superelastic NiTi thin films as interlayers between chromium nitride (CrN) and diamond-like carbon (DLC) hard coatings and aluminum substrates, it is shown that the superelasticity can improve tribological performance and increase interfacial adhesion. The NiTi interlayers were sputter deposited onto 6061 T6 aluminum and M2 steel substrates. CrN and DLC coatings were deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition. Temperature scanning X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation were used to characterize NiTi interlayers. Temperature scanning wear and scratch tests showed that superelastic NiTi interlayers improved tribological performance on aluminum substrates significantly. The two-way shape memory effect under contact loading conditions is demonstrated for the first time, which could be used to make novel tribological systems. Spherical indents in NiTi shape memory alloys and thin films had reversible depth changes that were driven by temperature cycling, after thermomechanical cycling, or one-cycle slip-plasticity deformation training. Reversible surface topography was realized after the indents were planarized. Micro- and nano- scale circular surface protrusions arose from planarized spherical indents in bulk and thin film NiTi alloy; line surface protrusions appeared from planarized scratch tracks. Functional surfaces with reversible surface topography can potentially result in novel tribological systems with reversible friction coefficient. A three dimensional constitutive model was developed to describe shape memory effects with slip

  4. Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Design: CASMART Collaborative Best Practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, Othmane; Brown, Jeff; Calkins, F. Tad; Kumar, Parikshith; Stebner, Aaron; Turner, Travis; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Webster, John; Young, Marcus L.

    2011-01-01

    Upon examination of shape memory alloy (SMA) actuation designs, there are many considerations and methodologies that are common to them all. A goal of CASMART's design working group is to compile the collective experiences of CASMART's member organizations into a single medium that engineers can then use to make the best decisions regarding SMA system design. In this paper, a review of recent work toward this goal is presented, spanning a wide range of design aspects including evaluation, properties, testing, modeling, alloy selection, fabrication, actuator processing, design optimization, controls, and system integration. We have documented each aspect, based on our collective experiences, so that the design engineer may access the tools and information needed to successfully design and develop SMA systems. Through comparison of several case studies, it is shown that there is not an obvious single, linear route a designer can adopt to navigate the path of concept to product. SMA engineering aspects will have different priorities and emphasis for different applications.

  5. New developments in actuator materials as reflected in magnetically controlled shape memory alloys and high-strength shape memory steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullakko, Kari; Yakovenko, Peter G.; Gavriljuk, Valentin G.

    1996-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are applied as actuator materials in smart structures and in fastening and pre-stressing devices. Shape memory alloys can be divided into three groups: one-way alloys, two-way alloys and magnetically controlled SMAs. The magnetically controlled SMAs recently suggested by one of the present authors are potential actuator materials for smart structures because they may provide rapid strokes with large amplitudes under precise control. The most extensively applied conventional SMAs are Ni-Ti and Cu- based alloys. Iron-based shape memory alloys, especially Fe-Mn-Si steels, are becoming more and more important in engineering applications due to their low price. The properties of Fe- Mn-Si steels have been improved by alloying, for example, with Cr, Ni and Co. Nitrogen alloying was shown to significantly improve shape memory, mechanical and corrosion properties of Fe-Mn-Si-based steels. Tensile strengths over 1500 MPa, recovery stresses of 300 MPa and recoverable strains of 4% have been attained. In fasteners made from these steels, stresses of 700 MPa were reached. The beneficial effect of nitrogen alloying on shape memory and mechanical properties is based on the decrease of stacking fault energy and increase of the strength of austenite caused by nitrogen atoms. Nitrogen alloyed Fe-Mn-Si- based steels are expected to be employed as actuator materials in pre-stressing and fastening applications in many fields of engineering. Nitrogen alloyed shape memory steels possess good manufacturing properties and weldability, and they are economical to process using conventional industrial methods.

  6. Characterization of shape memory alloys for safety mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin, Jarred T.; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Massad, Jordan Elias

    2008-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are metals that exhibit large recoverable strains and exert large forces with tremendous energy densities. The behavior of SMAs is thermomechanically coupled. Their response to temperature is sensitive to their loading condition and their response to loading is sensitive to their thermal condition. This coupled behavior is not to be circumvented, but to be confronted and understood, since it is what manifests SMA's superior clamping performance. To reasonably characterize the coupled behavior of SMA clamping rings used in safety mechanisms, we conduct a series of experiments on SMA samples. The results of the tests will allow increased fidelity in modeling and failure analysis of parts.

  7. Memory alloy heat engine and method of operation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Alfred Davis

    1977-01-01

    A heat engine and method of operation employing an alloy having a shape memory effect. A memory alloy element such as one or more wire loops are cyclically moved through a heat source, along a path toward a heat sink, through the heat sink and then along another path in counter-flow heat exchange relationship with the wire in the first path. The portion of the wire along the first path is caused to elongate to its trained length under minimum tension as it is cooled. The portion of the wire along the second path is caused to contract under maximum tension as it is heated. The resultant tension differential between the wires in the two paths is applied as a force through a distance to produce mechanical work. In one embodiment a first set of endless memory alloy wires are reeved in non-slip engagement between a pair of pulleys which are mounted for conjoint rotation within respective hot and cold reservoirs. Another set of endless memory alloy wires are reeved in non-slip engagement about another pair of pulleys which are mounted in the respective hot and cold reservoirs. The pulleys in the cold reservoir are of a larger diameter than those in the hot reservoir and the opposite reaches of the wires between the two sets of pulleys extend in closely spaced-apart relationship in counter-flow heat regenerator zones. The pulleys are turned to move the two sets of wires in opposite directions. The wires are stretched as they are cooled upon movement through the heat regenerator toward the cold reservoirs, and the wires contract as they are heated upon movement through the regenerator zones toward the hot reservoir. This contraction of wires exerts a larger torque on the greater diameter pulleys for turning the pulleys and supplying mechanical power. Means is provided for applying a variable tension to the wires. Phase change means is provided for controlling the angular phase of the pulleys of each set for purposes of start up procedure as well as for optimizing engine

  8. Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

    DOEpatents

    Browne, Alan L; Johnson, Nancy L; Keefe, Andrew C; Alexander, Paul W; Sarosi, Peter Maxwell; Herrera, Guillermo A; Yates, James Ryan

    2013-12-17

    A heat engine includes a first rotatable pulley and a second rotatable pulled spaced from the first rotatable pulley. A shape memory alloy (SMA) element is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at an SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element includes first spring coil and a first fiber core within the first spring coil. A timing cable is disposed about disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at a timing pulley ratio, which is different than the SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element converts a thermal energy gradient between the hot region and the cold region into mechanical energy.

  9. Applications of the directional solidification in magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. J.; Liu, J.; Hu, Q. D.; Liu, Q. H.; Karaman, I.; Li, J. G.

    2016-03-01

    A zone melting liquid metal cooling (ZMLMC) method of directional solidification was applied to prepare highly-oriented Ni52Fe17Ga27Co4 magnetic shape memory alloys. At high temperature gradient and low growth velocity, the well-developed preferred orientation for coarse columnar crystals was obtained. Such a structure leads to a large complete pseudoelastic recovery of 5% at 348 K. Moreover, the pseudoelastic behaviours and the kinetics of the martensitic transformation (MT) are significantly affected by the intersection angle between the loading direction and the grain boundaries.

  10. Novel shape memory alloy optical fibre connection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouillard, G.; Zivojinovic, P.; Cerutti, R.; Godmaire, X. Pruneau; Weynant, E.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, the capacity and quality of a shape memory alloy device is demonstrated for installation and connection of 125-μm to 1000-μm optical fibres. The new mechanical splice has the particularity of using a very simple tool for aligning and holding the cladding of fibres itself without the need of glue. Optimend main characteristics are its small dimensions (few millimetres), reusability, glueless, ruggedness, low temperature variation, heat dissipation and ease of use. These properties are very suitable for many optical fibre applications where both quick and reliable connections are desirable.

  11. Applications of memory alloy stent in vertebral fractures

    PubMed Central

    Yimin, Yang; Zhi, Zhang; ZhiWei, Ren; Wei, Ma; Jha, Rajiv Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of treating vertebral compression fractures using an autonomously developed nitinol memory alloy vertebral stent. Material/Methods Thoracolumbar vertebral specimens from adult human cadavers were made into models of compression fractures. The models were divided into group A, which received percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP), balloon dilation, and nitinol memory alloy vertebral stent implantation (PKP + nitinol stent group); group B, which received percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) and direct implantation of a nitinol memory alloy vertebral stent (PVP + nitinol stent group); and group C, which received PKP, balloon dilation, and bone cement vertebroplasty (PKP + polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) group). Vertebral heights were measured before and after the surgery and the water bath incubation to compare the impact of the 3 different surgical approaches on reducing vertebral compression. Results The 3 surgical groups could all significantly restore the heights of compressed vertebral bodies. The vertebral heights of the PKP + nitinol stent group, PVP + nitinol stent group, and PKP + PMMA group were changed from the preoperative levels of (1.59±0.08) cm, (1.68±0.08) cm, and (1.66±0.11) cm to the postoperative levels of (2.00±0.09) cm, (1.87±0.04) cm, and (1.99±0.09) cm, respectively. After the water bath, the vertebral heights of each group were changed to (2.10±0.07) cm, (1.98±0.09) cm, and (2.00±0.10) cm, respectively. Pairwise comparison of the differences between the preoperative and postoperative vertebral heights showed that group A and group B differed significantly (P=0.000); group B and group C differed significantly (P=0.003); and group A and group C had no significant difference (P=0.172). Pairwise comparison of the differences in the vertebral heights before and after the water bath showed that group A and group C differed significantly (P=0.000); group B and group C differed significantly

  12. Fabrication of silicon-based shape memory alloy micro-actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. David; Busch, John D.; Ray, Curtis A.; Sloan, Charles L.

    1992-01-01

    Thin film shape memory alloy has been integrated with silicon in a new actuation mechanism for microelectromechanical systems. This paper compares nickel-titanium film with other actuators, describes recent results of chemical milling processes developed to fabricate shape memory alloy microactuators in silicon, and describes simple actuation mechanisms which have been fabricated and tested.

  13. Shape memory effect and superelasticity of titanium nickelide alloys implanted with high ion doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogrebnjak, A. D.; Bratushka, S. N.; Beresnev, V. M.; Levintant-Zayonts, N.

    2013-12-01

    The state of the art in ion implantation of superelastic NiTi shape memory alloys is analyzed. Various technological applications of the shape memory effect are outlined. The principles and techiques of ion implantation are described. Specific features of its application for modification of surface layers in surface engineering are considered. Key properties of shape memory alloys and problems in utilization of ion implantation to improve the surface properties of shape memory alloys, such as corrosion resistance, friction coefficient, wear resistance, etc. are discussed. The bibliography includes 162 references.

  14. Thermal response of novel shape memory polymer-shape memory alloy hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Takashima, Kazuto; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2014-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) and shape memory alloys (SMA) have both been proven important smart materials in their own fields. Shape memory polymers can be formed into complex three-dimensional structures and can undergo shape programming and large strain recovery. These are especially important for deployable structures including those for space applications and micro-structures such as stents. Shape memory alloys on the other hand are readily exploitable in a range of applications where simple, silent, light-weight and low-cost repeatable actuation is required. These include servos, valves and mobile robotic artificial muscles. Despite their differences, one important commonality between SMPs and SMAs is that they are both typically activated by thermal energy. Given this common characteristic it is important to consider how these two will behave when in close environmental proximity, and hence exposed to the same thermal stimulus, and when they are incorporated into a hybrid SMA-SMP structure. In this paper we propose and examine the operation of SMA-SMP hybrids. The relationship between the two temperatures Tg, the glass transition temperature of the polymer, and Ta, the nominal austenite to martensite transition temperature of the alloy is considered. We examine how the choice of these two temperatures affects the thermal response of the hybrid. Electrical stimulation of the SMA is also considered as a method not only of actuating the SMA but also of inducing heating in the surrounding polymer, with consequent effects on actuator behaviour. Likewise by varying the rate and degree of thermal stimulation of the SMA significantly different actuation and structural stiffness can be achieved. Novel SMP-SMA hybrid actuators and structures have many ready applications in deployable structures, robotics and tuneable engineering systems.

  15. A Shape Memory Alloy Based Cryogenic Thermal Conduction Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, W. U.; Krishnan, V. B.; Singh, J. D.; Woodruff, T. R.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) can produce large strains when deformed (e.g., up to 8%). Heating results in a phase transformation and associated recovery of all the accumulated strain. This strain recovery can occur against large forces, resulting in their use as actuators. Thus an SMA element can integrate both sensory and actuation functions, by inherently sensing a change in temperature and actuating by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. Two aspects of our work on cryogenic SMAs are addressed here. First - a shape memory alloy based cryogenic thermal conduction switch for operation between dewars of liquid methane and liquid oxygen in a common bulkhead arrangement is discussed. Such a switch integrates the sensor element and the actuator element and can be used to create a variable thermal sink to other cryogenic tanks for liquefaction, densification, and zero boil-off systems for advanced spaceport applications. Second - fabrication via arc-melting and subsequent materials testing of SMAs with cryogenic transformation temperatures for use in the aforementioned switch is discussed.

  16. Strategies for Self-Repairing Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbein, Sven; Czechowicz, Alexander Jaroslaw; Meier, Horst

    2011-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are thermally activated smart materials. Due to their ability to change into a previously imprinted actual shape by the means of thermal activation, they are suitable as actuators for microsystems and, within certain limitations, macroscopic systems. A commonly used shape memory actuator type is an alloy of nickel and titanium (NiTi), which starts to transform its inner phase from martensitic to austenitic structure at a certain austenite start temperature. Retransformation starts at martensitic start temperature after running a hysteresis cycle. Most SMA-systems use straight wire actuators because of their simple integration, the occurring cost reduction and the resulting miniaturization. Unfortunately, SMA-actuators are only seldom used by constructors and system developers. This is due to occurring functional fatigue effects which depend on boundary conditions like system loads, strains, and number of cycles. The actuating stroke does not reduce essentially during the first thousand cycles. Striking is the elongation of the wire while maintaining the stroke during cycling (walking). In order to create a system which adjusts and repairs itself, different concepts to solve this problem are presented. They vary from smart control methods to constructive solutions with calibration systems. The systems are analyzed due to their effective, life cycle, and system costs showing outstanding advantages in comparison to commonly used SMA actuators.

  17. Fatigue Crack Growth Fundamentals in Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Ojha, A.; Patriarca, L.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, based on a regression of the crack tip displacements, the stress intensity range in fatigue is quantitatively determined for the shape memory alloy Ni2FeGa. The results are compared to the calculated stress intensity ranges with a micro-mechanical analysis accounting for the transformation-induced tractions. The effective stress intensity ranges obtained with both methods are in close agreement. Also, the fatigue crack closure levels were measured as 30 % of the maximum load using virtual extensometers along the crack flanks. This result is also in close agreement with the regression and micro-mechanical modeling findings. The current work pointed to the importance of elastic moduli changes and the residual transformation strains playing a role in the fatigue crack growth behavior. Additional simulations are conducted for two other important shape memory alloys, NiTi and CuZnAl, where the reductions in stress intensity range were found to be lower than Ni2FeGa.

  18. A Shape Memory Alloy Based Cryogenic Thermal Conduction Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, V. B.; Singh, J. D.; Woodruff, T. R.; Notardonato, W. U.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2004-06-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) can produce large strains when deformed (e.g., up to 8%). Heating results in a phase transformation and associated recovery of all the accumulated strain. This strain recovery can occur against large forces, resulting in their use as actuators. Thus an SMA element can integrate both sensory and actuation functions, by inherently sensing a change in temperature and actuating by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. Two aspects of our work on cryogenic SMAs are addressed here. First — a shape memory alloy based cryogenic thermal conduction switch for operation between dewars of liquid methane and liquid oxygen in a common bulkhead arrangement is discussed. Such a switch integrates the sensor element and the actuator element and can be used to create a variable thermal sink to other cryogenic tanks for liquefaction, densification, and zero boil-off systems for advanced spaceport applications. Second — fabrication via arc-melting and subsequent materials testing of SMAs with cryogenic transformation temperatures for use in the aforementioned switch is discussed.

  19. Manufacturing of high-strength Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloy rods via cold swaging.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kuramoto, Koji; Chiba, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    The strengthening of biomedical metallic materials is crucial to increasing component durability in biomedical applications. In this study, we employ cold swaging as a strengthening method for Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloy rods and examine its effect on the resultant microstructures and mechanical properties. N is added to the alloy to improve the cold deformability, and a maximum reduction in area (r) of 42.6% is successfully obtained via cold swaging. The rod strength and ductility increase and decrease, respectively, with increasing cold-swaging reduction r. Further, the 0.2% proof stress at r=42.6% eventually reaches 1900MPa, which is superior to that obtained for the other strengthening methods proposed to date. Such significant strengthening resulting from the cold-swaging process may be derived from extremely large work hardening due to a strain-induced γ (fcc)→ε (hcp) martensitic transformation, with the resultant intersecting ε-martensite plates causing local strain accumulation at the interfaces. The lattice defects (dislocations/stacking faults) inside the ε phase also likely contribute to the overall strength. However, excessive application of strain during the cold-swaging process results in a severe loss in ductility. The feasibility of cold swaging for the manufacture of high-strength Co-Cr-Mo alloy rods is discussed. PMID:26773647

  20. Simulation of the electron diffraction patterns from needle/rod-like precipitates in Al-Mg-Si alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Li Kai; Song Min; Du Yong; Zhang Hong

    2011-09-15

    The origin of the selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns from needle/rod-like metastable precipitates embedded in {alpha}-Al matrix in Al-Mg-Si alloys have been studied via an example of {beta}'' phase. In addition, the SAED pattern from {beta}'' phase has been simulated with significant improvement in comparison with the previous simulations. Three important factors, i.e. the 12 crystallographically equivalent variants of {beta}'' phase in the {alpha}-Al matrix due to the highly symmetric f.c.c. structure of {alpha}-Al, the coherence between {beta}'' phase and the {alpha}-Al matrix, and the double diffractions from the {alpha}-Al matrix and {beta}'' phase, are proved to contribute to the special square-shaped features in the SAED patterns from {beta}'' phase and thus fully taken into account in the simulation. An improved but simplified method for simulating the SAED patterns from needle/rod-like metastable precipitates has been developed. This method is further verified by simulating the SAED pattern from Q phase. The simulated SAED patterns from both {beta}'' and Q phases fit the experimentally determined patterns very well. - Highlights: {yields}An improved method has been developed to simulate the SADPs of Al alloys. {yields}The formation mechanism of SADPs of Al alloys has been systemically studied. {yields}Double diffraction contributes to the formation of the SADPs of Al alloys.

  1. Radioactive material package closures with the use of shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J.A.; Bronowski, D.R.

    1997-11-01

    When heated from room temperature to 165 C, some shape memory metal alloys such as titanium-nickel alloys have the ability to return to a previously defined shape or size with dimensional changes up to 7%. In contrast, the thermal expansion of most metals over this temperature range is about 0.1 to 0.2%. The dimension change of shape memory alloys, which occurs during a martensite to austenite phase transition, can generate stresses as high as 700 MPa (100 kspi). These properties can be used to create a closure for radioactive materials packages that provides for easy robotic or manual operations and results in reproducible, tamper-proof seals. This paper describes some proposed closure methods with shape memory alloys for radioactive material packages. Properties of the shape memory alloys are first summarized, then some possible alternative sealing methods discussed, and, finally, results from an initial proof-of-concept experiment described.

  2. Thermopower behavior for the shape memory alloy NiTi

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J. Y.; McIntosh, G. C.; Kaiser, A. B.; Park, Y. W.; Kaack, M.; Pelzl, J.; Kim, Chul Koo; Nahm, Kyun

    2001-06-01

    We report thermopower measurements for the nickel titanium shape memory alloy Ni{sub 0.507}Ti{sub 0.493}. Our measurements reveal abrupt changes in the temperature dependence of thermopower, which correlate well with the structural phase transition between the austenitic and martensitic phases. These transition effects in thermopower are more clearly defined than in the resistivity, which is also reported. In the martensitic phase, thermopower exhibits standard metallic diffusion behavior with a nonlinearity, which is consistent with either a small peak in the density of states just below the Fermi level, as calculated by Kulkova, Egorushkin, and Kalchikhin [Solid State Commun. 77, 667 (1991)], or else electron{endash}phonon mass enhancement. For thermally or mechanically treated samples, the magnitude of the transition effects in thermopower are reduced. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Stable crack growth during actuation in shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jape, Sameer; Baxevanis, Theocharis; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2014-03-01

    A finite element analysis of crack growth is carried out in an in nite center-cracked shape memory alloy plate subjected to thermal variations under plane strain mode I constant applied loading. Crack is assumed to propagate when the energy release rate reaches a material specific critical value. The virtual crack growth technique is employed to calculate the energy release rate, which was shown to increase an order of magnitude at constant applied loading as a result of phase transformation induced by thermal variations.1 A fracture toughening is observed associated with the energy dissipated by the transformed material in the wake of the growing crack and its sensitivity over key thermomechanical parameters is presented.

  4. Numerical modeling of shape memory alloy linear actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jani, Jaronie Mohd; Huang, Sunan; Leary, Martin; Subic, Aleksandar

    2015-09-01

    The demand for shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators in high-technology applications is increasing; however, there exist technical challenges to the commercial application of SMA actuator technologies, especially associated with actuation duration. Excessive activation duration results in actuator damage due to overheating while excessive deactivation duration is not practical for high-frequency applications. Analytical and finite difference equation models were developed in this work to predict the activation and deactivation durations and associated SMA thermomechanical behavior under variable environmental and design conditions. Relevant factors, including latent heat effect, induced stress and material property variability are accommodated. An existing constitutive model was integrated into the proposed models to generate custom SMA stress-strain curves. Strong agreement was achieved between the proposed numerical models and experimental results; confirming their applicability for predicting the behavior of SMA actuators with variable thermomechanical conditions.

  5. Shape memory alloy heat engines and energy harvesting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, Alan L; Johnson, Nancy L; Shaw, John Andrew; Churchill, Christopher Burton; Keefe, Andrew C; McKnight, Geoffrey P; Alexander, Paul W; Herrera, Guillermo A; Yates, James Ryan; Brown, Jeffrey W

    2014-09-30

    A heat engine includes a first rotatable pulley and a second rotatable pulley spaced from the first rotatable pulley. A shape memory alloy (SMA) element is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at an SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element includes a first wire, a second wire, and a matrix joining the first wire and the second wire. The first wire and the second wire are in contact with the pulleys, but the matrix is not in contact with the pulleys. A timing cable is disposed about respective portions of the pulleys at a timing pulley ratio, which is different than the SMA pulley ratio. The SMA element converts a thermal energy gradient between the hot region and the cold region into mechanical energy.

  6. Shape memory alloy actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle for jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Gangbing (Inventor); Ma, Ning (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed adaptive exhaust nozzle features an innovative use of the shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actively control of the opening area of the exhaust nozzle for jet engines. The SMA actuators remotely control the opening area of the exhaust nozzle through a set of mechanism. An important advantage of using SMA actuators is the reduction of weight of the actuator system for variable area exhaust nozzle. Another advantage is that the SMA actuator can be activated using the heat from the exhaust and eliminate the need of other energy source. A prototype has been designed and fabricated. The functionality of the proposed SMA actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle is verified in the open-loop tests.

  7. Phase front patterns in shape memory alloy strips

    SciTech Connect

    Lagoudas, D.C.; Howard, S.D.

    1995-12-31

    Uniaxial thermomechanical tests of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) Nitinol strips, below the austenitic start temperature, have shown the formation of multiple phase front patterns forming at approximately 45 degrees angle with respect to the applied load. These phase fronts, that separate self-accommodating martensitic variants from detwinned martensite, propagate along the specimen in the direction of applied load, until fully detwinned martensite is developed. Similar patterns of martensitic-austenitic phase fronts occur when the temperature is raised above austenitic finish, and uniaxial loading is applied to the strip specimens. An experimental study of this phenomenon, together with some preliminary modelling results will be presented. In contrast to the above uniform loading case, experimental results and numerical simulations for the propagation of a phase transformation front, induced by an imposed temperature gradient, will also be presented.

  8. A Shape Memory Alloy Actuated Satellite Isolation Valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, J.; Mignon, A.; Promper, C.; Stalmans, R.; Lanfranconi, R.

    2004-10-01

    Pyrotechnic actuated valves are currently used extensively in satellite chemical propulsion systems. These valves serve as isolation valves. They are single- use, of very high reliability, and used to initiate a propulsion system at the start of its propulsion mission or to "safe" it at the end of its mission life. A new type of valve is currently in its initial stages of development which aims to replace the pyro with a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuator. This valve would give the same isolation performance, would work at high temperature up to 100°C, could be much slower limiting mechanical shocks, and be interchangeable with pyro-valves making substitution simple. This paper outlines the scope of this work.

  9. Multiscale theory of thin film magnetic shape memory alloy microactuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoilov, Vesselin

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the nano-macro transition in magnetic shape memory alloy(MSMA) thin films using a recently developed sharp phase front-based three-dimensional (3D) constitutive model outlined by Stoilov (JSMS 2007), and originally proposed in the 1D context by Stoilov and Bhattacharyya (Acta Mat 2002). The key ingredient in the model is the recognition of martensitic variants as separate phases in a MSMA domain. Evolution of the interface between these phases is taken as an indicator of the process of reorientation in progress. A formulation of the Helmholtz free energy potential based on Ising model has been derived. The implications of the external magnetic field on the initiation of phase transformation are studied for various mechanical loading modes.

  10. Thermal and damping behaviour of magnetic shape memory alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glock, Susanne; Michaud, Véronique

    2015-06-01

    Single crystals of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (MSMA) exhibit magnetic field and stress induced strains via energy dissipating twinning. Embedding single crystalline MSMA particles into a polymer matrix could thus produce composites with enhanced energy dissipation, suitable for damping applications. Composites of ferromagnetic, martensitic or austenitic Ni-Mn-Ga powders embedded in a standard epoxy matrix were produced by casting. The martensitic powder composites showed a crystal structure dependent damping behaviour that was more dissipative than that of austenitic powder or Cu-Ni reference powder composites and than that of the pure matrix. The loss ratio also increased with increasing strain amplitude and decreasing frequency, respectively. Furthermore, Ni-Mn-Ga powder composites exhibited an increased damping behaviour at the martensite/austenite transformation temperature of the Ni-Mn-Ga particles in addition to that at the glass transition temperature of the epoxy matrix, creating possible synergetic effects.

  11. Electromagnetic heating of a shape memory alloy translator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giroux, E.-A.; Maglione, M.; Gueldry, A.; Mantoux, J.-L.

    1996-03-01

    The active part of a linear translator is a shape memory alloy (SMA) made of nickel and titanium (NiTi) wire which is to be thermally cycled. We have achieved heating using electromagnetic radiation with a magnetic sheath and low-frequency waves at 8 kHz and without magnetic sheath and radio frequency waves at 28 MHz. The heating is equivalent for these two arrangements. In vitro experiments have been confirmed by computer simulations of the radiation distribution within the implant. We thus show that electromagnetic radiation could specifically heat a NiTi wire inside a stainless steel tube without heating the tube. An application could be a femoral prosthesis for the lengthening of the bone.

  12. Nonhysteretic superelasticity of shape memory alloys at nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Ding, Xiangdong; Ren, Xiaobing; Otsuka, Kazuhiro

    2014-03-01

    Superelasticity with recoverable strains about 8% is known to appear in shape memory alloys (SMAs) possessing a spontaneous martensitic transformation (MT). However, it is unknown whether such a property can still exist below the critical size where MT disappears. We perform molecular dynamics simulations to show that SMA nanoparticles below the critical size not only demonstrate superelasticity but also exhibit features such as absence of hysteresis, continuous nonlinear elastic distortion, and high blocking force. Atomic level investigations show that this nonhysteretic superelasticity results from a continuous transformation from the parent phase to martensite under external stress. This aspect of SMAs is attributed to a surface effect; i.e., the surface locally retards the formation of martensite and then induces a critical-end-point-like behavior when the system is below the critical size. Our work potentially broadens the application of SMAs to the nanoscale. It also suggests a method to achieve nonhysteretic superelasticity in conventional bulk SMAs.

  13. Simulation of grain size effects in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajeev; Quek, Siu Sin; Wu, David T.

    2015-06-01

    Recently, it has been demonstrated that martensitic transformation in nanocrystalline shape memory alloys can be suppressed for small grain sizes. Motivated by these results, we study the grain size dependence of martensitic transformations and stress-strain response of nanocrystalline shape memory alloys within the framework of the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory. A GL model for a square to rectangle transformation in polycrystals is extended to account for grain boundary effects. We propose that an inhibition of the transformation in grain boundary regions can occur, if the grain boundary energy of the martensite is higher than that of the austenite phase. We show that this inhibition of transformation in grain boundary regions has a strong influence on domain patterns inside grains. Although the transformation is inhibited only at the grain boundaries, it leads to a suppression of the transformation even inside the grains as grain size is decreased. In fact, below a critical grain size, the transformation can be completely suppressed. We explain these results in terms of the extra strain gradient cost associated with grain boundaries, when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries. On the other hand, no significant size effects are observed when transformation is not inhibited at grain boundaries. We also study the grain size dependence of the stress strain curve. It is found that when the transformation is inhibited at grain boundaries, a significant reduction in the hysteresis associated with stress-strain curves during the loading-unloading cycles is observed. The hysteresis for this situation reduces even further as the grain size is reduced, which is consistent with recent experiments. The simulations also demonstrate that the mechanical behavior is influenced by inter-granular interactions and the local microstructural neighbourhood of a grain has a stronger influence than the orientation of the grain itself.

  14. Finite Element Analysis of a Copper Single Crystal Shape Memory Alloy-Based Endodontic Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Marin; Thiebaud, Frédéric; Bel Haj Khalifa, Saifeddine; Engels-Deutsch, Marc; Ben Zineb, Tarak

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is the development of endodontic Cu-based single crystal Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) instruments in order to eliminate the antimicrobial and mechanical deficiencies observed with the conventional Nickel-Titane (NiTi) SMA files. A thermomechanical constitutive law, already developed and implemented in a finite element code by our research group, is adopted for the simulation of the single crystal SMA behavior. The corresponding material parameters were identified starting from experimental results for a tensile test at room temperature. A computer-aided design geometry has been achieved and considered for a finite element structural analysis of the endodontic Cu-based single crystal SMA files. They are meshed with tetrahedral continuum elements to improve the computation time and the accuracy of results. The geometric parameters tested in this study are the length of the active blade, the rod length, the pitch, the taper, the tip diameter, and the rod diameter. For each set of adopted parameters, a finite element model is built and tested in a combined bending-torsion loading in accordance with ISO 3630-1 norm. The numerical analysis based on finite element procedure allowed purposing an optimal geometry suitable for Cu-based single crystal SMA endodontic files. The same analysis was carried out for the classical NiTi SMA files and a comparison was made between the two kinds of files. It showed that Cu-based single crystal SMA files are less stiff than the NiTi files. The Cu-based endodontic files could be used to improve the root canal treatments. However, the finite element analysis brought out the need for further investigation based on experiments.

  15. Stress-strain behavior and shape memory effect in powder metallurgy TiNi alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, H.; Koyari, T.; Miura, S. . Dept. of Engineering Science); Tokizane, M. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The shape memory properties of the TiNi alloy produced by a powder metallurgical method have been evaluated from tensile stress-strain curves. The contamination of the powders during atomization can be suppressed by applying the Plasma Rotating Electrode Process (P-REP), so that the compact made by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is expected to exhibit the shape memory effect identical to the typical alloy grown from melt. The fracture behavior of the P/M alloy is also studied, and the improvement of fracture strength of the P/M alloy is attempted.

  16. The Characterization of Thin Film Nickel Titanium Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris Odum, Nicole Latrice

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are able to recover their original shape through the appropriate heat or stress exposure after enduring mechanical deformation at a low temperature. Numerous alloy systems have been discovered which produce this unique feature like TiNb, AgCd, NiAl, NiTi, and CuZnAl. Since their discovery, bulk scale SMAs have undergone extensive material property investigations and are employed in real world applications. However, its thin film counterparts have been modestly investigated and applied. Researchers have introduced numerous theoretical microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices; yet, the research community's overall unfamiliarity with the thin film properties has delayed growth in this area. In addition, it has been difficult to outline efficient thin film processing techniques. In this dissertation, NiTi thin film processing and characterization techniques will be outlined and discussed. NiTi thin films---1 mum thick---were produced using sputter deposition techniques. Substrate bound thin films were deposited to analysis the surface using Scanning Electron Microscopy; the film composition was obtained using Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy; the phases were identified using X-ray diffraction; and the transformation temperatures acquired using resistivity testing. Microfabrication processing and sputter deposition were employed to develop tensile membranes for membrane deflection experimentation to gain insight on the mechanical properties of the thin films. The incorporation of these findings will aid in the movement of SMA microactuation devices from theory to fruition and greatly benefit industries such as medicinal and aeronautical.

  17. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kolobov, A.V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-01-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials. PMID:26323962

  18. Understanding Phase-Change Memory Alloys from a Chemical Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Tominaga, J.

    2015-09-01

    Phase-change memories (PCM) are associated with reversible ultra-fast low-energy crystal-to-amorphous switching in GeTe-based alloys co-existing with the high stability of the two phases at ambient temperature, a unique property that has been recently explained by the high fragility of the glass-forming liquid phase, where the activation barrier for crystallisation drastically increases as the temperature decreases from the glass-transition to room temperature. At the same time the atomistic dynamics of the phase-change process and the associated changes in the nature of bonding have remained unknown. In this work we demonstrate that key to this behavior is the formation of transient three-center bonds in the excited state that is enabled due to the presence of lone-pair electrons. Our findings additionally reveal previously ignored fundamental similarities between the mechanisms of reversible photoinduced structural changes in chalcogenide glasses and phase-change alloys and offer new insights into the development of efficient PCM materials.

  19. Applications of shape memory alloys for neurology and neuromuscular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Pittaccio, Simone; Garavaglia, Lorenzo; Ceriotti, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are a very promising class of metallic materials that display interesting nonlinear properties, such as pseudoelasticity (PE), shape memory effect (SME) and damping capacity, due to high mechanical hysteresis and internal friction. Our group has applied SMA in the field of neuromuscular rehabilitation, designing some new devices based on the mentioned SMA properties: in particular, a new type of orthosis for spastic limb repositioning, which allows residual voluntary movement of the impaired limb and has no predetermined final target position, but follows and supports muscular elongation in a dynamic and compliant way. Considering patients in the sub-acute phase after a neurological lesion, and possibly bedridden, the paper presents a mobiliser for the ankle joint, which is designed exploiting the SME to provide passive exercise to the paretic lower limb. Two different SMA-based applications in the field of neuroscience are then presented, a guide and a limb mobiliser specially designed to be compatible with diagnostic instrumentations that impose rigid constraints in terms of electromagnetic compatibility and noise distortion. Finally, the paper discusses possible uses of these materials in the treatment of movement disorders, such as dystonia or hyperkinesia, where their dynamic characteristics can be advantageous. PMID:26023790

  20. Applications of Shape Memory Alloys for Neurology and Neuromuscular Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Pittaccio, Simone; Garavaglia, Lorenzo; Ceriotti, Carlo; Passaretti, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are a very promising class of metallic materials that display interesting nonlinear properties, such as pseudoelasticity (PE), shape memory effect (SME) and damping capacity, due to high mechanical hysteresis and internal friction. Our group has applied SMA in the field of neuromuscular rehabilitation, designing some new devices based on the mentioned SMA properties: in particular, a new type of orthosis for spastic limb repositioning, which allows residual voluntary movement of the impaired limb and has no predetermined final target position, but follows and supports muscular elongation in a dynamic and compliant way. Considering patients in the sub-acute phase after a neurological lesion, and possibly bedridden, the paper presents a mobiliser for the ankle joint, which is designed exploiting the SME to provide passive exercise to the paretic lower limb. Two different SMA-based applications in the field of neuroscience are then presented, a guide and a limb mobiliser specially designed to be compatible with diagnostic instrumentations that impose rigid constraints in terms of electromagnetic compatibility and noise distortion. Finally, the paper discusses possible uses of these materials in the treatment of movement disorders, such as dystonia or hyperkinesia, where their dynamic characteristics can be advantageous. PMID:26023790

  1. Design of space systems using shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, Olivier J.; Lagoudas, Magdalini Z.; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.

    2003-08-01

    Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) are a unique type of material characterized by two properties that ordinary metals do not exhibit: Shape Memory Effect (SME) and pseudoelasticity. SMAs can be actuated mechanically and/or thermally, and these properties have already been exploited in a wide variety of engineering applications. The appearance of SMAs in space applications, however, is more recent. This paper presents the motivations leading to interest for SMAs in space applications, as well as an overview of their use from tested mechanisms to ones still in development. As will be shown, many SMA space applications are single use and thermally activated. Although heating is never a problem, cooling SMA actuators in a reasonable amount of time still has to be achieved. A thermoelectric cooling system that allows for thermal control will be presented. This active cooling can allow better thermal actuation of SMA mechanisms using the two way SME. The last section of the paper describes their suitability for passive vibration isolation during launch, with a simple design using SMA hollow tubes at the interface between the payload and the spacecraft.

  2. Self-activated mesh device using shape memory alloy for periosteal expansion osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Kensuke; Takahashi, Tetsu; Tanaka, Kenko; Nogami, Shinnosuke; Kaneuji, Takeshi; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Lethaus, Bernd; Kessler, Peter

    2013-07-01

    The present study evaluated the use of this self-activated shape memory alloy (SMA) device, with a focus on its effects in the region under the periosteum. Twelve Japanese white rabbits were used in this study. The device was inserted under the periosteum at the forehead. In the experimental group, the device was pushed, bent, and attached to the bone surface and fixed with a titanium screw. In control group, the device was only inserted under the periosteum. After 14 days, the screw was removed and the mesh was activated in the experimental group. Rabbits were sacrificed 5 and 8 weeks after the operation and newly formed bone was histologically and radiographically evaluated. The quantitative data by the area and the occupation of newly formed bone indicated that the experimental group had a higher volume of new bone than the control group at each consolidation period. Histologically, some newly formed bone was observed and most of the subperiosteal space underneath the device was filled with fibrous tissue, and a thin layer of immature bone was observed in the control group. In the experimental group, multiple dome-shaped bones, outlined by thin and scattered trabeculae, were clearly observed under the SMA mesh device. The use of self-activated devices for the periosteal expansion technique may make it possible to avoid donor site morbidity, trans-skin activation rods, any bone-cutting procedure, and the following intermittent activation procedure. PMID:23359561

  3. High Work Output Ni-Ti-Pt High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys and Associated Processing Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Draper, Susan L. (Inventor); Nathal, Michael V. (Inventor); Garg, Anita (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    According to the invention, compositions of Ni-Ti-Pt high temperature, high force, shape memory alloys are disclosed that have transition temperatures above 100 C.; have narrow hysteresis; and produce a high specific work output.

  4. Wear Properties of Thixoformed and High Pressure Die Cast Aluminium Alloys for Connecting Rod Applications in Compressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birol, Yücel; Birol, Feriha

    2007-04-01

    Hypereutectic aluminium casting alloys are attractive candidates for connecting rod applications in compressors. The wear properties of these alloys are largely controlled by their microstructural features which in turn are affected by the processing route. Several hypo- and hypereutectic Al-Si alloys were produced by high pressure die casting and thixoforming in the present work. The former route produced a very fine microstructure while relatively coarser, globular α-Al matrix dominated in thixoformed grades. A modified Falex Block on Ring equipment was employed to investigate the wear properties of these alloys. Wear tests were carried out under service conditions in the lubricated state at 75°C. The superior wear properties of hypereutectic alloys produced by high pressure die casting with respect to the thixoformed variety is accounted for by the very fine microstructure with a fine dispersion of primary Si particles in the former. Of the two production routes employed, thixoforming had a favorable effect on wear properties at equal Si levels.

  5. Precipitation-Strengthened, High-Temperature, High-Force Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Draper, Susan L.; Nathal, Michael V.; Crombie, Edwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are an enabling component in the development of compact, lightweight, durable, high-force actuation systems particularly for use where hydraulics or electrical motors are not practical. However, commercial shape memory alloys based on NiTi are only suitable for applications near room temperature, due to their relatively low transformation temperatures, while many potential applications require higher temperature capability. Consequently, a family of (Ni,Pt)(sub 1-x)Ti(sub x) shape memory alloys with Ti concentrations ranging from about 15 to 25 at.% have been developed for applications in which there are requirements for SMA actuators to exert high forces at operating temperatures higher than those of conventional binary NiTi SMAs. These alloys can be heat treated in the range of 500 C to produce a series of fine precipitate phases that increase the strength of alloy while maintaining a high transformation temperature, even in Ti-lean compositions.

  6. Shape memory alloy seals for geothermal applications. Final report. Report ESG-82-14

    SciTech Connect

    Friske, Warren H.; Schwartzbart, Harry

    1982-07-30

    A novel temperature-actuated seal for geothermal applications is under development. This program uses the shape memory property of nickel-titanium (Nitinol) alloys to achieve an improved seal in geothermal downhole pumps. Nitinol flange face seals and pump shaft seals have been designed, fabricated, and tested. It has been demonstrated that the shape memory effect of Nitinol alloys can be utilized to activate and maintain a leaktight seal in geothermal environments.

  7. Effect of heat treatment on microstructures and mechanical properties of a Ti-6Al-4V alloy rod prepared by powder compact extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fei; Gabbitas, Brian

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, Ti-6Al-4V alloy rods were manufactured by the powder compact extrusion of a powder mixture of hydride-dehydride (HDH) titanium powder, elemental aluminum powder and master alloy powder. Extrusions were carried out at 1300°C and with a holding time of 5 min in an argon atmosphere. The effects of different heat treatments (HT1: 960°C/1 h, water quenching, HT2: 960°C/1 h, water quenching + 500°C/6 h, air cooling, HT3: 850°C/2 h, furnace cooling to 540°C, then air cooling) on the microstructure and mechanical properties of as-extruded Ti-6Al-4V alloy rods were investigated. The results showed that a homogeneous microstructure, composed of a lamellar structure with a grain size range of 40-60 μm, was produced by powder compact extrusion of a powder mixture. The mechanical properties achieved were an ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of 1254 MPa, a yield strength (YS) of 1216 MPa and 8% ductility. After quenching at 960°C and with a holding time of 1 h, the UTS and YS of the heat treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy rod were increased to 1324 MPa and 1290 MPa, and the ductility was increased to 12%. After HT2, the UTS and YS of the heat treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy rod were significantly increased to 1436 MPa and 1400 MPa, but the ductility decreased to 4%. After HT3, the mechanical properties of the heat treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy rod were slightly decreased to give a UTS of 1213 MPa and a YS of 1180 MPa, with an increase in ductility to 11%. The microstructural changes of as-extruded Ti-6Al-4V alloy rods were also investigated for the different heat treatments.

  8. One-dimensional shape memory alloy models for use with reinforced composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, A. J.; Cartmell, M. P.; Ostachowicz, W. M.; Wiercigroch, M.

    2003-06-01

    In this paper three models of the shape memory alloy behaviour have been presented and re-investigated. The models are attributed to Tanaka, Liang and Rogers, and Brinson, and have been used extensively in the literature for studying the static or dynamic performance of different composite material structures with embedded shape memory alloy components. The major differences and similarities between these models have been emphasised and examined in the paper. A simple experimental rig was designed and manufactured to gain additional insight into the main mechanics governing the shape memory alloy (SMA) mechanical properties. Data obtained from the experimental measurements on Ni-Ti wires have been used in the numerical simulation for validation purposes. It has been found that the three models all agree well in their predictions of the superelastic behaviour at higher temperatures, above the austenite finish temperature when shape memory alloys stay in the fully austenitic phase. However, at low temperatures, when the alloys stay in the fully martensitic phase, some difficulties may be encountered. The model developed by Brinson introduces two new state variables and therefore two different mechanisms for the instigation of stress-induced and temperature-induced martensite. This enables more accurate predictions of the superelastic behaviour. In general, it can be recommended that for investigations of the shape memory and superelastic behaviour of shape memory alloy components the Brinson model, or refinements based on the Brinson model, should be applied.

  9. Evaluation and Repair of Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Alloy 600/182 Control Rod Drive Mechanism Nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Frye, Charles R.; Arey, Melvin L. Jr.; Robinson, Michael R.; Whitaker, David E.

    2002-07-01

    In February 2001, a routine visual inspection of the reactor vessel head of Oconee Nuclear Station Unit 3 identified boric acid crystals at nine of sixty-nine locations where control rod drive mechanism housings (CRDM nozzles) penetrate the head. The boric acid deposits resulted from primary coolant leaking from cracks in the nozzle attachment weld and from through-thickness cracks in the nozzle wall. A general overview of the inspection and repair process is presented and results of the metallurgical analysis are discussed in more detail. The analysis confirmed that primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) is the mechanism of failure of both the Alloy 182 weld filler material and the alloy 600 wrought base material. (authors)

  10. A bio-inspired shape memory alloy composite (BISMAC) actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villanueva, A. A.; Joshi, K. B.; Blottman, J. B.; Priya, S.

    2010-02-01

    A beam-shape composite actuator using shape memory alloy (SMA) wires as the active component, termed a Bio-Inspired Shape Memory Alloy Composite (BISMAC), was designed to provide a large deformation profile. The BISMAC design was inspired by contraction of a jellyfish bell, utilizing the rowing mechanism for locomotion. Characterization of maximum deformation in underwater conditions was performed for different actuator configurations to analyze the effect of different design parameters, including silicone thickness, flexible steel thickness and distance between the SMA and flexible steel. A constant cross-section (CC)-BISMAC of length 16 cm was found to achieve deformation with a radius of curvature of 3.5 cm. Under equilibrium conditions, the CC-BISMAC was found to achieve 80% of maximum deformation, consuming 7.9 J/cycle driven at 16.2 V/0.98 A and a frequency of 0.25 Hz. A detailed analytical model was developed using the transfer matrix method and a 1D finite beam element (FE) model to simulate the behavior of the BISMAC incorporating gravity, buoyancy and SMA parameters. The FE and transfer matrix models had a maximum deformation error norm of 1.505 and 1.917 cm in comparison with experimentally observed beam deformation in the CC-BISMAC. The mean curvatures predicted by the FE and transfer matrix methods were 0.292 cm-1 and 0.295 cm-1 compared to a mean experimental curvature of 0.294 cm-1, a percentage error of -5.4% and 2.77%, respectively. Using the developed analytical model, an actuator design was fabricated mimicking the maximum deformation profile of jellyfish of the species Aurelia aurita (AA). The designed AA-BISMAC achieved a maximum curvature of 0.428 cm-1 as compared to 0.438 cm-1 for A. aurita with an average square root error of 0.043 cm-1, 10.2% of maximum A. aurita curvature.

  11. Thermodynamic modeling of martensitic transformations in shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guthikonda, Venkata Suresh Reddy

    The unusual properties of shape memory alloys (SMAs) are due to solid-to-solid martensitic transformations (MTs) which correspond to a lattice level instability of the crystal structure. Currently, there exists a shortage of material models that can capture the details of lattice level MTs occurring in SMAs. In the first part of this work, an effective interaction potential (EIP) model is developed for the SMA AuCd. EIPs are atomic interaction potentials that are explicit functions of temperature. In particular, the Morse pair potential is used and its adjustable coefficients are taken to be temperature dependent. A hysteretic temperature-induced MT between the B2 cubic and B19 orthorhombic crystal structures is predicted. This is the behavior that is observed in the real material. The model predicts, to reasonable accuracy, the transformation strain tensor and captures the latent heat and thermal hysteresis to within an order of magnitude. The second part of this work consists of developing a lattice dynamics model to simulate the MTs. The atomic interactions are modeled using temperature independent Morse pair potentials. The effects of atomic vibrations on the material properties are captured using the first-order self-consistent approach which consists of renormalizing the frequencies of atomic vibration using self-consistent equations. These renormalized frequencies are dependent on both configuration and temperature. The model is applied for the case of a one-dimensional bi-atomic chain. The constant Morse pair potential parameters are chosen to demonstrate the usefulness of the current model. The resulting model is evaluated by generating equilibrium paths with temperature and mechanical load as the loading parameters. In both types of loading, a first-order MT is predicted indicating that the current model is able to capture the first-order MTs that occur in SMAs. This qualitative prediction of a first-order MT indicates the likely-hood that the current

  12. Stable Crack Growth During Thermal Actuation of Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jape, S.; Baxevanis, T.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2016-03-01

    A finite element analysis of crack growth is carried out in shape memory alloys subjected to thermal variations under plane strain, mode I, constant applied loading. The crack is assumed to propagate at a critical level of the crack-tip energy release rate which is modeled using the virtual crack closure technique. The load level, applied at a high temperature at which the austenite phase is stable, is assumed sufficiently low so that the resulting crack-tip energy release rate is smaller than the critical value but sufficiently high so that the critical value is reached during cooling, initiating crack growth (Baxevanis and Lagoudas in Int J Fract 191:191-213, 2015). Stable crack growth is observed, mainly associated with the shielding effect of the transformed material left in the wake of the advancing crack. Results pertaining to the near-tip mechanical fields and fracture toughness are presented and their sensitivity to phase transformation metrics and bias load levels is investigated.

  13. Thermal responses of shape memory alloy artificial anal sphincters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yun; Takagi, Toshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Kenichi

    2003-08-01

    This paper presents a numerical investigation of the thermal behavior of an artificial anal sphincter using shape memory alloys (SMAs) proposed by the authors. The SMA artificial anal sphincter has the function of occlusion at body temperature and can be opened with a thermal transformation induced deformation of SMAs to solve the problem of severe fecal incontinence. The investigation of its thermal behavior is of great importance in terms of practical use in living bodies as a prosthesis. In this work, a previously proposed phenomenological model was applied to simulate the thermal responses of SMA plates that had undergone thermally induced transformation. The numerical approach for considering the thermal interaction between the prosthesis and surrounding tissues was discussed based on the classical bio-heat equation. Numerical predictions on both in vitro and in vivo cases were verified by experiments with acceptable agreements. The thermal responses of the SMA artificial anal sphincter were discussed based on the simulation results, with the values of the applied power and the geometric configuration of thermal insulation as parameters. The results obtained in the present work provided a framework for the further design of SMA artificial sphincters to meet demands from the viewpoint of thermal compatibility as prostheses.

  14. Experimental characterization of shape memory alloy actuator cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biggs, Daniel B.; Shaw, John A.

    2016-04-01

    Wire rope (or cables) are a fundamental structural element in many engineering applications. Recently, there has been growing interest in stranding NiTi wires into cables to scale up the adaptive properties of NiTi tension elements and to make use of the desirable properties of wire rope. Exploratory experiments were performed to study the actuation behavior of two NiTi shape memory alloy cables and straight monofilament wire of the same material. The specimens were held under various dead loads ranging from 50 MPa to 400 MPa and thermally cycled 25 times from 140°C to 5°C at a rate of 12°C/min. Performance metrics of actuation stroke, residual strain, and work output were measured and compared between specimen types. The 7x7 cable exhibited similar actuation to the single straight wire, but with slightly longer stroke and marginally more shakedown, while maintaining equivalent specific work output. This leads to the conclusion that the 7x7 cable effectively scaled up the adaptive properties the straight wire. Under loads below 150 MPa, the 1x27 cable had up to double the actuation stroke and work output, but exhibited larger shakedown and poorer performance when loaded higher.

  15. MOSFET Switching Circuit Protects Shape Memory Alloy Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gummin, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    A small-footprint, full surface-mount-component printed circuit board employs MOSFET (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor) power switches to switch high currents from any input power supply from 3 to 30 V. High-force shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators generally require high current (up to 9 A at 28 V) to actuate. SMA wires (the driving element of the actuators) can be quickly overheated if power is not removed at the end of stroke, which can damage the wires. The new analog driver prevents overheating of the SMA wires in an actuator by momentarily removing power when the end limit switch is closed, thereby allowing complex control schemes to be adopted without concern for overheating. Either an integral pushbutton or microprocessor-controlled gate or control line inputs switch current to the actuator until the end switch line goes from logic high to logic low state. Power is then momentarily removed (switched off by the MOSFET). The analog driver is suited to use with nearly any SMA actuator.

  16. Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-Based Launch Lock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2014-01-01

    Most NASA missions require the use of a launch lock for securing moving components during the launch or securing the payload before release. A launch lock is a device used to prevent unwanted motion and secure the controlled components. The current launch locks are based on pyrotechnic, electro mechanically or NiTi driven pin pullers and they are mostly one time use mechanisms that are usually bulky and involve a relatively high mass. Generally, the use of piezoelectric actuation provides high precession nanometer accuracy but it relies on friction to generate displacement. During launch, the generated vibrations can release the normal force between the actuator components allowing shaft's free motion which could result in damage to the actuated structures or instruments. This problem is common to other linear actuators that consist of a ball screw mechanism. The authors are exploring the development of a novel launch lock mechanism that is activated by a shape memory alloy (SMA) material ring, a rigid element and an SMA ring holding flexure. The proposed design and analytical model will be described and discussed in this paper.

  17. Modiolus-hugging intracochlear electrode array with shape memory alloy.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyou Sik; Jun, Sang Beom; Lim, Yoon Seob; Park, Se-Ik; Kim, Sung June

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear implant system, the distance between spiral ganglia and the electrodes within the volume of the scala tympani cavity significantly affects the efficiency of the electrical stimulation in terms of the threshold current level and spatial selectivity. Because the spiral ganglia are situated inside the modiolus, the central axis of the cochlea, it is desirable that the electrode array hugs the modiolus to minimize the distance between the electrodes and the ganglia. In the present study, we propose a shape-memory-alloy-(SMA-) embedded intracochlear electrode which gives a straight electrode a curved modiolus-hugging shape using the restoration force of the SMA as triggered by resistive heating after insertion into the cochlea. An eight-channel ball-type electrode array is fabricated with an embedded titanium-nickel SMA backbone wire. It is demonstrated that the electrode array changes its shape in a transparent plastic human cochlear model. To verify the safe insertion of the electrode array into the human cochlea, the contact pressures during insertion at the electrode tip and the contact pressures over the electrode length after insertion were calculated using a 3D finite element analysis. The results indicate that the SMA-embedded electrode is functionally and mechanically feasible for clinical applications. PMID:23762181

  18. Shape-Memory-Alloy-Based Deicing System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Ice buildup on aircraft leading edge surfaces has historically been a problem. Most conventional deicing systems rely either on surface heating to melt the accreted ice or pneumatic surface inflation to mechanically debond the ice. Deicers that rely solely on surface heating require large amounts of power. Pneumatic deicers usually cannot remove thin layers of ice and lack durability. Thus, there is a need for an advanced, low-power ice protection system. As part of the NASA Small Business and Innovation Research (SBIR) program, Innovative Dynamics, Inc., developed an aircraft deicing system that utilizes the properties of Shape Memory Alloys (SMA). The SMA-based system has achieved promising improvements in energy efficiency and durability over more conventional deicers. When they are thermally activated, SMA materials change shape; this is analogous to a conventional thermal expansion. The thermal input is currently applied via conventional technology, but there are plans to implement a passive thermal input that is supplied from the energy transfer due to the formation of the ice itself. The actively powered deicer was tested in the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel on a powered rotating rig in early 1995. The system showed promise, deicing both rime and glaze ice shapes as thin as 1/8 in. The first prototype SMA deicer reduced power usage by 45 percent over existing electrothermal systems. This prototype system was targeted for rotorcraft system development. However, there are current plans underway to develop a fixed-wing version of the deicer.

  19. Thermomechanical Modeling of Stress Relaxation in Shape Memory Alloy Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Fateme; Kadkhodaei, Mahmoud; Salafian, Iman

    2015-04-01

    When a shape memory alloy (SMA) is subjected to a mechanical load, especially at high strain rates, its temperature varies due to thermomechanical coupling in the response of these materials. Thus, if strain is kept constant during the transformation, temperature change will cause stress to decrease during loading and to increase during unloading. A decrease in stress under constant strain indicates stress relaxation, and an increase in stress indicates stress recovery, i.e., reverse stress relaxation. In this paper, a fully coupled thermomechanical model is developed in a continuum framework to study stress relaxation and stress recovery in SMA wires. Numerical simulations at different ambient temperatures, applied strain rates, wire radii, and relaxation intervals are done to show the abilities of the proposed model in predicting relaxation phenomena in various conditions where strain remains constant during loading or unloading. Relaxation experiments were also performed on NiTi wires, and the numerical and empirical results are shown to be in a good agreement.

  20. Smart structures for deformable mirrors actuated by shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, M.; Bettini, P.; Di Landro, L.; Sala, G.; Zerbi, F. M.

    2010-07-01

    Deformable mirrors actuated by smart structures are promising devices for next generation astronomical instrumentation. Thermal activated Shape Memory Alloys are materials able to recover their original shape, after an external deformation, if heated above a characteristic temperature. If the recovery of the shape is completely or partially prevented by the presence of constraints, the material can generate recovery stress. Thanks to this feature, these materials can be positively exploited in Smart Structures if properly embedded into host materials. This paper will show the technological processes developed for an efficient use of SMA-based actuators embedded in smart structures tailored to astronomical instrumentation. In particular the analysis of the interface with the host material. Some possible modeling approaches to the actuators behavior will be addressed taking into account trade-offs between detailed analysis and overall performance prediction as a function of the computational time. We developed a combined Finite Element and Raytracing analysis devoted to a parametric performance predictions of a SMA based substrate applicable to deformable mirrors. We took in detail into account the possibility to change the focal length of the mirror keeping a satisfactory image quality. Finally a possible approach with some preliminary results for an efficient control system for the strongly non-linear SMA actuators will be presented.

  1. Seismic retrofitting of bridge columns using shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrawes, Bassem; Shin, Moochul

    2008-03-01

    This analytical work focuses on enhancing the ductility capacity and damage mitigation of reinforced concrete bridge columns during earthquakes by using innovative active confinement technique. The high recovery stress associated with the shape recovery of shape memory alloys (SMAs) is exploited to apply the confining pressure. A 2-D analytical model for a single column is developed and analyzed. The model is used to evaluate the seismic behavior of the column retrofitted with SMA rings and compare it with the behavior of the column retrofitted with the more conventional approach using carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets. The stress-strain behavior of the concrete confined with internal ties only, internal ties and external SMA rings, and internal ties and external CFRP sheets is described based on two different constitutive models. The column model is subjected to cyclic loading with increasing amplitude and a ground motion excitation. The analysis shows that the SMA rings provide the column with more damage protection represented by a reduction in the maximum strain by up to 273% compared to CFRP sheets. In addition, the column retrofitted with SMA rings shows smaller lateral drifts compared to the column retrofitted with the CFRP sheets when subjected to the same ground motion excitation. The superior performance of the SMA rings is primarily attributed to the increase in the compressive strength at early stages of loading associated with applying the active confinement pressure.

  2. Design of fish fin actuators using shape memory alloy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Nagato; Kusaka, Masahiro; Taya, Minoru; Wang, Chiyuan

    2004-07-01

    The present paper considers a design of fish fin actuators based on shape memory alloy composites composed of a couple of plates with the opposite functions. Both SMA plates, whose microstructure is either martensite or austenite, are individually arranged in parallel and operated as a bias to each other. The actuation mechanism is based on change in elastic constant, from stiff to soft during austenite to martensite transformation. First, a preliminary model of the elastic and superelastic deformation is proposed for prediction of the optimum curvature of SMA plates, which enable us to control the steering of an underwater object. The analytical model provides the relationship between the bending moment and the curvature for the composite plates in each deformation range. For a given velocity of a moving fish robot, the underwater curvature and bending moment of its plates is successfully obtained. We design such a fish fin actuator made of a set of different types of SMA composite plates which are embedded in an elastometer matrix to form a fish tail fin.

  3. Frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyaadi, Hassan; Askari Farsangi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-11-01

    This paper is focused on presenting an accurate framework to describe frequency-dependent energy harvesting via magnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs). Modeling strategy incorporates the phenomenological constitutive model developed formerly together with the magnetic diffusion equation. A hyperbolic hardening function is employed to define reorientation-induced strain hardening in the material, and the diffusion equation is used to add dynamic effects to the model. The MSMA prismatic specimen is surrounded by a pickup coil, and the induced voltage during martensite-variant reorientation is investigated with the help of Faraday’s law of magnetic field induction. It has been shown that, in order to harvest the maximum RMS voltage in the MSMA-based energy harvester, an optimum value of bias magnetic field exists, which is the corresponding magnetic field for the start of pseudoelasticity behavior. In addition, to achieve a more compact energy harvester with higher energy density, a specimen with a lower aspect ratio can be chosen. As the main novelty of the paper, it is found that the dynamic effects play a major role in determining the harvested voltage and power, especially for high excitation frequency or specimen thickness.

  4. Interfacial stresses in shape memory alloy-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, S. R.; Prajapati, Maulik; Rakesh, S.; Roy Mahapatra, D.

    2014-03-01

    Debonding of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) wires in SMA reinforced polymer matrix composites is a complex phenomenon compared to other fabric fiber debonding in similar matrix composites. This paper focuses on experimental study and analytical correlation of stress required for debonding of thermal SMA actuator wire reinforced composites. Fiber pull-out tests are carried out on thermal SMA actuator at parent state to understand the effect of stress induced detwinned martensites. An ASTM standard is followed as benchmark method for fiber pull-out test. Debonding stress is derived with the help of non-local shear-lag theory applied to elasto-plastic interface. Furthermore, experimental investigations are carried out to study the effect of Laser shot peening on SMA surface to improve the interfacial strength. Variation in debonding stress due to length of SMA wire reinforced in epoxy are investigated for non-peened and peened SMA wires. Experimental results of interfacial strength variation due to various L/d ratio for non-peened and peened SMA actuator wires in epoxy matrix are discussed.

  5. Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-based launch lock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2014-04-01

    Most NASA missions require the use of a launch lock for securing moving components during the launch or securing the payload before release. A launch lock is a device used to prevent unwanted motion and secure the controlled components. The current launch locks are based on pyrotechnic, electro mechanically or NiTi driven pin pullers and they are mostly one time use mechanisms that are usually bulky and involve a relatively high mass. Generally, the use of piezoelectric actuation provides high precession nanometer accuracy but it relies on friction to generate displacement. During launch, the generated vibrations can release the normal force between the actuator components allowing free motion of the shaft, which could result in damage to the actuated structures or instruments. This problem is common to other linear actuators that consist of a ball screw mechanism. The authors are exploring the development of a novel launch lock mechanism that is activated by a shape memory alloy (SMA) material ring, a rigid element and an SMA ring holding flexure. The proposed design and analytical model will be described and discussed in this paper.

  6. Directions for High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys' Improvement: Straight Way to High-Entropy Materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firstov, G. S.; Kosorukova, T. A.; Koval, Yu N.; Verhovlyuk, P. A.

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, all thermo-mechanical effects, associated with the martensitic structural phase transitions, are still in the focus of scientists and engineers, especially once these phenomena are taking place at elevated temperatures. The list of the materials, undergoing high-temperature martensitic transformation, is constantly widening. Still, industrial application of these materials, called high-temperature shape memory alloys, is far enough due to the lack of understanding of the peculiarities of the high-temperature martensitic transformation and shape memory effect. The present work attempts to show how the development of the proper directions for high-temperature shape memory alloys' improvement might lead to the creation of essentially new functional materials.

  7. Potential High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys Identified in the Ti(Ni,Pt) System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Garg, Anita; Nathal, Michael V.

    2004-01-01

    "Shape memory" is a unique property of certain alloys that, when deformed (within certain strain limits) at low temperatures, will remember and recover to their original predeformed shape upon heating. It occurs when an alloy is deformed in the low-temperature martensitic phase and is then heated above its transformation temperature back to an austenitic state. As the material passes through this solid-state phase transformation on heating, it also recovers its original shape. This behavior is widely exploited, near room temperature, in commercially available NiTi alloys for connectors, couplings, valves, actuators, stents, and other medical and dental devices. In addition, there are limitless applications in the aerospace, automotive, chemical processing, and many other industries for materials that exhibit this type of shape-memory behavior at higher temperatures. But for high temperatures, there are currently no commercial shape-memory alloys. Although there are significant challenges to the development of high-temperature shape-memory alloys, at the NASA Glenn Research Center we have identified a series of alloy compositions in the Ti-Ni-Pt system that show great promise as potential high-temperature shape-memory materials.

  8. Development of microstructure and mechanical properties during annealing of a cold-swaged Co-Cr-Mo alloy rod.

    PubMed

    Mori, Manami; Sato, Nanae; Yamanaka, Kenta; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kuramoto, Koji; Chiba, Akihiko

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties during annealing of a cold-swaged Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloy for biomedical applications. A Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.14N-0.05C (mass%) alloy rod was processed by cold swaging, with a reduction in area of 27.7%, and then annealed at 1173-1423K for various periods up to 6h. The duplex microstructure of the cold-swaged rod consisted of a face-centered cubic γ-matrix and hexagonal closed-packed ε-martensite developed during cold swaging. This structure transformed nearly completely to the γ-phase after annealing and many annealing twin boundaries were observed as a result of the heat treatment. A small amount of the ε-phase was identified in specimens annealed at 1173K. Growth of the γ-grains occurred with increasing annealing time at temperatures ≥1273K. Interestingly, the grain sizes remained almost unchanged at 1173K and a very fine grain size of approximately 8μm was obtained. The precipitation that occurred during annealing was attributed to the limited grain coarsening during heat treatment. Consequently, the specimens treated at this temperature showed the highest tensile strength and lowest ductility among the specimens prepared. An elongation-to-failure value larger than 30% is sufficient for the proposed applications. The other specimens treated at higher temperatures possessed similar tensile properties and did not show any significant variations with different annealing times. Optimization of the present rod manufacturing process, including cold swaging and interval annealing heat treatment, is discussed. PMID:27500542

  9. Potential High-Temperature Shape-Memory-Alloy Actuator Material Identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald D.; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Biles, Tiffany A.; Garg, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Shape-memory alloys are unique "smart materials" that can be used in a wide variety of adaptive or "intelligent" components. Because of a martensitic solid-state phase transformation in these materials, they can display rather unusual mechanical properties including shape-memory behavior. This phenomenon occurs when the material is deformed at low temperatures (below the martensite finish temperature, Mf) and then heated through the martensite-to-austenite phase transformation. As the material is heated to the austenite finish temperature Af, it is able to recover its predeformed shape. If a bias is applied to the material as it tries to recover its original shape, work can be extracted from the shape-memory alloy as it transforms. Therefore, shape-memory alloys are being considered for compact solid-state actuation devices to replace hydraulic, pneumatic, or motor-driven systems.

  10. A new look at biomedical Ti-based shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Biesiekierski, Arne; Wang, James; Gepreel, Mohamed Abdel-Hady; Wen, Cuie

    2012-05-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are materials that exhibit a distinct thermomechanical coupling, one that gives rise to a wide variety of applications across a broad range of fields. One of the most successful roles is in the construction of novel medical implants. Unfortunately, concerns have been raised about the biocompatibility of the most popular SMA, nitinol (NiTi), due to the known toxic, allergenic and carcinogenic properties of nickel. Given the unique capabilities of SMAs, it is apparent that there is a need for a new class of alloys - alloys that exhibit the full range of shape memory abilities yet are also free of any undesirable side effects. This article reviews the literature surrounding SMAs and identifies the metals Ti, Au, Sn, Ta, Nb, Ru and Zr as candidates for the production of thoroughly biocompatible SMAs. Hf and Re are also promising, though more research is necessary before a definitive statement can be made. Further, the Ti-(Ta,Nb)-(Zr,Hf) alloy system is particularly suited for orthopaedic implants due to a reduced Young's modulus. However, concerns over this system's shape memory properties exist, and should be taken into consideration. Alternate alloy systems that demonstrate higher bulk moduli may still be considered, however, if they are formed into a porous structure. Due to the nature of the alloying components, blended elemental powder metallurgy is recommended for the manufacture of these alloys, particularly due to the ease with which it may be adapted to the formation of porous alloys. PMID:22326786

  11. Standard specification for cobalt-chromium-nickel-molybdenum-tungsten alloy (UNS R31233) rod. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-2 on Nonferrous Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B02.07 on Refined Nickel and Cobalt and Their Alloys. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1997 and published February 1998. Originally published as B 815-91. Last previous edition was B 815-91.

  12. Shape memory alloy actuation for a variable area fan nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey, Nancy; Tillman, Gregory; Miller, Robin M.; Wynosky, Thomas; Larkin, Michael J.; Flamm, Jeffrey D.; Bangert, Linda S.

    2001-06-01

    The ability to control fan nozzle exit area is an enabling technology for next generation high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines. Performance benefits for such designs are estimated at up to 9% in thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC) relative to current fixed-geometry engines. Conventionally actuated variable area fan nozzle (VAN) concepts tend to be heavy and complicated, with significant aircraft integration, reliability and packaging issues. The goal of this effort was to eliminate these undesirable features and formulate a design that meets or exceeds leakage, durability, reliability, maintenance and manufacturing cost goals. A Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) bundled cable actuator acting to move an array of flaps around the fan nozzle annulus is a concept that meets these requirements. The SMA bundled cable actuator developed by the United Technologies Corporation (Patents Pending) provides significant work output (greater than 2200 in-lb per flap, through the range of motion) in a compact package and minimizes system complexity. Results of a detailed design study indicate substantial engine performance, weight, and range benefits. The SMA- based actuation system is roughly two times lighter than a conventional mechanical system, with significant aircraft direct operating cost savings (2-3%) and range improvements (5-6%) relative to a fixed-geometry nozzle geared turbofan. A full-scale sector model of this VAN system was built and then tested at the Jet Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley to demonstrate the system's ability to achieve 20% area variation of the nozzle under full scale aerodynamic loads. The actuator exceeded requirements, achieving repeated actuation against full-scale loads representative of typical cruise as well as greater than worst-case (ultimate) aerodynamic conditions. Based on these encouraging results, work is continuing with the goal of a flight test on a C-17 transport aircraft.

  13. Thermoelectric control of shape memory alloy microactuators: a thermal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abadie, J.; Chaillet, Nicolas; Lexcellent, Christian; Bourjault, Alain

    1999-06-01

    Microtechnologies and microsystems engineering use new active materials. These materials are interesting to realize microactuators and microsensors. In this category of materials, Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) are good candidates for microactuation. SMA wires, or thin plates, can be used as active material in microfingers. These microstructures are able to provide very important forces, but have low dynamic response, especially for cooling, in confined environment. The control of the SMA phase transformations, and then the mechanical power generation, is made by the temperature. The Joule effect is an easy and efficiency way to heat the SMA wires, but cooling is not so easy. The dynamic response of the actuator depends on cooling capabilities. The thermal convection and conduction are the traditional ways to cool the SMA, but have limitations for microsystems. We are looking for a reversible way of heating and cooling SMA microactuators, based on the thermoelectric effects. Using Peltier effect, a positive or a negative electrical courant is able to pump or produce heat, in the SMA actuator. A physical model based on thermal exchanges between a Nickel/Titanium (NiTi) SMA, and Bismuth/Telluride (Te3Bi2) thermoelectric material has been developed. For simulation, we use a numerical resolution of our model, with finite elements, which takes into account the Peltier effect, the Joule effect, the convection, the conduction and the phase transformation of the SMA. We have also developed the corresponding experimental system, with two thermoelectric junctions, where the SMA actuator is one of the element of each junction. In this paper, the physical model and its numerical resolution are given, the experimental system used to validate the model is described, and experimental results are shown.

  14. Improved Damage Resistant Composite Materials Incorporating Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paine, Jeffrey S. N.; Rogers, Craig A.

    1996-01-01

    Metallic shape memory alloys (SMA) such as nitinol have unique shape recovery behavior and mechanical properties associated with a material phase change that have been used in a variety of sensing and actuation applications. Recent studies have shown that integrating nitinol-SMA actuators into composite materials increases the composite material's functionality. Hybrid composites of conventional graphite/epoxy or glass/epoxy and nitinol-SMA elements can perform functions in applications where monolithic composites perform inadequately. One such application is the use of hybrid composites to function both in load bearing and armor capacities. While monolithic composites with high strength-to-weight ratios function efficiently as loadbearing structures, because of their brittle nature, impact loading can cause significant catastrophic damage. Initial composite failure modes such as delamination and matrix cracking dissipate some impact energy, but when stress exceeds the composite's ultimate strength, fiber fracture and material perforation become dominant. One of the few methods that has been developed to reduce material perforation is hybridizing polymer matrix composites with tough kevlar or high modulus polyethynylene plies. The tough fibers increase the impact resistance and the stiffer and stronger graphite fibers carry the majority of the load. Similarly, by adding nitinol-SMA elements that absorb impact energy through the stress-induced martensitic phase transformation, the composites' impact perforation resistance can be greatly enhanced. The results of drop-weight and high velocity gas-gun impact testing of various composite materials will be presented. The results demonstrate that hybridizing composites with nitinol-SMA elements significantly increases perforation resistance compared to other traditional toughening elements. Inspection of the composite specimens at various stages of perforation by optical microscope illustrates the mechanisms by which

  15. Development of shape memory alloy (SMA) torsional actuators for variable twist tilt rotor (VTTR) blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahlad, Harsha

    This dissertation presents the development of a torsional actuator to alter the twist distributions of a tiltrotor blade between hover and forward flight. The actuator uses a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) tube as its active element. The historical development of the tiltrotor aircraft is discussed, with emphasis on advanced tiltrotor concepts. The central theme in these concepts is to reduce the compromises for tiltrotor blade design, thereby improving performance of the aircraft in both hover and forward flight modes. A survey of research conducted in the application of smart structures to performance enhancement of aircraft is conducted. A review of other torsional actuators that are based on SMAs is presented. An assessment of the state-of-the-art in SMA modeling and characterization, both in mechanical tensile and torsional loading, is also discussed. Shape Memory Alloys are "smart" actuation materials that are capable of providing high stroke and high force of actuation at relatively low bandwidth. However, their behavior is complex, and influenced by material non-linearities, thermo-mechanical conditions and history of loading. In addition, the behavior of torsional SMA actuators has not been investigated in detail. In order to address these issues, the current research carries out a comprehensive characterization of SMAs. Experimental characteristics of SMA wires under extensional loading, and SMA rods and tubes in both extensional and torsional loading under a variety of thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this dissertation. It is demonstrated that the uniaxial quasistatic SMA models show good overall agreement with the experimental behavior of an SMA wire under extensional loading. In addition, an approach that incorporates these models with radial non-uniformity due to torsional deflections is shown to provide good predictions of torsional characteristics of SMA rods and tubes. Several differences of the material response under non

  16. Feasibility study of shape memory alloy ring spring systems for self-centring seismic resisting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Cheng; Yam, Michael C. H.; Lam, Angus C. C.; Zhang, Yanyang

    2015-07-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) have recently emerged as promising material candidates for structural seismic resisting purposes. Most of the existing SMA-based strategies, however, are based on the wire or rod form of SMAs, where issues such as gripping complexity and fracture may exist. This paper presents a proof-of-concept study on an innovative type of SMA-based self-centring system, namely, a superelastic SMA ring spring system. The proposed system includes a series of inner high-strength steel (HSS) rings and outer superelastic SMA rings stacked in alternation with mating taper faces, where the resisting load is provided by the wedging action which tends to expand the outer rings and concurrently to squeeze the inner rings. The superelastic effect of the SMA offers energy dissipation and a driving force for recentring, and the frictional effect over the taper face further contributes to the overall resisting load and energy dissipation. The feasibility of the new system is carefully examined via numerical studies considering the parameters of ring thickness, taper angle, and coefficient of friction. The key hysteretic responses, including resisting load, stiffness, stress distributions, source of residual deformation, energy dissipation, and equivalent viscous damping, are discussed in detail. The behaviour of the SMA ring springs is also studied via analytical models, and the analytical predictions are found to agree well with the numerical results. Finally, two practical applications of the new system, namely self-centring HS-SMA ring spring connections, and self-centring SMA ring spring dampers, are discussed via comprehensive numerical studies.

  17. Influence of mold length and mold heat transfer on horizontal continuous casting of nonferrous alloy rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verwijs, J. P.; Weckman, D. C.

    1988-04-01

    The influence of mold length and mold heat transfer on the conventional hot-top D.C. continuous casting process was studied through numerical simulations and experiments with horizontally cast 20 mm diameter lead and zinc rods. The minimum casting speed was found to be a nonlinear function of the mold length. For short molds, an inverse relationship between mold length and minimum casting speed was observed. However, the minimum casting speed for zinc cast from molds longer than 12 mm was constant at 2.5 mm/s. For lead cast in molds longer than 12 mm, the minimum observed casting speed was constant at 4.0 mm/s. The observed nonlinear relationship between minimum casting speed and mold length was predicted using a numerical model of the process. For this, an analytical expression for the mold boundary conditions was derived which included the influence of gas gap formation between the rod and the mold due to thermoelastic deformations of both the rod and the mold. Correlation between observed and predicted behavior was demonstrated for both the lead and zinc rods. Maximum casting speed was observed to increase with increased mold length; however, this speed was found to be critically dependent on process attributes such as mold and pinch wheel alignment and mold lubrication.

  18. 76 FR 78882 - Carbon and Certain Alloy Steel Wire Rod From Mexico: Affirmative Preliminary Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... FR 65945 (October 29, 2002) (Wire Rod Order). DATES: Effective Date: December 20, 2011. FOR FURTHER... Order, 76 FR 33218 (June 8, 2011) (Initiation). On July 22, 2011, Deacero submitted its response to the... Steel Plate From Canada, 66 FR 7617, 7618 (January 24, 2001)) (Canadian Plate), and accompanying...

  19. Microscopic Shape Memory and Superelastic Effects in Shape Memory Alloys and Thin Films Studied by Indentation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Wangyang; Cheng, Yang-Tse; Grummon, David S.

    2003-03-01

    Although shape memory alloys were discovered more than 50 years ago, there is a growing interest in shape memory thin films and coatings for applications ranging from MEMs to tribology. While the macroscopic shape memory (SM) and superelastic (SE) behavior of NiTi alloys are well known, very few studies have been conducted to investigate the SM and SE effects at the micro- and nano-meter length scales. In this presentation, instrumented indentation experiments with spherical, Vickers, and Berkovich indenters were used to study the mechanical behavior of NiTi alloys and thin films at the micro- and nano- meter scales. The indentation load-displacement curves for the shape memory and superelastic NiTi were obtained under a range of indentation conditions. The SM effect was quantified by the depth recovery ratio of the indents measured by a surface profilometer and atomic force microscope; the SE effect was determined by the ratio of reversible work to total work. We show that SM and SE effects exist under both spherical and pyramidal indenters for a wide range of indentation loads and depths. However, the magnitude of these effects depends strongly on indenter geometry. These observations were rationalized using the concept of representative strain and maximum strain under the spherical and pyramidal indenters. These studies provide new insights into the mechanisms of SM and SE effects at multiple length scales.

  20. Effect of Thermomechanical Processing on the Microstructure, Properties, and Work Behavior of a Ti50.5 Ni29.5 Pt20 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, Ronald; Draper, Susan; Gaydosh, Darrell; Garga, Anita; Lerch, Brad; Penney, Nicholas; Begelow, Glen; Padula, Santo, II; Brown, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    TiNiPt shape memory alloys are particularly promising for use as solid state actuators in environments up to 300 C, due to a reasonable balance of properties, including acceptable work output. However, one of the challenges to commercializing a viable high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) is to establish the appropriate primary and secondary processing techniques for fabrication of the material in a required product form such as rod and wire. Consequently, a Ti(50.5)Ni(29.5)Pt20 alloy was processed using several techniques including single-pass high-temperature extrusion, multiple-pass high-temperature extrusion, and cold drawing to produce bar stock, thin rod, and fine wire, respectively. The effects of heat treatment on the hardness, grain size, room temperature tensile properties, and transformation temperatures of hot- and cold-worked material were examined. Basic tensile properties as a function of temperature and the strain-temperature response of the alloy under constant load, for the determination of work output, were also investigated for various forms of the Ti(50.5)Ni(29.5)Pt20 alloy, including fine wire.

  1. Investigation of the Rod Compression Test and Simulation Study of 6061 Aluminum Alloy in the Semisolid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboutalebian, Gholam Hossein; Mosaddegh, Peiman; Moradi, Mehran

    2014-06-01

    Processing material in the semisolid state has the advantage of a low energy requirement in comparison to processing in the solid state. In this study, a simple rod compression test of AL6061 alloy in the semisolid state is experimentally investigated with solid volume fractions of 0.6, 0.7, 0.8, and 0.9 and various ram speeds of 2, 5, and 7 mm/min. Also, commercial Deform-3D finite-element software is used to model the forging process of a cylindrical rod. In all simulations, the material model in macroscopic behavior with various solid volume fractions is considered as viscoplastic when its liquid volume fraction is ignored. The Sellars and Tegart constitutive model is used to determine the material behavior in this state. The experimental and simulation results show that the compression force increases with an increase in both the solid volume fraction and ram speed. By analyzing the results of compression force, it can be claimed that the maximum difference between ram speeds of 2 and 7 mm/min at 862 K (589 °C) is around 27 pct, while the maximum difference between 862 and 883 K (589 °C and 610 °C) at a minimum ram speed of 2 mm/min is around 15 pct. So the strain rate of deformation has a greater effect than temperature in semisolid deformation.

  2. LACBED characterization of dislocations in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys processed by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, P. P.; Ibarra, A.; San Jean, J.; Morniro, J. P.; No, M. L.

    2003-10-01

    Powder metallurgy Cu-AI-Ni shape memory alloys show excellent thermomechanical properties, being the fracture behavior close to the one observed in single crystals. However, the microstructural mechanisms responsible of such behavior are still under study. In this paper we present the characterization of the dislocations present in these alloys by Large Angle Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction (LACBED) in two different stages of the elaboration process: after HIP compaction and after hot rolling.

  3. Optimal Performance of Buildings Isolated By Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) Under Random Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Sumanta; Mishra, Sudib K.

    2014-05-01

    Shape Memory Alloy (SMA)-based bearing has been proposed recently for improved base isolation by optimal choice of its transformation strength. Presently, superior performances of the Shape-Memory-Alloy-Rubber-Bearing (SMARB) over the elastomeric bearing are established in mitigating seismic vibration under constraint on maximum isolator displacement. The optimal transformation strengths are proposed through constrained optimization based on stochastic responses. Numerical simulation reveals that Lead Rubber Bearings (LRB) either fails to provide feasible parameters or leads to large floor acceleration, compromising the isolation efficiency. Contrarily, optimal SMARB can efficiently enforce such constraint without greatly affecting the isolation efficiency. Evidence of robustness of SMARB over LRB is also established.

  4. Ion beam sputter deposition of TiNi shape memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sam T.; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi

    1999-08-01

    The development of functional or smart materials for integration into microsystem is of increasing interest. An example is the shape memory effect exhibited by certain metal alloys which, in principle, can be exploited in the fabrication of micro-scale manipulators or actuators, thereby providing on-chip micromechanical functionality. We have investigated an ion beam sputter deposition process for the growth of TiNi shape memory alloy thin films and demonstrated the required control to produce equiatomic composition, uniform coverage and atomic layer-by-layer growth rates on engineering surfaces. The process uses argon ions at intermediate energy produced by a Kaufman-type ion source to sputter non-alloyed targets of high purity titanium and nickel. Precise measurements of deposition rates allows compositional control during thin film growth. As the sputtering targets and substrates are remote from the discharge plasma, deposition occurs under good vacuum of approximately 10-6 mtorr thus promoting high quality films. Furthermore, the ion beam energetics allow deposition at relatively low substrate temperatures of < 150 degrees C with as-deposited films exhibiting shape memory properties without post-process high temperature annealing. Thermal imagin is used to monitor changes which are characteristic of the shape memory effect and is indicative of changes in specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity as the TiNi shape memory alloy undergoes martensitic to austenitic phase transformations.

  5. Tension, compression, and bending of superelastic shape memory alloy tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin; Churchill, Christopher B.; Nelson, Emily E.; Shaw, John A.; Daly, Samantha H.

    2014-02-01

    While many uniaxial tension experiments of shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been published in the literature, relatively few experimental studies address their behavior in compression or bending, despite the prevalence of this latter deformation mode in applications. In this study, superelastic NiTi tubes from a single lot of material were characterized in tension, compression, and pure bending, which allowed us to make direct comparisons between the deformation modes for the first time. Custom built fixtures were used to overcome some long-standing experimental difficulties with performing well-controlled loading and accurate measurements during uniaxial compression (avoiding buckling) and large-rotation bending. In all experiments, the isothermal, global, mechanical responses were measured, and stereo digital image correlation (DIC) was used to measure the evolution of the strain fields on the tube's outer surface.As is characteristic of textured NiTi, our tubes exhibited significant tension-compression asymmetry in their uniaxial responses. Stress-induced transformations in tension exhibited flat force plateaus accompanied by strain localization and propagation. No such localization, however, was observed in compression, and the stress "plateaus" during compression always maintained a positive tangent modulus. While our uniaxial results are similar to the observations of previous researchers, the DIC strain measurements provided details of localized strain behavior with more clarity and allowed more quantitative measurements to be made. Consistent with the tension-compression asymmetry, our bending experiments showed a significant shift of the neutral axis towards the compression side. Furthermore, the tube exhibited strain localization on the tension side, but no localization on the compression side during bending. This is a new observation that has not been explored before. Detailed analysis of the strain distribution across the tube diameter revealed that the

  6. Hot Workability of CuZr-Based Shape Memory Alloys for Potential High-Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-07-01

    The research on high-temperature shape memory alloys has been growing because of the interest of several potential industrial fields, such as automotive, aerospace, mechanical, and control systems. One suitable candidate is given by the CuZr system, because of its relative low price in comparison with others, like the NiTi-based one. In this context, the goal of this work is the study of hot workability of some CuZr-based shape memory alloys. In particular, this study addresses on the effect of hot rolling process on the metallurgical and calorimetric properties of the CuZr system. The addition of some alloying elements (Cr, Co, Ni, and Ti) is taken into account and their effect is also put in comparison with each other. The alloys were produced by means of an arc melting furnace in inert atmosphere under the shape of cigars. Due to the high reactivity of these alloys at high temperature, the cigars were sealed in a stainless steel can before the processing and two different procedures of hot rolling were tested. The characterization of the rolled alloys is performed using discrete scanning calorimetry in terms of evolution of the martensitic transformation and scanning electron microscopy for the microstructural investigations. Additionally, preliminary tests of laser interaction has been also proposed on the alloy more interesting for potential applications, characterized by high transformation temperatures and its good thermal stability.

  7. Standard specification for tantalum and tantalum alloy rod and wire. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee B-10 on Reactive and Refractory Metals and Alloys and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee B10.03 on Niobium and Tantalum. Current edition approved Apr. 10, 1998 and published October 1998. Originally published as B 365-61T. Last previous edition was B 365-92.

  8. Modelling Shape-Memory Effects in Ferromagnetic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbia, Jonathan F.; Lloveras, Pol; Castán, Teresa; Saxena, Avadh; Planes, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    We develop a combined Ginzburg-Landau/micromagnetic model dealing with conventional and magnetic shape-memory properties in ferromagnetic shape-memory materials. The free energy of the system is written as the sum of structural, magnetic and magnetostructural contributions. We first analyse a mean field linearized version of the model that does not take into account long-range terms arising from elastic compatibility and demagnetization effects. This model can be solved analytically and in spite of its simplicity allows us to understand the role of the magnetostructural term in driving magnetic shape-memory effects. Numerical simulations of the full model have also been performed. They show that the model is able to reproduce magnetostructural microstructures reported in magnetic shape-memory materials such as Ni2MnGa as well as conventional and magnetic shape-memory behaviour.

  9. Shape control of solar collectors using torsional shape memory alloy actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lobitz, D.W.; Rice, T.M.; Grossman, J.W.

    1996-03-01

    Solar collectors that are focused on a central receiver are designed with a mechanism for defocusing the collector or disabling it by turning it out of the path of the sun`s rays. This is required to avoid damaging the receiver during periods of inoperability. In either of these two cases a fail-safe operation is very desirable where during power outages the collector passively goes to its defocused or deactivated state. This paper will be principally concerned with focusing and defocusing the collector in a fail-safe manner using shape memory alloy actuators. Shape memory alloys are well suited to this application in that once calibrated the actuators can be operated in an on/off mode using a small amount of electric power. Also, in contrast to other smart materials that were investigated for this application, shape memory alloys are capable of providing enough stroke at the appropriate force levels to focus the collector. In order to accommodate the large, nonlinear deformations required in the solar collector plate to obtain desired focal lengths, a torsional shape memory alloy actuator was developed that produces a stroke of 0.5 inches. Design and analysis details presented, along with comparisons to test data taken from an actual prototype, demonstrate that the collector can be repeatedly focused and defocused within accuracies required by typical solar energy systems.

  10. Airfoil-based piezoelectric energy harvesting by exploiting the pseudoelastic hysteresis of shape memory alloy springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, Vagner Candido; De Marqui Junior, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The modeling and analysis of an electromechanically coupled typical aeroelastic section with shape memory alloy springs for wind energy harvesting is addressed in this paper. An airfoil with two-degrees-of-freedom, namely pitch and plunge, is considered and piezoelectric coupling is added to the plunge degree-of-freedom. A load resistance is assumed in the electrical domain of the problem in order to estimate the electrical power output. Shape memory alloy coil springs are modeled in the pitch degree-of-freedom of the typical section. A nickel-titanium alloy that exhibits pseudoelasticity at room temperature is assumed. The constitutive model for the shape memory alloy is based on classical phenomenological models. The unsteady aerodynamic loads are obtained by Jones’ approximation to Wagner’s indicial function. The resulting nonlinear electroaeroelastic model is cast into a state-space representation and solved with a Runge-Kutta method. The effects of preload values of the shape memory springs and resistive power generation on the aeroelastic behavior of the wind energy harvester are investigated at the flutter boundary and in a post-flutter regime. The nonlinear kinetics of the austenite-to-martensite phase transformation changes the typical linear flutter behavior to stable limit-cycle oscillations over a range of airflow speeds. Such nonlinear aeroelastic behavior introduced by the hysteretic behavior of the SMA springs provides an important source of persistent electrical power.

  11. Accumulative Roll Bonding and Post-Deformation Annealing of Cu-Al-Mn Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Ahmad Ostovari; Ketabchi, Mostafa; Afrasiabi, Yaser

    2014-09-01

    Accumulative roll bonding is a severe plastic deformation process used for Cu-Al-Mn shape memory alloy. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of grain refinement of Cu-9.5Al-8.2Mn (in wt.%) shape memory alloy using accumulative roll bonding and post-deformation annealing. The alloy was successfully subjected to 5 passes of accumulative roll bonding at 600 °C. The microstructure, properties as well as post-deformation annealing of this alloy were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter, and bend and tensile testing. The results showed that after 5 passes of ARB at 600 °C, specimens possessed α + β microstructure with the refined grains, but martensite phases and consequently shape memory effect completely disappeared. Post-deformation annealing was carried out at 700 °C, and the martensite phase with the smallest grain size (less than 40 μm) was obtained after 150 s of annealing at 700 °C. It was found that after 5 passes of ARB and post-deformation annealing, the stability of SME during thermal cycling improved. Also, tensile properties of alloys significantly improved after post-deformation annealing.

  12. Accumulative Roll Bonding and Post-Deformation Annealing of Cu-Al-Mn Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Ahmad Ostovari; Ketabchi, Mostafa; Afrasiabi, Yaser

    2014-12-01

    Accumulative roll bonding is a severe plastic deformation process used for Cu-Al-Mn shape memory alloy. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the possibility of grain refinement of Cu-9.5Al-8.2Mn (in wt.%) shape memory alloy using accumulative roll bonding and post-deformation annealing. The alloy was successfully subjected to 5 passes of accumulative roll bonding at 600 °C. The microstructure, properties as well as post-deformation annealing of this alloy were investigated by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimeter, and bend and tensile testing. The results showed that after 5 passes of ARB at 600 °C, specimens possessed α + β microstructure with the refined grains, but martensite phases and consequently shape memory effect completely disappeared. Post-deformation annealing was carried out at 700 °C, and the martensite phase with the smallest grain size (less than 40 μm) was obtained after 150 s of annealing at 700 °C. It was found that after 5 passes of ARB and post-deformation annealing, the stability of SME during thermal cycling improved. Also, tensile properties of alloys significantly improved after post-deformation annealing.

  13. Apparatus and Method for Low-Temperature Training of Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanger, A. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Trigwell, S.; Gibson, T. L.; Williams, M. K.; Benafan, O.

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the low-temperature thermo-mechanical training of shape memory alloys (SMA) has been developed. The experimental SMA materials are being evaluated as prototypes for applicability in novel thermal management systems for future cryogenic applications. Alloys providing two-way actuation at cryogenic temperatures are the chief target. The mechanical training regimen was focused on the controlled movement of rectangular strips, with S-bend configurations, at temperatures as low as 30 K. The custom holding fixture included temperature sensors and a low heat-leak linear actuator with a magnetic coupling. The fixture was mounted to a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler providing up to 25 W of cooling power at 20 K and housed within a custom vacuum chamber. Operations included both training cycles and verification of shape memory movement. The system design and operation are discussed. Results of the training for select prototype alloys are presented.

  14. Spray forming of NiTi and NiTiPd shape-memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ronald; Mabe, James; Ruggeri, Robert; Noebe, Ronald

    2008-03-01

    In the work to be presented, vacuum plasma spray forming has been used as a process to deposit and consolidate prealloyed NiTi and NiTiPd powders into near net shape actuators. Testing showed that excellent shape memory behavior could be developed in the deposited materials and the investigation proved that VPS forming could be a means to directly form a wide range of shape memory alloy components. The results of DSC characterization and actual actuation test results will be presented demonstrating the behavior of a Nitinol 55 alloy and a higher transition temperature NiTiPd alloy in the form of torque tube actuators that could be used in aircraft and aerospace controls.

  15. Spray Forming of NiTi and NiTiPd Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mabe, James; Ruggeri, Robert; Noebe, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    In the work to be presented, vacuum plasma spray forming has been used as a process to deposit and consolidate prealloyed NiTi and NiTiPd powders into near net shape actuators. Testing showed that excellent shape memory behavior could be developed in the deposited materials and the investigation proved that VPS forming could be a means to directly form a wide range of shape memory alloy components. The results of DSC characterization and actual actuation test results will be presented demonstrating the behavior of a Nitinol 55 alloy and a higher transition temperature NiTiPd alloy in the form of torque tube actuators that could be used in aircraft and aerospace controls.

  16. The Investigation of a Shape Memory Alloy Micro-Damper for MEMS Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiang; Cho, Chongdu

    2007-01-01

    Some shape memory alloys like NiTi show noticeable high damping property in pseudoelastic range. Due to its unique characteristics, a NiTi alloy is commonly used for passive damping applications, in which the energy may be dissipated by the conversion from mechanical to thermal energy. This study presents a shape memory alloy based micro-damper, which exploits the pseudoelasticity of NiTi wires for energy dissipation. The mechanical model and functional principle of the micro-damper are explained in detail. Moreover, the mechanical behavior of NiTi wires subjected to various temperatures, strain rates and strain amplitudes is observed. Resulting from those experimental results, the damping properties of the micro-damper involving secant stiffness, energy dissipation and loss factor are analyzed. The result indicates the proposed NiTi based micro-damper exhibits good energy dissipation ability, compared with conventional materials damper.

  17. Apparatus and method for low-temperature training of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanger, A. M.; Fesmire, J. E.; Trigwell, S.; Gibson, T. L.; Williams, M. K.; Benafan, O.

    2015-12-01

    An apparatus and method for the low-temperature thermo-mechanical training of shape memory alloys (SMA) has been developed. The experimental SMA materials are being evaluated as prototypes for applicability in novel thermal management systems for future cryogenic applications. Alloys providing two-way actuation at cryogenic temperatures are the chief target. The mechanical training regimen was focused on the controlled movement of rectangular strips, with S-bend configurations, at temperatures as low as 30 K. The custom holding fixture included temperature sensors and a low heat-leak linear actuator with a magnetic coupling. The fixture was mounted to a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler providing up to 25 W of cooling power at 20 K and housed within a custom vacuum chamber. Operations included both training cycles and verification of shape memory movement. The system design and operation are discussed. Results of the training for select prototype alloys are presented.

  18. Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy - a tool to probe magneto-elastic properties of ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heczko, Oleg; Seiner, Hanuš; Sedlák, Petr; Kopeček, Jaromír; Kopecký, Vít; Landa, Michal

    2013-02-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) was used to investigate the changes of elastic properties induced by magnetic field in magnetic shape memory alloys Ni-Mn-Ga and Co-Ni-Al. In contrast to large magneto-elastic response of Ni2MnGa austenite, there is only very weak response of Co-Ni-Al. This indicates that the austenite phase of Ni-Mn-Ga can have a privileged position and this may be a reason for the existence of magnetic shape memory effect. In contrast to austenite, the magneto-elastic response in Ni-Mn-Ga martensite is very small with large damping due to existence of twin boundaries. The measurement showed that RUS can be a powerful method to probe magneto-elastic properties of shape memory alloys.

  19. Ultrafast optical manipulation of atomic arrangements in chalcogenide alloy memory materials.

    PubMed

    Makino, Kotaro; Tominaga, Junji; Hase, Muneaki

    2011-01-17

    A class of chalcogenide alloy materials that shows significant changes in optical properties upon an amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition has lead to development of large data capacities in modern optical data storage. Among chalcogenide phase-change materials, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) is most widely used because of its reliability. We use a pair of femtosecond light pulses to demonstrate the ultrafast optical manipulation of atomic arrangements from tetrahedral (amorphous) to octahedral (crystalline) Ge-coordination in GST superlattices. Depending on the parameters of the second pump-pulse, ultrafast nonthermal phase-change occurred within only few-cycles (≈1 picosecond) of the coherent motion corresponding to a GeTe4 local vibration. Using the ultrafast switch in chalcogenide alloy memory could lead to a major paradigm shift in memory devices beyond the current generation of silicon-based flash-memory. PMID:21263667

  20. A Low Hysteresis NiTiFe Shape Memory Alloy Based Thermal Conduction Switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemanski, J. L.; Krishnan, V. B.; Manjeri, R. Mahadevan; Notardonato, W. U.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2006-03-01

    Shape memory alloys possess the ability to return to a preset shape by undergoing a solid state phase transformation at a particular temperature. This work reports on the development and testing of a low temperature thermal conduction switch that incorporates a NiTiFe shape memory element for actuation. The switch was developed to provide a variable conductive pathway between liquid methane and liquid oxygen dewars in order to passively regulate the temperature of methane. The shape memory element in the switch undergoes a rhombohedral or R-phase transformation that is associated with a small hysteresis (typically 1-2 degrees C) and offers the advantage of precision control over a set temperature range. For the NiTiFe alloy used, its thermomechanical processing, subsequent characterization using dilatometry, differential scanning calorimetry and implementation in the conduction switch configuration are addressed.

  1. Surface corrosion enhancement of passive films on NiTi shape memory alloy in different solutions.

    PubMed

    Jinlong, Lv; Tongxiang, Liang; Chen, Wang; Limin, Dong

    2016-06-01

    The corrosion behaviors of NiTi shape memory alloy in NaCl solution, H2SO4 solution and borate buffer solution were investigated. It was found that TiO2 in passive film improved the corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory. However, low corrosion resistance of passive film was observed in low pH value acidic solution due to TiO2 dissolution. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of NiTi shape memory alloy decreased with the increasing of passivated potential in the three solutions. The donor density in passive film increased with the increasing of passivated potential. Different solutions affect the semiconductor characteristics of the passive film. The reducing in the corrosion resistance was attributed to the more donor concentrations in passive film and thinner thickness of the passive film. PMID:27040211

  2. Influence of volume magnetostriction on the thermodynamic properties of Ni-Mn-Ga shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kosogor, Anna; L'vov, Victor A.; Cesari, Eduard

    2015-10-07

    In the present article, the thermodynamic properties of Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys exhibiting the martensitic transformations (MTs) above and below Curie temperature are compared. It is shown that when MT goes below Curie temperature, the elastic and thermal properties of alloy noticeably depend on magnetization value due to spontaneous volume magnetostriction. However, the separation of magnetic parts from the basic characteristics of MT is a difficult task, because the volume magnetostriction does not qualitatively change the transformational behaviour of alloy. This problem is solved for several Ni-Mn-Ga alloys by means of the quantitative theoretical analysis of experimental data obtained in the course of stress-strain tests. For each alloy, the entropy change and the transformation heat evolved in the course of MT are evaluated, first, from the results of stress-strain tests and, second, from differential scanning calorimetry data. For all alloys, a quantitative agreement between the values obtained in two different ways is observed. It is shown that the magnetic part of transformation heat exceeds the non-magnetic one for the Ni-Mn-Ga alloys undergoing MTs in ferromagnetic state, while the elevated values of transformation heat measured for the alloys undergoing MTs in paramagnetic state are caused by large MT strains.

  3. Ultrasound-modulated shape memory and payload release effects in a biodegradable cylindrical rod made of chitosan-functionalized PLGA microspheres.

    PubMed

    Bao, Min; Zhou, Qihui; Dong, Wen; Lou, Xiangxin; Zhang, Yanzhong

    2013-06-10

    Minimally invasive implants and/or scaffolds integrated with multiple functionalities are of interest in the clinical settings. In this paper, chitosan (CTS) functionalized poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres containing a model payload, lysozyme (Lyz), were prepared by a water-in-oil-in-water emulsion method, from which cylindrical shaped rod (5 mm in diameter) was fabricated by sintering the composite microspheres in a mold. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was then employed as a unique technique to enable shape memory and payload release effects of the three-dimensional (3-D) structure. It was found that incorporation of CTS into PLGA microspheres could regulate the transition temperature Ttrans of the microsphere from 45 to 50 °C and affect shape memory ratio of the fabricated cylindrical rod to some extent. Shape memory test and drug release assay proved that HIFU could modulate the shape recovery process and synchronize the release kinetics of the encapsulated Lyz in the rod in a switchable manner. Moreover, the two processes could be manipulated by varying the acoustic power and insonation duration. Mechanical tests of the microspheres-based rod before and after ultrasound irradiation revealed its compressive properties in the range of trabecular bone. Examination of the degradation behavior indicated that the introduction of CTS into the PLGA microspheres also alleviated acidic degradation characteristic of the PLGA-dominant cylindrical rod. With HIFU, this study thus demonstrated the desired capabilities of shape recovery and payload release effects integrated in one microspheres-based biodegradable cylindrical structure. PMID:23675980

  4. Biomechanical Analysis of a Newly Developed Shape Memory Alloy Hook in a Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion (TLIF) In Vitro Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Xu, Jing; Zhu, Yuexing; Li, Jiukun; Zhou, Si; Tian, Shunliang; Xiang, Yucheng; Liu, Xingmo; Zheng, Ying; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this biomechanical study was to evaluate the stability provided by a newly developed shape memory alloy hook (SMAH) in a cadaveric transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) model. Methods Six human cadaveric spines (L1-S2) were tested in an in vitro flexibility experiment by applying pure moments of ±8 Nm in flexion/extension, left/right lateral bending, and left/right axial rotation. After intact testing, a TLIF was performed at L4-5. Each specimen was tested for the following constructs: unilateral SMAH (USMAH); bilateral SMAH (BSMAH); unilateral pedicle screws and rods (UPS); and bilateral pedicle screws and rods (BPS). The L3–L4, L4–L5, and L5-S1 range of motion (ROM) were recorded by a Motion Analysis System. Results Compared to the other constructs, the BPS provided the most stability. The UPS significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion and lateral bending; the BSMAH significantly reduced the ROM in extension/flexion, lateral bending, and axial rotation; and the USMAH significantly reduced the ROM in flexion and left lateral bending compared with the intact spine (p<0.05). The USMAH slightly reduced the ROM in extension, right lateral bending and axial rotation (p>0.05). Stability provided by the USMAH compared with the UPS was not significantly different. ROMs of adjacent segments increased in all fixed constructs (p>0.05). Conclusions Bilateral SMAH fixation can achieve immediate stability after L4–5 TLIF in vitro. Further studies are required to determine whether the SMAH can achieve fusion in vivo and alleviate adjacent segment degeneration. PMID:25474112

  5. Relationship among grain size, annealing twins and shape memory effect in Fe–Mn–Si based shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gaixia; Peng, Huabei; Zhang, Chengyan; Wang, Shanling; Wen, Yuhua

    2016-07-01

    In order to clarify the relationship among grain size, annealing twins and the shape memory effect in Fe–Mn–Si based shape memory alloys, the Fe–21.63Mn–5.60Si–9.32Cr–5.38Ni (weight %) alloy with a grain size ranging from 48.9 μm–253.6 μm was obtained by adjusting the heating temperature or heating time after 20% cold-rolling. The densities of grain boundaries and annealing twins increase with a decrease in grain size, whereas the volume fraction and width of stress-induced ε martensite after 9% deformation at Ms + 10 K decrease. This result indicates that grain refinement raises the constraint effects of grain boundaries and annealing twins upon martensitic transformation. In this case, the ability to suppress the plastic deformation and facilitate the stress-induced ε martensite transformation deteriorates after grain refinement owing to the enhancement of the constraint effects. It is demonstrated by the result that the difference at Ms + 10 K between the critical stress for plastic yielding and that for inducing martensitic transformation is smaller for the specimen with a grain size of 48.9 μm than for the specimen with a grain size of 253.6 μm. Therefore, the shape memory effect declined by decreasing the grain size.

  6. Vibration Characteristics of a Large-Capacity Complex Vibration Source Using a Titanium Alloy Complex Transverse Vibration Rod with Two Stepped Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Kikuchi, Yuya

    2004-05-01

    The configurations of large-capacity 27 kHz ultrasonic complex vibration sources with multiple longitudinal transducers are proposed and studied. Ultrasonic complex vibration systems are effective for various types of metal welding and essential for new applications in various industries. The large-capacity vibration source consists of a complex transverse rod with a welding tip (titanium alloy), a complex vibration rod with a flange and a stepped part for holding the system (stainless-steel), a one-wavelength longitudinal vibration disk (aluminum alloy) and six bolt-clamped Langevin type piezo-electric ceramic (PZT) transducers (BLTs) installed along the circumference of the disk at an angle difference of 60°. The vibration source is driven using three driving systems with three transformers at a phase difference of 120°, and the disk is driven in a circular locus. The transverse vibration rod installed at the center of the disk is driven transversally and the welding tip of the rod vibrates in a circular locus.

  7. The nanoscale mechanical properties of nickel-titanium shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Gordon A., III

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are a class of metal alloys which can recover large amounts of strain through a solid-state phase change known as a martensitic transformation. Nickel titanium is the most well-known of these alloys, and although it is widely used, relatively little is known about its potential for use in nanotechnology. This thesis contains research designed to examine the mechanical properties of nickel titanium at the nanometer scale, and determine its suitability for use in nanotechnology applications. Results from nanoindentation-atomic force microscopy experiments show indentations in the surface of nickel titanium thin films can recover by the thermally induced shape memory effect. This process is explained in the context of a new model based on the expanding spherical cavity model, which can also be used to predict the onset of substrate effects during indentation. A new digital information storage device based on this phenomenon will also be discussed. Finally, the fabrication and characterization of mechanically active nickel titanium nanoparticles is presented. The research presented indicates that nickel titanium shape memory alloy is quite suitable for nanotechnology applications.

  8. Static critical phenomena in Co-Ni-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sethi, Brahmananda Sarma, S. Srinivasan, A. Santra, S. B.

    2014-04-24

    Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are smart materials because they exhibit temperature driven shape memory effect and magnetic field induced strain. Thus two types of energy, i.e. thermal and magnetic, are used to control their shape memory behaviour. Study of critical phenomenon in such materials has received increased experimental and theoretical attention for better understanding of the magnetic phase transition behavior as well as further development of ferromagnetic shape memory materials. In the present study we report the preparation and characterization of bulk Co{sub 45}Ni{sub 25}Ga{sub 30} alloy, prepared by a sequence of arc melting technique followed by homogenization at 1150 °C for 24 hours and ice-water quenching. Structural and magnetic properties of the alloys were studied by means of X-ray diffraction and vibrating sample magnetometer in an applied field range of ±18 kOe equipped with a high temperature oven. We have determined the critical temperature T{sub C} (∼375.5 K) and the critical exponents viz; β=0.40, γ=1.68 and δ=5.2. Asymptotic critical exponents β, γ, and δ obey Widom scaling relation, γ+β=βδ, and the magnetization data satisfy the scaling equation of state for second-order phase transition in the asymptotic critical region.

  9. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPt High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Orlando; Noebe, Ronald; Biles, Tiffany; Garg, Anita; Palczer, Anna; Scheiman, Daniel; Seifert, Hans Jurgen; Kaufman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Pt additions substituted for Ni in NiTi alloys are known to increase the transformation temperature of the alloy but only at fairly high Pt levels. However, until now only ternary compositions with a very specific stoichiometry, Ni50-xPtxTi50, have been investigated and then only to very limited extent. In order to learn about this potential high-temperature shape memory alloy system, a series of over twenty alloys along and on either side of a line of constant stoichiometry between NiTi and TiPt were arc melted, homogenized, and characterized in terms of their microstructure, transformation temperatures, and hardness. The resulting microstructures were examined by scanning electron microscopy and the phase compositions quantified by energy dispersive spectroscopy."Stoichiometric" compositions along a line of constant stoichiometry between NiTi to TiPt were essentially single phase but by any deviations from a stoichiometry of (Ni,Pt)50Ti50 resulted in the presence of at least two different intermetallic phases, depending on the overall composition of the alloy. Essentially all alloys, whether single or two-phase, still under went a martensitic transformation. It was found that the transformation temperatures were depressed with initial Pt additions but at levels greater than 10 at.% the transformation temperature increased linearly with Pt content. Also, the transformation temperatures were relatively insensitive to alloy stoichiometry within the range of alloys examined. Finally, the dependence of hardness on Pt content for a series of Ni50-xPtxTi50 alloys showed solution softening at low Pt levels, while hardening was observed in ternary alloys containing more than about 10 at.% Pt. On either side of these "stoichiometric" compositions, hardness was also found to increase significantly.

  10. Improvement in the Shape Memory Response of Ti50.5Ni24.5Pd25 High-Temperature Shape Memory Alloy with Scandium Microalloying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atli, K. C.; Karaman, I; Noebe, R. D.; Garg, A.; Chumlyakov, Y. I.; Kireeva, I. V.

    2010-01-01

    A Ti(50.5)Ni(24.5)Pd25 high-temperature shape memory alloy (HTSMA) is microalloyed with 0.5 at. pct scandium (Sc) to enhance its shape-memory characteristics, in particular, dimensional stability under repeated thermomechanical cycles. For both Ti(50.5)Ni(24.5)Pd25 and the Sc-alloyed material, differential scanning calorimetry is conducted for multiple cycles to characterize cyclic stability of the transformation temperatures. The microstructure is evaluated using electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Isobaric thermal cycling experiments are used to determine transformation temperatures, dimensional stability, and work output as a function of stress. The Sc-doped alloy displays more stable shape memory response with smaller irrecoverable strain and narrower thermal hysteresis than the baseline ternary alloy. This improvement in performance is attributed to the solid solution hardening effect of Sc.

  11. Thermomechanical behavior of NiTiPdPt high temperature shape memory alloy springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. E.; Padula, S. A., II; Noebe, R. D.; Benafan, O.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    2014-12-01

    Transformation strains in high temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) are generally smaller than for conventional NiTi alloys and can be purposefully limited in cases where stability and repeatability at elevated temperatures are desired. Yet such alloys can still be used in actuator applications that require large strokes when used in the form of springs. Thus there is a need to understand the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy spring actuators, particularly those consisting of alternative alloys. In this work, a modular test setup was assembled with the objective of acquiring stroke, stress, temperature, and moment data in real time during joule heating and forced convective cooling of Ni19.5Ti50.5Pd25Pt5 HTSMA springs. The spring actuators were subjected to both monotonic axial loading and thermomechanical cycling. The role of rotational constraints (i.e., by restricting rotation or allowing for free rotation at the ends of the springs) on stroke performance was also assessed. Finally, recognizing that evolution in the material microstructure can result in changes in HTSMA spring geometry, the effect of material microstructural evolution on spring performance was examined. This was done by taking into consideration the changes in geometry that occurred during thermomechanical cycling. This work thus provides insight into designing with HTSMA springs and predicting their thermomechanical performance.

  12. Corrosion Behavior of Ti-55Ni-1.2Co High Stiffness Shape Memory Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Norwich, Dennis W.; Ehrlinspiel, Michael

    2014-07-01

    The corrosion behavior of high stiffness nominal Ti-55Ni-1.2Co (wt.%) shape memory alloys (SMAs) was systematically investigated in the present study including straight wires, wire-formed stents, and laser-cut stents. It was found that the corrosion behavior of Ti-55Ni-1.2Co alloys is comparable with those of binary NiTiNol counterparts, which is attributed to the small alloying amount of cobalt. Additionally, the corrosion resistance of high stiffness Ti-55Ni-1.2Co SMAs is independent of the stent-forming method. To explore the galvanic corrosion susceptibility between Ti-55Ni-1.2Co and binary NiTiNol alloys, a NiTiNol sleeve was laser welded to the Ti-55Ni-1.2Co stent. Interestingly, there is no galvanic corrosion observed in this NiTiCo-NiTiNol component, even after immersion of the component in phosphate-buffered saline solution at 37 °C for three months. This study will shed some light on the industrial applications of high stiffness Ti-55Ni-1.2Co shape memory alloys.

  13. Shape Memory Effect in Cast Versus Deformation-Processed NiTiNb Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Reginald F.; Lanba, Asheesh; Ozbulut, Osman E.; Tittmann, Bernhard R.

    2015-06-01

    The shape memory effect (SME) response of a deformation-processed NiTiNb shape memory alloy is benchmarked against the response of a cast alloy. The insoluble Nb element ternary addition is known to widen the hysteresis with respect to the binary NiTi alloy. Cast microstructures naturally consist of a cellular arrangement of characteristic eutectic microconstituents surrounding primary matrix regions. Deformation processing typically aligns the microconstituents such that the microstructure resembles discontinuous fiber-reinforced composites. Processed alloys are typically characterized for heat-to-recover applications and thus deformed at constant temperature and subsequently heated for SME recovery, and the critical stress levels are expected to facilitate plastic deformation of the microconstituents. The current work employs thermal cycling under constant bias stresses below those critical levels. This comparative study of cast versus deformation-processed NiTiNb alloys contrasts the strain-temperature responses in terms of forward Δ T F = M s - M f and reverse Δ T R = A f - A s temperature intervals, the thermal hysteresis, and the recovery ratio. The results underscore that the deformation-processed microstructure inherently promotes irreversibility and differential forward and reverse transformation pathways.

  14. Tribological characteristics of ceramic conversion treated NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, X.; Dong, H.

    2007-09-01

    NiTi shape memory alloys are very attractive for medical implants and devices (such as orthopaedic and orthodontic implants) and various actuators. However, wear is a major concern for such applications and a novel surface engineering process, ceramic conversion treatment, has recently been developed to address this problem. In this study, the tribological characteristics of ceramic conversion treated NiTi alloy have been systematically investigated under dry unidirectional wear, reciprocating-corrosion wear and fretting-corrosion wear condition. Based on the experimental results, the wear behaviour under different conditions is compared and wear mechanisms involved are discussed.

  15. Nanostructured Nb reinforced NiTi shape memory alloy composite with high strength and narrow hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Shijie; Cui, Lishan; Jiang, Daqiang; Yu, Cun; Jiang, Jiang; Shi, Xiaobin; Liu, Zhenyang; Wang, Shan; Wang, Yandong; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2013-06-01

    An in-situ nanostructured Nb reinforced NiTi shape-memory alloy composite was fabricated by mechanical reduction of an as-cast Nb-NiTi eutectic alloy. The composite exhibits large elastic strain, high strength, narrow hysteresis, and high mechanical energy storage density and efficiency during tensile cycling. In situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction revealed that these superior properties were attributed to the strong coupling between nanostructured Nb and NiTi matrix during deformation. Furthermore, this study offers a good understanding of the deformation behavior of the nanoscale reinforcement embedded in the metal matrix deformed by stress-induced phase transformation.

  16. Properties of Porous TiNbZr Shape Memory Alloy Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Isostatic Pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, L. W.; Chung, C. Y.; Tong, Y. X.; Zheng, Y. F.

    2011-07-01

    In the past decades, systematic researches have been focused on studying Ti-Nb-based SMAs by adding ternary elements, such as Mo, Sn, Zr, etc. However, only arc melting or induction melting methods, with subsequent hot or cold rolling, were used to fabricate these Ni-free SMAs. There is no work related to powder metallurgy and porous structures. This study focuses on the fabrication and characterization of porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr (at.%) shape memory alloys produced using elemental powders by means of mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing. It is found that the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloys prepared by the HIP process exhibit a homogenous pore distribution with spherical pores, while the pores have irregular shape in the specimen prepared by conventional sintering. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the solid solution-treated Ti-22Nb-6Zr alloy consists of both β phase and α″ martensite phase. Morphologies of martensite were observed. Finally, the porous Ti-22Nb-6Zr SMAs produced by both MA and HIP exhibit good mechanical properties, such as superior superelasticity, with maximum recoverable strain of ~3% and high compressive strength.

  17. Shape Memory Alloys and their Applications in Power Generation and Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun

    2013-07-01

    The shape memory effect is closely related to the reversible martensitic phase transformation, which is diffusionless and involves shear deformation. The recoverable transformation between the two phases with different crystalline symmetry results in reversible changes in physical properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetization, and elasticity. Accompanying the transformation is a change of entropy. Fascinating applications are developed based on these changes. In this paper, the history, fundamentals and technical challenges of both thermoelastic and ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are briefly reviewed; applications related to energy conversion such as power generation and refrigeration as well as recent developments will be discussed.

  18. Shape Memory Alloys and Their Applications in Power Generation and Refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jun

    2013-03-27

    The shape memory effect is closely related to the reversible martensitic phase transformation, which is diffusionless and involves shear deformation. The recoverable transformation between the two phases with different crystalline symmetry results in reversible changes in physical properties such as electrical conductivity, magnetization, and elasticity. Accompanying the transformation is a change of entropy. Fascinating applications are developed based on these changes. In this paper, the history, fundamentals and technical challenges of both thermoelastic and ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are briefly reviewed; applications related to energy conversion such as power generation and refrigeration as well as recent developments will be discussed.

  19. Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution in magnetic shape memory alloys: Phase field simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yongmei M.

    2009-02-09

    Effects of twin boundary mobility on domain microstructure evolution during magnetic field-induced deformation in magnetic shape memory alloys are studied by phase field micromagnetic microelastic modeling. The simulations show that different twin boundary mobilities lead to drastically different domain microstructures and evolution pathways, yielding very different magnetization and strain responses, even with opposite signs. The study also reveals complex domain phenomena in magnetic shape memory alloys.

  20. Feedforward-Feedback Hybrid Control for Magnetic Shape Memory Alloy Actuators Based on the Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Miaolei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Jingyuan

    2014-01-01

    As a new type of smart material, magnetic shape memory alloy has the advantages of a fast response frequency and outstanding strain capability in the field of microdrive and microposition actuators. The hysteresis nonlinearity in magnetic shape memory alloy actuators, however, limits system performance and further application. Here we propose a feedforward-feedback hybrid control method to improve control precision and mitigate the effects of the hysteresis nonlinearity of magnetic shape memory alloy actuators. First, hysteresis nonlinearity compensation for the magnetic shape memory alloy actuator is implemented by establishing a feedforward controller which is an inverse hysteresis model based on Krasnosel'skii-Pokrovskii operator. Secondly, the paper employs the classical Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control with feedforward control to comprise the hybrid control system, and for further enhancing the adaptive performance of the system and improving the control accuracy, the Radial Basis Function neural network self-tuning Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control replaces the classical Proportion Integration Differentiation feedback control. Utilizing self-learning ability of the Radial Basis Function neural network obtains Jacobian information of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator for the on-line adjustment of parameters in Proportion Integration Differentiation controller. Finally, simulation results show that the hybrid control method proposed in this paper can greatly improve the control precision of magnetic shape memory alloy actuator and the maximum tracking error is reduced from 1.1% in the open-loop system to 0.43% in the hybrid control system. PMID:24828010

  1. Development of a shape memory alloy actuator for a robotic eye prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunton, T. B. Wolfe; Faulkner, M. G.; Wolfaardt, J.

    2005-08-01

    The quality of life of patients who wear an orbital prosthesis would be vastly improved if their prostheses were also able to execute vertical and horizontal motion. This requires appropriate actuation and control systems to create an intelligent prosthesis. A method of actuation that meets the demanding design criteria is currently not available. The present work considers an activation system that follows a design philosophy of biomimicry, simplicity and space optimization. While several methods of actuation were considered, shape memory alloys were chosen for their high power density, high actuation forces and high displacements. The behaviour of specific shape memory alloys as an actuator was investigated to determine the force obtained, the transformation temperatures and details of the material processing. In addition, a large-scale prototype was constructed to validate the response of the proposed system.

  2. Variational prediction of the mechanical behavior of shape memory alloys based on thermal experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junker, Philipp; Jaeger, Stefanie; Kastner, Oliver; Eggeler, Gunther; Hackl, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we present simulations of shape memory alloys which serve as first examples demonstrating the predicting character of energy-based material models. We begin with a theoretical approach for the derivation of the caloric parts of the Helmholtz free energy. Afterwards, experimental results for DSC measurements are presented. Then, we recall a micromechanical model based on the principle of the minimum of the dissipation potential for the simulation of polycrystalline shape memory alloys. The previously determined caloric parts of the Helmholtz free energy close the set of model parameters without the need of parameter fitting. All quantities are derived directly from experiments. Finally, we compare finite element results for tension tests to experimental data and show that the model identified by thermal measurements can predict mechanically induced phase transformations and thus rationalize global material behavior without any further assumptions.

  3. In-flight tracking of helicopter rotor blades using shape memory alloy actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Jeanette J.; Chopra, Inderjit

    2001-02-01

    This paper describes the concept, design, fabrication and control of a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuator for tracking helicopter rotor blades while in-flight. A NACA 0012 wing section that has a 12 in chord and span was constructed with a trailing-edge tab with a 4 in span and a 2.4 in chord. A shape memory alloy wire actuator was embedded into the wing section. The actuator consists of a wire clamp, a hinge tube and several pre-strained, 0.015 in diameter SMA (Nitinol) wires. It was shown that with SMA wires that have 3.158% initial pre-strain, a tab deflection of 29° could be obtained.

  4. Investigation of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Previous work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) involved fabrication and testing of composite beams with embedded, pre-strained shape memory alloy (SMA) ribbons. That study also provided comparison of experimental results with numerical predictions from a research code making use of a new thermoelastic model for shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures. The previous work showed qualitative validation of the numerical model. However, deficiencies in the experimental-numerical correlation were noted and hypotheses for the discrepancies were given for further investigation. The goal of this work is to refine the experimental measurement and numerical modeling approaches in order to better understand the discrepancies, improve the correlation between prediction and measurement, and provide rigorous quantitative validation of the numerical model. Thermal buckling, post-buckling, and random responses to thermal and inertial (base acceleration) loads are studied. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results, thereby quantitatively validating the numerical tool.

  5. Design of a Shape Memory Alloy deployment hinge for reflector facets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, W. S.; Rogers, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A design concept for a Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuated hinge mechanism for deploying segmented facet-type reflector surfaces on antenna truss structures is presented. The mechanism uses nitinol, a nickel-titanium shape memory alloy, as a displacement-force micro-actuator. An electrical current is used to resistively heat a 'plastically' elongated SMA actuator wire, causing it to contract in response to a thermally-induced phase transformation. The resulting tension creates a moment, imparting rotary motion between two adjacent panels. Mechanical stops are designed into the device to limit its range of motion and to establish positioning accuracy at the termination of deployment. The concept and its operation are discussed in detail, and an analytical dynamic simulation model is presented. The model has been used to perform nondimensionalized parametric design studies.

  6. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  7. Performance of Integrated Fiber Optic, Piezoelectric, and Shape Memory Alloy Actuators/Sensors in Thermoset Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trottier, C. Michael

    1996-01-01

    Recently, scientists and engineers have investigated the advantages of smart materials and structures by including actuators in material systems for controlling and altering the response of structural environments. Applications of these materials systems include vibration suppression/isolation, precision positioning, damage detection and tunable devices. Some of the embedded materials being investigated for accomplishing these tasks include piezoelectric ceramics, shape memory alloys, and fiber optics. These materials have some benefits and some shortcomings; each is being studied for use in active material design in the SPICES (Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures) Consortium. The focus of this paper concerns the manufacturing aspects of smart structures by incorporating piezoelectric ceramics, shape memory alloys and fiber optics in a reinforced thermoset matrix via resin transfer molding (RTM).

  8. The alloy with a memory, 55-Nitinol: Its physical metallurgy, properties, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, C. M.; Wagner, H. J.; Wasilewski, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A series of nickel titanium alloys (55-Nitinol), which are unique in that they possess a shape memory, are described. Components made of these materials that are altered in their shapes by deformation under proper conditions return to predetermined shapes when they are heated to the proper temperature range. The shape memory, together with the force exerted and the ability of the material to do mechanical work as it returns to its predetermined shape, suggest a wide variety of industrial applications for the alloy. Also included are discussions of the physical metallurgy and the mechanical, physical, and chemical properties of 55-Nitinol; procedures for melting and processing the material into useful shapes; and a summary of applications.

  9. Wireless and passive temperature indicator utilizing the large hysteresis of magnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmair, Bernhard; Liu, Jian; Huber, Thomas; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Suess, Dieter

    2012-07-01

    An ultra-low cost, wireless magnetoelastic temperature indicator is presented. It comprises a magnetostrictive amorphous ribbon, a Ni-Mn-Sn-Co magnetic shape memory alloy with a highly tunable transformation temperature, and a bias magnet. It allows to remotely detect irreversible changes due to transgressions of upper or lower temperature thresholds. Therefore, the proposed temperature indicator is particularly suitable for monitoring the temperature-controlled supply chain of, e.g., deep frozen and chilled food or pharmaceuticals.

  10. Constitutive modelling of magnetic shape memory alloys with discrete and continuous symmetries

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, K.; Lagoudas, D. C.

    2014-01-01

    A free energy-based constitutive formulation is considered for magnetic shape memory alloys. Internal state variables are introduced whose evolution describes the transition from reference state to the deformed and transformed one. We impose material symmetry restrictions on the Gibbs free energy and on the evolution equations of the internal state variables. Discrete symmetry is considered for single crystals, whereas continuous symmetry is considered for polycrystalline materials. PMID:25197247

  11. Operational physical conditions for a solid-state-engine (SSE) applying shape memory (SM) alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kajamaa, J.

    1987-03-01

    The physical conditions for a solid-state-engine (SSE) applying shape memory (SM) alloy is treated based on both experimental results and theoretical considerations. First, the mechanical efficiency is derived. It is compared to that of the fuel engine. Then, the energy transformation diagram is drawn. By means of this the overall efficiency of the system is defined. Also it is concluded that this system can store a part of the accepted kinetic energy as a potential energy in a reversible manner.

  12. X-ray diffraction study of the phase transformations in NiTi shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Uchil, J.; Fernandes, F.M. Braz . E-mail: kkmahesh@rediffmail.com

    2007-03-15

    The phase transformations occurring in heat-treated NiTi shape memory alloys have been studied through the analysis of variation in integrated peak area (integrated intensity) with temperature, under the XRD peak profiles in the transformation temperature range. For this purpose, integrated peak area under the prominent peak corresponding to (110) plane of the austenitic phase has been chosen. The results so obtained are compared with those got from the DSC method. The XRD method is found to be more sensitive.

  13. Design of torque actuator based on ferromagnetic shape memory alloy composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Victor J.; Taya, Minoru; Lee, Jae Kon; Kusaka, Masahiro; Wada, Taishi

    2004-07-01

    Experimental tests were conducted on a torque actuator based on ferromagnetic shape memory alloy composite and performance data obtained. Based on experimental results of the initial design, several design changes were made to the actuator that resulted in improved torque capability and maximum angle of twist compared to the original design. A full 3-D finite element method model was undertaken to optimize magnetic flux lines generated by the hybrid magnet.

  14. Constitutive modelling of magnetic shape memory alloys with discrete and continuous symmetries.

    PubMed

    Haldar, K; Lagoudas, D C

    2014-09-01

    A free energy-based constitutive formulation is considered for magnetic shape memory alloys. Internal state variables are introduced whose evolution describes the transition from reference state to the deformed and transformed one. We impose material symmetry restrictions on the Gibbs free energy and on the evolution equations of the internal state variables. Discrete symmetry is considered for single crystals, whereas continuous symmetry is considered for polycrystalline materials. PMID:25197247

  15. Assessment of Shape Memory Alloys - From Atoms To Actuators - Via In Situ Neutron Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benafan, Othmane

    2014-01-01

    As shape memory alloys (SMAs) become an established actuator technology, it is important to identify the fundamental mechanisms responsible for their performance by understanding microstructure performance relationships from processing to final form. Yet, microstructural examination of SMAs at stress and temperature is often a challenge since structural changes occur with stress and temperature and microstructures cannot be preserved through quenching or after stress removal, as would be the case for conventional materials. One solution to this dilemma is in situ neutron diffraction, which has been applied to the investigation of SMAs and has offered a unique approach to reveal the fundamental micromechanics and microstructural aspects of bulk SMAs in a non-destructive setting. Through this technique, it is possible to directly correlate the micromechanical responses (e.g., internal residual stresses, lattice strains), microstructural evolutions (e.g., texture, defects) and phase transformation properties (e.g., phase fractions, kinetics) to the macroscopic actuator behavior. In this work, in situ neutron diffraction was systematically employed to evaluate the deformation and transformation behavior of SMAs under typical actuator conditions. Austenite and martensite phases, yield behavior, variant selection and transformation temperatures were characterized for a polycrystalline NiTi (49.9 at. Ni). As the alloy transforms under thermomechanical loading, the measured textures and lattice plane-level variations were directly related to the cyclic actuation-strain characteristics and the dimensional instability (strain ratcheting) commonly observed in this alloy. The effect of training on the shape memory characteristics of the alloy and the development of two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) were also assessed. The final conversion from a material to a useful actuator, typically termed shape setting, was also investigated in situ during constrained heatingcooling and

  16. In vitro corrosion behaviour of Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys in Ringer's physiological solution.

    PubMed

    Rosalbino, F; Macciò, D; Scavino, G; Saccone, A

    2012-04-01

    The nearly equiatomic Ni-Ti alloy (Nitinol) has been widely employed in the medical and dental fields owing to its shape memory or superelastic properties. The main concern about the use of this alloy derives form the fact that it contains a large amount of nickel (55% by mass), which is suspected responsible for allergic, toxic and carcinogenic reactions. In this work, the in vitro corrosion behavior of two Ti-Nb-Sn shape memory alloys, Ti-16Nb-5Sn and Ti-18Nb-4Sn (mass%) has been investigated and compared with that of Nitinol. The in vitro corrosion resistance was assessed in naturally aerated Ringer's physiological solution at 37°C by corrosion potential and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements as a function of exposure time, and potentiodynamic polarization curves. Corrosion potential values indicated that both Ni-Ti and Ti-Nb-Sn alloys undergo spontaneous passivation due to spontaneously formed oxide film passivating the metallic surface, in the aggressive environment. It also indicated that the tendency for the formation of a spontaneous oxide is greater for the Ti-18Nb-5Sn alloy. Significantly low anodic current density values were obtained from the polarization curves, indicating a typical passive behaviour for all investigated alloys, but Nitinol exhibited breakdown of passivity at potentials above approximately 450 mV(SCE), suggesting lower corrosion protection characteristics of its oxide film compared to the Ti-Nb-Sn alloys. EIS studies showed high impedance values for all samples, increasing with exposure time, indicating an improvement in corrosion resistance of the spontaneous oxide film. The obtained EIS spectra were analyzed using an equivalent electrical circuit representing a duplex structure oxide film, composed by an outer and porous layer (low resistance), and an inner barrier layer (high resistance) mainly responsible for the alloys corrosion resistance. The resistance of passive film present on the metals' surface

  17. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  18. [NiTi shape-memory alloy cramp used in repair of skull defect].

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Zhou, S; Tian, F

    1998-11-01

    Fixation of silicon-polyester fiber network on skull defect was usually difficult to handle and the fixation was unstable. In order to solve these problems, NiTi shape-memory alloy cramp was adopted and 101 patients with skull defects were selected for this clinical trial. Among them, there were 79 males and 22 females, and the age ranged from 12-55 years old. The area of skull defect ranged from 3 cm x 4 cm to 10 cm x 16 cm. All of these patients received repairing of the skull defects by silicon-polyester fiber network which was fixed by NiTi memory alloy cramps. After operation, there was no complication. One hundred patients were followed up for 1-8 years, in which 97 cases returned to their normal work, and only 2 cases had a transient dysfunction of frontal muscle for 2 months. In addition, There were no loosening of the cramps, displacement of plastic network and malignant degeneration. The NiTi shape-memory alloy cramps had the following advantages: 1. Simple operative procedure; 2. Rigid fixation; 3. Mild postoperative tissue reaction; 4. Few postoperative complication; 5. Favorable effect of skull repair; 6. No interference with CT and MRI image; 7. No carcinogenicity. PMID:10437089

  19. Titanium-nickel shape memory alloy foams for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xiong, J Y; Li, Y C; Wang, X J; Hodgson, P D; Wen, C E

    2008-07-01

    Titanium-nickel (TiNi) shape memory alloy (SMA) foams with an open-cell porous structure were fabricated by space-holder sintering process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The mechanical properties and shape memory properties of the TiNi foam samples were investigated using compressive test. Results indicate that the plateau stresses and elastic moduli of the foams under compression decrease with the increase of their porosities. The plateau stresses and elastic moduli are measured to be from 1.9 to 38.3 MPa and from 30 to 860 MPa for the TiNi foam samples with porosities ranged from 71% to 87%, respectively. The mechanical properties of the TiNi alloy foams can be tailored to match those of bone. The TiNi alloy foams exhibit shape memory effect (SME), and it is found that the recoverable strain due to SME decreases with the increase of foam porosity. PMID:19627791

  20. Ti-Ni Rods with Variable Stiffness for Spine Stabilization: Manufacture and Biomechanical Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brailovski, Vladimir; Facchinello, Yann; Brummund, Martin; Petit, Yvan; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2016-03-01

    A new concept of monolithic spinal rods with variable flexural stiffness is proposed to reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration and vertebral fracture, while providing adequate stability to the spine. The variability of mechanical properties is generated by locally annealing Ti-Ni shape memory alloy rods. Ten-minute Joule effect annealing allows the restoration of the superelasticity in the heated portion of the rod. Such processing also generates a mechanical property gradient between the heated and the unheated zones. A numerical model simulating the annealing temperature and the distributions of the mechanical properties was developed to optimize the Joule-heating strategy and to modulate the rod's overall flexural stiffness. Subsequently, the rod model was included in a finite element model of a porcine lumbar spine to study the effect of the rod's stiffness profiles on the spinal biomechanics.

  1. Fracture modes during severe plastic deformation of NiTi shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, C. M.; Silva, R. J. C.; Fernandes, F. M. Braz

    2015-07-01

    The effects of severe plastic deformation on the surface micro-structural characteristics of NiTi shape memory alloys were observed after one single pass using the equal channel angular pressure technique. The analysis of the deformation and fracture showed distinct features related to the composition of the alloys, the temperature of the process, and the surface effects during the relative sliding in the die. In samples deformed at room temperature, the cracks initiated at the surface under tensile stress are amplified during the extrusion in the concurrent channel. The multiple cracks that develop during the friction process between the surfaces of the sample and channels of the die are the main cause for the fracture, even in materials that are less brittle, incorporating a smaller fraction of Ti2Ni precipitates and showing ductile fracture. A differential state of stress appears to exist in the deformed alloys starting from one surface to the other.

  2. Elastically driven metamagnetic-like phase transformations of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilevich, A. G.; L'vov, V. A.

    2016-03-01

    A theoretical model of metamagnetic-like (ferromagnetic-paramagnetic and ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic) phase transitions is developed for the interpretation of experimental results obtained recently for the Ni-Mn-Co-X (X  =  In, Sn, Ga) shape memory alloys. The conditions of elastically driven (caused by the martensitic transformation of alloy) metamagnetic-like phase transitions are determined. These conditions are: high magnetic susceptibility of paramagnetic/antiferromagnetic phase; large (but real for some alloys) volume change during the martensitic transformation; and large value of volume magnetostriction caused by the metamagnetic-like phase transition. The magnetoelastic mechanism is proposed for the explanation of magnetic field influence on the martensitic transformation. The elastically driven ferromagnetic-paramagnetic phase transition is considered in more detail and the results of corresponding magnetic measurements are described.

  3. Magnetically driven magnetostructural transformations of shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    L'vov, V. A.; Cesari, E.; Pérez-Landazábal, J. I.; Recarte, V.; Torrens-Serra, J.

    2016-03-01

    A conception of magnetically driven martensitic transformation (MT) has been put forward. The MT driven by the ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic phase transition has been analysed in detail for the case of weak antiferromagnetic exchange between the magnetic sublattices. It has been shown that in this case the MT is characterized by (i) a strong dependence of the MT temperature on the external magnetic field; (ii) a pronounced decrease in the martensite volume fraction and the macroscopic MT strain under the increasing field; (iii) the ‘arrest’ of the forward MT on the cooling of the alloy in a strong magnetic field; and (iv) a drastic decrease in the entropy difference between the austenitic and martensitic phases on approaching the temperature of arrest of the MT. The assumption about the antiferromagnetic ordering of the martensitic phase is not crucial for the proposed model of magnetically driven MT, and so its applicability to other types of ordering has been discussed. The Ni-Mn-In-based alloys have been considered as a case for study.

  4. Thermal Behavior of Mechanically Alloyed Powders Used for Producing an Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni Shape Memory Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, B.; Söyler, U.; Lohan, N. M.; Özkal, B.; Bujoreanu, L. G.; Chicet, D.; Munteanu, C.

    2012-11-01

    In order to produce shape memory rings for constrained-recovery pipe couplings, from Fe-14 Mn-6 Si-9 Cr-5 Ni (mass%) powders, the main technological steps were (i) mechanical alloying, (ii) sintering, (iii) hot rolling, (iv) hot-shape setting, and (v) thermomechanical training. The article generally describes, within its experimental-procedure section, the last four technological steps of this process the primary purpose of which has been to accurately control both chemical composition and the grain size of shape memory rings. Details of the results obtained in the first technological step, on raw powders employed both in an initial commercial state and in a mixture state of commercial and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders, which were subjected to several heating-cooling cycles have been reported and discussed. By means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD), the thermal behaviors of the two sample powders have been analyzed. The effects of the heating-cooling cycles, on raw commercial powders and on 50% MA powders, respectively, were argued from the point of view of specific temperatures and heat variations, of elemental diffusion after thermal cycling and of crystallographic parameters, determined by DSC, SEM, and XRD, respectively.

  5. Microstructure and Shape Memory Characteristics of Powder-Metallurgical-Processed Ti-Ni-Cu Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon-Wook; Chung, Young-Soo; Choi, Eunsoo; Nam, Tae-Hyun

    2012-08-01

    Even though Ti-Ni-Cu alloys have attracted a lot of attention because of their high performance in shape memory effect and decrease in thermal and stress hysteresis compared with Ti-Ni binary alloys, their poor workability restrains the practical applications of Ti-Ni-Cu shape memory alloys. Consolidation of Ti-Ni-Cu alloy powders is useful for the fabrication of bulk near-net-shape shape memory alloy. Ti50Ni30Cu20 shape memory alloy powders were prepared by gas atomization, and the sieved powders with the specific size range of 25 to 150 μm were chosen for this study. The evaluation of powder microstructures was based on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of the surface and the polished and etched powder cross sections. The typical images showed cellular/dendrite morphology and high population of small shrinkage cavities at intercellular regions. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that a B2-B19 one-step martensitic transformation occurred in the as-atomized powders. The martensitic transformation start temperature (Ms) of powders ranging between 25 and 50 μm was 304.5 K (31.5 °C). The Ms increased with increasing powder size. However, the difference of Ms in the as-atomized powders ranging between 25 and 150 μm was only 274 K (1 °C). A dense cylindrical specimen of 10 mm diameter and 15 mm length were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at 1073 K (800 °C) and 10 MPa for 20 minutes. Then, this bulk specimen was heat treated for 60 minutes at 1123 K (850 °C) and quenched in ice water. The Ms of the SPS specimen was 310.5 K (37.5 °C) whereas the Ms of conventionally cast ingot is found to be as high as 352.7 K (79.7 °C). It is considered that the depression of the Ms in rapidly solidified powders is ascribed to the density of dislocations and the stored energy produced by rapid solidification.

  6. Solid-state flow, mechanical alloying, and melt-related phenomena for [001] single-crystal tungsten ballistic rod penetrators interacting with steel targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizana, Carlos

    This research program consists of a detailed microstructural investigation of in-target, single-crystal [001], clad (with Inconel 718) and unclad, W long-rod, ballistic penetrators. The rods were shot into rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) steel targets approximately 76 mm in thickness at impact velocities ranging from 1100 m/s to 1350 m/s. A comprehensive microstructural overview of the penetration process was obtained from this investigation. Solid-state flow/erosion, solid-state target/rod mixing as well as influencing factors such as strain rate, penetration performance, cladding interference and the interaction between target and projectile were emphasized. Some of the microstructural features observed, including deformation twins, cleaving, adiabatic shear bands and DRX support an overall solid-state penetration process. Furthermore they provide for a unifying perspective for the applicability of the hydrodynamic paradigm (DOP ≈ l∘rp/rt ) and earlier mechanistic erosion approaches. DRX and grain growth within adiabatic shear bands observed at specific high strain/strain-rate zones within the rods suggest that the projectile erodes by means of these microstructures in a solid-state form. This erosion process contributes to the performance of the rod by either allowing optimum flow of rod material which would increase penetration depth, or by maximizing rod material consumption which would reduce it. Since flow and/or erosion are also necessary in the target for perforation to occur, it is not surprising that the erosion process in the target was observed to mirror the one in the projectile. That is both target and projectile developed erosion zones with DRX facilitating the extreme deformation via dense overlapping shear band formation. Mechanical alloying and/or mixing of the target (steel) and rod (W, or W-Inconel 718) was also observed and investigated. Selective etching techniques as well as energy-dispersive x-ray mapping revealed unambiguous evidence of

  7. Reversible surface morphology in shape-memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, M. J.; Huang, W. M.; Fu, Y. Q.; Chollet, F.; Hu, Y. Y.; Cai, M.

    2009-02-01

    Reversible surface morphology can be used for significantly changing many surface properties such as roughness, friction, reflection, surface tension, etc. However, it is not easy to realize atop metals at micron scale around ambient temperature. In this paper, we demonstrate that TiNi and TiNi based (e.g., TiNiCu) shape-memory thin films, which are sputter-deposited atop a silicon wafer, may have different types of thermally-induced reversible surface morphologies. Apart from the well-known surface relief phenomenon, irregular surface trenches may appear in the fully crystallized thin films, but disappear upon heating. On the other hand, in partially crystallized thin films, the crystalline structures (islands) appear in chrysanthemum-shape at high temperature; while at room temperature, the surface morphology within the islands changes to standard martensite striations. Both phenomena are fully repeatable upon thermal cycling. The mechanisms behind these phenomena are investigated.

  8. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  9. Mechanical behavior and phase stability of NiAl-based shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.P.; Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Kunsmann, H.; King, T.; Kao, M.

    1993-12-31

    NiAl-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) can be made ductile by alloying with 100--300 wppm B and 14--20 at.% Fe. The addition of Fe has the undesirable effect that it lowers the temperature (A{sub p}) of the martensite {yields} austenite phase transformation. Fortunately, however, A can be raised by lowering the ``equivalent`` amount of Al in the alloy. In this way a high A{sub p} temperature of {approximately}190 C has been obtained without sacrificing ductility. Furthermore, a recoverable strain of 0.7% has been obtained in a Ni-Al-Fe alloy with A{sub p} temperature of {approximately}140 C. Iron additions do not suppress the aging-induced embrittlement that occurs in NiAl alloys at 300--500 C as a result of Ni{sub 5}Al{sub 3} precipitation. Manganese additions (up to 10 at.%) have the effect of lowering A{sub p}, degrading hot workability, and decreasing room-temperature ductility.

  10. Ferromagnetic interactions and martensitic transformation in Fe doped Ni-Mn-In shape memory alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, D. N.; Priolkar, K. R.; Emura, S.; Nigam, A. K.

    2014-11-14

    The structure, magnetic, and martensitic properties of Fe doped Ni-Mn-In magnetic shape memory alloys have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry, magnetization, resistivity, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and EXAFS. While Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6) alloys are ferromagnetic and non martensitic, the martensitic transformation temperature in Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.5}In{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y} and Ni{sub 2}Mn{sub 1.6}In{sub 1−y}Fe{sub y} increases for lower Fe concentrations (y ≤ 0.05) before decreasing sharply for higher Fe concentrations. XRD analysis reveals presence of cubic and tetragonal structural phases in Ni{sub 2}MnIn{sub 1−x}Fe{sub x} at room temperature with tetragonal phase content increasing with Fe doping. Even though the local structure around Mn and Ni in these Fe doped alloys is similar to martensitic Mn rich Ni-Mn-In alloys, presence of ferromagnetic interactions and structural disorder induced by Fe affect Mn-Ni-Mn antiferromagnetic interactions resulting in suppression of martensitic transformation in these Fe doped alloys.