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Sample records for memory polymer therapeutic

  1. Shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2015-06-09

    New shape memory polymer compositions, methods for synthesizing new shape memory polymers, and apparatus comprising an actuator and a shape memory polymer wherein the shape memory polymer comprises at least a portion of the actuator. A shape memory polymer comprising a polymer composition which physically forms a network structure wherein the polymer composition has shape-memory behavior and can be formed into a permanent primary shape, re-formed into a stable secondary shape, and controllably actuated to recover the permanent primary shape. Polymers have optimal aliphatic network structures due to minimization of dangling chains by using monomers that are symmetrical and that have matching amine and hydroxyl groups providing polymers and polymer foams with clarity, tight (narrow temperature range) single transitions, and high shape recovery and recovery force that are especially useful for implanting in the human body.

  2. Shape memory polymer medical device

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan (Pleasant Hill, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Bearinger, Jane P. (Livermore, CA); Wilson, Thomas S. (San Leandro, CA); Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Jensen, Wayne A. (Livermore, CA); Ortega, Jason M. (Pacifica, CA); Marion, III, John E. (Livermore, CA); Loge, Jeffrey M. (Stockton, CA)

    2010-06-29

    A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport vehicle and a shape memory polymer material through the conduit, transmitting energy to the shape memory polymer material for moving the shape memory polymer material from a first shape to a second and different shape, and withdrawing the transport vehicle and the shape memory polymer material through the conduit carrying the matter.

  3. Nitinol-reinforced shape-memory polymers

    E-print Network

    Di Leo, Claudio V

    2010-01-01

    Reinforced shape-memory polymers have been developed from an acrylate based thermoset shape-memory polymer and nitinol wires. A rectangular shape-memory polymer measuring approximately 1 by 2 by 0.1 inches has a ten fold ...

  4. Porous Shape Memory Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Singhal, Pooja; Horn, John; Small, Ward; Olsovsky, Cory; Maitland, Kristen C.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2013-01-01

    Porous shape memory polymers (SMPs) include foams, scaffolds, meshes, and other polymeric substrates that possess porous three-dimensional macrostructures. Porous SMPs exhibit active structural and volumetric transformations and have driven investigations in fields ranging from biomedical engineering to aerospace engineering to the clothing industry. The present review article examines recent developments in porous SMPs, with focus given to structural and chemical classification, methods of characterization, and applications. We conclude that the current body of literature presents porous SMPs as highly interesting smart materials with potential for industrial use. PMID:23646038

  5. TARGETING POLYMER THERAPEUTICS TO BONE

    PubMed Central

    Low, Stewart; Kope?ek, Jind?ich

    2012-01-01

    An aging population in the developing world has led to an increase in musculoskeletal diseases such as osteoporosis and bone metastases. Left untreated many bone diseases cause debilitating pain and in the case of cancer, death. Many potential drugs are effective in treating diseases but result in side effects preventing their efficacy in the clinic. Bone, however, provides an unique environment of inorganic solids, which can be exploited in order to effectively target drugs to diseased tissue. By integration of bone targeting moieties to drug-carrying water-soluble polymers, the payload to diseased area can be increased while side effects decreased. The realization of clinically relevant bone targeted polymer therapeutics depends on (1) understanding bone targeting moiety interactions, (2) development of controlled drug delivery systems, as well as (3) understanding drug interactions. The latter makes it possible to develop bone targeted synergistic drug delivery systems. PMID:22316530

  6. Surface shape memory in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Many crosslinked polymers exhibit a shape memory effect wherein a permanent shape can be prescribed during crosslinking and arbitrary temporary shapes may be set through network chain immobilization. Researchers have extensively investigated such shape memory polymers in bulk form (bars, films, foams), revealing a multitude of approaches. Applications abound for such materials and a significant fraction of the studies in this area concern application-specific characterization. Recently, we have turned our attention to surface shape memory in polymers as a means to miniaturization of the effect, largely motivated to study the interaction of biological cells with shape memory polymers. In this presentation, attention will be given to several approaches we have taken to prepare and study surface shape memory phenomenon. First, a reversible embossing study involving a glassy, crosslinked shape memory material will be presented. Here, the permanent shape was flat while the temporary state consisted of embossed parallel groves. Further the fixing mechanism was vitrification, with Tg adjusted to accommodate experiments with cells. We observed that the orientation and spreading of adherent cells could be triggered to change by the topographical switch from grooved to flat. Second, a functionally graded shape memory polymer will be presented, the grading being a variation in glass transition temperature in one direction along the length of films. Characterization of the shape fixing and recovery of such films utilized an indentation technique that, along with polarizing microscopy, allowed visualization of stress distribution in proximity to the indentations. Finally, very recent research concerning shape memory induced wrinkle formation on polymer surfaces will be presented. A transformation from smooth to wrinkled surfaces at physiological temperatures has been observed to have a dramatic effect on the behavior of adherent cells. A look to the future in research and applications for surface shape memory in polymers will round out the talk.

  7. Therapeutic gene delivery using bioreducible polymers.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kitae; Kim, Tae-Il

    2014-01-01

    Bioreducible polymers, which can be degraded in reducing environment due to the cleavage of internal disulfide bonds, have been developed for gene delivery systems. They show high stability in extracellular physiological condition and cytoplasm-specific release of genetic materials, as well as decreased cytotoxicity because cytoplasm is a reducing environment containing high level of reducing molecules such as glutathione. Based on these advantages, recently, many bioreducible polymers have been further investigated with therapeutic genes for the treatment of diseases and demonstrated promising results. This review will focus on the therapeutic gene delivery using bioreducible polymers and the evaluation of therapeutic efficacy for cancer, myocardial infarction, diabetes and miscellaneous diseases. PMID:24178745

  8. Memory as a new therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Karim; Hardt, Oliver; Lanius, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to demonstrate how an understanding of the brain mechanisms involved in memory provides a basis for; (i) reconceptualizing some mental disorders; (ii) refining existing therapeutic tools; and (iii) designing new ones for targeting processes that maintain these disorders. First, some of the stages which a memory undergoes are defined, and the clinical relevance of an understanding of memory processing by the brain is discussed. This is followed by a brief review of some of the clinical studies that have targeted memory processes. Finally, some new insights provided by the field of neuroscience with implications for conceptualizing mental disorders are presented. PMID:24459414

  9. Shape-Memory Polymer Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madbouly, Samy A.; Lendlein, Andreas

    The development of shape-memory polymer composites (SMPCs) enables high recovery stress levels as well as novel functions such as electrical conductivity, magnetism, and biofunctionality. In this review chapter the substantial enhancement in mechanical properties of shape-memory polymers (SMPs) by incorporating small amounts of stiff fillers will be highlighted exemplarily for clay and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). Three different functions resulting from adding functional fillers to SMP-matrices will be introduced and discussed: magnetic SMPCs with different types of magnetic nanoparticles, conductive SMPCs based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), carbon black (CB), short carbon fiber (SCF), and biofunctional SMPCs containing hydroxyapatite (HA). Indirect induction of the shape-memory effect (SME) was realized for magnetic and conductive SMPCs either by exposure to an alternating magnetic field or by application of electrical current. Major challenges in design and fundamental understanding of polymer composites are the complexity of the composite structure, and the relationship between structural parameters and properties/functions, which is essential for tailoring SMPCs for specific applications. Therefore the novel functions and enhanced properties of SMPCs will be described considering the micro-/nanostructural parameters, such as dimension, shape, distribution, volume fraction, and alignment of fillers as well as interfacial interaction between the polymer matrix and dispersed fillers. Finally, an outlook is given describing the future challenges of this exciting research field as well as potential applications including automotive, aerospace, sensors, and biomedical applications.

  10. Shape memory alloy/shape memory polymer tools

    DOEpatents

    Seward, Kirk P.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2005-03-29

    Micro-electromechanical tools for minimally invasive techniques including microsurgery. These tools utilize composite shape memory alloy (SMA), shape memory polymer (SMP) and combinations of SMA and SMP to produce catheter distal tips, actuators, etc., which are bistable. Applications for these structures include: 1) a method for reversible fine positioning of a catheter tip, 2) a method for reversible fine positioning of tools or therapeutic catheters by a guide catheter, 3) a method for bending articulation through the body's vasculature, 4) methods for controlled stent delivery, deployment, and repositioning, and 5) catheters with variable modulus, with vibration mode, with inchworm capability, and with articulated tips. These actuators and catheter tips are bistable and are opportune for in vivo usage because the materials are biocompatible and convenient for intravascular use as well as other minimal by invasive techniques.

  11. Temperature-memory polymer actuators

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Marc; Kratz, Karl; Noechel, Ulrich; Sauter, Tilman; Lendlein, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Reading out the temperature-memory of polymers, which is their ability to remember the temperature where they were deformed recently, is thus far unavoidably linked to erasing this memory effect. Here temperature-memory polymer actuators (TMPAs) based on cross-linked copolymer networks exhibiting a broad melting temperature range (?Tm) are presented, which are capable of a long-term temperature-memory enabling more than 250 cyclic thermally controlled actuations with almost constant performance. The characteristic actuation temperatures Tacts of TMPAs can be adjusted by a purely physical process, guiding a directed crystallization in a temperature range of up to 40 °C by variation of the parameter Tsep in a nearly linear correlation. The temperature Tsep divides ?Tm into an upper Tm range (T > Tsep) forming a reshapeable actuation geometry that determines the skeleton and a lower Tm range (T < Tsep) that enables the temperature-controlled bidirectional actuation by crystallization-induced elongation and melting-induced contraction. The macroscopic bidirectional shape changes in TMPAs could be correlated with changes in the nanostructure of the crystallizable domains as a result of in situ X-ray investigations. Potential applications of TMPAs include heat engines with adjustable rotation rate and active building facades with self-regulating sun protectors. PMID:23836673

  12. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  13. Shape memory polymer actuator and catheter

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Matthews, Dennis L. (Moss Beach, CA); Decker, Derek E. (Byron, CA); Jungreis, Charles A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2007-11-06

    An actuator system is provided for acting upon a material in a vessel. The system includes an optical fiber and a shape memory polymer material operatively connected to the optical fiber. The shape memory polymer material is adapted to move from a first shape for moving through said vessel to a second shape where it can act upon said material.

  14. Release mechanism utilizing shape memory polymer material

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  15. Medical applications of shape memory polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolowski, Witold M.

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory polymers are described here and major advantages in some applications are identified over other medical materials such as shape memory alloys (SMA). A number of medical applications are anticipated for shape memory polymers. Some simple applications are already utilized in medical world, others are in examination process. Lately, several important applications are being considered for CHEM foams for self-deployable vascular and coronary devices. One of these potential applications, the endovascular treatment of aneurysm was experimentally investigated with encouraging results and is described in this paper as well.

  16. Guide wire extension for shape memory polymer occlusion removal devices

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Hartman, Jonathan (Sacramento, CA)

    2009-11-03

    A flexible extension for a shape memory polymer occlusion removal device. A shape memory polymer instrument is transported through a vessel via a catheter. A flexible elongated unit is operatively connected to the distal end of the shape memory polymer instrument to enhance maneuverability through tortuous paths en route to the occlusion.

  17. Temperature and electrical memory of polymer fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Jinkai; Zakri, Cécile; Grillard, Fabienne; Neri, Wilfrid; Poulin, Philippe

    2014-05-15

    We report in this work studies of the shape memory behavior of polymer fibers loaded with carbon nanotubes or graphene flakes. These materials exhibit enhanced shape memory properties with the generation of a giant stress upon shape recovery. In addition, they exhibit a surprising temperature memory with a peak of generated stress at a temperature nearly equal to the temperature of programming. This temperature memory is ascribed to the presence of dynamical heterogeneities and to the intrinsic broadness of the glass transition. We present recent experiments related to observables other than mechanical properties. In particular nanocomposite fibers exhibit variations of electrical conductivity with an accurate memory. Indeed, the rate of conductivity variations during temperature changes reaches a well defined maximum at a temperature equal to the temperature of programming. Such materials are promising for future actuators that couple dimensional changes with sensing electronic functionalities.

  18. Autobiographical Memory Disturbances in Depression: A Novel Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Cristiano A.; Carvalho, André F.; Alves, Gilberto S.; McIntyre, Roger S.; Hyphantis, Thomas N.; Cammarota, Martín

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by a dysfunctional processing of autobiographical memories. We review the following core domains of deficit: systematic biases favoring materials of negative emotional valence; diminished access and response to positive memories; a recollection of overgeneral memories in detriment of specific autobiographical memories; and the role of ruminative processes and avoidance when dealing with autobiographical memories. Furthermore, we review evidence from functional neuroimaging studies of neural circuits activated by the recollection of autobiographical memories in both healthy and depressive individuals. Disruptions in autobiographical memories predispose and portend onset and maintenance of depression. Thus, we discuss emerging therapeutics that target memory difficulties in those with depression. We review strategies for this clinical domain, including memory specificity training, method-of-loci, memory rescripting, and real-time fMRI neurofeedback training of amygdala activity in depression. We propose that the manipulation of the reconsolidation of autobiographical memories in depression might represent a novel yet largely unexplored, domain-specific, therapeutic opportunity for depression treatment. PMID:26380121

  19. Memory operation mechanism of fullerene-containing polymer memory

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Anri Fujii, Daiki

    2015-03-09

    The memory operation mechanism in fullerene-containing nanocomposite gate insulators was investigated while varying the kind of fullerene in a polymer gate insulator. It was cleared what kind of traps and which positions in the nanocomposite the injected electrons or holes are stored in. The reason for the difference in the easiness of programming was clarified taking the role of the charging energy of an injected electron into account. The dependence of the carrier dynamics on the kind of fullerene molecule was investigated. A nonuniform distribution of injected carriers occurred after application of a large magnitude programming voltage due to the width distribution of the polystyrene barrier between adjacent fullerene molecules. Through the investigations, we demonstrated a nanocomposite gate with fullerene molecules having excellent retention characteristics and a programming capability. This will lead to the realization of practical organic memories with fullerene-containing polymer nanocomposites.

  20. Bioreducible Polymers for Therapeutic Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Sook; Kim, Sung Wan

    2014-01-01

    Most currently available cationic polymers have significant acute toxicity concerns such as cellular toxicity, aggregation of erythrocytes, and entrapment in the lung capillary bed, largely due to their poor biocompatibility and non-degradability under physiological conditions. To develop more intelligent polymers, disulfide bonds are introduced in the design of biodegradable polymers. Herein, the sustained innovations of biomimetic nanosized constructs with bioreducible poly(disulfide amine)s demonstrate a viable clinical tool for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, anemia, diabetes, and cancer. PMID:24746626

  1. Polymer Synthesis Figure 1: Typical thermal response shape memory cycle. The polymer is heated past a

    E-print Network

    Polymer Synthesis a) b) c) d) e) Figure 1: Typical thermal response shape memory cycle. The polymer of a New Class of Shape Memory Polymers for Development of "Smart" Vascular Constructs James Taylor polymer films that transition at the appropriate temperature · Testing has shown that most of the films we

  2. Shape Memory Polymer Patrick T. Mather,1,2

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Shape Memory Polymer Research Patrick T. Mather,1,2 Xiaofan Luo,1,2 and Ingrid A. Rousseau3 1-145419 Copyright c 2009 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved 1531-7331/09/0804-0445$20.00 Key Words shape memory witnessed significant advances in the field of shape memory polymers (SMPs) with the elucidation of new

  3. Development of multifunctional shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Janice J.; Srivastava, Ijya; Naguib, Hani E.

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMP) are a class of stimuli-responsive materials which are able to respond to external stimulus such as temperature and deformation by changing their shape, and return to their original shape upon reversal or removal of the external stimulus. Although SMP materials have been studied extensively and have been used in a wide range of applications such as medicine, aerospace, and robotics, only few studies have looked at the potential of designing multifunctional SMP foams and blends. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of a design of SMP foam materials and blends. The actuator construct will contain a core SMP epoxy and blend of polylactic acid and polyurethane. The effects of the processing parameters of shape memory polymer (SMP) foams on the shape memory effect (SME) were investigated. The solid state foaming technique was employed to obtain the desired foamed cellular structure. One particular point of interest is to understand how the processing parameters affect the SMP and its glass transition temperature (Tg). By correctly tailoring these parameters it is possible to modify the SMP to have an improved shape memory effect SME.

  4. Polymer-based resistive memory materials and devices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen-Peng; Liu, Shu-Juan; Gong, Tao; Zhao, Qiang; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Due to the advantages of good scalability, flexibility, low cost, ease of processing, 3D-stacking capability, and large capacity for data storage, polymer-based resistive memories have been a promising alternative or supplementary devices to conventional inorganic semiconductor-based memory technology, and attracted significant scientific interest as a new and promising research field. In this review, we first introduced the general characteristics of the device structures and fabrication, memory effects, switching mechanisms, and effects of electrodes on memory properties associated with polymer-based resistive memory devices. Subsequently, the research progress concerning the use of single polymers or polymer composites as active materials for resistive memory devices has been summarized and discussed. In particular, we consider a rational approach to their design and discuss how to realize the excellent memory devices and understand the memory mechanisms. Finally, the current challenges and several possible future research directions in this field have also been discussed. PMID:24339246

  5. Modeling and simulation of magnetic shape-memory polymer composites

    E-print Network

    Rumpf, Martin

    as an energy damp- ing mechanism and as actuators. Compared to a single crystal bulk material, the productionModeling and simulation of magnetic shape-memory polymer composites September 6, 2006 S. Conti1 , M Composites of small magnetic-shape-memory (MSM) particles em- bedded in a polymer matrix have been proposed

  6. Methods of Making and Using Shape Memory Polymer Composite Patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    A method of repairing a composite component having a damaged area including: laying a composite patch over the damaged area: activating the shape memory polymer resin to easily and quickly mold said patch to said damaged area; deactivating said shape memory polymer so that said composite patch retains the molded shape; and bonding said composite patch to said damaged part.

  7. Porous inorganic—organic shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dawei; Burkes, William L.; Schoener, Cody A.; Grunlan, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoresponsive shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a type of stimuli-sensitive materials that switch from a temporary shape back to their permanent shape upon exposure to heat. While the majority of SMPs have been fabricated in the solid form, porous SMP foams exhibit distinct properties and are better suited for certain applications, including some in the biomedical field. Like solid SMPs, SMP foams have been restricted to a limited group of organic polymer systems. In this study, we prepared inorganic–organic SMP foams based on the photochemical cure of a macromer comprised of inorganic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) segments and organic poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) segments, diacrylated PCL40-block-PDMS37-block-PCL40. To achieve tunable pore size with high interconnectivity, the SMP foams were prepared via a refined solvent-casting/particulate-leaching (SCPL) method. By varying design parameters such as degree of salt fusion, macromer concentration in the solvent and salt particle size, the SMP foams with excellent shape memory behavior and tunable pore size, pore morphology, and modulus were obtained. PMID:22956854

  8. High-Temperature Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoonessi, Mitra; Weiss, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    physical conformation changes when exposed to an external stimulus, such as a change in temperature. Such materials have a permanent shape, but can be reshaped above a critical temperature and fixed into a temporary shape when cooled under stress to below the critical temperature. When reheated above the critical temperature (Tc, also sometimes called the triggering or switching temperature), the materials revert to the permanent shape. The current innovation involves a chemically treated (sulfonated, carboxylated, phosphonated, or other polar function group), high-temperature, semicrystalline thermoplastic poly(ether ether ketone) (Tg .140 C, Tm = 340 C) mix containing organometallic complexes (Zn++, Li+, or other metal, ammonium, or phosphonium salts), or high-temperature ionic liquids (e.g. hexafluorosilicate salt with 1-propyl-3- methyl imidazolium, Tm = 210 C) to form a network where dipolar or ionic interactions between the polymer and the low-molecular-weight or inorganic compound forms a complex that provides a physical crosslink. Hereafter, these compounds will be referred to as "additives". The polymer is semicrystalline, and the high-melt-point crystals provide a temporary crosslink that acts as a permanent crosslink just so long as the melting temperature is not exceeded. In this example case, the melting point is .340 C, and the shape memory critical temperature is between 150 and 250 C. PEEK is an engineering thermoplastic with a high Young fs modulus, nominally 3.6 GPa. An important aspect of the invention is the control of the PEEK functionalization (in this example, the sulfonation degree), and the thermal properties (i.e. melting point) of the additive, which determines the switching temperature. Because the compound is thermoplastic, it can be formed into the "permanent" shape by conventional plastics processing operations. In addition, the compound may be covalently cross - linked after forming the permanent shape by S-PEEK by applying ionizing radiation ( radiation, neutrons), or by chemical crosslinking to form a covalent permanent network. With respect to other shape memory polymers, this invention is novel in that it describes the use of a thermoplastic composition that can be thermally molded or solution-cast into complex "permanent" shapes, and then reheated or redissolved and recast from solution to prepare another shape. It is also unique in that the shape memory behavior is provided by a non-polymer additive.

  9. Metal complex modified azo polymers for multilevel organic memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhou, Feng; Li, Hua; Dong, Huilong; Li, You-Yong; Hu, Zhi-Jun; Xu, Qing-Feng; Lu, Jian-Mei

    2015-04-01

    Multilevel organic memories have attracted considerable interest due to their high capacity of data storage. Despite advances, the search for multilevel memory materials still remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we present a rational design and synthesis of a class of polymers containing an azobenzene-pyridine group (PAzo-py) and its derivatives, for multilevel organic memory storage. In this design, a metal complex (M(Phen)Cl2, M = Cu, Pd) is employed to modify the HOMO-LUMO energy levels of azo polymers, thereby converting the memory state from binary to ternary. More importantly, this approach enables modulating the energy levels of azo polymers by varying the coordination metal ions. This makes the achievement of high performance multilevel memories possible. The ability to tune the bandgap energy of azo polymers provides new exciting opportunities to develop new materials for high-density data storage.Multilevel organic memories have attracted considerable interest due to their high capacity of data storage. Despite advances, the search for multilevel memory materials still remains a formidable challenge. Herein, we present a rational design and synthesis of a class of polymers containing an azobenzene-pyridine group (PAzo-py) and its derivatives, for multilevel organic memory storage. In this design, a metal complex (M(Phen)Cl2, M = Cu, Pd) is employed to modify the HOMO-LUMO energy levels of azo polymers, thereby converting the memory state from binary to ternary. More importantly, this approach enables modulating the energy levels of azo polymers by varying the coordination metal ions. This makes the achievement of high performance multilevel memories possible. The ability to tune the bandgap energy of azo polymers provides new exciting opportunities to develop new materials for high-density data storage. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00871a

  10. Thermo-Responsive Polymers for Cell-based Therapeutic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Hodari-Sadiki

    Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) is a well-known thermo-responsive polymer that has be shown to be biocompatible, with surfaces coated with PNIPAAm supporting the culture of cells. These surfaces support the adhesion and proliferation of multiple cell phenotypes at 37 °C, when surface is hydrophobic, as the polymer chains are collapse and lose their affinity for water. Reducing the temperature below the polymers lower critical solution temperature (LCST) elicits hydration and swelling of the polymer chains and leads to cell detachment. In vitro culture on thermo-responsive surfaces can be used to produce cell sheets for the use of different therapeutic treatments. PNIPAAm coated membranes were used to culture human keratinocyte cells to confluence, with cell release possible after exposing the membranes to room temperature (˜25 °C) for 10 minutes. Cell sheet transfer was possible from the coated membrane to cell culture dishes using a protocol that we developed. There was also a trend towards similar cell apoptosis on both PNIPAAm coated and uncoated surfaces.

  11. DESIGN OF A VARIABLE STIFFNESS LEG USING SHAPE MEMORY POLYMER COMPOSITES

    E-print Network

    Collins, Emmanuel

    571 DESIGN OF A VARIABLE STIFFNESS LEG USING SHAPE MEMORY POLYMER COMPOSITES DUNCAN W. HALDANE-based shape memory polymer material used in the legs design is described and characterized. The design-based chemically crosslinked co-polymer resin with shape memory properties. We designed the polymer to have a glass

  12. Evaluation of a degradable shape-memory polymer network as matrix for controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Wischke, Christian; Neffe, Axel T; Steuer, Susi; Lendlein, Andreas

    2009-09-15

    Degradable shape-memory polymers are multifunctional materials with broad applicability for medical devices. They are designed to acquire their therapeutically relevant shape and mechanical properties after implantation. In this study, the potential of a completely amorphous shape-memory polymer matrix for controlled drug release was comprehensively characterized according to a four step general strategy which provides concepts for validating multifunctional materials for pharmaceutical applications. Independent functionalities are thereby crucial for fully exploiting the potential of the materials. The copolyester urethane network was synthesized by crosslinking star-shaped tetrahydroxy telechelics of oligo[(rac-lactide)-co-glycolide] with an aliphatic diisocyanate. In step 1 of the four step characterization procedure, this material showed the thermal and mechanical properties, which are required for the shape-memory effect under physiological conditions. Shape recovery could be realized by a one-step or a multi-step methodology. In step 2, feasibility of drug loading of pre-formed shape-memory networks has been demonstrated with drugs of different hydrophobicities. The presence of drugs did not disturb the material's functionalities directly after loading (step 3) and under release conditions (step 4). A predictable release of about 90% of the payload in 80 days was observed. Overall, the synthesized amorphous polymer network showed three independent functionalities, i.e., a shape-memory effect combined with biodegradability and controlled drug release. PMID:19470395

  13. AC Electric Field Activated Shape Memory Polymer Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kang, Jin Ho; Siochi, Emilie J.; Penner, Ronald K.; Turner, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory materials have drawn interest for applications like intelligent medical devices, deployable space structures and morphing structures. Compared to other shape memory materials like shape memory alloys (SMAs) or shape memory ceramics (SMCs), shape memory polymers (SMPs) have high elastic deformation that is amenable to tailored of mechanical properties, have lower density, and are easily processed. However, SMPs have low recovery stress and long response times. A new shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive fillers to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. A new composition of shape memory thermosetting polymer nanocomposite (LaRC-SMPC) was synthesized with conductive functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) to enhance its thermo-mechanical characteristics. The elastic modulus of LaRC-SMPC is approximately 2.7 GPa at room temperature and 4.3 MPa above its glass transition temperature. Conductive FGSs-doped LaRC-SMPC exhibited higher conductivity compared to pristine LaRC SMP. Applying an electric field at between 0.1 Hz and 1 kHz induced faster heating to activate the LaRC-SMPC s shape memory effect relative to applying DC electric field or AC electric field at frequencies exceeding1 kHz.

  14. Shape memory polymer foams for endovascular therapies

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2015-05-26

    A system for occluding a physical anomaly. One embodiment comprises a shape memory material body wherein the shape memory material body fits within the physical anomaly occluding the physical anomaly. The shape memory material body has a primary shape for occluding the physical anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly.

  15. Shape memory polymer foams for endovascular therapies

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S. (Castro Valley, CA); Maitland, Duncan J. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    2012-03-13

    A system for occluding a physical anomaly. One embodiment comprises a shape memory material body wherein the shape memory material body fits within the physical anomaly occluding the physical anomaly. The shape memory material body has a primary shape for occluding the physical anomaly and a secondary shape for being positioned in the physical anomaly.

  16. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Design strategies for shape memory polymers

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Design strategies for shape memory polymers Xiaofan Luo* and Patrick T Mather Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are polymeric materials capable of recovering from a `fixed elements are required for a polymer to exhibit useful shape memory: a network structure that defines

  17. Shape memory polymers with high and low temperature resistant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xinli; Kong, Deyan; Qiu, Xueying; Zhang, Wenbo; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Yang; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-09-01

    High temperature shape memory polymers that can withstand the harsh temperatures for durable applications are synthesized, and the aromatic polyimide chains with flexible linkages within the backbone act as reversible phase. High molecular weight (Mn) is demanded to form physical crosslinks as fixed phase of thermoplastic shape memory polyimide, and the relationship between Mn and glass transition temperature (Tg) is explored. Thermoset shape memory polyimide shows higher Tg and storage modulus, better shape fixity than thermoplastic counterpart due to the low-density covalent crosslinking, and the influence of crosslinking on physical properties are studied. The mechanism of high temperature shape memory effects based on chain flexibility, molecular weight and crosslink density is proposed. Exposure to thermal cycling from +150?°C to -150?°C for 200?h produces negligible effect on the properties of the shape memory polyimide, and the possible mechanism of high and low temperature resistant property is discussed.

  18. Shape memory polymers with high and low temperature resistant properties

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xinli; Kong, Deyan; Qiu, Xueying; Zhang, Wenbo; Liu, Yanju; Zhang, Shen; Zhang, Fenghua; Hu, Yang; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-01-01

    High temperature shape memory polymers that can withstand the harsh temperatures for durable applications are synthesized, and the aromatic polyimide chains with flexible linkages within the backbone act as reversible phase. High molecular weight (Mn) is demanded to form physical crosslinks as fixed phase of thermoplastic shape memory polyimide, and the relationship between Mn and glass transition temperature (Tg) is explored. Thermoset shape memory polyimide shows higher Tg and storage modulus, better shape fixity than thermoplastic counterpart due to the low-density covalent crosslinking, and the influence of crosslinking on physical properties are studied. The mechanism of high temperature shape memory effects based on chain flexibility, molecular weight and crosslink density is proposed. Exposure to thermal cycling from +150?°C to ?150?°C for 200?h produces negligible effect on the properties of the shape memory polyimide, and the possible mechanism of high and low temperature resistant property is discussed. PMID:26382318

  19. Microscopic mechanisms of the shape memory effect in crosslinked polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jacob D.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we perform coarse-grained molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the molecular origins of the thermal shape memory effect in crosslinked polymer materials. Thermal shape memory polymers (SMPs) are materials able to hold a deformed shape when cooled below the glass transition temperature, and subsequently recover the initial shape when heated. To use SMPs in various applications requires materials which reliably hold and recover their shapes; this has sparked recent synthesis work to create new SMP materials with optimized properties. Here we use coarse-grained MD simulations with different polymer chain models to determine which parameters affect relevant SMP behavior and to investigate the molecular mechanisms at the level of individual chains during temperature cycling. The simulations show how temperature-dependent chain mobility leads to shape memory polymer behavior. In particular, we demonstrate the importance of attractive monomer interactions in leading to ‘good’ SMP behavior. The results suggest promising routes for material development. Additionally, the mechanisms identified with the simple simulation model can be used to inform multi-scale models of SMP material behavior.

  20. Ultra-flexible nonvolatile memory based on donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer blends

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Flexible memory cell array based on high mobility donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer has been demonstrated. The memory cell exhibits low read voltage, high cell-to-cell uniformity and good mechanical flexibility, and has reliable retention and endurance memory performance. The electrical properties of the memory devices are systematically investigated and modeled. Our results suggest that the polymer blends provide an important step towards high-density flexible nonvolatile memory devices. PMID:26029856

  1. Ultra-flexible nonvolatile memory based on donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer blends.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Yan, Yan; Zhou, Li; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V A L

    2015-01-01

    Flexible memory cell array based on high mobility donor-acceptor diketopyrrolopyrrole polymer has been demonstrated. The memory cell exhibits low read voltage, high cell-to-cell uniformity and good mechanical flexibility, and has reliable retention and endurance memory performance. The electrical properties of the memory devices are systematically investigated and modeled. Our results suggest that the polymer blends provide an important step towards high-density flexible nonvolatile memory devices. PMID:26029856

  2. Biomedical Applications of Thermally Activated Shape Memory Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Singhal, P; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2009-04-10

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs.

  3. Biomedical applications of thermally activated shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Small, Ward; Singhal, Pooja; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can remember a primary shape and can return to this primary shape from a deformed secondary shape when given an appropriate stimulus. This property allows them to be delivered in a compact form via minimally invasive surgeries in humans, and deployed to achieve complex final shapes. Here we review the various biomedical applications of SMPs and the challenges they face with respect to actuation and biocompatibility. While shape memory behavior has been demonstrated with heat, light and chemical environment, here we focus our discussion on thermally stimulated SMPs. PMID:21258605

  4. Thermomechanical modeling of a shape memory polymer 

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Pritha B.

    2009-05-15

    +m( yk )m 1 + + 1b( c 1)n s + _T Tobushi also investigated the relationship of the modulus with temperature as shown in Fig. (12.b) and expressed all parameters including ; ;k; y; c; C and L as: x = xg exp[a(TgT 1)]. Fig. (12.c) shows..., and the rate of breaking and reforming of temporary nodes starts rising once again. This\\unlocks" the permanent network which now take over and recoil the polymer back to its original state. This simple view of the material response is adequate to create a...

  5. Shape memory polymers based on uniform aliphatic urethane networks

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, T S; Bearinger, J P; Herberg, J L; Marion III, J E; Wright, W J; Evans, C L; Maitland, D J

    2007-01-19

    Aliphatic urethane polymers have been synthesized and characterized, using monomers with high molecular symmetry, in order to form amorphous networks with very uniform supermolecular structures which can be used as photo-thermally actuable shape memory polymers (SMPs). The monomers used include hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), trimethylhexamethylenediamine (TMHDI), N,N,N{prime},N{prime}-tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)ethylenediamine (HPED), triethanolamine (TEA), and 1,3-butanediol (BD). The new polymers were characterized by solvent extraction, NMR, XPS, UV/VIS, DSC, DMTA, and tensile testing. The resulting polymers were found to be single phase amorphous networks with very high gel fraction, excellent optical clarity, and extremely sharp single glass transitions in the range of 34 to 153 C. Thermomechanical testing of these materials confirms their excellent shape memory behavior, high recovery force, and low mechanical hysteresis (especially on multiple cycles), effectively behaving as ideal elastomers above T{sub g}. We believe these materials represent a new and potentially important class of SMPs, and should be especially useful in applications such as biomedical microdevices.

  6. Design of a deployable structure with shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Takashima, Kazuto; Walters, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Auxetic (negative Poisson's ratio) configurations have recently been used to build prototypes of deployable structures using classical shape memory alloys (Nickel-Titanium-Copper). Chiral configurations, featuring three or more inter-connected spiral-wound hubs, exploit efficient tensile-rotational mechanisms. These structures offer high deployability ratios in structural elements with load-bearing characteristics. Shape memory polymers have the potential to replace these shape memory alloys and other stored-energy actuators, and have the attractive properties of low mass, high actuation strain, easy fabrication and tuneable thermal properties. In this work we discuss how shape memory polymers (SMP) integrated into a chiral core could offer enhanced deployable characteristics and increase the efficiency of the auxetic deformations in these unusual cellular structures. We consider the spiral-wound fundamental component needed for SMP n-chiral prototypes and present test results showing actuation motion of expanding SMP deployable structures. Applications likely to benefit from these structures include lightweight elements for structural engineering applications, deployable structures for space applications and implantable medical devices.

  7. Tunable thiol-epoxy shape memory polymer foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellson, Gregory; Di Prima, Matthew; Ware, Taylor; Tang, Xiling; Voit, Walter

    2015-05-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are uniquely suited to a number of applications due to their shape storage and recovery abilities and the wide range of available chemistries. However, many of the desired performance properties are tied to the polymer chemistry which can make optimization difficult. The use of foaming techniques is one way to tune mechanical response of an SMP without changing the polymer chemistry. In this work, a novel thiol-epoxy SMP was foamed using glass microspheres (40 and 50% by volume Q-Cel 6019), using expandable polymer microspheres (1% 930 DU 120), and by a chemical blowing agent (1% XOP-341). Each approach created SMP foam with a differing density and microstructure from the others. Thermal and thermomechanical analysis was performed to observe the behavioral difference between the foaming techniques and to confirm that the glass transition (Tg) was relatively unchanged near 50 °C while the glassy modulus varied from 19.1 to 345 MPa and the rubbery modulus varied from 0.04 to 2.2 MPa. The compressive behavior of the foams was characterized through static compression testing at different temperatures, and cyclic compression testing at Tg. Constrained shape recovery testing showed a range of peak recovery stress from 5 MPa for the syntactic Q-Cel foams to ˜0.1 MPa for the chemically blown XOP-341 foam. These results showed that multiple foaming approaches can be used with a novel SMP to vary the mechanical response independent of Tg and polymer chemistry.

  8. Shape memory polymer filled honeycomb model and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beblo, R. V.; Puttmann, J. P.; Joo, J. J.; Reich, G. W.

    2015-02-01

    An analytical model predicting the in-plane Young’s and shear moduli of a shape memory polymer filled honeycomb composite is presented. By modeling the composite as a series of rigidly attached beams, the mechanical advantage of the load distributed on each beam by the infill is accounted for. The model is compared to currently available analytical models as well as experimental data. The model correlates extremely well with experimental data for empty honeycomb and when the polymer is above its glass transition temperature. Below the glass transition temperature, rule of mixtures is shown to be more accurate as bending is no longer the dominant mode of deformation. The model is also derived for directions other than the typical x and y allowing interpolation of the stiffness of the composite in any direction.

  9. Smart medical stocking using memory polymer for chronic venous disorders.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Bipin; Hu, Jinlian; Pan, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Proper level of pressure or compression generated by medical stocking or hosiery is the key element for successful treatment or management of chronic venous disorders such as oedema, leg ulcers, etc. However achieving the recommended compression level and, more importantly, sustaining it using stockings has been a major challenge to the health practitioners supervising the treatment. This work aims to investigate and design a smart compression stocking using shape-memory polymer that allows externally controlling the pressure level in the wrapped position on the leg. Based on thermodynamical rubber theories, we first derived several criteria that have to be satisfied simultaneously in order to achieve the controlled pressure adjustment using external heat stimuli. We then presented a case where such a stocking is developed using a blend yarn consists of selected shape-memory polyurethane and nylon filaments. Extensive experimental work has also been conducted to demonstrate the feasibility and explore the influencing factors involved. PMID:26513411

  10. Tailoring the time-dependent recovery of shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azra, C.; Plummer, C. J. G.; Månson, J.-A. E.

    2012-04-01

    On application of heat, shape memory polymers (SMPs) are able to revert to a primary shape from a secondary shape induced by mechanical deformation. It may be desirable to induce shape recovery at controlled rates under quasi-isothermal conditions, e.g. in certain biomedical applications in which actuation occurs at body temperature, requiring knowledge of the time dependent response of SMPs. In the present work, the time dependence of isothermal shape recovery has been investigated for two shape memory polyurethanes (SMPUs) with different molecular architectures. These are discussed in terms of a simple linear thermo-viscoelastic model for the time and temperature dependence of the shape memory response at small deformations, based on data obtained from a single constant frequency dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) temperature sweep. This approach is based on the establishment of an approximate relationship between the storage modulus E'(T), the loss factor tan ?(T) and the shift factor, aT(T), more usually derived from time-temperature superposition of isothermal data obtained at different temperatures. The DMA data are thus shown to be sufficient to describe the relaxation and retardation time spectra. As well as providing a useful phenomenological description of the shape memory effect, the model derived from the DMA data permits quantitative comparison of materials, and may hence be used as guidelines for materials design for specific applications. This is demonstrated for the two SMPUs considered in the present work, whose viscoelastic spectra vary significantly in width, affording considerable insight into the distribution of segmental mobility within the polymer network.

  11. Characterization of Nonlinear Rate Dependent Response of Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, Brent; Lagoudas, Dimitris C.; Chen, Yi-Chao; Whitley, Karen S.

    2007-01-01

    Shape Memory Polymers (SMPs) are a class of polymers, which can undergo deformation in a flexible state at elevated temperatures, and when cooled below the glass transition temperature, while retaining their deformed shape, will enter and remain in a rigid state. Upon heating above the glass transition temperature, the shape memory polymer will return to its original, unaltered shape. SMPs have been reported to recover strains of over 400%. It is important to understand the stress and strain recovery behavior of SMPs to better develop constitutive models which predict material behavior. Initial modeling efforts did not account for large deformations beyond 25% strain. However, a model under current development is capable of describing large deformations of the material. This model considers the coexisting active (rubber) and frozen (glass) phases of the polymer, as well as the transitions between the material phases. The constitutive equations at the continuum level are established with internal state variables to describe the microstructural changes associated with the phase transitions. For small deformations, the model reduces to a linear model that agrees with those reported in the literature. Thermomechanical characterization is necessary for the development, calibration, and validation of a constitutive model. The experimental data reported in this paper will assist in model development by providing a better understanding of the stress and strain recovery behavior of the material. This paper presents the testing techniques used to characterize the thermomechanical material properties of a shape memory polymer (SMP) and also presents the resulting data. An innovative visual-photographic apparatus, known as a Vision Image Correlation (VIC) system was used to measure the strain. The details of this technique will also be presented in this paper. A series of tensile tests were performed on specimens such that strain levels of 10, 25, 50, and 100% were applied to the material while it was above its glass transition temperature. After deforming the material to a specified applied strain, the material was then cooled to below the glass transition temperature (Tg) while retaining the deformed shape. Finally, the specimen was heated again to above the transition temperature, and the resulting shape recovery profile was measured. Results show that strain recovery occurs at a nonlinear rate with respect to time. Results also indicate that the ratio of recoverable strain/applied strain increases as the applied strain increases.

  12. Shape memory polymer hexachiral auxetic structures with tunable stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossiter, Jonathan; Takashima, Kazuto; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Walters, Peter; Mukai, Toshiharu

    2014-04-01

    Planar auxetic structures have the potential to impact on a wide range of applications from deployable and morphing structures to space-filling composite and medical treatments. The ability to fabricate auxetics from smart materials greatly enhances this facility by building in controllable actuation and deployment. A smart auxetic device can be compressed and fixed into a storage state. When deployment is required the device can be appropriately stimulated and the stored elastic energy is released, resulting in a marked structural expansion. Instead of using a conventional external actuator to drive deployment the material is made to undergo phase transition where one stimulus (e.g. heat) initiates a mechanical response. Here we show how smart material auxetics can be realized using a thermally responsive shape memory polymer composites. We show how a shape memory polymer auxetic hexachiral structure can be tailored to provide a tunable stiffness response in its fully deployed state by varying the angle of inter-hub connections, and yet is still able to undergo thermally stimulated deployment.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Flow Velocity and Temperature Mapping of a Shape Memory Polymer Foam Device

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Gjersing, E; Herberg, J L; Wilson, T S; Maitland, D J

    2008-10-29

    Interventional medical devices based on thermally responsive shape memory polymer (SMP) are under development to treat stroke victims. The goals of these catheter-delivered devices include re-establishing blood flow in occluded arteries and preventing aneurysm rupture. Because these devices alter the hemodynamics and dissipate thermal energy during the therapeutic procedure, a first step in the device development process is to investigate fluid velocity and temperature changes following device deployment. A laser-heated SMP foam device was deployed in a simplified in vitro vascular model. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques were used to assess the fluid dynamics and thermal changes associated with device deployment. Spatial maps of the steady-state fluid velocity and temperature change inside and outside the laser-heated SMP foam device were acquired. Though non-physiological conditions were used in this initial study, the utility of MRI in the development of a thermally-activated SMP foam device has been demonstrated.

  14. The future orientation of constructive memory: an evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ernest; Erickson-Klein, Roxanna; Rossi, Kathryn

    2008-04-01

    We explore a new distinction between the future, prospective memory system being investigated in current neuroscience and the past, retrospective memory system, which was the original theoretical foundation of therapeutic hypnosis, classical psychoanalysis, and psychotherapy. We then generalize a current evolutionary theory of sleep and dreaming, which focuses on the future, prospective memory system, to conceptualize a new evolutionary perspective on therapeutic hypnosis and brief psychotherapy. The implication of current neuroscience research is that activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity are the psychobiological basis of adaptive behavior, consciousness, and creativity in everyday life as well as psychotherapy. We summarize a case illustrating how this evolutionary perspective can be used to quickly resolve problems with past obstructive procrastination in school to facilitate current and future academic success. PMID:18524301

  15. Numerical simulations for microvascular shape memory polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Goulbourne, N. C.

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular shape memory polymer (SMP) composites are a new class of active composites consisting of an embedded microvascular network in a SMP matrix. The microvascular network can be used to deliver thermal, chemical, electrical, and magnetic stimulation to the SMP matrix thus integrating the activation/deactivation mechanism and opening up a new functional space for active polymers. Here, we focus on thermomechanical coupling triggered through fluid transport within the polymer. A modified thermo-viscoelastic model is used to simulate the response of microvascular SMP composites. The model is developed within a finite deformation continuum mechanics framework and captures the free recovery response of the SMP composite. The present model includes two glass transition temperatures to describe the structural relaxation time and the stress relaxation time, respectively. The model results are calibrated with experimental data from the literature. Lined and unlined microvascular composites fabricated with a varying number of channels and thermal profiles were recorded by infrared camera. Using a range of thermal inputs, we calculate the corresponding free recovery response of microvascular SMP composites. We show that the response can be optimized by tailoring a number of controllable parameters including channel spacing, inlet temperature, fluid flow rate, and the heating/cooling protocol.

  16. Biodistribution of polymer hydrogel capsules for the delivery of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Tracey M; Monaghan, Paul; Green, Diane; Kooijmans, Sander A A; Shi, Shuning; Breheney, Kerry; Tizard, Mark; Nicolazzo, Joseph A; Zelikin, Alexander N; Wark, Kim

    2012-09-01

    A key phase in the development of intelligently designed nanoparticle delivery vehicles for new therapeutic agents is to gain an understanding of their interaction with tissues and cells. We report a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments aimed at tracking a potential delivery vehicle for therapeutic agents, including vaccine peptides and drugs derived from poly(methacrylic acid) hydrogel capsules in certain organs and cell types. For the in vitro studies, two immortal liver-derived cell lines (Huh7 and Hepa1-6) and primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes were incubated with Alexa 647 labelled fluorescent capsules to track their internalization and intracellular distribution by confocal microscopy. Capsules, 500nm in diameter, were taken up into the cells in a time-dependent manner in all three cell lines. Capsules were observed in plasma membrane-derived vesicles within the cells. After 24h a significant proportion of the capsules was observed in lysosomes. To understand the behaviour of the capsules in vivo, Alexa 488 labelled fluorescent capsules were intravenously injected into Sprague-Dawley rats and after 24h the fate of the capsules in a number of organs was determined by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. By flow cytometry, the majority of the capsules were detected in the spleen whilst similar numbers were found in the lung and liver. By confocal microscopy, the majority of the capsules were found in the liver and spleen with significantly less capsules in the lung, heart and kidney. Colocalization of capsules with cell-type specific markers indicated that in lung, heart and kidney, the majority of the capsules were located in endothelial cells. In the spleen ~50% of the capsules were found in CD163-positive cells, whereas in the liver, almost all capsules were located in CD163-positive cells, indicating uptake by Kupffer cells. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of capsules within Kupffer cells. PMID:22659177

  17. Bioactive factor delivery strategies from engineered polymer hydrogels for therapeutic medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Minh Khanh; Alsberg, Eben

    2014-01-01

    Polymer hydrogels have been widely explored as therapeutic delivery matrices because of their ability to present sustained, localized and controlled release of bioactive factors. Bioactive factor delivery from injectable biopolymer hydrogels provides a versatile approach to treat a wide variety of diseases, to direct cell function and to enhance tissue regeneration. The innovative development and modification of both natural-(e.g., alginate (ALG), chitosan, hyaluronic acid (HA), gelatin, heparin (HEP), etc.) and synthetic-(e.g., polyesters, polyethyleneimine (PEI), etc.) based polymers has resulted in a variety of approaches to design drug delivery hydrogel systems from which loaded therapeutics are released. This review presents the state-of-the-art in a wide range of hydrogels that are formed though self-assembly of polymers and peptides, chemical crosslinking, ionic crosslinking and biomolecule recognition. Hydrogel design for bioactive factor delivery is the focus of the first section. The second section then thoroughly discusses release strategies of payloads from hydrogels for therapeutic medicine, such as physical incorporation, covalent tethering, affinity interactions, on demand release and/or use of hybrid polymer scaffolds, with an emphasis on the last 5 years. PMID:25242831

  18. The Effect of Moisture Absorption on the Physical Properties of Polyurethane Shape Memory Polymer Foams 

    E-print Network

    Yu, Ya-Jen

    2012-07-16

    The effect of moisture absorption on the glass transition temperature (Tg) and stress/strain behavior of network polyurethane shape memory polymer (SMP) foams has been investigated. With our ultimate goal of engineering polyurethane SMP foams...

  19. Inorganic-Organic Shape Memory Polymers and Foams for Bone Defect Repairs 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Dawei

    2013-04-16

    The ultimate goal of this research was to develop a “self-fitting” shape memory polymer (SMP) scaffold for the repair of craniomaxillofacial (CMF) bone defects. CMF defects may be caused by trauma, tumor removal or congenital abnormalities...

  20. Computational and Experimental Evaluation of Actuating Shape Memory Polymer Foams in the Context of Aneurysm Treatment 

    E-print Network

    Hahn, Edward

    2010-07-14

    Shape memory polymer foams may be used to treat vascular aneurysms through thermal actuation of the foam from a compacted to an expanded configuration within the aneurysm structure, thereby alleviating blood pressure on the weakened aneurysm walls...

  1. Critical Material Parameters for Modeling Devices Made from an Epoxy-Based Shape Memory Polymer 

    E-print Network

    Erel, Veysel

    2014-06-17

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), simple tension, and planar tension experiments were used to investigate the behavior of an epoxy-based shape memory polymer (SMP) system. DSC results found the mixture had consistent glass transition at 70° C...

  2. Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the Magnetic Actuation of Medical Devices

    E-print Network

    Buckley, Patrick R.

    2007-01-23

    Presently there is interest in making medical devices such as expandable stents and intravascular microactuators from shape memory polymer (SMP). One of the key challenges in realizing SMP medical devices is the implementation ...

  3. Actuation of shape memory polymer using magnetic fields for applications in medical devices

    E-print Network

    Buckley, Patrick Regan, 1981-

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach to the heating and actuation of shape memory polymer using dispersed Curie temperature thermo-regulated particles is proposed. Such a material has potential applications in medical devices which are delivered ...

  4. Assessment and preliminary model development of shape memory polymers mechanical counter pressure space suits

    E-print Network

    Wee, Brian (Brian J.)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis seeks to assess the viability of a space qualified shape memory polymer (SMP) mechanical counter pressure (MCP) suit. A key development objective identified by the International Space Exploration Coordination ...

  5. Polyurethane Shape-Memory Polymers Demonstrate Functional Biocompatibility

    E-print Network

    Simon, Scott I.

    of thermally acti- vated shape memory materials such as shape memory alloys (SMAs)[2] and shape memory ceramics, an external heating mechanism such as photothermal (laser) heating or electrical (resistive) heating

  6. Internal stress storage in shape memory polymer nanocomposites Ken Gall,a)

    E-print Network

    Balzar, Davor

    shape memory polymer matrix. Although the shape memory effect is not inherent to the ceramic. Under 50% compression of the composite material, the nanoparticles store a finite compressive stress strain, by the inclusion of hard ceramic reinforcements.3 In the present study, we examine the storage

  7. Chromogenic Photonic Crystals Enabled by Novel Vapor-Responsive Shape-Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Choi, Baeck; Leo, Sin-Yen; Gao, Jian; Ge, Beverly; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-06-24

    A new type of shape-memory polymer (SMP) is developed by integrating scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields: the fast-growing photonic crystal and SMP technologies. This new SMP enables room-temperature operation for the entire shape-memory cycle and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by exposure to a variety of organic vapors. PMID:25981680

  8. Dynamic cell behavior on shape memory polymer substrates Kevin A. Davis a,b

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Dynamic cell behavior on shape memory polymer substrates Kevin A. Davis a,b , Kelly A. Burke b: Cell culture Shape memory Thermally responsive material Surface topography a b s t r a c t Cell culture substrates of defined topography have emerged as powerful tools with which to investigate cell mechanobiology

  9. Virtual Treatment of Basilar Aneurysms Using Shape Memory Polymer Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, J. M.; Hartman, J.; Rodriguez, J. N.; Maitland, D. J.

    2012-11-01

    Numerical simulations are performed on patient-specific basilar aneurysms that are treated with shape memory polymer (SMP) foam. In order to assess the post-treatment hemodynamics, two modeling approaches are employed. In the first, the foam geometry is obtained from a micro-CT scan and the pulsatile blood flow within the foam is simulated for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian viscosity models. In the second, the foam is represented as a porous media continuum, which has permeability properties that are determined by computing the pressure gradient through the foam geometry over a range of flow speeds comparable to those of in vivo conditions. Virtual angiography and additional post-processing demonstrate that the SMP foam significantly reduces the blood flow speed within the treated aneurysms, while eliminating the high-frequency velocity fluctuations that are present prior to treatment. A prediction of the initial locations of thrombus formation throughout the SMP foam is obtained by means of a low fidelity thrombosis model that is based upon the residence time and shear rate of blood. The two modeling approaches capture similar qualitative trends for the initial locations of thrombus within the SMP foam.

  10. Method for loading shape memory polymer gripper mechanisms

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for loading deposit material, such as an embolic coil, into a shape memory polymer (SMP) gripping/release mechanism. The apparatus enables the application of uniform pressure to secure a grip by the SMP mechanism on the deposit material via differential pressure between, for example, vacuum within the SMP mechanism and hydrostatic water pressure on the exterior of the SMP mechanism. The SMP tubing material of the mechanism is heated to above the glass transformation temperature (Tg) while reshaping, and subsequently cooled to below Tg to freeze the shape. The heating and/or cooling may, for example, be provided by the same water applied for pressurization or the heating can be applied by optical fibers packaged to the SMP mechanism for directing a laser beam, for example, thereunto. At a point of use, the deposit material is released from the SMP mechanism by reheating the SMP material to above the temperature Tg whereby it returns to its initial shape. The reheating of the SMP material may be carried out by injecting heated fluid (water) through an associated catheter or by optical fibers and an associated beam of laser light, for example.

  11. Micro devices using shape memory polymer patches for mated connections

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Fitch, Joseph P. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method and micro device for repositioning or retrieving miniature devices located in inaccessible areas, such as medical devices (e.g., stents, embolic coils, etc.) located in a blood vessel. The micro repositioning or retrieving device and method uses shape memory polymer (SMP) patches formed into mating geometries (e.g., a hoop and a hook) for re-attachment of the deposited medical device to a catheter or guidewire. For example, SMP or other material hoops are formed on the medical device to be deposited in a blood vessel, and SMP hooks are formed on the micro device attached to a guidewire, whereby the hooks on the micro device attach to the hoops on the medical device, or vice versa, enabling deposition, movement, re-deposit, or retrieval of the medical device. By changing the temperature of the SMP hooks, the hooks can be attached to or released from the hoops located on the medical device. An exemplary method for forming the hooks and hoops involves depositing a sacrificial thin film on a substrate, patterning and processing the thin film to form openings therethrough, depositing or bonding SMP materials in the openings so as to be attached to the substrate, and removing the sacrificial thin film.

  12. Self-Deploying Trusses Containing Shape-Memory Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schueler, Robert M.

    2008-01-01

    Composite truss structures are being developed that can be compacted for stowage and later deploy themselves to full size and shape. In the target applications, these smart structures will precisely self-deploy and support a large, lightweight space-based antenna. Self-deploying trusses offer a simple, light, and affordable alternative to articulated mechanisms or inflatable structures. The trusses may also be useful in such terrestrial applications as variable-geometry aircraft components or shelters that can be compacted, transported, and deployed quickly in hostile environments. The truss technology uses high-performance shape-memory-polymer (SMP) thermoset resin reinforced with fibers to form a helical composite structure. At normal operating temperatures, the truss material has the structural properties of a conventional composite. This enables truss designs with required torsion, bending, and compression stiffness. However, when heated to its designed glass transition temperature (Tg), the SMP matrix acquires the flexibility of an elastomer. In this state, the truss can be compressed telescopically to a configuration encompassing a fraction of its original volume. When cooled below Tg, the SMP reverts to a rigid state and holds the truss in the stowed configuration without external constraint. Heating the materials above Tg activates truss deployment as the composite material releases strain energy, driving the truss to its original memorized configuration without the need for further actuation. Laboratory prototype trusses have demonstrated repeatable self-deployment cycles following linear compaction exceeding an 11:1 ratio (see figure).

  13. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual ‘cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields—the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies—enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale. PMID:26074349

  14. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-06-01

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual `cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields--the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies--enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale.

  15. Reconfigurable photonic crystals enabled by pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Taylor, Curtis; Basile, Vito; Jiang, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Smart shape-memory polymers can memorize and recover their permanent shape in response to an external stimulus (for example, heat). They have been extensively exploited for a wide spectrum of applications ranging from biomedical devices to aerospace morphing structures. However, most of the existing shape-memory polymers are thermoresponsive and their performance is hindered by heat-demanding programming and recovery steps. Although pressure is an easily adjustable process variable such as temperature, pressure-responsive shape-memory polymers are largely unexplored. Here we report a series of shape-memory polymers that enable unusual 'cold' programming and instantaneous shape recovery triggered by applying a contact pressure at ambient conditions. Moreover, the interdisciplinary integration of scientific principles drawn from two disparate fields--the fast-growing photonic crystal and shape-memory polymer technologies--enables fabrication of reconfigurable photonic crystals and simultaneously provides a simple and sensitive optical technique for investigating the intriguing shape-memory effects at nanoscale. PMID:26074349

  16. Polymeric carriers: preclinical safety and the regulatory implications for design and development of polymer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Rogério; Duncan, Ruth

    2009-11-12

    Since the early 1990s polymer-protein conjugates (included PEGylated enzymes and cytokines), polymeric drugs and polymeric sequestrants have been entering the market as innovative polymer-based therapeutics. Initially these products were most frequently developed as novel anticancer agents; indeed they can be considered first generation "nanomedicines". More recently, a much broader range of life-threatening and debilitating diseases (e.g. viral infections, arthritis, multiple sclerosis and hormone abnormalities) have been targeted via intravenous (i.v.), subcutaneous (s.c.) or oral routes of administration. Given the increasing novelty of polymeric materials proposed for development as second-generation polymer therapeutics (with increasing complexity of conjugate composition), and the growing debate as to the safety of nanomedicines per se, the need for evolution of an appropriate regulatory framework is at the forefront of the scientific discussion. The adequacy of the current tests and models used to define safety are also constantly being reviewed. Here we describe the current status and future challenges in relation to these issues. PMID:19682513

  17. Self-assembly of Nanopatterns on Shape Memory Polymer Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhongbi

    Periodic surface nanostructures provide unique acoustic, electronic, optical and mechanical properties, with potential applications to metamaterials, sensors, catalysis, medicine, etc. However, assembling nanometer scale constituents into engineering scale components or devices poses tremendous challenges such as cost reduction and scalability. In this work, we will introduce a novel directed self-assembly method that has the potential to address these challenges by forming unidirectional micro- and nano-wrinkles on engineering scale polymer substrates. The approach utilizes a smart material, shape memory polymer (SMP), as the substrate in a bi-layer thin-film/substrate system. With a specially-designed programming scheme, the SMP substrate can retract in one direction while expand in the perpendicular direction in a heating process. Consequently, the thin film corrugates and the wrinkling patterns are aligned. A parametric study that investigates how the system parameters influence the surface topology will be presented. Besides wrinkles, surface defects that occurred concurrently were also observed. We will present a progressive damage scheme and a microdomain-based model to understand and possibly help preventing the formation of defects. In addition, this work will also address our efforts in shrinking the wrinkle feature size from several microns to the tens of nanometer range. Two methods, through which the minimum wrinkle wavelength was reduced from one micron to 300 nm and further down to 35 nm will be elaborated. Such aligned wrinkles whose wavelength spanning two orders of magnitude from as small as 35 nm to as large as 5 mum will open up avenues for numerous exciting applications. The application of using the self-assembled wrinkled surface as the back-reflector in solar cells to improve the power conversion efficiency will be discussed as a case study. The long-term stability of the wrinkle topology, which is essential to efficiency boost will be examined through a viscoelastic model. Another application of using wrinkled surfaces as templates to obtain one-dimensional nanoparticle arrays will be demonstrated. This complete bottom-up approach is simple, cost-effective and has the potential of large-scale fabrication. It is also expected to bring us much closer to transforming nanostructures into real products.

  18. Multidimensional Characterization of Thermally Actuated Shape Memory Polymer Stents 

    E-print Network

    Nash, Landon 1990-

    2012-04-23

    thermoplastic polymer solution and subsequently covalently crosslinking the polymer using UV irradiation to yield thermoset tubes. These crosslinked tubes were CO2 laser engraved to produce the complex stent geometry. Experiments were conducted to determine...

  19. Programmable and self-demolding microstructured molds fabricated from shape-memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Tobias; Bur, Julia; Reinhard, Maximilian; Schneider, Marc; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Hölscher, Hendrik

    2015-06-01

    We introduce shape memory polymers as materials to augment molds with programmable switching between different micro and nanostructures as functional features of the mold and self-demolding properties. These polymer molds can be used for hot embossing (or nanoimprinting) and casting. Furthermore, they enable the replication of nano- and microstructures on curved surfaces as well as embedded structures like on the inside walls of a microfluidic channel. The shape memory polymer molds can be replicated from master molds fabricated by conventional techniques. We tested their durability for microfabrication processes and demonstrated the advantages of shape memory molds for hot embossing and casting by replicating microstructures with high aspect ratios and optical grade surface quality.

  20. Constitutive model for a stress- and thermal-induced phase transition in a shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Zhou, Bo; Leng, Jinsong

    2014-10-01

    Recently, increasing applications of shape memory polymers have pushed forward the development of appropriate constitutive models for smart materials such as the shape memory polymer. During the heating process, the phase transition, which is a continuous time-dependent process, happens in the shape memory polymer, and various individual phases will form at different configuration temperatures. In addition, these phases can generally be divided into two parts: the frozen and active phase (Liu Y et al 2006 Int. J. Plast. 22 279-313). During the heating or cooling process, the strain will be stored or released with the occurring phase transition between these two parts. Therefore, a shape memory effect emerges. In this paper, a new type of model was developed to characterize the variation of the volume fraction in a shape memory polymer during the phase transition. In addition to the temperature variation, the applied stress was also taken as a significant influence factor on the phase transition. Based on the experimental results, an exponential equation was proposed to describe the relationship between the stress and phase transition temperature. For the sake of describing the mechanical behaviors of the shape memory polymer, a three-dimensional constitutive model was established. Also, the storage strain, which was the key factor of the shape memory effect, was also discussed in detail. Similar to previous works, we first explored the effect of applied stress on storage strain. Through comparisons with the DMA and the creep experimental results, the rationality and accuracy of the new phase transition and constitutive model were finally verified.

  1. Influence of strain rates on the mechanical behaviors of shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaogang; Liu, Liwu; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-09-01

    In the last few decades, shape memory polymers have demonstrated their major advantages of extremely high recovery strain, low density and low cost. Generally, the mechanical behavior of shape memory polymers is strongly dependent on the loading strain rates. Uniaxial tensile experiments were conducted on one kind of typical shape memory polymer (epoxy) at several different temperatures (348 K, 358 K, 368 K and 378 K) and true strain rates (0.25% s-1, 1.25% s-1 and 2.5% s-1). Thus, the influence of strain rate and temperature on the mechanical behavior of epoxy, in particular on the post yield stresses and the strain hardening behavior, were investigated through this experimental study. Based on our previous work Guo (2014 Smart Mater. Struct. 23 105019), a simplified model which can explain the shape memory effect of epoxy was proposed to predict the strain hardening behavior of the shape memory polymer. Based on the suggestion of Rault (1998 J. Non-Cryst. Solids 235-7 737-41), a linear compensation model was introduced to indicate the change in yield stresses with the increase of strain rate and temperature. Finally, the new model predictions for the true strain and stress behavior of epoxy were compared with the experimental results.

  2. Initiation of shape-memory effect by inductive heating of magnetic nanoparticles in thermoplastic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, R.; Kratz, K.; Weigel, T.; Lucka-Gabor, M.; Moneke, M.; Lendlein, A.

    2006-01-01

    In shape-memory polymers, changes in shape are mostly induced by heating, and exceeding a specific switching temperature, Tswitch. If polymers cannot be warmed up by heat transfer using a hot liquid or gaseous medium, noncontact triggering will be required. In this article, the magnetically induced shape-memory effect of composites from magnetic nanoparticles and thermoplastic shape-memory polymers is introduced. A polyetherurethane (TFX) and a biodegradable multiblock copolymer (PDC) with poly(p-dioxanone) as hard segment and poly(?-caprolactone) as soft segment were investigated as matrix component. Nanoparticles consisting of an iron(III)oxide core in a silica matrix could be processed into both polymers. A homogeneous particle distribution in TFX could be shown. Compounds have suitable elastic and thermal properties for the shape-memory functionalization. Temporary shapes of TFX compounds were obtained by elongating at increased temperature and subsequent cooling under constant stress. Cold-drawing of PDC compounds at 25°C resulted in temporary fixation of the mechanical deformation by 50–60%. The shape-memory effect of both composite systems could be induced by inductive heating in an alternating magnetic field (f = 258 kHz; H = 30 kA·m?1). The maximum temperatures achievable by inductive heating in a specific magnetic field depend on sample geometry and nanoparticle content. Shape recovery rates of composites resulting from magnetic triggering are comparable to those obtained by increasing the environmental temperature. PMID:16537442

  3. Investigation of interfacial shear stresses, shape fixity, and actuation strain in composites incorporating shape memory polymers and shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jungkyu; Headings, Leon; Dapino, Marcelo; Baur, Jeffery; Tandon, Gyaneshwar

    2015-03-01

    Shape memory composites (SMCs) based on shape memory alloys (SMAs) and shape memory polymers (SMPs) allow many design possibilities due to their controllable temperature-dependent mechanical properties. The complementary characteristics of SMAs and SMPs can be utilized in systems with shape recovery created by the SMA and shape fixity provided by the SMP. In this research, three SMC operating regimes are identified and the behavior of SMC structures is analyzed by focusing on composite shape fixity and interfacial stresses. Analytical models show that SMPs can be used to adequately fix the shape of SMA actuators and springs. COMSOL finite element simulations are in agreement with analytical expressions for shape fixity and interfacial stresses. Analytical models are developed for an end-coupled linear SMP-SMA two-way actuator and the predicted strain is shown to be in good agreement with experimental test results.

  4. Cancer-reactive memory T cells from bone marrow: Spontaneous induction and therapeutic potential (Review).

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, Volker

    2015-12-01

    Cognate interactions between naïve tumor antigen (TA)-specific T cells and TA-presenting dendritic cells (DCs) are facilitated by secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph nodes or the spleen. These can result either in TA-specific tolerance or, depending on environmental costimulatory signals, in TA-specific immune responses. In the present review, we describe such events for the bone marrow (BM) when blood-borne TA, released from the primary tumor or expressed by blood circulating tumor cells or DCs enters the BM stroma and parenchyma. We argue that cognate T-DC interactions in the BM result in immune responses and generation of memory T cells (MTCs) rather than tolerance because T cells in the BM show an increased level of pre-activation. The review starts with the spontaneous induction of cancer-reactive MTCs in the BM and the involvement of such MTCs in the control of tumor dormancy. The main part deals with the therapeutic potency of BM MTCs. This is a new area of research in which the authors research group has performed pioneering studies which are summarized. These include studies in animal tumor models, studies with human cells in tumor xenotransplant models and clinical studies. Based on observations of an enormous expansion capacity, longevity and therapeutic capacity of BM MTCs, a hypothesis is presented which suggests the involvement of stem-like MTCs. PMID:26459860

  5. High performance shape memory polymer networks based on rigid nanoparticle cores

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jie

    2010-01-01

    Smart materials that can respond to external stimuli are of widespread interest in biomedical science. Thermal-responsive shape memory polymers, a class of intelligent materials that can be fixed at a temporary shape below their transition temperature (Ttrans) and thermally triggered to resume their original shapes on demand, hold great potential as minimally invasive self-fitting tissue scaffolds or implants. The intrinsic mechanism for shape memory behavior of polymers is the freezing and activation of the long-range motion of polymer chain segments below and above Ttrans, respectively. Both Ttrans and the extent of polymer chain participation in effective elastic deformation and recovery are determined by the network composition and structure, which are also defining factors for their mechanical properties, degradability, and bioactivities. Such complexity has made it extremely challenging to achieve the ideal combination of a Ttrans slightly above physiological temperature, rapid and complete recovery, and suitable mechanical and biological properties for clinical applications. Here we report a shape memory polymer network constructed from a polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane nanoparticle core functionalized with eight polyester arms. The cross-linked networks comprising this macromer possessed a gigapascal-storage modulus at body temperature and a Ttrans between 42 and 48?°C. The materials could stably hold their temporary shapes for > 1 year at room temperature and achieve full shape recovery ? 51 °C in a matter of seconds. Their versatile structures allowed for tunable biodegradability and biofunctionalizability. These materials have tremendous promise for tissue engineering applications. PMID:20375285

  6. Multi-stimulus-responsive shape-memory polymer nanocomposite network cross-linked by cellulose nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Li, Ying; Yang, Guang; Zheng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Shaobing

    2015-02-25

    In this study, we developed a thermoresponsive and water-responsive shape-memory polymer nanocomposite network by chemically cross-linking cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG). The nanocomposite network was fully characterized, including the microstructure, cross-link density, water contact angle, water uptake, crystallinity, thermal properties, and static and dynamic mechanical properties. We found that the PEG[60]-PCL[40]-CNC[10] nanocomposite exhibited excellent thermo-induced and water-induced shape-memory effects in water at 37 °C (close to body temperature), and the introduction of CNC clearly improved the mechanical properties of the mixture of both PEG and PCL polymers with low molecular weights. In addition, Alamar blue assays based on osteoblasts indicated that the nanocomposites possessed good cytocompatibility. Therefore, this thermoresponsive and water-responsive shape-memory nanocomposite could be potentially developed into a new smart biomaterial. PMID:25647407

  7. Ultra-low power, highly uniform polymer memory by inserted multilayer graphene electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Byung Chul; Seong, Hyejeong; Kim, Jong Yun; Koo, Beom Jun; Kim, Sung Kyu; Yang, Sang Yoon; Gap Im, Sung; Choi, Sung-Yool

    2015-12-01

    Filament type resistive random access memory (RRAM) based on polymer thin films is a promising device for next generation, flexible nonvolatile memory. However, the resistive switching nonuniformity and the high power consumption found in the general filament type RRAM devices present critical issues for practical memory applications. Here, we introduce a novel approach not only to reduce the power consumption but also to improve the resistive switching uniformity in RRAM devices based on poly(1,3,5-trimethyl-3,4,5-trivinyl cyclotrisiloxane) by inserting multilayer graphene (MLG) at the electrode/polymer interface. The resistive switching uniformity was thereby significantly improved, and the power consumption was markedly reduced by 250 times. Furthermore, the inserted MLG film enabled a transition of the resistive switching operation from unipolar resistive switching to bipolar resistive switching and induced self-compliance behavior. The findings of this study can pave the way toward a new area of application for graphene in electronic devices.

  8. Shape memory polymer nanofibers and their composites: electrospinning, structure, performance and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Zhang, Zhichun; Zhou, Tianyang; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-10-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have been defined as a kind of smart materials under great investigation from academic research to industry applications. Research on SMPs and their composites, now incorporates a growing focus on nanofibers which offers new structures in microscopic level and the potential of enhanced performance of SMPs. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the development of shape memory polymer nanofibers and their composites, including the introduction of electrospinning technology, the morphology and structures of nanofibers (non-woven fibers, oriented fibers, core/shell fibers and functional particles added in the fibers), shape memory performance (thermal and mechanical properties, stimulus responsive behavior, multiple and two-way shape changing performance), as well as their potential applications in the fields of biomedical and tissue engineering.

  9. Current tissue engineering and novel therapeutic approaches to axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury using polymer scaffolds?

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Nicolas N.; McMahon, Siobhan; O’Brien, Timothy; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    This review highlights current tissue engineering and novel therapeutic approaches to axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury. The concept of developing 3-dimensional polymer scaffolds for placement into a spinal cord transection model has recently been more extensively explored as a solution for restoring neurologic function after injury. Given the patient morbidity associated with respiratory compromise, the discrete tracts in the spinal cord conveying innervation for breathing represent an important and achievable therapeutic target. The aim is to derive new neuronal tissue from the surrounding, healthy cord that will be guided by the polymer implant through the injured area to make functional reconnections. A variety of naturally derived and synthetic biomaterial polymers have been developed for placement in the injured spinal cord. Axonal growth is supported by inherent properties of the selected polymer, the architecture of the scaffold, permissive microstructures such as pores, grooves or polymer fibres, and surface modifications to provide improved adherence and growth directionality. Structural support of axonal regeneration is combined with integrated polymeric and cellular delivery systems for therapeutic drugs and for neurotrophic molecules to regionalize growth of specific nerve populations. PMID:19737633

  10. Tumortropic monocyte-mediated delivery of echogenic polymer bubbles and therapeutic vesicles for chemotherapy of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chia; Chiang, Wen-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Hui; Lin, Wan-Chi; Yu, Ching-Fang; Yen, Chia-Yi; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Chern, Chorng-Shyan; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Chiu, Hsin-Cheng

    2015-12-01

    Overcoming limitations often experienced in nanomedicine delivery toward hypoxia regions of malignant tumors remains a great challenge. In this study, a promising modality for active hypoxia drug delivery was developed by adopting tumortropic monocytes/macrophages as a cellular vehicle for co-delivery of echogenic polymer/C5F12 bubbles and doxorubicin-loaded polymer vesicles. Through the remote-controlled focused ultrasound (FUS)-triggered drug liberation, therapeutic monocytes show prominent capability of inducing apoptosis of cancer cells. The in vivo and ex vivo fluorescence imaging shows appreciable accumulation of cell-mediated therapeutics in tumor as compared to the nanoparticle counterpart residing mostly in liver. Inhibition of tumor recurrence with ?-ray pre-irradiated Tramp-C1-bearing mice receiving therapeutic monocytes intravenously alongside the FUS activation at tumor site was significantly observed. Immunohistochemical examination of tumor sections confirms successful cellular transport of therapeutic payloads to hypoxic regions and pronounced cytotoxic action against hypoxic cells. Following the intravenous administration, the cellular-mediated therapeutics can penetrate easily to a depth beyond 150 ?m from the nearest blood vessels within pre-irradiated tumor while nanoparticles are severely limited to a depth of ca 10-15 ?m. This work demonstrates the great promise of cellular delivery to carry therapeutic payloads for improving chemotherapy in hypoxia by combining external trigger for drug release. PMID:26318818

  11. Ferroelectric switching behavior in morphology controlled ferroelectric-semiconductor polymer blends for organic memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Eunhee; Su, Gregory; Kramer, Edward; Chabinyc, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Memory is a fundamental component of all modern electronic systems. Organic ferroelectric memories are advantageous because they are thin and lightweight devices that can be made printable, foldable, and stretchable. Organic ferroelectric memories comprise a physical blend of an organic semiconducting polymer and an insulating ferroelectric polymer as the active layer in a thin film diode. Controlling the thin film morphology in these blends is important for electrical properties of the resulting device. We have found that when a semiconducting thiophene polymer with polar alkanoate side chains (P3EPT) is blended with well-studied ferroelectric polymer poly [(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene] P (VDF-TrFE), the resulting film has low surface roughness and more controllable domain sizes compared to the widely used poly (3-hexylthiophene). This difference allows more reliable study of the ferroelectric switching behavior in devices with domain size of about 100nm. The influence of the 3D composition measured by a combination of methods, including soft x-ray microscopy, on the electrical characteristics will be presented.

  12. Direct Writing of Three-Dimensional Macroporous Photonic Crystals on Pressure-Responsive Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yin; Ni, Yongliang; Leo, Sin-Yen; Wang, Bingchen; Basile, Vito; Taylor, Curtis; Jiang, Peng

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a single-step direct writing technology for making three-dimensional (3D) macroporous photonic crystal patterns on a new type of pressure-responsive shape memory polymer (SMP). This approach integrates two disparate fields that do not typically intersect: the well-established templating nanofabrication and shape memory materials. Periodic arrays of polymer macropores templated from self-assembled colloidal crystals are squeezed into disordered arrays in an unusual shape memory "cold" programming process. The recovery of the original macroporous photonic crystal lattices can be triggered by direct writing at ambient conditions using both macroscopic and nanoscopic tools, like a pencil or a nanoindenter. Interestingly, this shape memory disorder-order transition is reversible and the photonic crystal patterns can be erased and regenerated hundreds of times, promising the making of reconfigurable/rewritable nanooptical devices. Quantitative insights into the shape memory recovery of collapsed macropores induced by the lateral shear stresses in direct writing are gained through fundamental investigations on important process parameters, including the tip material, the critical pressure and writing speed for triggering the recovery of the deformed macropores, and the minimal feature size that can be directly written on the SMP membranes. Besides straightforward applications in photonic crystal devices, these smart mechanochromic SMPs that are sensitive to various mechanical stresses could render important technological applications ranging from chromogenic stress and impact sensors to rewritable high-density optical data storage media. PMID:26447681

  13. Integrin-assisted drug delivery of nano-scaled polymer therapeutics bearing paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Boock, Anat; Miller, Keren; Sanchis, Joaquin; Lupu, Ruth; Vicent, María J.; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a prominent role in cancer progression. Anti-angiogenic therapy therefore, either alone or in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapy, offers a promising therapeutic approach. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a widely-used potent cytotoxic drug that also exhibits anti-angiogenic effects at low doses. However, its use, at its full potential, is limited by severe side effects. Here we designed and synthesized a targeted conjugate of PTX, a polymer and an integrin-targeted moiety resulting in a polyglutamic acid (PGA)-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)2] nano-scaled conjugate. Polymer conjugation converted PTX to a macromolecule, which passively targets the tumor tissue exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention effect, while extravasating via the leaky tumor neovasculature. The cyclic RGD peptidomimetic enhanced the effects previously seen for PGA-PTX alone, utilizing the additional active targeting to the ?v?3 integrin overexpressed on tumor endothelial and epithelial cells. This strategy is particularly valuable when tumors are well-vascularized, but they present poor vascular permeability. We show that PGA is enzymatically-degradable leading to PTX release under lysosomal acidic pH. PGA-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)2] inhibited the growth of proliferating ?v?3-expressing endothelial cells and several cancer cells. We also showed that PGA-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)2] blocked endothelial cells migration towards vascular endothelial growth factor; blocked capillary-like tube formation; and inhibited endothelial cells attachment to fibrinogen. Orthotopic studies in mice demonstrated preferential tumor accumulation of the RGD-bearing conjugate, leading to enhanced antitumor efficacy and a marked decrease in toxicity as compared with free PTX-treated mice. PMID:21376390

  14. Improved delivery of polymer therapeutics to prostate tumors using plasmonic photothermal therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gormley, Adam Joseph

    When a patient is presented with locally advanced prostate cancer, it is possible to provide treatment with curative intent. However, once the disease has formed distant metastases, the chances of survival drops precipitously. For this reason, proper management of the disease while it remains localized is of critical importance. Treating these malignant cells with cytotoxic agents is effective at cell killing; however, the nonspecific toxicity profiles of these drugs often limit their use until the disease has progressed and symptom palliation is required. Incorporation of these drugs in nanocarriers such as polymers help target them to tumors with a degree of specificity, though major vascular barriers limit their effective delivery. In this dissertation, it is shown that plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT) can be used to help overcome some of these barriers and improve delivery to prostate tumors. First, the concept of using PPTT to improve the delivery of macromolecules to solid tumors was validated. This was done by measuring the tumor uptake of albumin. Next, the concept of targeting gold nanorods (GNRs) directly to the tumor's vasculature to better modulate vascular response to heating was tested. Surface conjugation of cyclic RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) to GNRs improved their binding and uptake to endothelial cells in vitro, but not in vivo. Nontargeted GNRs and PPTT were then utilized to guide the location of polymer therapeutic delivery to prostate tumors. N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers, which were designed to be targeted to cells previously exposed to heat shock, were used in this study. Treatment of tumors with PPTT facilitated a burst accumulation of the copolymers over 4 hours, and heat shock targeting to cells allowed them to be retained for an extended period of time. Finally, the tumor localization of the HPMA copolymers following PPTT was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These results show that PPTT may be a useful tool to enhance delivery of polymeric drug carriers to locally advanced prostate tumors.

  15. Electron Beam Crosslinked Polyurethane Shape Memory Polymers with Tunable Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Nash, Landon D.; Volk, Brent L.; Ware, Taylor; Lewicki, James P.; Voit, Walter E.; Wilson, Thomas S.

    2014-01-01

    Novel electron beam crosslinked polyurethane shape memory polymers with advanced processing capabilities and tunable thermomechanical properties have been synthesized and characterized. We demonstrate the ability to manipulate crosslink density in order to finely tune rubbery modulus, strain capacity, ultimate tensile strength, recovery stress, and glass transition temperature. This objective is accomplished for the first time in a low-molecular-weight polymer system through the precise engineering of thermoplastic resin precursors suitable for mass thermoplastic processing. Neurovascular stent prototypes were fabricated by dip-coating and laser machining to demonstrate processability. PMID:25411531

  16. Polymer ferroelectric field-effect memory device with SnO channel layer exhibits record hole mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Khan, M. A.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2014-06-01

    Here we report for the first time a hybrid p-channel polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory device with record mobility. The memory device, fabricated at 200°C on both plastic polyimide and glass substrates, uses ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE) as the gate dielectric and transparent p-type oxide (SnO) as the active channel layer. A record mobility of 3.3 cm2V-1s-1, large memory window (~16 V), low read voltages (~-1 V), and excellent retention characteristics up to 5000 sec have been achieved. The mobility achieved in our devices is over 10 times higher than previously reported polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory with p-type channel. This demonstration opens the door for the development of non-volatile memory devices based on dual channel for emerging transparent and flexible electronic devices.

  17. Polymer ferroelectric field-effect memory device with SnO channel layer exhibits record hole mobility

    PubMed Central

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Khan, M. A.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report for the first time a hybrid p-channel polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory device with record mobility. The memory device, fabricated at 200°C on both plastic polyimide and glass substrates, uses ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE) as the gate dielectric and transparent p-type oxide (SnO) as the active channel layer. A record mobility of 3.3?cm2V?1s?1, large memory window (?16?V), low read voltages (??1?V), and excellent retention characteristics up to 5000?sec have been achieved. The mobility achieved in our devices is over 10 times higher than previously reported polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory with p-type channel. This demonstration opens the door for the development of non-volatile memory devices based on dual channel for emerging transparent and flexible electronic devices. PMID:24912617

  18. Shape Memory Polymers from Blends of Elastomers and Crystalline Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavicchi, Kevin; Brostowitz, Nicole; Hukill, Brent; Fairbairn, Heather

    2015-03-01

    This talk will present work on the fabrication of shape memory polymers (SMPs) by swelling natural with molten fatty acids. By this method a SMPs with excellent shape fixity and recovery can be obtained during free recovery after uniaxial deformation to 100% strain. Experiments to measure the shape memory properties under both stress and strain controlled conditions will be reported and compared. This fabrication method offers a number of advantages for preparing SMPs. First, it utilizes natural rubber as the base material for the SMP, which capitalizes on a high performance, commodity elastomer. Second, by blending a commercial polymer with a small molecule additive no additional chemistry is needed for the preparation of the SMP. Third, this route inverts the typically processing steps by crosslinking the permanent network prior to formation of the physically crosslinked reversible network. This offers a means to potentially generate a SMP from any preformed elastomeric article.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26633356

  20. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter. E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26633356

  1. A preliminary study on anti-irradiation performance of epoxy shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuelian; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-07-01

    As a new class of smart material, shape memory polymer (SMP) receives more and more attention. In this paper, in addition to the fabrication of a new type of epoxy SMP, the thermo-mechanical properties of the polymer with/without gamma irradiation were investigated and compared systematically. The radiation source is Co-60 and the total dosage of radiation is 1×104Gy. Changes of network structures of the polymer were investigated by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The influence of gamma irradiation on thermo and mechanical properties of the polymer were investigated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and tensile test, respectively. Furthermore, shape recovery behaviors of the polymer before/after the irradiation were compared too. Results show that the epoxy SMP possesses good chemical stability, glass transition temperature (Tg) determined by DSC decreased by 7°C after the irradiation. The gamma radiation has a slight influence on storage modulus, loss modulus and tan delta, respectively. No considerable change was found both in tensile strength and elongation at break after the gamma radiation. Finally, the shape recovery ratio of the polymer is near 100% with and without the gamma irradiation. Based on the above results, it can be demonstrated that the epoxy SMP prepared in the study possesses not only good thermo-mechanical properties but unique anti irradiation performance. The epoxy SMP shows potential for application of aerospace fields.

  2. Towards Therapeutic Applications of Arthropod Venom K+-Channel Blockers in CNS Neurologic Diseases Involving Memory Acquisition and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Gati, Christiano D. C.; Mortari, Márcia R.; Schwartz, Elisabeth F.

    2012-01-01

    Potassium channels are the most heterogeneous and widely distributed group of ion channels and play important functions in all cells, in both normal and pathological mechanisms, including learning and memory processes. Being fundamental for many diverse physiological processes, K+-channels are recognized as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of several Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, schizophrenia, HIV-1-associated dementia, and epilepsy. Blockers of these channels are therefore potential candidates for the symptomatic treatment of these neuropathies, through their neurological effects. Venomous animals have evolved a wide set of toxins for prey capture and defense. These compounds, mainly peptides, act on various pharmacological targets, making them an innumerable source of ligands for answering experimental paradigms, as well as for therapeutic application. This paper provides an overview of CNS K+-channels involved in memory acquisition and storage and aims at evaluating the use of highly selective K+-channel blockers derived from arthropod venoms as potential therapeutic agents for CNS diseases involving learning and memory mechanisms. PMID:22701481

  3. Thermally responsive polymer systems for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Xiaofan

    Responsive polymers are "smart" materials that are capable of performing prescribed, dynamic functions under an applied stimulus. In this dissertation, we explore several novel design strategies to develop thermally responsive polymers and polymer composites for self-healing, reversible adhesion and shape memory applications. In the first case described in Chapters 2 and 3, a thermally triggered self-healing material was prepared by blending a high-temperature epoxy resin with a thermoplastic polymer, poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL). The initially miscible system undergoes polymerization induced phase separation (PIPS) during the curing of epoxy and yields a variety of compositionally dependent morphologies. At a particular PCL loading, the cured blend displays a "bricks-and-mortar" morphology in which epoxy exists as interconnected spheres ("bricks") within a continuous PCL matrix ("mortar"). A heat induced "bleeding" phenomenon was observed in the form of spontaneous wetting of all free surfaces by the molten PCL, and is attributed to the volumetric thermal expansion of PCL above its melting point in excess of epoxy brick expansion, which we term differential expansive bleeding (DEB). This DEB is capable of healing damage such as cracks. In controlled self-healing experiments, heating of a cracked specimen led to PCL bleeding from the bulk that yields a liquid layer bridging the crack gap. Upon cooling, a "scar" composed of PCL crystals was formed at the site of the crack, restoring a significant portion of mechanical strength. We further utilized DEB to enable strong and thermally-reversible adhesion of the material to itself and to metallic substrates, without any requirement for macroscopic softening or flow. After that, Chapters 4--6 present a novel composite strategy for the design and fabrication of shape memory polymer composites. The basic approach involves physically combining two or more functional components into an interpenetrating fiber/matrix structure, allowing them to function in a synergistic fashion yet remain physically separated. This latter aspect is critical since it enables the control of overall composite properties and functions by separately tuning each component. Utilizing the intrinsic versatility of this approach, composites with novel properties and functions (in addition to "regular" shape memory) have been developed, including (1) shape memory elastomeric composites (SMECs; Chapter 4), (2) triple-shape polymeric composites (TSPCs; Chapter 5), and (3) electrically conductive nanocomposites (Chapter 6). Then in Chapter 7, by combining the success in both thermoplastic based self-healing and shape memory polymer composites, we demonstrate a thermally triggered self-healing coating. This coating features a unique "shape memory assisted self-healing" mechanism in which crack closure (via shape memory) and crack re-bonding (via melting and diffusion of the thermoplastic healing agent) are achieved simultaneously upon a single heating step, leading to both structural and functional (corrosion resistance) recovery. Finally, Chapter 8 presents for the first time the preparation of functionally graded shape memory polymers (SMPs) that, unlike conventional SMPs, have a range of glass transition temperatures that are spatially graded. This was achieved using a temperature gradient curing method that imposes different vitrification limits at different positions along the gradient. The resulting material is capable of responding to a wide range of thermal triggers and a good candidate for low-cost, material based temperature sensors. All the aforementioned materials and methods show great potential for practical applications due to their high performance, low cost and broad applicability. Some recommendations for future research and development are given in Chapter 9.

  4. Shape memory polymer (SMP) gripper with a release sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Schumann, Daniel L. (Concord, CA); Silva, Luiz Da (Danville, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A system for releasing a target material, such as an embolic coil from an SMP located at the end of a catheter utilizing an optical arrangement for releasing the material. The system includes a laser, laser driver, display panel, photodetector, fiber optics coupler, fiber optics and connectors, a catheter, and an SMP-based gripper, and includes a release sensing and feedback arrangement. The SMP-based gripper is heated via laser light through an optic fiber causing the gripper to release a target material (e.g., embolic coil for therapeutic treatment of aneurysms). Various embodiments are provided for coupling the laser light into the SMP, which includes specific positioning of the coils, removal of the fiber cladding adjacent the coil, a metal coating on the SMP, doping the SMP with a gradient absorbing dye, tapering the fiber optic end, coating the SMP with low refractive index material, and locating an insert between the fiber optic and the coil.

  5. S 17092: a prolyl endopeptidase inhibitor as a potential therapeutic drug for memory impairment. Preclinical and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Morain, Philippe; Lestage, Pierre; De Nanteuil, Guillaume; Jochemsen, Roeline; Robin, Jean-Loïc; Guez, David; Boyer, Pierre-Alain

    2002-01-01

    Any treatment that could positively modulate central neuropeptides levels would provide a promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of cognitive deficits associated with aging and/or neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, based on the activity in rodents, S 17092 (2S,3aS,7aS)-1][(R,R)-2-phenylcyclopropyl]carbonyl]-2-[(thiazolidin-3-yl)carbonyl]octahydro-1H-indole) has been selected as a potent inhibitor of cerebral prolyl-endopeptidase (PEP). By retarding the degradation of neuroactive peptides, S 17092 was successfully used in a variety of memory tasks. These tasks explored short-term, long-term, reference and working memory in aged mice, as well as in rodents and monkeys with chemically induced amnesia or spontaneous memory deficits. S 17092 has also been safely administered to humans, and showed a clear peripheral expression of its mechanism of action through its inhibitory effect upon PEP activity in plasma. S 17092 exhibited central effects, as evidenced by EEG recording in healthy volunteers, and could improve a delayed verbal memory task. Collectively, the preclinical and clinical effects of S 17092 have suggested a promising role for this compound as an agent for the treatment of cognitive disorders associated with cerebral aging. PMID:12070525

  6. Reticulation of low density shape memory polymer foam with an in vivo demonstration of vascular occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Miller, Matthew W.; Boyle, Anthony; Horn, John; Yang, Cheng-Kang; Wilson, Thomas S.; Ortega, Jason M.; Small, Ward; Nash, Landon; Skoog, Hunter; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Predominantly closed-cell low density shape memory polymer (SMP) foam was recently reported to be an effective aneurysm filling device in a porcine model (Rodriguez et al., Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A 2013: (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.34782)). Because healing involves blood clotting and cell migration throughout the foam volume, a more open-cell structure may further enhance the healing response. This research sought to develop a non-destructive reticulation process for this SMP foam to disrupt the membranes between pore cells. Non-destructive mechanical reticulation was achieved using a gravity-driven floating nitinol pin array coupled with vibratory agitation of the foam and supplemental chemical etching. Reticulation resulted in a reduced elastic modulus and increased permeability, but did not impede shape memory behavior. Reticulated foams were capable of achieving rapid vascular occlusion in an in vivo porcine model. PMID:25222869

  7. Reticulation of low density shape memory polymer foam with an in vivo demonstration of vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N; Miller, Matthew W; Boyle, Anthony; Horn, John; Yang, Cheng-Kang; Wilson, Thomas S; Ortega, Jason M; Small, Ward; Nash, Landon; Skoog, Hunter; Maitland, Duncan J

    2014-12-01

    Predominantly closed-cell low density shape memory polymer (SMP) foam was recently reported to be an effective aneurysm filling device in a porcine model (Rodriguez et al., Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A 2013: (http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jbm.a.34782)). Because healing involves blood clotting and cell migration throughout the foam volume, a more open-cell structure may further enhance the healing response. This research sought to develop a non-destructive reticulation process for this SMP foam to disrupt the membranes between pore cells. Non-destructive mechanical reticulation was achieved using a gravity-driven floating nitinol pin array coupled with vibratory agitation of the foam and supplemental chemical etching. Reticulation resulted in a reduced elastic modulus and increased permeability, but did not impede the shape memory behavior. Reticulated foams were capable of achieving rapid vascular occlusion in an in vivo porcine model. PMID:25222869

  8. Model Development and Simulation of the Response of Shape Memory Polymers 

    E-print Network

    Ghosh, Pritha 1983-

    2012-08-15

    stream_source_info Ghosh, Pritha.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 353645 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Ghosh, Pritha.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 MODEL DEVELOPMENT... AND SIMULATION OF THE RESPONSE OF SHAPE MEMORY POLYMERS A Dissertation by PRITHA BHUTNATH GHOSH Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by...

  9. Sequential Self-Folding Structures by 3D Printed Digital Shape Memory Polymers.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yiqi; Yu, Kai; Isakov, Michael S; Wu, Jiangtao; Dunn, Martin L; Jerry Qi, H

    2015-01-01

    Folding is ubiquitous in nature with examples ranging from the formation of cellular components to winged insects. It finds technological applications including packaging of solar cells and space structures, deployable biomedical devices, and self-assembling robots and airbags. Here we demonstrate sequential self-folding structures realized by thermal activation of spatially-variable patterns that are 3D printed with digital shape memory polymers, which are digital materials with different shape memory behaviors. The time-dependent behavior of each polymer allows the temporal sequencing of activation when the structure is subjected to a uniform temperature. This is demonstrated via a series of 3D printed structures that respond rapidly to a thermal stimulus, and self-fold to specified shapes in controlled shape changing sequences. Measurements of the spatial and temporal nature of self-folding structures are in good agreement with the companion finite element simulations. A simplified reduced-order model is also developed to rapidly and accurately describe the self-folding physics. An important aspect of self-folding is the management of self-collisions, where different portions of the folding structure contact and then block further folding. A metric is developed to predict collisions and is used together with the reduced-order model to design self-folding structures that lock themselves into stable desired configurations. PMID:26346202

  10. Sequential Self-Folding Structures by 3D Printed Digital Shape Memory Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yiqi; Yu, Kai; Isakov, Michael S.; Wu, Jiangtao; Dunn, Martin L.; Jerry Qi, H.

    2015-09-01

    Folding is ubiquitous in nature with examples ranging from the formation of cellular components to winged insects. It finds technological applications including packaging of solar cells and space structures, deployable biomedical devices, and self-assembling robots and airbags. Here we demonstrate sequential self-folding structures realized by thermal activation of spatially-variable patterns that are 3D printed with digital shape memory polymers, which are digital materials with different shape memory behaviors. The time-dependent behavior of each polymer allows the temporal sequencing of activation when the structure is subjected to a uniform temperature. This is demonstrated via a series of 3D printed structures that respond rapidly to a thermal stimulus, and self-fold to specified shapes in controlled shape changing sequences. Measurements of the spatial and temporal nature of self-folding structures are in good agreement with the companion finite element simulations. A simplified reduced-order model is also developed to rapidly and accurately describe the self-folding physics. An important aspect of self-folding is the management of self-collisions, where different portions of the folding structure contact and then block further folding. A metric is developed to predict collisions and is used together with the reduced-order model to design self-folding structures that lock themselves into stable desired configurations.

  11. Sequential Self-Folding Structures by 3D Printed Digital Shape Memory Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yiqi; Yu, Kai; Isakov, Michael S.; Wu, Jiangtao; Dunn, Martin L.; Jerry Qi, H.

    2015-01-01

    Folding is ubiquitous in nature with examples ranging from the formation of cellular components to winged insects. It finds technological applications including packaging of solar cells and space structures, deployable biomedical devices, and self-assembling robots and airbags. Here we demonstrate sequential self-folding structures realized by thermal activation of spatially-variable patterns that are 3D printed with digital shape memory polymers, which are digital materials with different shape memory behaviors. The time-dependent behavior of each polymer allows the temporal sequencing of activation when the structure is subjected to a uniform temperature. This is demonstrated via a series of 3D printed structures that respond rapidly to a thermal stimulus, and self-fold to specified shapes in controlled shape changing sequences. Measurements of the spatial and temporal nature of self-folding structures are in good agreement with the companion finite element simulations. A simplified reduced-order model is also developed to rapidly and accurately describe the self-folding physics. An important aspect of self-folding is the management of self-collisions, where different portions of the folding structure contact and then block further folding. A metric is developed to predict collisions and is used together with the reduced-order model to design self-folding structures that lock themselves into stable desired configurations. PMID:26346202

  12. Micro-mechanics of nanostructured carbon/shape memory polymer hybrid thin film.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming; Xu, Ben; Pei, Yutao; Lu, Haibao; Fu, Yong Qing

    2015-12-16

    This paper investigates the mechanics of hybrid shape memory polymer polystrene (PS) based nanocomposites with skeletal structures of CNFs/MWCNTs formed inside. Experimental results showed an increase of glass transition temperature (Tg) with CNF/MWCNT concentrations instead of a decrease of Tg in nanocomposites filled by spherical particles, and an increase in mechanical properties on both macro- and ?m-scales. Compared with CNFs, MWCNTs showed a better mechanical enhancement for PS nanocomposites due to their uniform distribution in the nanocomposites. In nanoindentation tests using the Berkovich tips, indentation size effects and pile-up effects appeared obviously for the nanocomposites, but not for pure PS. Experimental results revealed the enhancement mechanisms of CNFs/MWCNTs related to the secondary structures formed by nanofillers, including two aspects, i.e., filler-polymer interfacial connections and geometrical factors of nanofillers. The filler-polymer interfacial connections were strongly dependent on temperature, thus leading to the opposite changing trend of loss tangent with nanofiller concentrations, respectively, at low and high temperature. The geometrical factors of nanofillers were related to testing scales, further leading to the appearance of pile-up effects for nanocomposites in the nanoindentation tests, in which the size of indents was close to the size of the nanofiller skeleton. PMID:26448555

  13. Study on the activation of styrene-based shape memory polymer by medium-infrared laser light

    SciTech Connect

    Leng Jinsong; Yu Kai; Lan Xin; Zhang Dawei; Liu Yanju

    2010-03-15

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of shape memory polymer (SMP) activation by medium-infrared laser light. Medium-infrared light is transmitted by an optical fiber embedded in the SMP matrix, and the shape recovery process and temperature distribution are recorded by an infrared camera. Light-induced SMP exhibits potential applications in biomedicines and flexible displays.

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 53, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2006 2075 Inductively Heated Shape Memory Polymer for the

    E-print Network

    ferromagnetic particles were actuated in air by applying an alternating magnetic field to induce heating of ferrite particles in the SMP. These tests demonstrated the feasibility of SMP actuation by inductive, inductive heating magnetic particle, medical device, shape memory polymer (SMP). I. INTRODUCTION SHAPE

  15. Self-adjuvanting polymer-peptide conjugates as therapeutic vaccine candidates against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tzu-Yu; Hussein, Waleed M; Jia, Zhongfan; Ziora, Zyta M; McMillan, Nigel A J; Monteiro, Michael J; Toth, Istvan; Skwarczynski, Mariusz

    2013-08-12

    Dendrimers are structurally well-defined, synthetic polymers with sizes and physicochemical properties often resembling those of biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins). As a result, they are promising candidates for peptide-based vaccine delivery platforms. Herein, we established a synthetic pathway to conjugate a human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 protein-derived peptide antigen to a star-polymer to create a macromolecular vaccine candidate to treat HPV-related cancers. These conjugates were able to reduce tumor growth and eradicate E7-expressing TC-1 tumors in mice after a single immunization, without the help of any external adjuvant. PMID:23837675

  16. A Shape Memory Polymer Dialysis Needle Adapter for the Reduction of Hemodynamic Stress within Arteriovenous Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M; Small, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W; Loge, J; Maitland, D J

    2006-08-16

    A deployable, shape memory polymer adapter is investigated for reducing the hemodynamic stress caused by a dialysis needle flow within an arteriovenous graft. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of dialysis sessions with and without the adapter demonstrate that the adapter provides a significant decrease in the wall shear stress. In vitro flow visualization measurements are made within a graft model following delivery and actuation of a prototype shape memory polymer adapter. Vascular access complications resulting from arteriovenous (AV) graft failures account for over $1 billion per year in the health care costs of dialysis patients in the U.S.[1] The primary mode of failure of arteriovenous fistulas (AVF's) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts is the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and the subsequent formation of stenotic lesions, resulting in a graft flow decline. The hemodynamic stresses arising within AVF's and PTFE grafts play an important role in the pathogenesis of IH. Studies have shown that vascular damage can occur in regions where there is flow separation, oscillation, or extreme values of wall shear stress (WSS).[2] Nevaril et al.[3] show that exposure of red blood cells to WSS's on the order of 1500 dynes/cm2 can result in hemolysis. Hemodynamic stress from dialysis needle flow has recently been investigated for the role it plays in graft failure. Using laser Doppler velocimetry measurements, Unnikrishnan et al.[4] show that turbulence intensities are 5-6 times greater in the AV flow when the needle flow is present and that increased levels of turbulence exist for approximately 7-8cm downstream of the needle. Since the AVF or PTFE graft is exposed to these high levels of hemodynamic stress several hours each week during dialysis sessions, it is quite possible that needle flow is an important contributor to vascular access occlusion.[4] We present a method for reducing the hemodynamic stress in an AV graft by tailoring the fluid dynamics of the dialysis needle flow using a deployable shape memory polymer (SMP) dialysis needle adapter. Such an adapter is deployed through the needle into the graft where it is actuated into an expanded shape using thermal energy. The expanded adapter has a tube-like shape, in which the distal end has a larger cross-sectional area than that of the needle. When the dialysis session is completed, the adapter is retracted through the needle. In this initial study, we conduct computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to assess the changes in the hemodynamic stress on a graft wall when the SMP adapter is utilized. Additionally, we fabricate a prototype SMP adapter and deploy it in an in vitro model of an AV graft.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of Cylindrical Light Diffusers Comprised of Shape Memory Polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Buckley, P R; Wilson, T S; Loge, J M; Maitland, K D; Maitland, D J

    2007-01-29

    We have developed a technique for constructing light diffusing devices comprised of a flexible shape memory polymer (SMP) cylindrical diffuser attached to the tip of an optical fiber. Devices were fabricated by casting an SMP rod over the cleaved tip of an optical fiber and media blasting the SMP rod to create a light diffusing surface. The axial and polar emission profiles and circumferential (azimuthal) uniformity were characterized for various blasting pressures, nozzle-to-sample distances, and nozzle translation speeds. The diffusers were generally strongly forward-directed and consistently withstood over 8 W of incident infrared laser light without suffering damage when immersed in water. These devices are suitable for various endoluminal and interstitial biomedical applications.

  18. Modeling thermo-mechanical behaviors of reinforced shape memory polymer under cyclic loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bo; Lan, Xin; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2009-07-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis(DMA) tests are conducted on styrene-based fiber reinforced shape memory polymer (SMP) to investigate its glass transition behaviors. Results show the properties of stiffness, damping and energy dissipation of the reinforced SMP are obviously better than that of the pure SMP during the process of glass transition. Static threepoint bending tests are performed on the reinforced SMP to determine its stiffness and strength. Results show the reinforcement in the reinforced SMP improve the material properties of stiffness and strength at the room temperature. Cyclic three-point bending tests are operated to study the material training effect of the reinforced SMP. A training evolutional equation is established to describe the material training effect of the reinforced SMP. Numerical results show the training evolutional equation is able to predict the material training effect of the reinforced SMP effectively.

  19. Thermomechanical Properties, Collapse Pressure, and Expansion of Shape Memory Polymer Neurovascular Stent Prototypes

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Géraldine M.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Small, Ward; Hartman, Jonathan; Benett, William J.; Matthews, Dennis L.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymer stent prototypes were fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. Commercial stents are generally made of stainless steel or other alloys. These alloys are too stiff and prevent most stent designs from being able to navigate small and tortuous vessels to reach intracranial lesions. A solid tubular model and a high flexibility laser etched model are presented. The stents were tested for collapse in a pressure chamber. At 37°C, the full collapse pressure was comparable to that of commercially available stents, and higher than the estimated maximum pressure exerted by intracranial arteries. However, there is a potential for onset of collapse, which needs further study. The stents were crimped and expanded, the laser-etched stent showed full recovery with an expansion ratio of 2.7 and a 1% axial shortening. PMID:19107804

  20. Fabrication of Highly Uniform Nanoparticles from Recombinant Silk-Elastinlike Protein Polymers for Therapeutic Agent Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Anumolu, Rajasekhar; Gustafson, Joshua A.; Magda, Jules J.; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Pease, Leonard F.

    2011-01-01

    Here we generate silk-elastinlike protein (SELP) polymeric nanoparticles and demonstrate precise control over their dimensions using an electrospray differential mobility analyzer (ES-DMA). Electrospray produces droplets encompassing several polymer strands. Evaporation ensues, leading polymer strands to accumulate at the droplet interface forming a hollow nanoparticle. The resulting nanoparticle size distributions which govern particle yield, depend on buffer concentration to the ?1/3 power, polymer concentration to the 1/3 power, and ratio of silk to elastin blocks. Three recombinantly tuned ratios of silk to elastin blocks, 8:16, 4:8, and 4:16, respectively named SELP-815K, SELP-47K, and SELP-415K, are employed with the latter ratio resulting in a thinner shell and larger diameter for the nanoparticles than the former. The DMA narrows the size distribution by electrostatically classifying the aerosolized nanoparticles. These highly uniform nanoparticles have variations of 1.2 nm and 1.4 nm for 24.0 nm and 36.0 nm particles, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the nanoparticles to be faceted, as a buckling instability releases compression energy arising from evaporation after the shell has formed by bending it. A thermodynamic equilibrium exists between compression and bending energies, where the facet length is 1/2 the particle diameter, in agreement with experiments. Rod-like particles also formed from polymer stabilized filaments when the viscous length exceeds the jet radius at higher solution viscosities. The unusual uniformity in composition and dimension indicates the potential of these nanoparticles to deliver bioactive and imaging agents. PMID:21696150

  1. Lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles as a new generation therapeutic delivery platform: a review.

    PubMed

    Hadinoto, Kunn; Sundaresan, Ajitha; Cheow, Wean Sin

    2013-11-01

    Lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs) are core-shell nanoparticle structures comprising polymer cores and lipid/lipid-PEG shells, which exhibit complementary characteristics of both polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes, particularly in terms of their physical stability and biocompatibility. Significantly, the LPNs have recently been demonstrated to exhibit superior in vivo cellular delivery efficacy compared to that obtained from polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes. Since their inception, the LPNs have advanced significantly in terms of their preparation strategy and scope of applications. Their preparation strategy has undergone a shift from the conceptually simple two-step method, involving preformed polymeric nanoparticles and lipid vesicles, to the more principally complex, yet easier to perform, one-step method, relying on simultaneous self-assembly of the lipid and polymer, which has resulted in better products and higher production throughput. The scope of LPNs' applications has also been extended beyond single drug delivery for anticancer therapy, to include combinatorial and active targeted drug deliveries, and deliveries of genetic materials, vaccines, and diagnostic imaging agents. This review details the current state of development for the LPNs preparation and applications from which we identify future research works needed to bring the LPNs closer to its clinical realization. PMID:23872180

  2. Silicone Membranes to Inhibit Water Uptake into Thermoset Polyurethane Shape-Memory Polymer Conductive Composites

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ya-Jen; Infanger, Stephen; Grunlan, Melissa A.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    Electroactive shape memory polymer (SMP) composites capable of shape actuation via resistive heating are of interest for various biomedical applications. However, water uptake into SMPs will produce a depression of the glass transition temperature (Tg) resulting in shape recovery in vivo. While water actuated shape recovery may be useful, it is foreseen to be undesirable during early periods of surgical placement into the body. Silicone membranes have been previously reported to prevent release of conductive filler from an electroactive polymer composite in vivo. In this study, a silicone membrane was used to inhibit water uptake into a thermoset SMP composite containing conductive filler. Thermoset polyurethane (PU) SMPs were loaded with either 5 wt% carbon black (CB) or 5 wt% carbon nanotubes (CNT) and subsequently coated with either an Al2O3- or silica-filled silicone membrane. It was observed that the silicone membranes, particularly the silica-filled membrane, reduced the rate of water absorption (37 °C) and subsequent Tg depression versus uncoated composites. In turn, this led to a reduction in the rate of recovery of the permanent shape when exposed to water at 37 °C. PMID:25663711

  3. Fabrication of a Bioactive, PCL-based "Self-fitting" Shape Memory Polymer Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Nail, Lindsay N; Zhang, Dawei; Reinhard, Jessica L; Grunlan, Melissa A

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering has been explored as an alternative strategy for the treatment of critical-sized cranio-maxillofacial (CMF) bone defects. Essential to the success of this approach is a scaffold that is able to conformally fit within an irregular defect while also having the requisite biodegradability, pore interconnectivity and bioactivity. By nature of their shape recovery and fixity properties, shape memory polymer (SMP) scaffolds could achieve defect "self-fitting." In this way, following exposure to warm saline (~60 ºC), the SMP scaffold would become malleable, permitting it to be hand-pressed into an irregular defect. Subsequent cooling (~37 ºC) would return the scaffold to its relatively rigid state within the defect. To meet these requirements, this protocol describes the preparation of SMP scaffolds prepared via the photochemical cure of biodegradable polycaprolactone diacrylate (PCL-DA) using a solvent-casting particulate-leaching (SCPL) method. A fused salt template is utilized to achieve pore interconnectivity. To realize bioactivity, a polydopamine coating is applied to the surface of the scaffold pore walls. Characterization of self-fitting and shape memory behaviors, pore interconnectivity and in vitro bioactivity are also described. PMID:26556112

  4. Multiple shape memory polymers based on laminates formed from thiol-click chemistry based polymerizations.

    PubMed

    Podgórski, M; Wang, C; Bowman, C N

    2015-09-14

    This investigation details the formation of polymer network trilayer laminates formed by thiol-X click chemistries, and their subsequent implementation and evaluation for quadruple shape memory behavior. Thiol-Michael addition and thiol-isocyanate-based crosslinking reactions were employed to fabricate each of the laminate's layers with independent control of the chemistry and properties of each layer and outstanding interlayer adhesion and stability. The characteristic features of step-growth thiol-X reactions, such as excellent network uniformity and narrow thermal transitions as well as their stoichiometric nature, enabled fabrication of trilayer laminates with three distinctly different glass transition temperatures grouped within a narrow range of 100 °C. Through variations in the layer thicknesses, a step-wise modulus drop as a function of temperature was achieved. This behavior allowed multi-step programming and the demonstration and quantification of quadruple shape memory performance. As is critical for this performance, the interface connecting the layers was evaluated in stoichiometric as well as off-stoichiometric systems. It was shown that the laminated structures exhibit strong interfacial binding and hardly suffer any delamination during cyclic material testing and deformation. PMID:26234205

  5. Estimation of creep and recovery behavior of a shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Takenobu; Tao, Takayuki; Somiya, Satoshi

    2015-09-01

    The shape recovery and shape fixity properties of shape memory polymers (SMPs), advanced functional materials, were investigated in this study. Although the shape recovery behavior of these polymers has been examined from a viscoelastic point of view, questions remain with regard to quantifying the recovery behavior of SMPs. SMPs can recover their shape after the molding process; this recovery occurs via creep recovery and/or shape recovery; an estimation of SMP recovery requires a good understanding of both processes. In this study, the time-temperature superposition principle was applied to the creep and shape recovery behavior of SMPs. The creep behavior was estimated using an experimentally obtained master curve and time-temperature shift factors. Our estimated results were in good agreement with the experimental data. However, the estimation of the creep recovery with changing temperature below or above the glass transition temperature was not successful due to the lack of consideration of the shape recovery behavior. The time and temperature dependency of the shape recovery were confirmed for creep behavior, using the master curve for the recovery ratio and the corresponding shift factors for shape recovery. The values of the shape recovery shift factors differed from those for the time-temperature shift factors obtained for creep behavior. Therefore, these shape recovery shift factors were used in the estimation of creep and shape recovery behavior using the master curve for the creep tests. The estimated results were closer to the results obtained experimentally. Moreover, our results indicated that the recovery behavior above Tg was dominated by shape recovery as a result of polymer viscoelasticity.

  6. An approach to predict the shape-memory behavior of amorphous polymers from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuki, Ákos; Czifrák, Katalin; Karger-Kocsis, József; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2015-02-01

    The prediction of shape-memory behavior is essential regarding the design of a smart material for different applications. This paper proposes a simple and quick method for the prediction of shape-memory behavior of amorphous shape memory polymers (SMPs) on the basis of a single dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) temperature sweep at constant frequency. All the parameters of the constitutive equations for linear viscoelasticity are obtained by fitting the DMA curves. The change with the temperature of the time-temperature superposition shift factor ( a T ) is expressed by the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model near and above the glass transition temperature ( T g ), and by the Arrhenius law below T g . The constants of the WLF and Arrhenius equations can also be determined. The results of our calculations agree satisfactorily with the experimental free recovery curves from shape-memory tests.

  7. Solution-processable low-voltage and flexible floating-gate memories based on an n-type polymer semiconductor and high-k polymer gate dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Yan, Feng

    2014-08-13

    High-performance low-voltage flash memories based on organic floating-gate field-effect transistors are prepared by a solution process for the first time. Transistors with a high-mobility n-type polymer semiconductor, poly{[N,N(')-bis(2-octyldodecyl)naphthalene-1,4,5,8-bis(dicarboximide)-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5'-(2,2'-bithiophene)}, and a high-k polymer gate dielectric, poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene-chlorofluoroethylene) (k ? 60), are successfully fabricated on flexible substrates. A thin layer of Au nanoparticles is embedded in the gate dielectric, which can store injected charge from the channel and result in a memory effect. The organic memories demonstrate high carrier mobilities (>0.3 cm(2)/(V s)), low program/erase voltages (±6 V), little degradation after 10(5) program/erase cycles, and good retention after 10(5) s, which suggest great promise in the application of nonvolatile memories in flexible electronics. PMID:25026221

  8. Demonstration of a multiscale modeling technique: prediction of the stress-strain response of light activated shape memory polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beblo, Richard V.; Mauck Weiland, Lisa

    2010-09-01

    Presented is a multiscale modeling method applied to light activated shape memory polymers (LASMPs). LASMPs are a new class of shape memory polymer (SMPs) being developed for adaptive structures applications where a thermal stimulus is undesirable. LASMP developmental emphasis is placed on optical manipulation of Young's modulus. A multiscale modeling approach is employed to anticipate the soft and hard state moduli solely on the basis of a proposed molecular formulation. Employing such a model shows promise for expediting down-selection of favorable formulations for synthesis and testing, and subsequently accelerating LASMP development. An empirical adaptation of the model is also presented which has applications in system design once a formulation has been identified. The approach employs rotational isomeric state theory to build a molecular scale model of the polymer chain yielding a list of distances between the predicted crosslink locations, or r-values. The r-values are then fitted with Johnson probability density functions and used with Boltzmann statistical mechanics to predict stress as a function of the strain of the phantom polymer network. Empirical adaptation for design adds junction constraint theory to the modeling process. Junction constraint theory includes the effects of neighboring chain interactions. Empirical fitting results in numerically accurate Young's modulus predictions. The system is modular in nature and thus lends itself well to being adapted to other polymer systems and development applications.

  9. Biodegradable polymer nanocarriers for therapeutic antisense microRNA delivery in living animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Sekar, Narayana M.; Sekar, Thillai V.

    2012-03-01

    MicroRNAs are endogenous regulators of gene expression, deregulated in several cellular diseases including cancer. Altering the cellular microenvironment by modulating the microRNAs functions can regulate different genes involved in major cellular processes, and this approach is now being investigated as a promising new generation of molecularly targeted anti-cancer therapies. AntagomiRs (Antisense-miRNAs) are a novel class of chemically modified stable oligonucleotides used for blocking the functions of endogenous microRNAs, which are overexpressed. A key challenge in achieving effective microRNAbased therapeutics lies in the development of an efficient delivery system capable of specifically delivering antisense oligonucleotides and target cancer cells in living animals. We are now developing an effective delivery system designed to selectively deliver antagomiR- 21 and antagomiR-10b to triple negative breast cancer cells, and to revert tumor cell metastasis and invasiveness. The FDA-approved biodegradable PLGA-nanoparticles were selected as a carrier for antagomiRs delivery. Chemically modified antagomiRs (antagomiR-21 and antagomiR-10b) were co-encapsulated in PEGylated-PLGA-nanoparticles by using the double-emulsification (W/O/W) solvent evaporation method, and the resulting average particle size of 150-200nm was used for different in vitro and in vivo experiments. The antagomiR encapsulated PLGA-nanoparticles were evaluated for their in vitro antagomiRs delivery, intracellular release profile, and antagomiRs functional effects, by measuring the endogenous cellular targets, and the cell growth and metastasis. The xenografts of tumor cells in living mice were used for evaluating the anti-metastatic and anti-invasive properties of cells. The results showed that the use of PLGA for antagomiR delivery is not only efficient in crossing cell membrane, but can also maintain functional intracellular antagomiRs level for a extended period of time and achieve therapeutic effect in living animals.

  10. Strong electroactive biodegradable shape memory polymer networks based on star-shaped polylactide and aniline trimer for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Meihua; Wang, Ling; Ge, Juan; Guo, Baolin; Ma, Peter X

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of functional shape memory polymer (SMP) for tissue engineering remains a challenge. Here the synthesis of strong electroactive shape memory polymer (ESMP) networks based on star-shaped polylactide (PLA) and aniline trimer (AT) is reported. Six-armed PLAs with various chain lengths were chemically cross-linked to synthesize SMP. After addition of an electroactive AT segment into the SMP, ESMP was obtained. The polymers were characterized by (1)H NMR, GPC, FT-IR, CV, DSC, DMA, tensile test, and degradation test. The SMP and ESMP exhibited strong mechanical properties (modulus higher than GPa) and excellent shape memory performance: short recovery time (several seconds), high recovery ratio (over 94%), and high fixity ratio (almost 100%). Moreover, cyclic voltammetry test confirmed the electroactivity of the ESMP. The ESMP significantly enhanced the proliferation of C2C12 cells compared to SMP and linear PLA (control). In addition, the ESMP greatly improved the osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 myoblast cells compared to PH10 and PLA in terms of ALP enzyme activity, immunofluorescence staining, and relative gene expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). These intelligent SMPs and electroactive SMP with strong mechanical properties, tunable degradability, good electroactivity, biocompatibility, and enhanced osteogenic differentiation of C2C12 cells show great potential for bone regeneration. PMID:25742188

  11. Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKean, Kevin

    1983-01-01

    Discusses current research (including that involving amnesiacs and snails) into the nature of the memory process, differentiating between and providing examples of "fact" memory and "skill" memory. Suggests that three brain parts (thalamus, fornix, mammilary body) are involved in the memory process. (JN)

  12. Thermoresponsive semicrystalline poly(?-caprolactone) networks: exploiting cross-linking with cinnamoyl moieties to design polymers with tunable shape memory.

    PubMed

    Garle, Amit; Kong, Sany; Ojha, Umaprassana; Budhlall, Bridgette M

    2012-02-01

    The overall goal of this study was to synthesize semicrystalline poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) copolymer networks with stimuli-responsive shape memory behavior. Herein, we investigate the influence of a cinnamoyl moiety to design shape memory polymer networks with tunable transition temperatures. The effect of various copolymer architectures (random or ABA triblock), the molecular weight of the crystalline domains, PCL diol, (M(w) 1250 or 2000 g mol(-1)) and its composition in the triblock (50 or 80 mol %) were also investigated. The polymer microstructures were confirmed by NMR, DSC, WAXS and UV-vis spectroscopic techniques. The thermal and mechanical properties and the cross-linking density of the networks were characterized by DSC, tensile testing and solvent swelling, respectively. Detailed thermomechanical investigations conducted using DMA showed that shape memory behavior was obtained only in the ABA triblock copolymers. The best shape memory fixity, R(f) of ~99% and shape recovery, R(r) of ~99% was obtained when PCL diol with M(w) 2000 g mol(-1) was incorporated in the triblock copolymer at a concentration of 50 mol %. The series of triblock copolymers with PCL at 50 mol % also showed mechanical properties with tunable shape memory transition temperatures, ranging from 54 °C to close to body temperature. Our work establishes a general design concept for inducing a shape memory effect into any semicrystalline polyester network. More specifically, it can be applied to systems which have the highest transition temperature closest to the application temperature. An advantage of our novel copolymers is their ability to be cross-linked with UV radiation without any initiator or chemical cross-linker. Possible applications are envisioned in the area of endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke and cerebrovascular aneurysms, and for femoral stents. PMID:22252722

  13. Sensing and actuating capabilities of a shape memory polymer composite integrated with hybrid filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Yu, Kai; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, hybrid fillers, including carbon black (CB) and chopped short carbon fibers (SCF), are integrated into a styrene-based shape memory polymer (SMP) with sensing and actuating capabilities. The hybrid filler is expected to transform insulating SMP into conducting. Static mechanical properties of the SMP composites containing various filler concentrations of hybrid filler reinforcement are studied first, and it is theoretically and experimentally confirmed that the mechanical properties are significantly improved by a factor of filler content of SCF. The excellent electrical properties of this novel type of SMP composite are determined by a four-point-probe method. As a consequence, the sensing properties of SMP composite filled with 5 wt% CB and 2 wt% SCF are characterized by functions of temperature and strain. These two experimental results both aid the use of SMP composites as sensors that respond to changes in temperature or mechanical loads. On the other hand, the actuating capability of SMP composites is also validated and demonstrated. The dynamic mechanical analysis result reveals that the output strength of SMP composites is improved with an increase in filler content of SCF. The actuating capability of SMP composites is subsequently demonstrated in a series of photographs.

  14. Fabrication and In Vitro Deployment of a Laser-Activated Shape Memory Polymer Vascular Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, G M; Small IV, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W J; Matthews, D L; Hartman, J; Maitland, D J

    2007-04-25

    Vascular stents are small tubular scaffolds used in the treatment of arterial stenosis (narrowing of the vessel). Most vascular stents are metallic and are deployed either by balloon expansion or by self-expansion. A shape memory polymer (SMP) stent may enhance flexibility, compliance, and drug elution compared to its current metallic counterparts. The purpose of this study was to describe the fabrication of a laser-activated SMP stent and demonstrate photothermal expansion of the stent in an in vitro artery model. A novel SMP stent was fabricated from thermoplastic polyurethane. A solid SMP tube formed by dip coating a stainless steel pin was laser-etched to create the mesh pattern of the finished stent. The stent was crimped over a fiber-optic cylindrical light diffuser coupled to an infrared diode laser. Photothermal actuation of the stent was performed in a water-filled mock artery. At a physiological flow rate, the stent did not fully expand at the maximum laser power (8.6 W) due to convective cooling. However, under zero flow, simulating the technique of endovascular flow occlusion, complete laser actuation was achieved in the mock artery at a laser power of {approx}8 W. We have shown the design and fabrication of an SMP stent and a means of light delivery for photothermal actuation. Though further studies are required to optimize the device and assess thermal tissue damage, photothermal actuation of the SMP stent was demonstrated.

  15. A simplified constitutive model for predicting shape memory polymers deformation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunxin; Guo, Siu-Siu; He, Yuhao; Liu, Zishun

    2015-12-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) can keep a temporary shape after pre-deformation at a higher temperature and subsequent cooling. When they are reheated, their original shapes can be recovered. Such special characteristics of SMPs make them widely used in aerospace structures, biomedical devices, functional textiles and other devices. Increasing usefulness of SMPs motivates us to further understand their thermomechanical properties and deformation behavior, of which the development of appropriate constitutive models for SMPs is imperative. There is much work in literatures that address constitutive models of the thermo-mechanical coupling in SMPs. However, due to their complex forms, it is difficult to apply these constitutive models in the real world. In this paper, a three-element model with simple form is proposed to investigate the thermo-mechanical small strain (within 10%) behavior of polyurethane under uniaxial tension. Two different cases of heated recovery are considered: (1) unconstrained free strain recovery and (2) stress recovery under full constraint at a strain level fixed during low temperature unloading. To validate the model, simulated and predicted results are compared with Tobushi's experimental results and good agreement can be observed.

  16. Opacification of Shape Memory Polymer Foam Designed for Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jennifer N.; Yu, Ya-Jen; Miller, Matthew W.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Hartman, Jonathan; Clubb, Fred J.; Gentry, Brandon; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    Shape memory polymer (SMP) foam possesses structural and mechanical characteristics that make them very promising as an alternative treatment for intracranial aneurysms. Our SMP foams have low densities, with porosities as high as 98.8%; favorable for catheter delivery and aneurysm filling, but unfavorable for attenuating X-rays. This lack of contrast impedes the progression of this material becoming a viable medical device. This paper reports on increasing radioopacity by incorporating a high-Z element, tungsten particulate filler to attenuate X-rays, while conserving similar physical properties of the original non-opacified SMP foams. The minimal amount of tungsten for visibility was determined and subsequently incorporated into SMP foams, which were then fabricated into samples of increasing thicknesses. These samples were imaged through a pig’s skull to demonstrate radio-opacity in situ. Quantification of the increase in image contrast was performed via image processing methods and standard curves were made for varying concentrations of tungsten doped solid and foam SMP. 4% by volume loading of tungsten incorporated into our SMP foams has proven to be an effective method for improving radio-opacity of this material while maintaining the mechanical, physical and chemical properties of the original formulation. PMID:22101759

  17. Production of bioinspired and rationally designed polymer hydrogels for controlled delivery of therapeutic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Hye

    Hydrogel systems for controlled delivery therapeutic growth factors have been developed in a wide spectrum of strategies: these systems aim for the release of growth factors via a passive diffusion, electrostatic interaction, degradation of hydrogels, and responsiveness to external stimuli. Heparin, a highly sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG), was employed for a targeted delivery system of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to endothelial cells overexpressing a relevant receptor VEGFR-2. Addition of dimeric VEGF to 4-arm star-shaped poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) immobilized with low-molecular weight heparin (LMWH) afforded a non-covalently assembled hydrogel via interaction between heparin and VEGF, with storage modulus 10 Pa. The release of VEGF and hydrogel erosion reached maximum 100 % at day 4 in the presence of VEGFR-2 overexpressing pocine aortic endothelial cell (PAE/KDR), while those of 80% were achieved via passive release at day 5 in the presence of PAE cell lacking VEGFR-2 or in the absence of cell, indicating that the release of VEGF was in targeted manner toward cell receptor. The proliferation of PAE/KDR in the presence of [PEG-LMWH/VEGF] hydrogel was greater by ca. 30% at day 4 compared to that of PAE, confirming that the release of VEGF was in response to the cellular demand. The phosphorylation fraction of VEGFR-2 on PAE/KDR was greater in the presence of [PEG-LMWH/VEGF] hydrogel, increasing from 0.568 at day 1 to 0.790 at day 4, whereas it was maintained at 0.230 at day 4 in the presence of [PEG-LMWH] hydrogel. This study has proven that this hydrogel, assembled via bio-inspired non-covalent interaction, liberating VEGFon celluar demand to target cell, eroding upon VEGF release, and triggering endothelial cell proliferation, could be used in multiple applications including targeted delivery and angiogenesis. Heparin has been widely exploited in growth factor delivery systems owing to its ability to bind many growth factors through the flexible patterns of functional groups. However, heterogeneity in the composition and in the polydispersity of heparin has been problematic in controlled delivery system and thus motivated the development of homogeneous heparin mimics. Peptides of appropriate sequence and chemical function have therefore recently emerged as potential replacements for heparin in select applications. Studied was the assessment of the binding affinities of multiple sulfated peptides (SPs) for a set of heparin-binding peptides (HBPs) and for VEGF; these binding partners have application in the selective immobilization of proteins and in hydrogel formation through non-covalent interactions. Sulfated peptides were produced via solid-phase methods, and their affinity for the HBPs and VEGF was assessed via affinity liquid chromatography (ALC), surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and in select cases, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The shortest peptide, SPa, showed the highest affinity binding of HBPs and VEGF165 in both ALC and SPR measurements, with slight exceptions. Of the investigated HBPs, a peptide based on the heparin-binding domain of human platelet factor 4 showed greatest binding affinities toward all of the SPs, consistent with its stronger binding to heparin. The affinity between SPa and PF4ZIP was indicated via SPR ( KD = 5.27 muM) and confirmed via ITC (KD = 8.09 muM). The binding by SPa of both VEGF and HBPs suggests its use as a binding partner to multiple species, and the use of these interactions in assembly of materials. Given that the peptide sequences can be varied to control binding affinity and selectivity, opportunities are also suggested for the production of a wider array of matrices with selective binding and release properties useful for biomaterials applications. Hydrogel consisting of SPa was formed via a covalent Michael Addition reaction between maleimide- and thiol-terminated multi-arm PEGs and Cys-SPa. The mechanical property of hydrogel was tunable from ca. 186 to 1940 Pa. by varing the cross-linking density, suggesting its flexible applications depending

  18. Porous media properties of reticulated shape memory polymer foams and mock embolic coils for aneurysm treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Shape memory polymer (SMP) foams are being investigated as an alternative aneurysm treatment method to embolic coils. The goal of both techniques is the reduction of blood flow into the aneurysm and the subsequent formation of a stable thrombus, which prevents future aneurysm rupture. The purpose of this study is to experimentally determine the parameters, permeability and form factor, which are related to the flow resistance imposed by both media when subjected to a pressure gradient. Methods The porous media properties—permeability and form factor—of SMP foams and mock embolic coils (MECs) were measured with a pressure gradient method by means of an in vitro closed flow loop. We implemented the Forchheimer-Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy equation to calculate these properties. Mechanically-reticulated SMP foams were fabricated with average cell sizes of 0.7E-3 and 1.1E-3 m, while the MECs were arranged with volumetric packing densities of 11-28%. Results The permeability of the SMP foams was an order of magnitude lower than that of the MECs. The form factor differed by up to two orders of magnitude and was higher for the SMP foams in all cases. The maximum flow rate of all samples tested was within the inertial laminar flow regime, with Reynolds numbers ranging between 1 and 35. Conclusions The SMP foams impose a greater resistance to fluid flow compared to MECs, which is a result of increased viscous and inertial losses. These results suggest that aneurysms treated with SMP foam will have flow conditions more favorable for blood stasis than those treated with embolic coils having packing densities???28%. PMID:24120254

  19. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Northrup, M. Allen; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Krulevitch, Peter A.; Benett, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use.

  20. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators

    DOEpatents

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ciarlo, D.R.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-06-15

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a release actuator for the delivery of embolic coils through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. 8 figs.

  1. Electrical switching and memory behaviors in organic diodes based on polymer blend films treated by ultraviolet ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jinying; Ma, Dongge

    2014-09-01

    Resistive memory devices with resistive switching characteristics were fabricated based on poly (3,4-ethylene-dioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) doping with polyvinyl alcohol. It has been demonstrated that the resistive switching characteristics in the memory device was strongly dependent on the treatment of the polymer blend film by ultraviolet ozone (UV-ozone). The UV-ozone treated device exhibited improved performance with the ON/OFF current ratio of more than 102, and its ON and OFF states can be maintained over 96 h without deterioration. The resistive switching behavior in the UV-ozone treated device was attributed to the formation and rupture of the PEDOT:PSS filaments as well as the narrow conducting paths through the native oxide of aluminum.

  2. Fabrication and static characterization of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers with embedded NiTi shape memory wire actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Araújo, C. J.; Rodrigues, L. F. A.; Coutinho Neto, J. F.; Reis, R. P. B.

    2008-12-01

    In this work, unidirectional carbon-fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP) with embedded NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) wire actuators were manufactured using a universal testing machine equipped with a thermally controlled chamber. Beam specimens containing cold-worked, annealed and trained NiTi SMA wires distributed along their neutral plane were fabricated. Several tests in a three-point bending mode at different constant temperatures were performed. To verify thermal buckling effects, electrical activation of the specimens was realized in a cantilevered beam mode and the influence of the SMA wire actuators on the tip deflection of the composite is demonstrated.

  3. Photo-Mediated Copper(I)-Catalyzed Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition (CuAAC) “Click” Reactions for Forming Polymer Networks as Shape Memory Materials

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Matthew K.; Gong, Tao; Nair, Devatha P.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of polymer networks polymerized with the Copper (I) – catalyzed azide – alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click reaction is described along with their accompanying utilization as shape memory polymers. Due to the click nature of the reaction and the synthetic accessibility of azide and alkyne functional-monomers, the polymer architecture was readily controlled through monomer design to manipulate crosslink density, ability for further functionalization, and the glass transition temperature (55 to 120°C). Free strain recovery is used to quantify the shape memory properties of a model CuAAC network resulting in excellent shape fixity and recovery of 99%. The step growth nature of this polymerization results in homogenous network formation with narrow glass transitions ranges having half widths of the transition close to 15°C for these materials resulting in shape recovery sharpness of 3.9 %/°C in a model system comparable to similarly crosslinked chain growth polymers. Utilization of the CuAAC reaction to form shape memory materials opens a range of possibilities and behaviors that are not readily achieved in other shape memory materials such as (meth) acrylates, thiolene, thiol-Michael, and poly(caprolactone) based shape memory materials. PMID:25378717

  4. Influence of strain-holding conditions on shape recovery and secondary-shape forming in polyurethane-shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobushi, H.; Hayashi, S.; Hoshio, K.; Miwa, N.

    2006-08-01

    It was found in previous work on the thermomechanical properties of the polyurethane-shape memory polymer foam that the shape fixity and shape recovery become imperfect and that secondary-shape forming appears, depending on the strain-holding conditions. The main factors of the strain-holding conditions which affect the secondary-shape forming are the holding temperature, holding time and holding strain. In the present study, the influence of the strain-holding conditions on the shape recovery and secondary-shape forming was investigated for the polyurethane-shape memory polymer film. It was found that the secondary-shape forming appears markedly if the holding temperature is higher than the glass transition temperature and does not appear if the holding temperature is lower than the glass transition temperature. The rate of secondary-shape forming increases with an increase in the holding time if the holding temperature is higher than the glass transition temperature. The irrecoverable strain increases in proportion to the holding strain.

  5. A phenomenological model for the chemo-responsive shape memory effect in amorphous polymers undergoing viscoelastic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Huang, Wei Min

    2013-11-01

    We present a phenomenological approach to study the viscoelastic transition and working mechanism of the chemo-responsive shape memory effect (SME) in amorphous shape memory polymers (SMPs). Both the copolymerization viscosity model and Doolittle equation are initially applied to quantitatively identify the influential factors behind the chemo-responsive SME in the SMPs exposure to a right solvent. After this, the Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) equation is employed to couple the viscosity (?), time-temperature shift factor (??) and glass transition temperature (Tg) in amorphous polymers. By means of combining the WLF and Arrhenius equations together, the inductively decreased transition temperature is confirmed as the driving force for the chemo-responsive SME. Finally, a phenomenological viscoelastic model is proposed and then verified by the available experimental data reported in the literature and then compared with the simulation results of a semi-empirical model. This phenomenological model is expected to provide a powerful simulation tool for theoretical prediction and experimental substantiation of the chemo-responsive SME in amorphous SMPs by viscoelastic transition.

  6. Therapeutic Antiviral Effect of the Nucleic Acid Polymer REP 2055 against Persistent Duck Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noordeen, Faseeha; Scougall, Catherine A.; Grosse, Arend; Qiao, Qiao; Ajilian, Behzad B.; Reaiche-Miller, Georget; Finnie, John; Werner, Melanie; Broering, Ruth; Schlaak, Joerg F.; Vaillant, Andrew; Jilbert, Allison R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that nucleic acid polymers (NAPs) have both entry and post-entry inhibitory activity against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) infection. The inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs prevented DHBV infection of primary duck hepatocytes in vitro and protected ducks from DHBV infection in vivo and did not result from direct activation of the immune response. In the current study treatment of primary human hepatocytes with NAP REP 2055 did not induce expression of the TNF, IL6, IL10, IFNA4 or IFNB1 genes, confirming the lack of direct immunostimulation by REP 2055. Ducks with persistent DHBV infection were treated with NAP 2055 to determine if the post-entry inhibitory activity exhibited by NAPs could provide a therapeutic effect against established DHBV infection in vivo. In all REP 2055-treated ducks, 28 days of treatment lead to initial rapid reductions in serum DHBsAg and DHBV DNA and increases in anti-DHBs antibodies. After treatment, 6/11 ducks experienced a sustained virologic response: DHBsAg and DHBV DNA remained at low or undetectable levels in the serum and no DHBsAg or DHBV core antigen positive hepatocytes and only trace amounts of DHBV total and covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) were detected in the liver at 9 or 16 weeks of follow-up. In the remaining 5/11 REP 2055-treated ducks, all markers of DHBV infection rapidly rebounded after treatment withdrawal: At 9 and 16 weeks of follow-up, levels of DHBsAg and DHBcAg and DHBV total and cccDNA in the liver had rebounded and matched levels observed in the control ducks treated with normal saline which remained persistently infected with DHBV. These data demonstrate that treatment with the NAP REP 2055 can lead to sustained control of persistent DHBV infection. These effects may be related to the unique ability of REP 2055 to block release of DHBsAg from infected hepatocytes. PMID:26560490

  7. Quantification of insulin release from implantable polymer-based delivery systems and augmentation of therapeutic effect with simultaneous release of somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Edelman, E R; Brown, L; Langer, R

    1996-12-01

    Insulin injections control diabetes mellitus but do not reproduce physiologic regulation. Polymer-based controlled-release technology has enabled us to demonstrate: that the controlled release of insulin from polymer matrices can indeed be used to control diabetes mellitus but does so at the expense of hyperinsulinemia and hypoglycemia; and that somatostatin can be delivered in similar fashion, so as to provide glucose homeostasis in a more physiologic range, at lower insulin levels and at somatostatin doses below those used in intermittent infusion studies; and, that microgram quantities of a drug can be delivered successfully in vivo with intact biological function and in a manner that can be monitored continuously. In the present study the simultaneous polymer-matrix-controlled release of insulin with somatostatin extended glycemic control in diabetic rats. Eleven rats received subcutaneous polymer matrix implants containing insulin alone and 11 rats received implants containing insulin and somatostatin. Plasma and urinary glucose control were improved in both groups. Glucose concentrations in the insulin alone group remained depressed for 5 days until insulin release from the matrices declined below 11.6 units/kg/day. When somatostatin was delivered at 0.75-1.1 micrograms/kg/day together with insulin, plasma glucose control persisted for 12 days until insulin release decreased below 3.6 units/kg/day. It is our hope that further experiments regarding the potential role of both controlled-release devices and somatostatin will be performed to provide continuing therapeutic alternatives to the insulin-dependent diabetic. This is also the first in vivo demonstration of the simultaneous release of two biologically active peptide hormones from polymer matrices. The use of the polymer matrix systems may not only have profound effects on the ambulatory care of diabetes but might also permit the investigation of the synergistic effects of other families of compounds. PMID:8961137

  8. Theoretical model based on the memory effect for the strange photoisomerization kinetics of diarylethene derivatives dispersed on polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Kazuhiko; Tachiya, M.

    2007-01-28

    In the present paper the authors present a theoretical model to explain the kinetics involving the induction period observed by Irie et al. [Nature (London) 420, 759 (2002)] for photoisomerization of diarylethene derivatives dispersed on polymer films at a single molecular level. In the model we assume that both ground state and excited state free energy landscapes which result from the interaction between the photochromic molecule and the surrounding polymer are rugged and have several local minima along the pathway to the critical point at which isomerization actually occurs. We assume that after one photoexcitation a fraction of the photochromic molecule moves to a new local minimum and stays there, although the other fraction returns to the original local minimum. The former effect is referred to as the memory effect. After repeated photoexcitations the photochromic molecule moves gradually from one local minimum to another in the pathway to the isomerization point. It finally reaches the isomerization point, where isomerization occurs. Their model successfully reproduces the kinetics of photoisomerization of diarylethene derivatives dispersed on polymer films observed experimentally.

  9. Polyacetal-stilbene conjugates - The first examples of polymer therapeutics for the inhibition of HIF-1 in the treatment of solid tumours.

    PubMed

    England, Richard M; Masiá, Esther; Giménez, Vanessa; Lucas, Rut; Vicent, María J

    2012-12-28

    We report here the first examples of Polymer Therapeutics synthesised with the intention of inhibiting Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1 (HIF-1), a transcription factor heavily involved in numerous cell processes under a low oxygen environment. Four compounds were selected for use in these systems; Diethylstilbestrol (DES), Bisphenol A (BIS), Dienestrol (DIENES) and Hexestrol (HEX), which were chosen from a large family of similar molecules known as Stilbenes. These are non-steroidal molecules with structural similarities to oestrogen, and of which DES and BIS have previously been reported for HIF-1 inhibition. These molecules were incorporated into a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) based polyacetal system using a reaction of short PEG chains with di(ethylene glycol) divinyl ether units and an acid catalyst and without the need for biodegradable linkers. With an improved polyacetal synthesis strategy we obtained high yields of water soluble polymer conjugates with desirable drug loadings and tailored molecular weights (Mw 23,000-35,000g/mol) with relatively narrow polydispersities (pdi 1.3-1.5). These polymers were found to be hydrolytically cleaved under acid conditions (such as those found in endosomes, lysosomes or the extracellular fluid of some tumours) yielding the free drug. Additionally, they were found to be stable over prolonged periods of time at pH 7.4 mimicking blood plasma. Of the four polymers synthesised, the conjugates of DES and BIS displayed the best activity for HIF-1? inhibition in HeLa 9xHRE-Luc tumour cells. More importantly, these conjugates were found to exhibit little to no cell toxicity, contrary to the free drugs, and consequently, they significantly enhanced drug therapeutic index (TI 3.5 vs. 7.2 for free DES vs. DES-polyacetal 2a, and TI 1.1 vs. >20 for free BIS vs. BIS-polyacetal 1b). PMID:22940127

  10. Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Presents an open-ended experiment which has students exploring polymer chemistry and reverse osmosis. This activity involves construction of a polymer membrane, use of it in a simple osmosis experiment, and application of its principles in solving a science-technology-society problem. (ML)

  11. Modelling of shape memory polymer sheets that self-fold in response to localized heating.

    PubMed

    Mailen, Russell W; Liu, Ying; Dickey, Michael D; Zikry, Mohammed; Genzer, Jan

    2015-10-21

    We report a nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) of the thermo-mechanical shrinking and self-folding behavior of pre-strained polystyrene polymer sheets. Self-folding is useful for actuation, packaging, and remote deployment of flat surfaces that convert to 3D objects in response to a stimulus such as heat. The proposed FEA model accounts for the viscoelastic recovery of pre-strained polystyrene sheets in response to localized heating on the surface of the polymer. Herein, the heat results from the localized absorption of light by ink patterned on the surface of the sheet. This localized delivery of heat results in a temperature gradient through the thickness of the sheet, and thus a gradient of strain recovery, or shrinkage, develops causing the polymer sheet to fold. This process transforms a 2D pattern into a 3D shape through an origami-like behavior. The FEA predictions indicate that shrinking and folding are sensitive to the thermo-mechanical history of the polymer during pre-straining. The model also shows that shrinkage does not vary linearly through the thickness of the polymer during folding due to the accumulation of mass in the hinged region. Counterintuitively, the maximum shrinkage does not occur at the patterned surface. Rather, it occurs considerably below the top surface of the polymer. This investigation provides a fundamental understanding of shrinking, self-folding dynamics, and bending angles, and provides design guidelines for origami shapes and structures. PMID:26324954

  12. Programming Tilting Angles in Shape Memory Polymer Janus Pillar Arrays with Unidirectional Wetting against the Tilting Direction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Mon; Chiang, Chang-Lung; Yang, Shu

    2015-09-01

    By coating a thin layer of metal, including gold and gold-palladium alloy, of different thickness on the deformed shape memory polymer (SMP) pillars, we manipulate the degree of recovery of the SMP pillars. Pillars of different tilting angles were obtained as a result of balancing the strain recovery energy of the SMP pillars that favor the original straight state and the elastic energy of the metal layers that prefer the bent state. With this selective coating of a metal layer on the tilted pillars, we report a unique anisotropic liquid spreading behavior, where the water droplet is fully pinned in the direction of pillar tilting but advances in the reverse direction. This phenomenon is explained by the interplay of the surface chemistry and topography. PMID:26305291

  13. Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue of the journal "Exploring" covers the topic of "memories" and describes an exhibition at San Francisco's Exploratorium that ran from May 22, 1998 through January 1999 and that contained over 40 hands-on exhibits, demonstrations, artworks, images, sounds, smells, and tastes that demonstrated and depicted the biological,…

  14. Dually actuated triple shape memory polymers of cross-linked polycyclooctene-carbon nanotube/polyethylene nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenwen; Zhao, Jun; Chen, Min; Yang, Minhao; Tang, Luyang; Dang, Zhi-Min; Chen, Fenghua; Huang, Miaoming; Dong, Xia

    2014-11-26

    In this work, electrically and thermally actuated triple shape memory polymers (SMPs) of chemically cross-linked polycyclooctene (PCO)-multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/polyethylene (PE) nanocomposites with co-continuous structure and selective distribution of fillers in PCO phase are prepared. We systematically studied not only the microstructure including morphology and fillers' selective distribution in one phase of the PCO/PE blends, but also the macroscopic properties including thermal, mechanical, and electrical properties. The co-continuous window of the immiscible PCO/PE blends is found to be the volume fraction of PCO (vPCO) of ca. 40-70 vol %. The selective distribution of fillers in one phase of co-continuous blends is obtained by a masterbatch technique. The prepared triple SMP materials show pronounced triple shape memory effects (SMEs) on the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and the visual observation by both thermal and electric actuations. Such polyolefin samples with well-defined microstructure, electrical actuation, and triple SMEs might have potential applications as, for example, multiple autochoke elements for engines, self-adjusting orthodontic wires, and ophthalmic devices. PMID:25347728

  15. Self-deploying shape memory polymer scaffolds for grafting and stabilizing complex bone defects: A mouse femoral segmental defect study.

    PubMed

    Baker, Richard M; Tseng, Ling-Fang; Iannolo, Maria T; Oest, Megan E; Henderson, James H

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of complex bone defects places a significant burden on the US health care system. Current strategies for treatment include grafting and stabilization using internal metal plates/screws, intramedullary rods, or external fixators. Here, we introduce the use of shape memory polymer (SMP) materials for grafting and adjunct stabilization of segmental defects. Self-deploying SMP grafts and SMP sleeves capable of expanding and contracting, respectively, under intraoperative conditions were developed and evaluated in a mouse segmental defect model in vivo. Integration between grafts/sleeves and native bone was assessed using x-ray radiography, microcomputed tomography, and torsional mechanical testing. We found that SMP grafts were able to integrate with the native bone after 12 weeks, maintain defect stability, and provide torsional mechanical properties comparable to an allograft alone treatment; however no gross de novo bone formation was observed. SMP sleeves did not inhibit bony bridging at the margins, and limbs treated with a sleeve/allograft combination had torsional mechanical properties comparable to limbs treated with an allograft alone. In vitro torsional and bending tests suggest sleeves may provide additional torsional stability to defects. Incorporation of shape memory into synthetic bone graft substitutes and adjunct stabilization devices is anticipated to enhance functionality of synthetic materials employed in both applications. PMID:26561935

  16. Development of a self-stressing NiTiNb shape memory alloy (SMA)/fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) patch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Tahan, M.; Dawood, M.; Song, G.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a self-stressing patch using a combination of shape memory alloys (SMAs) and fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites. Prestressed carbon FRP patches are emerging as a promising alternative to traditional methods to repair cracked steel structures and civil infrastructure. However, prestressing these patches typically requires heavy and complex fixtures, which is impractical in many applications. This paper presents a new approach in which the prestressing force is applied by restraining the shape memory effect of NiTiNb SMA wires. The wires are subsequently embedded in an FRP overlay patch. This method overcomes the practical challenges associated with conventional prestressing. This paper presents the conceptual development of the self-stressing patch with the support of experimental observations. The bond between the SMA wires and the FRP is evaluated using pull-out tests. The paper concludes with an experimental study that evaluates the patch response during activation subsequent monotonic tensile loading. The results demonstrate that the self-stressing patch with NiTiNb SMA is capable of generating a significant prestressing force with minimal tool and labor requirements.

  17. Radiation-crosslinking of shape memory polymers based on poly(vinyl alcohol) in the presence of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basfar, A. A.; Lotfy, S.

    2015-01-01

    Shape memory polymers based on poly(vinyl alcohol) (SM-PVA) in the presence of 2-carboxyethyl acrylate oligomers (CEA) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) crosslinked by ionizing radiation were investigated. Chemical-crosslinking of PVA by glutaraldehyde in the presence of CEA and MWCNTs was also studied. The swelling and gel fraction of the radiation-crosslinked SM-PVA and chemically crosslinked systems were evaluated. Analysis of the swelling and gel fraction revealed a significant reduction in swelling and an increase in the gel fraction of the material that was chemically crosslinked with glutaraldehyde. The radiation-crosslinked SM-PVA demonstrated 100% gelation at an irradiation dose of 50 kGy. In addition, radiation-crosslinked SM-PVA exhibited good temperature responsive shape-memory behavior. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis was performed. The thermal properties of radiation-crosslinked SM-PVA were investigated by a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The ability of the material to return or store energy (E?), to its ability to lose energy (E?), and the ratio of these effects (Tan?), which is called damping were examined via DMA. The temperature of Tan? in the radiation-crosslinked SM-PVA decreased significantly by 6 and 13 °C as a result of the addition of MWCNTs. In addition, the temperature of Tan? for SM-PVA increased as the irradiation dose increased. These radiation-crosslinked SM-PVA materials show promising shape-memory behavior based on the range of temperatures at which Tan? appears.

  18. Implicit memory and early unrepressed unconscious: their role in the therapeutic process (how the neurosciences can contribute to psychoanalysis).

    PubMed

    Mancia, Mauro

    2006-02-01

    The author discusses memory from the point of view of the neurosciences and molecular biology, proposing an integration with the psychoanalytic theory of the unconscious. The discovery of the implicit memory has extended the concept of the unconscious and supports the hypothesis that this is where the emotional and affective--sometimes traumatic--presymbolic and preverbal experiences of the primary mother-infant relations are stored. They could form the ground structure of an early unrepressed unconscious nucleus of the self. Identifying the unconscious with the memory leads to a theory about its morpho-functional organization. The unrepressed unconscious can be brought to the surface in analysis through the 'musical dimension' of the transference, characterized by the voice (its intonation and rhythm) and the prosody of the language. Dreams can symbolically transform pre-symbolic and preverbal experiences, so that they can be put into words and thought about even without their recollection. Dreams can also create images to fi ll the gap of the absence of representation which characterize the unrepressed unconscious. The description of a segment of analysis of a patient suffering from death anxiety provides a clinical illustration of the theories discussed. The interpretation of her voice and of the prosody of her language, besides the work on dreams, reproduced the emotional essence of the analysand's traumatic childhood experiences. This reconstruction enabled her to speak and think about them even without the actual recollection. PMID:16635862

  19. Charge trapping at the polymer-metal oxide interface as a first step in the electroforming of organic-inorganic memory diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Rocha, Paulo; Gomes, Henrique L.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.

    2015-09-01

    Diodes containing a layer of aluminum oxide combined with a layer of ?-conjugated polymer show nonvolatile memory effects after they have been electroformed. Electroforming is induced by application high bias voltage close to the limit for dielectric breakdown and can be performed reliably and with high yield on organic-inorganic hybrid diodes with controlled oxide thickness. Here we investigate the initial stage of the electroforming process and show through temperature dependent current-voltage characterization that electrons are trapped in deep traps at the interface between ?-conjugated polyspirofluorene polymer and the aluminum oxide.

  20. Fabrication of highly uniform nanoparticles from recombinant silk-elastin-like protein polymers for therapeutic agent delivery.

    PubMed

    Anumolu, Rajasekhar; Gustafson, Joshua A; Magda, Jules J; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Pease, Leonard F

    2011-07-26

    Here we generate silk-elastin-like protein (SELP) polymeric nanoparticles and demonstrate precise control over their dimensions using an electrospray differential mobility analyzer (ES-DMA). Electrospray produces droplets encompassing several polymer strands. Evaporation ensues, leading polymer strands to accumulate at the droplet interface, forming a hollow nanoparticle. The resulting nanoparticle size distributions, which govern particle yield, depend on buffer concentration to the -1/3 power, polymer concentration to the 1/3 power, and ratio of silk-to-elastin blocks. Three recombinantly tuned ratios of 8:16, 4:8, and 4:16, respectively named SELP-815K, SELP-47K, and SELP-415K, are employed, with the latter ratio resulting in a thinner shell and larger diameter for the nanoparticles than the former. The DMA narrows the size distribution by electrostatically classifying the aerosolized nanoparticles. These highly uniform nanoparticles have variations of 1.2 and 1.4 nm for 24.0 and 36.0 nm particles, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the nanoparticles to be faceted, as a buckling instability releases compression energy arising from evaporation after the shell has formed by bending it. A thermodynamic equilibrium exists between compression and bending energies, where the facet length is half the particle diameter, in agreement with experiments. Rod-like particles also formed from polymer-stabilized filaments when the viscous length exceeds the jet radius at higher solution viscosities. The unusual uniformity in composition and dimension indicates the potential of these nanoparticles to deliver bioactive and imaging agents. PMID:21696150

  1. VEGF therapeutic gene delivery using dendrimer type bio-reducible polymer into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyojung; Nam, Kihoon; Nam, Joung-Pyo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yong Man; Joo, Wan Seok; Kim, Sung Wan

    2015-12-28

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has garnered great attention in the expansive diversity of biomedical research. Despite this broad interest in stem cells, limited incorporation and poor viability are major disadvantages for accomplishing therapeutic success in the field of hMSC-based cell therapy, and an optimal approach for hMSC-based cell therapy using non-viral vectors has not been established. Hence, we examined the possibility of performing gene therapy using the biodegradable polymeric non-viral vector Arginine-grafted poly (cystaminebisacrylamide-diaminohexane) (ABP)-conjugated poly (amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer (PAM-ABP) in hMSCs. PAM-ABP formed compact nanosized polyplexes and showed low cytotoxicity compared to bPEI 25k and Lipofectamine® 2000 in hMSCs. Although the cellular uptake was similar, the transfection efficiency and VEGF expression of PAM-ABP using gWiz-Luc and p?-VEGF were higher than those of the control groups. Although hMSCs were transfected, their stem cell characteristics were retained. Our results suggest that PAM-ABP has the ability to deliver a therapeutic gene in hMSCs. PMID:26368313

  2. A remote-activated shape memory polymer network employing vinyl-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles as netpoints for durable performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Shuang; Li, Xingjian; Wang, Yaru; Pan, Yi; Zheng, Zhaohui; Ding, Xiaobin; Peng, Yuxing

    2014-08-01

    A new type of shape memory polymer (SMP) employing vinyl-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles as netpoints that determine the permanent shape for remote activation has been presented. The new design effectively prevents the nanoparticles from moving and re-aggregating in a polymer matrix and guarantees the stability of the SMP networks when a high temperature and external stress are applied. Therefore, durable shape memory performance is obtained during the programmed deformation-recovery processes. Meanwhile, a homogeneous distribution of vinyl-capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles achieves uniform heat generation and heat transfer in the alternating magnetic field. Consequently, the novel remote-activated SMP also exhibits a fast magnetic responsiveness compared to the SMPs physically dispersed with Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

  3. The effect of free radical inhibitor on the sensitized radiation crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of polyurethane shape memory polymers

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Smith, Sarah E.; Maher, Cameron A.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of free radical inhibitor on the electron beam crosslinking and thermal processing stabilization of novel radiation crosslinkable polyurethane shape memory polymers (SMPs) blended with acrylic radiation sensitizers have been determined. The SMPs in this study possess novel processing capabilities—that is, the ability to be melt processed into complex geometries as thermoplastics and crosslinked in a secondary step using electron beam irradiation. To increase susceptibility to radiation crosslinking, the radiation sensitizer pentaerythritol triacrylate (PETA) was solution blended with thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs made from 2-butene-1,4-diol and trimethylhexamethylene diisocyanate (TMHDI). Because thermoplastic melt processing methods such as injection molding are often carried out at elevated temperatures, sensitizer thermal instability is a major processing concern. Free radical inhibitor can be added to provide thermal stabilization; however, inhibitor can also undesirably inhibit radiation crosslinking. In this study, we quantified both the thermal stabilization and radiation crosslinking inhibition effects of the inhibitor 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ) on polyurethane SMPs blended with PETA. Sol/gel analysis of irradiated samples showed that the inhibitor had little to no inverse effects on gel fraction at concentrations of 0-10,000 ppm, and dynamic mechanical analysis showed only a slight negative correlation between BQ composition and rubbery modulus. The 1,4-benzoquinone was also highly effective in thermally stabilizing the acrylic sensitizers. The polymer blends could be heated to 150°C for up to five hours or to 125°C for up to 24 hours if stabilized with 10,000 ppm BQ and could also be heated to 125°C for up to 5 hours if stabilized with 1000 ppm BQ without sensitizer reaction occurring. We believe this study provides significant insight into methods for manipulation of the competing mechanisms of radiation crosslinking and thermal stabilization of radiation sensitizers, thereby facilitating further development of radiation crosslinkable thermoplastic SMPs. PMID:23226930

  4. Examination of nanoformulated crosslinked polymers complexed with copper/zinc superoxide dismutase as a therapeutic strategy for angiotensin II-mediated hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savalia, Krupa

    Excessive generation of superoxide (O2·-) has been extensively implicated as a signaling molecule in cardiovascular pathologies, including hypertension. As a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure, the morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension is a worldwide epidemic. Although there are several standard therapies that effectively lower blood pressure, many hypertensive patients have uncontrolled blood pressure despite taking available medications. Thus, there is a necessity to develop new pharmacotherapies that target novel molecular effectors (e.g. O2·-) that have been implicated to be integral in the pathogenesis of hypertension. To overcome the failed therapeutic impact of currently available antioxidants in cardiovascular disease, we developed a nanomedicine-based delivery system for the O2 ·- scavenging enzyme, copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), in which CuZnSOD protein is electrostatically bound to poly-L-lysine (PLL 50)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block co-polymer to form CuZnSOD nanozyme. Different formulations of CuZnSOD nanozyme are covalently stabilized by either reducible or non-reducible crosslinked bonds between the PLL50-PEG polymers. Herein, we tested the overall hypothesis that PLL50-PEG CuZnSOD nanozyme delivers active CuZnSOD protein to neurons and decreases blood pressure in a model of Angll-dependent hypertension. As determined by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, nanozymes retain full SOD enzymatic activity. Furthermore, non-reducible crosslinked nanozyme delivers active CuZnSOD protein to central neurons in culture (CATH.a neurons) without inducing significant neuronal toxicity. In vivo studies conducted in Angll-mediated hypertensive adult male C57BL/6 mice demonstrate that the non-reducible crosslinked nanozyme significantly attenuates blood pressure when given directly into the brain and prevents the further increase in hypertension when intravenously (IV) administered. While these physiologic data are promising, it was essential to determine the biological distribution of our nanozymes. The experimental data provided herein implicate the proximal tubules in the kidney cortex as a primary target for CuZnSOD nanozyme following IV administration. Collectively, these studies support the further development of PLL50 -PEG CuZnSOD nanozyme as an antioxidant-based therapeutic option for the improved treatment of hypertension. Furthermore, the therapeutic impact of CuZnSOD nanozyme could be investigated in additional pathologies in which there are excessive levels of O2·- present in the kidney.

  5. Implementation of poly(?-caprolactone) sheet-based shape-memory polymer microvalves into plastic-based microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chenyang; Uto, Koichiro; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Aoyagi, Takao; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-06-01

    Implementation of shape-memory polymer (SMP) sheet-based microvalves into plastic-based microfluidic devices has been studied toward the use in disposable and mass producible micro total analysis devices. Poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) and poly(methyl methacrylate-co-styrene) (MS) were used as SMP and main substrate materials, respectively. Bonding between PCL sheets and MS plates was the critical issue in the practical implementation. We found the pristine PCL sheet has relatively rough surface with Ra of 85.14 nm, which is the cause of poor bonding. Hence, by introducing the post-anneal treatment with sandwiched between two flat glass plates, the PCL surface could be smoothed to Ra of 12.50 nm, and tight bonding could be obtained. Consequently, microfluidic devices consisting of plastic/PCL/plastic layers were successfully fabricated and therein the actuation of SMP valves without any leakage was demonstrated. The present technology is expected to be applicable to disposable microfluidic devices as required for point-of-care testing.

  6. Dependence of memory characteristics of fullerene-containing polymer on the kind of gate metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Anri; Shoji, Atsushi; Nagano, Kohei; Kajihara, Jun

    2015-10-01

    The memory operation of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl-ester-containing polystyrene nanocomposites was investigated while varying the kind of gate metal used. Moderate magnitudes of flatband voltage shift were observed both after negative and positive programming voltages were applied to the Au gate. Excellent retention characteristics were obtained for electrons, whereas the retention time of holes was much shorter than that of electrons for the gate. An analysis of the band diagram indicated that carriers are injected and stored in the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital or highest occupied molecular orbital levels of fullerene. Au gates are promising from the practical viewpoint because they make the magnitudes of both the writing and erasing voltages small.

  7. Probing molecular interactions of poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) with lipid matrix models to interpret the therapeutic potential of the co-polymer.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shubhadeep; Pal, Tapan K; Guha, Sujoy K

    2012-03-01

    To understand and maximize the therapeutic potential of poly(styrene-co-maleic acid) (SMA), a synthetic, pharmacologically-active co-polymer, its effect on conformation, phase behavior and stability of lipid matrix models of cell membranes were investigated. The modes of interaction between SMA and lipid molecules were also studied. While, attenuated total reflection-Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and static (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments detected SMA-induced conformational changes in the headgroup region, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies revealed thermotropic phase behavior changes of the membranes. (1)H NMR results indicated weak immobilization of SMA within the bilayers. Molecular interpretation of the results indicated the role of hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic forces between SMA and zwitterionic phospholipid bilayers. The extent of membrane fluidization and generation of isotropic phases were affected by the surface charge of the liposomes, and hence suggested the role of electrostatic interactions between SMA and charged lipid headgroups. SMA was thus found to directly affect the structural integrity of model membranes. PMID:22197504

  8. Response of the medial temporal lobe network in amnestic mild cognitive impairment to therapeutic intervention assessed by fMRI and memory task performance

    PubMed Central

    Bakker, Arnold; Albert, Marilyn S.; Krauss, Gregory; Speck, Caroline L.; Gallagher, Michela

    2015-01-01

    Studies of individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) have detected hyperactivity in the hippocampus during task-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Such elevated activation has been localized to the hippocampal dentate gyrus/CA3 (DG/CA3) during performance of a task designed to detect the computational contributions of those hippocampal circuits to episodic memory. The current investigation was conducted to test the hypothesis that greater hippocampal activation in aMCI represents a dysfunctional shift in the normal computational balance of the DG/CA3 regions, augmenting CA3-driven pattern completion at the expense of pattern separation mediated by the dentate gyrus. We tested this hypothesis using an intervention based on animal research demonstrating a beneficial effect on cognition by reducing excess hippocampal neural activity with low doses of the atypical anti-epileptic levetiracetam. In a within-subject design we assessed the effects of levetiracetam in three cohorts of aMCI participants, each receiving a different dose of levetiracetam. Elevated activation in the DG/CA3 region, together with impaired task performance, was detected in each aMCI cohort relative to an aged control group. We observed significant improvement in memory task performance under drug treatment relative to placebo in the aMCI cohorts at the 62.5 and 125 mg BID doses of levetiracetam. Drug treatment in those cohorts increased accuracy dependent on pattern separation processes and reduced errors attributable to an over-riding effect of pattern completion while normalizing fMRI activation in the DG/CA3 and entorhinal cortex. Similar to findings in animal studies, higher dosing at 250 mg BID had no significant benefit on either task performance or fMRI activation. Consistent with predictions based on the computational functions of the DG/CA3 elucidated in basic animal research, these data support a dysfunctional encoding mechanism detected by fMRI in individuals with aMCI and therapeutic intervention using fMRI to detect target engagement in response to treatment. PMID:25844322

  9. Integrating a novel shape memory polymer into surgical meshes to improve device performance during laparoscopic hernia surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimkowski, Michael M.

    About 600,000 hernia repair surgeries are performed each year. The use of laparoscopic minimally invasive techniques has become increasingly popular in these operations. Use of surgical mesh in hernia repair has shown lower recurrence rates compared to other repair methods. However in many procedures, placement of surgical mesh can be challenging and even complicate the procedure, potentially leading to lengthy operating times. Various techniques have been attempted to improve mesh placement, including use of specialized systems to orient the mesh into a specific shape, with limited success and acceptance. In this work, a programmed novel Shape Memory Polymer (SMP) was integrated into commercially available polyester surgical meshes to add automatic unrolling and tissue conforming functionalities, while preserving the intrinsic structural properties of the original surgical mesh. Tensile testing and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was performed on four different SMP formulas to identify appropriate mechanical properties for surgical mesh integration. In vitro testing involved monitoring the time required for a modified surgical mesh to deploy in a 37°C water bath. An acute porcine model was used to test the in vivo unrolling of SMP integrated surgical meshes. The SMP-integrated surgical meshes produced an automated, temperature activated, controlled deployment of surgical mesh on the order of several seconds, via laparoscopy in the animal model. A 30 day chronic rat model was used to test initial in vivo subcutaneous biocompatibility. To produce large more clinical relevant sizes of mesh, a mold was developed to facilitate manufacturing of SMP-integrated surgical mesh. The mold is capable of manufacturing mesh up to 361 cm2, which is believed to accommodate the majority of clinical cases. Results indicate surgical mesh modified with SMP is capable of laparoscopic deployment in vivo, activated by body temperature, and possesses the necessary strength and biocompatibility to function as suitable ventral hernia repair mesh, while offering a reduction in surgical operating time and improving mesh placement characteristics. Future work will include ball-burst tests similar to ASTM D3787-07, direct surgeon feedback studies, and a 30 day chronic porcine model to evaluate the SMP surgical mesh in a realistic hernia repair environment, using laparoscopic techniques for typical ventral hernia repair.

  10. Laser-induced nondestructive patterning of a thin ferroelectric polymer film with controlled crystals using Ge8Sb2Te11 alloy layer for nonvolatile memory.

    PubMed

    Bae, Insung; Kim, Richard Hahnkee; Hwang, Sun Kak; Kang, Seok Ju; Park, Cheolmin

    2014-09-10

    We present a simple but robust nondestructive process for fabricating micropatterns of thin ferroelectric polymer films with controlled crystals. Our method is based on utilization of localized heat arising from thin Ge(8)Sb(2)Te(11) (GST) alloy layer upon exposure of 650 nm laser. The heat was generated on GST layer within a few hundred of nanosecond exposure and subsequently transferred to a thin poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) film deposited on GST layer. By controlling exposure time and power of the scanned laser, ferroelectric patterns of one or two microns in size are fabricated with various shape. In the micropatterned regions, ferroelectric polymer crystals were efficiently controlled in both degree of the crystallinity and the molecular orientations. Nonvolatile memory devices with laser scanned ferroelectric polymer layers exhibited excellent device performance of large remnant polarization, ON/OFF current ratio and data retention. The results are comparable with devices containing ferroelectric films thermally annealed at least for 2 h, making our process extremely efficient for saving time. Furthermore, our approach can be conveniently combined with a number of other functional organic materials for the future electronic applications. PMID:25127181

  11. Two-way reversible shape memory effects in a free-standing polymer composite This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    Published 23 May 2011 Online at stacks.iop.org/SMS/20/065010 Abstract Shape memory polymers (SMPs) have School, Niwot, CO 80503, USA E-mail: qih@colorado.edu Received 7 January 2011, in final form 8 April 2011

  12. Stress-induced melting of crystals in natural rubber: a new way to tailor the transition temperature of shape memory polymers.

    PubMed

    Heuwers, Benjamin; Quitmann, Dominik; Katzenberg, Frank; Tiller, Joerg C

    2012-09-26

    Lightly cross-linked natural rubber (NR, cis-1,4-polyisoprene) was found to be an exceptional cold programmable shape memory polymer (SMP) with strain storage of up to 1000%. These networks are stabilized by strain-induced crystals. Here, we explore the influence of mechanical stress applied perpendicular to the elongation direction of the network on the stability of these crystals. We found that the material recovers its original shape at a critical transverse stress. It could be shown that this is due to a disruption of the strain-stabilizing crystals, which represents a completely new trigger for SMPs. The variation of transverse stress allows tuning of the trigger temperature T(trig) (?) in a range of 45 to 0 °C, which is the first example of manipulating the transition of a crystal-stabilized SMP after programming. PMID:22760997

  13. Exploration of use of SenseCam to support autobiographical memory retrieval within a cognitive-behavioural therapeutic intervention following acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Brindley, Rob; Bateman, Andrew; Gracey, Fergus

    2011-10-01

    Delivering effective psychotherapy to address the significant emotional consequences of acquired brain injury (ABI) is challenged by the presence of acquired cognitive impairments, especially retrieval of detailed autobiographical memories of emotional trigger events. Initial studies using a wearable camera (SenseCam) suggest long-term improvements in autobiographical retrieval of recorded events. In this study a single-case experimental design was implemented to explore the use of SenseCam as a memory aid for a man with a specific anxiety disorder and memory and executive difficulties following ABI. We predicted that SenseCam supported rehearsal of memories of events that trigger high levels of anxiety would yield improved retrieval of both factual detail and internal state information (thoughts and feelings) compared with a conventional psychotherapy aid (automatic thought record sheets, ATRs) and no strategy. The findings indicated SenseCam supported retrieval of anxiety trigger events was superior to ATRs or no strategy in terms of both detail and internal state information, with 94% of the information being recalled in the SenseCam condition, compared to 39% for the "no strategy" and 22% for the ATR conditions. It is concluded that SenseCam may be of use as a compensatory aid in psychotherapies relying on retrieval of emotionally salient trigger events. PMID:20635299

  14. Electrospun biomimetic fibrous scaffold from shape memory polymer of PDLLA-co-TMC for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bao, Min; Lou, Xiangxin; Zhou, Qihui; Dong, Wen; Yuan, Huihua; Zhang, Yanzhong

    2014-02-26

    Multifunctional fibrous scaffolds, which combine the capabilities of biomimicry to the native tissue architecture and shape memory effect (SME), are highly promising for the realization of functional tissue-engineered products with minimally invasive surgical implantation possibility. In this study, fibrous scaffolds of biodegradable poly(d,l-lactide-co-trimethylene carbonate) (denoted as PDLLA-co-TMC, or PLMC) with shape memory properties were fabricated by electrospinning. Morphology, thermal and mechanical properties as well as SME of the resultant fibrous structure were characterized using different techniques. And rat calvarial osteoblasts were cultured on the fibrous PLMC scaffolds to assess their suitability for bone tissue engineering. It is found that by varying the monomer ratio of DLLA:TMC from 5:5 to 9:1, fineness of the resultant PLMC fibers was attenuated from ca. 1500 down to 680 nm. This also allowed for readily modulating the glass transition temperature Tg (i.e., the switching temperature for actuating shape recovery) of the fibrous PLMC to fall between 19.2 and 44.2 °C, a temperature range relevant for biomedical applications in the human body. The PLMC fibers exhibited excellent shape memory properties with shape recovery ratios of Rr > 94% and shape fixity ratios of Rf > 98%, and macroscopically demonstrated a fast shape recovery (?10 s at 39 °C) in the pre-deformed configurations. Biological assay results corroborated that the fibrous PLMC scaffolds were cytocompatible by supporting osteoblast adhesion and proliferation, and functionally promoted biomineralization-relevant alkaline phosphatase expression and mineral deposition. We envision the wide applicability of using the SME-capable biomimetic scaffolds for achieving enhanced efficacy in repairing various bone defects (e.g., as implants for healing bone screw holes or as barrier membranes for guided bone regeneration). PMID:24476093

  15. Nitrogen-doped, boron-doped and undoped multiwalled carbon nanotube/polymer composites in WORM memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamo, Messai A.; Sustaita, Alan O.; Tetana, Zikhona N.; Coville, Neil J.; Hümmelgen, Ivo A.

    2013-03-01

    We report the preparation of write-once-read-many times memory devices using composites of carbon nanotubes and poly(vinyl phenol) sandwiched between Al electrodes. Three types of nanotubes (undoped multiwalled carbon nanotubes, nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes and boron-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes) are investigated for this application. The OFF to ON state switching threshold is only slightly dependent on nanotube type, but the ON/OFF current ratio depends on both nanotube type and concentration and varies up to 106, decreasing for nanotube concentrations larger than 0.50 wt% in the composite.

  16. Switching and memory effects in composite films of semiconducting polymers with particles of graphene and graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krylov, P. S.; Berestennikov, A. S.; Aleshin, A. N.; Komolov, A. S.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Petrov, V. N.; Trapeznikova, I. N.

    2015-08-01

    The effects of switching were investigated in composite films based on multifunctional polymers. i.e., derivatives of carbazole (PVK) and fluorene (PFD), as well as based on particles of graphene (Gr) and graphene oxide (GO). The concentration of Gr and GO particles in the PVK(PFD) matrix was varied in the range of 2-3 wt %, which corresponded to the percolation threshold in these systems. The atomic composition of the composite films PVK: GO was examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the effect of switching in structures of the form Al/PVK(PFD): GO(Gr)/ITO/PET manifests itself in a sharp change of the electrical resistance of the composite film from a low-conducting state to a relatively high-conducting state when applying a bias to Al-ITO electrodes of ˜0.1-0.3 V ( E ˜ 3-5 × 104 V/cm), which is below the threshold switching voltages for similar composites. The mechanism of resistance switching, which is associated with the processes of capture and accumulation of charge carriers by Gr (GO) particles introduced into the matrices of the high-molecular-weight (PVK) and relatively low-molecular-weight (PFD) polymers, was discussed.

  17. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Approaches to Basic Questions in Biology"

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    , with results comparing delivery of anti-cancer drug to brain tumors versus other sites. Proteomic profilingPOLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Approaches to Basic Questions in Biology" Prof. Dennis E. Discher-like, flexible polymer micelles ­ `filomicelles' ­ that reveal non-spherical nano-therapeutics can persist

  18. A Bioreducible Polymer for Efficient Delivery of Fas-Silencing siRNA into Stem Cell Spheroids and Enhanced Therapeutic Angiogenesis**

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Min Suk; Bhang, Suk Ho; Yoon, Kyunghwan; Choi, Kyunghee

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a bioreducible polymer for efficient delivery of Fas-silencing small interfering RNA (Fas siRNA) into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The genetically modified hMSCs could be formulated as spheroids with enlarged sizes (? 800 ?m in diameter) to enhance their angiogenic efficacy. The Fas siRNA delivered into the cytoplasm of hMSCs via the bioreducible polymer could efficiently inhibit Fas expression, leading to effective inhibition of hypoxia-induced apoptosis in the core of an enlarged spheroid of hMSCs. The enlarged spheroid not only increased the number of viable hMSCs but also significantly enhanced the secretion of bioactive angiogenic growth factors per hMSC relative to small spheroids that were not treated with Fas siRNA. Twenty-eight days after transplantation into mouse with ischemic hindlimbs, the enlarged hMSC spheroids significantly enhanced cell survival, limb salvage, blood perfusion, and vessel formation while substantially reducing muscle degeneration and tissue fibrosis. This study demonstrates a promising strategy that combines siRNA and spheroid-based stem cell therapies using a stimuli-responsive nonviral siRNA carrier for the efficient treatment of ischemic disease. PMID:23074025

  19. Psychotherapy and Memories of Childhood Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, D. Stephen

    This conference address examines the question of whether "memory work"--using therapeutic techniques to help clients recover suspected hidden memories of childhood sexual abuse--has led some clients to develop illusory memories or false beliefs. Prospective research on memory for childhood trauma indicates that the gist of traumatic childhood…

  20. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  1. Polymers for Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liechty, William B.; Kryscio, David R.; Slaughter, Brandon V.; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have played an integral role in the advancement of drug delivery technology by providing controlled release of therapeutic agents in constant doses over long periods, cyclic dosage, and tunable release of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs. From early beginnings using off-the-shelf materials, the field has grown tremendously, driven in part by the innovations of chemical engineers. Modern advances in drug delivery are now predicated upon the rational design of polymers tailored for specific cargo and engineered to exert distinct biological functions. In this review, we highlight the fundamental drug delivery systems and their mathematical foundations and discuss the physiological barriers to drug delivery. We review the origins and applications of stimuli-responsive polymer systems and polymer therapeutics such as polymer-protein and polymer-drug conjugates. The latest developments in polymers capable of molecular recognition or directing intracellular delivery are surveyed to illustrate areas of research advancing the frontiers of drug delivery. PMID:22432577

  2. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators and release mechanisms therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.P.; Fitch, J.P.; Schumann, D.L.; Da Silva, L.; Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.

    2000-05-09

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a retaining/release actuator for the delivery of material, such as embolic coils, for example, through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. The SMP microtubing can be positioned around or within an end of a deposit material. Various heating arrangements can be utilized with the SMP release mechanism, and the SMP microtubing can include a metallic coating for enhanced light absorption.

  3. Microfabricated therapeutic actuators and release mechanisms therefor

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Abraham P.; Fitch, Joseph P.; Schumann, Daniel L.; Da Silva, Luiz; Benett, William J.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2000-01-01

    Microfabricated therapeutic actuators are fabricated using a shape memory polymer (SMP), a polyurethane-based material that undergoes a phase transformation at a specified temperature (Tg). At a temperature above temperature Tg material is soft and can be easily reshaped into another configuration. As the temperature is lowered below temperature Tg the new shape is fixed and locked in as long as the material stays below temperature Tg. Upon reheating the material to a temperature above Tg, the material will return to its original shape. By the use of such SMP material, SMP microtubing can be used as a retaining/release actuator for the delivery of material, such as embolic coils, for example, through catheters into aneurysms, for example. The microtubing can be manufactured in various sizes and the phase change temperature Tg is determinate for an intended temperature target and intended use. The SMP microtubing can be positioned around or within an end of a deposit material. Various heating arrangements can be utilized with the SMP release mechanism, and the SMP microtubing can include a metallic coating for enhanced light absorption.

  4. Nonvolatile Ferroelectric Memory Circuit Using Black Phosphorus Nanosheet-Based Field-Effect Transistors with P(VDF-TrFE) Polymer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Tack; Kwon, Hyeokjae; Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Hong-Hee; Lee, Yun Jae; Lim, Jung Ah; Song, Yong-Won; Yi, Yeonjin; Choi, Won-Kook; Hwang, Do Kyung; Im, Seongil

    2015-10-27

    Two-dimensional van der Waals (2D vdWs) materials are a class of new materials that can provide important resources for future electronics and materials sciences due to their unique physical properties. Among 2D vdWs materials, black phosphorus (BP) has exhibited significant potential for use in electronic and optoelectronic applications because of its allotropic properties, high mobility, and direct and narrow band gap. Here, we demonstrate a few-layered BP-based nonvolatile memory transistor with a poly(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) ferroelectric top gate insulator. Experiments showed that our BP-based ferroelectric transistors operate satisfactorily at room temperature in ambient air and exhibit a clear memory window. Unlike conventional ambipolar BP transistors, our ferroelectric transistors showed only p-type characteristics due to the carbon-fluorine (C-F) dipole effect of the P(VDF-TrFE) layer, as well as the highest linear mobility value of 1159 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with a 10(3) on/off current ratio. For more advanced memory applications beyond unit memory devices, we implemented two memory inverter circuits, a resistive-load inverter circuit and a complementary inverter circuit, combined with an n-type molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanosheet. Our memory inverter circuits displayed a clear memory window of 15 V and memory output voltage efficiency of 95%. PMID:26370537

  5. Soluble porphyrin polymers

    DOEpatents

    Gust, Jr., John Devens; Liddell, Paul Anthony

    2015-07-07

    Porphyrin polymers of Structure 1, where n is an integer (e.g., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or greater) ##STR00001## are synthesized by the method shown in FIGS. 2A and 2B. The porphyrin polymers of Structure 1 are soluble in organic solvents such as 2-MeTHF and the like, and can be synthesized in bulk (i.e., in processes other than electropolymerization). These porphyrin polymers have long excited state lifetimes, making the material suitable as an organic semiconductor for organic electronic devices including transistors and memories, as well as solar cells, sensors, light-emitting devices, and other opto-electronic devices.

  6. A large-deformation thermo-mechanically coupled elastic-viscoplastic theory for amorphous polymers : modeling of micro-scale forming and the shape memory phenomenon

    E-print Network

    Srivastava, Vikas

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous polymers are important engineering materials; however, their nonlinear, strongly temperature- and rate-dependent elastic-viscoplastic behavior is still not very well understood, and is modeled by existing ...

  7. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C. (Albuquerque, NM); Duesterhaus, Michelle A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Renn, Rosemarie A. (Alburquerque, NM); Baker, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-08-15

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  8. Mechanical memory

    DOEpatents

    Gilkey, Jeffrey C. (Albuquerque, NM); Duesterhaus, Michelle A. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Renn, Rosemarie A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baker, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-05-16

    A first-in-first-out (FIFO) microelectromechanical memory apparatus (also termed a mechanical memory) is disclosed. The mechanical memory utilizes a plurality of memory cells, with each memory cell having a beam which can be bowed in either of two directions of curvature to indicate two different logic states for that memory cell. The memory cells can be arranged around a wheel which operates as a clocking actuator to serially shift data from one memory cell to the next. The mechanical memory can be formed using conventional surface micromachining, and can be formed as either a nonvolatile memory or as a volatile memory.

  9. Polymer films

    DOEpatents

    Granick, Steve (Champaign, IL); Sukhishvili, Svetlana A. (Maplewood, NJ)

    2008-12-30

    A film contains a first polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond donating moieties, and a second polymer having a plurality of hydrogen bond accepting moieties. The second polymer is hydrogen bonded to the first polymer.

  10. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring

    MedlinePLUS

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Drugs | Common Questions | Related Pages What is therapeutic drug monitoring? Therapeutic drug monitoring is the measurement of ...

  11. Memory Matters

    MedlinePLUS

    ... different parts. Some of them are important for memory. The hippocampus (say: hih-puh-KAM-pus) is one of the more important parts of the brain that processes memories. Old information and new information, or memories, are ...

  12. Self-assembling materials for therapeutic delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Monica C.; Schneider, Joel P.

    2009-01-01

    A growing number of medications must be administered through parenteral delivery, i.e., intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous injection, to ensure effectiveness of the therapeutic. For some therapeutics, the use of delivery vehicles in conjunction with this delivery mechanism can improve drug efficacy and patient compliance. Macromolecular self-assembly has been exploited recently to engineer materials for the encapsulation and controlled delivery of therapeutics. Self-assembled materials offer the advantages of conventional crosslinked materials normally used for release, but also provide the ability to tailor specific bulk material properties, such as release profiles, at the molecular level via monomer design. As a result, the design of materials from the “bottom up” approach has generated a variety of supramolecular devices for biomedical applications. This review provides an overview of self-assembling molecules, their resultant structures, and their use in therapeutic delivery. It highlights the current progress in the design of polymer- and peptide-based self-assembled materials. PMID:19010748

  13. Learning, Memory, & Attention Instructor

    E-print Network

    Coulson, Seana

    1 COGS 101B: Learning, Memory, & Attention · Welcome! · Instructor ­ Dr. Coulson ­ Email: coulson Attention ­ Divided Attention ­ Automaticity ­ Attentional Capture · Immediate Memory ­ Sensory Memory ­ Short-Term Memory ­ Working Memory · Long-Term Memory ­ Levels of Processing ­ Memory Systems

  14. Microgravity Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    A one-day, interactive workshop considering the effects of gravity on polymer materials science was held in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 9, 1985. Selected programmatic and technical issues were reviewed to introduce the field to workshop participants. Parallel discussions were conducted in three disciplinary working groups: polymer chemistry, polymer physics, and polymer engineering. This proceedings presents summaries of the workshop discussions and conclusions.

  15. Characterization of Therapeutic Coatings on Medical Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wormuth, Klaus

    Therapeutic coatings on medical devices such as catheters, guide wires, and stents improve biocompatibility by favorably altering the chemical nature of the device/tissue or device/blood interface. Such coatings often minimize tissue damage (reduce friction), decrease chances for blood clot formation (prevent platelet adsorption), and improve the healing response (deliver drugs). Confocal Raman microscopy provides valuable information about biomedical coatings by, for example, facilitating the measurement of the thickness and swelling of frictionreducing hydrogel coatings on catheters and by determining the distribution of drug within a polymer-based drug-eluting coatings on stents. This chapter explores the application of Raman microscopy to the imaging of thin coatings of cross-linked poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) gels, parylene films, mixtures of dexamethasone with various polymethacrylates, and mixtures of rapamycin with hydrolysable (biodegradable) poly(lactide-co-glycolide) polymers. Raman microscopy measures the thickness and swelling of coatings, reveals the degree of mixing of drug and polymer, senses the hydrolysis of biodegradable polymers, and determines the polymorphic forms of drug present within thin therapeutic coatings on medical devices.

  16. Vicarious memories.

    PubMed

    Pillemer, David B; Steiner, Kristina L; Kuwabara, Kie J; Thomsen, Dorthe Kirkegaard; Svob, Connie

    2015-11-01

    People not only have vivid memories of their own personal experiences, but also vicarious memories of events that happened to other people. To compare the phenomenological and functional qualities of personal and vicarious memories, college students described a specific past event that they had recounted to a parent or friend, and also an event that a friend or parent had recounted to them. Although ratings of memory vividness, emotional intensity, visualization, and physical reactions were higher for personal than for vicarious memories, the overall pattern of ratings was similar. Participants' ratings also indicated that vicarious memories serve many of the same life functions as personal memories, although at lower levels of intensity. The findings suggest that current conceptions of autobiographical memory, which focus on past events that happened directly to the self, should be expanded to include detailed mental representations of specific past events that happened to other people. PMID:26172521

  17. Cognitive memory.

    PubMed

    Widrow, Bernard; Aragon, Juan Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Regarding the workings of the human mind, memory and pattern recognition seem to be intertwined. You generally do not have one without the other. Taking inspiration from life experience, a new form of computer memory has been devised. Certain conjectures about human memory are keys to the central idea. The design of a practical and useful "cognitive" memory system is contemplated, a memory system that may also serve as a model for many aspects of human memory. The new memory does not function like a computer memory where specific data is stored in specific numbered registers and retrieval is done by reading the contents of the specified memory register, or done by matching key words as with a document search. Incoming sensory data would be stored at the next available empty memory location, and indeed could be stored redundantly at several empty locations. The stored sensory data would neither have key words nor would it be located in known or specified memory locations. Sensory inputs concerning a single object or subject are stored together as patterns in a single "file folder" or "memory folder". When the contents of the folder are retrieved, sights, sounds, tactile feel, smell, etc., are obtained all at the same time. Retrieval would be initiated by a query or a prompt signal from a current set of sensory inputs or patterns. A search through the memory would be made to locate stored data that correlates with or relates to the prompt input. The search would be done by a retrieval system whose first stage makes use of autoassociative artificial neural networks and whose second stage relies on exhaustive search. Applications of cognitive memory systems have been made to visual aircraft identification, aircraft navigation, and human facial recognition. Concerning human memory, reasons are given why it is unlikely that long-term memory is stored in the synapses of the brain's neural networks. Reasons are given suggesting that long-term memory is stored in DNA or RNA. Neural networks are an important component of the human memory system, and their purpose is for information retrieval, not for information storage. The brain's neural networks are analog devices, subject to drift and unplanned change. Only with constant training is reliable action possible. Good training time is during sleep and while awake and making use of one's memory. A cognitive memory is a learning system. Learning involves storage of patterns or data in a cognitive memory. The learning process for cognitive memory is unsupervised, i.e. autonomous. PMID:23453302

  18. Episodic Memories in Anxiety Disorders: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Machulska, Alla; Adolph, Dirk; Dere, Ekrem; Margraf, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize research on the emerging role of episodic memories in the context of anxiety disorders (AD). The available literature on explicit, autobiographical, and episodic memory function in AD including neuroimaging studies is critically discussed. We describe the methodological diversity of episodic memory research in AD and discuss the need for novel tests to measure episodic memory in a clinical setting. We argue that alterations in episodic memory functions might contribute to the etiology of AD. We further explain why future research on the interplay between episodic memory function and emotional disorders as well as its neuroanatomical foundations offers the promise to increase the effectiveness of modern psychological treatments. We conclude that one major task is to develop methods and training programs that might help patients suffering from AD to better understand, interpret, and possibly actively use their episodic memories in a way that would support therapeutic interventions and counteract the occurrence of symptoms. PMID:24795583

  19. Emerging memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, Livio; Bez, Roberto; Sandhu, Gurtej

    2014-12-01

    Memory is a key component of any data processing system. Following the classical Turing machine approach, memories hold both the data to be processed and the rules for processing them. In the history of microelectronics, the distinction has been rather between working memory, which is exemplified by DRAM, and storage memory, exemplified by NAND. These two types of memory devices now represent 90% of all memory market and 25% of the total semiconductor market, and have been the technology drivers in the last decades. Even if radically different in characteristics, they are however based on the same storage mechanism: charge storage, and this mechanism seems to be near to reaching its physical limits. The search for new alternative memory approaches, based on more scalable mechanisms, has therefore gained new momentum. The status of incumbent memory technologies and their scaling limitations will be discussed. Emerging memory technologies will be analyzed, starting from the ones that are already present for niche applications, and which are getting new attention, thanks to recent technology breakthroughs. Maturity level, physical limitations and potential for scaling will be compared to existing memories. At the end the possible future composition of memory systems will be discussed.

  20. Piezoelectric Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, J. S.; Ounaies, Z.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to detail the current theoretical understanding of the origin of piezoelectric and ferroelectric phenomena in polymers; to present the state-of-the-art in piezoelectric polymers and emerging material systems that exhibit promising properties; and to discuss key characterization methods, fundamental modeling approaches, and applications of piezoelectric polymers. Piezoelectric polymers have been known to exist for more than forty years, but in recent years they have gained notoriety as a valuable class of smart materials.

  1. Epigenetic memory: the Lamarckian brain

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andre

    2014-01-01

    Recent data support the view that epigenetic processes play a role in memory consolidation and help to transmit acquired memories even across generations in a Lamarckian manner. Drugs that target the epigenetic machinery were found to enhance memory function in rodents and ameliorate disease phenotypes in models for brain diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Chorea Huntington, Depression or Schizophrenia. In this review, I will give an overview on the current knowledge of epigenetic processes in memory function and brain disease with a focus on Morbus Alzheimer as the most common neurodegenerative disease. I will address the question whether an epigenetic therapy could indeed be a suitable therapeutic avenue to treat brain diseases and discuss the necessary steps that should help to take neuroepigenetic research to the next level. PMID:24719207

  2. Therapeutic use exemption.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, J; Kirkendall, D; Vouillamoz, M

    2006-07-01

    Football players who have either physical symptoms or disease after injury may need to be treated with specific medicines that are on the list of prohibited substances. Therapeutic use exemption may be granted to such players, in accordance with strictly defined criteria-these are presented in this article. Procedures of how to request for an abbreviated or a standard therapeutic use exemption are explained, and data on therapeutic use exemptions (UEFA and FIFA, 2004 and 2005) are also presented. PMID:16799102

  3. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The quest for higher efficiency, better fidelity, broader bandwidth, multimode capacity and longer storage lifetime is pursued in all those approaches, as shown in this special issue. The improvement of quantum memory operation specifically requires in-depth study and control of numerous physical processes leading to atomic decoherence. The present issue reflects the development of rare earth ion doped matrices offering long lifetime superposition states, either as bulk crystals or as optical waveguides. The need for quantum sources and high efficiency detectors at the single photon level is also illustrated. Several papers address the networking of quantum memories either in long-haul cryptography or in the prospect of quantum processing. In this context, much attention has been paid recently to interfacing quantum light with superconducting qubits and with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. Finally, the quantum interfacing of light with matter raises questions on entanglement. The last two papers are devoted to the generation of entanglement by dissipative processes. It is shown that long lifetime entanglement may be built in this way. We hope this special issue will help readers to become familiar with the exciting field of ensemble-based quantum memories and will stimulate them to bring deeper insights and new ideas to this area.

  4. Therapeutic Recreation Practicum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneegas, Kay

    This manual provides information on the practicum program offered by Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) for students in its therapeutic recreation program. Sections I and II outline the rationale and goals for providing practical, on-the-job work experiences for therapeutic recreation students. Section III specifies MVCC's responsibilities…

  5. Trends in Therapeutic Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ralph W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the implications of the rapid, dramatic changes taking place in therapeutic recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The article notes the impact of changes in managed care, examines programming trends in therapeutic recreation (adventure/outdoor education, competitive sports, handcycling, health enhancement activities, and…

  6. Therapeutic suggestion has not effect on postoperative morphine requirements.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, W H; van Leeuwen, B L; Sebel, P S; Winograd, E; Baumann, P; Bonke, B

    1996-01-01

    This study was designed to confirm the effect of therapeutic intraoperative auditory suggestion on recovery from anesthesia, to establish the effect of preoperative suggestion, and to assess implicit memory for intraoperative information using an indirect memory task. Sixty consenting unpremedicated patients scheduled for elective gynecologic surgery were randomly divided into three equal groups: Group 1 received a tape of therapeutic suggestions preoperatively, and the story of Robinson Crusoe intraoperatively; Group 2 heard the story of Peter Pan preoperatively and therapeutic suggestions intraoperatively; Group 3 heard the Crusoe story preoperatively and the Peter Pan story intraoperatively. A standardized anesthetic technique was used with fentanyl, propofol, isoflurane, and nitrous oxide. After surgery, all patients received patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with a standardized regimen. In the 24 h postsurgery, morphine use was recorded every 6 h and at 24 h an indirect memory test (free association) was used to test for memory of the stories. Anxiety scores were measured before surgery and at 6 and 24 h postsurgery. There were no significant differences between groups for postoperative morphine use, pain or nausea scores, anxiety scores, or days spent in hospital after surgery. Seven of 20 patients who heard the Pan story intraoperative gave a positive association with the word "Hook," whereas 2 of 20 who did not hear the story gave such an association. Indirect memory for the Pan story was established using confidence interval (CI) analysis. (The 95% CI for difference in proportion did not include zero). No indirect memory for the Crusoe story could be demonstrated. This study did not confirm previous work which suggested that positive therapeutic auditory suggestions, played intraoperatively, reduced PCA morphine requirements. In contrast, a positive implicit memory effect was found for a story presented intraoperatively. PMID:8712392

  7. Updating stored memory requires adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Pereira, Irene; Carrión, Ángel M

    2015-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis appears to influence hippocampal functions, such as memory formation for example. While adult hippocampal neurogenesis is known to be involved in hippocampal-dependent learning and consolidation processes, the role of such immature neurons in memory reconsolidation, a process involved in the modification of stored memories, remains unclear. Here, using a novel fast X-ray ablation protocol to deplete neurogenic cells, we have found that adult hippocampal neurogenesis is required to update object recognition stored memory more than to reinforce it. Indeed, we show that immature neurons were selectively recruited to hippocampal circuits during the updating of stored information. Thus, our data demonstrate a new role for neurogenesis in cognitive processes, adult hippocampal neurogenesis being required for the updating of stored OR memories. These findings suggest that manipulating adult neurogenesis may have a therapeutic application in conditions associated with traumatic stored memory, for example. PMID:26358557

  8. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Mark A.; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR–peptide–MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool. PMID:26697013

  9. Polymer adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joanny, Jean-Francois

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this talk is to review Pierre-Gilles deGennes' work on polymer adsorption and the impact that it has now in our understanding of this problem. We will first present the self-consistent mean-field theory and its applications to adsorption and depletion. De Gennes most important contribution is probably the derivation of the self-similar power law density profile for adsorbed polymer layers that we will present next, emphasizing the differences between the tail sections and the loop sections of the adsorbed polymers. We will then discuss the kinetics of polymer adsorption and the penetration of a new polymer chain in an adsobed layer that DeGennes described very elegantly in analogy with a quantum tunneling problem. Finally, we will discuss the role of polymer adsorption for colloid stabilization.

  10. Episodic Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Martin A.

    2009-01-01

    An account of episodic memories is developed that focuses on the types of knowledge they represent, their properties, and the functions they might serve. It is proposed that episodic memories consist of "episodic elements," summary records of experience often in the form of visual images, associated to a "conceptual frame" that provides a…

  11. Childhood Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danielson, Kathy Everts

    1989-01-01

    Provides numerous ideas for helping students write about special memories in the following categories: growing up--future dreams; authors and illustrators; family history; special places; and special memories. Describes how to write a "bio poem," and includes a bibliography of children's books that enhance and enrich student learning and writing.…

  12. Collaging Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Even middle school students can have memories of their childhoods, of an earlier time. The art of Romare Bearden and the writings of Paul Auster can be used to introduce ideas about time and memory to students and inspire works of their own. Bearden is an exceptional role model for young artists, not only because of his astounding art, but also…

  13. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  14. Polymers All Around You!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertz, Susan

    Background information on natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and the properties of polymers is presented as an introduction to this curriculum guide. Details are provided on the use of polymer products in consumer goods, polymer recycling, polymer densities, the making of a polymer such as GLUEP, polyvinyl alcohol, dissolving plastics, polymers

  15. Therapeutics for Bowel Disorders

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute''s Laboratory of Metabolism is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize therapeutics that ameliorate bowel disorders.

  16. Therapeutic development in psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Sobell, Jeffrey M; Leonardi, Craig L

    2014-06-01

    Advances in molecular biology have provided the basis for development of new therapeutic approaches to psoriasis. New, more effective therapies target specific molecules in the inflammatory cascade involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.The biologic era of psoriasis therapy began with inhibitors of T-cell activation, tumor necrosis factor-?, and interleukin (IL)-12/23. Continued investigation has led to therapies and therapeutic candidates that target IL-17, IL-23, phosphodiesterase-4, and isomers of Janus kinase. PMID:25268599

  17. Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

    Cancer.gov

    Research at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center is focused on cancer diagnosis and enhancing responses of tumor to treatment with a goal of curing cancer. Animal studies of novel cancer therapeutics, while imperfect as a treatment model, have utility, both in studying therapeutic efficacy and toxicity. Because tumors are heterogenous, both between individuals and within a single tumor, non-invasive imaging studies are necessary to provide information about variation in response.

  18. Reversible Shape Memory Optical Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoxi; Tippets, Cary; Fu, Yulan; Donev, Eugene; Turner, Sara; Ashby, Valerie; Lopez, Rene; Sheiko, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    Recent advancements in the understanding of the mechanisms that control shape memory in semi-crystalline polymers, has led to the development of protocols that allow for reversibility in complex shape transformations. The shifting between two programmable shapes is reversible without applying any external force. This is made possible by thermodynamically driven relaxation of extended polymer chains on heating is then inverted by kinetically preferred pathways of polymer crystallization on cooling. Reversible shapeshifting was applied to modulation of photonic gratings to create hands-free reversibly tunable optical elements. We have fabricated a sub-micron ratio optical square grating that presents reversible magnitude changes of its diffraction intensity (up to about 38% modulation) when subject to changes in temperature. This result is attributed to programmable changes in the grating height due to reversible shape memory and is repeatable over multiple cycles. Besides, roughness-induced variations in scattering signal observed upon heating-cooling cycles may offer another way to monitor kinetics of polymer melting and crystallization. Grants: NSF DMR-1407645,

  19. Nitric Oxide Release Part II. Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Alexis W.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Summary A wide range of nitric oxide (NO)-releasing materials have emerged as potential therapeutics that exploit NO’s vast biological roles. Macromolecular NO-releasing scaffolds are particularly promising due to their ability to store and deliver larger NO payloads in a more controlled and effective manner compared to low molecular weight NO donors. While a variety of scaffolds (e.g., particles, dendrimers, and polymers/films) have been cleverly designed, the ultimate clinical utility of most NO-releasing macromolecules remains unrealized. Although not wholly predictive of clinical success, in vitro and in vivo investigations have enabled a preliminary evaluation of the therapeutic potential of such materials. Herein, we review the application of macromolecular NO therapies for cardiovascular disease, cancer, bacterial infections, and wound healing. PMID:22362384

  20. Evolution of microstructure during shape memory cycling of a main-chain liquid crystalline elastomer

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    whose fixing mechanism is based on crystallization or vitrification of the constituent chains, rendering through either the glass transition (Tg) or crystallization (Tc) temperature of the polymer. Because Available online 28 March 2013 Keywords: Liquid crystalline elastomer Shape memory polymer Polymer

  1. Serotonin, neural markers, and memory

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Diverse neuropsychiatric disorders present dysfunctional memory and no effective treatment exits for them; likely as result of the absence of neural markers associated to memory. Neurotransmitter systems and signaling pathways have been implicated in memory and dysfunctional memory; however, their role is poorly understood. Hence, neural markers and cerebral functions and dysfunctions are revised. To our knowledge no previous systematic works have been published addressing these issues. The interactions among behavioral tasks, control groups and molecular changes and/or pharmacological effects are mentioned. Neurotransmitter receptors and signaling pathways, during normal and abnormally functioning memory with an emphasis on the behavioral aspects of memory are revised. With focus on serotonin, since as it is a well characterized neurotransmitter, with multiple pharmacological tools, and well characterized downstream signaling in mammals' species. 5-HT1A, 5-HT4, 5-HT5, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as well as SERT (serotonin transporter) seem to be useful neural markers and/or therapeutic targets. Certainly, if the mentioned evidence is replicated, then the translatability from preclinical and clinical studies to neural changes might be confirmed. Hypothesis and theories might provide appropriate limits and perspectives of evidence. PMID:26257650

  2. Polymers & People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentz, Linda; Robinson, Thomas; Martin, Elizabeth; Miller, Mary; Ashburn, Norma

    2004-01-01

    Each Tuesday during the fall of 2002, teams of high school students from three South Carolina counties conducted a four-hour polymer institute for their peers. In less than two months, over 300 students visited the Charleston County Public Library in Charleston, South Carolina, to explore DNA, nylon, rubber, gluep, and other polymers. Teams of…

  3. A coarse grained model of polymer networks focusing on the intermediate length scales

    E-print Network

    Takashi Shibata; Hidemitsu Furukawa; Toshihiro Kawakatsu

    2008-03-29

    We propose a coarse-grained model for polymer chains and polymer networks based on the meso-scale dynamics. The model takes the internal degrees of freedom of the constituent polymer chains into account using memory functions and colored noises. We apply our model to dilute polymer solutions and polymer networks. A numerical simulation on a dilute polymer solution demonstrates the validity of the assumptions on the dynamics of our model. By applying this model to polymer networks, we find a transition in the dynamical behavior from an isolated chain state to a network state.

  4. Memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Alberini, Cristina M; Ledoux, Joseph E

    2013-09-01

    The formation, storage and use of memories is critical for normal adaptive functioning, including the execution of goal-directed behavior, thinking, problem solving and decision-making, and is at the center of a variety of cognitive, addictive, mood, anxiety, and developmental disorders. Memory also significantly contributes to the shaping of human personality and character, and to social interactions. Hence, understanding how memories are formed, stored, retrieved, modified, updated and used potentially impacts many areas in human life, including mental health. PMID:24028957

  5. Fullerene Embedded Shape Memory Nanolens Array

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Sohee; Jang, Jun Young; Youn, Jae Ryoun; Jeong, Jun-ho; Brenner, Howard; Song, Young Seok

    2013-01-01

    Securing fragile nanostructures against external impact is indispensable for offering sufficiently long lifetime in service to nanoengineering products, especially when coming in contact with other substances. Indeed, this problem still remains a challenging task, which may be resolved with the help of smart materials such as shape memory and self-healing materials. Here, we demonstrate a shape memory nanostructure that can recover its shape by absorbing electromagnetic energy. Fullerenes were embedded into the fabricated nanolens array. Beside the energy absorption, such addition enables a remarkable enhancement in mechanical properties of shape memory polymer. The shape memory nanolens was numerically modeled to impart more in-depth understanding on the physics regarding shape recovery behavior of the fabricated nanolens. We anticipate that our strategy of combining the shape memory property with the microwave irradiation feature can provide a new pathway for nanostructured systems able to ensure a long-term durability. PMID:24253423

  6. Cell memory-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers ‘memory-based therapy’, which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  7. Memory Technologies Vivek Asthana

    E-print Network

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh

    Memory Technologies Vivek Asthana 13th Mar 2013 #12;13-Mar-13 2 Memory Usage (2025) #12;13-Mar-13 3 Outline What is a Memory Current Memory technologies · SRAM · DRAM · Flash Upcoming Memory technologies · MRAM · PCRAM · FeRAM · ... #12;13-Mar-13 4 What is a Memory Memory cell: Binary data storage element

  8. Clinical applications of counterfactual thinking during memory reactivation.

    PubMed

    De Brigard, Felipe; Hanna, Eleanor

    2015-01-01

    The Integrative Memory Model offers a strong foundation upon which to build successful strategies for clinical intervention. The next challenge is to figure out which cognitive strategies are more likely to bring about successful and beneficial modifications of reactivated memories during therapy. In this commentary we suggest that exercising emotional regulation during episodic counterfactual thinking is likely to be a successful therapeutic strategy to bring about beneficial memory modifications. PMID:26050696

  9. Memory loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... may be a sign of dementia . Dementia also affects thinking, language, judgment, and behavior. Other causes of memory loss include: Alcohol or use of illegal drugs Brain infections such as Lyme disease , syphilis, or HIV/ ...

  10. Engineered therapeutic-releasing nanoporous anodic alumina-aluminum wires with extended release of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Law, Cheryl Suwen; Santos, Abel; Kumeria, Tushar; Losic, Dusan

    2015-02-18

    In this study, we present a nanoengineered therapeutic-releasing system based on aluminum wires featuring nanoporous anodic alumina layers and chitosan coatings. Nanoporous anodic alumina layers are produced on the surface of aluminum wires by electrochemical anodization. These nanoporous layers with precisely engineered nanopore geometry are used as nanocontainers for bovine serum albumin molecules labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (BSA-FITC), which is selected as a model drug. The surface of these therapeutic-releasing implants is coated with a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer, chitosan, in order to achieve a sustained release of protein over extended periods of time. The performance of this therapeutic-releasing device is systematically assessed through a series of experiments under static and dynamic flow conditions. In these experiments, the effect of such parameters as the number of layers of chitosan coating and the temperature and pH of the eluting medium is established. The obtained results reveal that the proposed therapeutic-releasing system based on nanoporous aluminum wires can be engineered with sustained release performance for up to 6.5 weeks, which is a critical factor for medical treatments using sensitive therapeutics such as proteins and genes when a localized delivery is desired. PMID:25625878

  11. Rational design of molecularly imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Curk, Tine; Dobnikar, Jure; Frenkel, Daan

    2015-12-16

    Molecular imprinting is the process whereby a polymer matrix is cross-linked in the presence of molecules with surface sites that can bind selectively to certain ligands on the polymer. The cross-linking process endows the polymer matrix with a chemical 'memory', such that the target molecules can subsequently be recognized by the matrix. We present a simple model that accounts for the key features of this molecular recognition. Using a combination of analytical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations, we show that the model can account for the binding of rigid particles to an imprinted polymer matrix with valence-limited interactions. We show how the binding multivalency and the polymer material properties affect the efficiency and selectivity of molecular imprinting. Our calculations allow us to formulate design criteria for optimal molecular imprinting. PMID:26452006

  12. Shape memory self-deployable structures for solar sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Witold; Tan, Seng; Willis, Paul; Pryor, Mark

    2008-12-01

    A cold-hibernated elastic memory (CHEM) structures technology is one of the most recent results of the quest for simple, reliable and low-cost self-deployable structures. The CHEM technology utilizes shape-memory polymers in open-cell foam structures or sandwich structures made of shape-memory-polymer foam cores and polymeric laminated-composite skins. It takes advantage of a polymer's shape memory and the corresponding internal elastic recovery forces to self-deploy a compacted structure. This paper describes these structures and their major advantages over other expandable and deployable structures presently used. Previous preliminary investigations and experiments have confirmed the feasibility of certain CHEM structures for space applications. Further improvements in CHEM technology and structure design widen potential space applications, including advanced solar sail structural concepts that are revealed and described in this paper.

  13. Biofunctional polymer nanoparticles for intra-articular targeting and retention

    E-print Network

    of dense, avascular tissues presents a barrier to entry for polymer-based therapeutics, such as drugs by biopanning on denuded cartilage. The ligand WYRGRL was selected in 94 of 96 clones sequenced after five therapeutic effects1­4 . Our interest here is delivery and targeting of nanoparticles to a distinctly

  14. Visual Memory and Imagery Visual Memory

    E-print Network

    Majumder, Aditi

    1 Visual Memory and Imagery #12;2 Visual Memory Iconic Memory Visual STM Visual LTM Memory or 10 every second. Try to recognize if you have seen a picture Conceptual Masking #12;20 Visual LTM devices Photographic memories #12;21 Three types of LTM Semantic ­ general knowledge of generic concepts

  15. DELIVERY OF THERAPEUTIC PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Pisal, Dipak S.; Kosloski, Matthew P.; Balu-Iyer, Sathy V.

    2009-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of protein therapeutics are limited by three interrelated pharmaceutical issues, in vitro and in vivo instability, immunogenicity and shorter half-lives. Novel drug modifications for overcoming these issues are under investigation and include covalent attachment of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), polysialic acid, or glycolic acid, as well as developing new formulations containing nanoparticulate or colloidal systems (e.g. liposomes, polymeric microspheres, polymeric nanoparticles). Such strategies have the potential to develop as next generation protein therapeutics. This review includes a general discussion on these delivery approaches. PMID:20049941

  16. Materials for Diabetes Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bratlie, Kaitlin M.; York, Roger L.; Invernale, Michael A.; Langer, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on the materials and methods used to fabricate closed-loop systems for type 1 diabetes therapy. Herein, we give a brief overview of current methods used for patient care and discuss two types of possible treatments and the materials used for these therapies–(i) artificial pancreases, comprised of insulin producing cells embedded in a polymeric biomaterial, and (ii) totally synthetic pancreases formulated by integrating continuous glucose monitors with controlled insulin release through degradable polymers and glucose-responsive polymer systems. Both the artificial and the completely synthetic pancreas have two major design requirements: the device must be both biocompatible and be permeable to small molecules and proteins, such as insulin. Several polymers and fabrication methods of artificial pancreases are discussed: microencapsulation, conformal coatings, and planar sheets. We also review the two components of a completely synthetic pancreas. Several types of glucose sensing systems (including materials used for electrochemical, optical, and chemical sensing platforms) are discussed, in addition to various polymer-based release systems (including ethylene-vinyl acetate, polyanhydrides, and phenylboronic acid containing hydrogels). PMID:23184741

  17. Long-Term Delivery of Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Ravi; Khurana, Varun; Patel, Sulabh; Mitra, Ashim K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Proteins are effective biotherapetics with applications in diverse ailments. Despite being specific and potent, their full clinical potential has not yet been realized. This can be attributed to short half-lives, complex structures, poor in vivo stability, low permeability frequent parenteral administrations and poor adherence to treatment in chronic diseases. A sustained release system, providing controlled release of proteins, may overcome many of these limitations. Areas covered This review focuses on recent development in approaches, especially polymer-based formulations, which can provide therapeutic levels of proteins over extended periods. Advances in particulate, gel based formulations and novel approaches for extended protein delivery are discussed. Emphasis is placed on dosage form, method of preparation, mechanism of release and stability of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Substantial advancements have been made in the field of extended protein delivery via various polymer-based formulations over last decade despite the unique delivery-related challenges posed by protein biologics. A number of injectable sustained-release formulations have reached market. However, therapeutic application of proteins is still hampered by delivery related issues. A large number of protein molecules are under clinical trials and hence there is an urgent need to develop new methods to deliver these highly potent biologics. PMID:25251334

  18. Semiconducting polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, A. M.

    A review is presented of the electrical properties of those polymers whose conductivities occupy the middle ground between polymeric insulators and polymeric superconductors. Attention is confined to polymers in which conduction occurs through electronic, rather than ionic, transport. Four classes of semiconductors are discussed: (1) highly-conjugated polymers, including those formed by pyrolysis; (2) polymeric charge-transfer complexes and radical-ion salts; (3) organometallic polymeric semiconductors; and (4) composite polymer systems containing carbon or other highly conducting media. The possible applications discussed include cathodes in solid-state metal/halogen primary batteries, cathodes in lithium/poly-p-phenylene or polyacetylene secondary batteries, conductive coatings and epoxies, and chemical sensing agents. Other applications are Peltier cooling devices, pressure transducers, photovoltaic devices, infrared radiation detectors, and switches and resistors.

  19. Organometallic Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carraher, Charles E., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Reactions utilized to incorporate a metal-containing moiety into a polymer chain (addition, condensation, and coordination) are considered, emphasizing that these reactions also apply to smaller molecules. (JN)

  20. Branched Polymers

    E-print Network

    Richard Kenyon; Peter Winkler

    2007-09-14

    Building on and from the work of Brydges and Imbrie, we give an elementary calculation of the volume of the space of branched polymers of order $n$ in the plane and in 3-space. Our development reveals some more general identities, and allows exact random sampling. In particular we show that a random 3-dimensional branched polymer of order $n$ has diameter of order $\\sqrt{n}$.

  1. Developing Therapeutic Listening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Billy; Prior, Seamus

    2013-01-01

    We present an experience-near account of the development of therapeutic listening in first year counselling students. A phenomenological approach was employed to articulate the trainees' lived experiences of their learning. Six students who had just completed a one-year postgraduate certificate in counselling skills were interviewed and the…

  2. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  3. THERAPEUTIC DRUG DISCOVERY

    E-print Network

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    that drugs that boost OXPHOS capacity in muscle might improve diabetes. Accordingly, it has long been knownTHERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES DRUG DISCOVERY TODAY Estrogen-related receptor a (ERRa): A novel target in type 2 diabetes Christoph Handschin1,*, Vamsi K. Mootha2 1 Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department

  4. [ME]morial

    E-print Network

    Lee, Beomki

    2015-01-01

    Challenging an archetypal relationship between collective memory and a multitude of traditional memorials, "[ME]morial" presents a new concept in memorial architecture based on the reinterpretation of Freud's and Bergson's ...

  5. Memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Squire, Larry R; Genzel, Lisa; Wixted, John T; Morris, Richard G

    2015-08-01

    Conscious memory for a new experience is initially dependent on information stored in both the hippocampus and neocortex. Systems consolidation is the process by which the hippocampus guides the reorganization of the information stored in the neocortex such that it eventually becomes independent of the hippocampus. Early evidence for systems consolidation was provided by studies of retrograde amnesia, which found that damage to the hippocampus-impaired memories formed in the recent past, but typically spared memories formed in the more remote past. Systems consolidation has been found to occur for both episodic and semantic memories and for both spatial and nonspatial memories, although empirical inconsistencies and theoretical disagreements remain about these issues. Recent work has begun to characterize the neural mechanisms that underlie the dialogue between the hippocampus and neocortex (e.g., "neural replay," which occurs during sharp wave ripple activity). New work has also identified variables, such as the amount of preexisting knowledge, that affect the rate of consolidation. The increasing use of molecular genetic tools (e.g., optogenetics) can be expected to further improve understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying consolidation. PMID:26238360

  6. Polyphenols: Multipotent Therapeutic Agents in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Khushwant S.; Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Aging leads to numerous transitions in brain physiology including synaptic dysfunction and disturbances in cognition and memory. With a few clinically relevant drugs, a substantial portion of aging population at risk for age-related neurodegenerative disorders require nutritional intervention. Dietary intake of polyphenols is known to attenuate oxidative stress and reduce the risk for related neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), stroke, multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Huntington's disease (HD). Polyphenols exhibit strong potential to address the etiology of neurological disorders as they attenuate their complex physiology by modulating several therapeutic targets at once. Firstly, we review the advances in the therapeutic role of polyphenols in cell and animal models of AD, PD, MS, and HD and activation of drug targets for controlling pathological manifestations. Secondly, we present principle pathways in which polyphenol intake translates into therapeutic outcomes. In particular, signaling pathways like PPAR, Nrf2, STAT, HIF, and MAPK along with modulation of immune response by polyphenols are discussed. Although current polyphenol researches have limited impact on clinical practice, they have strong evidence and testable hypothesis to contribute clinical advances and drug discovery towards age-related neurological disorders. PMID:23840922

  7. The past, the future and the biology of memory storage.

    PubMed Central

    Kandel, E R; Pittenger, C

    1999-01-01

    We here briefly review a century of accomplishments in studying memory storage and delineate the two major questions that have dominated thinking in this area: the systems question of memory, which concerns where in the brain storage occurs; and the molecular question of memory, which concerns the mechanisms whereby memories are stored and maintained. We go on to consider the themes that memory research may be able to address in the 21st century. Finally, we reflect on the clinical and societal import of our increasing understanding of the mechanisms of memory, discussing possible therapeutic approaches to diseases that manifest with disruptions of learning and possible ethical implication of the ability, which is on the horizon, to ameliorate or even enhance human memory. PMID:10670023

  8. Influence of therapeutic radiation on polycaprolactone and polyurethane biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Shelley L; Whittington, Abby R

    2016-03-01

    Biomedical polymers are exposed in vivo to ionizing radiation as implants, coatings and bystander materials. High levels of ionizing radiation (e.g. X-ray and gamma) have been reported to cause degradation and/or cross-linking in many polymers. This pilot study sought to determine causes of failure, by investigating how therapeutic radiation affects two different porous polymeric scaffolds: polycaprolactone (PCL) and polyurethane (PU). PCL is a bioresorbable material used in biomedical devices (e.g., dentistry, internal fixation devices and targeted drug delivery capsules). PU is commonly used in medical applications (e.g., coatings for pacemakers, tissue expanders, catheter tubing and wound dressings). PU was specifically fabricated to be a non-degradable polymer in this study. Porous scaffolds, fabricated using solvent casting and/or salt leeching techniques, were placed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH=7.4) and exposed to typical cancer radiotherapy. A total dose of 50Gy was broken into 25 doses over an eleven-week period. Collected PBS was tested for polymer leachants and degradation products using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS), results revealed no analyzable leachants from either polymer. Scaffolds were characterized using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy, Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). No gross visual changes were observed in either polymer, however PU exhibited microstructure changes after irradiation. Increased number average molecular weight and weight average molecular weight in PCL and PU were observed after irradiation, indicating crosslinking. PU displayed an increase in intrinsic viscosity that further confirms increased crosslinking. PCL and PU showed decreases in crystallinity after irradiation, and PU crystallinity shifted from long-range-order hard segments to short-range-order hard segments after irradiation. Results from both PCL and PU suggest changes in polymer backbones. This preliminary study suggests that therapeutic radiation doses cause both degradation and crosslinking in PCL and PU. PMID:26706509

  9. Strategies for therapeutic hypometabothermia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shimin; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2012-01-01

    Although therapeutic hypothermia and metabolic suppression have shown robust neuroprotection in experimental brain ischemia, systemic complications have limited their use in treating acute stroke patients. The core temperature and basic metabolic rate are tightly regulated and maintained in a very stable level in mammals. Simply lowering body temperature or metabolic rate is actually a brutal therapy that may cause more systemic as well as regional problems other than providing protection. These problems are commonly seen in hypothermia and barbiturate coma. The main innovative concept of this review is to propose thermogenically optimal and synergistic reduction of core temperature and metabolic rate in therapeutic hypometabothermia using novel and clinically practical approaches. When metabolism and body temperature are reduced in a systematically synergistic manner, the outcome will be maximal protection and safe recovery, which happen in natural process, such as in hibernation, daily torpor and estivation. PMID:24179563

  10. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  11. [Therapeutic adherence in elderly].

    PubMed

    Petermans, J; Suarez, A Samalea; Van Hees, T

    2010-01-01

    Therapeutic adherence can be defined as the degree of concordance between the behaviour of a person in relation with drugs prescription and medical recommendations. It represents the ability of people to follow a treatment. Bad adherence is frequent in geriatric patients. The behaviour of the patient is important but the role of the prescriptor and distributor of the drugs should also be emphasized. A bad adherence is responsible for iatrogenic consequences, which has a great impact on the functionality of the old person, but also on the cost and organization of care. Therapeutic education, a standardised method to help the patient take care of his own treatment, must be developed. The aims and means should be clearly efined. The patient himself must be involved and human or material sources of help must be sought. PMID:20684404

  12. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-12-10

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  13. New levodopa therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    LeWitt, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    During its almost half-century of use for treating Parkinson's disease, levodopa therapy has permitted most patients to reverse much of this disorder's symptomatology. However, the full range of its therapeutic properties is not completely understood, as levodopa is showing itself to be more than just a metabolic intermediate for dopamine synthesis. Improving the constancy of drug delivery is the next frontier for enhancing therapeutic options with levodopa. Because conventional immediate-release carbidopa-levodopa tablets yield such variable pharmacokinetic profiles (as do other marketed products attempting to extend levodopa effect), improved formulations are greatly needed by patients experiencing motor fluctuations. Products under development or recently released in the U.S. include intestinal infusion, sustained-release microtablets, gastric-retentive formulations, a levodopa pro-drug, and methods for delivery of the drug by inhalation or subcutaneous infusion. PMID:26459662

  14. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  15. Retracing Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    2005-01-01

    There are plenty of paths to poetry but few are as accessible as retracing ones own memories. When students are asked to write about something they remember, they are given them the gift of choosing from events that are important enough to recall. They remember because what happened was funny or scary or embarrassing or heartbreaking or silly.…

  16. Hollow memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-04-01

    A hollow-core optical fibre filled with warm caesium atoms can temporarily store the properties of photons. Michael Sprague from the University of Oxford, UK, explains to Nature Photonics how this optical memory could be a useful building block for fibre-based quantum optics.

  17. Injectable preformed scaffolds with shape-memory properties

    PubMed Central

    Bencherif, Sidi A.; Sands, R. Warren; Bhatta, Deen; Arany, Praveen; Verbeke, Catia S.; Edwards, David A.; Mooney, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Injectable biomaterials are increasingly being explored to minimize risks and complications associated with surgical implantation. We describe a strategy for delivery via conventional needle–syringe injection of large preformed macroporous scaffolds with well-defined properties. Injectable 3D scaffolds, in the form of elastic sponge-like matrices, were prepared by environmentally friendly cryotropic gelation of a naturally sourced polymer. Cryogels with shape-memory properties may be molded to a variety of shapes and sizes, and may be optionally loaded with therapeutic agents or cells. These scaffolds have the capability to withstand reversible deformations at over 90% strain level, and a rapid volumetric recovery allows the structurally defined scaffolds to be injected through a small-bore needle with nearly complete geometric restoration once delivered. These gels demonstrated long-term release of biomolecules in vivo. Furthermore, cryogels impregnated with bioluminescent reporter cells provided enhanced survival, higher local retention, and extended engraftment of transplanted cells at the injection site compared with a standard injection technique. These injectable scaffolds show great promise for various biomedical applications, including cell therapies. PMID:23150549

  18. Polymer inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Syed Moeez; Husain, Viqar; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2015-03-01

    We consider the semiclassical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a Gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semiclassical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by an epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow-roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckian initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  19. Polymer inflation

    E-print Network

    Syed Moeez Hassan; Viqar Husain; Sanjeev S. Seahra

    2015-03-05

    We consider the semi-classical dynamics of a free massive scalar field in a homogeneous and isotropic cosmological spacetime. The scalar field is quantized using the polymer quantization method assuming that it is described by a gaussian coherent state. For quadratic potentials, the semi-classical equations of motion yield a universe that has an early "polymer inflation" phase which is generic and almost exactly de Sitter, followed by a epoch of slow-roll inflation. We compute polymer corrections to the slow roll formalism, and discuss the probability of inflation in this model using a physical Hamiltonian arising from time gauge fixing. We also show how in this model, it is possible to obtain a significant amount of slow-roll inflation from sub-Planckain initial data, hence circumventing some of the criticisms of standard scenarios. These results show the extent to which a quantum gravity motivated quantization method affects early universe dynamics.

  20. Antimocrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Huang, Zhi-Heng (Walnut Creek, CA); Wright, Stacy C. (Columbus, GA)

    2005-09-06

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from quaternary ammonium compounds, gentian violet compounds, substituted or unsubstituted phenols, biguanide compounds, iodine compounds, and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A)3P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the antimicrobial agent is chlorhexidine, dimethylchlorophenol, cetyl pyridinium chloride, gentian violet, triclosan, thymol, iodine, and mixtures thereof.

  1. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Wright, Stacy C. (Flint, MI); Taylor, Andrew C. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  2. Spatial memory, recognition memory, and the hippocampus

    E-print Network

    Squire, Larry R.

    Spatial memory, recognition memory, and the hippocampus Nicola J. Broadbent*, Larry R. Squire. Squire, August 27, 2004 There is wide agreement that spatial memory is dependent on the integrity recognition memory is not as clear. We examined the relationship between hippocampal lesion size and both

  3. Cystic Fibrosis Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Bonnie W.

    2013-01-01

    A great deal of excitement and hope has followed the successful trials and US Food and Drug Administration approval of the drug ivacaftor (Kalydeco), the first therapy available that targets the underlying defect that causes cystic fibrosis (CF). Although this drug has currently demonstrated a clinical benefit for a small minority of the CF population, the developmental pathway established by ivacaftor paves the way for other CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) modulators that may benefit many more patients. In addition to investigating CFTR modulators, researchers are actively developing numerous other innovative CF therapies. In this review, we use the catalog of treatments currently under evaluation with the support of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, known as the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics Pipeline, as a platform to discuss the variety of candidate treatments for CF lung disease that promise to improve CF care. Many of these approaches target the individual components of the relentless cycle of airway obstruction, inflammation, and infection characteristic of lung disease in CF, whereas others are aimed directly at the gene defect, or the resulting dysfunctional protein, that instigates this cycle. We discuss how new findings from the laboratory have informed not only the development of novel therapeutics, but also the rationales for their use and the outcomes used to measure their effects. By reviewing the breadth of candidate treatments currently in development, as well as the recent progress in CF therapies reflected by the evolution of the therapeutics pipeline over the past few years, we hope to build upon the optimism and anticipation generated by the recent success of Kalydeco. PMID:23276843

  4. Antimicrobial polymers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Duvvuri, L Sailaja; Farah, Shady; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2014-12-01

    Better health is basic requirement of human being, but the rapid growth of harmful pathogens and their serious health effects pose a significant challenge to modern science. Infections by pathogenic microorganisms are of great concern in many fields such as medical devices, drugs, hospital surfaces/furniture, dental restoration, surgery equipment, health care products, and hygienic applications (e.g., water purification systems, textiles, food packaging and storage, major or domestic appliances etc.) Antimicrobial polymers are the materials having the capability to kill/inhibit the growth of microbes on their surface or surrounding environment. Recently, they gained considerable interest for both academic research and industry and were found to be better than their small molecular counterparts in terms of enhanced efficacy, reduced toxicity, minimized environmental problems, resistance, and prolonged lifetime. Hence, efforts have focused on the development of antimicrobial polymers with all desired characters for optimum activity. In this Review, an overview of different antimicrobial polymers, their mechanism of action, factors affecting antimicrobial activity, and application in various fields are given. Recent advances and the current clinical status of these polymers are also discussed. PMID:25408272

  5. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    PubMed

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. PMID:25043543

  6. Therapeutic approaches to cellulite.

    PubMed

    Green, Jeremy B; Cohen, Joel L; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaminer, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cellulite is a condition that affects the vast majority of women. Although it is of no danger to one's overall health, cellulite can be psychosocially debilitating. Consequently, much research has been devoted to understanding cellulite and its etiopathogenesis. With additional insights into the underlying causes of its clinical presentation, therapeutic modalities have been developed that offer hope to cellulite sufferers. This review examines evidence for topical treatments, noninvasive energy-based devices, and recently developed minimally invasive interventions that may finally provide a solution. PMID:26566570

  7. Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore

    E-print Network

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    Polymers Pushing Polymers: Polymer Mixtures in Thermodynamic Equilibrium with a Pore R. Podgornik, 1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia Polymer Science and Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, United States ABSTRACT: We investigate polymer partitioning from polymer

  8. What is a suggestion? The neuroscience of implicit processing heuristics in therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Ernest L; Rossi, Kathryn L

    2007-04-01

    Neuroscience and bioinformatics research on activity-dependent gene expression and brain plasticity in memory and learning are used to reconceptualize a fundamental question of therapeutic hypnosis, "What is a suggestion?" John Kihlstrom's cognitive-behavioral perspective of implicit (unconscious) and explicit (conscious) memory and Eric Kandel's Nobel Prize winning neurobiological research are integrated for a 30-year update of Milton H. Erickson's "neuro-psycho-physiology" of therapeutic hypnosis. Implicit processing heuristics are proposed as a more general framework for Erickson's concept of permissive indirect suggestions in therapeutic hypnosis and psychotherapy. These perspectives are illustrated by utilizing implicit processing heuristics to facilitate the four-stage creative process in converting implicit to explicit memory in a brain-damaged patient. PMID:17444364

  9. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers"

    E-print Network

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Nanomanufacturing with Polymers" Prof. Joey Mead University Lowell has developed a suite of processes to enable the nanomanufacturing of polymer based products of properties (e.g. biocompatibility, polarity, and modulus). Polymer materials can be used as substrates

  10. Silk constructs for delivery of muskuloskeletal therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Meinel, Lorenz; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Silk fibroin (SF) is a biopolymer with distinguishing features from many other bio- as well as synthetic polymers. From a biomechanical and drug delivery perspective, SF combines remarkable versatility for scaffolding (solid implants, hydrogels, threads, solutions), with advanced mechanical properties and good stabilization and controlled delivery of entrapped protein and small molecule drugs, respectively. It is this combination of mechanical and pharmaceutical features which render SF so exciting for biomedical applications. his pattern along with the versatility of this biopolymer have been translated into progress for musculoskeletal applications. We review the use and potential of silk fibroin for systemic and localized delivery of therapeutics in diseases affecting the musculoskeletal system. We also present future directions for this biopolymer as well as the necessary research and development steps for their achievement. PMID:22522139

  11. Visual Memory Definition

    E-print Network

    Majumder, Aditi

    "buffer" memory ­ Short-term memory Limited-capacity store of longer duration (10s of seconds) ­ Long-term1/74 A Square #12;2/74 Visual Memory Definition ­ Memory of visual information! ­ Duration ­ Methodologically easier ­ Provides some generalizable results to visual memory #12;3/74 Historical Perspective

  12. Memory Systems Doug Burger

    E-print Network

    Burger, Doug

    Memory Systems Doug Burger University of Wisconsin-Madison A computer's memory system and produces. A perfect memory system is one that can supply immediately any datum that the CPU requests. This ideal memory is not practically implementable, however, as the three factors of memory capacity, speed

  13. Person-centered Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cloninger, C. Robert; Cloninger, Kevin M.

    2015-01-01

    A clinician’s effectiveness in treatment depends substantially on his or her attitude toward -- and understanding of -- the patient as a person endowed with self-awareness and the will to direct his or her own future. The assessment of personality in the therapeutic encounter is a crucial foundation for forming an effective working alliance with shared goals. Helping a person to reflect on their personality provides a mirror image of their strengths and weaknesses in adapting to life’s many challenges. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) provides an effective way to describe personality thoroughly and to predict both the positive and negative aspects of health. Strengths and weaknesses in TCI personality traits allow strong predictions of individual differences of all aspects of well-being. Diverse therapeutic techniques, such as diet, exercise, mood self-regulation, meditation, or acts of kindness, influence health and personality development in ways that are largely indistinguishable from one another or from effective allopathic treatments. Hence the development of well-being appears to be the result of activating a synergistic set of mechanisms of well-being, which are expressed as fuller functioning, plasticity, and virtue in adapting to life’s challenges PMID:26052429

  14. Nitrones as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Robert A.; Kopke, Richard D.; Choi, Chul-Hee; Foster, Steven B.; Doblas, Sabrina; Towner, Rheal A.

    2008-01-01

    Nitrones have the general chemical formula X-CH=NO-Y. They were first used to trap free radicals in chemical systems and then subsequently in biochemical systems. More recently several nitrones including PBN (?-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone) have been shown to have potent biological activity in many experimental animal models. Many diseases of aging including stroke, cancer development, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease are known to have enhanced levels of free radicals and oxidative stress. Some derivatives of PBN are significantly more potent than PBN and have undergone extensive commercial development in stroke. Recent research has shown that PBN-related nitrones also have anti-cancer activity in several experimental cancer models and have potential as therapeutics in some cancers. Also in recent observations nitrones have been shown to act synergistically in combination with antioxidants in the prevention of acute acoustic noise induced hearing loss. The mechanistic basis of the potent biological activity of PBN-related nitrones is not known. Even though PBN-related nitrones do decrease oxidative stress and oxidative damage, their potent biological anti-inflammatory activity and their ability to alter cellular signaling processes can not readily be explained by conventional notions of free radical trapping biochemistry. This review is focused on our observations and others where the use of selected nitrones as novel therapeutics have been evaluated in experimental models in the context of free radical biochemical and cellular processes considered important in pathologic conditions and age-related diseases. PMID:18793715

  15. Molecular Targets in Alzheimer's Disease: From Pathogenesis to Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuan; Zhang, Lu; Lian, Ya-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by progressive cognitive decline usually beginning with impairment in the ability to form recent memories. Nonavailability of definitive therapeutic strategy urges developing pharmacological targets based on cell signaling pathways. A great revival of interest in nutraceuticals and adjuvant therapy has been put forward. Tea polyphenols for their multiple health benefits have also attracted the attention of researchers. Tea catechins showed enough potentiality to be used in future as therapeutic targets to provide neuroprotection against AD. This review attempts to present a concise map of different receptor signaling pathways associated with AD with an insight into drug designing based on the proposed signaling pathways, molecular mechanistic details of AD pathogenesis, and a scientific rationale for using tea polyphenols as proposed therapeutic agents in AD. PMID:26665008

  16. Transient behaviour of a polymer dragged through a viscoelastic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandebroek, Hans; Vanderzande, Carlo

    2014-09-01

    We study the dynamics of a polymer that is pulled by a constant force through a viscoelastic medium. This is a model for a polymer being pulled through a cell by an external force, or for an active biopolymer moving due to a self-generated force. Using the Rouse model with a memory dependent drag force, we find that the center of mass of the polymer follows a subballistic motion. We determine the time evolution of the length and the shape of the polymer. Through an analysis of the velocity of the monomers, we investigate how the tension propagates through the polymer. We discuss how polymers can be used to probe the properties of a viscoelastic medium.

  17. Cell microencapsulation with synthetic polymers

    PubMed Central

    Olabisi, Ronke M

    2015-01-01

    The encapsulation of cells into polymeric microspheres or microcapsules has permitted the transplantation of cells into human and animal subjects without the need for immunosuppressants. Cell-based therapies use donor cells to provide sustained release of a therapeutic product, such as insulin, and have shown promise in treating a variety of diseases. Immunoisolation of these cells via microencapsulation is a hotly investigated field, and the preferred material of choice has been alginate, a natural polymer derived from seaweed due to its gelling conditions. Although many natural polymers tend to gel in conditions favorable to mammalian cell encapsulation, there remain challenges such as batch to batch variability and residual components from the original source that can lead to an immune response when implanted into a recipient. Synthetic materials have the potential to avoid these issues; however, historically they have required harsh polymerization conditions that are not favorable to mammalian cells. As research into microencapsulation grows, more investigators are exploring methods to microencapsulate cells into synthetic polymers. This review describes a variety of synthetic polymers used to microencapsulate cells. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 846–859, 2015. PMID:24771675

  18. L19 Virtual Memory 1Comp 411 Virtual Memory

    E-print Network

    Bishop, Gary

    L19 ­ Virtual Memory 1Comp 411 Virtual Memory Carolina Course Evaluation Open Today: Virtual Memory #12;L19 ­ Virtual Memory 2Comp 411 Virtual Memory ·Main memory is a CACHE for disk ·Advantages: ·illusion of having more physical memory ·program relocation ·protection #12;L19 ­ Virtual Memory 3Comp 411

  19. Catching the engram: strategies to examine the memory trace

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Memories are stored within neuronal ensembles in the brain. Modern genetic techniques can be used to not only visualize specific neuronal ensembles that encode memories (e.g., fear, craving) but also to selectively manipulate those neurons. These techniques are now being expanded for the study of various types of memory. In this review, we will summarize the genetic methods used to visualize and manipulate neurons involved in the representation of memory engrams. The methods will help clarify how memory is encoded, stored and processed in the brain. Furthermore, these approaches may contribute to our understanding of the pathological mechanisms associated with human memory disorders and, ultimately, may aid the development of therapeutic strategies to ameliorate these diseases. PMID:22999350

  20. Systemic administration of riluzole enhances recognition memory and facilitates extinction of fear memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Azusa; Saitoh, Akiyoshi; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Yamada, Mitsuhiko

    2015-10-01

    Strategies to enhance recognition memory and facilitate extinction of fear memory have attracted increasing attention for enhancing the effectiveness of exposure therapy for anxiety disorders. Previously, we demonstrated that systemic administration of riluzole has clear anxiolytic-like effects, without impairing memory, in rats. In the present study, we examined whether riluzole could have therapeutic potential for anxiety disorders when combined with exposure therapy. Both riluzole and D-cycloserine enhanced recognition memory in the novel object recognition test and facilitated extinction learning in the contextual fear conditioning in rats. Interestingly, the facilitatory effect of riluzole on extinction learning was clearly observed even after a short re-exposure to the context, while D-cycloserine was ineffective at facilitating extinction when a short duration exposure session was given. In contrast, diazepam impaired both recognition memory and the extinction of fear memory. Our findings strongly suggest that systemic administration of riluzole may have therapeutic efficacy when combined with exposure therapy for treating a range of anxiety disorders. Clinical trials to examine the efficacy of riluzole in combination with exposure therapy in these patients are warranted. PMID:26116528

  1. Goliad Memorial Auditorium 2 

    E-print Network

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    1936-01-01

    specific material places both preserve and trigger memories, especially memories relevant to the colonial and postcolonial history of these places, and how the conjunction of place and the past leads us to “bump into” social memories often dismissed from...

  2. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  3. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations. PMID:25371141

  4. Outpatient therapeutic nuclear oncology.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Harvey

    2012-05-01

    In the beginning, nuclear medicine was radionuclide therapy, which has evolved into molecular tumour-targeted control of metastatic cancer. Safe, efficacious, clinical practice of therapeutic nuclear oncology may now be based upon accurate personalised dosimetry by quantitative gamma SPECT/CT imaging to prescribe tumoricidal activities without critical organ toxicity. Preferred therapy radionuclides possess gamma emission of modest energy and abundance to enable quantitative SPECT/CT imaging for calculation of the beta therapy dosimetry, without radiation exposure risk to hospital personnel, carers, family or members of the public. The safety of outpatient radiopharmaceutical therapy of cancer with Iodine-131, Samarium-153, Holmium-166, Rhenium-186, Rhenium-188, Lutetium-177 and Indium-111 is reviewed. Measured activity release rates and radiation exposure to carers and the public are all within recommendations and guidelines of international regulatory agencies and, when permitted by local regulatory authorities allow cost-effective, safe, outpatient radionuclide therapy of cancer without isolation in hospital. PMID:22222779

  5. [Therapeutic education didactic techniques].

    PubMed

    Valverde, Maite; Vidal, Mercè; Jansa, Margarida

    2012-10-01

    This article includes an introduction to the role of Therapeutic Education for Diabetes treatment according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Diabetes Education Study Group (DESG) of the "European Association for Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) of the Spanish Ministry of Health. We analyze theoretical models and the differences between teaching vs. learning as well as current trends (including Internet), that can facilitate meaningful learning of people with diabetes and their families and relatives. We analyze the differences, similarities, advantages and disadvantages of individual and group education. Finally, we describe different educational techniques (metaplan, case method, brainstorming, role playing, games, seminars, autobiography, forums, chats,..) applicable to individual, group or virtual education and its application depending on the learning objective. PMID:23157069

  6. Mitochondrial Energetics and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Douglas C.; Fan, Weiwei; Procaccio, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to a wide range of degenerative and metabolic diseases, cancer, and aging. All these clinical manifestations arise from the central role of bioenergetics in cell biology. Although genetic therapies are maturing as the rules of bioenergetic genetics are clarified, metabolic therapies have been ineffectual. This failure results from our limited appreciation of the role of bioenergetics as the interface between the environment and the cell. A systems approach, which, ironically, was first successfully applied over 80 years ago with the introduction of the ketogenic diet, is required. Analysis of the many ways that a shift from carbohydrate glycolytic metabolism to fatty acid and ketone oxidative metabolism may modulate metabolism, signal transduction pathways, and the epigenome gives us an appreciation of the ketogenic diet and the potential for bioenergetic therapeutics. PMID:20078222

  7. Therapeutic applications of melatonin

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin is a methoxyindole synthesized within the pineal gland. The hormone is secreted during the night and appears to play multiple roles within the human organism. The hormone contributes to the regulation of biological rhythms, may induce sleep, has strong antioxidant action and appears to contribute to the protection of the organism from carcinogenesis and neurodegenerative disorders. At a therapeutic level as well as in prevention, melatonin is used for the management of sleep disorders and jet lag, for the resynchronization of circadian rhythms in situations such as blindness and shift work, for its preventive action in the development of cancer, as additive therapy in cancer and as therapy for preventing the progression of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23515203

  8. Phthalocyanine polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achar, B. N.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (inventors)

    1985-01-01

    A method of forming 4,4',4'',4''' -tetraamino phthalocyanines involves reducing 4,4',4'',4''' -tetranitro phthalocyanines, polymerizing the metal tetraamino phthalocyanines with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride (preferably aromatic) or copolymerizing with a tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a diamine (preferably also aromatic) to produce amic acids which are then dehydrocyclized to imides. Thermally and oxidatively stable polymers result which form tough, flexible films, varnishes, adhesives, and fibers.

  9. Examining Object Location and Object Recognition Memory in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vogel-Ciernia, Annie; Wood, Marcelo A.

    2014-01-01

    Unit Introduction The ability to store and recall our life experiences defines a person's identity. Consequently, the loss of long-term memory is a particularly devastating part of a variety of cognitive disorders, diseases and injuries. There is a great need to develop therapeutics to treat memory disorders, and thus a variety of animal models and memory paradigms have been developed. Mouse models have been widely used both to study basic disease mechanisms and to evaluate potential drug targets for therapeutic development. The relative ease of genetic manipulation of Mus musculus has led to a wide variety of genetically altered mice that model cognitive disorders ranging from Alzheimer's disease to autism. Rodents, including mice, are particularly adept at encoding and remembering spatial relationships, and these long-term spatial memories are dependent on the medial temporal lobe of the brain. These brain regions are also some of the first and most heavily impacted in disorders of human memory including Alzheimer's disease. Consequently, some of the simplest and most commonly used tests of long-term memory in mice are those that examine memory for objects and spatial relationships. However, many of these tasks, such as Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning, are dependent upon the encoding and retrieval of emotionally aversive and inherently stressful training events. While these types of memories are important, they do not reflect the typical day-to-day experiences or memories most commonly affected in human disease. In addition, stress hormone release alone can modulate memory and thus obscure or artificially enhance these types of tasks. To avoid these sorts of confounds, we and many others have utilized tasks testing animals’ memory for object location and novel object recognition. These tasks involve exploiting rodents’ innate preference for novelty, and are inherently not stressful. In this protocol we detail how memory for object location and object identity can be used to evaluate a wide variety of mouse models and treatments. PMID:25297693

  10. Conductive Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bohnert, G.W.

    2002-11-22

    Electroluminescent devices such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and high-energy density batteries. These new polymers offer cost savings, weight reduction, ease of processing, and inherent rugged design compared to conventional semiconductor materials. The photovoltaic industry has grown more than 30% during the past three years. Lightweight, flexible solar modules are being used by the U.S. Army and Marine Corps for field power units. LEDs historically used for indicator lights are now being investigated for general lighting to replace fluorescent and incandescent lights. These so-called solid-state lights are becoming more prevalent across the country since they produce efficient lighting with little heat generation. Conductive polymers are being sought for battery development as well. Considerable weight savings over conventional cathode materials used in secondary storage batteries make portable devices easier to carry and electric cars more efficient and nimble. Secondary battery sales represent an $8 billion industry annually. The purpose of the project was to synthesize and characterize conductive polymers. TRACE Photonics Inc. has researched critical issues which affect conductivity. Much of their work has focused on production of substituted poly(phenylenevinylene) compounds. These compounds exhibit greater solubility over the parent polyphenylenevinylene, making them easier to process. Alkoxy substituted groups evaluated during this study included: methoxy, propoxy, and heptyloxy. Synthesis routes for production of alkoxy-substituted poly phenylenevinylene were developed. Considerable emphasis was placed on final product yield and purity.

  11. A Beginner's Guide to Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Elizabeth M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is designed to equip the reader with the information needed to deal with questions of computer memory. Discussed are core memory; semiconductor memory; size of memory; expanding memory; charge-coupled device memories; magnetic bubble memory; and read-only and read-mostly memories. (KC)

  12. High-throughput gene expression profiling of memory differentiation in primary human T cells

    E-print Network

    Angelosanto, Jill

    Background: The differentiation of naive T and B cells into memory lymphocytes is essential for immunity to pathogens. Therapeutic manipulation of this cellular differentiation program could improve vaccine efficacy and ...

  13. Extending the Memory of Microcomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Memory increased while retaining real-time capabilities. Extra memory capacity added to microprocessor without increasing memory address length and special transfer instructions by dedicating block of space in main memory to hold addresses of locations in extra memory.

  14. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, Peter A. . E-mail: p.whittaker@lancaster.ac.uk

    2005-09-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated.

  15. Chelating polymeric beads as potential therapeutics for Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattová, Jana; Pou?ková, Pavla; Ku?ka, Jan; Skodová, Michaela; Vetrík, Miroslav; St?pánek, Petr; Urbánek, Petr; Pet?ík, Miloš; Nový, Zbyn?k; Hrubý, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Wilson's disease is a genetic disorder caused by a malfunction of ATPase 7B that leads to high accumulation of copper in the organism and consequent toxic effects. We propose a gentle therapy to eliminate the excessive copper content with oral administration of insoluble non-resorbable polymer sorbents containing selective chelating groups for copper(II). Polymeric beads with the chelating agents triethylenetetramine, N,N-di(2-pyridylmethyl)amine, and 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQB) were investigated. In a preliminary copper uptake experiment, we found that 8HQB significantly reduced copper uptake (using copper-64 as a radiotracer) after oral administration in Wistar rats. Furthermore, we measured organ radioactivity in rats to demonstrate that 8HQB radiolabelled with iodine-125 is not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract after oral administration. Non-resorbability and the blockade of copper uptake were also confirmed with small animal imaging (PET/CT) in mice. In a long-term experiment with Wistar rats fed a diet containing the polymers, we have found that there were no signs of polymer toxicity and the addition of polymers to the diet led to a significant reduction in the copper contents in the kidneys, brains, and livers of the rats. We have shown that polymers containing specific ligands could potentially be novel therapeutics for Wilson's disease. PMID:24815561

  16. Mass Production and Size Control of Lipid–Polymer Hybrid Nanoparticles through Controlled Microvortices

    E-print Network

    Kim, YongTae

    Lipid–polymer hybrid (LPH) nanoparticles can deliver a wide range of therapeutic compounds in a controlled manner. LPH nanoparticle syntheses using microfluidics improve the mixing process but are restricted by a low ...

  17. Polymer Physics Research Profile

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Polymer Physics Research Profile Our main interests are the theory of simplification and some behavior on different autonomous levels of description. Our favorite applications range from polymer + Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics + Coarse Graining + Soft Matter + Polymer Physics + Rheology + Competences

  18. Successful Use of Therapeutic Hypothermia in a Pregnant Patient

    PubMed Central

    Oyetayo, Ola O.; Stewart, David; Costa, Steven M.; Jones, Richard O.

    2015-01-01

    Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States. Pregnant women are not immune to cardiac arrest, and the treatment of such patients can be difficult. Pregnancy is a relative contraindication to the use of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. A 20-year-old woman who was 18 weeks pregnant had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Upon her arrival at the emergency department, she was resuscitated and her circulation returned spontaneously, but her score on the Glasgow Coma Scale was 3. After adequate family discussion of the risks and benefits of therapeutic hypothermia, a decision was made to initiate therapeutic hypothermia per established protocol for 24 hours. The patient was successfully cooled and rewarmed. By the time she was discharged, she had experienced complete neurologic recovery, apart from some short-term memory loss. Subsequently, at 40 weeks, she delivered vaginally a 7-lb 3-oz girl whose Apgar scores were 8 and 9, at 1 and 5 minutes respectively. To our knowledge, this is only the 3rd reported case of a successful outcome following the initiation of therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in a pregnant woman. On the basis of this and previous reports of successful outcomes, we recommend that therapeutic hypothermia be considered an option in the management of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the pregnant population. To facilitate a successful outcome, a multidisciplinary approach involving cardiology, emergency medicine, obstetrics, and neurology should be used. PMID:26413021

  19. Leech therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Abdualkader, A M; Ghawi, A M; Alaama, M; Awang, M; Merzouk, A

    2013-03-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproductive system problems, inflammation, and dental problems. Recently, extensive researches on leech saliva unveiled the presence of a variety of bioactive peptides and proteins involving antithrombin (hirudin, bufrudin), antiplatelet (calin, saratin), factor Xa inhibitors (lefaxin), antibacterial (theromacin, theromyzin) and others. Consequently, leech has made a comeback as a new remedy for many chronic and life-threatening abnormalities, such as cardiovascular problems, cancer, metastasis, and infectious diseases. In the 20(th) century, leech therapy has established itself in plastic and microsurgery as a protective tool against venous congestion and served to salvage the replanted digits and flaps. Many clinics for plastic surgery all over the world started to use leeches for cosmetic purposes. Despite the efficacious properties of leech therapy, the safety, and complications of leeching are still controversial. PMID:24019559

  20. Therapeutic apheresis in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Yeh, J H; Chiu, H C

    2001-12-01

    From July 1, 1999, to June 30, 2000, the Formosan Blood Purification Society conducted a survey on the current status of therapeutic apheresis (TA) treatments in Taiwan. There were 13 centers with a total of 437 patients, 498 courses, and 2,086 procedures. The most common indication was for neurological disorders (58.4%), which included mainly myasthenia gravis (34.9%) and Guillain-Barré syndrome (18.2%). The other indications were hematological disorders (19.3%), hepatic-pancreatic disorders (12.3%), and rheumatic disorders (7.1%). Seventy-one percent of TA treatments were reported to be effective. Plasma exchange (PE) performed by either centrifugation or the filtration method constituted 55.4% of TA treatments, the double-filtration (DF) method constituted 39.3% of treatments, and cytapheresis constituted 5.3% of treatments. The most common machines used for TA were the Plasauto iQ, the KM 8800, the Hemonetics series, and the Fenwal CS-3000. The overall frequency of complications was 42.2% per course and 12.9% per procedure. Among them, fever, urticaria, and hypotension were the major complications. As compared with the trends of TA treatment in the world, PE still represents the major TA treatment in Taiwan, which should be replaced by DF or more selective adsorptive methods to reduce the PE-related adverse effects. PMID:11800091

  1. Phytonutrients as therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Charu; Prakash, Dhan

    2014-09-01

    Nutrients present in various foods plays an important role in maintaining the normal functions of the human body. The major nutrients present in foods include carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, and minerals. Besides these, there are some bioactive food components known as "phytonutrients" that play an important role in human health. They have tremendous impact on the health care system and may provide medical health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of disease and various physiological disorders. Phytonutrients play a positive role by maintaining and modulating immune function to prevent specific diseases. Being natural products, they hold a great promise in clinical therapy as they possess no side effects that are usually associated with chemotherapy or radiotherapy. They are also comparatively cheap and thus significantly reduce health care cost. Phytonutrients are the plant nutrients with specific biological activities that support human health. Some of the important bioactive phytonutrients include polyphenols, terpenoids, resveratrol, flavonoids, isoflavonoids, carotenoids, limonoids, glucosinolates, phytoestrogens, phytosterols, anthocyanins, ?-3 fatty acids, and probiotics. They play specific pharmacological effects in human health such as anti-microbial, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, antiallergic, anti-spasmodic, anti-cancer, anti-aging, hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, neuroprotective, hypotensive, diabetes, osteoporosis, CNS stimulant, analgesic, protection from UVB-induced carcinogenesis, immuno-modulator, and carminative. This mini-review attempts to summarize the major important types of phytonutrients and their role in promoting human health and as therapeutic agents along with the current market trend and commercialization. PMID:25051278

  2. Leech Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Abdualkader, A. M.; Ghawi, A. M.; Alaama, M.; Awang, M.; Merzouk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hematophagous animals including leeches have been known to possess biologically active compounds in their secretions, especially in their saliva. The blood-sucking annelids, leeches have been used for therapeutic purposes since the beginning of civilization. Ancient Egyptian, Indian, Greek and Arab physicians used leeches for a wide range of diseases starting from the conventional use for bleeding to systemic ailments, such as skin diseases, nervous system abnormalities, urinary and reproductive system problems, inflammation, and dental problems. Recently, extensive researches on leech saliva unveiled the presence of a variety of bioactive peptides and proteins involving antithrombin (hirudin, bufrudin), antiplatelet (calin, saratin), factor Xa inhibitors (lefaxin), antibacterial (theromacin, theromyzin) and others. Consequently, leech has made a comeback as a new remedy for many chronic and life-threatening abnormalities, such as cardiovascular problems, cancer, metastasis, and infectious diseases. In the 20th century, leech therapy has established itself in plastic and microsurgery as a protective tool against venous congestion and served to salvage the replanted digits and flaps. Many clinics for plastic surgery all over the world started to use leeches for cosmetic purposes. Despite the efficacious properties of leech therapy, the safety, and complications of leeching are still controversial. PMID:24019559

  3. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  4. Order-memory and association-memory.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Two highly studied memory functions are memory for associations (items presented in pairs, such as SALT-PEPPER) and memory for order (a list of items whose order matters, such as a telephone number). Order- and association-memory are at the root of many forms of behaviour, from wayfinding, to language, to remembering people's names. Most researchers have investigated memory for order separately from memory for associations. Exceptions to this, associative-chaining models build an ordered list from associations between pairs of items, quite literally understanding association- and order-memory together. Alternatively, positional-coding models have been used to explain order-memory as a completely distinct function from association-memory. Both classes of model have found empirical support and both have faced serious challenges. I argue that models that combine both associative chaining and positional coding are needed. One such hybrid model, which relies on brain-activity rhythms, is promising, but remains to be tested rigourously. I consider two relatively understudied memory behaviours that demand a combination of order- and association-information: memory for the order of items within associations (is it William James or James William?) and judgments of relative order (who left the party earlier, Hermann or William?). Findings from these underexplored procedures are already difficult to reconcile with existing association-memory and order-memory models. Further work with such intermediate experimental paradigms has the potential to provide powerful findings to constrain and guide models into the future, with the aim of explaining a large range of memory functions, encompassing both association- and order-memory. PMID:25894964

  5. Amphetamine increases errors during episodic memory retrieval.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael Edward; Gallo, David A; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-02-01

    Moderate doses of stimulant drugs are known to enhance memory encoding and consolidation, but their effects on memory retrieval have not been explored in depth. In laboratory animals, stimulants seem to improve retrieval of emotional memories, but comparable studies have not been carried out in humans. In the present study, we examined the effects of dextroamphetamine (AMP) on retrieval of emotional and unemotional stimuli in healthy young adults, using doses that enhanced memory formation when administered before encoding in our previous study. During 3 sessions, healthy volunteers (n = 31) received 2 doses of AMP (10 and 20 mg) and placebo in counterbalanced order under double-blind conditions. During each session, they first viewed emotional and unemotional pictures and words in a drug-free state, and then 2 days later their memory was tested, 1 hour after AMP or placebo administration. Dextroamphetamine did not affect the number of emotional or unemotional stimuli remembered, but both doses increased recall intrusions and false recognition. Dextroamphetamine (20 mg) also increased the number of positively rated picture descriptions and words generated during free recall. These data provide the first evidence that therapeutic range doses of stimulant drugs can increase memory retrieval errors. The ability of AMP to positively bias recollection of prior events could contribute to its potential for abuse. PMID:24135845

  6. DCTD — Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP)

    Cancer.gov

    In 2009, NCI consolidated its anticancer drug discovery and development resources in support of a robust, balanced, goal-driven therapeutics pipeline--the NCI Experimental Therapeutics (NExT) Program. For more information about this new initiative, including how to submit an application, please visit the NExT website.

  7. Language Patterns and Therapeutic Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phoenix, Valdemar G.; Lindeman, Mary L.

    Noting that the mental health practitioner needs highly developed linguistic and communicative skills in order to precipitate therapeutic changes, this paper discusses the nature of the contexts of therapeutic interaction. It examines verb tense as a linguistic context marker and shows how various schools of therapy can use it. In addition, it…

  8. Interpretations of Polymer-Polymer Miscibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olabisi, Olagoke

    1981-01-01

    Discusses various aspects of polymeric mixtures, mixtures of structurally different homopolymers, copolymers, terpolymers, and the like. Defines concepts of polymer-polymer miscibility from practical and theoretical viewpoints, and ways of predicting such miscibility. (JN)

  9. Supramolecular Polymer Nanocomposites - Improvement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinricher, Jesse; Neikirk, Colin; Priestley, Rodney

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular polymers differ from traditional polymers in that their repeat units are connected by hydrogen bonds that can reversibly break and form under various stimuli. They can be more easily recycled than conventional materials, and their highly temperature dependent viscosities result in reduced energy consumption and processing costs. Furthermore, judicious selection of supramolecular polymer architecture and functionality allows the design of advanced materials including shape memory and self-healing materials. Supramolecular polymers have yet to see widespread use because they can't support much weight due to their inherent mechanical weakness. In order to address this issue, the mechanical strength of supramolecular polymer nanocomposites based on ureidopyrmidinone (UPy) telechelic poly(caprolactone) doped with surface activated silica nanoparticles was investigated by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis. The effects of varying amounts and types of nanofiller surface functionality were investigated to glean insight into the contributions of filler-filler and filler-matrix interactions to mechanical reinforcement in supramolecular polymer nanocomposites. MRSEC NSF DMR 0819860 (PI: Prof. N. Phuan Ong) REU Site Grant: NSF DMR-1156422 (PI: Prof. Mikko Haataja)

  10. Therapeutic cloning: promises and issues

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    Advances in biotechnology necessitate both an understanding of scientific principles and ethical implications to be clinically applicable in medicine. In this regard, therapeutic cloning offers significant potential in regenerative medicine by circumventing immunorejection, and in the cure of genetic disorders when used in conjunction with gene therapy. Therapeutic cloning in the context of cell replacement therapy holds a huge potential for de novo organogenesis and the permanent treatment of Parkinson’s disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and diabetes mellitus as shown by in vivo studies. Scientific roadblocks impeding advancement in therapeutic cloning are tumorigenicity, epigenetic reprogramming, mitochondrial heteroplasmy, interspecies pathogen transfer, low oocyte availability. Therapeutic cloning is also often tied to ethical considerations concerning the source, destruction and moral status of IVF embryos based on the argument of potential. Legislative and funding issues are also addressed. Future considerations would include a distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning in legislative formulations. PMID:18523539

  11. Transdermal delivery of therapeutic agent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwiatkowski, Krzysztof C. (Inventor); Hayes, Ryan T. (Inventor); Magnuson, James W. (Inventor); Giletto, Anthony (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A device for the transdermal delivery of a therapeutic agent to a biological subject that includes a first electrode comprising a first array of electrically conductive microprojections for providing electrical communication through a skin portion of the subject to a second electrode comprising a second array of electrically conductive microprojections. Additionally, a reservoir for holding the therapeutic agent surrounding the first electrode and a pulse generator for providing an exponential decay pulse between the first and second electrodes may be provided. A method includes the steps of piercing a stratum corneum layer of skin with two arrays of conductive microprojections, encapsulating the therapeutic agent into biocompatible charged carriers, surrounding the conductive microprojections with the therapeutic agent, generating an exponential decay pulse between the two arrays of conductive microprojections to create a non-uniform electrical field and electrokinetically driving the therapeutic agent through the stratum corneum layer of skin.

  12. Delivery of local therapeutics to the brain: working toward advancing treatment for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Pinheiro, Leon; Brem, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, including glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytomas, are characterized by their propensity to invade surrounding brain parenchyma, making curative resection difficult. These tumors typically recur within two centimeters of the resection cavity even after gross total removal. As a result, there has been an emphasis on developing therapeutics aimed at achieving local disease control. In this review, we will summarize the current developments in the delivery of local therapeutics, namely direct injection, convection-enhanced delivery and implantation of drug-loaded polymers, as well as the application of these therapeutics in future methods including microchip drug delivery and local gene therapy. PMID:25853310

  13. Optical memory

    DOEpatents

    Mao, Samuel S; Zhang, Yanfeng

    2013-07-02

    Optical memory comprising: a semiconductor wire, a first electrode, a second electrode, a light source, a means for producing a first voltage at the first electrode, a means for producing a second voltage at the second electrode, and a means for determining the presence of an electrical voltage across the first electrode and the second electrode exceeding a predefined voltage. The first voltage, preferably less than 0 volts, different from said second voltage. The semiconductor wire is optically transparent and has a bandgap less than the energy produced by the light source. The light source is optically connected to the semiconductor wire. The first electrode and the second electrode are electrically insulated from each other and said semiconductor wire.

  14. Predictable Exhibits memory

    E-print Network

    Plant, Robert

    Predictable Chaotic Exhibits memory Equilibrium Towards non-equilibrium Acknowledgements LD importance of memory. Email: l.davies@rdg.ac.uk Investigating the effect of memory on a convective system L, with the response on one day depending on that of previous days. Thus, it exhibits an element of memory. La 3

  15. Research Report Mismaking Memories

    E-print Network

    Kutas, Marta

    not induce later illusory (false) memories of associated but nonpresented lure words. The amplitudeResearch Report Mismaking Memories Neural Precursors of Memory Illusions in Electrical Brain of California, San Diego, and 2 Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ ABSTRACT--Memory illusions

  16. Unique Properties of Reversibly Associating Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthamatten, Mitchell

    2008-03-01

    Reversibly associating functional groups offer the polymer physicist with a new tool to develop stimuli-responsive polymers. Our focus has been to attach reversibly associating groups onto rubbery network polymers. Free radical copolymerization was used to synthesize a series of crosslinked poly(n-butylacrylate)s containing quadruple H-bonding ureidopyrimidinone (UPy) side-groups. Resulting elastomeric networks contain both covalent and dynamic non-covalent crosslinks, and this unique architecture is shown to affect viscoelastic behavior and mass-transport properties. Shape-memory effects are studied quantitatively using thermomechanical techniques. Experiments show how reversible interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are capable of stabilizing mechanically strained states. Unlike conventional shape-memory polymers, these dynamic networks lack a well-defined shape recovery temperature. Instead, their shape recovery rate depends on temperature. To further study the dynamics and temperature dependence of mechanical relaxation, isothermal creep experiments and dynamic mechanical analysis were performed. Creep data, acquired at several different temperatures, are fit to a simple viscoelastic model. Fit viscosities exhibit Arrhenius-like temperature dependence with activation energies of ˜90 kJ/mol, which is in rough agreement with H-bond dissociation barriers. Molecular transport through dynamic networks is studied using gravimetric sorption and dye-diffusion techniques. Diffusion depends on temperature, network architecture, solute size, and the interaction between the solute and the network. Membranes with high temperature-sensitive diffusion properties may be useful in applications such as transdermal drug delivery, microfluidics, or liquid chemical separation processes.

  17. Therapeutic Devices for Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic devices provide new options for treating drug-resistant epilepsy. These devices act by a variety of mechanisms to modulate neuronal activity. Only vagus nerve stimulation, which continues to develop new technology, is approved for use in the United States. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of anterior thalamus for partial epilepsy recently was approved in Europe and several other countries. Responsive neurostimulation, which delivers stimuli to one or two seizure foci in response to a detected seizure, recently completed a successful multicenter trial. Several other trials of brain stimulation are in planning or underway. Transcutaneous magnetic stimulation (TMS) may provide a noninvasive method to stimulate cortex. Controlled studies of TMS split on efficacy, and may depend on whether a seizure focus is near a possible region for stimulation. Seizure detection devices in the form of “shake” detectors via portable accelerometers can provide notification of an ongoing tonic-clonic seizure, or peace of mind in the absence of notification. Prediction of seizures from various aspects of EEG is in early stages. Prediction appears to be possible in a subpopulation of people with refractory seizures and a clinical trial of an implantable prediction device is underway. Cooling of neocortex or hippocampus reversibly can attenuate epileptiform EEG activity and seizures, but engineering problems remain in its implementation. Optogenetics is a new technique that can control excitability of specific populations of neurons with light. Inhibition of epileptiform activity has been demonstrated in hippocampal slices, but use in humans will require more work. In general, devices provide useful palliation for otherwise uncontrollable seizures, but with a different risk profile than with most drugs. Optimizing the place of devices in therapy for epilepsy will require further development and clinical experience. PMID:22367987

  18. Polymers with integrated sensing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunzelman, Jill Nicole

    This dissertation is focused on the creation and characterization of new types of chromogenic polymers, which change their absorption and/or fluorescence characteristics in response to an external stimulus. These optical sensor materials rely on chromophores that display pronounced color changes upon self-assembly as a result of charge-transfer interactions and/or conformational changes. When these chromophores are incorporated into a polymer of interest, the relative amounts of dispersed and aggregated molecules (and therefore their optical appearance) can be initially tuned by controlling the extent of aggregation via the materials composition and the processing protocol employed; the phase-behavior is changed in a predefined manner upon exposure to a specific stimulus. This sensing scheme was exploited in a number of different polymer matrices, leading to a variety of sensor types including mechanochromic, thermochromic, moisture-sensing, and shape-memory materials that allow visualization of the set/release temperature. Important design fundamentals of "aggregachromic" sensor dyes are discussed and chemical structure is related to type of interactions (hydrophobic, pi-pi, charge-transfer) and self-assembly/color relationships. The knowledge is used to control behavior such as piezochromism, aggregation rate, and intramolecular-excimer-formation.

  19. Memory: sins and virtues

    PubMed Central

    Schacter, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    Memory plays an important role in everyday life but does not provide an exact and unchanging record of experience: research has documented that memory is a constructive process that is subject to a variety of errors and distortions. Yet these memory “sins” also reflect the operation of adaptive aspects of memory. Memory can thus be characterized as an adaptive constructive process, which plays a functional role in cognition but produces distortions, errors, or illusions as a consequence of doing so. PMID:23909686

  20. Shape memory rubber bands & supramolecular ionic copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brostowitz, Nicole

    The primary focus of this dissertation is to understand the thermo-mechanical properties that govern shape memory in rubber blends. An ideal shape memory polymer (SMP) has a large entropic component that drives shape recovery with a distinct transition mechanism to control the recovery conditions. Polyisoprene rubber is highly elastic and shows shape memory behavior through strain induced crystallization above its glass transition temperature. However, this transition temperature is below 0°C and not suitable for most applications. Shape memory blends can tailor the transition temperature through selection of the switching phase. Most SMP blends require complicated synthesis routes or intensive compounding which would be inhibitive for production. A facile method was developed for fabrication of a robust shape memory polymer by swelling cross-linked natural rubber with stearic acid. Thermal, microscopic studies showed that stearic acid formed a percolated network of crystalline platelets within the natural rubber. Further investigation of the material interactions was carried out with a low molecular weight polyisoprene analog, squalene, and stearic acid gel. Tensile tests on the rubber band demonstrated the thermo-mechanical effect of swelling with stearic acid. Low hysteresis was observed under cyclic loading which indicated viability for the stearic acid swollen rubber band as an SMP. The microscopic crystals and the cross-linked rubber produce a temporary network and a permanent network, respectively. These two networks allow thermal shape memory cycling with deformation and recovery above the melting point of stearic acidand fixation below that point. Under manual, strain-controlled tensile deformation, the shape memory rubber bands exhibited fixity and recovery of 100% +/- 10%. The recovery properties of the SMP were studied under various loading conditions and a model was fit to describe the potential recovery with relation to the fixation. An additional subject covered in this dissertation is supra-molecular ionic copolymers. Supramolecular interactions are non-covalent; e.g. hydrogen bonding, ionic interactions, van der Waals forces. Supramolecular interactions in polymers can be used to tailor the thermo-mechanical properties by controlling bond association and dissociation. Recent research has focused on hydrogen bonded systems due to established synthesis mechanisms. Reversibility of the supramolecular interactions can be triggered by environmental changes. Ionic interactions would provide greater bond strength and more control over operating conditions. Research has been limited on ionic copolymers due to complicated synthesis methods needed to include functionalization. Low molecular weight polymers were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization with post polymerization conversion to phosphonium end-groups. Both polystyrene and poly(methyl acrylate) were investigated with similar reaction conditions. Chromatography measured the molecular weight and indicated a low polydispersity consistent with controlled reactions. Copolymers were formed by interfacial mixing of the cationic polymers with multifunctional, anionic oligomers. Oligomers containing sulfonate groups were used to create linear or three-dimensional polymer networks. NMR and rheology was used to characterize the presence and effect of ionic groups when compared to the neat polymer.

  1. Neural and Cellular Mechanisms of Fear and Extinction Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Caitlin A.; Maren, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of natural history, countless animal species have evolved adaptive behavioral systems to cope with dangerous situations and promote survival. Emotional memories are central to these defense systems because they are rapidly acquired and prepare organisms for future threat. Unfortunately, the persistence and intrusion of memories of fearful experiences are quite common and can lead to pathogenic conditions, such as anxiety and phobias. Over the course of the last thirty years, neuroscientists and psychologists alike have attempted to understand the mechanisms by which the brain encodes and maintains these aversive memories. Of equal interest, though, is the neurobiology of extinction memory formation as this may shape current therapeutic techniques. Here we review the extant literature on the neurobiology of fear and extinction memory formation, with a strong focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. PMID:22230704

  2. Polymeric drugs: Advances in the development of pharmacologically active polymers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yi; Oupický, David

    2015-12-10

    Synthetic polymers play a critical role in pharmaceutical discovery and development. Current research and applications of pharmaceutical polymers are mainly focused on their functions as excipients and inert carriers of other pharmacologically active agents. This review article surveys recent advances in alternative pharmaceutical use of polymers as pharmacologically active agents known as polymeric drugs. Emphasis is placed on the benefits of polymeric drugs that are associated with their macromolecular character and their ability to explore biologically relevant multivalency processes. We discuss the main therapeutic uses of polymeric drugs as sequestrants, antimicrobials, antivirals, and anticancer and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26410809

  3. Memory Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under contract to NASA during preparations for the space station, Memry Technologies Inc. investigated shape memory effect (SME). SME is a characteristic of certain metal alloys that can change shape in response to temperature variations. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, Memry used its NASA-acquired expertise to produce a line of home and industrial safety products, and refined the technology in the mid-1990s. Among the new products they developed are three MemrySafe units which prevent scalding from faucets. Each system contains a small valve that reacts to temperature, not pressure. When the water reaches dangerous temperatures, the unit reduces the flow to a trickle; when the scalding temperature subsides, the unit restores normal flow. Other products are the FIRECHEK 2 and 4, heat-activated shutoff valves for industrial process lines, which sense excessive heat and cut off pneumatic pressure. The newest of these products is Memry's Demand Management Water Heater which shifts the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak demands, conserving energy and money.

  4. CNS pharmacology and clinical therapeutic effects of oxiracetam.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Menon, G N; Songar, A; Itil, K Z

    1986-01-01

    Oxiracetam, a new substance found to be a nootropic in experimental pharmacological studies, was tested in three clinical trials: a single rising dose tolerance and dose-finding study with quantitative pharmaco-electroencephalogram (pharmaco-EEG) and quantitative pharmacopsychology in healthy volunteers; a dose-finding study, at three dose levels for 3 months, with quantitative pharmaco-EEG in mild to moderate dementia patients; and a safety and efficacy study with increasing dosages for 12 weeks with subjective and objective tests in elderly patients with dementia. In single and repeated oral dosages up to 2,400 mg, oxiracetam is a safe compound. According to HZI Data Bank Classification Systems, oxiracetam is a vigilance-enhancing compound with some effects on spontaneous memory. The therapeutic effect of oxiracetam can be discriminated from placebo, and in comparison with piracetam, oxiracetam exhibits greater improvement in memory factor. PMID:3594458

  5. Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Therapeutics

    E-print Network

    Rider, Todd H.

    Currently there are relatively few antiviral therapeutics, and most which do exist are highly pathogen-specific or have other disadvantages. We have developed a new broad-spectrum antiviral approach, dubbed Double-stranded ...

  6. How to Use Equipment Therapeutically.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowne, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    Shares therapeutic and economic practices surrounding equipment used in New York's Higher Horizons adventure program of therapy for troubled youth. Encourages educators, therapists, and administrators to explore relationship between equipment selection, program goals, and clients. (NEC)

  7. DCTD — Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP)

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Content Click here to view the Site Map Home | Sitemap | Contact DCTD Search this site Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) Introduction Major Ongoing Initiatives Current Funding Opportunities Tools and Resources Scientific Advances DCTD

  8. Therapeutic Hypothermia: The Safar Vision

    PubMed Central

    Drabek, Tomas; Tisherman, Samuel A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract At the 2nd International Brain Hypothermia conference, in Miami, the late Dr. Peter Safar was honored for his many contributions to the field of therapeutic hypothermia. Therapeutic hypothermia played a central role in his overall vision for optimized resuscitation and neurointensive care, across a large number of potential insults. The successful use of therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients after cardiac arrest, for example, was already included in the historic first “ABCs” of resuscitation, published by Safar in 1964. This review addresses key historical events in the development and implementation of therapeutic hypothermia across a number of central nervous system insults. A discussion of future potential uses of this therapy in a variety of applications as part of the Safar vision is also presented. PMID:19271966

  9. Glycosylation of recombinant antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Jefferis, Royston

    2005-01-01

    The adaptive immune system has the capacity to produce antibodies with a virtually infinite repertoire of specificities. Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are established in the clinic as therapeutics and represent a major new class of drug. Therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of complexes with target molecules and subsequent activation of downstream biologic effector mechanisms that result in elimination of the target. The activation of effector mechanisms is dependent on structural characteristics of the antibody molecule that result from posttranslational modifications, in particular, glycosylation. The production of therapeutic antibody with a consistent human glycoform profile has been and remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. Recent research has shown that individual glycoforms of antibody may provide optimal efficacy for selected outcomes. Thus a further challenge will be the production of a second generation of antibody therapeutics customized for their clinical indication. PMID:15903235

  10. Cardiovascular applications of therapeutic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Nazer, Babak; Gerstenfeld, Edward P; Hata, Akiko; Crum, Lawrence A; Matula, Thomas J

    2014-04-01

    Ultrasound (US) has gained widespread use in diagnostic cardiovascular applications. At amplitudes and frequencies typical of diagnostic use, its biomechanical effects on tissue are largely negligible. However, these parameters can be altered to harness US's thermal and non-thermal effects for therapeutic indications. High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ECWT) are two therapeutic US modalities which have been investigated for treating cardiac arrhythmias and ischemic heart disease, respectively. Here, we review the biomechanical effects of HIFU and ECWT, their potential therapeutic mechanisms, and pre-clinical and clinical studies demonstrating their efficacy and safety limitations. Furthermore, we discuss other potential clinical applications of therapeutic US and areas in which future research is needed. PMID:24297498

  11. Drug-Free Macromolecular Therapeutics – A New Paradigm in Polymeric Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Te-Wei; Kope?ek, Jind?ich

    2015-01-01

    This review highlights a unique research area in polymer-based nanomedicine designs. Drug-free macromolecular therapeutics induce apoptosis of malignant cells by the crosslinking of surface non-internalizing receptors. The receptor crosslinking is mediated by the biorecognition of high-fidelity natural binding motifs (such as antiparallel coiled-coil peptides or complementary oligonucleotides) that are grafted to the side chains of polymers or attached to targeting moieties against cell receptors. This approach features the absence of low-molecular-weight cytotoxic compounds. Here, we summarize the rationales, different designs, and advantages of drug-free macromolecular therapeutics. Recent developments of novel therapeutic systems for B-cell lymphomas are discussed, as well as relevant approaches for other diseases. We conclude by pointing out various potential future directions in this exciting new field. PMID:26191406

  12. Storage Techniques in Flash Memories and Phase-change Memories 

    E-print Network

    Li, Hao

    2010-10-12

    Non-volatile memories are an emerging storage technology with wide applica- tions in many important areas. This study focuses on new storage techniques for flash memories and phase-change memories. Flash memories are ...

  13. Shared Memory Parallel Programming with Entry Consistency for Distributed Memory

    E-print Network

    Midway: Shared Memory Parallel Programming with Entry Consistency for Distributed Memory memory multiprocessing offers a cost­effective and scalable solution for a large class of scientific and numeric applications. Unfortunately, the performance of current distributed memory programming

  14. On Memory, Trauma, Public Space, Monuments, and Memorials

    E-print Network

    Bonder, Julian

    2009-01-01

    design, toward techniques and materials, toward sites of memory,design work on Holocaust memorials, which attempt to investigate these questions by constructing responsive sites of memory.landscape design, and architecture. The pursuit of memory is

  15. Memory beyond expression.

    PubMed

    Delorenzi, A; Maza, F J; Suárez, L D; Barreiro, K; Molina, V A; Stehberg, J

    2014-01-01

    The idea that memories are not invariable after the consolidation process has led to new perspectives about several mnemonic processes. In this framework, we review our studies on the modulation of memory expression during reconsolidation. We propose that during both memory consolidation and reconsolidation, neuromodulators can determine the probability of the memory trace to guide behavior, i.e. they can either increase or decrease its behavioral expressibility without affecting the potential of persistent memories to be activated and become labile. Our hypothesis is based on the findings that positive modulation of memory expression during reconsolidation occurs even if memories are behaviorally unexpressed. This review discusses the original approach taken in the studies of the crab Neohelice (Chasmagnathus) granulata, which was then successfully applied to test the hypothesis in rodent fear memory. Data presented offers a new way of thinking about both weak trainings and experimental amnesia: memory retrieval can be dissociated from memory expression. Furthermore, the strategy presented here allowed us to show in human declarative memory that the periods in which long-term memory can be activated and become labile during reconsolidation exceeds the periods in which that memory is expressed, providing direct evidence that conscious access to memory is not needed for reconsolidation. Specific controls based on the constraints of reminders to trigger reconsolidation allow us to distinguish between obliterated and unexpressed but activated long-term memories after amnesic treatments, weak trainings and forgetting. In the hypothesis discussed, memory expressibility--the outcome of experience-dependent changes in the potential to behave--is considered as a flexible and modulable attribute of long-term memories. Expression seems to be just one of the possible fates of re-activated memories. PMID:25102126

  16. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  17. DCTD — Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP)

    Cancer.gov

    To address the mechanistic gap that occurs because of difficulties in determining the effect of a therapeutic intervention on its putative site of action in patients, in 2005, the DTP Toxicology and Pharmacology Branch was expanded to include NCTVL. This laboratory will elucidate novel methodologies in target tissues specifically applicable to human cancer clinical trials. These methodologies will demonstrate the therapeutic effects of small molecule anticancer agents on specific cellular pathways of interest.

  18. Targeted nanotherapy for induction of therapeutic immune responses.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Su M; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2012-02-01

    Nanotechnology permits the design of therapeutic devices with defined structure and molecular composition. Modular designs employing surface-bound ligands provide specific homing devices for loaded cargo, and biocompatible and biodegradable constructs provide surrogate temporary microenvironments. We first present a case for developing 'smart' modular constructs as immunogenic vaccines to prime immune memory against specific pathogens where current vaccines fail. Second, we argue that nanotherapeutic intervention can harness pivotal molecular pathways recently discovered to regulate lineage development between pathogenic TH17 cells associated with autoimmune disease, versus tolerogenic regulatory T cells (Treg). Underpinned by molecular mechanisms that enable exquisitely specific responses in adaptive immunity, targeted nanodevices designed to stimulate either immune aggression or immune tolerance signify the birth of a new era in therapeutics. PMID:22172276

  19. Modifications of Glycans: Biological Significance and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Saddam M.; Campbell, Christopher; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Carbohydrates play a central role in a wide range of biological processes. As with nucleic acids and proteins, modifications of specific sites within the glycan chain can modulate a carbohydrate’s overall biological function. For example, acylation, methylation, sulfation, epimerization, and phosphorylation can occur at various positions within a carbohydrate to modulate bioactivity. Therefore, there is significant interest in identifying discrete carbohydrate modifications and understanding their biological effects. Additionally, enzymes that catalyze those modifications and proteins that bind modified glycans provide numerous targets for therapeutic intervention. This review will focus on modifications of glycans that occur after the oligomer/polymer has been assembled, generally referred to as postglycosylational modifications. PMID:22195988

  20. False or Recovered Memories?: Legal and Ethical Implications for Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Places the development of the debate over false or recovered memories in its social and historical context. Identifies some of the ethical and legal implications of this area of work for therapists by using the Drama Triangle. Outlines ethical dilemmas for therapists and some of the implications for therapeutic practice. (RJM)

  1. Nanomaterials for Photo-Based Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Jyothi U.; Jadeja, Parth; Tambe, Pranjali; Vu, Khanh; Yuan, Baohong; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2013-01-01

    Photo-based diagnosis and treatment methods are gaining prominence due to increased spatial imaging resolution, minimally invasive modalities involved as well as localized treatment. Recently, nanoparticles (NPs) have been developed and used in photo-based therapeutic applications. While some nanomaterials have inherent photo-based imaging capabilities, others including polymeric NPs act as nanocarriers to deliver various fluorescent dyes or photosensitizers for photoimaging and therapeutic applications. These applications can vary from Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and optical imaging to photothermal therapy (PTT) and chemotherapy. Materials commonly used for development of photo-based NPs ranges from metal-based (gold, silver and silica) to polymer-based (chitosan, dextran, poly ethylene glycol (PEG) and poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)). Recent research has paved the way for multi-modal 'theranostic' (a combination of therapy and diagnosis) nano-carriers capable of active targeting using cell-specific ligands and carrying multiple therapeutic and imaging agents for accurate diagnosis and controlled drug delivery. This review summarizes the different materials used today to synthesize photo-based NPs, their diagnostic and therapeutic applications as well as the current challenges faced in bringing these novel nano-carriers into clinical practices. PMID:23471164

  2. Reversal of cognitive decline: A novel therapeutic program

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a novel, comprehensive, and personalized therapeutic program that is based on the underlying pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and which involves multiple modalities designed to achieve metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND). The first 10 patients who have utilized this program include patients with memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD), amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), or subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). Nine of the 10 displayed subjective or objective improvement in cognition beginning within 3-6 months, with the one failure being a patient with very late stage AD. Six of the patients had had to discontinue working or were struggling with their jobs at the time of presentation, and all were able to return to work or continue working with improved performance. Improvements have been sustained, and at this time the longest patient follow-up is two and one-half years from initial treatment, with sustained and marked improvement. These results suggest that a larger, more extensive trial of this therapeutic program is warranted. The results also suggest that, at least early in the course, cognitive decline may be driven in large part by metabolic processes. Furthermore, given the failure of monotherapeutics in AD to date, the results raise the possibility that such a therapeutic system may be useful as a platform on which drugs that would fail as monotherapeutics may succeed as key components of a therapeutic system. PMID:25324467

  3. 21 CFR 890.5660 - Therapeutic massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5660 Therapeutic massager. (a) Identification. A...

  4. 21 CFR 890.5660 - Therapeutic massager.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Therapeutic Devices § 890.5660 Therapeutic massager. (a) Identification. A...

  5. Cache Basics Cache Performance Memory Organization Virtual Memory Engineering 9859

    E-print Network

    Peters, Dennis

    -- Computer Architecture Memory Hierarchy Design Dennis Peters1 Fall 2007 1 Based on notes from Dr. RCache Basics Cache Performance Memory Organization Virtual Memory Engineering 9859 CoE Fundamentals. Venkatesan #12;Cache Basics Cache Performance Memory Organization Virtual Memory Speed of Memory vs CPU #12

  6. Memory-effects of magnetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Razzaq, Muhammad Yasar; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2012-10-21

    The thermally induced shape memory effect (SME) is the capability of a material to fix a temporary (deformed) shape and recover a 'memorized' permanent shape in response to heat. SMEs in polymers have enabled a variety of applications including deployable space structures, biomedical devices, adaptive optical devices, smart dry adhesives and fasteners. By the incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) into shape-memory polymer (SMP), a magnetically controlled SME has been realized. Magnetic actuation of nanocomposites enables remotely controlled devices based on SMP, which might be useful in medical technology, e.g. remotely controlled catheters or drug delivery systems. Here, an overview of the recent advances in the field of magnetic actuation of SMP is presented. Special emphasis is given on the magnetically controlled recovery of SMP with one switching temperature T(sw) (dual-shape effect) or with two T(sw)s (triple-shape effect). The use of magnetic field to change the apparent switching temperature (T(sw,app)) of the dual or triple-shape nanocomposites is described. Finally, the capability of magnetic nanocomposites to remember the magnetic field strength (H) initially used to deform the sample (magnetic-memory effect) is addressed. The distinguished advantages of magnetic heating over conventional heating methods make these multifunctional nanocomposites attractive candidates for in vivo applications. PMID:22941347

  7. Memory-effects of magnetic nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaq, Muhammad Yasar; Behl, Marc; Lendlein, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    The thermally induced shape memory effect (SME) is the capability of a material to fix a temporary (deformed) shape and recover a `memorized' permanent shape in response to heat. SMEs in polymers have enabled a variety of applications including deployable space structures, biomedical devices, adaptive optical devices, smart dry adhesives and fasteners. By the incorporation of magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) into shape-memory polymer (SMP), a magnetically controlled SME has been realized. Magnetic actuation of nanocomposites enables remotely controlled devices based on SMP, which might be useful in medical technology, e.g. remotely controlled catheters or drug delivery systems. Here, an overview of the recent advances in the field of magnetic actuation of SMP is presented. Special emphasis is given on the magnetically controlled recovery of SMP with one switching temperature Tsw (dual-shape effect) or with two Tsws (triple-shape effect). The use of magnetic field to change the apparent switching temperature (Tsw,app) of the dual or triple-shape nanocomposites is described. Finally, the capability of magnetic nanocomposites to remember the magnetic field strength (H) initially used to deform the sample (magnetic-memory effect) is addressed. The distinguished advantages of magnetic heating over conventional heating methods make these multifunctional nanocomposites attractive candidates for in vivo applications.

  8. Serotonergic Mechanisms in Addiction-Related Memories

    PubMed Central

    Nic Dhonnchadha, Bríd Á; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2008-01-01

    Drug-associated memories are a hallmark of addiction and a contributing factor in the continued use and relapse to drugs of abuse. Repeated association of drugs of abuse with conditioned stimuli leads to long-lasting behavioral responses that reflect reward-controlled learning and participate in the establishment of addiction. A greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of drug-associated memories may shed light on potential therapeutic approaches to effectively intervene with drug use-associated memory. There is evidence to support the involvement of serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission in learning and memory formation through the families of the 5-HT1 receptor (5-HT1R) and 5-HT2R which have also been shown to play a modulatory role in the behavioral effects induced by many psychostimulants. While there is a paucity of studies examining the effects of selective 5-HT1AR ligands, the available dataset suggests that 5-HT1BR agonists may inhibit retrieval of cocaine-associated memories. The 5-HT2AR and 5-HT2CR appear to be integral in the strong conditioned associations made between cocaine and environmental cues with 5-HT2AR antagonists and 5-HT2CR agonists possessing potency in blocking retrieval of cocaine-associated memories following cocaine self-administration procedures. The complex anatomical connectivity between 5-HT neurons and other neuronal phenotypes in limbic-corticostriatal brain structures, the heterogeneity of 5-HT receptors (5-HTXR) and the conflicting results of behavioral experiments which employ non-specific 5-HTXR ligands contribute to the complexity of interpreting the involvement of 5-HT systems in addictive-related memory processes. This review briefly traces the history of 5-HT involvement in retrieval of drug-cue associations and future targets of serotonergic manipulation that may reduce the impact that drug cues have on addictive behavior and relapse. PMID:18639587

  9. Drifting absence :: drafting memory

    E-print Network

    Kuhn, Marlene Eva

    2006-01-01

    The emotive power of a memorial derives from its ability to engage the viewer in active remembrance. The project considers the limitations of a monumentality which embraces a distinct division between viewer and memorial. ...

  10. Memory and Aging

    MedlinePLUS

    Memory and Aging Losing keys, misplacing a wallet, or forgetting someone’s name are common experiences. But for people nearing or over age 65, such memory lapses can be frightening. They wonder if they ...

  11. The malleability of memory 

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Caroline

    2011-06-29

    in acquisition and individual differences. Using a repeated measures design, it was found that memory for faces was better than memory for events. In accordance with the hypothesis, face recognition was worse when actors changed clothes between the crime scene...

  12. [Memory and cognitivism].

    PubMed

    Spinetto, M

    2001-12-01

    The goal of this article is to explore the notion of cognitive memory. For that reason we would study the implicit and explicit memory. We would also study the notion of childhood amnesia and trauma. PMID:11780154

  13. Memory-mapped transactions

    E-print Network

    Sukha, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Memory-mapped transactions combine the advantages of both memory mapping and transactions to provide a programming interface for concurrently accessing data on disk without explicit I/O or locking operations. This interface ...

  14. Understanding Memory Loss

    MedlinePLUS

    ... memory problems—causes and treatments Help for serious memory problems What you need to know Where can I get more information? Words to know ... Institutes of Health U.S. Department of Health & Human Services USA.gov

  15. Polymer-Block-Polypeptides and Polymer-Conjugated Hybrid Materials as Stimuli-Responsive Nanocarriers for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    John, Johnson V; Johnson, Renjith P; Heo, Min Seon; Moon, Byeong Kyu; Byeon, Seong Jin; Kim, Il

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive nanocarriers are a class of soft materials that includes natural polymers, synthetic polymers, and polypeptides. Recently, modern synthesis tools such as atom transfer radical polymerization, reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, nitroxide-mediated radical polymerization, ring-opening polymerization of ?-amino acid N-carboxyanhydrides, and various "click" chemistry strategies were simultaneously employed for the design and synthesis of nanosized drug delivery vehicles. Importantly, the research focused on the improvement of the nanocarrier targetability and the site-specific, triggered release of therapeutics with high drug loading efficiency and minimal drug leakage during the delivery to specific targets. In this context, nanocarriers responsive to common stimuli such as pH, temperature, redox potential, light, etc. have been widely used for the controlled delivery of therapeutics to pathological sites. Currently, different synthesis and self-assembly strategies improved the drug loading efficacy and targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to the desired site. In particular, polypeptide-containing hybrid materials have been developed for the controlled delivery of therapeutic agents. Therefore, stimuli-sensitive synthetic polypeptide-based materials have been extensively investigated in recent years. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of polymer-block-polypeptides and polymer-conjugated hybrid materials that have been designed and evaluated for various stimuli-responsive drug and gene delivery applications. PMID:26301298

  16. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  17. Degradability of Polymers for Implantable Biomedical Devices

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, SuPing; Untereker, Darrel

    2009-01-01

    Many key components of implantable medical devices are made from polymeric materials. The functions of these materials include structural support, electrical insulation, protection of other materials from the environment of the body, and biocompatibility, as well as other things such as delivery of a therapeutic drug. In such roles, the stability and integrity of the polymer, over what can be a very long period of time, is very important. For most of these functions, stability over time is desired, but in other cases, the opposite–the degradation and disappearance of the polymer over time is required. In either case, it is important to understand both the chemistry that can lead to the degradation of polymers as well as the kinetics that controls these reactions. Hydrolysis and oxidation are the two classes of reactions that lead to the breaking down of polymers. Both are discussed in detail in the context of the environmental factors that impact the utility of various polymers for medical device applications. Understanding the chemistry and kinetics allows prediction of stability as well as explanations for observations such as porosity and the unexpected behavior of polymeric composite materials in some situations. In the last part, physical degradation such interfacial delamination in composites is discussed. PMID:19865531

  18. Optical memory: Phase-change memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2015-11-01

    Integrated nano-optical memories may help overcome the limitations of communication speeds and energy costs in electronic chips. Now, using nanoscale phase-change materials researchers have realized the first multi-bit all-optical non-volatile memories with a very small footprint.

  19. Emotional Memory Persists Longer than Event Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriyama, Kenichi; Soshi, Takahiro; Fujii, Takeshi; Kim, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-01

    The interaction between amygdala-driven and hippocampus-driven activities is expected to explain why emotion enhances episodic memory recognition. However, overwhelming behavioral evidence regarding the emotion-induced enhancement of immediate and delayed episodic memory recognition has not been obtained in humans. We found that the recognition…

  20. Mazes and memory Mechanisms of spatial memory

    E-print Network

    Jackson, Sophie

    Mazes and memory Mechanisms of spatial memory The search for meaning From perception to conception to multivariate data analysis methods such as representational similarity analysis (RSA) ­ which, Professor Tyler data on healthy people." The general consensus is that language processing draws upon a left hemisphere

  1. 3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science

    E-print Network

    Duh, Kevin

    3. Advanced Polymer Molecular Science Advanced Polymer Science 4. Photo-Functional Elements Supplies with New Functions Achieved with Artificial Collagen and Nano-structured Polymers Biocompatible. Organic Semi- conducting Polymer Creation through Precursor Methods Photofunctional Organic Chemistry

  2. Transactional Memory Boris Korenfeld

    E-print Network

    Linial, Nathan "Nati"

    Transactional Memory Boris Korenfeld Moti Medina Computer Engineering Tel-Aviv University June, 2006 Abstract Today's methods of writing programs that are executed on shared-memory multiprocessors of Transactional Memory (TM) that enables execution of multithreaded programs without using a locking mechanism

  3. German City, Jewish Memory

    E-print Network

    Snider, Barry B.

    German City, Jewish Memory Copyrighted Material #12;the tauber institute series for the study www.upne.com Nils Roemer, German City, Jewish Memory:The Story ofWorms David Assaf, Untold Published by University Press of New England Hanover and London German City, Jewish Memory Copyrighted

  4. MEMORY AS A PROGRAMMING

    E-print Network

    Franek, Frantisek

    MEMORY AS A PROGRAMMING CONCEPT IN C AND C++ FRANTISEK FRANEK McMaster University #12;PUBLISHED) Memory as a programming concept in C and C++ / Frantisek Franek. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-521-81720-X ­ ISBN 0-521-52043-6 (pb.) 1. Memory management (Computer science) 2

  5. Generation and Context Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Lozito, Jeffrey P.; Rosner, Zachary A.

    2006-01-01

    Generation enhances memory for occurrence but may not enhance other aspects of memory. The present study further delineates the negative generation effect in context memory reported in N. W. Mulligan (2004). First, the negative generation effect occurred for perceptual attributes of the target item (its color and font) but not for extratarget…

  6. Make-Believe Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftus, Elizabeth F.

    2003-01-01

    Research on memory distortion has shown that postevent suggestion can contaminate what a person remembers. Moreover, suggestion can lead to false memories being injected outright into the minds of people. These findings have implications for police investigation, clinical practice, and other settings in which memory reports are solicited.

  7. Oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Insufficient pharmacokinetic properties and poor cellular uptake are the main hurdles for successful therapeutic development of oligonucleotide agents. The covalent attachment of various ligands designed to influence the biodistribution and cellular uptake or for targeting specific tissues is an attractive possibility to advance therapeutic applications and to expand development options. In contrast to advanced formulations, which often consist of multiple reagents and are sensitive to a variety of preparation conditions, oligonucleotide conjugates are defined molecules, enabling structure-based analytics and quality control techniques. This review gives an overview of current developments of oligonucleotide conjugates for therapeutic applications. Attached ligands comprise peptides, proteins, carbohydrates, aptamers and small molecules, including cholesterol, tocopherol and folic acid. Important linkage types and conjugation methods are summarized. The distinct ligands directly influence biochemical parameters, uptake machanisms and pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:23883124

  8. Anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik

    2015-06-02

    Anion exchange polymer electrolytes that include guanidinium functionalized polymers may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  9. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  10. Stiff Quantum Polymers

    E-print Network

    H. Kleinert

    2007-05-01

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the moments and of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  11. Introduction to Polymer Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Frank W.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the physical and chemical properties of polymers and the two major methods of polymer synthesis: addition (chain, chain-growth, or chain-reaction), and condensation (step-growth or step-reaction) polymerization. (JN)

  12. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  13. Mechanical Properties of Polymers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aklonis, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanical properties (stress-strain relationships) of polymers are reviewed, taking into account both time and temperature factors. Topics include modulus-temperature behavior of polymers, time dependence, time-temperature correspondence, and mechanical models. (JN)

  14. Quantum random access memory

    E-print Network

    Vittorio Giovannetti; Seth Lloyd; Lorenzo Maccone

    2008-03-26

    A random access memory (RAM) uses n bits to randomly address N=2^n distinct memory cells. A quantum random access memory (qRAM) uses n qubits to address any quantum superposition of N memory cells. We present an architecture that exponentially reduces the requirements for a memory call: O(log N) switches need be thrown instead of the N used in conventional (classical or quantum) RAM designs. This yields a more robust qRAM algorithm, as it in general requires entanglement among exponentially less gates, and leads to an exponential decrease in the power needed for addressing. A quantum optical implementation is presented.

  15. The neurology of memory.

    PubMed

    Dworetzky, B A

    2001-01-01

    Remembering is an intrinsic and awesome aspect of human function. Memory loss, a common sequela of brain damage, has been studied extensively to understand how the brain encodes, stores and retrieves information. Important anatomic structures for memory have been identified from work in surgical therapy for epilepsy as well as other clinical syndromes where memory loss is a major feature. Beyond clinicoanatomic correlations, current research has focused on synaptic modifications and biochemical processes that underlie changes in neuronal connectivity. As Alzheimer's disease research expands our knowledge of memory, the treatment of other memory disorders will follow. PMID:11373070

  16. Regulating critical period plasticity: insight from the visual system to fear circuitry for therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Nabel, Elisa M; Morishita, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Early temporary windows of heightened brain plasticity called critical periods developmentally sculpt neural circuits and contribute to adult behavior. Regulatory mechanisms of visual cortex development - the preeminent model of experience-dependent critical period plasticity-actively limit adult plasticity and have proved fruitful therapeutic targets to reopen plasticity and rewire faulty visual system connections later in life. Interestingly, these molecular mechanisms have been implicated in the regulation of plasticity in other functions beyond vision. Applying mechanistic understandings of critical period plasticity in the visual cortex to fear circuitry may provide a conceptual framework for developing novel therapeutic tools to mitigate aberrant fear responses in post traumatic stress disorder. In this review, we turn to the model of experience-dependent visual plasticity to provide novel insights for the mechanisms regulating plasticity in the fear system. Fear circuitry, particularly fear memory erasure, also undergoes age-related changes in experience-dependent plasticity. We consider the contributions of molecular brakes that halt visual critical period plasticity to circuitry underlying fear memory erasure. A major molecular brake in the visual cortex, perineuronal net formation, recently has been identified in the development of fear systems that are resilient to fear memory erasure. The roles of other molecular brakes, myelin-related Nogo receptor signaling and Lynx family proteins - endogenous inhibitors for nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, are explored in the context of fear memory plasticity. Such fear plasticity regulators, including epigenetic effects, provide promising targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:24273519

  17. Advanced Developments in Cyclic Polymers: Synthesis, Applications, and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yinghuai; Hosmane, Narayan S

    2015-01-01

    Due to the topological effect, cyclic polymers demonstrate different and unique physical and biological properties in comparison with linear counterparts having the same molecular-weight range. With advanced synthetic and analytic technologies, cyclic polymers with different topologies, e.g. multicyclic polymers, have been reported and well characterized. For example, various cyclic DNA and related structures, such as cyclic duplexes, have been prepared conveniently by click chemistry. These types of DNA have increased resistance to enzymatic degradation and have high thermodynamic stability, and thus, have potential therapeutic applications. In addition, cyclic polymers have also been used to prepare organic–inorganic hybrids for applications in catalysis, e.g. catalyst supports. Due to developments in synthetic technology, highly pure cyclic polymers could now be produced in large scale. Therefore, we anticipate discovering more applications in the near future. Despite their promise, cyclic polymers are still less explored than linear polymers like polyolefins and polycarbonates, which are widely used in daily life. Some critical issues, including controlling the molecular weight and finding suitable applications, remain big challenges in the cyclic-polymer field. This review briefly summarizes the commonly used synthetic methodologies and focuses more on the attractive functional materials and their biological properties and potential applications. PMID:26478835

  18. Memory and anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Mcnally, R J

    1997-11-29

    Experimental psychopathologists have identified varying patterns in memory bias in people with depressive and anxiety disorders. Individuals suffering from depression tend to exhibit explicit memory deficits for positively-valanced material, and sometimes exhibit biases for retrieving negative self-relevant information as well. Most studies, however, provide scant evidence for implicit memory biases in depression. In contrast to depression, anxiety disorders are rarely associated with enhanced explicit memory for threat-related information (with the exception of panic disorder). Evidence for implicit memory biases for threat in these syndromes is mixed. After providing an overview of findings on memory abnormalities in depressive and anxiety disorders, data from several new studies bearing on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in Vietnam combat veterans and in women with histories of childhood sexual abuse are presented. Involving directed forgetting, implicit memory and autobiographical cueing paradigms, these experiments point to a pattern of abnormalities linked to PTSD rather than to trauma per se. PMID:9415928

  19. Immunological memory is associative

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.J.; Forrest, S.; Perelson, A.S.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to show that immunological memory is an associative and robust memory that belongs to the class of sparse distributed memories. This class of memories derives its associative and robust nature by sparsely sampling the input space and distributing the data among many independent agents. Other members of this class include a model of the cerebellar cortex and Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM). First we present a simplified account of the immune response and immunological memory. Next we present SDM, and then we show the correlations between immunological memory and SDM. Finally, we show how associative recall in the immune response can be both beneficial and detrimental to the fitness of an individual.

  20. Polymer Reaction & Colloidal Engineering

    E-print Network

    Giger, Christine

    Polymer Reaction & Colloidal Engineering Research Profile The Morbidelli Group is carrying out research in numerous areas related to polymer and colloid science and enginee- ring. Our research activity combines a variety of experimen- tal techniques for polymers and particles characterization with advanced

  1. Metal-polymer and polymer-polymer interfaces: Application to conjugated polymer electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallfield, Julie Anne Osladil

    The study of metal-polymer and polymer-polymer interfaces is applied to conjugated polymer electronic devices. Conjugated polymers are a class of organic materials which have metallic or semiconducting properties which are being investigated as alternatives to traditional semiconducting materials. When conjugated polymers are used in devices, the interfaces are found to be critical to device performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), which give information about the atomic and chemical composition, workfunction, and ionization potential of materials, are used to study these interfaces. In studying metal-polymer interfaces, it is shown that the interface between the conjugated polymer fully sulfonated polyaniline (NSPAN) and an aluminum alloy is an active interface, in which copper is extracted by the polymer from the aluminum alloy. This results in the aluminum alloy becoming more resistant to corrosion in a salty environment. The interface between aluminum and NSPAN, as it is found in some light emitting devices (LEDS), is also studied. It is concluded that negative charge is transferred from the aluminum to the polymer, resulting in a thin layer of oxidized aluminum and a more reduced form of the polymer at the interface. In studying polymer-polymer interfaces, it is proposed that NSPAN protonates a pyridine containing polymer at an interface which is also found in some LEDs. This is proposed to be responsible for color variation found in some LEDs. A model system was studied, and protonation at the polymer-polymer interface was directly observed, supporting the earlier proposals. Polymer-polymer interfaces found in SCALE devices, which are LEDs made with three polymer layers, are studied by UPS to determine the band structure of these devices. It is concluded that the EB layers decrease the hole barrier and increase the electron barrier, which leads to better charge balance and a better device. The EB layers also create a symmetric device, which enables it to emit light under both forward and reverse bias. Finally, a new type of all polymer transistor device is studied, with an emphasis on how modifying the charge on the polymer surface affects device performance.

  2. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R.

    1992-09-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  3. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  4. DCTD — Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP)

    Cancer.gov

    Natural products are a leading source of therapeutics — anticancer agents included. For instance, some 60 to 65 percent of all anticancer drugs are derived from natural products. Additionally, sales figures from 2003 show that for all drug sales of more than $1 billion, purely synthetic therapies comprise only 20 percent of the market.

  5. Therapeutics To Treat Ocular Diseases

    Cancer.gov

    The National Eye Institute's Section on Epithelial and Retinal Physiology and Disease (SERPD) is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize therapeutics for ocular diseases caused by accumulation of sub-retinal fluid.

  6. Nanoporous polymer electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Elliott, Brian (Wheat Ridge, CO); Nguyen, Vinh (Wheat Ridge, CO)

    2012-04-24

    A nanoporous polymer electrolyte and methods for making the polymer electrolyte are disclosed. The polymer electrolyte comprises a crosslinked self-assembly of a polymerizable salt surfactant, wherein the crosslinked self-assembly includes nanopores and wherein the crosslinked self-assembly has a conductivity of at least 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 S/cm at 25.degree. C. The method of making a polymer electrolyte comprises providing a polymerizable salt surfactant. The method further comprises crosslinking the polymerizable salt surfactant to form a nanoporous polymer electrolyte.

  7. Memory of myself: Autobiographical memory and identity in Alzheimer's disease

    E-print Network

    Addis, Donna Rose

    Memory of myself: Autobiographical memory and identity in Alzheimer's disease Donna Rose Addis autobiographical memory and identity. To test this we assessed the status of autobiographical memory and identity degree of autobiographical memory impairment was associated with changes in identity. Two tests

  8. March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 1 Main Memory

    E-print Network

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 1 Main Memory Chapter 8 #12;March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 2 Chapter Outline Background Contiguous Memory Allocation Paging Structure of the Page Table Segmentation #12;March 29, 2008 Operating Systems: Main Memory 3 Objectives To provide

  9. Computational models of working memory: putting long-term memory

    E-print Network

    Lin, Kevin K.

    Computational models of working memory: putting long-term memory into context Neil Burgess1, York, YO10 5DD, UK Detailed computational modeling of human memory has typically been aimed at either short-term (working) memory or long-term memory in isolation. However, recent research highlights

  10. Chapter 5: Virtual Memory Management 1 Virtual Memory Management

    E-print Network

    Melbourne, University of

    of tasks. Unlike tradi- tional virtual memory designs, the PARAS kernel does not implement all and machine-independent portion of memory manager. Hence, the discussion #12;The Design of the PARASChapter 5: Virtual Memory Management 1 6 Virtual Memory Management 6.1 Introduction Memory

  11. Ion conducting organic/inorganic hybrid polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Maryann B. (Inventor); Kinder, James D. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    This invention relates to a series of organic/inorganic hybrid polymers that are easy to fabricate into dimensionally stable films with good ion-conductivity over a wide range of temperatures for use in a variety of applications. The polymers are prepared by the reaction of amines, preferably diamines and mixtures thereof with monoamines with epoxy-functionalized alkoxysilanes. The products of the reaction are polymerized by hydrolysis of the alkoxysilane groups to produce an organic-containing silica network. Suitable functionality introduced into the amine and alkoxysilane groups produce solid polymeric membranes which conduct ions for use in fuel cells, high-performance solid state batteries, chemical sensors, electrochemical capacitors, electro-chromic windows or displays, analog memory devices and the like.

  12. Quantum Online Memory Checking

    E-print Network

    Wim van Dam; Qingqing Yuan

    2010-02-15

    The problem of memory checking considers storing files on an unreliable public server whose memory can be modified by a malicious party. The main task is to design an online memory checker with the capability to verify that the information on the server has not been corrupted. To store n bits of public information, the memory checker has s private reliable bits for verification purpose; while to retrieve each bit of public information the checker communicates t bits with the public memory. Earlier work showed that, for classical memory checkers, the lower bound s*t \\in Omega(n) holds. In this article we study quantum memory checkers that have s private qubits and that are allowed to quantum query the public memory using t qubits. We prove an exponential improvement over the classical setting by showing the existence of a quantum checker that, using quantum fingerprints, requires only s \\in O(log n) qubits of local memory and t \\in O(polylog n) qubits of communication with the public memory.

  13. Cognitive impairment and memory dysfunction after a stroke diagnosis: a post-stroke memory assessment

    PubMed Central

    Al-Qazzaz, Noor Kamal; Ali, Sawal Hamid; Ahmad, Siti Anom; Islam, Shabiul; Mohamad, Khairiyah

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive impairment and memory dysfunction following stroke diagnosis are common symptoms that significantly affect the survivors’ quality of life. Stroke patients have a high potential to develop dementia within the first year of stroke onset. Currently, efforts are being exerted to assess stroke effects on the brain, particularly in the early stages. Numerous neuropsychological assessments are being used to evaluate and differentiate cognitive impairment and dementia following stroke. This article focuses on the role of available neuropsychological assessments in detection of dementia and memory loss after stroke. This review starts with stroke types and risk factors associated with dementia development, followed by a brief description of stroke diagnosis criteria and the effects of stroke on the brain that lead to cognitive impairment and end with memory loss. This review aims to combine available neuropsychological assessments to develop a post-stroke memory assessment (PSMA) scheme based on the most recognized and available studies. The proposed PSMA is expected to assess different types of memory functionalities that are related to different parts of the brain according to stroke location. An optimal therapeutic program that would help stroke patients enjoy additional years with higher quality of life is presented. PMID:25228808

  14. High performance polymer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    The term high performance as applied to polymers is generally associated with polymers that operate at high temperatures. High performance is used to describe polymers that perform at temperatures of 177 C or higher. In addition to temperature, other factors obviously influence the performance of polymers such as thermal cycling, stress level, and environmental effects. Some recent developments at NASA Langley in polyimides, poly(arylene ethers), and acetylenic terminated materials are discussed. The high performance/high temperature polymers discussed are representative of the type of work underway at NASA Langley Research Center. Further improvement in these materials as well as the development of new polymers will provide technology to help meet NASA future needs in high performance/high temperature applications. In addition, because of the combination of properties offered by many of these polymers, they should find use in many other applications.

  15. A generalized memory test algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milner, E. J.

    1982-01-01

    A general algorithm for testing digital computer memory is presented. The test checks that (1) every bit can be cleared and set in each memory work, and (2) bits are not erroneously cleared and/or set elsewhere in memory at the same time. The algorithm can be applied to any size memory block and any size memory word. It is concise and efficient, requiring the very few cycles through memory. For example, a test of 16-bit-word-size memory requries only 384 cycles through memory. Approximately 15 seconds were required to test a 32K block of such memory, using a microcomputer having a cycle time of 133 nanoseconds.

  16. TNF biology, pathogenic mechanisms and emerging therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Kalliolias, George D; Ivashkiv, Lionel B

    2016-01-01

    TNF is a pleiotropic cytokine with important functions in homeostasis and disease pathogenesis. Recent discoveries have provided insights into TNF biology that introduce new concepts for the development of therapeutics for TNF-mediated diseases. The model of TNF receptor signalling has been extended to include linear ubiquitination and the formation of distinct signalling complexes that are linked with different functional outcomes, such as inflammation, apoptosis and necroptosis. Our understanding of TNF-induced gene expression has been enriched by the discovery of epigenetic mechanisms and concepts related to cellular priming, tolerization and induction of 'short-term transcriptional memory'. Identification of distinct homeostatic or pathogenic TNF-induced signalling pathways has introduced the concept of selectively inhibiting the deleterious effects of TNF while preserving its homeostatic bioactivities for therapeutic purposes. In this Review, we present molecular mechanisms underlying the roles of TNF in homeostasis and inflammatory disease pathogenesis, and discuss novel strategies to advance therapeutic paradigms for the treatment of TNF-mediated diseases. PMID:26656660

  17. Polymersome Carriers: from Self-Assembly to siRNA and Protein Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Christian, David A.; Cai, Shenshen; Bowen, Diana M.; Kim, Younghoon; Pajerowski, J. David; Discher, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    Polymersomes are polymer-based vesicular shells that form upon hydration of amphiphilic block copolymers. These high molecular weight amphiphiles impart physicochemical properties that allow polymersomes to stably encapsulate or integrate a broad range of active molecules. This robustness together with recently described mechanisms for controlled breakdown of degradable polymersomes as well as escape from endolysosomes suggests that polymersomes might be usefully viewed as having structure/property/function relationships somewhere between lipid vesicles and viral capsids. Here we summarize the assembly and development of controlled release polymersomes to encapsulate therapeutics ranging from small molecule anti-cancer drugs to siRNA and therapeutic proteins. PMID:18977437

  18. Practical Memory Concerns in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Celinda M.; Cherry, Katie E.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we focus on practical memory concerns in adulthood. Young, middle-aged, and community-dwelling older adults responded to seven open-ended questions covering the topics of memory self-efficacy, memory management, memory remediation, and fears about memory aging in adulthood. The results revealed several similarities among the age…

  19. Structural Modifications in Liquid Crystals and Liquid Crystal Polymers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legge, Coulton Heath

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. The effect of doping liquid crystals and liquid crystal polymers with either photoactive molecules or cross links was investigated. Selective irradiation of low molar mass and polymer liquid crystals doped with a photoactive unit results in either a Eto Z or Zto E isomerisation of the photoactive unit. (4-butyl -4^'methoxyazobenzene and methyl beta-(1-naphthyl)propenoate were the photoactive molecules investigated.) The effect of the isomerisation is such as to cause a depression of the LC to I phase transition temperature of the system, which may be monitored optically. Both the overall depression and response is found to be dependent upon the concentration of chromophore present (a maximum depression of 50^circC in T_{rm Nl} was observed in one system). Orientational changes of the molecular units in some liquid crystal polymer samples were also observed as a result of the isomerisation. The changes were found to differ if the isomerisation took place in the glass phase of the polymer, where only the chromophore units rotated, or in the liquid crystal phase, where both chromophore and liquid crystal units rotated. In some low molar mass mixtures the incorporation of the photoactive molecule resulted in a biphasic liquid crystal + isotropic region whose breadth was dependant upon the chromophore concentration. Incorporation of cross-links into liquid crystal polymers to yield free-standing monodomain samples are shown to have a complete memory of the orientational configuration at the time of crosslinking. This memory is demonstrated through samples in which the parent polymer system is first aligned in a magnetic field prior to crosslinking. The resulting films exhibit a remarkable memory effect, in that the sample may be held in the isotropic phase for >2 weeks, but on cooling into the liquid crystal phase region, both the original director and the degree of preferred orientation are recovered.

  20. Using Cyclic Memory Allocation to Eliminate Memory Leaks

    E-print Network

    Nguyen, Huu Hai

    We present and evaluate a new memory management technique for eliminating memory leaks in programs with dynamic memory allocation. This technique observes the execution of the program on a sequence of training inputs to ...

  1. Polymer-peptide delivery platforms: effect of oligopeptide orientation on polymer-based DNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Parelkar, Sangram S.; Letteri, Rachel; Chan-Seng, Delphine; Zolochevska, Olga; Ellis, Jayne; Figueiredo, Marxa; Emrick, Todd

    2014-01-01

    The success of non-viral transfection using polymers hinges on efficient nuclear uptake of nucleic acid cargo and overcoming intra- and extracellular barriers. By incorporating PKKKRKV heptapeptide pendent groups as nuclear localization signals (NLS) on a polymer backbone, we demonstrate protein expression levels higher than obtained from JetPEI™ and Lipofectamine™ 2000, the latter being notorious for coupling high transfection efficiency with cytotoxicity. The orientation of the NLS peptide grafts markedly affected transfection performance. Polymers with the sequence attached to the backbone from the valine residue achieved higher nuclear translocation relative to those having the NLS groups attached in the opposite orientation. The differences in nuclear localization and DNA complexation strength between the two orientations correlated with a striking difference in protein expression, both in cell culture and in vivo. Polyplexes formed from these comb polymer structures exhibited transfection efficiencies superior to those of Lipofectamine 2000 but with greatly reduced toxicity. Moreover, these novel polymers enabled high reporter gene expression in mice when administered by intramuscular ultrasound-mediated delivery, demonstrating their therapeutic promise in vivo. PMID:24606402

  2. [Therapeutic use of cannabis derivatives].

    PubMed

    Benyamina, Amine; Reynaud, Michel

    2014-02-01

    The therapeutic use of cannabis has generated a lot of interest in the past years, leading to a better understanding of its mechanisms of action. Countries like the United States and Canada have modified their laws in order to make cannabinoid use legal in the medical context. It's also the case in France now, where a recent decree was issued, authorizing the prescription of medication containing "therapeutic cannabis" (decree no. 2013-473, June 5, 2013). Cannabinoids such as dronabinol, Sativex and nabilone have been tested for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. These agents are most promising to relieve chronic pain associated with cancer, with human immunodeficiency virus infection and with multiple sclerosis. However, longer-term studies are required to determine potential long-term adverse effects and risks of misuse and addiction. PMID:24701869

  3. Myrmics Memory Allocator

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-23

    MMA is a stand-alone memory management system for MPI clusters. It implements a shared Partitioned Global Address Space, where multiple MPI processes request objects from the allocator and the latter provides them with system-wide unique memory addresses for each object. It provides applications with an intuitive way of managing the memory system in a unified way, thus enabling easier writing of irregular application code.

  4. Memories of art.

    PubMed

    Hirstein, William

    2013-04-01

    Although the art-historical context of a work of art is important to our appreciation of it, it is our knowledge of that history that plays causal roles in producing the experience itself. This knowledge is in the form of memories, both semantic memories about the historical circumstances, but also episodic memories concerning our personal connections with an artwork. We also create representations of minds in order to understand the emotions that artworks express. PMID:23507101

  5. Memory Golf Clubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Memory Corporation's investigation of shape memory effect, stemming from Marshall Space Flight Center contracts to study materials for the space station, has aided in the development of Zeemet, a proprietary, high-damping shape memory alloy for the golf industry. The Nicklaus Golf Company has created a new line of golf clubs using Zeemet inserts. Its superelastic and high damping attributes translate into more spin on the ball, greater control, and a solid feel.

  6. Large energy absorption in Ni-Mn-Ga/polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Feuchtwanger, Jorge; Richard, Marc L.; Tang, Yun J.; Berkowitz, Ami E.; O'Handley, Robert C.; Allen, Samuel M.

    2005-05-15

    Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys can respond to a magnetic field or applied stress by the motion of twin boundaries and hence they show large hysteresis or energy loss. Ni-Mn-Ga particles made by spark erosion have been dispersed and oriented in a polymer matrix to form pseudo 3:1 composites which are studied under applied stress. Loss ratios have been determined from the stress-strain data. The loss ratios of the composites range from 63% to 67% compared to only about 17% for the pure, unfilled polymer samples.

  7. Enaminones: Exploring additional therapeutic activities.

    PubMed

    Edafiogho, Ivan O; Kombian, Samuel B; Ananthalakshmi, Kethireddy V V; Salama, Noha N; Eddington, Natalie D; Wilson, Tiffany L; Alexander, Mariano S; Jackson, Patrice L; Hanson, Clive D; Scott, K R

    2007-10-01

    Enaminones, enamines of beta-dicarbonyl compounds, have been known for many years. Their early use has been relegated to serving as synthetic intermediates in organic synthesis and of late, in pharmaceutical development. Recently, the therapeutic potential of these entities has been realized. This review provides the background and current research in this area with emphasis of these agents as potential anticonvulsants, their proposed mechanisms of action, and as potential modulators of multidrug resistance (MDR). PMID:17621683

  8. Bioengineering Beige Adipose Tissue Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tharp, Kevin M.; Stahl, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the therapeutic potential of brown/beige adipose tissue requires technological advancements that enable the controlled expansion of this uniquely thermogenic tissue. Transplantation of brown fat in small animal model systems has confirmed the expectation that brown fat expansion could possibly provide a novel therapeutic to combat obesity and related disorders. Expansion and/or stimulation of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1)-positive adipose tissues have repeatedly demonstrated physiologically beneficial reductions in circulating glucose and lipids. The recent discovery that brown adipose tissue (BAT)-derived secreted factors positively alter whole body metabolism further expands potential benefits of brown or beige/brite adipose expansion. Unfortunately, there are no sources of transplantable BATs for human therapeutic purposes at this time. Recent developments in bioengineering, including novel hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels, have enabled non-immunogenic, functional tissue allografts that can be used to generate large quantities of UCP1-positive adipose tissue. These sophisticated tissue-engineering systems have provided the methodology to develop metabolically active brown or beige/brite adipose tissue implants with the potential to be used as a metabolic therapy. Unlike the pharmacological browning of white adipose depots, implantation of bioengineered UCP1-positive adipose tissues offers a spatially controlled therapeutic. Moving forward, new insights into the mechanisms by which extracellular cues govern stem-cell differentiation and progenitor cell recruitment may enable cell-free matrix implant approaches, which generate a niche sufficient to recruit white adipose tissue-derived stem cells and support their differentiation into functional beige/brite adipose tissues. This review summarizes clinically relevant discoveries in tissue-engineering and biology leading toward the recent development of biomaterial supported beige adipose tissue implants and their potential for the metabolic therapies. PMID:26539163

  9. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  10. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  11. Retrieval of Emotional Memories

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Tony W.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term memories are influenced by the emotion experienced during learning as well as by the emotion experienced during memory retrieval. The present article reviews the literature addressing the effects of emotion on retrieval, focusing on the cognitive and neurological mechanisms that have been revealed. The reviewed research suggests that the amygdala, in combination with the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, plays an important role in the retrieval of memories for emotional events. The neural regions necessary for online emotional processing also influence emotional memory retrieval, perhaps through the reexperience of emotion during the retrieval process. PMID:17723029

  12. Sparse distributed memory overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raugh, Mike

    1990-01-01

    The Sparse Distributed Memory (SDM) project is investigating the theory and applications of massively parallel computing architecture, called sparse distributed memory, that will support the storage and retrieval of sensory and motor patterns characteristic of autonomous systems. The immediate objectives of the project are centered in studies of the memory itself and in the use of the memory to solve problems in speech, vision, and robotics. Investigation of methods for encoding sensory data is an important part of the research. Examples of NASA missions that may benefit from this work are Space Station, planetary rovers, and solar exploration. Sparse distributed memory offers promising technology for systems that must learn through experience and be capable of adapting to new circumstances, and for operating any large complex system requiring automatic monitoring and control. Sparse distributed memory is a massively parallel architecture motivated by efforts to understand how the human brain works. Sparse distributed memory is an associative memory, able to retrieve information from cues that only partially match patterns stored in the memory. It is able to store long temporal sequences derived from the behavior of a complex system, such as progressive records of the system's sensory data and correlated records of the system's motor controls.

  13. The future of memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinella, M.

    In the not too distant future, the traditional memory and storage hierarchy of may be replaced by a single Storage Class Memory (SCM) device integrated on or near the logic processor. Traditional magnetic hard drives, NAND flash, DRAM, and higher level caches (L2 and up) will be replaced with a single high performance memory device. The Storage Class Memory paradigm will require high speed (< 100 ns read/write), excellent endurance (> 1012), nonvolatility (retention > 10 years), and low switching energies (< 10 pJ per switch). The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) has recently evaluated several potential candidates SCM technologies, including Resistive (or Redox) RAM, Spin Torque Transfer RAM (STT-MRAM), and phase change memory (PCM). All of these devices show potential well beyond that of current flash technologies and research efforts are underway to improve the endurance, write speeds, and scalabilities to be on-par with DRAM. This progress has interesting implications for space electronics: each of these emerging device technologies show excellent resistance to the types of radiation typically found in space applications. Commercially developed, high density storage class memory-based systems may include a memory that is physically radiation hard, and suitable for space applications without major shielding efforts. This paper reviews the Storage Class Memory concept, emerging memory devices, and possible applicability to radiation hardened electronics for space.

  14. Mechanics of amorphous polymers and polymer gels

    E-print Network

    Chester, Shawn Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Many applications of amorphous polymers require a thermo-mechanically coupled large-deformation elasto-viscoplasticity theory which models the strain rate and temperature dependent response of amorphous polymeric materials ...

  15. Stimuli-responsive polymers and their applications in nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Cabane, Etienne; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Langowska, Karolina; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    This review focuses on smart nano-materials built of stimuli-responsive (SR) polymers and will discuss their numerous applications in the biomedical field. The authors will first provide an overview of different stimuli and their corresponding, responsive polymers. By introducing myriad functionalities, SR polymers present a wide range of possibilities in the design of stimuli-responsive devices, making use of virtually all types of polymer constructs, from self-assembled structures (micelles, vesicles) to surfaces (polymer brushes, films) as described in the second section of the review. In the last section of this review the authors report on some of the most promising applications of stimuli-responsive polymers in nanomedicine. In particular, we will discuss applications pertaining to diagnosis, where SR polymers are used to construct sensors capable of selective recognition and quantification of analytes and physical variables, as well as imaging devices. We will also highlight some examples of responsive systems used for therapeutic applications, including smart drug delivery systems (micelles, vesicles, dendrimers...) and surfaces for regenerative medicine. PMID:22589052

  16. Memory Systems Carnegie Mellon University

    E-print Network

    Chapter 1 Memory Systems Yoongu Kim Carnegie Mellon University Onur Mutlu Carnegie Mellon Concepts and Metrics ....................................... 2 1.1.2 Two Components of the Memory System ......................... 3 1.2 Memory Hierarchy ........................................................ 4 1.3 Managing

  17. ADDRESS TRANSLATION AWARE MEMORY CONSISTENCY

    E-print Network

    Sorin, Daniel J.

    ................................................................................................................................................................................................................... COMPUTER SYSTEMS WITH VIRTUAL MEMORY ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO DESIGN BUGS AND RUNTIME FAULTS IN THEIR ADDRESS TRANSLATION AWARE MEMORY CONSISTENCY FRAMEWORK FOR ADDRESS TRANSLATION AWARE MEMORY CONSISTENCY MODELS ADDRESSES THIS NEED. ......We expect

  18. A multilevel memory based on proton-doped polyazomethine with an excellent uniformity in resistive switching.

    PubMed

    Hu, Benlin; Zhu, Xiaojian; Chen, Xinxin; Pan, Liang; Peng, Shanshan; Wu, Yuanzhao; Shang, Jie; Liu, Gang; Yan, Qing; Li, Run-Wei

    2012-10-24

    The uniformity of operating parameters in organic nonvolatile memory devices is very important to avoid false programming and error readout problems. In the present work, we fabricated an organic resistive-switching memory based on protonic-acid-doped polyazomethine (PA-TsOH), which demonstrates an excellent operative uniformity and multilevel storage capability. The deliberate tuning of the resistance states can be attributed to the electric-field-controlled molecular doping of the imine-containing polymers. PMID:23035664

  19. Role of Polymer Architecture on the Activity of Polymer-Protein Conjugates for the Treatment of Accelerated Bone Loss Disorders.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Bryan S; Stewart, Jon D; Aguirre, J Ignacio; Holliday, L Shannon; Figg, C Adrian; Messer, Jonathan G; Sumerlin, Brent S

    2015-08-10

    Polymers of similar molecular weights and chemical constitution but varying in their macromolecular architectures were conjugated to osteoprotegerin (OPG) to determine the effect of polymer topology on protein activity in vitro and in vivo. OPG is a protein that inhibits bone resorption by preventing the formation of mature osteoclasts from the osteoclast precursor cell. Accelerated bone loss disorders, such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and metastatic bone disease, occur as a result of increased osteoclastogenesis, leading to the severe weakening of the bone. OPG has shown promise as a treatment in bone disorders; however, it is rapidly cleared from circulation through rapid liver uptake, and frequent, high doses of the protein are necessary to achieve a therapeutic benefit. We aimed to improve the effectiveness of OPG by creating OPG-polymer bioconjugates, employing reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization to create well-defined polymers with branching densities varying from linear, loosely branched to densely branched. Polymers with each of these architectures were conjugated to OPG using a "grafting-to" approach, and the bioconjugates were characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The OPG-polymer bioconjugates showed retention of activity in vitro against osteoclasts, and each bioconjugate was shown to be nontoxic. Preliminary in vivo studies further supported the nontoxic characteristics of the bioconjugates, and measurement of the bone mineral density in rats 7 days post-treatment via peripheral quantitative computed tomography suggested a slight increase in bone mineral density after administration of the loosely branched OPG-polymer bioconjugate. PMID:26151628

  20. Frontiers in polymer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, A Dieter

    2013-01-01

    The article shows how the initial concept of Staudinger on linear macromolecules was expanded topologically by increasing the cross-section diameter of polymer chains and by introducing sheet polymers with planar rather than the commonly known linear repeat units. The two concrete projects addressed are the synthesis of dendronized and of two-dimensional polymers. It is explained how these novel macromolecules were achieved and which obstacles had to be overcome but also where these frontiers in polymer chemistry might lead to new insights in polymer science in general and novel applications in particular. The article also provides insights into analytical issues because both target macromolecules are in an extraordinarily high molar mass range and contrast/sensitivity issues can turn rather serious in particular for the two-dimensional polymers. PMID:24388233

  1. [Repeated measurement of memory with valenced test items: verbal memory, working memory and autobiographic memory].

    PubMed

    Kuffel, A; Terfehr, K; Uhlmann, C; Schreiner, J; Löwe, B; Spitzer, C; Wingenfeld, K

    2013-07-01

    A large number of questions in clinical and/or experimental neuropsychology require the multiple repetition of memory tests at relatively short intervals. Studies on the impact of the associated exercise and interference effects on the validity of the test results are rare. Moreover, hardly any neuropsychological instruments exist to date to record the memory performance with several parallel versions in which the emotional valence of the test material is also taken into consideration. The aim of the present study was to test whether a working memory test (WST, a digit-span task with neutral or negative distraction stimuli) devised by our workgroup can be used with repeated measurements. This question was also examined in parallel versions of a wordlist learning paradigm and an autobiographical memory test (AMT). Both tests contained stimuli with neutral, positive and negative valence. Twenty-four participants completed the memory testing including the working memory test and three versions of a wordlist and the AMT at intervals of a week apiece (measuring points 1. - 3.). The results reveal consistent performances across the three measuring points in the working and autobiographical memory test. The valence of the stimulus material did not influence the memory performance. In the delayed recall of the wordlist an improvement in memory performance over time was seen. The tests on working memory presented and the parallel versions for the declarative and autobiographical memory constitute informal economic instruments within the scope of the measurement repeatability designs. While the WST and AMT are appropriate for study designs with repeated measurements at relatively short intervals, longer intervals might seem more favourable for the use of wordlist learning paradigms. PMID:23856944

  2. EXETRA Perspectives: Concepts in Therapeutic Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Larry L.; Edginton, Christopher R.

    Fifteen papers address issues in therapeutic recreation for disabled persons from the perspectives of practitioners, educators, and students. The following papers are presented. "Therapeutic Recreation Service: The Past and Challenging Present" (H. Sessoms); "Therapeutic Recreatiion in an Era of Limits: A Crisis...A Challenge... An Opportunity"…

  3. Thermally conductive polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, N. R.; Jenkins, R. K.; Lister, J. L. (inventors)

    1971-01-01

    A thermally conductive polymer is provided having physical and chemical properties suited to use as a medium for potting electrical components. The polymer is prepared from hydroquinone, phenol, and formaldehyde, by conventional procedures employed for the preparation of phenol-formaldehyde resins. While the proportions of the monomers can be varied, a preferred polymer is formed from the monomers in a 1:1:2.4 molar or ratio of hydroquinone:phenol:formaldehyde.

  4. (-)Epigallocatechin-3-gallate decreases the stress-induced impairment of learning and memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Soung, Hung-Sheng; Wang, Mao-Hsien; Tseng, Hsiang-Chien; Fang, Hsu-Wei; Chang, Kuo-Chi

    2015-08-18

    Stress induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes alterations in brain cytoarchitecture and cognition. Green tea has potent antioxidative properties especially the tea catechin (-) epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). These powerful antioxidative properties are able to protect against various oxidative damages. In this study we investigated the impact of stress on rats' locomotor activity, learning and memory. Many tea catechins, including EGCG, were examined for their possible therapeutic effects in treating stress-induced impairment. Our results indicated that locomotor activity was decreased, and the learning and memory were impaired in stressed rats (SRs). EGCG treatment was able to prevent the decreased locomotor activity as well as improve the learning and memory in SRs. EGCG treatment was also able to reduce the increased oxidative status in SRs' hippocampi. The above results suggest a therapeutic effect of EGCG in treating stress-induced impairment of learning and memory, most likely by means of its powerful antioxidative properties. PMID:26126814

  5. Predictive aging of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, Edward F. (inventor); Willis, Paul B. (inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A method of predicting aging of polymers operates by heating a polymer in the outdoors to an elevated temperature until a change of property is induced. The test is conducted at a plurality of temperatures to establish a linear Arrhenius plot which is extrapolated to predict the induction period for failure of the polymer at ambient temperature. An Outdoor Photo Thermal Aging Reactor (OPTAR) is also described including a heatable platen for receiving a sheet of polymer, means to heat the platen, and switching means such as a photoelectric switch for turning off the heater during dark periods.

  6. Predictive aging of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, Edward F. (Inventor); Willis, Paul B. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method of predicting aging of polymers operates by heating a polymer in the outdoors to an elevated temperature until a change of property is induced. The test is conducted at a plurality of temperatures to establish a linear Arrhenius plot which is extrapolated to predict the induction period for failure of the polymer at ambient temperature. An Outdoor Photo Thermal Aging Reactor (OPTAR) is also described including a heatable platen for receiving a sheet of polymer, means to heat the platen and switching means such as a photoelectric switch for turning off the heater during dark periods.

  7. Engineering Polymer Informatics

    E-print Network

    Adams, Nico; Ryder, Jennifer; Jessop, David M; Corbett, Peter; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2007-12-17

    stream_source_info Engineering Polymer Informatics.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9453 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Engineering Polymer Informatics.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... Engineering Polymer Informatics Nico Adams, Jen Ryder, Nicholas England, David Jessop, Peter Corbett, Peter Murray-Rust Our mission is to develop an informatics toolbox, which will take into account the special computational needs of polymers and will make...

  8. Adhesion of Polymer Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, John J.; Bates, Frank S.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Silas, James A.

    2005-07-01

    The adhesion and bending modulus of polybutadiene-poly(ethylene oxide) block copolymer vesicles made from a bidisperse mixture of polymers is measured using micropipette aspiration. The adhesion energy between biotinylated vesicles and avidin beads is modeled by incorporating the extension of the adhesive ligands above the surface brush of the vesicle according to the blob model of bidisperse polymer mixtures of Komura and Safran assuming the polymer brush at the surface of the vesicle is compact. The same model accurately reproduces the scaling of the bending modulus with polymer composition.

  9. Polymers for engineering applications

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the world of engineering plastics. It discusses the polymers, their properties strengths and limitations. There are 11 chapters, organized so that each chapter builds on the knowledge of the previous material. Coverage includes important polymer concepts, such as molecular structure, bonding, morphology and molecular weight, and polymer properties, such as thermal expansion, thermal transition, electrical properties and viscoelasticity. Details are provided on methods of processing fabrication and on specific families of polymers. The general-purpose polymers are discussed, such as natural and synthetic rubbers, rayon, acrylic and alkyd coatings, polyethylene, polystyrene and polyvinyl chloride (PVC). There's information on high-performance polymers - fibers, elastomers, and coatings. A thorough explanation of the characteristics and qualities of nylons, polyesters, polyimides, neoprene, silicones, polyurethanes and other polymers is given in the same section. Functional polymers with special properties, such as photoconductivity, electric conductivity, piezoelectricity, light sensitivity, and ion exchange; and polymers that are superior to general-purpose plastics, such as ABS, filled polypropylene, and glass-reinforced plastics, are also covered.

  10. Regret as Autobiographical Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Ian M.; Feeney, Aidan

    2008-01-01

    We apply an autobiographical memory framework to the study of regret. Focusing on the distinction between regrets for specific and general events we argue that the temporal profile of regret, usually explained in terms of the action-inaction distinction, is predicted by models of autobiographical memory. In two studies involving participants in…

  11. Memories of Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sidwell, Amy M.; Walls, Richard T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to explore college students' autobiographical memories of physical education (PE). Questionnaires were distributed to students enrolled in undergraduate Introduction to PE and Introduction to Communications courses. The 261 participants wrote about memories of PE. These students recalled events from Grades…

  12. The Biology of Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the conflicting evidence and points of view presented by scientists involved in research on the nature of memory. The research of one group supports a chemical basis for memory, while the other group presents evidence supporting an electro-physiological basis. (JR)

  13. When Forgetting Preserves Memory

    PubMed Central

    Hupbach, Almut

    2013-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest in defining the circumstances leading to memory modifications. Studies have shown that reactivating a supposedly stable memory re-introduces a time-limited window of plasticity during which presentation of interfering material can cause long-term memory changes. The present study asks whether such memory changes can be prevented if people are instructed to forget the memory before the new material is encoded. Participants learned a set of objects. After 48?h, they were reminded of this learning episode, and learned another set of objects. Again 48?h later, they recalled the first (Exp. 1) or second set (Exp. 3). As shown previously, a reminder caused intrusions from the second set into recall of the first set. Here I show that the instruction to forget the first set significantly diminished intrusions from the second set, especially when the instruction was given before the new set was encoded in the second session. Experiment 2 suggests that the reduced intrusions were due to list segregation/isolation, rather than temporarily inhibited access to Set 1. Taken together, the study shows that the attempt to forget a memory can immunize it such that the presentation of interfering material has limited effects, and the memory can be recalled unchanged in the future. This is important when veridical memory is essential, such as in eyewitness testimonies. PMID:23382724

  14. Memory technology survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The current status of semiconductor, magnetic, and optical memory technologies is described. Projections based on these research activities planned for the shot term are presented. Conceptual designs of specific memory buffer pplications employing bipola, CMOS, GaAs, and Magnetic Bubble devices are discussed.

  15. Memory and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marcia K.

    2006-01-01

    Although it may be disconcerting to contemplate, true and false memories arise in the same way. Memories are attributions that we make about our mental experiences based on their subjective qualities, our prior knowledge and beliefs, our motives and goals, and the social context. This article describes an approach to studying the nature of these…

  16. Retrieval of Emotional Memories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Tony W.

    2007-01-01

    Long-term memories are influenced by the emotion experienced during learning as well as by the emotion experienced during memory retrieval. The present article reviews the literature addressing the effects of emotion on retrieval, focusing on the cognitive and neurological mechanisms that have been revealed. The reviewed research suggests that the…

  17. Distributed multiport memory architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, W. H. (inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A multiport memory architecture is diclosed for each of a plurality of task centers connected to a command and data bus. Each task center, includes a memory and a plurality of devices which request direct memory access as needed. The memory includes an internal data bus and an internal address bus to which the devices are connected, and direct timing and control logic comprised of a 10-state ring counter for allocating memory devices by enabling AND gates connected to the request signal lines of the devices. The outputs of AND gates connected to the same device are combined by OR gates to form an acknowledgement signal that enables the devices to address the memory during the next clock period. The length of the ring counter may be effectively lengthened to any multiple of ten to allow for more direct memory access intervals in one repetitive sequence. One device is a network bus adapter which serially shifts onto the command and data bus, a data word (8 bits plus control and parity bits) during the next ten direct memory access intervals after it has been granted access. The NBA is therefore allocated only one access in every ten intervals, which is a predetermined interval for all centers. The ring counters of all centers are periodically synchronized by DMA SYNC signal to assure that all NBAs be able to function in synchronism for data transfer from one center to another.

  18. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  19. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  20. Repeatable quantum memory channels

    E-print Network

    Tomas Rybar; Mário Ziman

    2008-08-28

    Within the framework of quantum memory channels we introduce the notion of repeatability of quantum channels. In particular, a quantum channel is called repeatable if there exist a memory device implementing the same channel on each individual input. We show that random unitary channels can be implemented in a repeatable fashion, whereas the nonunital channels cannot.

  1. Memory Metals (Marchon Eyewear)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Another commercial application of memory metal technology is found in a "smart" eyeglass frame that remembers its shape and its wearer's fit. A patented "memory encoding process" makes this possible. Heat is not required to return the glasses to shape. A large commercial market is anticipated.

  2. Experimental Optoelectronic Associative Memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1992-01-01

    Optoelectronic associative memory responds to input image by displaying one of M remembered images. Which image to display determined by optoelectronic analog computation of resemblance between input image and each remembered image. Does not rely on precomputation and storage of outer-product synapse matrix. Size of memory needed to store and process images reduced.

  3. Eavesdropping without quantum memory

    SciTech Connect

    Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.

    2006-04-15

    In quantum cryptography the optimal eavesdropping strategy requires that the eavesdropper uses ancillas and quantum memories in order to optimize her information. What happens if the eavesdropper has no quantum memory? It is shown that in this case the eavesdropper obtains a better information/disturbance trade-off by adopting the simple intercept/resend strategy.

  4. External Memory Value Iteration

    E-print Network

    Morik, Katharina

    , applicable actions, tran- sition functions, and cost of applying actions on states, which is able to modelExternal Memory Value Iteration Stefan Edelkamp Shahid Jabbar Blai Bonet Forschungsbericht Nr. 813 April 2007 #12;External Memory Value Iteration Stefan Edelkamp Computer Science Department University

  5. Amnesia and Distributed Memory

    E-print Network

    McClelland, James L. "Jay"

    is that it produces a retrograde amnesia that is temporally graded. After the precipitating insult, the individualCHAPTER2S: Amnesia and Distributed Memory 1. L. McCLELLAND and D. E. RUMELHART In several chapters of the phenomenon of bitemporal amnesia-the deficit in memory that is pro- 0 duced bi a bilateral insult

  6. A Space for Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charman, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article I examine the possibilities of reparation in an era of privatisation and de-industrialisation. I examine the effect of a recent project Sunshine Memory Space, a space, designed to evoke memories of a de-industrialised urban Melbourne suburb Sunshine. This project offered the opportunity for the effects of industrial change to be…

  7. Individualised cancer therapeutics: dream or reality? Therapeutics construction.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuqiao; Senzer, Neil; Nemunaitis, John

    2005-11-01

    The analysis of DNA microarray and proteomic data, and the subsequent integration into functional expression sets, provides a circuit map of the hierarchical cellular networks responsible for sustaining the viability and environmental competitiveness of cancer cells, that is, their robust systematics. These technologies can be used to 'snapshot' the unique patterns of molecular derangements and modified interactions in cancer, and allow for strategic selection of therapeutics that best match the individual profile of the tumour. This review highlights technology that can be used to selectively disrupt critical molecular targets and describes possible vehicles to deliver the synthesised molecular therapeutics to the relevant cellular compartments of the malignant cells. RNA interference (RNAi) involves a group of evolutionarily conserved gene silencing mechanisms in which small sequences of double-stranded RNA or intrinsic antisense RNA trigger mRNA cleavage or translational repression, respectively. Although RNAi molecules can be synthesised to 'silence' virtually any gene, even if upregulated, a mechanism for selective delivery of RNAi effectors to sites of malignant disease remains challenging. The authors will discuss gene-modified conditionally replicating viruses as candidate vehicles for the delivery of RNAi. PMID:16255647

  8. 1MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 14, Polymer Structures Chapter Outline: Polymer Structures

    E-print Network

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    1 1MSE 2090: Introduction to Materials Science Chapter 14, Polymer Structures Chapter Outline: Polymer Structures Hydrocarbon and polymer molecules Chemistry of polymer molecules Molecular weight and shape Molecular structure and configurations Thermoplastic and thermosetting polymers Copolymers Polymer

  9. Optical quantum memory

    E-print Network

    A. I. Lvovsky; B. C. Sanders; W. Tittel

    2010-04-16

    Quantum memory is important to quantum information processing in many ways: a synchronization device to match various processes within a quantum computer, an identity quantum gate that leaves any state unchanged, and a tool to convert heralded photons to photons-on-demand. In addition to quantum computing, quantum memory would be instrumental for the implementation of long-distance quantum communication using quantum repeaters. The importance of this basic quantum gate is exemplified by the multitude of optical quantum memory mechanisms being studied: optical delay lines, cavities, electromagnetically-induced transparency, photon-echo, and off-resonant Faraday interaction. Here we report on the state-of-the-art in the field of optical quantum memory, including criteria for successful quantum memory and current performance levels.

  10. Memory and reality.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Marcia K

    2006-11-01

    Although it may be disconcerting to contemplate, true and false memories arise in the same way. Memories are attributions that we make about our mental experiences based on their subjective qualities, our prior knowledge and beliefs, our motives and goals, and the social context. This article describes an approach to studying the nature of these mental experiences and the constructive encoding, revival, and evaluative processes involved (the source monitoring framework). Cognitive behavioral studies using both objective (e.g., recognition, source memory) and subjective (e.g., ratings of memory characteristics) measures and neuroimaging findings are helping to clarify the complex relation between memory and reality. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:17115808

  11. Making Memories Matter

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Paul E.; Korol, Donna L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews some of the neuroendocrine bases by which emotional events regulate brain mechanisms of learning and memory. In laboratory rodents, there is extensive evidence that epinephrine influences memory processing through an inverted-U relationship, at which moderate levels enhance and high levels impair memory. These effects are, in large part, mediated by increases in blood glucose levels subsequent to epinephrine release, which then provide support for the brain processes engaged by learning and memory. These brain processes include augmentation of neurotransmitter release and of energy metabolism, the latter apparently including a key role for astrocytic glycogen. In addition to up- and down-regulation of learning and memory in general, physiological concomitants of emotion and arousal can also switch the neural system that controls learning at a particular time, at once improving some attributes of learning and impairing others in a manner that results in a change in the strategy used to solve a problem. PMID:23264764

  12. Computer memory management system

    DOEpatents

    Kirk, III, Whitson John (Greenwood, MO)

    2002-01-01

    A computer memory management system utilizing a memory structure system of "intelligent" pointers in which information related to the use status of the memory structure is designed into the pointer. Through this pointer system, The present invention provides essentially automatic memory management (often referred to as garbage collection) by allowing relationships between objects to have definite memory management behavior by use of coding protocol which describes when relationships should be maintained and when the relationships should be broken. In one aspect, the present invention system allows automatic breaking of strong links to facilitate object garbage collection, coupled with relationship adjectives which define deletion of associated objects. In another aspect, The present invention includes simple-to-use infinite undo/redo functionality in that it has the capability, through a simple function call, to undo all of the changes made to a data model since the previous `valid state` was noted.

  13. A Path to Soluble Molecularly Imprinted Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Abhilasha; Murray, George M.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imprinting is a technique for making a selective binding site for a specific chemical. The technique involves building a polymeric scaffold of molecular complements containing the target molecule. Subsequent removal of the target leaves a cavity with a structural “memory” of the target. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) can be employed as selective adsorbents of specific molecules or molecular functional groups. In addition, sensors for specific molecules can be made using optical transduction through lumiphores residing in the imprinted site. We have found that the use of metal ions as chromophores can improve selectivity due to selective complex formation. The combination of molecular imprinting and spectroscopic selectivity can result in sensors that are highly sensitive and nearly immune to interferences. A weakness of conventional MIPs with regard to processing is the insolubility of crosslinked polymers. Traditional MIPs are prepared either as monoliths and ground into powders or are prepared in situ on a support. This limits the applicability of MIPs by imposing tedious or difficult processes for their inclusion in devices. The size of the particles hinders diffusion and slows response. These weaknesses could be avoided if a means were found to prepare individual macromolecules with crosslinked binding sites with soluble linear polymeric arms. This process has been made possible by controlled free radical polymerization techniques that can form pseudo-living polymers. Modern techniques of controlled free radical polymerization allow the preparation of block copolymers with potentially crosslinkable substituents in specific locations. The inclusion of crosslinkable mers proximate to the binding complex in the core of a star polymer allows the formation of molecularly imprinted macromolecules that are soluble and processable. Due to the much shorter distance for diffusion, the polymers exhibit rapid responses. This paper reviews the methods that have been employed for the trace determination of organophosphates in real world samples using MIPs. PMID:24956512

  14. Ion-Conducting Organic/Inorganic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinder, James D.; Meador, Mary Ann B.

    2007-01-01

    Ion-conducting polymers that are hybrids of organic and inorganic moieties and that are suitable for forming into solid-electrolyte membranes have been invented in an effort to improve upon the polymeric materials that have been used previously for such membranes. Examples of the prior materials include perfluorosulfonic acid-based formulations, polybenzimidazoles, sulfonated polyetherketone, sulfonated naphthalenic polyimides, and polyethylene oxide (PEO)-based formulations. Relative to the prior materials, the polymers of the present invention offer greater dimensional stability, greater ease of formation into mechanically resilient films, and acceptably high ionic conductivities over wider temperature ranges. Devices in which films made of these ion-conducting organic/inorganic polymers could be used include fuel cells, lithium batteries, chemical sensors, electrochemical capacitors, electrochromic windows and display devices, and analog memory devices. The synthesis of a polymer of this type (see Figure 1) starts with a reaction between an epoxide-functionalized alkoxysilane and a diamine. The product of this reaction is polymerized by hydrolysis and condensation of the alkoxysilane group, producing a molecular network that contains both organic and inorganic (silica) links. The silica in the network contributes to the ionic conductivity and to the desired thermal and mechanical properties. Examples of other diamines that have been used in the reaction sequence of Figure 1 are shown in Figure 2. One can use any of these diamines or any combination of them in proportions chosen to impart desired properties to the finished product. Alternatively or in addition, one could similarly vary the functionality of the alkoxysilane to obtain desired properties. The variety of available alkoxysilanes and diamines thus affords flexibility to optimize the organic/inorganic polymer for a given application.

  15. Novel anticancer therapeutics targeting telomerase.

    PubMed

    Ruden, Maria; Puri, Neelu

    2013-08-01

    Telomeres are protective caps at the ends of human chromosomes. Telomeres shorten with each successive cell division in normal human cells whereas, in tumors, they are continuously elongated by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Telomerase is overexpressed in 80-95% of cancers and is present in very low levels or is almost undetectable in normal cells. Because telomerase plays a pivotal role in cancer cell growth it may serve as an ideal target for anticancer therapeutics. Inhibition of telomerase may lead to a decrease of telomere length resulting in cell senescence and apoptosis in telomerase positive tumors. Several strategies of telomerase inhibition are reviewed, including small molecule inhibitors, antisense oligonucleotides, immunotherapies and gene therapies, targeting the hTERT or the ribonucleoprotein subunit hTER. G-quadruplex stabilizers, tankyrase and HSP90 inhibitors targeting telomere and telomerase assembly, and T-oligo approach are also covered. Based on this review, the most promising current telomerase targeting therapeutics are the antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor GRN163L and immunotherapies that use dendritic cells (GRVAC1), hTERT peptide (GV1001) or cryptic peptides (Vx-001). Most of these agents have entered phase I and II clinical trials in patients with various tumors, and have shown good response rates as evidenced by a reduction in tumor cell growth, increased overall disease survival, disease stabilization in advanced staged tumors and complete/partial responses. Most therapeutics have shown to be more effective when used in combination with standard therapies, resulting in concomitant telomere shortening and tumor mass shrinkage, as well as preventing tumor relapse and resistance to single agent therapy. PMID:22841437

  16. Structurally Based Therapeutic Evaluation: A Therapeutic and Practical Approach to Teaching Medicinal Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsharif, Naser Z.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Explains structurally based therapeutic evaluation of drugs, which uses seven therapeutic criteria in translating chemical and structural knowledge into therapeutic decision making in pharmaceutical care. In a Creighton University (Nebraska) medicinal chemistry course, students apply the approach to solve patient-related therapeutic problems in…

  17. Therapeutic resistance in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nadkar, Aalok; Pungaliya, Chirag; Drake, Kenneth; Zajac, Ewa; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2006-10-01

    Despite considerable progress over the last 25 years in the systemic therapy of lung cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and radiation remains a vexing problem. The number of mechanisms of therapeutic resistance in lung cancer has expanded considerably over the past three decades, and the crucial role of stress resistance pathways is increasingly recognised as a cause of intrinsic and acquired chemo- and radiotherapy resistance. This paper reviews recent evidence for stress defence proteins, particularly RALBP1/RLIP76, in mediating intrinsic and acquired chemotherapy and radiation resistance in human lung cancer. PMID:17014393

  18. Therapeutic Applications of Ionizing Radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Santos, María Elena

    The aim of radiation therapy is to deliver a precisely measured dose of radiation to a defined tumour volume with minimal damage to the surrounding healthy tissue, resulting in the eradication of the tumour, a higher quality of life with palliation of symptoms of the disease, and the prolongation of survival at competitive cost. Together with surgery and pharmacology, radiotherapy is presently one of the most important therapeutical weapons against cancer. This chapter provides an overview of the clinical use of radiation, with emphasis on the optimisation of treatment planning and delivery, and a top level summary of state-of-the-art techniques in radiation therapy.

  19. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Eduardo B; Farah, Michel E; Maia, Maurício; Penha, Fernando M; Regatieri, Caio; Melo, Gustavo B; Pinheiro, Marcelo M; Zanetti, Carlos R

    2009-03-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used therapeutically by binding to molecular targets with high specificity. Therefore, they have excellent therapeutic applications in ophthalmology. This manuscript presents four aspects of the therapeutic use of mAbs in ophthalmology: the scientific rationale, the unique characteristics of selected mAbs, the current state-of-the-art application, and relevant therapeutic mAbs for future applications in ophthalmology. We identified in the literature various single-agent therapies that inhibit the following targets: tumor necrosis factor (TNF), epithelial growth factor receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor, basic fibroblast growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor, and cluster of differentiation antigens. The roles of all biochemical targets in ocular diseases were evaluated. Current and future mAbs against various cytokines were assessed for the treatment of ocular diseases. The medical literature showed the clinical benefits of mAbs for treating angiogenic and inflammatory ocular diseases. Two anti-VEGF mAbs, bevacizumab and ranibizumab, and three anti-TNF agents, infliximab, etanercept, and adalimumab, control ocular neovascularization and intraocular inflammation. Other mAbs such as rituximab, daclizumab, efalizumab, and alemtuzumab showed positive results in animal and early clinical studies and may represent useful adjuvant therapies for ocular lymphoma or ocular inflammation. Ranibizumab is the only FDA-approved therapy; for other mAbs the so-called off-label application remains the standard. Intravenous administration of mAbs has demonstrated acceptable toxicity profiles, while intraocular injection may decrease the chances of systemic complications and increase the amount of drug available to the retina and choroid. In conclusion, effective clinical use of mAbs in ophthalmology is more commonly seen in the field of angiogenic vitreoretinal and autoimmune inflammatory diseases. The challenge for the future is combining biologic therapies to improve the quality and duration of responses while diminishing side effects. The role of mAbs within ophthalmic treatments will be defined according to future clinical experience and the results of randomized clinical trials. PMID:19114125

  20. [Therapeutic approach to bilateral hepatoblastoma].

    PubMed

    Babut, J M; Le Gall, E; Bourdelat, D; Jouan, H; Gruel, Y

    1983-01-01

    The treatment of a case of bilateral hepatoblastoma by continuous infusion of adriamycin in the hepatic artery accompanied by ligature of the right hepatic artery enabled the authors to carry out six weeks later an extensive right lobe hepatectomy. Unfortunately the patient died seven weeks after the partial hepatectomy from complication of surgery. Thus it was possible to demonstrate the effectiveness of the intra arterial chemotherapy. No residual tumor could be found at autopsy. As in the case with the adult, arterial ligature combined with carefully targeted chemotherapy would seem to be potentially important therapeutic option in the treatment of malignant liver tumors in children. PMID:6303615

  1. Bioengineering Lantibiotics for Therapeutic Success

    PubMed Central

    Field, Des; Cotter, Paul D.; Hill, Colin; Ross, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    Several examples of highly modified antimicrobial peptides have been described. While many such peptides are non-ribosomally synthesized, ribosomally synthesized equivalents are being discovered with increased frequency. Of the latter group, the lantibiotics continue to attract most attention. In the present review, we discuss the implementation of in vivo and in vitro engineering systems to alter, and even enhance, the antimicrobial activity, antibacterial spectrum and physico-chemical properties, including heat stability, solubility, diffusion and protease resistance, of these compounds. Additionally, we discuss the potential applications of these lantibiotics for use as therapeutics. PMID:26640466

  2. DCTD — Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP)

    Cancer.gov

    Sipuleucel-T is a therapeutic vaccine developed to treat prostate cancer. A patient’s dendritic cells are isolated and pulsed with a peptide (PAP-GM-CSF fusion protein) derived from prostatic acid phosphatase. Then the modified dendritic cells are administered back to the patient. This vaccine was considered first-in-class as it was created to treat prostate cancer, whereas most vaccines are developed to build immunity to prevent disease. In the case of sipuleucel-T, the immune system is stimulated to attack the tumor and thereby prolong survival.

  3. Exploring breast with therapeutic ductoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sheldon Marc

    2014-01-01

    Breast lesions are thought to arise mostly from the epithelium of ductal lining. Conventional imaging could only show indirect images of suspected lesions which are confirmed by percutaneous biopsies. However, ductoscopy provides direct images of the ductal epithelium which is the source of most malignant and papillary lesions. As an advance of current ductoscopy systems, pathologic nipple discharge (PND) could be treated ductoscopically by miniaturized endo-baskets or wires. Our goal is to discuss current intraductal technology which enables diagnostic and therapeutic advance for breast lesions that cause nipple discharge. PMID:25083507

  4. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market.

    PubMed

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ? four new products per year, ? 70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  5. Approaches for Therapeutic Temperature Management.

    PubMed

    Olson, DaiWai M; Hoffman, Jo

    2016-01-01

    In concert with an evolution toward an increased awareness of the need to tightly manage temperature, the methods used to monitor and manipulate temperature have evolved from mercury-filled glass thermometers, alcohol baths, and ice packs into a high technology-driven multidisciplinary activity. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief overview of the historical development of temperature management and the primary tenets of each of the 3 phases (induction, maintenance, and rewarming), which are now recognized as crucial steps to ensure the safe practice of therapeutic temperature management. PMID:26714116

  6. Memory Antitumor T-Cells Resist Inhibition by Immune Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanhua; Whitaker-Dowling, Patricia; Bergman, Ira

    2015-09-01

    Cancer immune therapy is difficult partly because several classes of suppressor cells, including regulatory T-cells and macrophage-derived suppressor cells, inhibit the antitumor T-cell response. We used treatment studies of implanted tumors in mice to demonstrate that the same inhibitory cells that abrogated an acute therapeutic T-cell response to established tumor did not inhibit the therapeutic response produced by memory T-cells. Generating antitumor memory T-cells may be a highly potent strategy against cancer with late developing metastases. PMID:26254347

  7. Production of therapeutic antibodies with controlled fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yamane-Ohnuki, Naoko

    2009-01-01

    The clinical success of therapeutic antibodies is demonstrated by the number of antibody therapeutics that have been brought to market and the increasing number of therapeutic antibodies in development. Recombinant antibodies are molecular-targeted therapeutic agents and represent a major new class of drugs. However, it is still very important to optimize and maximize the clinical efficacy of therapeutic antibodies, in part to help lower the cost of therapeutic antibodies by potentially reducing the dose or the duration of treatment. Clinical trials using therapeutic antibodies fully lacking core fucose residue in the Fc oligosaccharides are currently underway, and their remarkable physiological activities in humans in vivo have attracted attention as next-generation therapeutic antibody approaches with improved efficacy. Thus, an industrially applicable antibody production process that provides consistent yields of fully non-fucosylated antibody therapeutics with fixed quality has become a key goal in the successful development of next-generation therapeutic agents. In this article, we review the current technologies for production of therapeutic antibodies with control of fucosylation of the Fc N-glycans. PMID:20065644

  8. Sleep & Memory/Review Memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep

    E-print Network

    Reber, Paul J.

    Sleep & Memory/Review Memory reactivation and consolidation during sleep Ken A. Paller1 and Joel L, Illinois 60208-2710, USA Do our memories remain static during sleep, or do they change? We argue here that memory change is not only a natural result of sleep cognition, but further, that such change constitutes

  9. Single-Item Memory, Associative Memory, and the Human Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squire, Larry R.; Gold, Jeffrey J.; Hopkins, Ramona O.

    2006-01-01

    We tested recognition memory for items and associations in memory-impaired patients with bilateral lesions thought to be limited to the hippocampal region. In Experiment 1 (Combined memory test), participants studied words and then took a memory test in which studied words, new words, studied word pairs, and recombined word pairs were presented in…

  10. Aging Memories: Differential Decay of Episodic Memory Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talamini, Lucia M.; Gorree, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Some memories about events can persist for decades, even a lifetime. However, recent memories incorporate rich sensory information, including knowledge on the spatial and temporal ordering of event features, while old memories typically lack this "filmic" quality. We suggest that this apparent change in the nature of memories may reflect a…

  11. A Memory System Design Framework: Creating Smart Memories

    E-print Network

    Kozyrakis, Christos

    A Memory System Design Framework: Creating Smart Memories Amin Firoozshahian*, Alex Solomatnikov to implement a higher-level memory model. This approach simplifies the design and verification of CMP systems these issues, this paper proposes a microarchitectural framework for the design of on-chip memory systems and

  12. Long-term retention in organic ferroelectric-graphene memories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavan, Santosh; Stolichnov, Igor; Setter, Nava; Heron, Jean-Savin; Tosun, Mahmut; Kis, Andras

    2012-01-01

    Long-term stability of high- and low-resistance states in full-organic ferroelectrically gated graphene transistors is an essential prerequisite for memory applications. Here, we demonstrate high retention performance for both memory states with fully saturated time-dependence of the graphene channel resistance. This behavior is in contrast with ferroelectric-polymer-gated silicon field-effect-transistors, where the gap between the two memory states continuously decreases with time. Before reaching saturation, the current decays exponentially as predicted by the retention model based on the charge injection into the interface-adjacent layer. The drain current saturation attests to a high quality of the graphene/ferroelectric interface with low density of charge traps.

  13. Thermoplastic shape-memory polyurethanes based on natural oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saralegi, Ainara; Foster, E. Johan; Weder, Christoph; Eceiza, Arantxa; Corcuera, Maria Angeles

    2014-02-01

    A new family of segmented thermoplastic polyurethanes with thermally activated shape-memory properties was synthesized and characterized. Polyols derived from castor oil with different molecular weights but similar chemical structures and a corn-sugar-based chain extender (propanediol) were used as starting materials in order to maximize the content of carbon from renewable resources in the new materials. The composition was systematically varied to establish a structure-property map and identify compositions with desirable shape-memory properties. The thermal characterization of the new polyurethanes revealed a microphase separated structure, where both the soft (by convention the high molecular weight diol) and the hard phases were highly crystalline. Cyclic thermo-mechanical tensile tests showed that these polymers are excellent candidates for use as thermally activated shape-memory polymers, in which the crystalline soft segments promote high shape fixity values (close to 100%) and the hard segment crystallites ensure high shape recovery values (80-100%, depending on the hard segment content). The high proportion of components from renewable resources used in the polyurethane formulation leads to the synthesis of bio-based polyurethanes with shape-memory properties.

  14. A bio-inspired memory device based on interfacing Physarum polycephalum with an organic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Agostino; Dimonte, Alice; Tarabella, Giuseppe; D'Angelo, Pasquale; Erokhin, Victor; Iannotta, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    The development of devices able to detect and record ion fluxes is a crucial point in order to understand the mechanisms that regulate communication and life of organisms. Here, we take advantage of the combined electronic and ionic conduction properties of a conducting polymer to develop a hybrid organic/living device with a three-terminal configuration, using the Physarum polycephalum Cell (PPC) slime mould as a living bio-electrolyte. An over-oxidation process induces a conductivity switch in the polymer, due to the ionic flux taking place at the PPC/polymer interface. This behaviour endows a current-depending memory effect to the device.

  15. Therapeutic Robotics: A Technology Push

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Hermano Igo; Hogan, Neville

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a retrospective and chronological review of our efforts to revolutionize the way physical medicine is practiced by developing and deploying therapeutic robots. We present a sample of our clinical results with well over 300 stroke patients, both inpatients and outpatients, proving that movement therapy has a measurable and significant impact on recovery following brain injury. Bolstered by this result, we embarked on a two-pronged approach: 1) to determine what constitutes best therapy practice and 2) to develop additional therapeutic robots. We review our robots developed over the past 15 years and their unique characteristics. All are configured both to deliver reproducible therapy but also to measure outcomes with minimal encumbrance, thus providing critical measurement tools to help unravel the key question posed under the first prong: what constitutes “best practice”? We believe that a “gym” of robots like these will become a central feature of physical medicine and the rehabilitation clinic within the next ten years. PMID:19779587

  16. Celecoxib Nanoparticles for Therapeutic Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margulis, Katherine; Neofytou, Evgenios A; Beygui, Ramin E; Zare, Richard N

    2015-09-22

    Controllable induction of blood vessel formation (angiogenesis) presents an important therapeutic goal in ischemic diseases and is also beneficial in various normal physiological processes. In this study, we have shown that nanoparticles of celecoxib, a lipophilic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, effectively evoke therapeutic angiogenesis in animal models, in both normal and ischemic organs. Celecoxib is widely considered to inhibit angiogenesis, although a recent study suggests that it can instead promote blood vessel growth in cancer cell lines. The hydrophobic nature of this drug necessitates its administration in nanoparticulate form in order to elicit a perceivable pharmacological response. We developed a facile method for nanoparticle formation by solvent extraction from microemulsions in supercritical carbon dioxide. This method exploits a spontaneous formation of nanometric domains within the microemulsion system and their rapid conversion to nanoparticles by supercritical fluid. The resultant nanoparticles were administered subcutaneously to mice in a biocompatible hydrogel, and caused a 4-fold increase in blood vessel count in normally perfused skin compared with drug-free particles. They were at least as effective in inducing angiogenesis as nanoparticles of deferoxamine, a well-established neovascularization promoter. Next, we evaluated their effect on ischemic tissues in murine model of myocardial infarction. We found that celecoxib nanoparticles were able to induce a significant vascularization of ischemic myocardium and hamper the progression of heart failure, which points toward a new approach for treating ischemia. PMID:26244654

  17. Hydrogels for therapeutic cardiovascular angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Seliktar, Dror

    2016-01-15

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) caused by ischemia is the most common cause of cardiac dysfunction. While growth factor or cell therapy is promising, the retention of bioactive agents in the highly vascularized myocardium is limited and prevents sustained activation needed for adequate cellular responses. Various types of biomaterials with different physical and chemical properties have been developed to improve the localized delivery of growth factor and/or cells for therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic tissues. Hydrogels are particularly advantageous as carrier systems because they are structurally similar to the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM), they can be processed under relatively mild conditions and can be delivered in a minimally invasive manner. Moreover, hydrogels can be designed to degrade in a timely fashion that coincides with the angiogenic process. For these reasons, hydrogels have shown great potential as pro-angiogenic matrices. This paper reviews a few of the hydrogel systems currently being applied together with growth factor delivery and/or cell therapy to promote therapeutic angiogenesis in ischemic tissues, with emphasis on myocardial applications. PMID:26212158

  18. Therapeutic Applications of Curcumin Nanoformulations.

    PubMed

    Yallapu, Murali M; Nagesh, Prashanth K Bhusetty; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2015-11-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a bioactive and major phenolic component of turmeric derived from the rhizomes of curcuma longa linn. For centuries, curcumin has exhibited excellent therapeutic benefits in various diseases. Owing to its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, curcumin plays a significant beneficial and pleiotropic regulatory role in various pathological conditions including cancer, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, inflammatory disorders, neurological disorders, and so on. Despite such phenomenal advances in medicinal applications, the clinical implication of native curcumin is hindered due to low solubility, physico-chemical instability, poor bioavailability, rapid metabolism, and poor pharmacokinetics. However, these issues can be overcome by utilizing an efficient delivery system. Active scientific research was initiated in 2005 to improve curcumin's pharmacokinetics, systemic bioavailability, and biological activity by encapsulating or by loading curcumin into nanoform(s) (nanoformulations). A significant number of nanoformulations exist that can be translated toward medicinal use upon successful completion of pre-clinical and human clinical trials. Considering this perspective, current review provides an overview of an efficient curcumin nanoformulation for a targeted therapeutic option for various human diseases. In this review article, we discuss the clinical evidence, current status, and future opportunities of curcumin nanoformulation(s) in the field of medicine. In addition, this review presents a concise summary of the actions required to develop curcumin nanoformulations as pharmaceutical or nutraceutical candidates. PMID:26335307

  19. Nonvolatile multilevel data storage memory device from controlled ambipolar charge trapping mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Sonar, Prashant; Roy, V. A. L.

    2013-01-01

    The capability of storing multi-bit information is one of the most important challenges in memory technologies. An ambipolar polymer which intrinsically has the ability to transport electrons and holes as a semiconducting layer provides an opportunity for the charge trapping layer to trap both electrons and holes efficiently. Here, we achieved large memory window and distinct multilevel data storage by utilizing the phenomena of ambipolar charge trapping mechanism. As fabricated flexible memory devices display five well-defined data levels with good endurance and retention properties showing potential application in printed electronics. PMID:23900459

  20. Sustained gastrointestinal activity of dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Gregor; Grotzky, Andrea; Luki?, Ružica; Matoori, Simon; Luciani, Paola; Yu, Hao; Zhang, Baozhong; Walde, Peter; Schlüter, A. Dieter; Gauthier, Marc A.; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2013-07-01

    Methods to stabilize and retain enzyme activity in the gastrointestinal tract are investigated rarely because of the difficulty of protecting proteins from an environment that has evolved to promote their digestion. Preventing the degradation of enzymes under these conditions, however, is critical for the development of new protein-based oral therapies. Here we show that covalent conjugation to polymers can stabilize orally administered therapeutic enzymes at different locations in the gastrointestinal tract. Architecturally and functionally diverse polymers are used to protect enzymes sterically from inactivation and to promote interactions with mucin on the stomach wall. Using this approach the in vivo activity of enzymes can be sustained for several hours in the stomach and/or in the small intestine. These findings provide new insight and a firm basis for the development of new therapeutic and imaging strategies based on orally administered proteins using a simple and accessible technology.

  1. Selective memory and memory deficits in depressed inpatients.

    PubMed

    Ellwart, Thomas; Rinck, Mike; Becker, Eni S

    2003-01-01

    We investigated memory impairment and mood-congruent memory bias in depression, using an explicit memory test and an implicit one. Thirty-six severely depressed inpatients that fulfilled DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder and 36 healthy controls matched for sex, age, and educational level participated in the study. Explicit memory was assessed with a free recall task and implicit memory with an anagram solution task. Results showed that depressed and controls differed in explicit memory performance, depending on the amount of cognitive distraction between incidental learning and testing. Implicit memory was not affected. In addition, severely depressed patients showed a mood-congruent memory bias in implicit memory but not in explicit memory. The complex pattern of results is discussed with regard to relevant theories of depression. PMID:12820175

  2. Polymers from biobased materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chum, H.L.

    1991-01-01

    This book reports on polymers from biobased materials which are polymers derived from renewable resources by chemical or combined chemical and mechanical methods, or produced directly in biological processes. Combinations of renewable and conventional fossil-fuel-derived plastics are also biobased materials. This assessment reviews materials from renewable resources and their properties, including major biopolymers produced by plants and selected animal sources.

  3. Stiff quantum polymers

    E-print Network

    H. Kleinert

    2009-10-19

    At ultralow temperatures, polymers exhibit quantum behavior, which is calculated here for the second and fourth moments of the end-to-end distribution in the large-stiffness regime. The result should be measurable for polymers in wide optical traps.

  4. Melons are branched polymers

    E-print Network

    Gurau, Razvan

    2013-01-01

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  5. Melons are branched polymers

    E-print Network

    Razvan Gurau; James P. Ryan

    2013-02-18

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  6. Melons are Branched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan; Ryan, James P.

    2014-11-01

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  7. Polymers that Conduct Electricity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Edward

    1983-01-01

    Although polymers are regarded as electrical insulators, it was discovered that they can be made to conduct electricity. This discovery has opened vast new practical and theoretical areas for exploration by physicists and chemists. Research studies with these conducting polymers and charge-transfer salts as well as possible applications are…

  8. Polymers Are Everywhere.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Raymond B.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the history of the human understanding of polymers from alchemy to modern times. Discusses renaissance chemistry, polymers in the nineteenth century, synthetic elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers, fibers, coatings, adhesives, derivatives of natural rubber, thermosets, step-reaction, and chain polymerization. (CW)

  9. Polymer based tunneling sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Tianhong (Inventor); Wang, Jing (Inventor); Zhao, Yongjun (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a polymer based circuit by the following steps. A mold of a design is formed through a lithography process. The design is transferred to a polymer substrate through a hot embossing process. A metal layer is then deposited over at least part of said design and at least one electrical lead is connected to said metal layer.

  10. METAL COMPLEXING SILOXANE POLYMERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel silicone polymers containing pendant phosphonate groups have been synthesized. A new silicone monomer, (CH3O)2CH3Si(CH2)3P=O(OCH2CH3)2 has been copolymerized with dimethyldimethoxysilane to form polymers capable of binding metal salts. The viscous liquids can complex a variety of metals, inc...

  11. Thermomechanical Characterization and Modeling of Shape Memory Polymers 

    E-print Network

    Volk, Brent L.

    2010-01-16

    deformations and temperature rates. Specifically, SMPs are deformed to tensile extensions of 10% to 100% at temperature rates varying from 1 degree C /min to 5 degree C/min, and the complete shape recovery profile is captured. The results from this experimental...

  12. Modeling semiflexible polymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broedersz, C. P.; MacKintosh, F. C.

    2014-07-01

    This is an overview of theoretical approaches to semiflexible polymers and their networks. Such semiflexible polymers have large bending rigidities that can compete with the entropic tendency of a chain to crumple up into a random coil. Many studies on semiflexible polymers and their assemblies have been motivated by their importance in biology. Indeed, cross-linked networks of semiflexible polymers form a major structural component of tissue and living cells. Reconstituted networks of such biopolymers have emerged as a new class of biological soft matter systems with remarkable material properties, which have spurred many of the theoretical developments discussed here. Starting from the mechanics and dynamics of individual semiflexible polymers, the physics of semiflexible bundles, entangled solutions, and disordered cross-linked networks are reviewed. Finally, recent developments on marginally stable fibrous networks, which exhibit critical behavior similar to other marginal systems such as jammed soft matter, are discussed.

  13. Rapid Polymer Sequencer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor (Inventor); Brock, Mathew W. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Method and system for rapid and accurate determination of each of a sequence of unknown polymer components, such as nucleic acid components. A self-assembling monolayer of a selected substance is optionally provided on an interior surface of a pipette tip, and the interior surface is immersed in a selected liquid. A selected electrical field is impressed in a longitudinal or transverse direction at the tip, a polymer sequence is passed through the tip, and a change in an electrical current signal is measured as each polymer component passes through the tip. Each measured change in electrical current signals is compared with a database of reference signals, with each reference signal identified with a polymer component, to identify the unknown polymer component. The tip preferably has a pore inner diameter of no more than about 40 nm and is prepared by heating and pulling a very small section of a glass tubing.

  14. Theory of polymer blends

    SciTech Connect

    Curro, J. G.; Schweizer, K. S.

    1989-01-01

    We have recently developed a new theoretical approach to the study of polymer liquids. The theory is based on the reference interaction site model'' (RISM theory) of Chandler and Andersen, which has been successful in describing the structure of small molecule liquids. We have recently extended our polymer RISM theory to the case of polymer blends. In the present investigation we have applied this theory to two special binary blends: (1) the athermal mixture where we isolate structural effects, and (2) the isotopic mixture in which structurally identical polymer chains interact with dissimilar attractive interactions. By studying these two special cases we are able to obtain insights into the molecular factors which control the miscibility in polymer mixtures. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Porous polymer media

    DOEpatents

    Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Highly crosslinked monolithic porous polymer materials for chromatographic applications. By using solvent compositions that provide not only for polymerization of acrylate monomers in such a fashion that a porous polymer network is formed prior to phase separation but also for exchanging the polymerization solvent for a running buffer using electroosmotic flow, the need for high pressure purging is eliminated. The polymer materials have been shown to be an effective capillary electrochromatographic separations medium at lower field strengths than conventional polymer media. Further, because of their highly crosslinked nature these polymer materials are structurally stable in a wide range of organic and aqueous solvents and over a pH range of 2-12.

  16. Memory, language, and ageing.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, D M; Mackay, D G

    1997-01-01

    This overview provides both theoretical and empirical reasons for emphasizing practice and familiar skills as a practical strategy for enhancing cognitive functioning in old age. Our review of empirical research on age-related changes in memory and language reveals a consistent pattern of spared and impaired abilities in normal old age. Relatively preserved in old age is memory performance involving highly practised skills and familiar information, including factual, semantic and autobiographical information. Relatively impaired in old age is memory performance that requires the formation of new connections, for example, recall of recent autobiographical experiences, new facts or the source of newly acquired facts. This pattern of impaired new learning versus preserved old learning cuts across distinctions between semantic memory, episodic memory, explicit memory and perhaps also implicit memory. However, familiar verbal information is not completely preserved when accessed on the output side rather than the input side: aspects of language production, namely word finding and spelling, exhibit significant age-related declines. This emerging pattern of preserved and impaired abilities presents a fundamental challenge for theories of cognitive ageing, which must explain why some aspects of language and memory are more vulnerable to the effects of ageing than others. Information-universal theories, involving mechanisms such as general slowing that are independent of the type or structure of the information being processed, require additional mechanisms to account for this pattern of cognitive aging. Information-specific theories, where the type or structure of the postulated memory units can influence the effects of cognitive ageing, are able to account for this emerging pattern, but in some cases require further development to account for comprehensive cognitive changes such as general slowing. PMID:9460069

  17. SafeMem: Exploiting ECC-Memory for Detecting Memory Leaks and Memory Corruption During Production Runs

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Yuanyuan

    is effective in pruning false positives for memory leak detection, and in reducing the amount of memory wasteSafeMem: Exploiting ECC-Memory for Detecting Memory Leaks and Memory Corruption During Production at Urbana Champaign fengqin, shanlu, yyzhou¡ @cs.uiuc.edu Abstract Memory leaks and memory corruption

  18. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  19. Towards Polymer-Based Capsules with Drastically Reduced Controlled Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, Daria V.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.

    Small molecules (dyes, therapeutics, etc.) could be easily handled, stored, delivered, and released by polyelectrolyte capsules. To make the polyelectrolyte capsule more efficient for small molecule encapsulation, capsule permeability should be significantly decreased. Here, we demonstrate the possibility to entrap water-soluble molecular species into polyelectrolyte capsules modified by a low permeable dense polymer (polypyrrole). Possible future areas in PE capsule application as carriers for gases and volatiles in the pharmaceutical, food, and gases industry, agriculture and cosmetology are discussed.

  20. Memory clinics in context

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, David; Moniz-Cook, Esme

    2009-01-01

    The growing number of older people in all parts of the world raises the question of how best to respond to their health needs, including those associated with memory impairment. Specialist Memory Clinics have a role to play, complementing community services which reach out to older people with mental health problems and encompassing younger people who become forgetful. Dementia is the most common syndrome seen, but there are other important treatable conditions which present with subjective or objective dysmnesia. Memory Clinics provide a high quality, devoted focus for early intervention, treatment, support and research. PMID:21416022