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Sample records for memory cell characteristics

  1. SONOS Nonvolatile Memory Cell Programming Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Phillips, Thomas A.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile memory is gaining favor over conventional EEPROM FLASH memory technology. This paper characterizes the SONOS write operation using a nonquasi-static MOSFET model. This includes floating gate charge and voltage characteristics as well as tunneling current, voltage threshold and drain current characterization. The characterization of the SONOS memory cell predicted by the model closely agrees with experimental data obtained from actual SONOS memory cells. The tunnel current, drain current, threshold voltage and read drain current all closely agreed with empirical data.

  2. Endurance characteristics of phase change memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruru, Huo; Daolin, Cai; Chen, Bomy; Yifeng, Chen; Yuchan, Wang; Yueqing, Wang; Hongyang, Wei; Qing, Wang; Yangyang, Xia; Dan, Gao; Zhitang, Song

    2016-05-01

    The endurance characteristics of phase change memory are studied. With operational cycles, the resistances of reset and set states gradually change to the opposite direction. What is more, the operational conditions that are needed are also discussed. The failure and the changes are concerned with the compositional change of the phase change material. An abnormal phenomenon that the threshold voltage decreases slightly at first and then increases is observed, which is due to the coaction of interface contact and growing active volume size changing. Project supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (No. XDA09020402), the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Nos. 2013CBA01900, 2010CB934300, 2011CBA00607, 2011CB932804), the National Integrate Circuit Research Program of China (No. 2009ZX02023-003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61176122, 61106001, 61261160500, 61376006), and the Science and Technology Council of Shanghai (Nos. 12nm0503701, 13DZ2295700, 12QA1403900, 13ZR1447200, 14ZR1447500).

  3. Akt inhibition enhances expansion of potent tumor-specific lymphocytes with memory cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Crompton, Joseph G; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Clever, David; Gros, Alena; Eil, Robert L; Tran, Eric; Hanada, Ken-Ichi; Yu, Zhiya; Palmer, Douglas C; Kerkar, Sid P; Michalek, Ryan D; Upham, Trevor; Leonardi, Anthony; Acquavella, Nicolas; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Gattinoni, Luca; Muranski, Pawel; Sundrud, Mark S; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Fearon, Douglas T; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-01-15

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) results in complete regression of advanced cancer in some patients, but the efficacy of this potentially curative therapy may be limited by poor persistence of TIL after adoptive transfer. Pharmacologic inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase Akt has recently been shown to promote immunologic memory in virus-specific murine models, but whether this approach enhances features of memory (e.g., long-term persistence) in TIL that are characteristically exhausted and senescent is not established. Here, we show that pharmacologic inhibition of Akt enables expansion of TIL with the transcriptional, metabolic, and functional properties characteristic of memory T cells. Consequently, Akt inhibition results in enhanced persistence of TIL after adoptive transfer into an immunodeficient animal model and augments antitumor immunity of CD8 T cells in a mouse model of cell-based immunotherapy. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt represents a novel immunometabolomic approach to enhance the persistence of antitumor T cells and improve the efficacy of cell-based immunotherapy for metastatic cancer. PMID:25432172

  4. Characteristics of a Nonvolatile SRAM Memory Cell Utilizing a Ferroelectric Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Cody; Laws, Crystal; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2011-01-01

    The SRAM cell circuit is a standard for volatile data storage. When utilizing one or more ferroelectric transistors, the hysteresis characteristics give unique properties to the SRAM circuit, providing for investigation into the development of a nonvolatile memory cell. This paper discusses various formations of the SRAM circuit, using ferroelectric transistors, n-channel and p-channel MOSFETs, and resistive loads. With varied source and supply voltages, the effects on the timing and retention characteristics are investigated, including retention times of up to 24 hours.

  5. Disturbance characteristics of half-selected cells in a cross-point resistive switching memory array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Li, Haitong; Chen, Hong-Yu; Chen, Bing; Liu, Rui; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Feifei; Jiang, Zizhen; Ye, Hongfei; Gao, Bin; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Yu, Shimeng

    2016-05-01

    Disturbance characteristics of cross-point resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays are comprehensively studied in this paper. An analytical model is developed to quantify the number of pulses (#Pulse) the cell can bear before disturbance occurs under various sub-switching voltage stresses based on physical understanding. An evaluation methodology is proposed to assess the disturb behavior of half-selected (HS) cells in cross-point RRAM arrays by combining the analytical model and SPICE simulation. The characteristics of cross-point RRAM arrays such as energy consumption, reliable operating cycles and total error bits are evaluated by the methodology. A possible solution to mitigate disturbance is proposed.

  6. Disturbance characteristics of half-selected cells in a cross-point resistive switching memory array.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe; Li, Haitong; Chen, Hong-Yu; Chen, Bing; Liu, Rui; Huang, Peng; Zhang, Feifei; Jiang, Zizhen; Ye, Hongfei; Bin Gao; Liu, Lifeng; Liu, Xiaoyan; Kang, Jinfeng; Wong, H-S Philip; Yu, Shimeng

    2016-05-27

    Disturbance characteristics of cross-point resistive random access memory (RRAM) arrays are comprehensively studied in this paper. An analytical model is developed to quantify the number of pulses (#Pulse) the cell can bear before disturbance occurs under various sub-switching voltage stresses based on physical understanding. An evaluation methodology is proposed to assess the disturb behavior of half-selected (HS) cells in cross-point RRAM arrays by combining the analytical model and SPICE simulation. The characteristics of cross-point RRAM arrays such as energy consumption, reliable operating cycles and total error bits are evaluated by the methodology. A possible solution to mitigate disturbance is proposed. PMID:27094841

  7. Memory T Cells in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Charles A.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Following infections and environmental exposures, memory T cells are generated that provide long-term protective immunity. Compared to their naïve T cell counterparts, memory T cells possess unique characteristics that endow them with the ability to quickly and robustly respond to foreign antigens. While such memory T cells are beneficial in protecting their hosts from recurrent infection, memory cells reactive to donor antigens pose a major barrier to successful transplantation and tolerance induction. Significant progress has been made over the past several decades contributing to our understanding of memory T cell generation, their distinct biology, and their detrimental impact in clinical and animal models of transplantation. This review focuses on the unique features which make memory T cells relevant to the transplant community and discusses potential therapies targeting memory T cells which may ameliorate allograft rejection. PMID:25435071

  8. Effect of embedded metal nanocrystals on the resistive switching characteristics in NiN-based resistive random access memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Min Ju; Kim, Hee-Dong; Man Hong, Seok; Hyun Park, Ju; Su Jeon, Dong; Geun Kim, Tae

    2014-03-07

    The metal nanocrystals (NCs) embedded-NiN-based resistive random access memory cells are demonstrated using several metal NCs (i.e., Pt, Ni, and Ti) with different physical parameters in order to investigate the metal NC's dependence on resistive switching (RS) characteristics. First, depending on the electronegativity of metal, the size of metal NCs is determined and this affects the operating current of memory cells. If metal NCs with high electronegativity are incorporated, the size of the NCs is reduced; hence, the operating current is reduced owing to the reduced density of the electric field around the metal NCs. Second, the potential wells are formed by the difference of work function between the metal NCs and active layer, and the barrier height of the potential wells affects the level of operating voltage as well as the conduction mechanism of metal NCs embedded memory cells. Therefore, by understanding these correlations between the active layer and embedded metal NCs, we can optimize the RS properties of metal NCs embedded memory cells as well as predict their conduction mechanisms.

  9. Asymmetric dual-gate-structured one-transistor dynamic random access memory cells for retention characteristics improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Jong-Ho; Park, Byung-Gook

    2016-08-01

    One of the major concerns of one-transistor dynamic random access memory (1T-DRAM) is poor retention time. In this letter, a 1T-DRAM cell with two separated asymmetric gates was fabricated and evaluated to improve sensing margin and retention characteristics. It was observed that significantly enhanced sensing margin and retention time over 1 s were obtained using a negatively biased second gate and trapped electrons in the nitride layer because of increased hole capacity in the floating body. These findings indicate that the proposed device could serve as a promising candidate for overcoming retention issues of 1T-DRAM cells.

  10. Identification of a novel human memory T-cell population with the characteristics of stem-like chemo-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Shibayama, Yuji; Mizushima, Emi; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kubo, Terufumi; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-dose chemotherapy may kill not only tumor cells but also immunocytes, and frequently induces severe lymphocytopenia. On the other hand, patients who recover from the nadir maintain immunity against infection, suggesting the existence of an unknown memory T-cell population with stress resistance, long-living capacity, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, the differentiation system of T-cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T-cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. Here we report a novel human T-cell memory population, “young memory” T (TYM) cells. TYM cells are defined by positive expression of CD73, which represents high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity and CXCR3 among CD8+CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells. TYM proliferate upon TCR stimulation, with differentiation capacity into TCM and TEM and drug resistance. Moreover, TYM are involved in memory function for viral and tumor-associated antigens in healthy donors and cancer patients, respectively. Regulation of TYM might be very attractive for peptide vaccination, adoptive cell-transfer therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27471640

  11. Characteristics of Memory B Cells Elicited by a Highly Efficacious HPV Vaccine in Subjects with No Pre-existing Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Erin M.; Smith, Robin A.; Simonich, Cassandra A.; Niyonzima, Nixon; Carter, Joseph J.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2014-01-01

    Licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines provide near complete protection against the types of HPV that most commonly cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers (HPV 16 and 18) when administered to individuals naive to these types. These vaccines, like most other prophylactic vaccines, appear to protect by generating antibodies. However, almost nothing is known about the immunological memory that forms following HPV vaccination, which is required for long-term immunity. Here, we have identified and isolated HPV 16-specific memory B cells from female adolescents and young women who received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine in the absence of pre-existing immunity, using fluorescently conjugated HPV 16 pseudoviruses to label antigen receptors on the surface of memory B cells. Antibodies cloned and expressed from these singly sorted HPV 16-pseudovirus labeled memory B cells were predominantly IgG (>IgA>IgM), utilized diverse variable genes, and potently neutralized HPV 16 pseudoviruses in vitro despite possessing only average levels of somatic mutation. These findings suggest that the quadrivalent HPV vaccine provides an excellent model for studying the development of B cell memory; and, in the context of what is known about memory B cells elicited by influenza vaccination/infection, HIV-1 infection, or tetanus toxoid vaccination, indicates that extensive somatic hypermutation is not required to achieve potent vaccine-specific neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:25330199

  12. Memory T Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qianqian; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a key feature of adaptive immunity. It provides the organism with long-lived and robust protection against infection. In organ transplantation, memory T cells pose a significant threat by causing allograft rejection that is generally resistant to immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, a more thorough understanding of memory T cell biology is needed to improve the survival of transplanted organs without compromising the host’s ability to fight infections. This review will focus on the mechanisms by which memory T cells migrate to the site where their target antigen is present, with particular emphasis on their migration to transplanted organs. First, we will define the known subsets of memory T cells (central, effector, and tissue resident) and their circulation patterns. Second, we will review the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which memory T cells migrate to inflamed and non-inflamed tissues and highlight the emerging paradigm of antigen-driven, trans-endothelial migration. Third, we will discuss the relevance of this knowledge to organ transplantation and the prevention or treatment of allograft rejection. PMID:26483794

  13. I-V Characteristics of a Static Random Access Memory Cell Utilizing Ferroelectric Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laws, Crystal; Mitchell, Cody; Hunt, Mitchell; Ho, Fat D.; MacLeod, Todd C.

    2012-01-01

    I-V characteristics for FeFET different than that of MOSFET Ferroelectric layer features hysteresis trend whereas MOSFET behaves same for both increasing and decreasing VGS FeFET I-V characteristics doesn't show dependence on VDS A Transistor with different channel length and width as well as various resistance and input voltages give different results As resistance values increased, the magnitude of the drain current decreased.

  14. Tier identification (TID) for tiered memory characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Jichuan; Lim, Kevin T; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-25

    A tier identification (TID) is to indicate a characteristic of a memory region associated with a virtual address in a tiered memory system. A thread may be serviced according to a first path based on the TID indicating a first characteristic. The thread may be serviced according to a second path based on the TID indicating a second characteristic.

  15. Characteristics of Positive Autobiographical Memories in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluck, Susan; Alea, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of positive autobiographical memory narratives were examined in younger and older adults. Narratives were content-coded for the extent to which they contained indicators of affect, sensory imagery, and cognition. Affect was additionally assessed through self-report. Young adults expressed more positive affect and less sensory…

  16. Analytical Model of Nano-Electromechanical (NEM) Nonvolatile Memory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Boram; Choi, Woo Young

    The fringe field effects of nano-electromechanical (NEM) nonvolatile memory cells have been investigated analytically for the accurate evaluation of NEM memory cells. As the beam width is scaled down, fringe field effect becomes more severe. It has been observed that pull-in, release and hysteresis voltage decrease more than our prediction. Also, the fringe field on cell characteristics has been discussed.

  17. Cell memory-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers 'memory-based therapy', which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  18. Cell memory-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers ‘memory-based therapy’, which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  19. Characteristics of near-death experiences memories as compared to real and imagined events memories.

    PubMed

    Thonnard, Marie; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Brédart, Serge; Dehon, Hedwige; Ledoux, Didier; Laureys, Steven; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memories of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ--Johnson et al., 1988): target memories (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all ps<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contained more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. PMID:23544039

  20. Characteristics of Near-Death Experiences Memories as Compared to Real and Imagined Events Memories

    PubMed Central

    Brédart, Serge; Dehon, Hedwige; Ledoux, Didier; Laureys, Steven; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey

    2013-01-01

    Since the dawn of time, Near-Death Experiences (NDEs) have intrigued and, nowadays, are still not fully explained. Since reports of NDEs are proposed to be imagined events, and since memories of imagined events have, on average, fewer phenomenological characteristics than real events memories, we here compared phenomenological characteristics of NDEs reports with memories of imagined and real events. We included three groups of coma survivors (8 patients with NDE as defined by the Greyson NDE scale, 6 patients without NDE but with memories of their coma, 7 patients without memories of their coma) and a group of 18 age-matched healthy volunteers. Five types of memories were assessed using Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ – Johnson et al., 1988): target memories (NDE for NDE memory group, coma memory for coma memory group, and first childhood memory for no memory and control groups), old and recent real event memories and old and recent imagined event memories. Since NDEs are known to have high emotional content, participants were requested to choose the most emotionally salient memories for both real and imagined recent and old event memories. Results showed that, in NDE memories group, NDE memories have more characteristics than memories of imagined and real events (p<0.02). NDE memories contain more self-referential and emotional information and have better clarity than memories of coma (all ps<0.02). The present study showed that NDE memories contained more characteristics than real event memories and coma memories. Thus, this suggests that they cannot be considered as imagined event memories. On the contrary, their physiological origins could lead them to be really perceived although not lived in the reality. Further work is needed to better understand this phenomenon. PMID:23544039

  1. On the bipolar resistive-switching characteristics of Al₂O₃- and HfO₂-based memory cells operated in the soft-breakdown regime

    SciTech Connect

    Goux, L. Fantini, A.; Nigon, R.; Strangio, S.; Degraeve, R.; Kar, G.; Chen, Y. Y.; Jurczak, M.; Raghavan, N.; De Stefano, F.; Afanas'ev, V. V.

    2014-10-07

    In this article, we investigate extensively the bipolar-switching properties of Al₂O₃- and HfO₂-based resistive-switching memory cells operated at low current down to <1 μA. We show that the switching characteristics differ considerably from those typically reported for larger current range (>15 μA), which we relate as intrinsic to soft-breakdown (SBD) regime. We evidence a larger impact of the used switching-oxide in this current range, due to lower density of oxygen-vacancy (V{sub o}) defects in the SBD regime. In this respect, deep resetting and large memory window may be achieved using the stoichiometric Al₂O₃ material due to efficient V{sub o} annihilation, although no complete erasure of the conductive-filament (CF) is obtained. We finally emphasize that the conduction may be described by a quantum point-contact (QPC) model down to very low current level where only a few V{sub o} defects compose the QPC constriction. The large switching variability inherent to this latter aspect is mitigated by CF shape tuning through adequate engineering of an Al₂O₃\\HfO₂ bilayer.

  2. Improving Memory Characteristics of Hydrogenated Nanocrystalline Silicon Germanium Nonvolatile Memory Devices by Controlling Germanium Contents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiwoong; Jang, Kyungsoo; Phu, Nguyen Thi Cam; Trinh, Thanh Thuy; Raja, Jayapal; Kim, Taeyong; Cho, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangho; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) with silicon dioxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxynitride (ONO(n)) charge trap structure is a promising flash memory technology duo that will fulfill process compatibility for system-on-panel displays, down-scaling cell size and low operation voltage. In this research, charge trap flash devices were fabricated with ONO(n) stack gate insulators and an active layer using hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon germanium (nc-SiGe:H) films at a low temperature. In this study, the effect of the interface trap density on the performance of devices, including memory window and retention, was investigated. The electrical characteristics of NVM devices were studied controlling Ge content from 0% to 28% in the nc-SiGe:H channel layer. The optimal Ge content in the channel layer was found to be around 16%. For nc-SiGe:H NVM with 16% Ge content, the memory window was 3.13 V and the retention data exceeded 77% after 10 years under the programming condition of 15 V for 1 msec. This showed that the memory window increased by 42% and the retention increased by 12% compared to the nc-Si:H NVM that does not contain Ge. However, when the Ge content was more than 16%, the memory window and retention property decreased. Finally, this research showed that the Ge content has an effect on the interface trap density and this enabled us to determine the optimal Ge content. PMID:27483856

  3. Two-Bit/Cell Programming Characteristics of High-Density NOR-Type Flash Memory Device with Recessed Channel Structure and Spacer-Type Nitride Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Kyoung-Rok; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2006-10-01

    The structure of novel 2-bit/cell silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) flash memory device was proposed and characterized for sub-50 nm non-volatile memory (NVM) technology. A proposed memory cell has spacer-type storage nodes on both sidewalls in a recessed channel region. It was shown that counter channel doping near the bottom of the recessed channel is very important and can improve the Vth margin for 2-bit/cell operation by ˜2.5 times. By controlling doping profiles of the channel doping and the counter channel doping in the recessed channel region, we could obtain the Vth margin more than ˜1.5 V.

  4. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases. PMID:23679222

  5. Energy-band engineering for tunable memory characteristics through controlled doping of reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Ye; Yang, Qing Dan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Yan, Yan; Lee, Chun-Sing; Roy, Vellaisamy A L

    2014-02-25

    Tunable memory characteristics are used in multioperational mode circuits where memory cells with various functionalities are needed in one combined device. It is always a challenge to obtain control over threshold voltage for multimode operation. On this regard, we use a strategy of shifting the work function of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in a controlled manner through doping gold chloride (AuCl3) and obtained a gradient increase of rGO work function. By inserting doped rGO as floating gate, a controlled threshold voltage (Vth) shift has been achieved in both p- and n-type low voltage flexible memory devices with large memory window (up to 4 times for p-type and 8 times for n-type memory devices) in comparison with pristine rGO floating gate memory devices. By proper energy band engineering, we demonstrated a flexible floating gate memory device with larger memory window and controlled threshold voltage shifts. PMID:24472000

  6. Vantage perspective during encoding: The effects on phenomenological memory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Mooren, Nora; Krans, Julie; Näring, Gérard W B; Moulds, Michelle L; van Minnen, Agnes

    2016-05-01

    The vantage perspective from which a memory is retrieved influences the memory's emotional impact, intrusiveness, and phenomenological characteristics. This study tested whether similar effects are observed when participants were instructed to imagine the events from a specific perspective. Fifty student participants listened to a verbal report of car-accidents and visualized the scenery from either a field or observer perspective. There were no between-condition differences in emotionality of memories and the number of intrusions, but imagery experienced from a relative observer perspective was rated as less self-relevant. In contrast to earlier studies on memory retrieval, vantage perspective influenced phenomenological memory characteristics of the memory representation such as sensory details, and ratings of vividness and distancing of the memory. However, vantage perspective is most likely not a stable phenomenological characteristic itself. Implications and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:27003265

  7. Memory T cells in organ transplantation: progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Jaclyn R; Samy, Kannan P; Kirk, Allan D

    2016-06-01

    Antigen-experienced T cells, also known as memory T cells, are functionally and phenotypically distinct from naive T cells. Their enhanced expression of adhesion molecules and reduced requirement for co-stimulation enables them to mount potent and rapid recall responses to subsequent antigen encounters. Memory T cells generated in response to prior antigen exposures can cross-react with other nonidentical, but similar, antigens. This heterologous cross-reactivity not only enhances protective immune responses, but also engenders de novo alloimmunity. This latter characteristic is increasingly recognized as a potential barrier to allograft acceptance that is worthy of immunotherapeutic intervention, and several approaches have been investigated. Calcineurin inhibition effectively controls memory T-cell responses to allografts, but this benefit comes at the expense of increased infectious morbidity. Lymphocyte depletion eliminates allospecific T cells but spares memory T cells to some extent, such that patients do not completely lose protective immunity. Co-stimulation blockade is associated with reduced adverse-effect profiles and improved graft function relative to calcineurin inhibition, but lacks efficacy in controlling memory T-cell responses. Targeting the adhesion molecules that are upregulated on memory T cells might offer additional means to control co-stimulation-blockade-resistant memory T-cell responses. PMID:26923209

  8. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells.

    PubMed

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-08-12

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5(+) TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses. PMID:25071203

  9. Memory B cells contribute to rapid Bcl6 expression by memory follicular helper T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ise, Wataru; Inoue, Takeshi; McLachlan, James B.; Kometani, Kohei; Kubo, Masato; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2014-01-01

    In primary humoral responses, B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6) is a master regulator of follicular helper T (TFH) cell differentiation; however, its activation mechanisms and role in memory responses remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that survival of CXCR5+ TFH memory cells, and thus subsequent recall antibody response, require Bcl6 expression. Furthermore, we show that, upon rechallenge with soluble antigen Bcl6 in memory TFH cells is rapidly induced in a dendritic cell-independent manner and that peptide:class II complexes (pMHC) on cognate memory B cells significantly contribute to this induction. Given the previous evidence that antigen-specific B cells residing in the follicles acquire antigens within minutes of injection, our results suggest that memory B cells present antigens to the cognate TFH memory cells, thereby contributing to rapid Bcl6 reexpression and differentiation of the TFH memory cells during humoral memory responses. PMID:25071203

  10. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Mark A.; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR–peptide–MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool. PMID:26697013

  11. Predicting which childhood memories persist: contributions of memory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Carole; Morris, Gwynn; Baker-Ward, Lynne; Flynn, Susan

    2014-02-01

    This investigation identified memory-level predictors of the survivability of 4- to 13-year-old children's earliest recollections over a 2-year period. Data previously reported by Peterson, Warren, and Short (2011) were coded for inclusion of emotion terms and thematic, chronological, and contextual narrative coherence. In addition, the uniqueness and content of the reported events were classified, and the presence or absence of event reminders was recorded. The use of logistic multilevel modeling indicated that emotion and each dimension of coherence added to the prediction of a memory's survivability over and above age-related variance. In contrast, event uniqueness, content category, reminders, and word count were not associated with retention. The findings help explain why particular early memories endure over time. PMID:23731291

  12. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations. PMID:25887082

  13. Resistive switching characteristics and mechanisms in silicon oxide memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yao-Feng; Fowler, Burt; Chen, Ying-Chen; Zhou, Fei; Wu, Xiaohan; Chen, Yen-Ting; Wang, Yanzhen; Xue, Fei; Lee, Jack C.

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsic unipolar SiOx-based resistance random access memories (ReRAM) characterization, switching mechanisms, and applications have been investigated. Device structures, material compositions, and electrical characteristics are identified that enable ReRAM cells with high ON/OFF ratio, low static power consumption, low switching power, and high readout-margin using complementary metal-oxide semiconductor transistor (CMOS)-compatible SiOx-based materials. These ideas are combined with the use of horizontal and vertical device structure designs, composition optimization, electrical control, and external factors to help understand resistive switching (RS) mechanisms. Measured temperature effects, pulse response, and carrier transport behaviors lead to compact models of RS mechanisms and energy band diagrams in order to aid the development of computer-aided design for ultralarge-v scale integration. This chapter presents a comprehensive investigation of SiOx-based RS characteristics and mechanisms for the post-CMOS device era.

  14. Characteristics of self-defining memory in depression vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Moulds, Michelle L

    2012-01-01

    There has been a growing recognition of the role of memory processes in depressive vulnerability, as has been suggested by influential cognitive models of depressive disorders (Teasdale, 1988). In this study recovered depressed (n=35) and never-depressed (n=49) participants recalled self-defining memories following either a sad or neutral mood induction. In a neutral mood, recovered depressed and never-depressed participants did not differ in terms of the characteristics of the memories that they recalled. However, in a sad mood recovered depressed participants recalled more vivid negative memories and less emotionally intense positive memories than never-depressed participants. This study provides support for aspects of Teasdale's differential activation model and contributes to the growing recognition that depressive disorders involve disturbances in both negative and positive memory processes. PMID:22900963

  15. Molecular Programming of Immunological Memory in Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Aimee M; Madera, Sharline; Sun, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of the adaptive immune system. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as a component of the innate immune system, they have recently been shown in mice and humans to exhibit certain features of immunological memory, including an ability to undergo a clonal-like expansion during virus infection, generate long-lived progeny (i.e. memory cells), and mediate recall responses against previously encountered pathogens--all characteristics previously ascribed only to adaptive immune responses by B and T cells in mammals. To date, the molecular events that govern the generation of NK cell memory are not completely understood. Using a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection, we demonstrate that individual pro-inflammatory IL-12, IL-18, and type I-IFN signaling pathways are indispensible and play non-redundant roles in the generation of virus-specific NK cell memory. Furthermore, we discovered that antigen-specific proliferation and protection by NK cells is mediated by the transcription factor Zbtb32, which is induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines and promotes a cell cycle program in activated NK cells. A greater understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling NK cell responses will provide novel strategies for tailoring vaccines to target infectious disease. PMID:26324348

  16. Asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Arif Azam; Srivastava, Ruchi; Lopes, Patricia Prado; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T; Cochrane, Justin; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Gutierrez, Lucas; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    Generation and maintenance of high quantity and quality memory CD8+ T cells determine the level of protection from viral, bacterial, and parasitic re-infections, and hence constitutes a primary goal for T cell epitope-based human vaccines and immunotherapeutics. Phenotypically and functionally characterizing memory CD8+ T cells that provide protection against herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections, which cause blinding ocular herpes, genital herpes, and oro-facial herpes, is critical for better vaccine design. We have recently categorized 2 new major sub-populations of memory symptomatic and asymptomatic CD8+ T cells based on their phenotype, protective vs. pathogenic function, and anatomical locations. In this report we are discussing a new direction in developing T cell-based human herpes vaccines and immunotherapeutics based on the emerging new concept of “symptomatic and asymptomatic memory CD8+ T cells.” PMID:24499824

  17. Modeling of Sonos Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeond, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories (NVSMS) have many advantages. These memories are electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs). They utilize low programming voltages, endure extended erase/write cycles, are inherently resistant to radiation, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. The SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. The SONOS floating gate charge and voltage, tunneling current, threshold voltage, and drain current were characterized during an erase cycle. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental device data.

  18. Modeling of SONOS Memory Cell Erase Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat H.

    2011-01-01

    Utilization of Silicon-Oxide-Nitride-Oxide-Silicon (SONOS) nonvolatile semiconductor memories as a flash memory has many advantages. These electrically erasable programmable read-only memories (EEPROMs) utilize low programming voltages, have a high erase/write cycle lifetime, are radiation hardened, and are compatible with high-density scaled CMOS for low power, portable electronics. In this paper, the SONOS memory cell erase cycle was investigated using a nonquasi-static (NQS) MOSFET model. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and experimental data.

  19. Memory CD4 T cells in influenza.

    PubMed

    Zens, Kyra D; Farber, Donna L

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly among young children and the elderly. Current vaccines induce neutralizing antibody responses directed toward highly variable viral surface proteins, resulting in limited heterosubtypic protection to new viral serotypes. By contrast, memory CD4 T cells recognize conserved viral proteins and are cross-reactive to multiple influenza strains. In humans, virus-specific memory CD4 T cells were found to be the protective correlate in human influenza challenge studies, suggesting their key role in protective immunity. In mouse models, memory CD4 T cells can mediate protective responses to secondary influenza infection independent of B cells or CD8 T cells, and can influence innate immune responses. Importantly, a newly defined, tissue-resident CD4 memory population has been demonstrated to be retained in lung tissue and promote optimal protective responses to an influenza infection. Here, we review the current state of results regarding the generation of memory CD4 T cells following primary influenza infection, mechanisms for their enhanced efficacy in protection from secondary challenge including their phenotype, localization, and function in the context of both mouse models and human infection. We also discuss the generation of memory CD4 T cells in response to influenza vaccines and its future implications for vaccinology. PMID:25005927

  20. Memory Engram Cells Have Come of Age.

    PubMed

    Tonegawa, Susumu; Liu, Xu; Ramirez, Steve; Redondo, Roger

    2015-09-01

    The idea that memory is stored in the brain as physical alterations goes back at least as far as Plato, but further conceptualization of this idea had to wait until the 20(th) century when two guiding theories were presented: the "engram theory" of Richard Semon and Donald Hebb's "synaptic plasticity theory." While a large number of studies have been conducted since, each supporting some aspect of each of these theories, until recently integrative evidence for the existence of engram cells and circuits as defined by the theories was lacking. In the past few years, the combination of transgenics, optogenetics, and other technologies has allowed neuroscientists to begin identifying memory engram cells by detecting specific populations of cells activated during specific learning epochs and by engineering them not only to evoke recall of the original memory, but also to alter the content of the memory. PMID:26335640

  1. Molecular regulation of effector and memory T cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, John T; Wherry, E John; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is a cardinal feature of adaptive immunity and an important goal of vaccination strategies. Here we highlight advances in the understanding of the diverse T lymphocyte subsets that provide acute and long-term protection from infection. These include new insights into the transcription factors, and the upstream ‘pioneering’ factors that regulate their accessibility to key sites of gene regulation, as well as metabolic regulators that contribute to the differentiation of effector and memory subsets; ontogeny and defining characteristics of tissue-resident memory lymphocytes; and origins of the remarkable heterogeneity exhibited by activated T cells. Collectively, these findings underscore progress in delineating the underlying pathways that control diversification in T cell responses but also reveal gaps in the knowledge, as well as the challenges that arise in the application of this knowledge to rationally elicit desired T cell responses through vaccination and immunotherapy. PMID:25396352

  2. Hoxb4 Overexpression in CD4 Memory Phenotype T Cells Increases the Central Memory Population upon Homeostatic Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marilaine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Bijl, Janet J.

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation. PMID:24324706

  3. Innate and virtual memory T cells in man.

    PubMed

    Van Kaer, Luc

    2015-07-01

    A hallmark of the antigen-specific B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system is their capacity to "remember" pathogens long after they are first encountered, a property that forms the basis for effective vaccine development. However, studies in mice have provided strong evidence that some naive T cells can develop characteristics of memory T cells in the absence of foreign antigen encounters. Such innate memory T cells may develop in response to lymphopenia or the presence of high levels of the cytokine IL-4, and have also been identified in unmanipulated animals, a phenomenal referred to as "virtual memory." While the presence of innate memory T cells in mice is now widely accepted, their presence in humans has not yet been fully validated. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Jacomet et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45:1926-1933] provide the best evidence to date for innate memory T cells in humans. These findings may contribute significantly to our understanding of human immunity to microbial pathogens and tumors. PMID:26013879

  4. Conditions of steady switching in phase-transition memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, A. I. Salnikov, S. M.; Anufriev, Yu. V.

    2015-04-15

    Three types of non-volatile memory cells of different designs based on phase transitions are developed and implemented. The effect of the design features of the cells and their active-region sizes on the switching characteristics and normal operation of the cells is considered as a whole. The causes of failure of the cells are analyzed from the obtained series of scanning electron images upon level-by-level etching of the samples. It is shown that the cell design is the most critical factor from the viewpoint of switching to the high-resistance state. The causes of this fact are analyzed and the criterion for providing the steady operation of cells of non-volatile memory based on phase transitions is formulated.

  5. Memory T Cell-Specific Therapeutics in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrew J.; Ford, Mandy L.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Review This review details the role of memory T cells in physiologic and allospecific immunity, and summarizes the effects of immunosuppressive agents used to manipulate their function in the context of organ transplantation. Recent Findings Memory T cells are lymphocytes with characteristics that are thought to promote anamnestic immune responses. They have a unique capacity to generate rapid effector functions upon secondary exposure to a pathogen, and this is achieved through truncated requirements for antigen presentation, reduced activation thresholds, and enhanced trafficking and adhesion mechanisms. In general, these same mechanisms also appear to evoke improved efficiency in mediating allograft rejection. The phenotype of these cells has been increasingly well defined and associated with a characteristic pattern of susceptibility to immunosuppressive agents. This knowledge is now being exploited in the development of immune therapeutic regimens to selectively mollify T memory cell effects. Summary A specific targeting of memory T cells has potential to prevent allograft rejection in a more precise manner that current means of immunosuppression. However, these benefits will be balanced by the reciprocal risk of susceptibility to recurrent infection. PMID:19779342

  6. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen. PMID:26362935

  7. Nonvolatile memory characteristics of nickel-silicon-nitride nanocrystal

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.-R.; Chang, T.-C.; Liu, P.-T.; Yeh, J.-L.; Tu, C.-H.; Lou, J.-C.; Yeh, C.-F.; Chang, C.-Y.

    2007-08-20

    The formation of nickel-silicon-nitride nanocrystals by sputtering a comixed target in the argon and nitrogen environment is proposed in this letter. High resolution transmission electron microscope analysis clearly shows the nanocrystals embedded in the silicon nitride and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy also shows the chemical material analysis of nanocrystals. The memory window of nickel-silicon-nitride nanocrystals enough to define 1 and 0 states is obviously observed, and a good data retention characteristic to get up to 10 years is exhibited for the nonvolatile memory application.

  8. A Novel Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Memory Cell Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; Bailey, Mark; Ho, Fat Duen

    2004-01-01

    The use of a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MFSFET) in a resistive-load SRAM memory cell has been investigated A typical two-transistor resistive-load SRAM memory cell architecture is modified by replacing one of the NMOS transistors with an n-channel MFSFET. The gate of the MFSFET is connected to a polling voltage pulse instead of the other NMOS transistor drain. The polling voltage pulses are of sufficient magnitude to saturate the ferroelectric gate material and force the MFSFET into a particular logic state. The memory cell circuit is further modified by the addition of a PMOS transistor and a load resistor in order to improve the retention characteristics of the memory cell. The retention characteristics of both the "1" and "0" logic states are simulated. The simulations show that the MFSFET memory cell design can maintain both the "1" and "0" logic states for a long period of time.

  9. Influence of time and number of antigen encounters on memory CD8 T cell development.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew D; Badovinac, Vladimir P

    2014-08-01

    CD8 T cells are an important part of the adaptive immune system providing protection against intracellular bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. After infection and/or vaccination, increased numbers of antigen-specific CD8 T cells remain as a memory population that is capable of responding and providing enhanced protection during reinfection. Experimental studies indicate that while memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for great lengths of time, their properties change with time after infection and/or vaccination. However, the full scope of these changes and what effects they have on memory CD8 T cell function remain unknown. In addition, memory CD8 T cells can encounter antigen multiple times through either reinfection or prime-boost vaccine strategies designed to increase numbers of protective memory CD8 T cells. Importantly, recent studies suggest that memory CD8 T cell development following infection and/or vaccination is influenced by the number of times they have encountered cognate antigen. Since protection offered by memory CD8 T cells in response to infection depends on both the numbers and quality (functional characteristics) at the time of pathogen re-encounter, a thorough understanding of how time and antigen stimulation history impacts memory CD8 T cell properties is critical for the design of vaccines aimed at establishing populations of long-lived, protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:24825776

  10. Nanoscale memory cell based on a nanoelectromechanical switched capacitor.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Eun; Cha, Seung Nam; Choi, Young Jin; Kang, Dae Joon; Butler, Tim P; Hasko, David G; Jung, Jae Eun; Kim, Jong Min; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2008-01-01

    The demand for increased information storage densities has pushed silicon technology to its limits and led to a focus on research on novel materials and device structures, such as magnetoresistive random access memory and carbon nanotube field-effect transistors, for ultra-large-scale integrated memory. Electromechanical devices are suitable for memory applications because of their excellent 'ON-OFF' ratios and fast switching characteristics, but they involve larger cells and more complex fabrication processes than silicon-based arrangements. Nanoelectromechanical devices based on carbon nanotubes have been reported previously, but it is still not possible to control the number and spatial location of nanotubes over large areas with the precision needed for the production of integrated circuits. Here we report a novel nanoelectromechanical switched capacitor structure based on vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes in which the mechanical movement of a nanotube relative to a carbon nanotube based capacitor defines 'ON' and 'OFF' states. The carbon nanotubes are grown with controlled dimensions at pre-defined locations on a silicon substrate in a process that could be made compatible with existing silicon technology, and the vertical orientation allows for a significant decrease in cell area over conventional devices. We have written data to the structure and it should be possible to read data with standard dynamic random access memory sensing circuitry. Simulations suggest that the use of high-k dielectrics in the capacitors will increase the capacitance to the levels needed for dynamic random access memory applications. PMID:18654446

  11. Production of RANKL by Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meednu, Nida; Zhang, Hengwei; Owen, Teresa; Sun, Wen; Wang, Victor; Cistrone, Christopher; Rangel-Moreno, Javier; Xing, Lianping; Anolik, Jennifer H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease that often leads to joint damage. The mechanisms of bone damage in RA are complex, involving activation of bone-resorbing osteoclasts (OCs) by synoviocytes and Th17 cells. This study was undertaken to investigate whether B cells play a direct role in osteoclastogenesis through the production of RANKL, the essential cytokine for OC development. Methods RANKL production by total B cells or sorted B cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood and synovial tissue from healthy donors or anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide–positive patients with RA was examined by flow cytometry, real-time polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemical analysis. To define direct effects on osteoclastogenesis, B cells were cocultured with CD14+ monocytes, and OCs were enumerated by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Results Healthy donor peripheral blood B cells were capable of expressing RANKL upon stimulation, with switched memory B cells (CD27+IgD−) having the highest propensity for RANKL production. Notably, switched memory B cells in the peripheral blood from RA patients expressed significantly more RANKL compared to healthy controls. In RA synovial fluid and tissue, memory B cells were enriched and spontaneously expressed RANKL, with some of these cells visualized adjacent to RANK+ OC precursors. Critically, B cells supported OC differentiation in vitro in a RANKL-dependent manner, and the number of OCs was higher in cultures with RA B cells than in those derived from healthy controls. Conclusion These findings reveal the critical importance of B cells in bone homeostasis and their likely contribution to joint destruction in RA. PMID:26554541

  12. Electromechanical Simulation of Switching Characteristics for Nanoelectromechanical Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagami, Tasuku; Tsuchiya, Yoshishige; Saito, Shinichi; Arai, Tadashi; Shimada, Toshikazu; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Oda, Shunri

    2009-11-01

    The static switching properties and readout characteristics of proposed high-speed and nonvolatile nanoelectromechanical (NEM) memory devices are investigated. By conducting a three-dimensional finite element mechanical simulation combined with an electrostatic analysis, we analyze the electromechanical switching operation of a mechanically bistable NEM floating gate by applying gate voltage. We show that switching voltage can be reduced to less than 10 V by reducing the zero-bias displacement of the floating gate and optimizing the cavity structure to improve mechanical symmetry. We also analyze the electrical readout property of the NEM memory devices by combining the electromechanical simulation with a drift-diffusion analysis. We demonstrate that the mechanically bistable states of the floating gate can be detected via the changes in drain current with an ON/OFF current ratio of about 3 ×104.

  13. Disturbance characteristics of charge trap flash memory with tunneling field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Ning; Cho, Eou-Sik; Choi, Woo Young; Cho, Il Hwan

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the disturbance characteristics of silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon (SONOS) memory based on the tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET) are investigated in terms of the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) program. Since the TFET SONOS memory uses a depletion channel region for program inhibition, the tunneling of an inhibited cell considers both the electron concentration and the vertical electric field. The effects of both parameters on tunneling current are analyzed using device simulation and the tunneling current equation. The tunneling current of the source-side region depends on the electric field and that of the drain-side region depends on the electron concentration. These results can be applied to the performance optimization of the TFET SONOS memory.

  14. Resident memory T cells in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Resident memory T cells are non-recirculating memory T cells that persist long term in epithelial barrier tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, lung, skin and reproductive tract. Resident memory T cells persist in the absence of antigens, have impressive effector functions and provide rapid on-site immune protection against known pathogens in peripheral tissues. A fundamentally distinct gene expression program differentiates resident memory T cells from circulating T cells. Although these cells likely evolved to provide rapid immune protection against pathogens, autoreactive, aberrantly activated and malignant resident memory cells contribute to numerous human inflammatory diseases including mycosis fungoides and psoriasis. This review will discuss both the science and medicine of resident memory T cells, exploring how these cells contribute to healthy immune function and discussing what is known about how these cells contribute to human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25568072

  15. Dynamic switching characteristic dependence on sidewall angle for phase change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, X. M.; Miao, X. S.; Sun, J. J.; Cheng, X. M.; Tong, H.; Li, Y.; Yang, D. H.; Huang, J. D.; Liu, C.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the volume-minimized model of phase change memory (PCM) cell with Ge 2Sb 2Te 5 (GST) material has been established to study the dynamic switching (set-to-reset) characteristic dependence on the sidewall angle. Joule heating volume, threshold current, dynamic resistance and phase transition rate of PCM cells by current pulse are all calculated. The results show that the threshold current increases with decreasing the sidewall angle and is significantly impacted by the feature size and aspect ratio. The PCM cell of 90° sidewall angle exhibits the smallest Joule heating volume, the highest RESET resistance and the fastest phase transition property.

  16. Effect with high density nano dot type storage layer structure on 20 nm planar NAND flash memory characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Takeshi; Muraguchi, Masakazu; Seo, Moon-Sik; Park, Sung-kye; Endoh, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    The merits, concerns and design principle for the future nano dot (ND) type NAND flash memory cell are clarified, by considering the effect of storage layer structure on NAND flash memory characteristics. The characteristics of the ND cell for a NAND flash memory in comparison with the floating gate type (FG) is comprehensively studied through the read, erase, program operation, and the cell to cell interference with device simulation. Although the degradation of the read throughput (0.7% reduction of the cell current) and slower program time (26% smaller programmed threshold voltage shift) with high density (10 × 1012 cm-2) ND NAND are still concerned, the suppress of the cell to cell interference with high density (10 × 1012 cm-2) plays the most important part for scaling and multi-level cell (MLC) operation in comparison with the FG NAND. From these results, the design knowledge is shown to require the control of the number of nano dots rather than the higher nano dot density, from the viewpoint of increasing its memory capacity by MLC operation and suppressing threshold voltage variability caused by the number of dots in the storage layer. Moreover, in order to increase its memory capacity, it is shown the tunnel oxide thickness with ND should be designed thicker (>3 nm) than conventional designed ND cell for programming/erasing with direct tunneling mechanism.

  17. Trilayer Tunnel Selectors for Memristor Memory Cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Byung Joon; Zhang, Jiaming; Norris, Kate; Gibson, Gary; Kim, Kyung Min; Jackson, Warren; Zhang, Min-Xian Max; Li, Zhiyong; Yang, J Joshua; Williams, R Stanley

    2016-01-13

    An integrated memory cell with a mem-ristor and a trilayer crested barrier selector, showing repeatable nonlinear current-voltage switching loops is presented. The fully atomic-layer-deposited TaN1+x /Ta2 O5 /TaN1+x crested barrier selector yields a large nonlinearity (>10(4) ), high endurance (>10(8) ), low variability, and low temperature dependence. PMID:26584142

  18. Inhibiting glycolytic metabolism enhances CD8+ T cell memory and antitumor function

    PubMed Central

    Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Liu, Jie; Ji, Yun; Subramanian, Murugan; Crompton, Joseph G.; Yu, Zhiya; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Palmer, Douglas C.; Muranski, Pawel; Karoly, Edward D.; Mohney, Robert P.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Lal, Ashish; Finkel, Toren; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Gattinoni, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Naive CD8+ T cells rely upon oxidation of fatty acids as a primary source of energy. After antigen encounter, T cells shift to a glycolytic metabolism to sustain effector function. It is unclear, however, whether changes in glucose metabolism ultimately influence the ability of activated T cells to become long-lived memory cells. We used a fluorescent glucose analog, 2-NBDG, to quantify glucose uptake in activated CD8+ T cells. We found that cells exhibiting limited glucose incorporation had a molecular profile characteristic of memory precursor cells and an increased capacity to enter the memory pool compared with cells taking up high amounts of glucose. Accordingly, enforcing glycolytic metabolism by overexpressing the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate mutase-1 severely impaired the ability of CD8+ T cells to form long-term memory. Conversely, activation of CD8+ T cells in the presence of an inhibitor of glycolysis, 2-deoxyglucose, enhanced the generation of memory cells and antitumor functionality. Our data indicate that augmenting glycolytic flux drives CD8+ T cells toward a terminally differentiated state, while its inhibition preserves the formation of long-lived memory CD8+ T cells. These results have important implications for improving the efficacy of T cell–based therapies against chronic infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:24091329

  19. Spanish Adaptation of the Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ).

    PubMed

    Pegalajar, Joaquín; Acosta, Alberto; Castillo, Miguel; Higueras, Lorenzo; Padilla, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    The Memory Characteristics Questionnaire (MCQ) was developed by Johnson, Foley, Suengas, and Raye (1988) to assess the characteristics of memories of external and internal origin, postulated in the source monitoring model (Johnson, Hashtroudi, & Lindsay, 1993). The MCQ was translated into Spanish using a back-translation method. Psychometric properties of the translated MCQ were tested using responses collected from an experimental study simulating a forensic context. Ten police officers and 8 psychologists individually interviewed 240 university students who completed the MCQ after reporting what they had seen in a film. Half of the participants were asked to tell the truth, while the other half were asked to lie. The results have shown adequate psychometric properties of the Spanish MCQ items for the total sample and across experimental conditions. Cronbach's alpha value was .79 for the total sample, .78 for the honest condition, and .76 for the lie condition. Validity evidence of dimensionality supports that the factor structure of Spanish MCQ was equivalent to that proposed by the authors of the original version. Also, a two-factor ANOVA (video clip x condition) was performed to analyze experimental data. Neither interaction effects, F(236) = 1.189; p = .277, nor main effects were found to be significant between those asked to tell the truth and those asked to lie. These results demonstrate that the Spanish MCQ has adequate psychometric properties. PMID:26695474

  20. The Effect of Shape Memory on Red Blood Cell Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiting; Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-11-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to study the effect of the shape memory on the motion of red blood cell in flows. In shear flow, shape memory also plays an important role to obtain all three motions: tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. In Poiseuille flow, cell has an equilibrium shape as a slipper or parachute depending on capillary number. To ensure the tank-treading motion while in slippery shape, a modified model is proposed by introducing a shape memory coefficient which describes the degree of shape memory in cells. The effect of the coefficient on the cell motion of red blood cell will be presented.

  1. Investigating Land Memory Characteristics Using Observations and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amenu, G. G.; Kumar, P.

    2004-12-01

    It has been speculated that understanding land memory dynamics may provide a basis for hydrologic and climate prediction at seasonal to longer time-scales. In this study the characteristics of land memory are explored using observed soil-moisture data from the Illinois Climate Network stations and corresponding simulated soil temperature. The soil moisture data is observed for 11 layers from the surface to a depth of 2 meters and spans 23 years, 1981 to 2003. The soil temperature profile is obtained using the numerical solution of the heat transfer equation, constrained by observed soil-moisture, and driven by observed surface variables which include air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, wind speed, and snow depth. Spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture and soil temperature with depth is explored. Depth-wise variability of the magnitudes of amplitude, phase-lag, and temporal scales are quantified for both soil moisture and soil temperature. Dominant signals are identified using spectral analysis techniques and their variability with depth is investigated. Linkage between the inter-annual signals of soil moisture, soil temperature, and ENSO is explored. Further, the sensitivity of surface temperature and surface energy fluxes to the variability of soil moisture at different depths is demonstrated.

  2. Item recognition memory and the receiver operating characteristic.

    PubMed

    Heathcote, Andrew

    2003-11-01

    Four experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of study time, study repetition, semantic and orthographic similarity, and category length on item recognition memory receiver operating characteristics (ROCs). Analyses of ROC shape rejected A. P. Yonelinas's (1994) dual-process model. The normal unequal variance signal-detection model provided a better account of the data, except for a small but consistent excess of high-confidence errors. It was found that z-transformed ROC slope was increased by similarity, category length, and study item repetition, rejecting R. Ratcliff, G. McKoon, and M. Tindall's (1994) "constancy-of-slopes" generalization for these variables, but slope was relatively unaffected by massed study time. PMID:14622056

  3. Memory CD8+ T Cells: Orchestrators and Key Players of Innate Immunity?

    PubMed

    Lauvau, Grégoire; Goriely, Stanislas

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decades, the dichotomy between innate and adaptive immune responses has largely dominated our understanding of immunology. Upon primary encounter with microbial pathogens, differentiation of adaptive immune cells into functional effectors usually takes several days or even longer, making them contribute to host protection only late during primary infection. However, once generated, antigen-experienced T lymphocytes can persist in the organism and constitute a pool of memory cells that mediate fast and effective protection to a recall infection with the same microbial pathogen. Herein, we challenge this classical paradigm by highlighting the "innate nature" of memory CD8+ T cells. First, within the thymus or in the periphery, naïve CD8+ T cells may acquire phenotypic and functional characteristics of memory CD8+ T cells independently of challenge with foreign antigens. Second, both the "unconventional" and the "conventional" memory cells can rapidly express protective effector functions in response to sets of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines signals, independent of cognate antigen triggering. Third, memory CD8+ T cells can act by orchestrating the recruitment, activation, and licensing of innate cells, leading to broad antimicrobial states. Thus, collectively, memory CD8+ T cells may represent important actors of innate immune defenses. PMID:27584152

  4. Primer: making sense of T-cell memory.

    PubMed

    Beverley, Peter C L

    2008-01-01

    Protective memory is a key property of the immune system. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns of invading organisms deliver signals to pattern-recognition receptors that activate the innate immune system. Ligation of the T-cell receptor by peptides bound to MHC antigens and presented by dendritic cells, together with signals produced by the activated innate immune system, initiate T-cell responses. The nature of the T-cell response, consisting of phases of clonal expansion and contraction, and differentiation to effector and memory cells, however, is determined both by the properties of the antigen and the co-stimuli produced by the innate immune system. Short-lived effector and longer-lived memory T cells are generated during primary responses; after the death of most of the effectors, memory cells remain. Memory cells are heterogeneous in phenotype and function; subsets include the relatively quiescent central and more activated effector memory cells, as well as cells able to promote inflammation, help antibody production or regulate other immune responses. Understanding the properties of memory cells will help in the rational design of vaccines for 'difficult' organisms or cancer, as well as immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:18172448

  5. Memory NK Cells Take Out the (Mitochondrial) Garbage.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Julia A; Fehniger, Todd A

    2015-08-18

    The molecular mechanisms important to generate innate natural killer cell "memory" are poorly understood. In this issue of Immunity, O'Sullivan et al. (2015) demonstrate that mitophagy plays a critical role in natural killer cell memory formation following viral infection. PMID:26287678

  6. Impaired memory CD8 T cell development in the absence of methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kersh, Ellen N

    2006-09-15

    Intracellular differentiation events that determine which cells develop into memory CD8 T cells are currently incompletely understood. Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) is a transcriptional repressor that binds to methylated DNA and mediates the biological consequences of epigenetic gene methylation. The role of MBD2 during the differentiation of naive CD8 T cells into effector and memory cells was determined following acute infection of MBD2-deficient mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Despite rapid viral clearance and an efficient primary effector CD8 T cell response, reduced numbers of Ag-specific memory CD8 T cells were observed. Importantly, the appearance of precursor memory cells (IL-7Ralphahigh) was delayed. The remaining MBD2(-/-) memory cells were not fully protective during rechallenge, and memory cell characteristics were altered with regard to surface markers (IL-7Ralpha, KLRG-1, CD27, and others) and cytokine production. The defect was CD8 T cell intrinsic, because memory cell development was also delayed when MBD2(-/-) CD8 T cells were adoptively transferred into SCID mice. These data demonstrate that MBD2 is a previously unrecognized intracellular factor required for the efficient generation of protective memory CD8 T cells. PMID:16951344

  7. Natural killer cells: walking three paths down memory lane.

    PubMed

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hendricks, Deborah W; Nabekura, Tsukasa; Lanier, Lewis L

    2013-06-01

    Immunological memory has traditionally been regarded as a unique feature of the adaptive immune response, mediated in an antigen-specific manner by T and B lymphocytes. All other hematopoietic cells, including natural killer (NK) cells, are classified as innate immune cells, which have been considered short-lived but can respond rapidly against pathogens in a manner not thought to be driven by antigen. Interestingly, NK cells have recently been shown to survive long term after antigen exposure and subsequently mediate antigen-specific recall responses. In this review, we address the similarities between, and the controversies surrounding, three major viewpoints of NK memory that have arisen from these recent studies: (i) mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV)-induced memory; (ii) cytokine-induced memory; and (iii) liver-restricted memory cells. PMID:23499559

  8. Distribution of Peripheral Memory T Follicular Helper Cells in Patients with Schistosomiasis Japonica

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaojun; Li, Wei; Zhang, Yang; Song, Xian; Xu, Lei; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhou, Sha; Zhu, Jifeng; Jin, Xin; Liu, Feng; Chen, Gengxin; Su, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a helminthic disease that affects more than 200 million people. An effective vaccine would be a major step towards eliminating the disease. Studies suggest that T follicular helper (Tfh) cells provide help to B cells to generate the long-term humoral immunity, which would be a crucial component of successful vaccines. Thus, understanding the biological characteristics of Tfh cells in patients with schistosomiasis, which has never been explored, is essential for vaccine design. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated the biological characteristics of peripheral memory Tfh cells in schistosomiasis patients by flow cytometry. Our data showed that the frequencies of total and activated peripheral memory Tfh cells in patients were significantly increased during Schistosoma japonicum infection. Moreover, Tfh2 cells, which were reported to be a specific subpopulation to facilitate the generation of protective antibodies, were increased more greatly than other subpopulations of total peripheral memory Tfh cells in patients with schistosomiasis japonica. More importantly, our result showed significant correlations of the percentage of Tfh2 cells with both the frequency of plasma cells and the level of IgG antibody. In addition, our results showed that the percentage of T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells was also increased in patients with schistosomiasis. Conclusions/Significance Our report is the first characterization of peripheral memory Tfh cells in schistosomasis patients, which not only provides potential targets to improve immune response to vaccination, but also is important for the development of vaccination strategies to control schistosomiasis. PMID:26284362

  9. Habit learning and memory in mammals: behavioral and neural characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gasbarri, Antonella; Pompili, Assunta; Packard, Mark G; Tomaz, Carlos

    2014-10-01

    Goal-direct behavior and habit learning represent two forms of instrumental learning; whereas the former is rapidly acquired and regulated by its outcome, the latter is reflexive, elicited by antecedent stimuli rather than their consequences. Habit learning can be generally defined as the acquisition of associations between stimuli and responses. Habits are acquired via experience-dependent plasticity, occurring repeatedly over the course of days or years and becoming remarkably fixed. The distinction between habit learning, as a product of a procedural learning brain system, and a declarative learning system for encoding facts and episodes is based on the hypothesis that memory is composed of multiple systems that have distinct neuroanatomy and operating principles. Here we review recent research analyzing the main behavioral and neural characteristics of habit learning. In particular, we focus on the distinction between goal-directed and habitual behavior, and describe the brain areas and neurotransmitters systems involved in habit learning. The emotional modulation of habit learning in rodents and primates is reviewed, and the implications of habit learning in psychopathology are briefly described. PMID:24981854

  10. Study of Multi-level Characteristics for 3D Vertical Resistive Switching Memory

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yue; Wu, Huaqiang; Wu, Riga; Zhang, Ye; Deng, Ning; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integration and multi-level cell (MLC) are two attractive technologies to achieve ultra-high density for mass storage applications. In this work, a three-layer 3D vertical AlOδ/Ta2O5-x/TaOy resistive random access memories were fabricated and characterized. The vertical cells in three layers show good uniformity and high performance (e.g. >1000X HRS/LRS windows, >1010 endurance cycles, >104 s retention times at 125°C). Meanwhile, four level MLC is demonstrated with two operation strategies, current controlled scheme (CCS) and voltage controlled scheme (VCS). The switching mechanism of 3D vertical RRAM cells is studied based on temperature-dependent transport characteristics. Furthermore, the applicability of CCS and VCS in 3D vertical RRAM array is compared using resistor network circuit simulation. PMID:25047906

  11. Study of multi-level characteristics for 3D vertical resistive switching memory.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yue; Wu, Huaqiang; Wu, Riga; Zhang, Ye; Deng, Ning; Yu, Zhiping; Qian, He

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) integration and multi-level cell (MLC) are two attractive technologies to achieve ultra-high density for mass storage applications. In this work, a three-layer 3D vertical AlOδ/Ta2O5-x/TaOy resistive random access memories were fabricated and characterized. The vertical cells in three layers show good uniformity and high performance (e.g. >1000X HRS/LRS windows, >10(10) endurance cycles, >10(4) s retention times at 125°C). Meanwhile, four level MLC is demonstrated with two operation strategies, current controlled scheme (CCS) and voltage controlled scheme (VCS). The switching mechanism of 3D vertical RRAM cells is studied based on temperature-dependent transport characteristics. Furthermore, the applicability of CCS and VCS in 3D vertical RRAM array is compared using resistor network circuit simulation. PMID:25047906

  12. Evidence for Resident Memory T Cells in Rasmussen Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Geoffrey C.; Chang, Julia W.; Huynh, My N.; Chirwa, Thabiso; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare pediatric neuroinflammatory disease of unknown etiology characterized by intractable seizures, and progressive atrophy usually confined to one cerebral hemisphere. Surgical removal or disconnection of the affected cerebral hemisphere is currently the only intervention that effectively stops the seizures. Histopathological evaluation of resected brain tissue has shown that activated brain resident macrophages (microglia) and infiltrating T cells are involved in the inflammatory reaction. Here, we report that T cells isolated from seven RE brain surgery specimens express the resident memory T cell (TRM) marker CD103. CD103 was expressed by >50% of CD8+ αβ T cells and γδ T cells irrespective of the length of time from seizure onset to surgery, which ranged from 0.3 to 8.4 years. Only ~10% of CD4+ αβ were CD103+, which was consistent with the observation that few CD4+ T cells are found in RE brain parenchyma. Clusters of T cells in brain parenchyma, which are a characteristic of RE histopathology, stained for CD103. Less than 10% of T cells isolated from brain specimens from eight surgical cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a condition that is also characterized by intractable seizures, were CD103+. In contrast to the RE cases, the percent of CD103+ T cells increased with the length of time from seizure onset to surgery. In sections of brain tissue from the FCD cases, T cells were predominantly found around blood vessels, and did not stain for CD103. The presence of significant numbers of TRM cells in RE brain irrespective of the length of time between clinical presentation and surgical intervention supports the conclusion that a cellular immune response to an as yet unidentified antigen(s) occurs at an early stage of the disease. Reactivated TRM cells may contribute to disease progression. PMID:26941743

  13. Evidence for Resident Memory T Cells in Rasmussen Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Geoffrey C; Chang, Julia W; Huynh, My N; Chirwa, Thabiso; Vinters, Harry V; Mathern, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare pediatric neuroinflammatory disease of unknown etiology characterized by intractable seizures, and progressive atrophy usually confined to one cerebral hemisphere. Surgical removal or disconnection of the affected cerebral hemisphere is currently the only intervention that effectively stops the seizures. Histopathological evaluation of resected brain tissue has shown that activated brain resident macrophages (microglia) and infiltrating T cells are involved in the inflammatory reaction. Here, we report that T cells isolated from seven RE brain surgery specimens express the resident memory T cell (TRM) marker CD103. CD103 was expressed by >50% of CD8(+) αβ T cells and γδ T cells irrespective of the length of time from seizure onset to surgery, which ranged from 0.3 to 8.4 years. Only ~10% of CD4(+) αβ were CD103(+), which was consistent with the observation that few CD4(+) T cells are found in RE brain parenchyma. Clusters of T cells in brain parenchyma, which are a characteristic of RE histopathology, stained for CD103. Less than 10% of T cells isolated from brain specimens from eight surgical cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a condition that is also characterized by intractable seizures, were CD103(+). In contrast to the RE cases, the percent of CD103(+) T cells increased with the length of time from seizure onset to surgery. In sections of brain tissue from the FCD cases, T cells were predominantly found around blood vessels, and did not stain for CD103. The presence of significant numbers of TRM cells in RE brain irrespective of the length of time between clinical presentation and surgical intervention supports the conclusion that a cellular immune response to an as yet unidentified antigen(s) occurs at an early stage of the disease. Reactivated TRM cells may contribute to disease progression. PMID:26941743

  14. Embedded Ultra High Density Flash Memory Cell and Corresponding Array Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kung-Hong; Wu, Meng-Yi; Dai, Sen-Hue; King, Ya-Chin

    2005-04-01

    A novel flash memory cell fabricated by standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) logic process and its corresponding array architecture is presented. The cell which consists of two metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET) in series is programmed by channel current induced drain avalanche hot hole and erased by channel hot electron injection. With novel operation principles and array architecture, a feature-sized n-MOSFET per non-volatile memory bit is successfully demonstrated and the CMOS-process-based flash cell size can be as small as multi-gated flash memory. The smallest bit area of a CMOS-process-based flash memory cell with good programming and erasing characteristics along with endurance up to 105 cycles, 10 years excellent read disturbance and data retention characteristics of data retention at 150°C is proposed. With its small cell size and full compatibility with standard CMOS logic process, the novel flash memory cell can be easily adapted in highly integrated very large scale integration (VLSI) systems.

  15. Quantifying memory CD8 T cells reveals regionalization of immunosurveillance

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Elizabeth M.; Schenkel, Jason M.; Fraser, Kathryn A.; Beura, Lalit K.; Manlove, Luke S.; Igyártó, Botond Z.; Southern, Peter J.; Masopust, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary Memory CD8 T cells protect against intracellular pathogens by scanning host cell surfaces, thus infection detection rates depend on memory cell number and distribution. Population analyses rely on isolation from whole organs and interpretation is predicated on presumptions of near complete cell recovery. Paradigmatically, memory is parsed into central, effector, and resident subsets, ostensibly defined by immunosurveillance patterns, but in practice identified by phenotypic markers. Because isolation methods ultimately inform models of memory T cell differentiation, protection, and vaccine translation, we tested their validity via parabiosis and quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of a mouse memory CD8 T cell population. We report three major findings: lymphocyte isolation fails to recover most cells and biases against certain subsets, residents greatly outnumber recirculating cells within nonlymphoid tissues, and memory subset homing to inflammation does not conform to previously hypothesized migration patterns. These results indicate that most host cells are surveyed for reinfection by segregated residents rather than by recirculating cells that migrate throughout the blood and body. PMID:25957682

  16. Regulated selection of germinal-center cells into the memory B cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Shinnakasu, Ryo; Inoue, Takeshi; Kometani, Kohei; Moriyama, Saya; Adachi, Yu; Nakayama, Manabu; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Despite the importance of memory B cells in protection from reinfection, how such memory cells are selected and generated during germinal-center (GC) reactions remains unclear. We found here that light-zone (LZ) GC B cells with B cell antigen receptors (BCRs) of lower affinity were prone to enter the memory B cell pool. Mechanistically, cells in this memory-prone fraction had higher expression of the transcriptional repressor Bach2 than that of their counterparts with BCRs of higher affinity. Haploinsufficiency of Bach2 resulted in reduced generation of memory B cells, independently of suppression of the gene encoding the transcription factor Blimp-1. Bach2 expression in GC cells was inversely correlated with the strength of help provided by T cells. Thus, we propose an instructive model in which weak help from T cells maintains relatively high expression of Bach2, which predisposes GC cells to enter the memory pool. PMID:27158841

  17. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells license dendritic cells to potentiate memory T helper 2 cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Timotheus YF; Hwang, You Yi; Scanlon, Seth T; Zaghouani, Habib; Garbi, Natalio; Fallon, Padraic G; McKenzie, Andrew NJ

    2015-01-01

    Rapid memory CD4+ T helper 2 (TH2) cell activation during allergic inflammation requires their recruitment into the affected tissue. Here we demonstrate that group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) play a critical role in memory TH2 cell responses, with targeted ILC2 depletion profoundly impairing TH2 cell localization to the lungs and skin of sensitized mice after allergen re-challenge. ILC2-derived interleukin-13 (IL-13) is critical for eliciting IRF4+CD11b+CD103− dendritic cells (DCs) to produce the TH2 cell-attracting chemokine CCL17. Consequently, the sentinel function of DCs is contingent on ILC2s for the generation of an efficient memory TH2 cell response. These results elucidate a key new innate mechanism in the regulation of the immune memory response to allergens. PMID:26523868

  18. Adults’ reports of their earliest memories: Consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Patricia J.; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults’ earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2 to 4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. PMID:24836979

  19. Adults' reports of their earliest memories: consistency in events, ages, and narrative characteristics over time.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Patricia J; Tasdemir-Ozdes, Aylin; Larkina, Marina

    2014-07-01

    Earliest memories have been of interest since the late 1800s, when it was first noted that most adults do not have memories from the first years of life (so-called childhood amnesia). Several characteristics of adults' earliest memories have been investigated, including emotional content, the perspective from which they are recalled, and vividness. The focus of the present research was a feature of early memories heretofore relatively neglected in the literature, namely, their consistency. Adults reported their earliest memories 2-4 times over a 4-year period. Reports of earliest memories were highly consistent in the events identified as the bases for earliest memories, the reported age at the time of the event, and in terms of qualities of the narrative descriptions. These findings imply stability in the boundary that marks the offset of childhood amnesia, as well as in the beginning of a continuous sense of self over time. PMID:24836979

  20. Improved memory characteristics by NH{sub 3}-nitrided GdO as charge storage layer for nonvolatile memory applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Xu, J. P.; Ji, F.; Chen, J. X.; Lai, P. T.

    2012-07-16

    Charge-trapping memory capacitor with nitrided gadolinium oxide (GdO) as charge storage layer (CSL) is fabricated, and the influence of post-deposition annealing in NH{sub 3} on its memory characteristics is investigated. Transmission electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction are used to analyze the cross-section and interface quality, composition, and crystallinity of the stack gate dielectric, respectively. It is found that nitrogen incorporation can improve the memory window and achieve a good trade-off among the memory properties due to NH{sub 3}-annealing-induced reasonable distribution profile of a large quantity of deep-level bulk traps created in the nitrided GdO film and reduction of shallow traps near the CSL/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  1. The role of precursor frequency in the differentiation of memory T cells: memory by numbers.

    PubMed

    Marzo, Amanda L; Sowell, Ryan T; Scott, Bernadette

    2010-01-01

    Immunological memory is considered the hallmark of adaptive, or acquired, immunity. That ability of our immune system to recognize and respond to those pathogens we have encountered before not only typifies acquired immunity but has provided the basis for the most notable of medical interventions: vaccination. Yet, as much as we now know about this process, we are still on the cusp of fully understanding how memory T cells develop, how they are maintained and the importance of memory T-cell heterogeneity. In this review we will primarily focus on our understanding of CD8 T-cell memory generated during acute infections and how precursor frequency influences their development and functional attributes. PMID:20795541

  2. Memory CD4 T cells emerge from effector T-cell progenitors.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Laurie E; Janowski, Karen M; Oliver, James R; Zajac, Allan J; Weaver, Casey T

    2008-03-20

    A hallmark of adaptive immunity is the generation of memory T cells that confer long-lived, antigen-specific protection against repeat challenges by pathogens. Understanding the mechanisms by which memory T cells arise is important for rational vaccination strategies and improved therapeutic interventions for chronic infections and autoimmune disorders. The large clonal expansion of CD8 T cells in response to some infections has made the development of CD8 T-cell memory more amenable to study, giving rise to a model of memory cell differentiation in which a fraction of fully competent effector T cells transition into long-lived memory T cells. Delineation of CD4 T-cell memory development has proved more difficult as a result of limitations on tracking the smaller populations of CD4 effector T cells generated during a pathogenic challenge, complicating efforts to determine whether CD4 memory T cells are direct descendants of effector T cells or whether they develop by alternative pathways. Here, using two complementary cytokine reporter mouse models to identify interferon (IFN)-gamma-positive effector T cells and track their fate, we show that the lineage relationship between effector and memory CD4 T cells resembles that for CD8 T cells responding to the same pathogen. We find that, in parallel with effector CD8 T cells, IFN-gamma-positive effector CD4 T cells give rise to long-lived memory T cells capable of anamnestic responses to antigenic rechallenge. PMID:18322463

  3. Three Types of Memory for Childhood Sexual Abuse: Relationships to Characteristics of Abuse and Psychological Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, M. Sue

    2008-01-01

    Data from a clinical sample (N = 88) reporting childhood sexual abuse was compared by types of memory, abuse characteristics, and psychological symptoms. Three types of memory were identified from a questionnaire ("Always" n = 27 [31%], "Recovered" n = 41 [46%], and "Both" n = 20 [23%]). When compared with narrative reports from a subset (n = 30)…

  4. T Cell Factor 1-Expressing Memory-like CD8(+) T Cells Sustain the Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infections.

    PubMed

    Utzschneider, Daniel T; Charmoy, Mélanie; Chennupati, Vijaykumar; Pousse, Laurène; Ferreira, Daniela Pais; Calderon-Copete, Sandra; Danilo, Maxime; Alfei, Francesca; Hofmann, Maike; Wieland, Dominik; Pradervand, Sylvain; Thimme, Robert; Zehn, Dietmar; Held, Werner

    2016-08-16

    Chronic infections promote the terminal differentiation (or "exhaustion") of T cells and are thought to preclude the formation of memorycells. In contrast, we discovered a small subpopulation of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells that sustained the T cell response during chronic infections. These cells were defined by, and depended on, the expression of the transcription factor Tcf1. Transcriptome analysis revealed that this population shared key characteristics of central memory cells but lacked an effector signature. Unlike conventional memory cells, Tcf1-expressing T cells displayed hallmarks of an "exhausted" phenotype, including the expression of inhibitory receptors such as PD-1 and Lag-3. This population was crucial for the T cell expansion that occurred in response to inhibitory receptor blockade during chronic infection. These findings identify a memory-like T cell population that sustains T cell responses and is a prime target for therapeutic interventions to improve the immune response in chronic infections. PMID:27533016

  5. Mass cytometry analysis shows that a novel memory phenotype B cell is expanded in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hansmann, Leo; Blum, Lisa; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Liedtke, Michaela; Robinson, William H.; Davis, Mark M.

    2015-01-01

    It would be very beneficial if the status of cancers could be determined from a blood specimen. However, peripheral blood leukocytes are very heterogeneous between individuals and thus high resolution technologies are likely required. We used cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) and next generation sequencing to ask whether a plasma cell cancer (multiple myeloma) and related pre-cancerous states had any consistent effect on the peripheral blood mononuclear cell phenotypes of patients. Analysis of peripheral blood samples from 13 cancer patients, 9 pre-cancer patients, and 9 healthy individuals revealed significant differences in the frequencies of the T, B, and natural killer cell compartments. Most strikingly, we identified a novel B-cell population that normally accounts for 4.0±0.7% (mean±SD) of total B cells and is up to 13-fold expanded in multiple myeloma patients with active disease. This population expressed markers previously associated with both memory (CD27+) and naïve (CD24loCD38+) phenotypes. Single-cell immunoglobulin gene sequencing showed polyclonality, indicating that these cells are not precursors to the myeloma, and somatic mutations, a characteristic of memory cells. SYK, ERK, and p38 phosphorylation responses, and the fact that most of these cells expressed isotypes other than IgM or IgD, confirmed the memory character of this population, defining it as a novel type of memory B cells. PMID:25711758

  6. Memory B Cells and Pneumococcal Antibody After Splenectomy1

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstrom, Heather; Bussel, James; Lim, Lony C.-L.; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    Splenectomized patients are susceptible to bloodstream infections with encapsulated bacteria, potentially due to loss of blood filtering but also defective production of anticarbohydrate Ab. Recent studies propose that a lack of Ab is related to reduced numbers of IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells found after splenectomy. To test this, we analyzed CD27+ memory B cell subsets, IgG, and IgM pneumococcal Ab responses in 26 vaccinated splenectomized subjects in comparison to memory B cell subsets and Ab responses in healthy controls. As shown previously, the splenectomized autoimmune subjects had fewer total, isotype switched, and IgM+ CD27+ memory B cells as compared with controls, but there was no difference in memory B cells subsets between controls and splenectomized subjects with spherocytosis. There was no difference between the geometric mean IgG Ab response between normal controls and splenectomized subjects (p = 0.51; p = 0.81). Control subjects produced more IgM Ab than splenectomized autoimmune subjects (p = 0.01) but the same levels as subjects with spherocytosis (p = 0.15.) There was no correlation between memory B cell subsets and IgG or IgM Ab responses for controls or splenectomized subjects. These data suggest that splenectomy alone may not be the sole reason for loss of memory B cells and reduced IgM antipneumococcal Ab. Because subjects with autoimmunity had splenectomy at a significantly older age than participants with spherocytosis, these data suggest that an age-related loss of extra splenic sites necessary for the maintenance or function of memory B cells may lead to impaired immunity in these subjects. PMID:18714044

  7. Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Charles

    1994-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics are being studied as part of a TRW program directed towards development of a high current battery cell bypass switch. The following are discussed: cell bypass switch; nickel-hydrogen cell reversal characteristics; and nickel-hydrogen cell chemistry: discharge/reversal and overdischarge (reversal) with nickel and hydrogen precharge.

  8. T inflammatory memory CD8 T cells participate to antiviral response and generate secondary memory cells with an advantage in XCL1 production.

    PubMed

    Jubin, Virginie; Ventre, Erwan; Leverrier, Yann; Djebali, Sophia; Mayol, Katia; Tomkowiak, Martine; Mafille, Julien; Teixeira, Marie; Teoh, Denise Y-L; Lina, Bruno; Walzer, Thierry; Arpin, Christophe; Marvel, Jacqueline

    2012-06-01

    Besides the classically described subsets of memory CD8 T cells generated under infectious conditions, are T inflammatory memory cells generated under sterile priming conditions, such as sensitization to allergens. Although not fully differentiated as pathogen-induced memory cells, they display memory properties that distinguish them from naive CD8 T cells. Given these memory cells are generated in an antigen-specific context that is devoid of pathogen-derived danger signals and CD4 T cell help, we herein questioned whether they maintained their activation and differentiation potential, could be recruited in an immune response directed against a pathogen expressing their cognate antigen and further differentiate in fully competent secondary memory cells. We show that T inflammatory memory cells can indeed take part to the immune response triggered by a viral infection, differentiate into secondary effectors and further generate typical central memory CD8 T cells and effector memory CD8 T cells. Furthermore, the secondary memory cells they generate display a functional advantage over primary memory cells in their capacity to produce TNF-α and the XCL1 chemokine. These results suggest that cross-reactive stimulations and differentiation of cells directed against allergens or self into fully competent pathogen-induced memory cells might have incidences in inflammatory immuno-pathologies. PMID:22528127

  9. Memory and Rehearsal Characteristics of Profoundly Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bebko, James M.

    1984-01-01

    Tests 64 deaf students from oral and total communication settings to examine whether a deficiency in spontaneous strategy use accounts for their verbal short-term memory performance. Spontaneous rehearsal of both deaf samples seemed to emerge later than the hearing sample's and was inefficiently implemented and less effective in mediating recall…

  10. Hardware implementation of associative memory characteristics with analogue-type resistive-switching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kibong; Park, Sangsu; Jang, Junwoo; Lee, Daeseok; Woo, Jiyong; Cha, Euijun; Lee, Sangheon; Park, Jaesung; Song, Jeonghwan; Koo, Yunmo; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the analogue memory characteristics of an oxide-based resistive-switching device under an electrical pulse to mimic biological spike-timing-dependent plasticity synapse characteristics. As a synaptic device, a TiN/Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3-based resistive-switching device exhibiting excellent analogue memory characteristics was used to control the synaptic weight by applying various pulse amplitudes and cycles. Furthermore, potentiation and depression characteristics with the same spikes can be achieved by applying negative and positive pulses, respectively. By adopting complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor devices as neurons and TiN/PCMO devices as synapses, we implemented neuromorphic hardware that mimics associative memory characteristics in real time for the first time. Owing to their excellent scalability, resistive-switching devices, shows promise for future high-density neuromorphic applications.

  11. Synthetic circuits integrating logic and memory in living cells.

    PubMed

    Siuti, Piro; Yazbek, John; Lu, Timothy K

    2013-05-01

    Logic and memory are essential functions of circuits that generate complex, state-dependent responses. Here we describe a strategy for efficiently assembling synthetic genetic circuits that use recombinases to implement Boolean logic functions with stable DNA-encoded memory of events. Application of this strategy allowed us to create all 16 two-input Boolean logic functions in living Escherichia coli cells without requiring cascades comprising multiple logic gates. We demonstrate long-term maintenance of memory for at least 90 cell generations and the ability to interrogate the states of these synthetic devices with fluorescent reporters and PCR. Using this approach we created two-bit digital-to-analog converters, which should be useful in biotechnology applications for encoding multiple stable gene expression outputs using transient inputs of inducers. We envision that this integrated logic and memory system will enable the implementation of complex cellular state machines, behaviors and pathways for therapeutic, diagnostic and basic science applications. PMID:23396014

  12. Requirement for CD4 T Cell Help in Generating Functional CD8 T Cell Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Shen, Hao

    2003-04-01

    Although primary CD8 responses to acute infections are independent of CD4 help, it is unknown whether a similar situation applies to secondary responses. We show that depletion of CD4 cells during the recall response has minimal effect, whereas depletion during the priming phase leads to reduced responses by memory CD8 cells to reinfection. Memory CD8 cells generated in CD4+/+ mice responded normally when transferred into CD4-/- hosts, whereas memory CD8 cells generated in CD4-/- mice mounted defective recall responses in CD4+/+ adoptive hosts. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in the development of functional CD8 memory.

  13. Shape memory characteristics of cold drawn Ti-Ni wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Otsuka, K.; Yoshida, H.; Nagai, H.; Oishi, R.; Horikawa, H.; Kishi, T.

    2003-10-01

    With the aim of the applications for smart composite, the influence of cold drawing on the shape systematically. It was found that the reverse transformation temperatures increased significantly, while the martensitic transformation temperatures decreased with increasing amount of cold drawing. Both the temperature range for reverse and martenistic transformations became larger with increasing amount of cold drawing. A recovery strain above 2% and a recovery stress up to 300MPa can be obtained in cold drawn wires. A two-way shape memory effect was observed in as-cold drawn TiNi wires. These results indicate that cold drawn TiNi wires have many unique shape memory properties which can be applicable for smart composites.

  14. PCC characteristics at rest in 10-year memory decliners.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Charlotte; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Helmer, Catherine; Chanraud, Sandra; Amieva, Hélène; Dartigues, Jean-François; Allard, Michèle; Catheline, Gwénaëlle

    2015-10-01

    The present research sought to characterize the intrinsic functional networks associated with a 10-year episodic memory decline in elderly using data from a longitudinal population-based cohort (Bordeaux-3City). Complementary measures of whole-brain resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging investigations were combined to compare functional architecture of brain networks both at connectional and topological levels in 22 decliners to 22 nondecliners; episodic memory decline being assessed through a multiple time point Free and Cued Selective Reminding Test. The decliners presented differences in functional architecture centered on the posterior cingulate cortex, characterized by a significant decrease of connectivity intensity, a significant increased centrality. In accordance, a decrease of the functional connectivity inside the default mode network was observed in the decliners. Our results highlight the central role of the posterior cingulate cortex in a slow but reliable memory decline in elderly. Because functional alterations of this region are currently described in Alzheimer's disease, this functional signature could constitute a risk for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26234756

  15. Impacts of Co doping on ZnO transparent switching memory device characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simanjuntak, Firman Mangasa; Prasad, Om Kumar; Panda, Debashis; Lin, Chun-An; Tsai, Tsung-Ling; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen

    2016-05-01

    The resistive switching characteristics of indium tin oxide (ITO)/Zn1-xCoxO/ITO transparent resistive memory devices were investigated. An appropriate amount of cobalt dopant in ZnO resistive layer demonstrated sufficient memory window and switching stability. In contrast, pure ZnO devices demonstrated a poor memory window, and using an excessive dopant concentration led to switching instability. To achieve suitable memory performance, relying only on controlling defect concentrations is insufficient; the grain growth orientation of the resistive layer must also be considered. Stable endurance with an ON/OFF ratio of more than one order of magnitude during 5000 cycles confirmed that the Co-doped ZnO device is a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory application. Additionally, fully transparent devices with a high transmittance of up to 90% at wavelength of 550 nm have been fabricated.

  16. Dendritic cells drive memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis via IL-15 transpresentation

    PubMed Central

    Stonier, Spencer W.; Ma, Lisa J.; Castillo, Eliseo F.

    2008-01-01

    Interleukin-15 (IL-15) is crucial for the development of naive and memory CD8 T cells and is delivered through a mechanism called transpresentation. Previous studies showed that memory CD8 T cells require IL-15 transpresentation by an as yet unknown cell of hematopoietic origin. We hypothesized that dendritic cells (DCs) transpresent IL-15 to CD8 T cells, and we examined this by developing a transgenic model that limits IL-15 transpresentation to DCs. In this study, IL-15 transpresentation by DCs had little effect on restoring naive CD8 T cells but contributed to the development of memory-phenotype CD8 T cells. The generation of virus-specific, memory CD8 T cells was partially supported by IL-15Rα+ DCs through the preferential enhancement of a subset of KLRG-1+CD27− CD8 T cells. In contrast, these DCs were largely sufficient in driving normal homeostatic proliferation of established memory CD8 T cells, suggesting that memory CD8 T cells grow more dependent on IL-15 transpresentation by DCs. Overall, our study clearly supports a role for DCs in memory CD8 T-cell homeostasis but also provides evidence that other hematopoietic cells are involved in this function. The identification of DCs fulfilling this role will enable future studies to better focus on mechanisms regulating T-cell homeostasis. PMID:18812469

  17. Adult-born hippocampal dentate granule cells undergoing maturation modulate learning and memory in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Saxe, Michael D.; Gallina, Iryna S.; Gage, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    Adult-born dentate granule cells (DGCs) contribute to learning and memory, yet it remains unknown when adult-born DGCs become involved in the cognitive processes. During neurogenesis, immature dentate granule cells (DGCs) display distinctive physiological characteristics while undergoing morphological maturation before final integration into the neural circuits. The survival and activity of the adult-born DGCs can be influenced by the experience of the animal during a critical period when newborn DGCs are still immature. To assess the temporal importance of adult neurogenesis, we developed a transgenic mouse model that allowed us to transiently reduce the numbers of adult-born DGCs in a temporally regulatable manner. We found that mice with a reduced population of adult-born DGCs at the immature stage were deficient in forming robust, long-term spatial memory and displayed impaired performance in extinction tasks. These results suggest that immature DGCs that undergo maturation make important contributions to learning and memory. PMID:19864566

  18. How eyewitnesses resist misinformation: social postwarnings and the monitoring of memory characteristics.

    PubMed

    Echterhoff, Gerald; Hirst, William; Hussy, Walter

    2005-07-01

    Previous findings have been equivocal as to whether the postevent misinformation effect on eyewitness memory is reduced by warnings presented after the misinformation (postwarnings). In the present research, social postwarnings, which characterize the postevent source as a low-credibility individual, diminished the misinformation effect in both cued recall and recognition tests. Discrediting the source as being either untrustworthy or incompetent was effective (Experiment 1). Also, postwarned participants rated reality characteristics of their memories more accurately than did participants receiving no or high-credibility information about the postevent source (Experiment 2). A social postwarning yielded the same results as an explicit source-monitoring appeal and led to longer response times for postevent items, relative to a no-warning condition (Experiments 3 and 4). The findings suggest that the reduced misinformation effect was due to more thorough monitoring of memory characteristics by postwarned participants, rather than to a stricter response criterion or to enhanced event memory. PMID:16383166

  19. Multilevel Cell Storage and Resistance Variability in Resistive Random Access Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantelis, D. I.; Karakizis, P. N.; Dragatogiannis, D. A.; Charitidis, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    Multilevel per cell (MLC) storage in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is attractive in achieving high-density and low-cost memory and will be required in future. In this chapter, MLC storage and resistance variability and reliability of multilevel in ReRAM are discussed. Different MLC operation schemes with their physical mechanisms and a comprehensive analysis of resistance variability have been provided. Various factors that can induce variability and their effect on the resistance margin between the multiple resistance levels are assessed. The reliability characteristics and the impact on MLC storage have also been assessed.

  20. Characteristics of visual interference with visuospatial working memory.

    PubMed

    Toms, M; Morris, N; Foley, P

    1994-02-01

    Recent discussions of visuospatial working memory have suggested that this subsystem may incorporate a visual buffer which holds visuospatial information relatively passively. Empirical investigations of visual interference with information held within a visuospatial subsystem have yielded somewhat equivocal results. Nonetheless, evidence from Logie (1986) has indicated that visuospatial processing can be disrupted by passive exposure to irrelevant visual material in a manner analogous to the disruption of serial verbal recall by exposure to irrelevant speech. This paper reports two experiments which explore whether such irrelevant visual input is disruptive to storage of imaginal information in a primarily spatial task--the Brooks spatial matrix task. Experiment 1 shows that exposure to irrelevant visual input during encoding selectively disrupts performance on a spatial, but not a verbal, version of the task. The extent of such disruption is shown to be independent of the visual complexity of the material, its similarity to the to-be-remembered information, or a change in state, with a static white square pattern yielding equivalent disruption to that produced by changing matrix patterns. The second experiment indicates that this pattern of effects is robust, and that such disruption is evident at an equivalent level when the visual material is present only during a 20-second retention interval. These results are interpreted as evidence of obligatory access of external visual material to a passive visual buffer. Implications for the nature of a visuospatial subsystem in working memory are discussed. PMID:8167974

  1. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  2. Memory T Cell-Derived interferon-γ Instructs Potent Innate Cell Activation For Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Soudja, Saidi M’Homa; Chandrabos, Ceena; Yakob, Ernest; Veenstra, Mike; Palliser, Deborah; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cells of the innate immune system are essential for host defenses against primary microbial pathogen infections, yet their involvement in effective memory responses of vaccinated individuals has been poorly investigated. Here we show that memory T cells instruct innate cells to become potent effector cells in a systemic and a mucosal model of infection. Memory T cells controlled phagocyte, dendritic cell and NK or NK T cell mobilization and induction of a strong program of differentiation, which included their expression of effector cytokines and microbicidal pathways, all of which were delayed in non-vaccinated hosts. Disruption of IFN-γ-signaling in Ly6C+ monocytes, dendritic cells and macrophages impaired these processes and the control of pathogen growth. These results reveal how memory T cells, through rapid secretion of IFN-γ, orchestrate extensive modifications of host innate immune responses that are essential for effective protection of vaccinated hosts. PMID:24931122

  3. Th17 memory cells: live long and proliferate.

    PubMed

    McGeachy, Mandy J

    2013-11-01

    The development of immune memory is a double-edged sword, helping to maintain health by preventing repeated infections but also driving chronic inflammation when dysregulated. Th17 cells are now well-known as major drivers of autoimmune disease but also play roles in protective immune responses against pathogens. This mini-review will focus on the recent evidence for long-lived, robust Th17 memory cell populations in mouse models and humans, and their functional roles in mediating host protection and chronic disease states. PMID:24006508

  4. Flexible conductive-bridging random-access-memory cell vertically stacked with top Ag electrode, PEO, PVK, and bottom Pt electrode.

    PubMed

    Seung, Hyun-Min; Kwon, Kyoung-Cheol; Lee, Gon-Sub; Park, Jea-Gun

    2014-10-31

    Flexible conductive-bridging random-access-memory (RAM) cells were fabricated with a cross-bar memory cell stacked with a top Ag electrode, conductive polymer (poly(n-vinylcarbazole): PVK), electrolyte (polyethylene oxide: PEO), bottom Pt electrode, and flexible substrate (polyethersulfone: PES), exhibiting the bipolar switching behavior of resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The cell also exhibited bending-fatigue-free nonvolatile memory characteristics: i.e., a set voltage of 1.0 V, a reset voltage of -1.6 V, retention time of >1 × 10(5) s with a memory margin of 9.2 × 10(5), program/erase endurance cycles of >10(2) with a memory margin of 8.4 × 10(5), and bending-fatigue-free cycles of ∼1 × 10(3) with a memory margin (I(on)/I(off)) of 3.3 × 10(5). PMID:25297517

  5. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  6. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C.; Duesterhaus, Michelle A.; Peter, Frank J.; Renn, Rosemarie A.; Baker, Michael S.

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  7. Tunneling Electroresistance Effect with Diode Characteristic for Cross-Point Memory.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2016-06-22

    Cross-point memory architecture (CPMA) by using memristors has attracted considerable attention because of its high-density integration. However, a common and significant drawback of the CPMA is related to crosstalk issues between cells by sneak currents. This study demonstrated the sneak current free resistive switching characteristic of a ferroelectric tunnel diode (FTD) memristor for a CPMA by utilizing a novel concept of a ferroelectric quadrangle and triangle barrier switch. A FTD of Au/BaTiO3 (5 nm)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (100) was used to obtain a desirable memristive effect for the CPMA. The FTD could reversibly change the shape of the ferroelectric potential from a quadrangle to a triangle. The effect included high nonlinearity and diode characteristics. It was derived from utilizing different sequences of carrier transport mechanisms such as the direct tunneling current, Fowler-Nordheim tunneling, and thermionic emission. The FTD memristor demonstrated the feasibility of sneak current-free high-density CPMA. PMID:27237433

  8. Memory T-cell competition for bone marrow seeding.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Santoni, Angela

    2003-03-01

    The presence in the bone marrow of memory CD8 T cells is well recognized. However, it is still largely unclear how T-cell migration from the lymphoid periphery to the bone marrow is regulated. In the present report, we show that antigen-specific CD4 T cells, as well as antigen-specific CD8 T cells, localize to the bone marrow of immunized mice, and are sustained there over long periods of time. To investigate the rules governing T-cell migration to the bone marrow, we generated chimeric mice in which the lymphoid periphery contained two genetically or phenotypically distinct groups of T cells, one of which was identical to the host. We then examined whether a distinct type of T cell had an advantage over the others in the colonization of bone marrow. Our results show that whereas ICAM1 and CD18 molecules are both involved in homing to lymph nodes, neither is crucial for T-cell bone marrow colonization. We also observed that memory-phenotype CD44high T cells, but not virgin-type CD44-/low T cells, preferentially home to the bone marrow upon adoptive transfer to normal young mice, but not to thymectomized old recipients where an existing memory T-cell pool precludes their free access. Thus, T-cell colonization of the bone marrow uses distinct molecules from those implicated in lymph node homing, and is regulated both by the properties of the T cell and by the competitive efficacy of other T cells inhabiting the same, saturable niche. This implies that the homing potential of an individual lymphocyte is not merely an intrinsic property of the cell, but rather a property of the lymphoid system taken as a whole. PMID:12603595

  9. Non-Volatile Flash Memory Characteristics of Tetralayer Nickel-Germanide Nanocrystals Embedded Structure.

    PubMed

    Panda, D; Panda, M

    2016-01-01

    Formation of tetralayer memory structure having nickel-germanide nanocrystals using a Ge/Ni multilayers is proposed. X-ray diffraction study shows the NiGe (002) phase formation after proper annealing. Cross sectional HRTEM clearly shows the sharpness and the size (~4-6 nm) of the stacked nanocrystals embedded in the oxide matrix. A large anti-clockwise hysteresis memory win- dow of 13.4 Volt at ± 15 Volt is observed for the optimized samples. This large memory window indicates for the MLC applications. Frequency independent C-V curve confirms about the charge storage in the nanocrystals. A good charge retention and endurance characteristics are exhibited upto 125 °C for the nonvolatile memory application. PMID:27398590

  10. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-01-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27240537

  11. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices.

  12. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sangram K; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K

    2016-01-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices. PMID:27240537

  13. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. PMID:27335500

  14. Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve Analysis of Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised Scores in Epilepsy Surgery Candidates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, William B.

    1997-01-01

    Wechsler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R) scores were analyzed for 82 epilepsy surgery candidates and used in combination with receiver operating characteristic curves to classify patients with left (LTL) and right (RTL) temporal lobe seizure onset. Results indicate that WMS-R scores used alone or in combination provide relatively poor discrimination…

  15. Most microbe-specific naïve CD4⁺ T cells produce memory cells during infection.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Fife, Brian T; Pagan, Antonio J; Kotov, Dmitri I; Goldberg, Michael F; Jenkins, Marc K

    2016-01-29

    Infection elicits CD4(+) memory T lymphocytes that participate in protective immunity. Although memory cells are the progeny of naïve T cells, it is unclear that all naïve cells from a polyclonal repertoire have memory cell potential. Using a single-cell adoptive transfer and spleen biopsy method, we found that in mice, essentially all microbe-specific naïve cells produced memory cells during infection. Different clonal memory cell populations had different B cell or macrophage helper compositions that matched effector cell populations generated much earlier in the response. Thus, each microbe-specific naïve CD4(+) T cell produces a distinctive ratio of effector cell types early in the immune response that is maintained as some cells in the clonal population become memory cells. PMID:26823430

  16. Defective CD8 T Cell Memory Following Acute Infection Without CD4 T Cell Help

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Joseph C.; Bevan, Michael J.

    2003-04-01

    The CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response to pathogens is thought to be CD4+ helper T cell independent because infectious agents provide their own inflammatory signals. Mice that lack CD4+ T cells mount a primary CD8 response to Listeria monocytogenes equal to that of wild-type mice and rapidly clear the infection. However, protective memory to a challenge is gradually lost in the former animals. Memory CD8+ T cells from normal mice can respond rapidly, but memory CD8+ T cells that are generated without CD4 help are defective in their ability to respond to secondary encounters with antigen. The results highlight a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in promoting protective CD8 memory development.

  17. Switched-memory B cells remodel B cell receptors within secondary germinal centers

    PubMed Central

    Okitsu, Shinji L.; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Effective vaccines induce high-affinity memory B cells and durable antibody responses through accelerated mechanisms of natural selection. Secondary changes in antibody repertoires after vaccine boosts suggest progressive B cell receptor (BCR) re-diversification, but underlying mechanisms remain unresolved. Here integrated specificity and function of individual memory B cell progeny reveal ongoing evolution of polyclonal antibody specificities through germinal center (GC) specific transcriptional activity. At the clonal and sub-clonal levels, single cell expression of Cd83 and Pol□ segregates the secondary GC transcriptional program into 4 stages that regulate divergent mechanisms of memory BCR evolution. These studies demonstrate that vaccine boosts re-activate a cyclic program of GC function in switched-memory B cells to remodel existing antibody specificities and enhance durable immune protection. PMID:25642821

  18. Do CD8 effector cells need IL-7R expression to become resting memory cells?

    PubMed

    Buentke, Eva; Mathiot, Anne; Tolaini, Mauro; Di Santo, James; Zamoyska, Rose; Seddon, Benedict

    2006-09-15

    The role for IL-7R expression in the differentiation of effector T cells into resting memory remains controversial. Here, using a conditional IL-7R transgenic model, we were able to test directly whether CD8 effector T cells require IL-7R expression for their differentiation into resting memory cells. In the absence of IL-7R expression, effector cells transferred into "full" hosts underwent a protracted and unremitting contraction compared with IL-7R-expressing control cells and were unable to develop into long-term resting memory cells. Surprisingly, when the same effector cells were transferred into empty T-cell-deficient hosts, they could generate long-lived fully functional resting memory cells independently of IL-7R expression. Formation of these latter cells was found to be dependent on IL-15, because the same IL-7R-deficient effector cells were rapidly lost from IL-15-deficient hosts, having a half-life of less than 40 hours. Therefore, our data suggest that, under physiological conditions, both IL-7 and IL-15 synergize to promote the formation of memory cells directly by limiting the contraction of effectors that occurs following an immune response and that reexpression of IL-7R is a key checkpoint in the regulation of this process. PMID:16705084

  19. On a model of pattern regeneration based on cell memory.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Nikolai; Levin, Michael; Morozova, Nadya; Reinberg, Natalia; Tosenberger, Alen; Volpert, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    We present here a new model of the cellular dynamics that enable regeneration of complex biological morphologies. Biological cell structures are considered as an ensemble of mathematical points on the plane. Each cell produces a signal which propagates in space and is received by other cells. The total signal received by each cell forms a signal distribution defined on the cell structure. This distribution characterizes the geometry of the cell structure. If a part of this structure is removed, the remaining cells have two signals. They keep the value of the signal which they had before the amputation (memory), and they receive a new signal produced after the amputation. Regeneration of the cell structure is stimulated by the difference between the old and the new signals. It is stopped when the two signals coincide. The algorithm of regeneration contains certain rules which are essential for its functioning, being the first quantitative model of cellular memory that implements regeneration of complex patterns to a specific target morphology. Correct regeneration depends on the form and the size of the cell structure, as well as on some parameters of regeneration. PMID:25695252

  20. The Transcription Factor Eomesodermin Enables CD8+ T Cells to Compete for the Memory Cell Niche

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arnob; Gordon, Scott M.; Intlekofer, Andrew M.; Paley, Michael A.; Mooney, Erin C.; Lindsten, Tulia; Wherry, E. John; Reiner, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    CD8+ T cells responding to intracellular infection give rise to cellular progeny that become terminally differentiated effector cells and self-renewing memory cells. T-bet and Eomesodermin are key transcription factors of cytotoxic lymphocyte lineages. We now show that CD8+ T cells lacking Eomesodermin compete poorly in contributing to the pool of antigen-specific central memory cells. Eomesodermin-deficient CD8+ T cells undergo primary clonal expansion but are defective in long-term survival, populating the bone marrow niche, and re-expanding after re-challenge. The phenotype of Eomesodermin-deficient CD8+ T cells supports the hypothesis that T-bet and Eomesodermin can act redundantly to induce effector functions, but can also act to reciprocally promote terminal differentiation versus self-renewal of antigen-specific memory cells. PMID:20935204

  1. Vaccination Expands Antigen-Specific CD4+ Memory T Cells and Mobilizes Bystander Central Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li Causi, Eleonora; Parikh, Suraj C.; Chudley, Lindsey; Layfield, David M.; Ottensmeier, Christian H.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Di Genova, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T helper memory (Thmem) cells influence both natural and vaccine-boosted immunity, but mechanisms for their maintenance remain unclear. Pro-survival signals from the common gamma-chain cytokines, in particular IL-7, appear important. Previously we showed in healthy volunteers that a booster vaccination with tetanus toxoid (TT) expanded peripheral blood TT-specific Thmem cells as expected, but was accompanied by parallel increase of Thmem cells specific for two unrelated and non cross-reactive common recall antigens. Here, in a new cohort of healthy human subjects, we compare blood vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells in terms of differentiation stage, function, activation and proliferative status. Both responses peaked 1 week post-vaccination. Vaccine-specific cytokine-producing Thmem cells were predominantly effector memory, whereas bystander cells were mainly of central memory phenotype. Importantly, TT-specific Thmem cells were activated (CD38High HLA-DR+), cycling or recently divided (Ki-67+), and apparently vulnerable to death (IL-7RαLow and Bcl-2 Low). In contrast, bystander Thmem cells were resting (CD38Low HLA-DR- Ki-67-) with high expression of IL-7Rα and Bcl-2. These findings allow a clear distinction between vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells, suggesting the latter do not derive from recent proliferation but from cells mobilized from as yet undefined reservoirs. Furthermore, they reveal the interdependent dynamics of specific and bystander T-cell responses which will inform assessments of responses to vaccines. PMID:26332995

  2. Evaluation of Data Retention Characteristics for Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (FRAMs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Ashok K.; Teverovsky, Alexander

    2001-01-01

    Data retention and fatigue characteristics of 64 Kb lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based Ferroelectric Random Access Memories (FRAMs) microcircuits manufactured by Ramtron were examined over temperature range from -85 C to +310 C for ceramic packaged parts and from -85 C to +175 C for plastic parts, during retention periods up to several thousand hours. Intrinsic failures, which were caused by a thermal degradation of the ferroelectric cells, occurred in ceramic parts after tens or hundreds hours of aging at temperatures above 200 C. The activation energy of the retention test failures was 1.05 eV and the extrapolated mean-time-to-failure (MTTF) at room temperature was estimated to be more than 280 years. Multiple write-read cycling (up to 3x10(exp 7)) during the fatigue testing of plastic and ceramic parts did not result in any parametric or functional failures. However, operational currents linearly decreased with the logarithm of number of cycles thus indicating fatigue process in PZT films. Plastic parts, that had more recent date code as compared to ceramic parts, appeared to be using die with improved process technology and showed significantly smaller changes in operational currents and data access times.

  3. Inflammasome-Dependent Induction of Adaptive NK Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    van den Boorn, Jasper G; Jakobs, Christopher; Hagen, Christian; Renn, Marcel; Luiten, Rosalie M; Melief, Cornelis J M; Tüting, Thomas; Garbi, Natalio; Hartmann, Gunther; Hornung, Veit

    2016-06-21

    Monobenzone is a pro-hapten that is exclusively metabolized by melanocytes, thereby haptenizing melanocyte-specific antigens, which results in cytotoxic autoimmunity specifically against pigmented cells. Studying monobenzone in a setting of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), we observed that monobenzone induced a long-lasting, melanocyte-specific immune response that was dependent on NK cells, yet fully intact in the absence of T- and B cells. Consistent with the concept of "memory NK cells," monobenzone-induced NK cells resided in the liver and transfer of these cells conferred melanocyte-specific immunity to naive animals. Monobenzone-exposed skin displayed macrophage infiltration and cutaneous lymph nodes showed an inflammasome-dependent influx of macrophages with a tissue-resident phenotype, coinciding with local NK cell activation. Indeed, macrophage depletion or the absence of the NLRP3 inflammasome, the adaptor protein ASC or interleukin-18 (IL-18) abolished monobenzone CHS, thereby establishing a non-redundant role for the NLRP3 inflammasome as a critical proinflammatory checkpoint in the induction of hapten-dependent memory NK cells. PMID:27287410

  4. Temporal requirements for B cells in the establishment of CD4 T cell memory.

    PubMed

    Mollo, Sarah B; Zajac, Allan J; Harrington, Laurie E

    2013-12-15

    CD4 T cell memory generation is shaped by a number of factors, including the strength and duration of TCR signaling, as well as the priming environment, all of which can be modified by B cells. Studies using B cell-deficient mice indicate B cells play a critical role in generating effector and memory CD4 T cells; however, when and how B cells are acting to promote these responses has not yet been ascertained. In this study, we use anti-CD20 Ab depletion of B cells at different times following Listeria monocytogenes infection to show that B cells are necessary for the induction of optimal CD4 T cell memory, but not for the transition and maintenance of this population. Importantly, the prerequisite of B cells early postinfection is partially dependent on their expression of MHC class II. B cells are not only required during the priming phase, but also necessary for the initiation of robust secondary responses by memory CD4 T cells. Interestingly, the requirement during the recall response is independent of B cell Ag presentation. Overall, these studies demonstrate the temporally and functionally distinct roles for B cells in regulating CD4 T cell responses. PMID:24218454

  5. Distinct Signaling of Coreceptors Regulates Specific Metabolism Pathways and Impacts Memory Development in CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kawalekar, Omkar U; O'Connor, Roddy S; Fraietta, Joseph A; Guo, Lili; McGettigan, Shannon E; Posey, Avery D; Patel, Prachi R; Guedan, Sonia; Scholler, John; Keith, Brian; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Snyder, Nathaniel; Blair, Ian A; Blair, Ian; Milone, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2016-02-16

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) redirect T cell cytotoxicity against cancer cells, providing a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. Despite extensive clinical use, the attributes of CAR co-stimulatory domains that impact persistence and resistance to exhaustion of CAR-T cells remain largely undefined. Here, we report the influence of signaling domains of coreceptors CD28 and 4-1BB on the metabolic characteristics of human CAR T cells. Inclusion of 4-1BB in the CAR architecture promoted the outgrowth of CD8(+) central memorycells that had significantly enhanced respiratory capacity, increased fatty acid oxidation and enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. In contrast, CAR T cells with CD28 domains yielded effector memory cells with a genetic signature consistent with enhanced glycolysis. These results provide, at least in part, a mechanistic insight into the differential persistence of CAR-T cells expressing 4-1BB or CD28 signaling domains in clinical trials and inform the design of future CAR T cell therapies. PMID:26885860

  6. Bipolar tri-state resistive switching characteristics in Ti/CeOx/Pt memory device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, M.; W. Abbas, M.; M. Rana, A.; Talib, I.; E., Ahmed; Y. Nadeem, M.; L. Tsai, T.; U., Chand; A. Shah, N.; Hussain, M.; Aziz, A.; T. Bhatti, M.

    2014-12-01

    Highly repeatable multilevel bipolar resistive switching in Ti/CeOx/Pt nonvolatile memory device has been demonstrated. X-ray diffraction studies of CeO2 films reveal the formation of weak polycrystalline structure. The observed good memory performance, including stable cycling endurance and long data retention times (> 104 s) with an acceptable resistance ratio (~102), enables the device for its applications in future non-volatile resistive random access memories (RRAMs). Based on the unique distribution characteristics of oxygen vacancies in CeOx films, the possible mechanism of multilevel resistive switching in CeOx RRAM devices has been discussed. The conduction mechanism in low resistance state is found to be Ohmic due to conductive filamentary paths, while that in the high resistance state was identified as Ohmic for low applied voltages and a space-charge-limited conduction dominated by Schottky emission at high applied voltages.

  7. Characteristics of junctionless charge trap flash memory for 3D stacked NAND flash.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jinho; Na, Heedo; Park, Sunghoon; Sohn, Hyunchul

    2013-09-01

    The electrical characteristics of tunnel barrier engineered-charge trap flash (TBE-CTF) memory devices with junctionless (JL) source and drain (S/D) were investigated. The JL structure is composed of an n(+)-poly-Si based ultra-thin channel and S/D with identical doping concentrations. The band engineered Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier stack was applied to a JL-TBE-CTF memory device in order to enhance the field sensitivity. The Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier, HfO2 trap layer, and Al2O3 blocking layer were deposited by atomic layer deposition. The fabricated device exhibited a large memory window of 9.43 V, as well as high programming and erasing speeds. Moreover, it also showed adequate retention times and endurance properties. Hence, the JL-TBE-CTF memory (which has a low process complexity) is expected to be an appropriate structure for 3D stacked ultra-high density memory applications. PMID:24205672

  8. In remembrance of things past: memory T cells and transplant rejection.

    PubMed

    Valujskikh, Anna; Lakkis, Fadi G

    2003-12-01

    A cardinal feature of the adaptive immune response is its ability to generate long-lived populations of memory T lymphocytes. Memory T cells are specific to the antigen encountered during the primary immune response and react rapidly and vigorously upon re-encounter with the same antigen. Memory T cells that recognize microbial antigens provide the organism with long-lasting protection against potentially fatal infections. On the other hand, memory T cells that recognize donor alloantigens can jeopardize the survival of life-saving organ transplants. We review here the immunobiology of memory T cells and describe their role in the rejection of solid organ allografts. PMID:14617198

  9. CD21(-/low) B cells in human blood are memory cells.

    PubMed

    Thorarinsdottir, K; Camponeschi, A; Cavallini, N; Grimsholm, O; Jacobsson, L; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2016-08-01

    The complement receptor 2 (CR2, CD21) is part of a complex (CD21/CD19/CD81) acting as a co-receptor to the B cell receptor (BCR). Simultaneous triggering of the BCR and CD21 lowers the threshold for B cell activation. Although CD21 is important, B cells that express low amounts or lack surface CD21 (CD21(-/low) ) are increased in conditions with chronic inflammation, e.g. autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the CD21(-/low) B cell subset in peripheral blood from healthy donors. Here, we show that CD21(-/low) cells represent approximately 5% of B cells in peripheral blood from adults but are barely detectable in cord blood, after excluding transitional B cells. The CD21(-/low) subset can be divided into CD38(-) 24(+) and CD38(-) 24(low) cells, where most of the CD38(-) 24(+) are CD27(+) immunoglobulin (Ig)M(+) IgD(+) and the CD38(-) 24(low) are switched CD27(-) . Expression levels of additional markers, e.g. CD95 and CD62L, are similar to those on classical memory B cells. In contrast to naive cells, the majority of CD21(-/low) cells lack expression of the ABCB1 transporter. Stimulation with a combination of BCR, Toll-like receptor (TLR)-7/8 and interleukin (IL)-2 induces proliferation and differentiation of the CD21(-/low) B cells comparable to CD21(+) CD27(+) memory B cells. The response excluding BCR agonist is not on par with that of classical memory B cells, although clearly above that of naive B cells. This is ascribed to a weaker response by the CD38(-) 24(low) subset, implying that some memorycells require not only TLR but also BCR triggering. We conclude that the CD21(-/low) cells in healthy donors are memory B cells. PMID:27010233

  10. Cellular Dynamics of Memory B Cell Populations: IgM+ and IgG+ Memory B Cells Persist Indefinitely as Quiescent Cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Derek D; Wilmore, Joel R; Allman, David

    2015-11-15

    Despite their critical role in long-term immunity, the life span of individual memory B cells remains poorly defined. Using a tetracycline-regulated pulse-chase system, we measured population turnover rates and individual t1/2 of pre-established Ag-induced Ig class-switched and IgM-positive memory B cells over 402 d. Our results indicate that, once established, both IgG-positive and less frequent IgM-positive memory populations are exceptionally stable, with little evidence of attrition or cellular turnover. Indeed, the vast majority of cells in both pools exhibited t1/2 that appear to exceed the life span of the mouse, contrasting dramatically with mature naive B cells. These results indicate that recall Ab responses are mediated by stable pools of extremely long-lived cells, and suggest that Ag-experienced B cells employ remarkably efficient survival mechanisms. PMID:26438523

  11. Differential sensitivity of naive and memory CD8+ T cells to apoptosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grayson, Jason M; Harrington, Laurie E; Lanier, J Gibson; Wherry, E John; Ahmed, Rafi

    2002-10-01

    Apoptosis is a critical regulator of homeostasis in the immune system. In this study we demonstrate that memory CD8(+) T cells are more resistant to apoptosis than naive cells. After whole body irradiation of mice, both naive and memory CD8(+) T cells decreased in number, but the reduction in the number of naive cells was 8-fold greater than that in memory CD8(+) T cells. In addition to examining radiation-induced apoptosis, we analyzed the expansion and contraction of naive and memory CD8(+) T cells in vivo following exposure to Ag. We found that memory CD8(+) T cells not only responded more quickly than naive cells after viral infection, but that secondary effector cells generated from memory cells underwent much less contraction compared with primary effectors generated from naive cells (3- to 5-fold vs 10- to 20-fold decrease). Increased numbers of secondary memory cells were observed in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. When naive and memory cells were transferred into the same animal, secondary effectors underwent less contraction than primary effector cells. These experiments analyzing apoptosis of primary and secondary effectors in the same animal show unequivocally that decreased downsizing of the secondary response reflects an intrinsic property of the memory T cells and is not simply due to environmental effects. These findings have implications for designing prime/boost vaccine strategies and also for optimizing immunotherapeutic regimens for treatment of chronic infections. PMID:12244170

  12. The effect of ultraviolet irradiation on data retention characteristics of resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Kentaro; Kimura, Kouhei; Ohmi, Koutoku; Kishida, Satoru

    It is getting more and more serious to generate soft-errors by cosmic radiation, with increasing the density of memory devices. Therefore, the irradiation resistance of resistance random access memory (ReRAM) to cosmic radiation has to be elucidated for practical use. In this paper, we investigated the data retention characteristics against ultraviolet irradiation to ReRAM with Pt/NiO/ITO structure. Soft-errors were confirmed to be caused by ultraviolet irradiation in both low and high resistance states. The analysis of irradiation frequency dependence of data retention characteristics suggested that electronic excitation by the irradiation caused the errors. Based on a statistically estimated soft-error rate, the errors were suggested to be caused by aggregation and dispersion of oxygen vacancies due to the generation of electron-hole pairs and valence change by the ultraviolet irradiation.

  13. Electrochemical characteristics of lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nagasubramanian, C.; Roth, P.; Jungst, R.G.; Clark, N.

    1998-01-01

    The authors describe below the electrochemical performance characteristics, including charge-discharge characteristics at different rates, of cylindrical 18650 (18 mm diameter, 65 mm high) and prismatic lithium ion cells at ambient and sub-ambient temperatures. Ragone plots of power and energy data for these cells are compared and indicate that at room temperature the prismatic lithium ion cells (approx. 500 mAh) exhibit higher specific power and power density than the 18650 cells (approx. 1,100 mAhr). The cell impedance was measured between 35 C and {minus}40 C at three open circuit voltages: 4.1 v (fully charged), 3.6 v (partially discharged), and 3.1 v (almost completely discharged). Over the temperature range from 35 C to {minus}20 C, the cell impedance is nearly constant for both cell types and increases by 2 to 3 times at {minus}40 C. The impedance doesn`t vary significantly with open circuit voltage (OCV). These cells show very little voltage drop at room temperature for current pulses up to 1 A. The charge-discharge characteristics of the cells are being studied at different rates as a function of temperature to compute the power, energy, and capacity outputs. This will not only broaden the database on lithium ion cells, but will also allow us to evaluate the suitability of the cells as power sources for low temperature applications. Other electrochemical characteristics of these cells including pulse response are being evaluated. Impedance measurements of the cells under load are planned to make meaningful correlations between the voltage drop and the current pulse amplitude.

  14. Methyltransferases mediate cell memory of a genotoxic insult.

    PubMed

    Rugo, R E; Mutamba, J T; Mohan, K N; Yee, T; Chaillet, J R; Greenberger, J S; Engelward, B P

    2011-02-10

    Characterization of the direct effects of DNA-damaging agents shows how DNA lesions lead to specific mutations. Yet, serum from Hiroshima survivors, Chernobyl liquidators and radiotherapy patients can induce a clastogenic effect on naive cells, showing indirect induction of genomic instability that persists years after exposure. Such indirect effects are not restricted to ionizing radiation, as chemical genotoxins also induce heritable and transmissible genomic instability phenotypes. Although such indirect induction of genomic instability is well described, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that mouse embryonic stem cells exposed to γ-radiation bear the effects of the insult for weeks. Specifically, conditioned media from the progeny of exposed cells can induce DNA damage and homologous recombination in naive cells. Notably, cells exposed to conditioned media also elicit a genome-destabilizing effect on their neighbouring cells, thus demonstrating transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, we show that the underlying basis for the memory of an insult is completely dependent on two of the major DNA cytosine methyltransferases, Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. Targeted disruption of these genes in exposed cells completely eliminates transmission of genomic instability. Furthermore, transient inactivation of Dnmt1, using a tet-suppressible allele, clears the memory of the insult, thus protecting neighbouring cells from indirect induction of genomic instability. We have thus demonstrated that a single exposure can lead to long-term, genome-destabilizing effects that spread from cell to cell, and we provide a specific molecular mechanism for these persistent bystander effects. Collectively, our results impact the current understanding of risks from toxin exposures and suggest modes of intervention for suppressing genomic instability in people exposed to carcinogenic genotoxins. PMID:21057543

  15. The memory of a killer T cell: models of CD8(+) T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, Bram; Pandit, Aridaman

    2016-03-01

    CD8(+) T cells have an important role in protection against infections and reinfections of intra-cellular pathogens like viruses. Naive CD8(+) T cells circulating in blood or lymphoid tissues can get activated upon stimulation by cognate antigen. The activated T cells undergo rapid proliferation and can expand more than 10(4)-folds comprising largely of effector T cells. Upon antigen clearance, the CD8(+) T-cell population contracts due to apoptosis, leaving behind a small population of memory T cells. The timing and mechanisms underlying the differentiation of naive cells into effector cells and memory cells is not yet clear. In this article, we review the recent quantitative studies that support different hypotheses of CD8(+) T-cell differentiation. PMID:26700072

  16. The Effects of Instruction on the Frequency and Characteristics of Involuntary Autobiographical Memories.

    PubMed

    Barzykowski, Krystian; Niedźwieńska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of experimental instruction on the retrieval of involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs). In previous studies of IAMs, participants were either instructed to record only memories (henceforth, the restricted group) or any thoughts (henceforth, the unrestricted group). However, it is unknown whether these two different types of instructions influence the retrieval of IAMs. The most recent study by Vannucci and her colleagues directly addressed this question and demonstrated that the frequency and phenomenological characteristics of IAMs strongly depended on the type of instruction received. The goal of the present study was to replicate these results while addressing some limitations of the Vannucci et al. study and to test three possible mechanisms proposed to explain the effect of instructions on the retrieval of IAMs. Our results accord well with the data presented by Vannucci et al. When participants were instructed to record only IAMs (the restricted group), they reported more memories and rated them as being retrieved in a more goal-oriented fashion. Their memories also were less clear, vivid, detailed and were less frequently accompanied by physiological reactions, compared to memories reported by the participants in the unrestricted group. In addition, the events to which the memories referred were rated as more unusual and personal by the restricted group. These results are consistent with the assumption that retrieval of IAMs depends on the type of instructions used in a study. In addition, our results suggest that one of the main mechanisms underlying the higher frequency of IAMs in the restricted group may be participants' ability to monitor the stream of consciousness and to extract autobiographical content from this flow. Further implications of the effect of instructions for IAMs research are discussed. PMID:27294408

  17. The Effects of Instruction on the Frequency and Characteristics of Involuntary Autobiographical Memories

    PubMed Central

    Niedźwieńska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of experimental instruction on the retrieval of involuntary autobiographical memories (IAMs). In previous studies of IAMs, participants were either instructed to record only memories (henceforth, the restricted group) or any thoughts (henceforth, the unrestricted group). However, it is unknown whether these two different types of instructions influence the retrieval of IAMs. The most recent study by Vannucci and her colleagues directly addressed this question and demonstrated that the frequency and phenomenological characteristics of IAMs strongly depended on the type of instruction received. The goal of the present study was to replicate these results while addressing some limitations of the Vannucci et al. study and to test three possible mechanisms proposed to explain the effect of instructions on the retrieval of IAMs. Our results accord well with the data presented by Vannucci et al. When participants were instructed to record only IAMs (the restricted group), they reported more memories and rated them as being retrieved in a more goal-oriented fashion. Their memories also were less clear, vivid, detailed and were less frequently accompanied by physiological reactions, compared to memories reported by the participants in the unrestricted group. In addition, the events to which the memories referred were rated as more unusual and personal by the restricted group. These results are consistent with the assumption that retrieval of IAMs depends on the type of instructions used in a study. In addition, our results suggest that one of the main mechanisms underlying the higher frequency of IAMs in the restricted group may be participants’ ability to monitor the stream of consciousness and to extract autobiographical content from this flow. Further implications of the effect of instructions for IAMs research are discussed. PMID:27294408

  18. Differential mechanisms of memory CD8 T cell maintenance by individual myeloid cell types

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Loredana; Stonier, Spencer W.; Overwijk, Willem W.; Schluns, Kimberly S.

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that individual myeloid subsets have a differential ability to maintain memory CD8 T cells via IL-15. Although DCs support IL-15-mediated homeostasis of memory CD8 T cells in vivo, whether various DC subsets and other myeloid cells similarly mediate homeostasis is unknown. Therefore, we studied the ability of different myeloid cells to maintain memory CD8 T cells in vitro. Using an in vitro cocoulture system that recapitulated known roles of DCs and IL-15 on memory CD8 T cells, all in vitro-derived or ex vivo-isolated DCs maintained CD8 T cells better than rIL-15 alone, and FLT-3L-DCs are the most efficient compared with GM-DCs, BM-derived macrophages, or freshly isolated DCs. Although FLT-3L-DCs were the least effective at inducing CD8 T cell proliferation, FLT-3L-DCs promoted better CD8 T cell survival and increased Bcl-2 and MCL-2 expression in CD8 T cells. T cell maintenance correlated only partially with DC expression of IL-15Rα and IL-15, suggesting that DCs provided additional support signals. Indeed, in the absence of IL-15 signals, CD70/CD27 further supported CD8 T cell maintenance. IFN-α enhanced CD70 expression by DCs, resulting in increased proliferation of CD8 T cells. Overall, this study supports our hypothesis by demonstrating that specific DC subtypes had a greater capacity to support memory CD8 T cell maintenance and did so through different mechanisms. Furthermore, this study shows that IL-15 trans-presentation can work in conjunction with other signals, such as CD70/CD27 interactions, to mediate CD8 T cell homeostasis efficiently. PMID:20354106

  19. Memory Stem T Cells in Autoimmune Disease: High Frequency of Circulating CD8+ Memory Stem Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kohei; Muranski, Pawel; Feng, Xingmin; Townsley, Danielle M; Liu, Baoying; Knickelbein, Jared; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Ito, Sawa; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Taylor, James G; Kaplan, Mariana J; Nussenblatt, Robert B; Barrett, A John; O'Shea, John; Young, Neal S

    2016-02-15

    Memory stem T cells (TSCMs) constitute a long-lived, self-renewing lymphocyte population essential for the maintenance of functional immunity. Hallmarks of autoimmune disease pathogenesis are abnormal CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell activation. We investigated the TSCM subset in 55, 34, 43, and 5 patients with acquired aplastic anemia (AA), autoimmune uveitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and sickle cell disease, respectively, as well as in 41 age-matched healthy controls. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was significantly increased in AA compared with healthy controls. An increased CD8(+) TSCM frequency at diagnosis was associated with responsiveness to immunosuppressive therapy, and an elevated CD8(+) TSCM population after immunosuppressive therapy correlated with treatment failure or relapse in AA patients. IFN-γ and IL-2 production was significantly increased in various CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cell subsets in AA patients, including CD8(+) and CD4(+) TSCMs. CD8(+) TSCM frequency was also increased in patients with autoimmune uveitis or sickle cell disease. A positive correlation between CD4(+) and CD8(+) TSCM frequencies was found in AA, autoimmune uveitis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Evaluation of PD-1, CD160, and CD244 expression revealed that TSCMs were less exhausted compared with other types of memory T cells. Our results suggest that the CD8(+) TSCM subset is a novel biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for AA. PMID:26764034

  20. Methyltransferases mediate cell memory of a genotoxic insult

    PubMed Central

    Rugo, Rebecca E.; Mutamba, James T.; Mohan, K. Naga; Yee, Tiffany; Chaillet, J. Richard; Greenberger, Joel S.; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Characterization of the direct effects of DNA damaging agents shows how DNA lesions lead to specific mutations. Yet, serum from Hiroshima survivors, Chernobyl liquidators, and radiotherapy patients can induce a clastogenic effect on naive cells, showing indirect induction of genomic instability that persists years after exposure. Such indirect effects are not restricted to ionizing radiation, as chemical genotoxins also induce heritable and transmissible genomic instability phenotypes. While such indirect induction of genomic instability is well described, the underlying mechanism has remained enigmatic. Here, we show that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exposed to γ-radiation remember the insult for weeks. Specifically, conditioned media from progeny of exposed cells can induce DNA damage and homologous recombination in naive cells. Notably, cells exposed to conditioned media also elicit a genome destabilizing effect on their neighbours, thus demonstrating transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, we show that the underlying basis for the memory of an insult is completely dependent on two of the major DNA cytosine methyltransferases (MTases), Dnmt1 and Dnmt3a. Targeted disruption of these genes in exposed cells completely eliminates transmission of genomic instability. Furthermore, transient inactivation of Dnmt1, using a tet-suppressible allele, clears the memory of the insult, thus protecting neighbouring cells from indirect induction of genomic instability. We have thus demonstrated that a single exposure can lead to long-term, genome destabilizing effects that spread from cell to cell and we provide a specific molecular mechanism for these persistent bystander effects. Collectively, our results impact current understanding of risks from toxin exposures and suggest modes of intervention for suppressing genomic instability in people exposed to carcinogenic genotoxins. PMID:21057543

  1. Smad4 represses the generation of memory-precursor effector T cells but is required for the differentiation of central memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J; Zhang, X; Wang, Q; Qiu, G; Hou, C; Wang, J; Cheng, Q; Lan, Y; Han, H; Shen, H; Zhang, Y; Yang, X; Shen, B; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional regulation underlying the differentiation of CD8+ effector and memory T cells remains elusive. Here, we show that 18-month-old mice lacking the transcription factor Smad4 (homolog 4 of mothers against decapentaplegic, Drosophila), a key intracellular signaling effector for the TGF-β superfamily, in T cells exhibited lower percentages of CD44hiCD8+ T cells. To explore the role of Smad4 in the activation/memory of CD8+ T cells, 6- to 8-week-old mice with or without Smad4 in T cells were challenged with Listeria monocytogenes. Smad4 deficiency did not affect antigen-specific CD8+ T-cell expansion but led to partially impaired cytotoxic function. Less short-lived effector T cells but more memory-precursor effector T cells were generated in the absence of Smad4. Despite that, Smad4 deficiency led to reduced memory CD8+ T-cell responses. Further exploration revealed that the generation of central memory T cells was impaired in the absence of Smad4 and the cells showed survival issue. In mechanism, Smad4 deficiency led to aberrant transcriptional programs in antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrated an essential role of Smad4 in the control of effector and memory CD8+ T-cell responses to infection. PMID:26583325

  2. Strategic priming with multiple antigens can yield memory cell phenotypes optimized for infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A computational study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-06

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. While many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likelymore » key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  3. Strategic Priming with Multiple Antigens can Yield Memory Cell Phenotypes Optimized for Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Ziraldo, Cordelia; Gong, Chang; Kirschner, Denise E.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of an effective vaccine results in 9 million new cases of tuberculosis (TB) every year and 1.8 million deaths worldwide. Although many infants are vaccinated at birth with BCG (an attenuated M. bovis), this does not prevent infection or development of TB after childhood. Immune responses necessary for prevention of infection or disease are still unknown, making development of effective vaccines against TB challenging. Several new vaccines are ready for human clinical trials, but these trials are difficult and expensive; especially challenging is determining the appropriate cellular response necessary for protection. The magnitude of an immune response is likely key to generating a successful vaccine. Characteristics such as numbers of central memory (CM) and effector memory (EM) T cells responsive to a diverse set of epitopes are also correlated with protection. Promising vaccines against TB contain mycobacterial subunit antigens (Ag) present during both active and latent infection. We hypothesize that protection against different key immunodominant antigens could require a vaccine that produces different levels of EM and CM for each Ag-specific memory population. We created a computational model to explore EM and CM values, and their ratio, within what we term Memory Design Space. Our model captures events involved in T cell priming within lymph nodes and tracks their circulation through blood to peripheral tissues. We used the model to test whether multiple Ag-specific memory cell populations could be generated with distinct locations within Memory Design Space at a specific time point post vaccination. Boosting can further shift memory populations to memory cell ratios unreachable by initial priming events. By strategically varying antigen load, properties of cellular interactions within the LN, and delivery parameters (e.g., number of boosts) of multi-subunit vaccines, we can generate multiple Ag-specific memory populations that cover a wide range of

  4. Convertible resistive switching characteristics between memory switching and threshold switching in a single ferritin-based memristor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaochao; Shang, Jie; Xue, Wuhong; Tan, Hongwei; Pan, Liang; Yang, Xi; Guo, Shanshan; Hao, Jian; Liu, Gang; Li, Run-Wei

    2016-04-01

    A bio-memristor fabricated with ferritin exhibits novel resistive switching characteristics wherein memory switching and threshold switching are made steadily coexistent and inter-convertible through controlling the magnitude of compliance current presets. PMID:26967024

  5. Coordinated Changes in DNA Methylation in Antigen-Specific Memory CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogoshi, Katsumi; Sasaki, Atsushi; Abe, Jun; Qu, Wei; Nakatani, Yoichiro; Ahsan, Budrul; Oshima, Kenshiro; Shand, Francis H. W.; Ametani, Akio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi; Hattori, Masahira; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Matsushima, Kouji

    2013-01-01

    Memory CD4+ T cells are central regulators of both humoral and cellular immune responses. T cell differentiation results in specific changes in chromatin structure and DNA methylation of cytokine genes. Although the methylation status of a limited number of gene loci in T cells has been examined, the genome-wide DNA methylation status of memory CD4+ T cells remains unexplored. To further elucidate the molecular signature of memory T cells, we conducted methylome and transcriptome analyses of memory CD4+ T cells generated using T cells from TCR-transgenic mice. The resulting genome-wide DNA methylation profile revealed 1144 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) across the murine genome during the process of T cell differentiation, 552 of which were associated with gene loci. Interestingly, the majority of these DMRs were located in introns. These DMRs included genes such as CXCR6, Tbox21, Chsy1, and Cish, which are associated with cytokine production, homing to bone marrow, and immune responses. Methylation changes in memory T cells exposed to specific Ag appeared to regulate enhancer activity rather than promoter activity of immunologically relevant genes. In addition, methylation profiles differed between memory T cell subsets, demonstrating a link between T cell methylation status and T cell differentiation. By comparing DMRs between naive and Ag-specific memory T cells, this study provides new insights into the functional status of memory T cells. PMID:23509353

  6. T cell therapies-are T memory stem cells the answer?

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jacqueline K; Gorry, Paul R

    2015-10-01

    T memory stem cells (TSCM) are the earliest developmental stage of memory T cells, displaying stem cell-like properties and exhibiting a gene profile between naive and central memory (CM) T cells. Their long-lifespan, robust proliferative potential and self-renewal capacity has generated much research and clinical interest particularly for therapeutic use. Here, we discuss recent findings published in Science Translational Medicine by Biasco and colleagues [2015 Feb 4;7(273):273ra13], which provided evidence for the persistence of TSCM in humans for up to 12 years after infusion of genetically modified lymphocytes, and we examine the implications for the development of novel immunotherapies using TSCM. PMID:26605297

  7. The Distribution of Human Stem Cell-like Memory T Cell in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hai; Gu, Yong; Sheng, Si Yuan; Lu, Chuan Gang; Zou, Jian Yong; Wu, Chang You

    2016-01-01

    Human stem cell-like memory T (Tscm) cells are long-lived, self-renewing memory lymphocytes that can differentiate into effector cells and mediate strong antitumour response in murine model. The distribution and function of Tscm cells in human lung cancer remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the properties of human Tscm cells in the blood and lymph node of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. There were more CD4 Tscm cells in blood from NSCLC patients than from healthy donors, fewer CD4 and CD8 TSCM cells in blood than in lymph node from NSCLC patients. To further analyze their properties, we stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from NSCLC patients by mitogens to examine cytokine production. Our data suggest that both CD4 and CD8 Tscm cells in blood produced interferon-γ significantly increased in NSCLC patients compare with healthy subjects. In addition, fewer Tscm cells produced interferon-γ in lymph node than in blood from NSCLC patients. Our results strongly suggest that the distribution and function of CD4 Tscm cells in NSCLC patients is upregulated. Understanding of the properties of stem-like memory T cells will supply a good rationale for designing the new adoptive immunotherapy in cancer. PMID:27244531

  8. Enhanced memory characteristics in organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors through thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, Ryo; Tashiro, Tomoya; Sekine, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2015-11-15

    We report on the memory characteristics of organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) using spin-coated poly(vinylidene difluoride/trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF/TrFE)) as a gate insulating layer. By thermal annealing the P(VDF/TrFE) layer at temperatures above its melting point, we could significantly improve the on/off current ratio to over 10{sup 4}. Considerable changes in the surface morphology and x-ray diffraction patterns were also observed in the P(VDF/TrFE) layer as a result of the annealing process. The enhanced memory effect is attributed to large polarization effects caused by rearranged ferroelectric polymer chains and improved crystallinity in the organic semiconductor layer of the FeFET devices.

  9. Bipolar resistive switching characteristics in tantalum nitride-based resistive random access memory devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Myung Ju; Jeon, Dong Su; Park, Ju Hyun; Kim, Tae Geun

    2015-05-18

    This paper reports the bipolar resistive switching characteristics of TaN{sub x}-based resistive random access memory (ReRAM). The conduction mechanism is explained by formation and rupture of conductive filaments caused by migration of nitrogen ions and vacancies; this mechanism is in good agreement with either Ohmic conduction or the Poole-Frenkel emission model. The devices exhibit that the reset voltage varies from −0.82 V to −0.62 V, whereas the set voltage ranges from 1.01 V to 1.30 V for 120 DC sweep cycles. In terms of reliability, the devices exhibit good retention (>10{sup 5 }s) and pulse-switching endurance (>10{sup 6} cycles) properties. These results indicate that TaN{sub x}-based ReRAM devices have a potential for future nonvolatile memory devices.

  10. Enhanced memory characteristics in organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors through thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugano, Ryo; Tashiro, Tomoya; Sekine, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2015-11-01

    We report on the memory characteristics of organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) using spin-coated poly(vinylidene difluoride/trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF/TrFE)) as a gate insulating layer. By thermal annealing the P(VDF/TrFE) layer at temperatures above its melting point, we could significantly improve the on/off current ratio to over 104. Considerable changes in the surface morphology and x-ray diffraction patterns were also observed in the P(VDF/TrFE) layer as a result of the annealing process. The enhanced memory effect is attributed to large polarization effects caused by rearranged ferroelectric polymer chains and improved crystallinity in the organic semiconductor layer of the FeFET devices.

  11. Determining the state of non-volatile memory cells with floating gate using scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzii, D.; Kelm, E.; Luapunov, N.; Milovanov, R.; Molodcova, G.; Yanul, M.; Zubov, D.

    2013-01-01

    During a failure analysis of integrated circuits, containing non-volatile memory, it is often necessary to determine its contents while Standard memory reading procedures are not applicable. This article considers how the state of NVM cells with floating gate can be determined using scanning probe microscopy. Samples preparation and measuring procedure are described with the example of Microchip microcontrollers with the EPROM memory (PIC12C508) and flash-EEPROM memory (PIC16F876A).

  12. Tissue-resident and memory properties of human T-cell and NK-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Lugli, Enrico; Hudspeth, Kelly; Roberto, Alessandra; Mavilio, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Efficient immune responses to invading pathogens are the result of the complex but coordinated synergy between a variety of cell types from both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. While adaptive and innate immune responses are highly complementary, some cells types within these two systems perform similar functions, underscoring the need for redundancy and increased flexibility. In this review, we will discuss the striking shared features of immunological memory and tissue residency recently discovered between T cells, a component of the adaptive immune system, and natural killer (NK) cells, members generally assigned to the innate compartment. Specifically, we will focus on the T-cell and NK-cell diversity at the single-cell level, on the discrete function of specific subsets, and on their anatomical location. Finally, we will discuss the implication of such diversity in the generation of long-term memory. PMID:27431095

  13. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M.; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T.; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  14. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  15. Resistive switching characteristics of HfO2-based memory devices on flexible plastics.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Cho, Kyoungah; Park, Sukhyung; Kim, Sangsig

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we examine the characteristics of HfO2-based resistive switching random access memory (ReRAM) devices on flexible plastics. The Pt/HfO2/Au ReRAM devices exhibit the unipolar resistive switching behaviors caused by the conducting filaments. From the Auger depth profiles of the HfO2 thin film, it is confirmed that the relatively lower oxygen content in the interface of the bottom electrode is responsible for the resistive switching by oxygen vacancies. And the unipolar resistive switching behaviors are analyzed from the C-V characteristics in which negative and positive capacitances are measured in the low-resistance state and the high-resistance state, respectively. The devices have a high on/off ratio of 10(4) and the excellent retention properties even after a continuous bending test of two thousand cycles. The correlation between the device size and the memory characteristics is investigated as well. A relatively smaller-sized device having a higher on/off ratio operates at a higher voltage than a relatively larger-sized device. PMID:25958498

  16. Regulation of germinal center, B-cell memory, and plasma cell formation by histone modifiers.

    PubMed

    Good-Jacobson, Kim L

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of antibody production and B-cell memory formation and function is core to finding new treatments for B-cell-derived cancers, antibody-mediated autoimmune disorders, and immunodeficiencies. Progression from a small number of antigen-specific B-cells to the production of a large number of antibody-secreting cells is tightly regulated. Although much progress has been made in revealing the transcriptional regulation of B-cell differentiation that occurs during humoral immune responses, there are still many questions that remain unanswered. Recent work on the expression and roles of histone modifiers in lymphocytes has begun to shed light on this additional level of regulation. This review will discuss the recent advancements in understanding how humoral immune responses, in particular germinal centers and memory cells, are modulated by histone modifiers. PMID:25477884

  17. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  18. Dependence of Memory Characteristics on Crystallinity in NiO-ReRAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobashi, Kazufumi; Kinosita, Kentaro; Makino, Tatsuya; Okutani, Takumi; Yoda, Takatoshi; Hanada, Akihiro; Kishida, Satoru

    Resistance Random Access Memory (ReRAM) is often made in the sandwiched structure where a transition metal oxide (TMO) film with polycrystalline structure is placed between the upper and the lower electrodes. Although whether resistance switching effect occurs in grains or in the grain boundary is key issue which decides the downsizing limit of memory cells, it has not been clarified yet. We prepared NiO/Pt structure using the DC sputtering method, and investigated the property of resistance change effect in the local area using conducting atomic force microscope. As a result, it was clarified that the resistance change occurred not in the NiO grain but in the NiO grain boundary. Therefore, it was suggested that the limitation of downsizing is decided according to the grain diameter.

  19. Performance and characteristics of double layer porous silicon oxide resistance random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Kuan-Chang; Zhang, Rui; Chang, Ting-Chang; Lou, J. C.; Chen, Jung-Hui; Young, Tai-Fa; Tseng, Bae-Heng; Shih, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Yin-Chih; Chen, Min-Chen; Pan, Jhih-Hong; Syu, Yong-En; Sze, Simon M.

    2013-06-01

    A bilayer resistive switching memory device with an inserted porous silicon oxide layer is investigated in this letter. Compared with single Zr:SiOx layer structure, Zr:SiOx/porous SiOx structure outperforms from various aspects, including low operating voltages, tighter distributions of set voltage, higher stability of both low resistance state and high resistance state, and satisfactory endurance characteristics. Electric field simulation by comsolTM Multiphysics is applied, which corroborates that intensive electric field around the pore in porous SiOx layer guides the conduction of electrons. The constraint of conduction path leads to better stabilization and prominent performance of bilayer resistive switching devices.

  20. Tribological characteristics of ceramic conversion treated NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, X.; Dong, H.

    2007-09-01

    NiTi shape memory alloys are very attractive for medical implants and devices (such as orthopaedic and orthodontic implants) and various actuators. However, wear is a major concern for such applications and a novel surface engineering process, ceramic conversion treatment, has recently been developed to address this problem. In this study, the tribological characteristics of ceramic conversion treated NiTi alloy have been systematically investigated under dry unidirectional wear, reciprocating-corrosion wear and fretting-corrosion wear condition. Based on the experimental results, the wear behaviour under different conditions is compared and wear mechanisms involved are discussed.

  1. Theoretical study of SET operation in carbon nanotube memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopa, Michael; Rueckes, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    We present results of self-consistent electronic structure calculations for an electromechanical memory cell consisting of a carbon nanotube (CNT) fabric between titanium leads to elucidate the mechanism whereby the applied bias works to close the current gaps in the CNT fabric. We demonstrate that the asymmetry in the bias conditions required to achieve the “SET” operation of the cell (changing it from a high resistivity to low resistivity) results from the nature of a voltage drop in a compensated semiconducting material and depends sensitively on the background charge as well as on the position of the layer where the conducting gaps occur. The calculations provide insight into the behavior of the material and suggest possible fabrication strategies to modify the functionality.

  2. Characteristics of autobiographical memories and prospective imagery across a spectrum of hypomanic personality traits.

    PubMed

    McGill, Brittany; Moulds, Michelle L

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of a strong causal relationship between mental imagery and emotion has informed psychological conceptualisations of disordered positive mood states (i.e., mania). Holmes et al.'s cognitive model of bipolar disorder asserts a prominent role for intrusive and affect-laden positive imagery of the past and the future in the amplification and maintenance of positive mood and associated manic behaviours. The aims of the current study were two-fold: (1) to test aspects of this model in a non-clinical population sampled for hypomanic personality traits and (2) to examine the phenomenological characteristics of positive autobiographical memories and imagery of the future. Undergraduate students (N = 80) completed a battery of self-report questionnaires and rated their positive and negative memories and images of the future on a number of dimensions. We found significant positive correlations between hypomanic tendencies and the (1) everyday experience and use of mental imagery, (2) experience of intrusive mental imagery of future events, (3) emotional intensity and sensory detail of positive but not negative autobiographical memories. Results are discussed in the context of their theoretical and clinical implications, and directions for future research are considered. PMID:24443812

  3. Memory retrieval by activating engram cells in mouse models of early Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dheeraj S; Arons, Autumn; Mitchell, Teryn I; Pignatelli, Michele; Ryan, Tomás J; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2016-03-24

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive memory decline and subsequent loss of broader cognitive functions. Memory decline in the early stages of AD is mostly limited to episodic memory, for which the hippocampus has a crucial role. However, it has been uncertain whether the observed amnesia in the early stages of AD is due to disrupted encoding and consolidation of episodic information, or an impairment in the retrieval of stored memory information. Here we show that in transgenic mouse models of early AD, direct optogenetic activation of hippocampal memory engram cells results in memory retrieval despite the fact that these mice are amnesic in long-term memory tests when natural recall cues are used, revealing a retrieval, rather than a storage impairment. Before amyloid plaque deposition, the amnesia in these mice is age-dependent, which correlates with a progressive reduction in spine density of hippocampal dentate gyrus engram cells. We show that optogenetic induction of long-term potentiation at perforant path synapses of dentate gyrus engram cells restores both spine density and long-term memory. We also demonstrate that an ablation of dentate gyrus engram cells containing restored spine density prevents the rescue of long-term memory. Thus, selective rescue of spine density in engram cells may lead to an effective strategy for treating memory loss in the early stages of AD. PMID:26982728

  4. The developmental pathway for CD103(+)CD8+ tissue-resident memory T cells of skin.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Laura K; Rahimpour, Azad; Ma, Joel Z; Collins, Nicholas; Stock, Angus T; Hafon, Ming-Li; Vega-Ramos, Javier; Lauzurica, Pilar; Mueller, Scott N; Stefanovic, Tijana; Tscharke, David C; Heath, William R; Inouye, Michael; Carbone, Francis R; Gebhardt, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (T(RM) cells) provide superior protection against infection in extralymphoid tissues. Here we found that CD103(+)CD8(+) T(RM) cells developed in the skin from epithelium-infiltrating precursor cells that lacked expression of the effector-cell marker KLRG1. A combination of entry into the epithelium plus local signaling by interleukin 15 (IL-15) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was required for the formation of these long-lived memory cells. Notably, differentiation into T(RM) cells resulted in the progressive acquisition of a unique transcriptional profile that differed from that of circulating memory cells and other types of T cells that permanently reside in skin epithelium. We provide a comprehensive molecular framework for the local differentiation of a distinct peripheral population of memory cells that forms a first-line immunological defense system in barrier tissues. PMID:24162776

  5. Dopaminergic neurons write and update memories with cell-type-specific rules.

    PubMed

    Aso, Yoshinori; Rubin, Gerald M

    2016-01-01

    Associative learning is thought to involve parallel and distributed mechanisms of memory formation and storage. In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is the major site of associative odor memory formation. Previously we described the anatomy of the adult MB and defined 20 types of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that each innervate distinct MB compartments (Aso et al., 2014a, 2014b). Here we compare the properties of memories formed by optogenetic activation of individual DAN cell types. We found extensive differences in training requirements for memory formation, decay dynamics, storage capacity and flexibility to learn new associations. Even a single DAN cell type can either write or reduce an aversive memory, or write an appetitive memory, depending on when it is activated relative to odor delivery. Our results show that different learning rules are executed in seemingly parallel memory systems, providing multiple distinct circuit-based strategies to predict future events from past experiences. PMID:27441388

  6. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew D; Kim, Marie T; Shan, Qiang; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T; Badovinac, Vladimir P

    2015-10-01

    Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability), and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo) and central memory (CD62Lhi) cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit protective memory

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Matthew D.; Kim, Marie T.; Shan, Qiang; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability), and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo) and central memory (CD62Lhi) cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit protective memory

  8. Circulating Memory T Follicular Helper Cells in Patients with Neuromyelitis Optica/Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xueli; Jiang, Yanfang; Han, Jinming; Liu, Jingyao; Wei, Yafen; Jiang, Xinmei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to examine the potential role of memory T follicular helper (Tfh) cells in patients with neuromyelitis optica/neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMO/NMOSD). Methods. The percentages of different subsets of circulating memory Tfh cells in 25 NMO/NMOSD patients before and after treatment as well as in 17 healthy controls were examined by flow cytometry. The levels of IL-21 and AQP4 Ab in plasma and CSF were measured by ELISA. Results. The percentages and numbers of circulating memory Tfh cells, ICOS+, CCR7−, CCR7−ICOS+, CCR7+, CCR7+ICOS+ memory Tfh cells, and the levels of IL-21 in plasma and CSF were significantly increased in NMO/NMOSD patients. The percentages of CCR7− and CCR7−ICOS+ memory Tfh cells were positively correlated with ARR, plasma IL-21, and AQP4 Ab levels. The percentages of CCR7+ and CCR7+ICOS+ memory Tfh cells were positively correlated with CSF white blood cell counts, proteins, and IL-21 levels. Treatment with corticosteroids significantly reduced the numbers of CCR7−ICOS+ and CCR7+ICOS+ memory Tfh cells as well as plasma IL-21 levels in patients with partial remission. Conclusions. Our findings indicate that circulating memory Tfh cells may participate in the relapse and development of NMO/NMOSD and may serve as a new therapeutic target. PMID:27057097

  9. Polarization diversity of human CD4+ stem cell memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Masaru; Suzuki, Katsuya; Kassai, Yoshiaki; Takiguchi, Maiko; Nakayama, Yusuke; Otomo, Yuki; Morita, Rimpei; Miyazaki, Takahiro; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2015-07-01

    T cells are considered to develop through three stages, from naïve T (Tn) into central memory T (Tcm) and finally into effector memory T (Tem). Among the subsets of Tn, stem cell memory T (Tscm) were recently found to be the least developed memory subset. While this subset was revealed to possess self-reproducibility and multipotentiality, little is known about the relationship between development and polarity. We conducted transcriptome analysis of human CD4(+) T subsets and found that Tscm was a clearly distinct subset, located between Tn and Tcm. Surface antigen analysis and differentiation assay showed that the flexibility of polarity and the cytokine production progressively changed as the differentiation of CD4(+) T cells advanced. Interestingly, we found that most cells of the CD45RO(-)CCR7(+)CCR6(+) subset, hitherto considered the naïve precursor of Th17, were in fact Tscm. These findings may advance our understanding of the highly heterogeneous human helper T cells. PMID:25931384

  10. Anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) differentially depletes naïve and memory T cells and permits memory-type regulatory T cells in nonobese diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background ATG has been employed to deplete T cells in several immune-mediated conditions. However, whether ATG administration affects naïve and memory T cell differently is largely unknown. The context and purpose of the study In this study, we assessed how murine ATG therapy affected T cell subsets in NOD mice, based on their regulatory and naïve or memory phenotype, as well as its influence on antigen-specific immune responses. Results Peripheral blood CD4+ and CD8+ T cells post-ATG therapy declined to their lowest levels at day 3, while CD4+ T cells returned to normal levels more rapidly than CD8+ T cells. ATG therapy failed to eliminate antigen-primed T cells. CD4+ T cell responses post-ATG therapy skewed to T helper type 2 (Th2) and possibly IL-10-producing T regulatory type 1 (Tr1) cells. Intriguingly, Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were less sensitive to ATG depletion and remained at higher levels following in vivo recovery compared to controls. Of note, the frequency of Foxp3+ Tregs with memory T cell phenotype was significantly increased in ATG-treated animals. Conclusion ATG therapy may modulate antigen-specific immune responses through inducing memory-like regulatory T cells as well as other protective T cells such as Th2 and IL-10-producing Tr1 cells. PMID:23237483

  11. Intravaginal infection with herpes simplex virus type-2 (HSV-2) generates a functional effector memory T cell population that persists in the murine genital tract.

    PubMed

    Tang, Vera A; Rosenthal, Kenneth L

    2010-12-01

    Although the female genital tract is the main portal of entry for sexually transmitted infections in women, we still have limited understanding of the generation, maintenance and characteristics of memory T cells in the local tissue. Here, we utilized a mouse model of intravaginal HSV-2 infection and tetramers against the immunodominant HSV glycoprotein B epitope recognized by CD8+ T cells to examine the generation, maintenance and characteristics of anti-HSV memory T cells in the genital tract following acute infection. Our results show that the highest percentage of HSVgB-specific CD8+ T cells was found in the genital tract compared to the spleen or iliac lymphnode. Indeed, although the actual number of CD8+ T cells contracted following viral clearance, approximately one quarter of the CD8+ population that remained in the genital tissue was HSVgB-specific. Memory gB-tetramer+CD8 T cells in the genital tract were positive for CD127 and KLRG1 and negative for CD62L and CCR7, thus confirming that HSV-specific CD8 cells were effector memory T cells that lack the capacity for homing to lymphoid tissues. Functionally, both memory CD8+ and CD4+ HSV-specific populations in the genital tract produced IFNγ when stimulated in vitro and CD4+ cells also produced TNFα. Genital HSVgB-specific memory T cells expressed tissue-homing integrins CD103 (αE integrin) and CD49a (VLA-1 or α1 integrin). Our findings suggest that HSV-specific memory T cells are retained in the genital tract, poised to act as an early line of defense against future virus encounter. PMID:20688399

  12. Bone Marrow T Cells and the Integrated Functions of Recirculating and Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Gebhardt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Changes in T cell trafficking accompany the naive to memory T cell antigen-driven differentiation, which remains an incompletely defined developmental step. Upon priming, each naive T cell encounters essential signals - i.e., antigen, co-stimuli and cytokines - in a secondary lymphoid organ; nevertheless, its daughter effector and memory T cells recirculate and receive further signals during their migration through various lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. These additional signals from tissue microenvironments have an impact on immune response features, including T cell effector function, expansion and contraction, memory differentiation, long-term maintenance, and recruitment upon antigenic rechallenge into local and/or systemic responses. The critical role of T cell trafficking in providing efficient T cell memory has long been a focus of interest. It is now well recognized that naive and memory T cells have different migratory pathways, and that memory T cells are heterogeneous with respect to their trafficking. We and others have observed that, long time after priming, memory T cells are preferentially found in certain niches such as the bone marrow (BM) or at the skin/mucosal site of pathogen entry, even in the absence of residual antigen. The different underlying mechanisms and peculiarities of resulting immunity are currently under study. In this review, we summarize key findings on BM and tissue-resident memory (TRM) T cells and revisit some issues in memory T cell maintenance within such niches. Moreover, we discuss BM seeding by memory T cells in the context of migration patterns and protective functions of either recirculating or TRM T cells. PMID:26909081

  13. Bone Marrow T Cells and the Integrated Functions of Recirculating and Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Rosa, Francesca; Gebhardt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Changes in T cell trafficking accompany the naive to memory T cell antigen-driven differentiation, which remains an incompletely defined developmental step. Upon priming, each naive T cell encounters essential signals – i.e., antigen, co-stimuli and cytokines – in a secondary lymphoid organ; nevertheless, its daughter effector and memory T cells recirculate and receive further signals during their migration through various lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. These additional signals from tissue microenvironments have an impact on immune response features, including T cell effector function, expansion and contraction, memory differentiation, long-term maintenance, and recruitment upon antigenic rechallenge into local and/or systemic responses. The critical role of T cell trafficking in providing efficient T cell memory has long been a focus of interest. It is now well recognized that naive and memory T cells have different migratory pathways, and that memory T cells are heterogeneous with respect to their trafficking. We and others have observed that, long time after priming, memory T cells are preferentially found in certain niches such as the bone marrow (BM) or at the skin/mucosal site of pathogen entry, even in the absence of residual antigen. The different underlying mechanisms and peculiarities of resulting immunity are currently under study. In this review, we summarize key findings on BM and tissue-resident memory (TRM) T cells and revisit some issues in memory T cell maintenance within such niches. Moreover, we discuss BM seeding by memory T cells in the context of migration patterns and protective functions of either recirculating or TRM T cells. PMID:26909081

  14. Local immunity by tissue-resident CD8+ memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, Thomas; Mackay, Laura K.

    2012-01-01

    Microbial infection primes a CD8+ cytotoxic T cell response that gives rise to a long-lived population of circulating memory cells able to provide protection against systemic reinfection. Despite this, effective CD8+ T cell surveillance of barrier tissues such as skin and mucosa typically wanes with time, resulting in limited T cell-mediated protection in these peripheral tissues. However, recent evidence suggests that a specialized subset of CD103+ memory T cells can permanently lodge and persist in peripheral tissues, and that these cells can compensate for the loss of peripheral immune surveillance by circulating memory T cells. Here, we review evolving concepts regarding the generation and long-term persistence of these tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) in epithelial and neuronal tissues. We further discuss the role of TRM cells in local infection control and their contribution to localized immune phenomena, in both mice and humans. PMID:23162555

  15. Characteristics and mechanism study of cerium oxide based random access memories

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Roy, Anupam; Rai, Amritesh; Chang, Yao-Feng; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2015-04-27

    In this work, low operating voltage and high resistance ratio of different resistance states of binary transition metal oxide based resistive random access memories (RRAMs) are demonstrated. Binary transition metal oxides with high dielectric constant have been explored for RRAM application for years. However, CeO{sub x} is considered as a relatively new material to other dielectrics. Since research on CeO{sub x} based RRAM is still at preliminary stage, fundamental characteristics of RRAM such as scalability and mechanism studies need to be done before moving further. Here, we show very high operation window and low switching voltage of CeO{sub x} RRAMs and also compare electrical performance of Al/CeO{sub x}/Au system between different thin film deposition methods and discuss characteristics and resistive switching mechanism.

  16. Dual operation characteristics of resistance random access memory in indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jyun-Bao; Chen, Yu-Ting; Chu, Ann-Kuo; Chang, Ting-Chang; Huang, Jheng-Jie; Chen, Yu-Chun; Tseng, Hsueh-Chih; Sze, Simon M.

    2014-04-14

    In this study, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors can be operated either as transistors or resistance random access memory devices. Before the forming process, current-voltage curve transfer characteristics are observed, and resistance switching characteristics are measured after a forming process. These resistance switching characteristics exhibit two behaviors, and are dominated by different mechanisms. The mode 1 resistance switching behavior is due to oxygen vacancies, while mode 2 is dominated by the formation of an oxygen-rich layer. Furthermore, an easy approach is proposed to reduce power consumption when using these resistance random access memory devices with the amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistor.

  17. Memory strategy training in children with cerebral infarcts related to sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Yerys, Benjamin E; White, Desirée A; Salorio, Cynthia F; McKinstry, Robert; Moinuddin, Asif; DeBaun, Michael

    2003-06-01

    Cerebral infarcts occur in approximately 30% of children with sickle cell disease (SCD), but little information exists regarding remediation of associated cognitive deficits. The authors examined the benefits of training children with infarcts to use memory strategies. Six children with SCD-related infarcts received academic tutoring; three of these children received additional training in memory strategies (silent rehearsal to facilitate short-term memory and semantic organization to facilitate long-term memory). The performance of children receiving strategy training appeared to improve more than that of children receiving only tutoring. Memory in children with SCD-related infarcts may be enhanced through strategy training. PMID:12794531

  18. Additional Electrochemical Treatment Effects on the Switching Characteristics of Anodic Porous Alumina Resistive Switching Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Shintaro; Takeda, Ryouta; Furuya, Saeko; Shimizu, Tomohiro; Shingubara, Shouso; Iwata, Nobuyuki; Watanabe, Tadataka; Takano, Yoshiki; Takase, Kouichi

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated the current-voltage characteristics of a resistive switching memory (ReRAM), especially the reproducibility of the switching voltage between an insulating state and a metallic state. The poor reproducibility hinders the practical use of this memory. According to a filament model, the variation of the switching voltage may be understood in terms of the random choice of filaments with different conductivities and lengths at each switching. A limitation of the number of conductive paths is expected to lead to the suppression of the variation of switching voltage. In this study, two strategies for the limitation have been proposed using an anodic porous alumina (APA). The first is the reduction of the number of conductive paths by restriction of the contact area between the top electrodes and the insulator. The second is the lowering of the resistivity of the insulator, which makes it possible to grow filaments with the same characteristics by electrochemical treatments using a pulse-electroplating technique.

  19. Influence of ultraviolet irradiation on data retention characteristics in resistive random access memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, K.; Ohmi, K.; Kishida, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    2016-03-01

    With increasing density of memory devices, the issue of generating soft errors by cosmic rays is becoming more and more serious. Therefore, the irradiation resistance of resistance random access memory (ReRAM) to cosmic radiation has to be elucidated for practical use. In this paper, we investigated the data retention characteristics of ReRAM against ultraviolet irradiation with a Pt/NiO/ITO structure. Soft errors were confirmed to be caused by ultraviolet irradiation in both low- and high-resistance states. An analysis of the wavelength dependence of light irradiation on data retention characteristics suggested that electronic excitation from the valence to the conduction band and to the energy level generated due to the introduction of oxygen vacancies caused the errors. Based on a statistically estimated soft error rates, the errors were suggested to be caused by the cohesion and dispersion of oxygen vacancies owing to the generation of electron-hole pairs and valence changes by the ultraviolet irradiation.

  20. CD4 memory T cells develop and acquire functional competence by sequential cognate interactions and stepwise gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Atsushi; Ishige, Akiko; Kitami, Toshimori; Watanabe, Takashi; Ohara, Osamu; Yanaka, Noriyuki; Okada, Mariko; Shimoda, Michiko; Taniguchi, Masaru; Takemori, Toshitada

    2016-06-01

    Memory CD4(+) T cells promote protective humoral immunity; however, how memory T cells acquire this activity remains unclear. This study demonstrates that CD4(+) T cells develop into antigen-specific memory T cells that can promote the terminal differentiation of memory B cells far more effectively than their naive T-cell counterparts. Memory T cell development requires the transcription factor B-cell lymphoma 6 (Bcl6), which is known to direct T-follicular helper (Tfh) cell differentiation. However, unlike Tfh cells, memory T cell development did not require germinal center B cells. Curiously, memory T cells that develop in the absence of cognate B cells cannot promote memory B-cell recall responses and this defect was accompanied by down-regulation of genes associated with homeostasis and activation and up-regulation of genes inhibitory for T-cell responses. Although memory T cells display phenotypic and genetic signatures distinct from Tfh cells, both had in common the expression of a group of genes associated with metabolic pathways. This gene expression profile was not shared to any great extent with naive T cells and was not influenced by the absence of cognate B cells during memory T cell development. These results suggest that memory T cell development is programmed by stepwise expression of gatekeeper genes through serial interactions with different types of antigen-presenting cells, first licensing the memory lineage pathway and subsequently facilitating the functional development of memory T cells. Finally, we identified Gdpd3 as a candidate genetic marker for memory T cells. PMID:26714588

  1. Pathogen-induced inflammatory environment controls effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Obar, Joshua J; Jellison, Evan R; Sheridan, Brian S; Blair, David A; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Zickovich, Julianne M; Lefrançois, Leo

    2011-11-15

    In response to infection, CD8(+) T cells integrate multiple signals and undergo an exponential increase in cell numbers. Simultaneously, a dynamic differentiation process occurs, resulting in the formation of short-lived effector cells (SLECs; CD127(low)KLRG1(high)) and memory precursor effector cells (CD127(high)KLRG1(low)) from an early effector cell that is CD127(low)KLRG1(low) in phenotype. CD8(+) T cell differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection differed significantly than during Listeria monocytogenes infection with a substantial reduction in early effector cell differentiation into SLECs. SLEC generation was dependent on Ebi3 expression. Furthermore, SLEC differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection was enhanced by administration of CpG-DNA, through an IL-12-dependent mechanism. Moreover, CpG-DNA treatment enhanced effector CD8(+) T cell functionality and memory subset distribution, but in an IL-12-independent manner. Population dynamics were dramatically different during secondary CD8(+) T cell responses, with a much greater accumulation of SLECs and the appearance of a significant number of CD127(high)KLRG1(high) memory cells, both of which were intrinsic to the memory CD8(+) T cell. These subsets persisted for several months but were less effective in recall than memory precursor effector cells. Thus, our data shed light on how varying the context of T cell priming alters downstream effector and memory CD8(+) T cell differentiation. PMID:21987662

  2. Immunoglobulin M receptors on memory cells of immunoglobulin G antibody-forming cell clones.

    PubMed

    Abney, E R; Keeler, K D; Parkhouse, R M; Willcox, H N

    1976-06-01

    The memory cells of two antibody-forming cell clones had receptors of the IgM class, even though the clones had been producing IgG1 or IgG2a anti-2,4-dinitrophenyl antibodies for 9-15 months previously (on exposure to antigen). Thus a phenotypic switch in heavy chain constant region evidently occurred after re-exposure of these memory cells to antigen. To show that, we first removed the clonal cells' surface immunoglobins by "capping" and "stripping", with class- or subclass-specific antisera. Then, to assay their remaining receptor activity, the cells were incubated with antigen in vitro, washed and transferred (together with carrier primed cells) to irradiated recipients, and their antibody responses to this in vitro boost were assayed by iselectric focusing. Pretreatment with anti-mu serum, as well as with anti-Fab(kappa), prevented the responses of the IgG1 and IgG2a clones to an in vitro boost, while anti-gamma1 and anti-gamma2a antisera had no effect. An antiserum to the putative mouse IgD also had no effect. The anti-mu serum failed to react with the IgG1 and IgG2A clonal serum antibodies in the test tube. Some other contaminating clones were suppressed completely only by the anti-Fab serum. This result strongly suggests that switching in class commitment may occur during the differentiation of memory cells to antibody producers, and may therefore be antigen-dependent. It also implies that some apparently naive cells with surface IgM may, in reality, be B memory cells. PMID:825376

  3. COSTIMULATION SIGNALS FOR MEMORY CD8+ T CELLS DURING VIRAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Duttagupta, Priyanka A.; Boesteanu, Alina C.; Katsikis, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Costimulation signals have been recognized as critical for optimal T cell responses and result from important interaction between receptors on the surface of T cells and their ligands on antigen presenting cells. Two families of receptors, the CD28 family and the TNFR family have been found to be major players in providing costimulation to CD8+ T cells. Recent studies using viral infection models have highlighted the importance of CD28 costimulation signals during memory responses against viruses. PD-1 another member of the CD28 family may contribute to functional defects of helpless memory CD8+ T cells. Members of the TNFR family such as CD27, 4-1BB, CD40, TRAIL and OX40 have also being implicated in the survival, generation, maintenance and quality of virus-specific memory CD8+ T cells. The delivery of costimulatory molecules such as CD28, 4-1BB and OX40 can help boost the generation and function of virus-specific memory CD8+ T cells. Taken together this suggests that the use of costimulatory molecules as adjuvants along with viral antigens in vaccines may facilitate the generation of effective antigen-specific memory CD8+ T cell responses. Understanding the costimulatory requirements of memory CD8+ T cells therefore may lead to improved vaccines that target anti-viral CD8+ T cell memory. PMID:20121696

  4. Specific central memory T cells in the bone marrow of patients immunized against tyrosinase peptides.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich; Kern, Florian; Asemissen, Anne Marie; Thiel, Eckhard; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    The goal of vaccination against tumors is the induction of effector T cells mediating tumor destruction and memory T cells providing long-term immunity. Several previous studies in patients vaccinated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptides failed to show induction of central memory T cells, which are considered important to provide long-term memory. This study examined the subset composition and function of specific T cells generated by immunization with MHC class I binding tyrosinase peptides in combination with the adjuvants granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and keyhole limpet hemocyanin in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of melanoma patients. Most of the tyrosinase-specific T cells in PB had a CD45RA(+)CCR7(-) effector phenotype. In contrast to this, a large subset of tyrosinase-specific T cells in BM were memory T cells, including CD45RA(+)CCR7(-) central and CD45RA(-)CCR7(-) effector memory T cells. BM tyrosinase-specific T cells were functional, because they produced interferon-gamma and had a high proliferative potential. This study suggests that peptide vaccination can generate a fully functional memory T-cell response characterized by central and effector memory phenotypes, proliferative potential, and BM tropism. PMID:16531820

  5. Simulation study on heat conduction of a nanoscale phase-change random access memory cell.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junho; Song, Ki-Bong

    2006-11-01

    We have investigated heat transfer characteristics of a nano-scale phase-change random access memory (PRAM) cell using finite element method (FEM) simulation. Our PRAM cell is based on ternary chalcogenide alloy, Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST), which is used as a recording layer. For contact area of 100 x 100 nm2, simulations of crystallization and amorphization processes were carried out. Physical quantities such as electric conductivity, thermal conductivity, and specific heat were treated as temperature-dependent parameters. Through many simulations, it is concluded that one can reduce set current by decreasing both electric conductivities of amorphous GST and crystalline GST, and in addition to these conditions by decreasing electric conductivity of molten GST one can also reduce reset current significantly. PMID:17252792

  6. Quantification of HLA class II-specific memory B cells in HLA-sensitized individuals.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca E; de Vaal, Yvonne J H; Roelen, Dave L; Buchli, Rico; Claas, Frans H J; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2015-03-01

    For the quantification of HLA-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood of sensitized individuals, a limited number of methods are available. However, none of these are capable of detecting memory B cells directed at HLA class II molecules. Since the majority of antibodies that occur after transplantation appear to be specific for HLA class II, our aim was to develop an assay to detect and quantify HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. By using biotinylated soluble HLA class II molecules as detection agent, we were able to develop an HLA class II-specific memory B cell ELISPOT assay. The assay was validated using B cell-derived hybridomas that produce human monoclonal antibodies directed at specific HLA class II molecules. In pregnancy-immunized females, we found memory B cell frequencies ranging from 25 to 756 spots per 10(6) B cells specific for the immunizing paternal HLA class II molecules, whereas in non-immunized males no significant spot formation was detected. Here, we present a novel ELISPOT assay for quantifying HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. This technique provides a unique tool for monitoring the HLA class II-specific memory B cell pool in sensitized transplant recipients. PMID:25636565

  7. Genome-wide RNA profiling of long-lasting stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by Yellow Fever vaccination in humans.

    PubMed

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A; Soneson, Charlotte; Delorenzi, Mauro; Speiser, Daniel E

    2015-09-01

    The live-attenuated Yellow Fever (YF) vaccine YF-17D induces a broad and polyfunctional CD8 T cell response in humans. Recently, we identified a population of stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells induced by YF-17D that persists at stable frequency for at least 25 years after vaccination. The YF-17D is thus a model system of human CD8 T cell biology that furthermore allows to track and study long-lasting and antigen-specific human memory CD8 T cells. Here, we describe in detail the sample characteristics and preparation of a microarray dataset acquired for genome-wide gene expression profiling of long-lasting YF-specific stem cell-like memory CD8 T cells, compared to the reference CD8 T cell differentiation subsets from total CD8 T cells. We also describe the quality controls, annotations and exploratory analyses of the dataset. The microarray data is available from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) public repository with accession number GSE65804. PMID:26484272

  8. Transcriptional profiling of antigen-dependent murine B cell differentiation and memory formation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Deepta; Cheah, Ming T; Franco, Christopher B; Hosen, Naoki; Pin, Christopher L; Sha, William C; Weissman, Irving L

    2007-11-15

    Humoral immunity is characterized by the generation of Ab-secreting plasma cells and memory B cells that can more rapidly generate specific Abs upon Ag exposure than their naive counterparts. To determine the intrinsic differences that distinguish naive and memory B cells and to identify pathways that allow germinal center B cells to differentiate into memory B cells, we compared the transcriptional profiles of highly purified populations of these three cell types along with plasma cells isolated from mice immunized with a T-dependent Ag. The transcriptional profile of memory B cells is similar to that of naive B cells, yet displays several important differences, including increased expression of activation-induced deaminase and several antiapoptotic genes, chemotactic receptors, and costimulatory molecules. Retroviral expression of either Klf2 or Ski, two transcriptional regulators specifically enriched in memory B cells relative to their germinal center precursors, imparted a competitive advantage to Ag receptor and CD40-engaged B cells in vitro. These data suggest that humoral recall responses are more rapid than primary responses due to the expression of a unique transcriptional program by memory B cells that allows them to both be maintained at high frequencies and to detect and rapidly respond to antigenic re-exposure. PMID:17982071

  9. Temperature dependent retention characteristics of ion-beam modified SONOS memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simatos, D. P.; Dimitrakis, P.; Normand, P.; Nikolaou, N.; Giannakopoulos, K.; Ladas, S.; Pecassou, B.; BenAssayag, G.; Ioannou-Sougleridis, V.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we report on the structural and electrical properties of oxide-nitride-oxide (ONO) structures that were formed by low-energy silicon or nitrogen implantation into oxide-nitride stacks. In particular ON stacks (2.5 nm/6 nm) were formed on n-type Si substrates, further implanted with 1 keV Si or N to a fluence of 1016 ions/cm2, and finally wet oxidized at 850 °C for 15 min. TEM imaging showed that the thickness of the blocking oxide layer, formed during wet oxidation, strongly depends on the implanted species. Charging characteristics revealed that Si implanted stacks can trap either electrons or holes resulting to a memory window as large as 8.5 V. In turn N implanted stacks can trap only electrons with a corresponding memory window of 4 V. Room-temperature charge retention measurements showed that the electron loss rate is faster in samples implanted with Si (∼0.32 V/decade) compared to N-samples (∼0.1 V/decade). The 10-year extrapolated memory windows were 1.7 and 2.5 V for Si and N-implanted devices, respectively. Retention measurements within the temperature range of 25-150 °C indicate that the Si implanted stacks exhibit a thermally activated retention, while N-samples showed a temperature independent behavior. These results are mainly attributed to the different nature of traps generated by ion implantation and wet oxidation processing.

  10. Antigen availability determines CD8+ T cell-dendritic cell interaction kinetics and memory fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Henrickson, Sarah E.; Stutte, Susanne; Quigley, Michael; Alexe, Gabriela; Iannacone, Matteo; Flynn, Michael P.; Omid, Shaida; Jesneck, Jonathan L.; Imam, Sabrina; Mempel, Thorsten R.; Mazo, Irina B.; Haining, William N.; von Andrian, Ulrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary T cells are activated by antigen (Ag) bearing dendritic cells (DCs) in lymph nodes in 3 phases. The duration of the initial phase of transient, serial DC-T cell interactions is inversely correlated with Ag dose. The second phase, characterized by stable DC-T cell contacts, is believed to be necessary for full-fledged T cell activation. Here we have shown that this is not the case. CD8+ T cells interacting with DCs presenting low-dose, short-lived Ag did not transition to phase 2, while higher Ag dose yielded phase 2 transition. Both antigenic constellations promoted T cell proliferation and effector differentiation, but yielded different transcriptome signatures at 12h and 24h. T cells that experienced phase 2 developed long-lived memory, whereas conditions without stable contacts yielded immunological amnesia. Thus, T cells make fate decisions within hours after Ag exposure resulting in long-term memory or abortive effector responses, correlating with T cell-DCs interaction kinetics. PMID:24054328

  11. The molecular basis of the memory T cell response: differential gene expression and its epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Nan-ping; Araki, Yasuto; Subedi, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    How the immune system remembers a previous encounter with a pathogen and responds more efficiently to a subsequent encounter has been one of the central enigmas for immunologists for over a century. The identification of pathogen-specific memory lymphocytes that arise after an infection provided a cellular basis for immunological memory. But the molecular mechanisms of immunological memory remain only partially understood. The emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic changes have a key role in controlling the distinct transcriptional profiles of memory lymphocytes and thus in shaping their function. In this Review, we summarize the recent progress that has been made in assessing the differential gene expression and chromatin modifications in memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and we present our current understanding of the molecular basis of memory T cell function. PMID:22421787

  12. Aero-thermo-mechanical characteristics of imperfect shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibrahim, Hesham Hamed; Yoo, Hong Hee; Lee, Kwan-Soo

    2009-08-01

    A nonlinear finite element model is provided to predict the static aero-thermal deflection and the vibration behavior of geometrically imperfect shape memory alloy hybrid composite panels under the combined effect of thermal and aerodynamic loads. The nonlinear governing equations are obtained using Marguerre curved plate theory and the principle of virtual work taking into account the temperature-dependence of material properties. The effect of large deflection is included in the formulation through the von Karman nonlinear strain-displacement relations. The thermal load is assumed to be a steady-state constant-temperature distribution, whereas the aerodynamic pressure is modeled using the quasi-steady first-order piston theory. The Newton-Raphson iteration method is employed to obtain the nonlinear aero-thermal deflections, while an eigenvalue problem is solved at each temperature step and static aerodynamic load to predict the free vibration frequencies about the deflected equilibrium position. Finally, the nonlinear deflection and free vibration characteristics of a composite panel are presented, illustrating the effects of geometric imperfection, temperature rise, aerodynamic pressure, boundary conditions and shape memory alloy fiber embeddings on the panel response.

  13. Electrical Characteristics of Hybrid-Organic Memory Devices Based on Au Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejm, Razan R.; Ayesh, Ahmad I.; Zeze, Dagou A.; Sleiman, Adam; Mabrook, Mohammed F.; Al-Ghaferi, Amal; Hussein, Mousa

    2015-08-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of hybrid-organic memory devices based on gold (Au) nanoparticles that utilize metal-insulator-semiconductor structure. Au nanoparticles were produced by sputtering and inert-gas condensation inside an ultrahigh-vacuum compatible system. The nanoparticles were self-assembled on a silicon dioxide (SiO2)/silicon (Si) substrate, then coated with a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) insulating layer. Aluminum (Al) electrodes were deposited by thermal evaporation on the Si substrate and the PMMA layer to create a capacitor. The nanoparticles worked as charge storage elements, while the PMMA is the capacitor insulator. The capacitance-voltage ( C- V) characteristics of the fabricated devices showed a clockwise hysteresis with a memory window of 3.4 V, indicative of electron injection from the top Al electrode through the PMMA layer into Au nanoparticles. Charge retention was measured at the stress voltage, demonstrating that the devices retain 94% of the charge stored after 3 h of continuous testing.

  14. Tissue Distribution of Memory T and B Cells in Rhesus Monkeys following Influenza A Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Boonnak, Kobporn; Thitithayanont, Arunee; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Wiboon-ut, Suwimon; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Spring, Michele; Chuang, Ilin; Mason, Carl J.; Saunders, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of influenza-specific immune responses in humans have largely assessed systemic responses involving serum Ab and peripheral blood T cell responses. However, recent evidence indicates that tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells play an important role in local murine intrapulmonary immunity. Rhesus monkeys were pulmonary exposed to 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus at days 0 and 28 and immune responses in different tissue compartments were measured. All animals were asymptomatic postinfection. Although only minimal memory immune responses were detected in peripheral blood, a high frequency of influenza nucleoprotein–specific memory T cells was detected in the lung at the “contraction phase,” 49–58 d after second virus inoculation. A substantial proportion of lung nucleoprotein-specific memory CD8+ T cells expressed CD103 and CD69, phenotypic markers of TRM cells. Lung CD103+ and CD103- memory CD8+ T cells expressed similar levels of IFN-γ and IL-2. Unlike memory T cells, spontaneous Ab secreting cells and memory B cells specific to influenza hemagglutinin were primarily observed in the mediastinal lymph nodes. Little difference in systemic and local immune responses against influenza was observed between young adult (6–8 y) and old animals (18–28 y). Using a nonhuman primate model, we revealed substantial induction of local T and B cell responses following 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection. Our study identified a subset of influenza-specific lung memory T cells characterized as TRM cells in rhesus monkeys. The rhesus monkey model may be useful to explore the role of TRM cells in local tissue protective immunity after rechallenge and vaccination. PMID:26408671

  15. Tissue Distribution of Memory T and B Cells in Rhesus Monkeys following Influenza A Infection.

    PubMed

    Pichyangkul, Sathit; Yongvanitchit, Kosol; Limsalakpetch, Amporn; Kum-Arb, Utaiwan; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Boonnak, Kobporn; Thitithayanont, Arunee; Jongkaewwattana, Anan; Wiboon-ut, Suwimon; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Mahanonda, Rangsini; Spring, Michele; Chuang, Ilin; Mason, Carl J; Saunders, David L

    2015-11-01

    Studies of influenza-specific immune responses in humans have largely assessed systemic responses involving serum Ab and peripheral blood T cell responses. However, recent evidence indicates that tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells play an important role in local murine intrapulmonary immunity. Rhesus monkeys were pulmonary exposed to 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus at days 0 and 28 and immune responses in different tissue compartments were measured. All animals were asymptomatic postinfection. Although only minimal memory immune responses were detected in peripheral blood, a high frequency of influenza nucleoprotein-specific memory T cells was detected in the lung at the "contraction phase," 49-58 d after second virus inoculation. A substantial proportion of lung nucleoprotein-specific memory CD8(+) T cells expressed CD103 and CD69, phenotypic markers of TRM cells. Lung CD103(+) and CD103(-) memory CD8(+) T cells expressed similar levels of IFN-γ and IL-2. Unlike memory T cells, spontaneous Ab secreting cells and memory B cells specific to influenza hemagglutinin were primarily observed in the mediastinal lymph nodes. Little difference in systemic and local immune responses against influenza was observed between young adult (6-8 y) and old animals (18-28 y). Using a nonhuman primate model, we revealed substantial induction of local T and B cell responses following 2009 pandemic H1N1 infection. Our study identified a subset of influenza-specific lung memory T cells characterized as TRM cells in rhesus monkeys. The rhesus monkey model may be useful to explore the role of TRM cells in local tissue protective immunity after rechallenge and vaccination. PMID:26408671

  16. Electrochemical characteristic of TiNi shape memory alloy in artificial body fluids.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenghao; Huang, Naibao

    2009-04-01

    In this work, the electrochemical characteristic of TiNi shape memory alloy (SMA) in Hank's solution was studied. The results indicated that low potential active dissolution of TiNi SMA occurred at a potential range of 150-250 mV during anodic polarizing. Its corrosion resistance was not affected by temperature, but was deeply affected by pH and Cl- ion concentration. Decreasing pH and improving Cl- ion concentration made the pitting broken potential (Eb) move toward negative and increased the sensitivity to pitting corrosion. Electro-probe microanalyzer and scanning electron microscope analysis showed that low potential active dissolution resulted in forming Ti2Ni precipitation phase in the hole, which enriched Ti and deficient Ni, became the sensitive position to pitting corrosion. PMID:18491391

  17. Characteristics of HfO2/Hf-based bipolar resistive memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinshun, Bi; Zhengsheng, Han

    2015-06-01

    Nano-scale Hf/HfO2-based resistive random-access-memory (RRAM) devices were fabricated. The cross-over between top and bottom electrodes of RRAM forms the metal-insulator-metal sandwich structure. The electrical responses of RRAM are studied in detail, including forming process, SET process and RESET process. The correlations between SET voltage and RESET voltage, high resistance state and low resistance state are discussed. The electrical characteristics of RRAM are in a strong relationship with the compliance current in the SET process. The conduction mechanism of nano-scale Hf/HfO2-based RRAM can be explained by the quantum point contact model. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11179003, 61176095).

  18. Radiation-hardened optically reconfigurable gate array exploiting holographic memory characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seto, Daisaku; Watanabe, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we present a proposal for a radiation-hardened optically reconfigurable gate array (ORGA). The ORGA is a type of field programmable gate array (FPGA). The ORGA configuration can be executed by the exploitation of holographic memory characteristics even if 20% of the configuration data are damaged. Moreover, the optoelectronic technology enables the high-speed reconfiguration of the programmable gate array. Such a high-speed reconfiguration can increase the radiation tolerance of its programmable gate array to 9.3 × 104 times higher than that of current FPGAs. Through experimentation, this study clarified the configuration dependability using the impulse-noise emulation and high-speed configuration capabilities of the ORGA with corrupt configuration contexts. Moreover, the radiation tolerance of the programmable gate array was confirmed theoretically through probabilistic calculation.

  19. Development and Function of Protective and Pathologic Memory CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaigirdar, Shafqat Ahrar; MacLeod, Megan K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological memory is one of the defining features of the adaptive immune system. As key orchestrators and mediators of immunity, CD4 T cells are central to the vast majority of adaptive immune responses. Generated following an immune response, memory CD4 T cells retain pertinent information about their activation environment enabling them to make rapid effector responses upon reactivation. These responses can either benefit the host by hastening the control of pathogens or cause damaging immunopathology. Here, we will discuss the diversity of the memory CD4 T cell pool, the signals that influence the transition of activated T cells into that pool, and highlight how activation requirements differ between naïve and memory CD4 T cells. A greater understanding of these factors has the potential to aid the design of more effective vaccines and to improve regulation of pathologic CD4 T cells, such as in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. PMID:26441961

  20. Tolerance induction in memory CD4 T cells requires two rounds of antigen-specific activation.

    PubMed

    David, Alexandria; Crawford, Frances; Garside, Paul; Kappler, John W; Marrack, Philippa; MacLeod, Megan

    2014-05-27

    A major goal for immunotherapy is to tolerize the immune cells that coordinate tissue damage in autoimmune and alloantigen responses. CD4 T cells play a central role in many of these conditions and improved antigen-specific regulation or removal of these cells could revolutionize current treatments. A confounding factor is that little is known about whether and how tolerance is induced in memory CD4 T cells. We used MHC class II tetramers to track and analyze a population of endogenous antigen-specific memory CD4 T cells exposed to soluble peptide in the absence of adjuvant. We found that such memory T cells proliferated and reentered the memory pool apparently unperturbed by the incomplete activation signals provided by the peptide. Upon further restimulation in vivo, CD4 memory T cells that had been previously exposed to peptide proliferated, provided help to primary responding B cells, and migrated to inflamed sites. However, these reactivated memory cells failed to survive. The reduction in T-cell number was marked by low expression of the antiapoptotic molecule B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) and increased expression of activated caspase molecules. Consequently, these cells failed to sustain a delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Moreover, following two separate exposures to soluble antigen, no T-cell recall response and no helper activity for B cells could be detected. These results suggest that the induction of tolerance in memory CD4 T cells is possible but that deletion and permanent removal of the antigen-specific T cells requires reactivation following exposure to the tolerogenic antigen. PMID:24821788

  1. B cells Can Modulate the CD8 Memory T Cell after DNA Vaccination Against Experimental Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although B cells are important as antigen presenting cells (APC) during the immune response, their role in DNA vaccination models is unknown. Methods In this study in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to evaluate the ability of B cells to protect mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Results In vitro and in vivo studies showed that B cells efficiently present antigens after naked plasmid pcDNA3 encoding M. leprae 65-kDa heat shock protein (pcDNA3-Hsp65) internalization and protect B knock-out (BKO) mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. pcDNA3-Hsp65-transfected B cells adoptively transferred into BKO mice rescued the memory phenotypes and reduced the number of CFU compared to wild-type mice. Conclusions These data not only suggest that B cells play an important role in the induction of CD8 T cells but also that they improve bacterial clearance in DNA vaccine model. PMID:21401938

  2. Explicit memory creation during sleep demonstrates a causal role of place cells in navigation.

    PubMed

    de Lavilléon, Gaetan; Lacroix, Marie Masako; Rondi-Reig, Laure; Benchenane, Karim

    2015-04-01

    Hippocampal place cells assemblies are believed to support the cognitive map, and their reactivations during sleep are thought to be involved in spatial memory consolidation. By triggering intracranial rewarding stimulations by place cell spikes during sleep, we induced an explicit memory trace, leading to a goal-directed behavior toward the place field. This demonstrates that place cells' activity during sleep still conveys relevant spatial information and that this activity is functionally significant for navigation. PMID:25751533

  3. Bystander chronic infection negatively impacts development of CD8+ T cell memory

    PubMed Central

    Stelekati, Erietta; Shin, Haina; Doering, Travis A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Ziegler, Carly G.; Beiting, Daniel P.; Dawson, Lucas; Liboon, Jennifer; Wolski, David; Ali, Mohammed-Alkhatim A.; Katsikis, Peter D.; Shen, Hao; Roos, David S.; Haining, W. Nicholas; Lauer, Georg M.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Summary Epidemiological evidence suggests that chronic infections impair immune responses to unrelated pathogens and vaccines. The underlying mechanisms, however, are unclear and distinguishing effects on priming versus development of immunological memory has been challenging. We investigated whether bystander chronic infections impact differentiation of memory CD8+ T cells, the hallmark of protective immunity against intracellular pathogens. Chronic bystander infections impaired development of memory CD8+ T cells in several mouse models and humans. These effects were independent of initial priming and were associated with chronic inflammatory signatures. Chronic inflammation negatively impacted the number of bystander CD8+ T cells and their memory development. Distinct underlying mechanisms of altered survival and differentiation were revealed with the latter regulated by the transcription factors T-bet and Blimp-1. Thus, exposure to prolonged bystander inflammation impairs the effector to memory transition. These data have relevance for immunity and vaccination during persisting infections and chronic inflammation. PMID:24837104

  4. Storage Characteristics of Lithium Ion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnakumar, B. V.; Smart, M. C.; Blosiu, J. O.; Surampudi, S.

    2000-01-01

    Lithium ion cells are being developed under the NASA/Air Force Consortium for the upcoming aerospace missions. First among these missions are the Mars 2001 Lander and Mars 2003 Lander and Rover missions. Apart from the usual needs of high specific energy, energy density and long cycle life, a critical performance characteristic for the Mars missions is low temperature performance. The batteries need to perform well at -20 C, with at least 70% of the rated capacity realizable at moderate discharge rates (C/5). Several modifications have been made to the lithium ion chemistry, mainly with respect to the electrolyte, both at JPL' and elsewhere to achieve this. Another key requirement for the battery is its storageability during pre-cruise and cruise periods. For the Mars programs, the cruise period is relatively short, about 12 months, compared to the Outer Planets missions (3-8 years). Yet, the initial results of our storage studies reveal that the cells do sustain noticeable permanent degradation under certain storage conditions, typically of 10% over two months duration at ambient temperatures, attributed to impedance buildup. The build up of the cell impedance or the decay in the cell capacity is affected by various storage parameters, i.e., storage temperature, storage duration, storage mode (open circuit, on buss or cycling at low rates) and state of charge. Our preliminary studies indicate that low storage temperatures and states of charge are preferable. In some cases, we have observed permanent capacity losses of approx. 10% over eight-week storage at 40 C, compared to approx. 0-2% at O C. Also, we are attempting to determine the impact of cell chemistry and design upon the storageability of Li ion cells.

  5. Hippocampus-based contextual memory alters the morphological characteristics of astrocytes in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Moonseok; Ahn, Sangzin; Yang, Eun-Jeong; Kim, Hyunju; Chong, Young Hae; Kim, Hye-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes have been reported to exist in two states, the resting and the reactive states. Morphological changes in the reactive state of astrocytes include an increase in thickness and number of processes, and an increase in the size of the cell body. Molecular changes also occur, such as an increase in the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). However, the morphological and molecular changes during the process of learning and memory have not been elucidated. In the current study, we subjected Fvb/n mice to contextual fear conditioning, and checked for morphological and molecular changes in astrocytes. 1 h after fear conditioning, type II and type III astrocytes exhibited a unique status with an increased number of processes and decreased GFAP expression which differed from the typical resting or reactive state. In addition, the protein level of excitatory excitatory amino acid transporter 2 (EAAT2) was increased 1 h to 24 h after contextual fear conditioning while EAAT1 did not show any alterations. Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein was found to be increased at 24 h after fear conditioning. These data suggest that hippocampus-based contextual memory process induces changes in the status of astrocytes towards a novel status different from typical resting or reactive states. These morphological and molecular changes may be in line with functional changes. PMID:27460927

  6. A Role for CD40 Expression on CD8+ T Cells in the Generation of CD8+ T Cell Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Christine; Rocha, Benedita; Tanchot, Corinne

    2002-09-01

    The delivery of CD4 help to CD8+ T cell responses requires interactions between CD40 and CD40 ligand and is thought to occur through antigen-presenting cell (APC) activation. Here we show that generation of memory CD8+ T cells displaying an enhanced capacity for cell division and cytokine secretion required CD4 help but not CD40 expression by the APCs. Activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressed CD40; and in the absence of this protein, CD8+ T cells were unable to differentiate into memory cells or receive CD4 help. These results suggest that, like B cells, CD8+ T cells receive CD4 help directly through CD40 and that this interaction is fundamental for CD8+ T cell memory generation.

  7. Analog memory and spike-timing-dependent plasticity characteristics of a nanoscale titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device.

    PubMed

    Seo, Kyungah; Kim, Insung; Jung, Seungjae; Jo, Minseok; Park, Sangsu; Park, Jubong; Shin, Jungho; Biju, Kuyyadi P; Kong, Jaemin; Lee, Kwanghee; Lee, Byounghun; Hwang, Hyunsang

    2011-06-24

    We demonstrated analog memory, synaptic plasticity, and a spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) function with a nanoscale titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device with a simple fabrication process and good yield uniformity. We confirmed the multilevel conductance and analog memory characteristics as well as the uniformity and separated states for the accuracy of conductance change. Finally, STDP and a biological triple model were analyzed to demonstrate the potential of titanium oxide bilayer resistive switching device as synapses in neuromorphic devices. By developing a simple resistive switching device that can emulate a synaptic function, the unique characteristics of synapses in the brain, e.g. combined memory and computing in one synapse and adaptation to the outside environment, were successfully demonstrated in a solid state device. PMID:21572200

  8. Visualizing Early Splenic Memory CD8+ T Cells Reactivation against Intracellular Bacteria in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bajénoff, Marc; Narni-Mancinelli, Emilie; Brau, Frédéric; Lauvau, Grégoire

    2010-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells represent an important effector arm of the immune response in maintaining long-lived protective immunity against viruses and some intracellular bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes (L.m). Memory CD8+ T cells are endowed with enhanced antimicrobial effector functions that perfectly tail them to rapidly eradicate invading pathogens. It is largely accepted that these functions are sufficient to explain how memory CD8+ T cells can mediate rapid protection. However, it is important to point out that such improved functional features would be useless if memory cells were unable to rapidly find the pathogen loaded/infected cells within the infected organ. Growing evidences suggest that the anatomy of secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) fosters the cellular interactions required to initiate naive adaptive immune responses. However, very little is known on how the SLOs structures regulate memory immune responses. Using Listeria monocytogenes (L.m) as a murine infection model and imaging techniques, we have investigated if and how the architecture of the spleen plays a role in the reactivation of memory CD8+ T cells and the subsequent control of L.m growth. We observed that in the mouse, memory CD8+ T cells start to control L.m burden 6 hours after the challenge infection. At this very early time point, L.m-specific and non-specific memory CD8+ T cells localize in the splenic red pulp and form clusters around L.m infected cells while naïve CD8+ T cells remain in the white pulp. Within these clusters that only last few hours, memory CD8+ T produce inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and CCL3 nearby infected myeloid cells known to be crucial for L.m killing. Altogether, we describe how memory CD8+ T cells trafficking properties and the splenic micro-anatomy conjugate to create a spatio-temporal window during which memory CD8+ T cells provide a local response by secreting effector molecules around infected cells. PMID:20634957

  9. Fluorescence characteristics of photoautotrophic soybean cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Rogers, S M; Goldstein, C; Widholm, J M; Govindjee

    1989-08-01

    We report here the first measurements on chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence characteristics of photoautotrophic soybean cells (cell lines SB-P and SBI-P). The cell fluorescence is free from severe distortion problems encountered in higher plant leaves. Chl a fluorescence spectra at 77 K show, after correction for the spectral sensitivity of the photomultiplier and the emission monochromator, peaks at 688, 696 and 745 nm, representing antenna systems of photosystem II-CP43 and CP47, and photosystem I, respectively. Calculations, based on the complementary area over the Chl a fluorescence induction curve, indicated a ratio of 6 of the mobile plastoquinone (including QB) to the primary stable electron acceptor, the bound plastoquinone QA. A ratio of one between the secondary stable electron acceptor, bound plastoquinone QB, and its reduced form QB (-) was obtained by using a double flash technique. Owing to this ratio, the flash number dependence of the Chl a fluorescence showed a distinct period of four, implying a close relationship to the 'S' state of the oxygen evolution mechanism. Analysis of the QA (-) reoxidation kinetics showed (1) the halftime of each of the major decay components (∼ 300 μs fast and ∼ 30 ms slow) increases with the increase of diuron and atrazine concentrations; and (2) the amplitudes of the fast and the slow components change in a complementary fashion, the fast component disappearing at high concentrations of the inhibitors. This implies that the inhibitors used are able to totally displace QB. In intact soybean cells, the relative amplitude of the 30 ms to 300 μs component is higher (40:60) than that in spinach chloroplasts (30:70), implying a larger contribution of the centers with unbound QB. SB-P and SBI-P soybean cells display a slightly different sensitivity of QA (-) decay to inhibitors. PMID:24424528

  10. Clinical Characteristics of Adults Reporting Repressed, Recovered, or Continuous Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNally, Richard J.; Perlman, Carol A.; Ristuccia, Carel S.; Clancy, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors assessed women and men who either reported continuous memories of their childhood sexual abuse (CSA, n = 92), reported recovering memories of CSA (n = 38), reported believing they harbored repressed memories of CSA (n = 42), or reported never having been sexually abused (n = 36). Men and women were indistinguishable on all clinical and…

  11. Characteristics and specificity of acquired immunologic memory to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.

    1988-05-15

    The results herein show that mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then exposed to a protracted course of isoniazid chemotherapy possess a heightened state of acquired resistance to subsequent challenge with the homologous organism. Our results provide the first evidence, moreover, that this resistance is mediated by a long-lived, cyclophosphamide- and irradiation-resistant L3T4+ Lyt-2- lymphocyte capable of giving rise to an accelerated re-emergence of resistance in the animal upon rechallenge. Evidence is also provided to show that triggering of this memory-immune T cell population in the re-challenged host was associated with the rapid emergence of non-specific resistance to secondary bacterial infection; however, the accelerated emergence of this population was only observed if the challenge inoculum consisted of the living organism. The relevance of this latter finding to strategies for vaccine development is discussed.

  12. Autophagy is essential for effector CD8 T cell survival and memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojin; Araki, Koichi; Li, Shuzhao; Han, Jin-Hwan; Ye, Lilin; Tan, Wendy G.; Konieczny, Bogumila T.; Bruinsma, Monique W.; Martinez, Jennifer; Pearce, Erika L; Green, Douglas R.; Jones, Dean P.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Ahmed, Rafi

    2014-01-01

    The importance of autophagy in memory CD8 T cell differentiation in vivo is not well defined. We show here that autophagy is dynamically regulated in virus-specific CD8 T cells during acute lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection. Autophagy decreased in activated proliferating T cells, and was then upregulated at the peak of the effector T cell response. Consistent with this model, deletion of the key autophagy genes Atg7 or Atg5 in virus-specific CD8 T cells had minimal effect on generating effector cells but greatly enhanced their death during the contraction phase resulting in compromised memory formation. These findings provide insight into when autophagy is needed during effector and memory T cell differentiation in vivo and also warrant a re-examination of our current concepts about the relationship between T cell activation and autophagy. PMID:25362489

  13. Memristive behavior in a junctionless flash memory cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orak, Ikram; Ürel, Mustafa; Bakan, Gokhan; Dana, Aykutlu

    2015-06-01

    We report charge storage based memristive operation of a junctionless thin film flash memory cell when it is operated as a two terminal device by grounding the gate. Unlike memristors based on nanoionics, the presented device mode, which we refer to as the flashristor mode, potentially allows greater control over the memristive properties, allowing rational design. The mode is demonstrated using a depletion type n-channel ZnO transistor grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), with HfO2 as the tunnel dielectric, Al2O3 as the control dielectric, and non-stoichiometric silicon nitride as the charge storage layer. The device exhibits the pinched hysteresis of a memristor and in the unoptimized device, Roff/Ron ratios of about 3 are presented with low operating voltages below 5 V. A simplified model predicts Roff/Ron ratios can be improved significantly by adjusting the native threshold voltage of the devices. The repeatability of the resistive switching is excellent and devices exhibit 106 s retention time, which can, in principle, be improved by engineering the gate stack and storage layer properties. The flashristor mode can find use in analog information processing applications, such as neuromorphic computing, where well-behaving and highly repeatable memristive properties are desirable.

  14. Memristive behavior in a junctionless flash memory cell

    SciTech Connect

    Orak, Ikram; Ürel, Mustafa; Dana, Aykutlu; Bakan, Gokhan

    2015-06-08

    We report charge storage based memristive operation of a junctionless thin film flash memory cell when it is operated as a two terminal device by grounding the gate. Unlike memristors based on nanoionics, the presented device mode, which we refer to as the flashristor mode, potentially allows greater control over the memristive properties, allowing rational design. The mode is demonstrated using a depletion type n-channel ZnO transistor grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD), with HfO{sub 2} as the tunnel dielectric, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the control dielectric, and non-stoichiometric silicon nitride as the charge storage layer. The device exhibits the pinched hysteresis of a memristor and in the unoptimized device, R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratios of about 3 are presented with low operating voltages below 5 V. A simplified model predicts R{sub off}/R{sub on} ratios can be improved significantly by adjusting the native threshold voltage of the devices. The repeatability of the resistive switching is excellent and devices exhibit 10{sup 6 }s retention time, which can, in principle, be improved by engineering the gate stack and storage layer properties. The flashristor mode can find use in analog information processing applications, such as neuromorphic computing, where well-behaving and highly repeatable memristive properties are desirable.

  15. Effects of IL-7 on memory CD8+ T cell homeostasis are influenced by the timing of therapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nanjappa, Som G.; Walent, Jane H.; Morre, Michel; Suresh, M.

    2008-01-01

    IL-7 is integral to the generation and maintenance of CD8+ T cell memory, and insufficient IL-7 is believed to limit survival and the persistence of memory CD8+ T cells. Here, we show that during the mouse T cell response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, IL-7 enhanced the number of memory CD8+ T cells when its administration was restricted to the contraction phase of the response. Likewise, IL-7 administration during the contraction phase of the mouse T cell response to vaccinia virus or a DNA vaccine potentiated antigen-specific CD8+ memory T cell proliferation and function. Qualitatively, CD8+ T cells from IL-7–treated mice exhibited superior recall responses and improved viral control. IL-7 treatment during the memory phase stimulated a marked increase in the number of memory CD8+ T cells, but the effects were transient. IL-7 therapy during contraction of the secondary CD8+ T cell response also expanded the pool of memory CD8+ T cells. Collectively, our studies show differential effects of IL-7 on memory CD8+ T cell homeostasis and underscore the importance of the timing of IL-7 therapy to effectively improve CD8+ T cell memory and protective immunity. These findings may have implications in the clinical use of IL-7 as an immunotherapeutic agent to bolster vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell memory. PMID:18246202

  16. Effects of drying temperature and ethanol concentration on bipolar switching characteristics of natural Aloe vera-based memory devices.

    PubMed

    Lim, Zhe Xi; Cheong, Kuan Yew

    2015-10-28

    Extracted, formulated, and processed natural Aloe vera has been used as an active layer for memory applications. The functional memory device is realized by a bottom-up structure of ITO/Aloe vera/Al in which the Aloe vera is spin-coated after mixing with different concentrations of ethanol (0-80 wt%) and subsequently dried at different temperatures (50-120 °C). From the current density-voltage measurements, the device can exhibit a reproducible bipolar switching characteristic with pure Aloe vera dried at 50 °C. It is proposed that charges are transported across the Aloe vera layer via space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC), and clusters of interstitial space formed by the functional groups of acemannans and de-esterified pectins in the dried Aloe vera contribute to the memory effect. The formation of charge traps in the Aloe vera layer is dependent on the drying temperature. The drying temperature of a memory-switching Aloe vera layer can be extended to 120 °C with the addition of appropriate amounts of ethanol. The concept of using natural Aloe vera as an active material for memory applications has been demonstrated, and the read memory window, ON/OFF ratio, and retention time are approximately 5.0 V, 10(3), and >10(4) s, respectively. PMID:26400096

  17. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8(+) memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, W H; Haridas, D; Wagener, M E; Song, M; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P; Ford, M L

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T-cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study the mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8(+) T-cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T-cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T-cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  18. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8+ memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, W. H.; Haridas, D.; Wagener, M. E.; Song, M.; Kirk, A. D.; Larsen, C. P.; Ford, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8+ T cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  19. Nonvolatile memory characteristics of organic thin film transistors using poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-based polymer multilayer dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ying-Chih; Su, Yan-Kuin; Yu, Hsin-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Yuan; Huang, Tsung-Syun

    2011-10-01

    A wide hysteresis width characteristic (memory window) was observed in the organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) using poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA)-based polymer multilayers. In this study, a strong memory effect was also found in the pentacene-based OTFTs and the electric characteristics were improved by introducing PHEMA/poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/PHEMA trilayer to replace the conventional PHEMA monolayer or PMMA/PHEMA and PHEMA/PMMA bilayer as the dielectric layers of OTFTs. The memory effect was originated from the electron trapping and slow polarization of the dielectrics. The hydroxyl (-OH) groups inside the polymer dielectric were the main charge storage sites of the electrons. This charge-storage phenomenon could lead to a wide flat-band voltage shift (memory window, △VFB = 22 V) which is essential for the OTFTs' memory-related applications. Moreover, the fabricated transistors also exhibited significant switchable channel current due to the charge-storage and slow charge relaxation.

  20. Overcoming Memory T cell Responses for Induction of Delayed Tolerance in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Y.; Boskovic, S.; Aoyama, A.; Murakami, T.; Putheti, P.; Smith, R. N.; Ochiai, T.; Nadazdin, O.; Koyama, I.; Boenisch, O.; Najafian, N.; Bhasin, M.K.; Colvin, R. B.; Madsen, J. C.; Strom, T. B.; Sachs, D. H.; Benichou, G.; Cosimi, A. B.; Kawai, T.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of alloreactive memory T cells is a major barrier for induction of tolerance in primates. In theory, delaying conditioning for tolerance induction until after organ transplantation could further decrease the efficacy of the regimen, since pre-existing alloreactive memory T cells might be stimulated by the transplanted organ. Here, we show that such “delayed tolerance” can be induced in nonhuman primates through the mixed chimerism approach, if specific modifications to overcome/avoid donor-specific memory T cell responses are provided. These modifications include adequate depletion of CD8+ memory T cells and timing of donor bone marrow administration to minimize levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Using this modified approach, mixed chimerism was induced successfully in 11 of 13 recipients of previously placed renal allografts and long-term survival without immunosuppression could be achieved in at least 6 of these 11 animals. PMID:22053723

  1. Splenectomy Associated Changes in IgM Memory B Cells in an Adult Spleen Registry Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Paul U.; Jones, Penelope; Gorniak, Malgorzata; Dunster, Kate; Paul, Eldho; Lewin, Sharon; Woolley, Ian; Spelman, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Asplenic patients have a lifelong risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and have been reported to have low numbers of peripheral blood IgM memory B cells. The clinical value of quantitation of memory B cells as an indicator of splenic abnormality or risk of infection has been unclear. To assess changes in B cell sub-populations after splenectomy we studied patients recruited to a spleen registry (n = 591). A subset of 209 adult asplenic or hyposplenic subjects, and normal controls (n = 140) were tested for IgM memory B cells. We also determined a) changes in IgM memory B cells with time after splenectomy using the cross-sectional data from patients on the registry and b) the kinetics of changes in haematological markers associated with splenectomy(n = 45). Total B cells in splenectomy patients did not differ from controls, but memory B cells, IgM memory B cells and switched B cells were significantly (p<0.001) reduced. The reduction was similar for different indications for splenectomy. Changes of asplenia in routine blood films including presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB), occurred early (median 25 days) and splenectomy associated thrombocytosis and lymphocytosis peaked by 50 days. There was a more gradual decrease in IgM memory B cells reaching a stable level within 6 months after splenectomy. IgM memory B cells as proportion of B cells was the best discriminator between splenectomized patients and normal controls and at the optimal cut-off of 4.53, showed a true positive rate of 95% and false positive rate of 20%. In a survey of 152 registry patients stratified by IgM memory B cells around this cut-off there was no association with minor infections and no registry patients experienced OPSI during the study. Despite significant changes after splenectomy, conventional measures of IgM memory cells have limited clinical utility in this population. PMID:21829713

  2. Anaplastic plasmacytomas: relationships to normal memory B cells and plasma cell neoplasms of immunodeficient and autoimmune mice.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chen-Feng; Shin, Dong-Mi; Li, Zhaoyang; Wang, Hongsheng; Feng, Jianxum; Hartley, Janet W; Fredrickson, Torgny N; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Morse, Herbert C

    2010-05-01

    Anaplastic plasmacytomas (APCTs) from NFS.V(+) congenic mice and pristane-induced plasmacytic PCTs from BALB/c mice were previously shown to be histologically and molecularly distinct subsets of plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs). Here we extended these comparisons, contrasting primary APCTs and PCTs by gene expression profiling in relation to the expression profiles of normal naïve, germinal centre, and memory B cells and plasma cells. We also sequenced immunoglobulin genes from APCT and APCT-derived cell lines and defined surface phenotypes and chromosomal features of the cell lines by flow cytometry and by spectral karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The results indicate that APCTs share many features with normal memory cells and the plasma cell-related neoplasms (PLs) of FASL-deficient mice, suggesting that APCTs and PLs are related and that both derive from memory B cells. Published in 2010 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:20217872

  3. Targeting HIV latency: resting memory T cells, hematopoietic progenitor cells, and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Nadia T.; Collins, Kathleen L.

    2014-01-01

    Current therapy for HIV effectively suppresses viral replication and prolongs life, but the infection persists due, at least in part, to latent infection of long-lived cells. One favored strategy towards a cure targets latent virus in resting memory CD4+ T cells by stimulating viral production. However, the existence of an additional reservoir in bone marrow hematopoietic progenitor cells has been detected in some treated HIV-infected people. This review describes approaches investigators have used to reactivate latent proviral genomes in resting CD4+ T cells and hematopoietic progenitor cells. In addition, we review approaches for clearance of these reservoirs along with other important topics related to HIV eradication. PMID:25189526

  4. Fast, memory-efficient cell location in unstructured grids for visualization.

    PubMed

    Garth, Christoph; Joy, Kenneth I

    2010-01-01

    Applying certain visualization techniques to datasets described on unstructured grids requires the interpolation of variables of interest at arbitrary locations within the dataset's domain of definition. Typical solutions to the problem of finding the grid element enclosing a given interpolation point make use of a variety of spatial subdivision schemes. However, existing solutions are memory- intensive, do not scale well to large grids, or do not work reliably on grids describing complex geometries. In this paper, we propose a data structure and associated construction algorithm for fast cell location in unstructured grids, and apply it to the interpolation problem. Based on the concept of bounding interval hierarchies, the proposed approach is memory-efficient, fast and numerically robust. We examine the performance characteristics of the proposed approach and compare it to existing approaches using a number of benchmark problems related to vector field visualization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our approach can successfully accommodate large datasets, and discuss application to visualization on both CPUs and GPUs. PMID:20975196

  5. T-cell memory: lessons from Epstein-Barr virus infection in man.

    PubMed Central

    Rickinson, A B; Callan, M F; Annels, N E

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus offers an ideal opportunity to follow the human T-cell response to a virus infection over time from its acute primary phase, as seen in infectious mononucleosis patients, into the memory phase that accompanies life-long virus persistence. Here we review recent evidence on the development and maturation of cytotoxic T-cell memory using this viral system. PMID:10794060

  6. Characterization and Functional Properties of Gastric Tissue-Resident Memory T Cells from Children, Adults, and the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Jayaum S.; Toapanta, Franklin R.; Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Patil, Seema; Kader, Howard A.; Safta, Anca M.; Czinn, Steven J.; Greenwald, Bruce D.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2014-01-01

    T cells are the main orchestrators of protective immunity in the stomach; however, limited information on the presence and function of the gastric T subsets is available mainly due to the difficulty in recovering high numbers of viable cells from human gastric biopsies. To overcome this shortcoming we optimized a cell isolation method that yielded high numbers of viable lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) from gastric biopsies. Classic memory T subsets were identified in gastric LPMC and compared to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from children, adults, and the elderly using an optimized 14 color flow cytometry panel. A dominant effector memory T (TEM) phenotype was observed in gastric LPMC CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in all age groups. We then evaluated whether these cells represented a population of gastric tissue-resident memory T (TRM) cells by assessing expression of CD103 and CD69. The vast majority of gastric LPMC CD8+ T cells either co-expressed CD103/CD69 (>70%) or expressed CD103 alone (~20%). Gastric LPMC CD4+ T cells also either co-expressed CD103/CD69 (>35%) or expressed at least one of these markers. Thus, gastric LPMC CD8+ and CD4+ T cells had the characteristics of TRM cells. Gastric CD8+ and CD4+ TRM cells produced multiple cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, TNF-α, IL-17A, MIP-1β) and up-regulated CD107a upon stimulation. However, marked differences were observed in their cytokine and multi-cytokine profiles when compared to their PBMC TEM counterparts. Furthermore, gastric CD8+ TRM and CD4+ TRM cells demonstrated differences in the frequency, susceptibility to activation, and cytokine/multi-cytokine production profiles among the age groups. Most notably, children’s gastric TRM cells responded differently to stimuli than gastric TRM cells from adults or the elderly. In conclusion, we demonstrate the presence of gastric TRM, which exhibit diverse functional characteristics in children, adults, and the elderly. PMID:24995010

  7. PLZF+ Innate T Cells Support the TGF-β-Dependent Generation of Activated/Memory-Like Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung Hyun; Park, Hyo Jin; Park, Hi Jung; Lee, Jae-II; Park, Seong Hoe; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2016-01-01

    PLZF-expressing invariant natural killer T cells and CD4 T cells are unique subsets of innate T cells. Both are selected via thymocyte-thymocyte interaction, and they contribute to the generation of activated/memory-like CD4 and CD8 T cells in the thymus via the production of IL-4. Here, we investigated whether PLZF+ innate T cells also affect the development and function of Foxp3+ regulatory CD4 T cells. Flow cytometry analysis of the thymus and spleen from both CIITA transgenic C57BL/6 and wild-type BALB/c mice, which have abundant PLZF+ CD4 T cells and invariant natural killer T cells, respectively, revealed that Foxp3+ T cells in these mice exhibited a CD103+ activated/memory-like phenotype. The frequency of CD103+ regulatory T cells was considerably decreased in PLZF+ cell-deficient CIITATgPlzflu/lu and BALB/c.CD1d−/− mice as well as in an IL-4-deficient background, such as in CIITATgIL-4−/− and BALB/c.lL-4−/− mice, indicating that the acquisition of an activated/memory-like phenotype was dependent on PLZF+ innate T cells and IL-4. Using fetal thymic organ culture, we further demonstrated that IL-4 in concert with TGF-β enhanced the acquisition of the activated/memory-like phenotype of regulatory T cells. In functional aspects, the activated/memory-like phenotype of Treg cells was directly related to their suppressive function; regulatory T cells of CIITATgPIV−/− mice more efficiently suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation compared with their counterparts from wild-type mice. All of these findings suggest that PLZF+ innate T cells also augmented the generation of activated/memory-like regulation via IL-4 production. PMID:27101876

  8. PLZF(+) Innate T Cells Support the TGF-β-Dependent Generation of Activated/Memory-Like Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Byung Hyun; Park, Hyo Jin; Park, Hi Jung; Lee, Jae-Ii; Park, Seong Hoe; Jung, Kyeong Cheon

    2016-06-30

    PLZF-expressing invariant natural killer T cells and CD4 T cells are unique subsets of innate T cells. Both are selected via thymocyte-thymocyte interaction, and they contribute to the generation of activated/memory-like CD4 and CD8 T cells in the thymus via the production of IL-4. Here, we investigated whether PLZF(+) innate T cells also affect the development and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory CD4 T cells. Flow cytometry analysis of the thymus and spleen from both CIITA transgenic C57BL/6 and wild-type BALB/c mice, which have abundant PLZF(+) CD4 T cells and invariant natural killer T cells, respectively, revealed that Foxp3(+) T cells in these mice exhibited a CD103(+) activated/memory-like phenotype. The frequency of CD103(+) regulatory T cells was considerably decreased in PLZF(+) cell-deficient CIITA(Tg)Plzf(lu/lu) and BALB/c.CD1d(-/-) mice as well as in an IL-4-deficient background, such as in CIITA(Tg)IL-4(-/-) and BALB/c.lL-4(-/-) mice, indicating that the acquisition of an activated/memory-like phenotype was dependent on PLZF(+) innate T cells and IL-4. Using fetal thymic organ culture, we further demonstrated that IL-4 in concert with TGF-β enhanced the acquisition of the activated/memory-like phenotype of regulatory T cells. In functional aspects, the activated/memory-like phenotype of Treg cells was directly related to their suppressive function; regulatory T cells of CIITA(Tg)PIV(-/-) mice more efficiently suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation compared with their counterparts from wild-type mice. All of these findings suggest that PLZF(+) innate T cells also augmented the generation of activated/memory-like regulation via IL-4 production. PMID:27101876

  9. Functional classification of memory CD8(+) T cells by CX3CR1 expression.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Jan P; Beyer, Marc; Meissner, Felix; Abdullah, Zeinab; Sander, Jil; Höchst, Bastian; Eickhoff, Sarah; Rieckmann, Jan C; Russo, Caroline; Bauer, Tanja; Flecken, Tobias; Giesen, Dominik; Engel, Daniel; Jung, Steffen; Busch, Dirk H; Protzer, Ulrike; Thimme, Robert; Mann, Matthias; Kurts, Christian; Schultze, Joachim L; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Knolle, Percy A

    2015-01-01

    Localization of memory CD8(+) T cells to lymphoid or peripheral tissues is believed to correlate with proliferative capacity or effector function. Here we demonstrate that the fractalkine-receptor/CX3CR1 distinguishes memory CD8(+) T cells with cytotoxic effector function from those with proliferative capacity, independent of tissue-homing properties. CX3CR1-based transcriptome and proteome-profiling defines a core signature of memory CD8(+) T cells with effector function. We find CD62L(hi)CX3CR1(+) memory T cells that reside within lymph nodes. This population shows distinct migration patterns and positioning in proximity to pathogen entry sites. Virus-specific CX3CR1(+) memory CD8(+) T cells are scarce during chronic infection in humans and mice but increase when infection is controlled spontaneously or by therapeutic intervention. This CX3CR1-based functional classification will help to resolve the principles of protective CD8(+) T-cell memory. PMID:26404698

  10. Functional classification of memory CD8+ T cells by CX3CR1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Jan P.; Beyer, Marc; Meissner, Felix; Abdullah, Zeinab; Sander, Jil; Höchst, Bastian; Eickhoff, Sarah; Rieckmann, Jan C.; Russo, Caroline; Bauer, Tanja; Flecken, Tobias; Giesen, Dominik; Engel, Daniel; Jung, Steffen; Busch, Dirk H.; Protzer, Ulrike; Thimme, Robert; Mann, Matthias; Kurts, Christian; Schultze, Joachim L.; Kastenmüller, Wolfgang; Knolle, Percy A.

    2015-01-01

    Localization of memory CD8+ T cells to lymphoid or peripheral tissues is believed to correlate with proliferative capacity or effector function. Here we demonstrate that the fractalkine-receptor/CX3CR1 distinguishes memory CD8+ T cells with cytotoxic effector function from those with proliferative capacity, independent of tissue-homing properties. CX3CR1-based transcriptome and proteome-profiling defines a core signature of memory CD8+ T cells with effector function. We find CD62LhiCX3CR1+ memory T cells that reside within lymph nodes. This population shows distinct migration patterns and positioning in proximity to pathogen entry sites. Virus-specific CX3CR1+ memory CD8+ T cells are scarce during chronic infection in humans and mice but increase when infection is controlled spontaneously or by therapeutic intervention. This CX3CR1-based functional classification will help to resolve the principles of protective CD8+ T-cell memory. PMID:26404698

  11. Shortened Intervals during Heterologous Boosting Preserve Memory CD8 T Cell Function but Compromise Longevity.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Emily A; Beura, Lalit K; Nelson, Christine E; Anderson, Kristin G; Vezys, Vaiva

    2016-04-01

    Developing vaccine strategies to generate high numbers of Ag-specific CD8 T cells may be necessary for protection against recalcitrant pathogens. Heterologous prime-boost-boost immunization has been shown to result in large quantities of functional memory CD8 T cells with protective capacities and long-term stability. Completing the serial immunization steps for heterologous prime-boost-boost can be lengthy, leaving the host vulnerable for an extensive period of time during the vaccination process. We show in this study that shortening the intervals between boosting events to 2 wk results in high numbers of functional and protective Ag-specific CD8 T cells. This protection is comparable to that achieved with long-term boosting intervals. Short-boosted Ag-specific CD8 T cells display a canonical memory T cell signature associated with long-lived memory and have identical proliferative potential to long-boosted T cells Both populations robustly respond to antigenic re-exposure. Despite this, short-boosted Ag-specific CD8 T cells continue to contract gradually over time, which correlates to metabolic differences between short- and long-boosted CD8 T cells at early memory time points. Our studies indicate that shortening the interval between boosts can yield abundant, functional Ag-specific CD8 T cells that are poised for immediate protection; however, this is at the expense of forming stable long-term memory. PMID:26903479

  12. Target morphology and cell memory: a model of regenerative pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Bessonov, Nikolai; Levin, Michael; Morozova, Nadya; Reinberg, Natalia; Tosenberger, Alen; Volpert, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing body of work on molecular components required for regenerative repair, we still lack a deep understanding of the ability of some animal species to regenerate their appropriate complex anatomical structure following damage. A key question is how regenerating systems know when to stop growth and remodeling – what mechanisms implement recognition of correct morphology that signals a stop condition? In this work, we review two conceptual models of pattern regeneration that implement a kind of pattern memory. In the first one, all cells communicate with each other and keep the value of the total signal received from the other cells. If a part of the pattern is amputated, the signal distribution changes. The difference fromthe original signal distribution stimulates cell proliferation and leads to pattern regeneration, in effect implementing an error minimization process that uses signaling memory to achieve pattern correction. In the second model, we consider a more complex pattern organization with different cell types. Each tissue contains a central (coordinator) cell that controls the tissue and communicates with the other central cells. Each of them keeps memory about the signals received from other central cells. The values of these signals depend on the mutual cell location, and the memory allows regeneration of the structure when it is modified. The purpose of these models is to suggest possible mechanisms of pattern regeneration operating on the basis of cell memory which are compatible with diverse molecular implementation mechanisms within specific organisms. PMID:26889161

  13. Target morphology and cell memory: a model of regenerative pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Bessonov, Nikolai; Levin, Michael; Morozova, Nadya; Reinberg, Natalia; Tosenberger, Alen; Volpert, Vitaly

    2015-12-01

    Despite the growing body of work on molecular components required for regenerative repair, we still lack a deep understanding of the ability of some animal species to regenerate their appropriate complex anatomical structure following damage. A key question is how regenerating systems know when to stop growth and remodeling - what mechanisms implement recognition of correct morphology that signals a stop condition? In this work, we review two conceptual models of pattern regeneration that implement a kind of pattern memory. In the first one, all cells communicate with each other and keep the value of the total signal received from the other cells. If a part of the pattern is amputated, the signal distribution changes. The difference fromthe original signal distribution stimulates cell proliferation and leads to pattern regeneration, in effect implementing an error minimization process that uses signaling memory to achieve pattern correction. In the second model, we consider a more complex pattern organization with different cell types. Each tissue contains a central (coordinator) cell that controls the tissue and communicates with the other central cells. Each of them keeps memory about the signals received from other central cells. The values of these signals depend on the mutual cell location, and the memory allows regeneration of the structure when it is modified. The purpose of these models is to suggest possible mechanisms of pattern regeneration operating on the basis of cell memory which are compatible with diverse molecular implementation mechanisms within specific organisms. PMID:26889161

  14. Effect of electrode material on characteristics of non-volatile resistive memory consisting of Ag2S nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Jaewon

    2016-07-01

    In this study, Ag2S nanoparticles are synthesized and used as the active material for two-terminal resistance switching memory devices. Sintered Ag2S films are successfully crystallized on plastic substrates with synthesized Ag2S nanoparticles, after a relatively low-temperature sintering process (200 °C). After the sintering process, the crystallite size is increased from 6.8 nm to 80.3 nm. The high ratio of surface atoms to inner atoms of nanoparticles reduces the melting point temperature, deciding the sintering process temperature. In order to investigate the resistance switching characteristics, metal/Ag2S/metal structures are fabricated and tested. The effect of the electrode material on the non-volatile resistive memory characteristics is studied. The bottom electrochemically inert materials, such as Au and Pt, were critical for maintaining stable memory characteristics. By using Au and Pt inert bottom electrodes, we are able to significantly improve the memory endurance and retention to more than 103 cycles and 104 sec, respectively.

  15. Limited clonal relatedness between gut IgA plasma cells and memory B cells after oral immunization.

    PubMed

    Bemark, Mats; Hazanov, Helena; Strömberg, Anneli; Komban, Rathan; Holmqvist, Joel; Köster, Sofia; Mattsson, Johan; Sikora, Per; Mehr, Ramit; Lycke, Nils Y

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how memory B cells are induced and relate to long-lived plasma cells is important for vaccine development. Immunity to oral vaccines has been considered short-lived because of a poor ability to develop IgA B-cell memory. Here we demonstrate that long-lived mucosal IgA memory is readily achieved by oral but not systemic immunization in mouse models with NP hapten conjugated with cholera toxin and transfer of B1-8(high)/GFP(+) NP-specific B cells. Unexpectedly, memory B cells are poorly related to long-lived plasma cells and less affinity-matured. They are α4β7-integrin(+)CD73(+)PD-L2(+)CD80(+) and at systemic sites mostly IgM(+), while 80% are IgA(+) in Peyer's patches. On reactivation, most memory B cells in Peyer's patches are GL7(-), but expand in germinal centres and acquire higher affinity and more mutations, demonstrating strong clonal selection. CCR9 expression is found only in Peyer's patches and appears critical for gut homing. Thus, gut mucosal memory possesses unique features not seen after systemic immunization. PMID:27596266

  16. Altered representation of naive and memory CD8 T cell subsets in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed Central

    Rabin, R L; Roederer, M; Maldonado, Y; Petru, A; Herzenberg, L A; Herzenberg, L A

    1995-01-01

    CD8 T cells are divided into naive and memory subsets according to both function and phenotype. In HIV-negative children, the naive subset is present at high frequencies, whereas memory cells are virtually absent. Previous studies have shown that the overall number of CD8 T cells does not decrease in HIV-infected children. In studies here, we use multiparameter flow cytometry to distinguish naive from memory CD8 T cells based on expression of CD11a, CD45RA, and CD62L. With this methodology, we show that within the CD8 T cell population, the naive subset decreases markedly (HIV+ vs. HIV-, 190 vs. 370 cells/microliter; P < or = 0.003), and that there is a reciprocal increase in memory cells, such that the total CD8 T cell counts remained unchanged (800 vs. 860 cells/microliter; P < or = 0.76). In addition, we show that for HIV-infected children, the naive CD8 T cell and total CD4 T cell counts correlate (chi 2 P < or = 0.001). This correlated loss suggests that the loss of naive CD8 T cells in HIV infection may contribute to the defects in cell-mediated immunity which become progressively worse as the HIV disease progresses and CD4 counts decrease. Images PMID:7738172

  17. Appearance of peripheral blood plasma cells and memory B cells in a primary and secondary immune response in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pulickal, Anoop S.; Jol-van der Zijde, Cornelia M.; Snape, Matthew D.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    In humans, the kinetics of the appearance of memory B cells and plasma cells during primary immunization are not well defined. In this study, we assessed the primary B-cell response of rabies-antigen naive volunteers during a 3-dose course of rabies vaccine compared with the B-cell response to a booster dose of rabies vaccine given to previously immunized volunteers. After a single dose of vaccine, in the naive group plasma and memory B cells appeared later (peak at day 10) than in the primed group (peak at day 7) and were at lower frequency. The most rapid responses (day 4) were detected after a third immunization in the naive group. This is the first study to document the detailed kinetics of the plasma cell and memory B-cell responses to immunization in adult humans and to demonstrate differences in the responses that relate to the preexisting immune status of the persons. PMID:19843885

  18. Remembering One's ID/E-ntity : E/ID Protein Regulation of T Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Omilusik, Kyla D.; Shaw, Laura A.; Goldrath, Ananda W.

    2013-01-01

    Upon infection, CD8+ T cells proliferate and differentiate into armed effector cells capable of eliminating the assaulting pathogen. Although the majority of the antigen-specific T cells will die as the immune response wanes, a few will survive indefinitely to establish the memory population and provide long-lived protection against reinfection. E protein transcription factors and their inhibitors, ID proteins, operate to balance expression of genes that control CD8+ T cell differentiation through this process. Here, we discuss the role of ID2 and ID3 in promoting the generation and survival of effector and memory populations, particularly highlighting their reciprocal roles in shaping the CD8+ T cell response unique to the inflammatory milieu. We further examine this coordinated control of gene expression in the context of additional transcription factors within the transcriptional network that programs CD8+ effector and memory T cell differentiation. PMID:24094885

  19. Clinical characteristics of adults reporting repressed, recovered, or continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    McNally, Richard J; Perlman, Carol A; Ristuccia, Carel S; Clancy, Susan A

    2006-04-01

    The authors assessed women and men who either reported continuous memories of their childhood sexual abuse (CSA, n = 92), reported recovering memories of CSA (n = 38), reported believing they harbored repressed memories of CSA (n = 42), or reported never having been sexually abused (n = 36). Men and women were indistinguishable on all clinical and psychometric measures. The 3 groups that reported abuse scored similarly on measures of anxiety, depression, dissociation, and absorption. These groups also scored higher than the control group. Inconsistent with betrayal trauma theory, recovered memory participants were not more likely to report abuse by a parent or stepparent than were continuous memory participants. Rates of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder did not differ between the continuous and recovered memory groups. PMID:16649868

  20. Two CMOS memory cells suitable for the design of SEU-tolerant VLSI circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Velazco, R.; Bessot, D. ); Duzellier, S. ); Ecoffet, R. ); Koga, R. )

    1994-12-01

    Two new CMOS memory cells, called HIT cells, designed to be SEU-immune are presented. Compared to previously reported design hardened solutions, the HIT cells feature better electrical performances and consume less silicon area. SEU tests performed on a prototype chip prove the efficiency of the approach.

  1. T memory stem cells and HIV: a long-term relationship

    PubMed Central

    Chahroudi, Ann; Silvestri, Guido; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    In analogy to many tissues in which mature, terminally-differentiated cells are continuously replenished by the progeny of less differentiated, long-lasting stem cells, it has been suspected that memory T lymphocytes might contain small numbers of stem cell-like cells. However only recently have such cells been physically identified and isolated from humans, mice and nonhuman primates. These cells, termed “T memory stem cells” (TSCM) represent approximately 2-4% of all circulating T lymphocytes, seem to be extremely durable and can rapidly differentiate into more mature central-memory, effector-memory, and effector T cells, while maintaining their own pool size through homeostatic self-renewal. Although it is becoming increasingly evident that that these cells have critical roles for T cell homeostasis and maintaining life-long cellular immunity against microbial pathogens during physiological conditions, they also seem intrinsically involved in many key aspects of HIV/SIV disease pathogenesis. Current data suggest that CD4+ TSCM cells represent a core element of the HIV-1 reservoir in patients treated with suppressive antiretroviral therapy ART, and that relative resistance of CD4+ TSCM cells to SIV represents a distinguishing feature of nonpathogenic SIV infection in natural hosts. This article summarizes recent studies investigating the role of TSCM cells in HIV/SIV infection. PMID:25578055

  2. A zero density change phase change memory material: GeTe-O structural characteristics upon crystallisation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xilin; Dong, Weiling; Zhang, Hao; Simpson, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen-doped germanium telluride phase change materials are proposed for high temperature applications. Up to 8 at.% oxygen is readily incorporated into GeTe, causing an increased crystallisation temperature and activation energy. The rhombohedral structure of the GeTe crystal is preserved in the oxygen doped films. For higher oxygen concentrations the material is found to phase separate into GeO2 and TeO2, which inhibits the technologically useful abrupt change in properties. Increasing the oxygen content in GeTe-O reduces the difference in film thickness and mass density between the amorphous and crystalline states. For oxygen concentrations between 5 and 6 at.%, the amorphous material and the crystalline material have the same density. Above 6 at.% O doping, crystallisation exhibits an anomalous density change, where the volume of the crystalline state is larger than that of the amorphous. The high thermal stability and zero-density change characteristic of Oxygen-incorporated GeTe, is recommended for efficient and low stress phase change memory devices that may operate at elevated temperatures. PMID:26068587

  3. Pathogen induced inflammatory environment controls effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation1

    PubMed Central

    Obar, Joshua J.; Jellison, Evan R.; Sheridan, Brian S.; Blair, David A.; Pham, Quynh-Mai; Zickovich, Julianne M.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2011-01-01

    In response to infection CD8+ T cells integrate multiple signals and undergo an exponential increase in cell numbers. Simultaneously, a dynamic differentiation process occurs, resulting in the formation of short-lived (SLEC; CD127lowKLRG1high) and memory-precursor (MPEC; CD127highKLRG1low) effector cells from an early-effector cell (EEC) that is CD127lowKLRG1low in phenotype. CD8+ T cell differentiation during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection differed significantly than during Listeria monocytogenes infection with a substantial reduction in EEC differentiation into SLECs. SLEC generationwas dependent on Ebi3 expression. Furthermore, SLEC differentiation during VSV infection wasenhanced by administration ofCpG-DNA, through an IL-12 dependent mechanism. Moreover, CpG-DNAtreatment enhanced effector CD8+ T cell functionality and memory subset distribution, but in an IL-12 independent manner. Population dynamics were dramatically different during secondary CD8+ T cell responses, with a much greater accumulation of SLECs and the appearance of a significant number of CD127highKLRG1highmemory cells, both of which were intrinsic to the memory CD8+ T cell. These subsets persisted for several months, but were less effective in recall than MPECs. Thus, our data shed light on how varying the context of T cell priming alters downstream effector and memory CD8+ T cell differentiation. PMID:21987662

  4. A New Differential Logic-Compatible Multiple-Time Programmable Memory Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi-Hung Tsai,; Hsiao-Lan Yang,; Wun-Jie Lin,; Chrong Jung Lin,; Ya-Chin King,

    2010-04-01

    This work presents a novel differential n-channel logic-compatible multiple-time programmable (MTP) memory cell. This cell features double sensing window by a differential pair of floating gates, and therefore increases the retention lifetime of the nonvolatile memory effectively. Also, a self-selective programming (SSP) method is innovated in writing one pair differential data by a single cell without increasing any design or process complexity in peripheral circuit. The differential cell is a promising MTP solution to challenge thin floating gate oxide below 70 Å for 90 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) node and beyond.

  5. Time cells in the hippocampus: a new dimension for mapping memories

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, Howard

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the existence of hippocampal neurons that fire at successive moments in temporally structured experiences. Several studies have shown that such temporal coding is not attributable to external events, specific behaviours or spatial dimensions of an experience. Instead, these cells represent the flow of time in specific memories and have therefore been dubbed ‘time cells’. The firing properties of time cells parallel those of hippocampal place cells; time cells thus provide an additional dimension that is integrated with spatial mapping. The robust representation of both time and space in the hippocampus suggests a fundamental mechanism for organizing the elements of experience into coherent memories. PMID:25269553

  6. Superantigen-induced CD4 Memory T Cell Anergy. I. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B Induces Fyn-mediated Negative Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Andrew R. O.; Janik, David K.; Lee, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Memory CD4 T cells must provide robust protection for an organism while still maintaining self-tolerance. Superantigens reveal a memory cell-specific regulatory pathway, by which signaling through the TCR can lead to clonal tolerance (anergy). Here we show that the src kinase Fyn is a critical regulator of anergy in murine memory CD4 T cells induced by the bacterial superantigen staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Exposure to SEB results in impaired TCR signaling due to failed CD3/ZAP-70 complex formation. Further, signal transduction through the TCR remains similarly blocked when anergic memory cells are subsequently exposed to agonist peptide antigen. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic elimination of Fyn kinase reverses memory cell anergy, resulting in SEB-induced cell proliferation. The mechanism underlying impaired TCR signaling and subsequent memory cell anergy must involve a Fyn signaling pathway given that the suppression of Fyn activity restores CD3/ZAP-70 complex formation and TCR proximal signaling. PMID:22386537

  7. Memory T cell–driven differentiation of naive cells impairs adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Scott, Christopher D.; Leonardi, Anthony J.; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Ouyang, Claudia; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Ji, Yun; Eil, Robert L.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Crompton, Joseph G.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Borman, Zachary A.; Clever, David; Thomas, Stacy K.; Patel, Shashankkumar; Yu, Zhiya; Muranski, Pawel; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gros, Alena; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Siegel, Richard M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of purified naive, stem cell memory, and central memory T cell subsets results in superior persistence and antitumor immunity compared with ACT of populations containing more-differentiated effector memory and effector T cells. Despite a clear advantage of the less-differentiated populations, the majority of ACT trials utilize unfractionated T cell subsets. Here, we have challenged the notion that the mere presence of less-differentiated T cells in starting populations used to generate therapeutic T cells is sufficient to convey their desirable attributes. Using both mouse and human cells, we identified a T cell–T cell interaction whereby antigen-experienced subsets directly promote the phenotypic, functional, and metabolic differentiation of naive T cells. This process led to the loss of less-differentiated T cell subsets and resulted in impaired cellular persistence and tumor regression in mouse models following ACT. The T memory–induced conversion of naive T cells was mediated by a nonapoptotic Fas signal, resulting in Akt-driven cellular differentiation. Thus, induction of Fas signaling enhanced T cell differentiation and impaired antitumor immunity, while Fas signaling blockade preserved the antitumor efficacy of naive cells within mixed populations. These findings reveal that T cell subsets can synchronize their differentiation state in a process similar to quorum sensing in unicellular organisms and suggest that disruption of this quorum-like behavior among T cells has potential to enhance T cell–based immunotherapies. PMID:26657860

  8. Altered Memory Circulating T Follicular Helper-B Cell Interaction in Early Acute HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Muir, Roshell; Metcalf, Talibah; Tardif, Virginie; Takata, Hiroshi; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Kroon, Eugene; Colby, Donn J.; Trichavaroj, Rapee; Valcour, Victor; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Trautmann, Lydie; Haddad, Elias K.

    2016-01-01

    The RV254 cohort of HIV-infected very early acute (4thG stage 1 and 2) (stage 1/2) and late acute (4thG stage 3) (stage 3) individuals was used to study T helper- B cell responses in acute HIV infection and the impact of early antiretroviral treatment (ART) on T and B cell function. To investigate this, the function of circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh) from this cohort was examined, and cTfh and memory B cell populations were phenotyped. Impaired cTfh cell function was observed in individuals treated in stage 3 when compared to stage 1/2. The cTfh/B cell cocultures showed lower B cell survival and IgG secretion at stage 3 compared to stage 1/2. This coincided with lower IL-10 and increased RANTES and TNF-α suggesting a role for inflammation in altering cTfh and B cell responses. Elevated plasma viral load in stage 3 was found to correlate with decreased cTfh-mediated B cell IgG production indicating a role for increased viremia in cTfh impairment and dysfunctional humoral response. Phenotypic perturbations were also evident in the mature B cell compartment, most notably a decrease in resting memory B cells in stage 3 compared to stage 1/2, coinciding with higher viremia. Our coculture assay also suggested that intrinsic memory B cell defects could contribute to the impaired response despite at a lower level. Overall, cTfh-mediated B cell responses are significantly altered in stage 3 compared to stage 1/2, coinciding with increased inflammation and a reduction in memory B cells. These data suggest that early ART for acutely HIV infected individuals could prevent immune dysregulation while preserving cTfh function and B cell memory. PMID:27463374

  9. Electrical performance of phase change memory cells with Ge3Sb2Te6 deposited by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boschker, Jos E.; Boniardi, Mattia; Redaelli, Andrea; Riechert, Henning; Calarco, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report on the electrical characterization of phase change memory cells containing a Ge3Sb2Te6 (GST) alloy grown in its crystalline form by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE). It is found that the high temperature growth on the amorphous substrate results in a polycrystalline film exhibiting a rough surface with a grain size of approximately 80-150 nm. A detailed electrical characterization has been performed, including I-V characteristic curves, programming curves, set operation performance, crystallization activation at low temperature, and resistance drift, in order to determine the material related parameters. The results indicate very good alignment of the electrical parameters with the current state-of-the-art GST, deposited by physical vapor deposition. Such alignment enables a possible employment of the MBE deposition technique for chalcogenide materials in the phase change memory technology, thus leading to future studies of as-deposited crystalline chalcogenides as integrated in electrical vehicles.

  10. Brain-resident memory T cells represent an autonomous cytotoxic barrier to viral infection.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Karin; Vincenti, Ilena; Kreutzfeldt, Mario; Page, Nicolas; Muschaweckh, Andreas; Wagner, Ingrid; Drexler, Ingo; Pinschewer, Daniel; Korn, Thomas; Merkler, Doron

    2016-07-25

    Tissue-resident memory T cells (TRM) persist at sites of prior infection and have been shown to enhance pathogen clearance by recruiting circulating immune cells and providing bystander activation. Here, we characterize the functioning of brain-resident memory T cells (bTRM) in an animal model of viral infection. bTRM were subject to spontaneous homeostatic proliferation and were largely refractory to systemic immune cell depletion. After viral reinfection in mice, bTRM rapidly acquired cytotoxic effector function and prevented fatal brain infection, even in the absence of circulating CD8(+) memory T cells. Presentation of cognate antigen on MHC-I was essential for bTRM-mediated protective immunity, which involved perforin- and IFN-γ-dependent effector mechanisms. These findings identify bTRM as an organ-autonomous defense system serving as a paradigm for TRM functioning as a self-sufficient first line of adaptive immunity. PMID:27377586