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Sample records for meningitis listeria

  1. [A case of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent infant].

    PubMed

    Pattarino, G; Arrigoni, S; Grazioli, R; De Palma, A; di Natale, B

    2006-08-01

    Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis is a rare affection after the neonatal period, but in immunocompromised patients. Listeria Monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular bacterium frequently causing infection in pregnant women, in patients with cell-mediated immunity deficit and in the early and late stages of life. We present a case of Listeria Monocytogenes meningitis in an immunocompetent nomad 8-month-child, preceded by gastroenteritis. Although gastrointestinal symptoms may be due to intestinal infection by Listeria, the concomitant presence of other bacteric or viral enteric pathogens may have promoted bacterium intestinal translocation and generated disseminated disease. The main transmission route of infection after the neonatal period is ingestion of contaminated food. A diet history was taken after isolation of the bacterium in liquor and showed that the child was an eater of undercooked hot-dogs. Despite the frequency of clinical complication in such affection, the outcome in this patient was a complete recovery. Although the infection is extremely infrequent in healthy children, physicians should always consider Listeria as a possible etiologic agent of meningitis in pediatric patients, regardless of their age or immunological status, especially in patients living in precarious sanitary conditions, where weaning times and conditions are not respected and a suitable food cooking is not assured. PMID:17008849

  2. Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis in an Immunosuppressed Patient with Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4 Subclass Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gaini, Shahin

    2015-01-01

    A 51-year-old Caucasian woman with Listeria monocytogenes meningitis was treated and discharged after an uncomplicated course. Her medical history included immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone and azathioprine for autoimmune hepatitis. A diagnostic work-up after the meningitis episode revealed that she had low levels of the IgG4 subclass. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a possible association between autoimmune hepatitis and the occurrence of Listeria monocytogenes meningitis, describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and deficiency of the IgG4 subclass and finally describing a possible association between Listeria monocytogenes meningitis and immunosuppressive therapy with prednisolone and azathioprine. PMID:26558118

  3. Listeria Meningitis Complicating Alemtuzumab Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis—Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Daniela; Lang, Michael; Harth, Andreas; Naumann, Markus; Weber, Frank; Tumani, Hayrettin; Bayas, Antonios

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting the surface molecule CD52, leads to a rapid depletion of immune cells in the innate and adaptive immune system. In phase 2 and 3 trials in multiple sclerosis (MS), infections have been reported more frequently in alemtuzumab than in interferon beta treated patients. Here we report two patients treated with alemtuzumab for MS developing Listeria meningitis few days after the first infusion cycle. Both patients recovered completely after prompt diagnosis and adequate treatment. Physicians and patients should be aware of this serious, but treatable complication. PMID:26132570

  4. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... system, infecting the meninges and causing meningitis. continue Bacteria and Viruses Many viruses can cause viral meningitis. ... examined under a microscope to see if any bacteria, cells, or substances that indicate inflammation or infection ...

  5. [A Case of Hydrocephalus in Listeria Meningitis Treated by Endoscopic Third Ventriculostomy].

    PubMed

    Abe, Takatsugu; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-09-01

    A 69-year-old woman presented with anorexia, fever, and vomiting. The patient was not a compromised host. She was finally diagnosed with Listeria meningitis and treated with ampicillin and gentamicin. However, her condition worsened over time. Non-contrast head CT showed ventricular dilatation. As a result, continuous right ventricular drainage was performed. Non-contrast MRI revealed hydrocephalus due to stenosis of the fourth ventricle. She underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy(ETV)to improve cerebrospinal fluid circulation. This procedure achieved a good result. The efficacy of ETV for post-infectious hydrocephalus has not been proven, but previous cases suggest that ETV would be effective in non-communicating hydrocephalus, even if it were a result of neuroinfection. PMID:27605478

  6. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by: Chemical irritation Drug allergies Fungi Parasites Tumors Many types of viruses can cause meningitis: Enteroviruses: These are viruses that also can cause intestinal illness. Herpes viruses: These are the same viruses ...

  7. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications. Viral meningitis is caused by viruses like enteroviruses , which are very common in summer and early ... or when they sneeze without covering their mouths. Enteroviruses begin to multiply in the digestive tract and ...

  8. Culture Negative Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Resulting in Hydrocephalus and Severe Neurological Sequelae in a Previously Healthy Immunocompetent Man with Penicillin Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Gaini, Shahin; Karlsen, Gunn Hege; Nandy, Anirban; Madsen, Heidi; Christiansen, Debes Hammershaimb; á Borg, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Caucasian man with penicillin allergy was admitted with evolving headache, confusion, fever, and neck stiffness. Treatment for bacterial meningitis with dexamethasone and monotherapy ceftriaxone was started. The cerebrospinal fluid showed negative microscopy for bacteria, no bacterial growth, and negative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial DNA. The patient developed hydrocephalus on a second CT scan of the brain on the 5th day of admission. An external ventricular catheter was inserted and Listeria monocytogenes grew in the cerebrospinal fluid from the catheter. The patient had severe neurological sequelae. This case report emphasises the importance of covering empirically for Listeria monocytogenes in all patients with penicillin allergy with suspected bacterial meningitis. The case also shows that it is possible to have significant infection and inflammation even with negative microscopy, negative cultures, and negative broad range polymerase chain reaction in cases of Listeria meningitis. Follow-up spinal taps can be necessary to detect the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:26697245

  9. Culture Negative Listeria monocytogenes Meningitis Resulting in Hydrocephalus and Severe Neurological Sequelae in a Previously Healthy Immunocompetent Man with Penicillin Allergy.

    PubMed

    Gaini, Shahin; Karlsen, Gunn Hege; Nandy, Anirban; Madsen, Heidi; Christiansen, Debes Hammershaimb; Á Borg, Sanna

    2015-01-01

    A previously healthy 74-year-old Caucasian man with penicillin allergy was admitted with evolving headache, confusion, fever, and neck stiffness. Treatment for bacterial meningitis with dexamethasone and monotherapy ceftriaxone was started. The cerebrospinal fluid showed negative microscopy for bacteria, no bacterial growth, and negative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial DNA. The patient developed hydrocephalus on a second CT scan of the brain on the 5th day of admission. An external ventricular catheter was inserted and Listeria monocytogenes grew in the cerebrospinal fluid from the catheter. The patient had severe neurological sequelae. This case report emphasises the importance of covering empirically for Listeria monocytogenes in all patients with penicillin allergy with suspected bacterial meningitis. The case also shows that it is possible to have significant infection and inflammation even with negative microscopy, negative cultures, and negative broad range polymerase chain reaction in cases of Listeria meningitis. Follow-up spinal taps can be necessary to detect the presence of Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:26697245

  10. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and older People at high risk for pneumococcus infection Alternative Names Pneumococcal meningitis Images Pneumococci organism Pneumococcal pneumonia References Swartz MN. Meningitis: bacterial, ...

  11. Bacterial Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... group B Streptococcus , Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae , and Listeria monocytogenes . In the United States, about 4,100 ... Newborns Group B Streptococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes Infants and Children Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, ...

  12. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially from late spring to fall when these viruses spread most often. However, only a small number ... infected with enteroviruses will actually develop meningitis. Other viruses that can cause meningitis are Mumps virus Herpesviruses, ...

  13. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  14. Cryptococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Reviewed May 19, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 503 Cryptococcal Meningitis WHAT IS CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS? HOW ... as part of the immune reconstitution syndrome (see fact sheet 483 .) A study in 2011 showed that starting ...

  15. Meningitis - staphylococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Staphylococcal meningitis is caused by Staphylococcus bacteria. When it is caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria, it usually develops as a complication of surgery or ...

  16. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-induced aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wambulwa, Charles; Bwayo, Salome; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Lombardo, Fredric

    2005-01-01

    We present a 46-year-old African-American man with AIDS who was admitted on two different occasions within three weeks for signs and symptoms of meningitis after using trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). TMP/SMX is primarily used for the treatment of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis in AIDS patients. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is commonly seen with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), antibiotics (with TMP/SMX being the most frequently implicated), intravenous immunoglobulins and OKT3 antibodies. However, the implication of TMP/SMX inducing aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MEDWATCH program. This might be due to the fact that it has also been used to treat bacterial meningitis from organisms like Listeria monocytogenes, which is a common pathogen in the elderly and in infants. We reviewed the literature in an attempt to characterize the pattern and predictors of TMP/SMX-induced aseptic meningitis. PMID:16396068

  17. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... History of meningitis Infection of a heart valve Injury or trauma to the head Meningitis in which there is leakage of spinal fluid Recent ear infection Recent pneumonia Recent upper respiratory infection Spleen removal or a spleen that does not function

  18. Rheumatoid meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nihat, Akin; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Bridges, Leslie; Johns, Paul; Sofat, Nidhi; Moynihan, Barry

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid meningitis is a rare, potentially treatable condition that can mimic a wide range of neurological conditions, including vascular syndromes and encephalopathies. Despite a concurrent history of rheumatoid arthritis, patients often have no active synovitis. Here we describe a patient with rheumatoid meningitis who presented to a hyperacute stroke unit with dysarthria on waking and transient facial droop. PMID:27029468

  19. Meningitis - meningococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... spring. It may cause local epidemics at boarding schools, college dormitories, or military bases. Risk factors include ... and close contacts (especially in health care or school settings) of people with this type of meningitis ...

  20. Treating Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways to treat bacterial meningitis. 1 They compared steroids (dexamethasone) with pla- cebo. The doctors gave medication ( ... compared anti- biotics by themselves with antibiotics plus steroids. Dr. Fritz and colleagues compared the mortality (deaths) ...

  1. Meningococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. The extended meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa, stretching from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia ... ampicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone. Under epidemic conditions in Africa in areas with limited health infrastructure and resources, ...

  2. Meningitis - meningococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most commonly used antibiotics for meningococcal meningitis. Penicillin in high doses is almost always effective, too. If the patient is allergic to penicillin, chloramphenicol may be used. Sometimes corticosteroids may be ...

  3. Meningitis - cryptococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Antifungal medicines are used to treat this form of meningitis. Intravenous (IV, through a vein) therapy with ... treatment. It is often combined with an oral antifungal medicine called 5-flucytosine. Another oral medication, fluconazole, ...

  4. Listeria (Listeriosis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Outcomes Listeria Outbreaks Surveillance Statistics Educational Resources Vital Signs: When Food Bites Back Many germs can be ... food. Some, like Listeria , can be deadly. This Vital Signs Fact Sheet provides key information on what can ...

  5. Neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heath, P T; Nik Yusoff, N K; Baker, C J

    2003-05-01

    Twelve years ago an annotation was published in Archives of Disease in Childhood regarding the antibiotic treatment of suspected neonatal meningitis. The authors recommended the use of cephalosporins rather than chloramphenicol and advocated intraventricular aminoglycoside treatment in selected cases. They noted the absence of clinical trials with third generation cephalosporins that showed an improvement in mortality or neurological outcome. PMID:12719388

  6. Listeria phages

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Jochen; Loessner, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    Listeria is an important foodborne pathogen and the causative agent of Listeriosis, a potentially fatal infection. Several hundred Listeria bacteriophages have been described over the past decades, but only few have actually been characterized in some detail, and genome sequences are available for less than twenty of them. We here present an overview of what is currently known about Listeria phage genomics, their role in host evolution and pathogenicity, and their various applications in biotechnology and diagnostics. PMID:24251077

  7. Meningitis - gram-negative

    MedlinePlus

    Gram-negative meningitis ... Acute bacterial meningitis can be caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Meningococcal and H. influenzae meningitis are caused by Gram-negative bacteria and are covered in detail in other articles. This article ...

  8. Listeria Infections (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Listeria Infections KidsHealth > For Parents > Listeria Infections Print A ... to Call the Doctor en español Listeriosis About Listeria Listeria infections (known as listeriosis ) are rare. When ...

  9. Camembert, Listeria and the immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Ries, F; Dicato, M; Hemmer, R; Arendt, F

    1990-01-01

    Listeriosis is a rare but well known infectious complication in pregnant women and immunocompromised patients. Epidemiological studies have shown an association between listeriosis and alimentary contamination by listeria of a variety of foodstuff including soft, ripened cheeses. We describe two case-reports of listeria meningitis with high evidence of food-related illness due to the consumption of contaminated camembert. These observations urged our State Department of Health to formulate a communication about alimentary listeriosis at the intent of all health care professionals, including recommendations for patients at risk. PMID:2292130

  10. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult. PMID:26954796

  11. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... No. 04-4840 Back to Meningitis and Encephalitis Information Page See a list of all NINDS Disorders Publicaciones en Español Meningitis y Encefalitis Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  12. Meningitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. Most cases are caused by bacteria or viruses, but some can be due to certain medications or illnesses. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but is usually serious and can be life threatening if not treated right away. Viral meningitis ( ...

  13. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Infographic Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  14. Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) in food is a critical public health concern given that it can grow and/or survive during storage at refrigeration and/or mildly abusive storage temperatures, thus contributing to the burden of food borne listeriosis associated with the consumption of conta...

  15. Listeria Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabanes, Didier; Sousa, Sandra; Cossart, Pascale

    The opportunistic intracellular foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has become a paradigm for the study of host-pathogen interactions and bacterial adaptation to mammalian hosts. Analysis of L. monocytogenes infection has provided considerable insight into how bacteria invade cells, move intracellularly, and disseminate in tissues, as well as tools to address fundamental processes in cell biology. Moreover, the vast amount of knowledge that has been gathered through in-depth comparative genomic analyses and in vivo studies makes L. monocytogenes one of the most well-studied bacterial pathogens. This chapter provides an overview of progress in the exploration of genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data in Listeria spp. to understand genome evolution and diversity, as well as physiological aspects of metabolism used by bacteria when growing in diverse environments, in particular in infected hosts.

  16. Listeria meningoencephalitis in an immunocompetent person.

    PubMed

    Drnda, Alija; Koluder, Nada; Hadzic, Amir; Bajramovic, Nermina; Baljic, Rusmir; Mulabdic, Velida

    2009-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a small, aerobic or facultative anaerobic, non-sporulating gram positive bacillus that can be isolated from soil, vegetation or animal reservoirs. There are six species of Listeria, and only L. monocytogenes is pathogenic for humans. Human disease occurs mainly in immunocompromised people, neonates and in pregnancy, while the cases in immunocompetent people are rare. CNS manifestations of the disease can be in form of meningitis, encephalitis, and also cerebritis and abscess since L. monocytogenes shows tropism for brain and brain stem as well for the meninges. In this case we presented 55 year old male patient with etiologically confirmed listerial meningoencephalitis, transferred from regional hospital tothe Clinic for Infectious Diseases with diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis. Disease started 4 days before the admission. Prior to this the patient was completely healthy. In his history he denied any preexisting disease. At admittance he was febrile, with altered consciousness, disoriented, showing ocular deviation, dystaxia, and with completely positive meningeal signs. Neurologist diagnosis was rhombencephalitis. CSF analysis showed mildly opalescent liquor with pleocytosis 546/mm3 and polymorphonuclear cell predominance >70%. CSF culture showed positive isolate of L. monocytogenes. Initial therapy was: Penicillin G and Chloramphenicol, together with all other supportive and symptomatic therapy. After initial therapy and based on antibiogram, ampicillin was administered for4 weeks, followed by imipenemum for 10 days. Control CSF analysis showed pleocytosis and increased protein level and the patient was discharged as recovered with diagnosis of acute meningoencephalitis PMID:19537672

  17. Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zach Z; Sherrid, Ashley M; Wallecha, Anu; Kollmann, Tobias R

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination as a medical intervention has proven capable of greatly reducing the suffering from childhood infectious disease. However, newborns and infants in particular are age groups for whom adequate vaccine-mediated protection is still largely lacking. With the challenges that the neonatal immune system faces and the required highest level of stringency for safety, designing vaccines for early life in general and the newborn in particular poses great difficulty. Nevertheless, recent advances in our understanding of neonatal immunity and its responses to vaccines and adjuvants suggest that neonatal vaccination is a task fully within reach. Among the most promising developments in neonatal vaccination is the use of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) as a delivery platform. In this review, we will outline key properties of Lm that make it such an ideal neonatal and early life vaccine vehicle, and also discuss potential constraints of Lm as a vaccine delivery platform. PMID:24513715

  18. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilitic aseptic meningitis is a complication of untreated syphilis. It involves inflammation of the tissues covering the ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacteria Treponema pallidum . Syphilis has three main ...

  19. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    MedlinePlus

    ... and close contacts (especially in health care or school settings) of people with this type of meningitis ... first visit. Close contacts in the same household, school, or day care center should be watched for ...

  20. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Non-Infectious Meningitis ... confusion) Top of Page Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis File Formats Help: ...

  1. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Meningitis and Encephalitis ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  2. DISCUSSION ON MENINGITIS

    PubMed Central

    1929-01-01

    (1) Meningitis: two groups of cases. (2) A method of washing out the subarachnoid space in cases of septic meningitis secondary to infection of the ear. (3) Discussion on the value of maintaining a positive pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid when operating on a septic region communicating with the subarachnoid space. (4) Leaking cerebrospinal fluid from the region of the ear: operative treatment. PMID:19986899

  3. Approach to Chronic Lymphocytic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Nadkarni, Nilesh

    2015-09-01

    Chronic meningitis is a common clinical problem. Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy is important in improving the overall outcome and to prevent long-lasting sequels. As many etiological agents lead to the development of chronic lymphocytic meningitis, it is important to develop a systematic approach to the diagnosis; taking clues from history, examination and laboratory tests, to make an accurate diagnosis and institute appropriate therapy. This review focuses on the diagnostic approach towards the commonly encountered situation of chronic lymphocytic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is defined as meningeal inflammation that persists for more than 4 weeks. Chronic meningitis accounts for less than 10% of all the cases of meningitis.1 Causes of chronic lymphocytic meningitis are mainly divided into infectious and non-infectious listed in Table 1.2 Due to advancement in investigations, diseases causing chronic meningitis may be diagnosed earlier than 4 weeks and hence the definition should be considered as a rough guideline. PMID:27608867

  4. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  5. Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis in Alcoholic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients). Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4%) and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001). A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% P<0.001). Alcoholics were more likely to have meningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01) and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005), whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01). A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04), often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01). Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients. PMID:20161709

  6. [Angiostrongylosis or eosinophilic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Bourée, Patrice; Dumazedier, Déborah; Dahane, Naïma

    2010-04-20

    Eosinophilic meningitis, or angiostrongyliasis, is a common disease in Asia, in the Caribbean and in the Pacific islands. It is caused by a rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Infection occurs by consumption of raw or undercooked snails. Diagnosis is based on epidemiological criteria, clinical manifestations, elevated count of eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid and serological tests. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. PMID:20465114

  7. Carcinomatosis of the Meninges

    PubMed Central

    Dinsdale, Henry B.; Taghavy, Ahmad

    1964-01-01

    Some clinical and pathological features of carcinomatosis of the meninges are reviewed along with a report of four cases. This condition usually presents in middle age as a subacute meningitis with cranial nerve involvement, but the diagnostic importance of the various mental disturbances which may be encountered early in its course are noted. The acute or subacute course may reflect a widespread mechanical interference with normal cerebral metabolism, a notion which is supported by recent clinical measurements in these patients of the rate of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. It is probable that the route taken by tumour cells to reach the meningeal spaces is a relatively unimportant factor in determining this pattern of growth and that the intrinsic growth characteristics of the primary tumour, its nutritional needs, and gravity probably play the major roles in production of this unusual type of secondary invasion. Greater therapeutic use of irradiation for these patients is encouraged. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:14118690

  8. Meningococcal meningitis outbreak control strategies.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Kumar, R; Roy, P; Varma, S; Sharma, B K

    2000-12-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has been occurring worldwide in both endemic and epidemic forms. Serogroup A accounts for majority of cases of epidemic as well as endemic Meningococcal meningitis in developing nations, whereas group C and group B causes epidemic and endemic meningococcal meningitis in developed countries. Person to person spread of N. meningitides generally occurs through inhalation of droplets of infected nasopharyngeal secretions by direct or indirect oral contact. Incubation period varies from 2 to 10 days. N. meningitides typically causes acute infective illness characterized by sequential development of upper respiratory tract infection, meningococcemia, meningitis and focal neurological deficit. Over 90 per cent cases of adult meningococcal infections have cerebrospinal meningitis, whereas in children prevalence of meningitis is much lower (50 per cent). Acute meningitis manifests with fever, severe headache, vomiting and neck stiffness. Presentations may be non-specific in infants, elderly and in patients with fulminant meningococcemia. Diagnosis is confirmed with cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Overall mortality due to meningitis is usually around 10 per cent. In meningococcal septicemia, the case fatality rate may exceed 50 per cent. Preventive strategies include vaccination, chemoprophylaxis and early detection and treatment. Mass vaccination campaign, if appropriately carried out, has been documented to halt an epidemic of meningococcal disease due to serogroup A or C. In the present review we have discussed the available evidence with regards to prevention at primary, secondary and tertiary level. Public health approach to an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis in a community or an organization is also outlined. PMID:11668937

  9. Recognising early meningitis: a missed opportunity to diagnose meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ponnampalam, Anusha; de Sousa, Paula; Carroll, Will

    2016-01-01

    There are ∼250 cases of neonatal bacterial meningitis each year in the UK. Clinical evaluation of signs and symptoms of meningitis is challenging, particularly, during the neonatal period. Although uncommon, it is recognised that bacterial meningitis can be present in a child with an apparently normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) initially.We report the case of a newborn baby girl who was admitted with concerns regarding 2 dusky episodes. She underwent blood tests, a lumbar puncture and was started on intravenous antibiotics. With negative cultures, normal blood results and following a significant clinical improvement, antibiotics were discontinued after 48 hours and the baby was discharged home. She re-presented to the children's emergency department 7 hours later with a history of an apnoeic episode. A second CSF sample was suggestive of bacterial meningitis. We will discuss the published literature and the potential drawbacks of lumbar punctures and ways to diagnose meningitis early. PMID:27516108

  10. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world. PMID:17521780

  11. [Listeria and listeriosis: from farm to fork].

    PubMed

    Le Monnier, A; Leclercq, A

    2009-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a bacterium widely spread in the environment. Its persistence in industrial environment leads to food product contamination from the raw materials and constitutes a recurrent problem in food processing industry despite the use of cold chain procedures. L. monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen causing severe and life-threatening infections that evolve mainly under sporadic mode, even if epidemics sometimes occur. Listeriosis causes mainly septicemia, central nervous system infections (meningitis and meningoencephalitis) and abortions. Listeriosis occurs primarily at risk groups of population like elderly people, pregnant women, neonates and patients with underlying diseases or impaired cellular immunity. In France, the epidemiological surveillance of listeriosis is based on two complementary approaches: the mandatory notification and the microbiological characterization by the National Reference Centre for Listeria of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from patients. The joined efforts of government and food producers have led to decrease significantly the incidence of listeriosis in France since 20 years and the number of epidemics. However, the recent observation of increasing number of listeriosis cases in most of the industrialised countries calls up to the attentiveness to reconsider the current rules and to reinforce the epidemiological surveillance of listeriosis in a context where susceptible people including the elderly are in increasing number. PMID:18829183

  12. Listeria (Listeriosis) Treatment and Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Listeria (Listeriosis) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Listeria (Listeriosis) Definition & Symptoms Outbreaks Listeriosis Linked to Frozen ...

  13. Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults. We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature. Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae. C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26937916

  14. Concurrent meningitis and vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Tuhin; Datta, Sumana; Agrawal, Neha; Bar, Mita; Kar, Arnab; Adhikary, Apu; Ranjan, Kunal

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic infectious disease in India. It is often associated with other infective conditions but concomitant infection of malaria and meningitis are uncommon. We present a case of meningitis with vivax malaria infection in a 24-year-old lady. This case emphasizes the importance of high index of clinical suspicion to detect other infective conditions like meningitis when fever does not improve even after anti-malarial treatment in a patient of malaria before switching therapy suspecting drug resistance, which is quite common in this part of world. PMID:26985423

  15. Rheumatoid meningitis associated with infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Stroberg, Edana; Metting, Austin

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient who had rheumatoid meningitis while on infliximab, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor, which initially presented as transient ischemic attacks. Although our patient had been stable on infliximab for several years, her neurologic symptoms improved when her infliximab was held due to active infection and then recurred after reinitiation of therapy. Rheumatoid meningitis is exceedingly rare; however, there have been several other reports of rheumatoid meningitis developing in patients on TNF-α inhibitor therapy. PMID:27034572

  16. Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pien, F D; Pien, B C

    1999-01-01

    In the past 50 years, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, has spread from Southeast Asia to the South Pacific, Africa, India, the Caribbean, and recently, to Australia and North America, mainly carried by cargo ship rats. Humans are accidental, "dead-end" hosts infected by eating larvae from snails, slugs, or contaminated, uncooked vegetables. These larvae migrate to the brain, spinal cord, and nerve roots, causing eosinophilia in both spinal fluid and peripheral blood. Infected patients present with severe headache, vomiting, paresthesias, weakness, and occasionally visual disturbances and extraocular muscular paralysis. Most patients have a full recovery; however, heavy infections can lead to chronic, disabling disease and even death. There is no proven treatment for this disease. In the authors' experience, corticosteroids have been helpful in severe cases to relieve intracranial pressure as well as neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory responses to migrating and eventually dying worms. PMID:10460929

  17. Considering syphilis in aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Sarup; Chadwick, David; Chawla, Girish

    2009-12-01

    Clinicians need to consider syphilis in the differential diagnosis of macular or papular rashes with neurological conditions, particularly aseptic meningitis, as early diagnosis and treatment lead to a better prognosis. PMID:20095316

  18. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts.

    PubMed

    Tarlov, I M

    1970-12-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. PMID:5531903

  19. Handbook of Listeria monocytogenes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Once feared as a deadly intracellular bacterium with the extraordinary capacity to survive a wide array of arduous external stressors, Listeria monocytogenes is increasingly recognized as a preferred vector for delivering anti-infective and anti-cancer vaccine molecules. A reliable, single-source re...

  20. [Normal and abnormal meningeal enhancement: MRI features].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J L; Correia Bernardo, R; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Koob, M; Nogueira, Th; Vargas, M I; Fakhoury, W; Zöllner, G

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe normal imaging of the meninges and meningeal spaces and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging findings in tumoral and nontumoral diseases. Dural or/and pial enhancement may be related to tumoral, infectious or granulomatous diseases. PMID:16269979

  1. An unusual case of meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Eric DR; El-Bailey, Sameh; Webster, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. A 56-year-old man with several pets developed a profoundly decreased level of consciousness following left tympanomastoidectomy. Lumbar puncture produced cerebrospinal fluid with the typical findings of meningitis (low glucose, high protein, high leukocytes). Cultures from the cerebrospinal fluid and a swab of the left ear revealed Gram-negative coccobacillus identified as P multocida. The organism was sensitive to ceftriaxone, ampicillin and penicillin, and a 14-day course of intravenous penicillin was used as definitive treatment, resulting in full recovery. Although rare, P multocida should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis in patients with animal exposure, particularly in the setting of recent cranial surgery. PMID:26236360

  2. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining that ...

  3. Changing etiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a nationwide multicenter study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, S-Y; Chung, D R; Kim, S-W; Chang, H H; Lee, H; Jung, D S; Kim, Y-S; Jung, S I; Ryu, S Y; Heo, S T; Moon, C; Ki, H K; Son, J S; Kwon, K T; Shin, S Y; Lee, J S; Lee, S S; Rhee, J-Y; Lee, J-A; Joung, M K; Cheong, H S; Peck, K R; Song, J-H

    2010-07-01

    Epidemiologic data on the etiologic organisms is important for appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment of bacterial meningitis. We identified the etiologies of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in Korean adults and the associated epidemiological factors. A retrospective, multicenter nationwide study was carried out. Patients 18 years of age or older with community-acquired bacterial meningitis with a confirmed pathogen were enrolled. Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were collected. One hundred and ninety-five cases were collected. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen (50.8%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (10.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.7%), Listeria monocytogenes (6.7%), and group B Streptococcus (3.1%). The penicillin resistance rate of the S. pneumoniae was 60.3%; 40.0% of the organisms were not susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins. The combination of third-generation cephalosporin with vancomycin was used in 76.3% of cases. Steroids were given before or with the first dose of antibiotics in 37.4% of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 20.5% and neurological sequelae developed in 15.6% of cases. S. pneumoniae was the most common organism identified in community-acquired bacterial meningitis among Korean adults. S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, L. monocytogenes, and group B Streptococcus were also common. S. pneumoniae had high rates of resistance to penicillin and third-generation cephalosporins. PMID:20432052

  4. Meningitis, clinical presentation of tetanus.

    PubMed

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease. PMID:25789186

  5. Neuroimaging features of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sobri, M; Merican, J S; Nordiyana, M; Valarmathi, S; Ai-Edrus, S A

    2006-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis leads to a high mortality rate. However, it responds well to chemotherapy if the treatment is started early. Neuroimaging is one of the most important initial investigations. There were 42 patients diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis in Kuala Lumpur Hospital based on clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and response to anti-tuberculous treatment over a 7 year period. Relevant information was obtained from patients' medical case notes and neuroimaging findings were evaluated. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The three major ethnics and the immigrant groups in Malaysia were represented in this study. The majority of the cases involved the Malays followed by immigrants, Chinese and Indians. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 62 years old with the mean age of 34.4 years. There were 95.2% (n = 40) of patients who presented with various neuroimaging abnormalities and only 2 (4.8%) patients had normal neuroimaging findings. Hydrocephalus and meningeal enhancement were the two commonest neuroimaging features. Other features include infarction, enhancing lesion, tuberculoma, abcess, oedema and calcification. Contrasted CT scan is an adequate neuroimaging tool to unmask abnormal findings in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:16708732

  6. Listeria monocytogenes, a food-borne pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Farber, J M; Peterkin, P I

    1991-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is an ubiquitous, intracellular pathogen which has been implicated within the past decade as the causative organism in several outbreaks of foodborne disease. Listeriosis, with a mortality rate of about 24%, is found mainly among pregnant women, their fetuses, and immunocompromised persons, with symptoms of abortion, neonatal death, septicemia, and meningitis. Epidemiological investigations can make use of strain-typing procedures such as DNA restriction enzyme analysis or electrophoretic enzyme typing. The organism has a multifactorial virulence system, with the thiol-activated hemolysin, listeriolysin O, being identified as playing a crucial role in the organism's ability to multiply within host phagocytic cells and to spread from cell to cell. The organism occurs widely in food, with the highest incidences being found in meat, poultry, and seafood products. Improved methods for detecting and enumerating the organism in foodstuffs are now available, including those based on the use of monoclonal antibodies, DNA probes, or the polymerase chain reaction. As knowledge of the molecular and applied biology of L. monocytogenes increases, progress can be made in the prevention and control of human infection. PMID:1943998

  7. Outbreak of Listeria Monocytogenes in Pheasants.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yufang; Liang, Xiongyan; Huang, Zhuan; Yang, Yuying

    2015-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is capable of infecting almost all animals. However, outbreaks of listeriosis are infrequent in birds. This report describes an outbreak of listeriosis in a small pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) breeder farm with more than 2,000 pheasants from Hubei province of the People's Republic of China. The affected flock consisted of adult and young birds. Approximately 300 young birds and a few adult birds were found dead within a few days of the onset of clinical signs. Twenty-five dead birds were collected for further examination. Histopathological lesions in the visceral organs were characterized by monocyte infiltration and proliferation. Localized encephalitis and meningitis were detected in the brains of dead birds. Gram-positive organisms were observed in heart blood smear, liver, and brain impression smears. The organisms were isolated from fresh liver and were identified as L. monocytogenes serotype 4b based on multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and hlyA gene sequence analysis. This is the first report describing outbreak of listeriosis in pheasant flock. PMID:26476090

  8. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the meninges that cover a person's brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high death rates and with disability in people who survive. Corticosteroids have been used as an adjunct to antituberculous drugs to treat people with tuberculous meningitis, but their role has been controversial. Objectives To evaluate the effects of corticosteroids as an adjunct to antituberculous treatment on death and severe disability in people with tuberculous meningitis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register up to the 18 March 2016; CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and Current Controlled Trials. We also contacted researchers and organizations working in the field, and checked reference lists. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared corticosteroid plus antituberculous treatment with antituberculous treatment alone in people with clinically diagnosed tuberculous meningitis and included death or disability as outcome measures. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed search results and methodological quality, and extracted data from the included trials. We analysed the data using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used a fixed-effect model. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis, where we included all participants randomized to treatment in the denominator. This analysis assumes that all participants who were lost to follow-up have good outcomes. We carried out a sensitivity analysis to explore the impact of the missing data. Main results Nine trials that included 1337 participants (with 469 deaths) met the inclusion criteria. At follow-up from three to 18 months, steroids reduce deaths by almost one quarter (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87; nine trials, 1337 participants, high quality evidence). Disabling neurological deficit is not common in survivors, and steroids may have little or no

  9. Streptococcal meningitis following myelogram procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew; Bergeron, Toni; Fox, Teresa; Gum, Greg; Pischke, Vera; Potts, David; Townes, John; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2007-05-01

    In September of 2004, we investigated 7 cases of post-myelography meningitis. Streptococcal species were recovered from blood or cerebrospinal fluid in all cases. Our findings suggest that droplet transmission of the oral flora of the clinician performing the procedure was the most likely source of these infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of face masks by those performing myelograms. PMID:17464927

  10. Gallium-67 uptake in meningeal sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.G.; Hicks, B.H.; Maisey, M.N.

    1986-07-01

    A case of sarcoidosis limited to the central nervous system is described in which the diagnosis was suggested by high Ga-67 uptake in the cranial and spinal meninges. The diagnosis was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. Treatment with oral corticosteroids resulted in clinical improvement and marked reduction in Ga-67 uptake in the meninges. This is the first reported case of the central nervous system sarcoid diagnosed by Ga-67 imaging.

  11. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency requiring immediate diagnosis and immediate treatment. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common and most aggressive pathogens of meningitis. Emerging antibiotic resistance is an upcoming challenge. Clinical and experimental studies have established a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms resulting in brain damage, sequelae and neuropsychological deficits. We summarize the current pathophysiological concept of acute bacterial meningitis and present current treatment strategies. PMID:21180625

  12. Listeria species escape from the phagosomes of interleukin-4-deactivated human macrophages independent of listeriolysin.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Katja; Eppler, Elisabeth; Filgueira, Luis; Groscurth, Peter; Gasal, Eduard; Schaffner, Andreas; Schoedon, Gabriele; Schneemann, Markus

    2003-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of infections like sepsis and meningitis, especially in immunocompromised hosts. Human macrophages are able to phagocytose and digest L. monocytogenes but IL-4 prevents human macrophages from killing the bacteria, the mechanisms of which are unknown. In the present study, we examined various listeria species and strains including wild-type and deletion mutants in human macrophages pretreated with IL-4. To analyse the IL-4-mediated deactivation process, we combined quantitative infection assays with various morphologic methods. IL-4 facilitates survival and escape of the pathogenic L. monocytogenes wild-type strain 10403S from the macrophage phagosomes. In untreated macrophages, the isogenic listeriolysin deletion mutant strain DP-L2161 was killed and did not escape from the phagolysosomes. However, after macrophage deactivation with IL-4 DP-L2161 survived and escaped from the phagosomes. This was also the case, but to a lesser extent, even for the naturally avirulent L. innocua. As detected by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy, IL-4 permitted the escape of all listeria species tested, including DP-L2161 and L. innocua from the phagosomal compartment of the macrophages. We conclude that escape from the phagosome and survival of the listeria species tested in IL-4-deactivated human macrophages is independent of the virulence factor listeriolysin. PMID:14636240

  13. Listeria species in domestic environments.

    PubMed Central

    Beumer, R. R.; te Giffel, M. C.; Spoorenberg, E.; Rombouts, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    Using a direct isolation method Listeria spp. were detected in 101 (47.4%) of 213 houses investigated. L. monocytogenes was present in 45 houses (21.1%). Listeria spp. occurred at all sampling sites. Dish-cloths (37%) and surface samples round the drain in the bathroom (27.2%) were most frequently contaminated. Highest numbers (c. 10(4) c.f.u./object) were found in dish-cloths and washing-up brushes. Lower levels (up to 10(3) c.f.u./object) were obtained from kitchen sinks, refrigerator vegetable compartment samples and tooth brushes. In total, 132 isolations of Listeria spp. were made from 871 samples. L. innocua (53%) and L. monocytogenes (41%) were the predominant species in the positive samples. Other Listeria spp. were found in only 6% of the positive samples. PMID:8972667

  14. Listeria species in domestic environments.

    PubMed

    Beumer, R R; te Giffel, M C; Spoorenberg, E; Rombouts, F M

    1996-12-01

    Using a direct isolation method Listeria spp. were detected in 101 (47.4%) of 213 houses investigated. L. monocytogenes was present in 45 houses (21.1%). Listeria spp. occurred at all sampling sites. Dish-cloths (37%) and surface samples round the drain in the bathroom (27.2%) were most frequently contaminated. Highest numbers (c. 10(4) c.f.u./object) were found in dish-cloths and washing-up brushes. Lower levels (up to 10(3) c.f.u./object) were obtained from kitchen sinks, refrigerator vegetable compartment samples and tooth brushes. In total, 132 isolations of Listeria spp. were made from 871 samples. L. innocua (53%) and L. monocytogenes (41%) were the predominant species in the positive samples. Other Listeria spp. were found in only 6% of the positive samples. PMID:8972667

  15. Effect of Listeria seeligeri or Listeria welshimeri on Listeria monocytogenes detection in and recovery from buffered Listeria enrichment broth.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Rachel C; Welch, Lacinda J; Hitchins, Anthony D; Smiley, R Derike

    2015-04-01

    The presence of multiple species of Listeria in regulated food products is not uncommon and can complicate the recovery of Listeria monocytogenes particularly on a non-differentiating medium. The potential complications of Listeria seeligeri and Listeria welshimeri on the recovery of L. monocytogenes from inoculated food test samples using the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) selective enrichment procedure was investigated. Post-enrichment enumeration, in the absence of food product, indicates that some L. seeligeri and L. monocytogenes pairings may have population differentials as great as 2.7 ± 0.1 logs with L. seeligeri being the predominant species. A similar observation was noted for L. welshimeri and L. monocytogenes pairings which resulted in population differentials as large as 3.7 ± 0.2 logs with L. welshimeri being the predominant species. Select strain pairings were used to inoculate guacamole, crab meat, broccoli, and cheese with subsequent recovery by the FDA Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) method with 10 colonies per sample selected for confirmation. The presence of L. seeligeri had little effect on the recovery of L. monocytogenes. The presence of L. welshimeri resulted in the failure to recover L. monocytogenes in three out of the four food matrices. This work extends the observation that non-pathogenic species of Listeria can complicate the recovery of L. monocytogenes and that competition during selective enrichment is not limited to the presence of just Listeria innocua. PMID:25475325

  16. Aerosol studies with Listeria innocua and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Ma, Li; Oyarzabal, Omar A; Doyle, Michael P

    2007-08-01

    Aerosol studies of Listeria monocytogenes in food processing plants have been limited by lack of a suitable surrogate microorganism. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of using green fluorescent protein-labeled strains of Listeria innocua as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes for aerosol studies. These studies were conducted in a laboratory bioaerosol chamber and a pilot food-processing facility. Four strains of L. innocua and five strains of L. monocytogenes were used. In the laboratory chamber study, Listeria cells were released into the environment at two different cell numbers and under two airflow conditions. Trypticase soy agar (TSA) plates and oven-roasted breasts of chicken and turkey were placed in the chamber to monitor Listeria cell numbers deposited from aerosols. A similar experimental design was used in the pilot plant study; however, only L. innocua was used. Results showed that L. monocytogenes and L. innocua survived equally well on chicken and turkey breast meats and TSA plates. No-fan and continuous fan applications, which affected airflow, had no significant effect on settling rates of aerosolized L. monocytogenes and L. innocua in the bioaerosol chamber or L. innocua in the pilot plant study. Listeriae cell numbers in the air decreased rapidly during the first 1.5 h following release, with few to no listeriae detected in the air at 3 h. Aerosol particles with diameters of 1 and 2 microM correlated directly with the number of Listeria cells in the aerosol but not with particles that were 0.3, 0.5, and 5 microM in diameter. Results indicate that L. innocua can be used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes in an aerosol study. PMID:17803142

  17. Japanese encephalitis virus in meningitis patients, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Ito, Mikako; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie; Fukuda, Shinji; Miyazaki, Kazuo; Kurane, Ichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2005-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from 57 patients diagnosed with meningitis were tested for Japanese encephalitis virus. Total RNA was extracted from the specimens and amplified. Two products had highest homology with Nakayama strain and 2 with Ishikawa strain. Results suggest that Japanese encephalitis virus causes some aseptic meningitis in Japan. PMID:15757569

  18. Full recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Poulomi J; Blackburn, Brian G; Kazacos, Kevin R; Warrier, Rajasekharan P; Bégué, Rodolfo E

    2007-06-01

    Infection by Baylisascaris procyonis is an uncommon but devastating cause of eosinophilic meningitis. We report the first case-patient, to our knowledge, who recovered from B. procyonis eosinophilic meningitis without any recognizable neurologic deficits. The spectrum of illness for this organism may be wider than previously recognized. PMID:17553240

  19. Keep Listeria Out of Your Kitchen

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Keep Listeria Out of Your Kitchen Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... Updates by E-mail Consumer Updates RSS Feed Listeria Podcast Download PDF (236 K) En Español On ...

  20. Cryptococcal Meningitis: Diagnosis and Management Update

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Mahsa; Boulware, David R; Rhein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cryptococcal meningitis are promising and have been improving long-term survival. Point of care testing has made diagnosing cryptococcal meningitis rapid, practical, and affordable. Targeted screening and treatment programs for cryptococcal antigenemia are a cost effective method for reducing early mortality on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Optimal initial management with amphotericin and flucytosine improves survival against alternative therapies, although amphotericin is difficult to administer and flucytosine is not available in middle or low income countries, where cryptococcal meningitis is most prevalent. Controlling increased intracranial pressure with serial therapeutic lumbar punctures has a proven survival benefit. Delaying ART initiation for 4 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis is associated with improved survival. Fortunately, new approaches have been leading the way toward improving care for cryptococcal meningitis patients. New trials utilizing different combinations of antifungal therapy are reviewed, and we summarize the efficacy of different regimens. PMID:26279970

  1. Towards a meningitis free world--can we eliminate meningococcal meningitis?: contribution of the meningitis patient groups.

    PubMed

    Davie, Sue; Glennie, Linda; Rowland, Kate

    2012-05-30

    Patient groups play a critical part in the fight against meningitis in all its forms. The UK has the world's three largest meningitis patient groups, which over the past 3 decades have worked tirelessly in the fight against meningitis. Within the UK, where the patient groups work to prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by meningitis and septicaemia, their work is in three areas: continued research; demonstrating burden; and awareness-raising and advocacy. The research relates to developing and improving vaccines, and to improving outcomes for forms of meningitis that are not vaccine preventable. Demonstrating burden - showing the real impact of meningitis from a human perspective - highlights the need for vaccines to prevent the disease. Lives are saved by raising awareness of signs and symptoms and of the need for fast action, whilst advocacy can bring about change to improve the quality of life of those affected by meningitis. Awareness raising and advocacy also have the wider benefit of creating a climate in which people recognise the need for vaccines to prevent this dreadful disease. In addition, the patient groups seek to influence the early introduction and uptake of vaccines as they are licensed and approved by the expert bodies, the UK body being the Joint Committee for Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). Each area of activity is explored, and examples given from each of the patient groups of work they have done or are doing in that area. PMID:22607905

  2. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  3. Climate Change and Cerebrospinal Meningitis in the Ghanaian Meningitis Belt

    PubMed Central

    Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Nabie, Vivian Adams

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) is one of the infectious diseases likely to be affected by climate change. Although there are a few studies on the climate change-CSM nexus, none has considered perceptions of community members. However, understanding public perception in relation to a phenomenon is very significant for the design of effective communication and mitigation strategies as well as coping and adaptation strategies. This paper uses focus group discussions (FGDs) to fill this knowledge lacuna. Results show that although a few elderly participants ascribed fatal causes (disobedience to gods, ancestors, and evil spirits) to CSM infections during FGDs, majority of participants rightly linked CSM infections to dry, very hot and dusty conditions experienced during the dry season. Finally, community members use a suite of adaptation options to curb future CSM epidemics. PMID:25003550

  4. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: rare cause of meningitis.

    PubMed

    Correia, Cátia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Sara Tavares; Nunes, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative bacillus, which is an extremely rare cause of meningitis. To our knowledge, there are only five previous pediatrics cases. Here, we describe the case of a 4-year-old boy who developed meningitis associated with this organism, after several neurosurgical procedures and previous treatment with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. He was treated successfully with a combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ceftazidime and levofloxacin. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis, especially among severely debilitated or immunosuppressed patients. Antimicrobial therapy is complicated by the high resistance of the organism to multiple antibiotics. PMID:25252064

  5. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases. PMID:26888190

  6. Delayed bactericidal activity of beta-lactam antibiotics against Listeria monocytogenes: antagonism of chloramphenicol and rifampin.

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, D L; Damme, J; Dieckman, E

    1983-01-01

    Penicillins are considered to be the drugs of choice for the treatment of listeric meningitis, and relapse of infection is rare when treatment is given in appropriate doses for at least 14 days. Despite this, in vitro studies by others have shown that penicillins are bacteriostatic against Listeria spp. We have shown that thienamycin, penicillin G, and ampicillin are the most active beta-lactam antibiotics against Listeria spp. Of 10 strains tested, 9 were killed by less than or equal to 8 micrograms of beta-lactam antibiotics (greater than or equal to 99.9% killing) when subcultures were performed after 48, rather than 24, h of incubation. In contrast, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, doxycycline, and rifampin were bacteriostatic after 48 h of incubation. In time-kill curves, these last drugs antagonized the bactericidal action of penicillins. In view of the inefficiency of opsonization in the cerebrospinal fluid, these antagonistic combinations should probably be avoided in documented or suspected listeric meningitis. PMID:6407393

  7. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  8. Hemi-meningitis with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Ozan; Yarar, Coskun; Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Ekici, Arzu; Bör, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. HLH may occur as a complication of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), particularly in patients with immunodeficiencies. Herein, we describe a 16-year-old girl with neurological complications associated EBV-induced HLH. Her cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images with enhancement of meningeal surface in the right hemisphere that was consistent with right hemi-meningitis. Hydrocephalus, dilated subdural spaces, delayed myelination, edema, diffuse parenchymal atrophy, calcifications, diffuse/patchy white matter abnormalities have all been previously described with HLH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hemi-meningitis associated with HLH. We suggest that clinicians should consider HLH with vascular disorders when they determine unilateral meningitis on a brain MRI. PMID:27570395

  9. Environmental Risk and Meningitis Epidemics in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Molesworth, Anna M.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Connor, Stephen J.; Morse, Andrew P.

    2003-01-01

    Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis occur in areas with particular environmental characteristics. We present evidence that the relationship between the environment and the location of these epidemics is quantifiable and propose a model based on environmental variables to identify regions at risk for meningitis epidemics. These findings, which have substantial implications for directing surveillance activities and health policy, provide a basis for monitoring the impact of climate variability and environmental change on epidemic occurrence in Africa. PMID:14609465

  10. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, A R; Scheld, W M

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with associated unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates despite the availability of effective bactericidal antimicrobial therapy. Through the use of experimental animal models of infection, a great deal of information has been gleaned concerning the pathogenic and pathophysiologic mechanisms operable in bacterial meningitis. Most cases of bacterial meningitis begin with host acquisition of a new organism by nasopharyngeal colonization followed by systemic invasion and development of a high-grade bacteremia. Bacterial encapsulation contributes to this bacteremia by inhibiting neutrophil phagocytosis and resisting classic complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Central nervous system invasion then occurs, although the exact site of bacterial traversal into the central nervous system is unknown. By production and/or release of virulence factors into and stimulation of formation of inflammatory cytokines within the central nervous system, meningeal pathogens increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing protein and neutrophils to move into the subarachnoid space. There is then an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, which leads to many of the pathophysiologic consequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Attenuation of this inflammatory response with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy is associated with reduced concentrations of tumor necrosis factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, with diminished cerebrospinal fluid leukocytosis, and perhaps with improvement of morbidity, as demonstrated in recent clinical trials. Further information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis should lead to the development of more innovative treatment and/or preventive strategies for this disorder. Images PMID:8472245

  11. Listeria monocytogenes Endovascular Graft Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heysell, Scott K.; Hughes, Molly A.

    2016-01-01

    Although best managed by surgical resection, we present a case of Listeria monocytogenes endovascular graft infection alternatively treated with graft retention and antibiotic induction followed by a lifelong suppressive course. The epidemiological, pathological, and clinical features of this unique entity are reviewed. PMID:26835477

  12. NATURAL ATYPICAL LISTERIA INNOCUA STRAINS WITH LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES PATHOGENICITY ISLAND 1 GENES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The detection of the human foodborne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, in food, environmental samples and clinical specimens associated with cases of listeriosis, a rare but high mortality-rate disease, requires distinguishing the pathogen from other Listeria species. Speciation...

  13. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Versus Nonbacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting-Ting; Hu, Zhi-De; Qin, Bao-Dong; Ma, Ning; Tang, Qing-Qin; Wang, Li-Li; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Ren-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in bacterial meningitis (BM), but the results were heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of PCT as a marker for BM detection. A systematic search of the EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases was performed to identify studies published before December 7, 2015 investigating the diagnostic accuracy of PCT for BM. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy method. The overall diagnostic accuracy of PCT detection in CSF or blood was pooled using the bivariate model. Twenty-two studies involving 2058 subjects were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The overall specificities and sensitivities were 0.86 and 0.80 for CSF PCT, and 0.97 and 0.95 for blood PCT, respectively. Areas under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.90 and 0.98 for CSF PCT and blood PCT, respectively. The major limitation of this systematic review and meta-analysis was the small number of studies included and the heterogeneous diagnostic thresholds adopted by eligible studies. Our meta-analysis shows that PCT is a useful biomarker for BM diagnosis. PMID:26986140

  14. Characteristics and distribution of Listeria spp., including Listeria species newly described since 2009.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Renato H; Wiedmann, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The genus Listeria is currently comprised of 17 species, including 9 Listeria species newly described since 2009. Genomic and phenotypic data clearly define a distinct group of six species (Listeria sensu strictu) that share common phenotypic characteristics (e.g., ability to grow at low temperature, flagellar motility); this group includes the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. The other 11 species (Listeria sensu lato) represent three distinct monophyletic groups, which may warrant recognition as separate genera. These three proposed genera do not contain pathogens, are non-motile (except for Listeria grayi), are able to reduce nitrate (except for Listeria floridensis), and are negative for the Voges-Proskauer test (except for L. grayi). Unlike all other Listeria species, species in the proposed new genus Mesolisteria are not able to grow below 7 °C. While most new Listeria species have only been identified in a few countries, the availability of molecular tools for rapid characterization of putative Listeria isolates will likely lead to future identification of isolates representing these new species from different sources. Identification of Listeria sensu lato isolates has not only allowed for a better understanding of the evolution of Listeria and virulence characteristics in Listeria but also has practical implications as detection of Listeria species is often used by the food industry as a marker to detect conditions that allow for presence, growth, and persistence of L. monocytogenes. This review will provide a comprehensive critical summary of our current understanding of the characteristics and distribution of the new Listeria species with a focus on Listeria sensu lato. PMID:27129530

  15. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  16. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  17. Antibiotic Resistance in Listeria Species Isolated from Catfish Fillets and Processing Environment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The susceptibility of 221 Listeria spp. (86 Listeria monocytogenes, 41 Listeria innocua and 94 Listeria seeligeri-Listeria welshimeri-Listeria ivanovii) isolated from catfish fillets and processing environment to 15 antibiotics was determined. Listeria isolates were analysed by disc-diffusion assay...

  18. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-04-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham-inoculated. The rats were killed when reaching terminal illness or on day 7, followed by light microscopy preparation and PAS-Alcian blue staining. The endolymphatic sac was examined for bacterial invasion and leukocyte infiltration. Neither bacteria nor leukocytes infiltrated the endolymphatic sac during the first days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges was found. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurred prior to bacterial invasion. During meningitis, bacteria do not invade the endolymphatic sac through the dura, but solely through the endolymphatic duct, following the invasion of the vestibular system. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurs prior to, as well as concurrent with bacterial invasion. The findings support the endolymphatic sac as part of an innate immune defense system protecting the inner ear from infection. PMID:24452771

  19. [A case of recurrent aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Tagawa, Asako; Hashimoto, Ritsuo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman with recurrent aseptic meningitis that was caused by ergot agents. She miscarried at age 27, and the uterus constrictor methylergometrine was prescribed. Three days later, she developed aseptic meningitis and was hospitalized. Two years later, she again developed aseptic meningitis the day after she took ergotamine tartrate. In both events, her symptoms improved rapidly when the medication was stopped. The drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test for methylergometrine yielded a value of 180%. Drug-induced meningitis is a rare form of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Many studies have reported cases of meningitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many other drugs can induce aseptic meningitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents. PMID:26103816

  20. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  1. Postsurgical Pantoea calida meningitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pantoea calida, a recently described environmental Enterobacteriaceae organism, has not yet been associated with human infection. Case presentation We report a case of postoperative meningitis caused by P. calida. After pituitary adenoma resection, a 52-year-old Caucasian woman developed febrile meningitis confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis. P. calida was grown in pure culture from this fluid and was firmly identified with partial rpoB gene sequencing. She was cured by a 14-day course of meropenem. Conclusions P. calida must be added to the list of opportunistic Enterobacteriaceae pathogens responsible for postsurgical meningitis. It is easily identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:24934580

  2. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth. PMID:9018266

  3. Evaluation and Treatment of Chronic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Zunt, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic meningitis is defined as an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile that persists for at least 1 month. The presentation often includes headache, nausea, vomiting, cranial neuropathies, symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure, or focal neurologic deficits. The most common etiologies of chronic meningitis fall into 3 broad categories: infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic. Evaluation of the patient with suspected chronic meningitis should include a detailed history and physical examination as well as repeated CSF diagnostics, serologic studies, and biopsy of the brain or other abnormal tissue (eg, lymph node or lung), when indicated. Early identification of the etiology and rapid treatment are crucial for improving morbidity and mortality, but potential infectious and neoplastic conditions should be excluded prior to empirically starting steroids or immunosuppressive medications. PMID:25360204

  4. [Purulent meningitis, caused by Corynebacterium xerosis, after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Vukmirovits, G; Todorova, R; Arányi, Z; Káli, G

    1991-12-30

    A previously healthy 25 year old sportsman is reported who developed Corynebacterium xerosis meningitis with coma and seizures after spinal anaesthesia. The adequate therapy (dexamethason, penicillin, ampicillin, mannitol, intensive care, hyperventillation) resulted in a complete recovery. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case of Corynebacterium xerosis meningitis and the first bacterial meningitis reported after spinal anaesthesia in Hungary. PMID:1766661

  5. Meningitis-Retention Syndrome as a Presentation of West Nile Virus Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Laengvejkal, Pavis; Argueta, Erwin; Limsuwat, Chok; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy man presented with fever, urinary retention, nuchal rigidity, and hyperreflexia but with a clear sensorium. His initial spinal fluid results were consistent with aseptic meningitis from West Nile virus infection, and this was confirmed by serological studies on blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies were unremarkable. He received supportive care and urinary catheterization to prevent bladder injury from overdistension. He was discharged home without recurrence of urinary retention after five days of hospitalization. Therefore, this case report describes the first case of West Nile virus meningitis in a patient with the meningitis-retention syndrome. PMID:23983716

  6. Asymptomatic (Subclinical) Meningitis in One of Premature Triplets with Simultaneous Enteroviral Meningitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Tolan, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Most enterovirus infection in the neonate and young infant is asymptomatic, but serious disease may occur, especially if acquired perinatally. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of asymptomatic enterovirus aseptic meningitis, and of concurrent enterovirus aseptic meningitis in premature triplets. Ten-week-old, 31-week-estimated gestational age premature triplet boys were diagnosed with enterovirus aseptic meningitis on the same day. Two of the triplets developed symptoms on the day of admission, while the third remained symptom free throughout the infection. All three recovered completely and are healthy more than a decade later. PMID:23946897

  7. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  8. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  9. FDG PET in Intracranial Carcinomatous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Céline; Bund, Caroline; Namer, Izzie Jacques

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old white man, diagnosed with pT3N2 squamous cell lung carcinoma, underwent right upper lobectomy with adjuvant radiochemotherapy. After a partial epileptic seizure, MRI revealed a solitary right frontal metastasis that was treated with surgical resection followed by stereotaxic radiotherapy. Three months later, the patient presented weight loss, weakness, and headache. He underwent a whole-body FDG PET/CT for restaging. It showed intense FDG uptakes on the brain periphery corresponding to nodular meningeal contrast enhancement on MRI leading to the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis, despite negative cerebrospinal fluid cytology. PMID:26447391

  10. [Bacterial meningitis in patients with sepsis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Z; Janeczko, J; Lipowski, D; Przyjałkowski, W; Strzelecki, R; Romanowska, B; Pogorzelska, E

    1994-01-01

    The authors discuss problems connected with diagnosis, management and treatment of bacterial meningitis among patients with the sepsis syndrome. Considering secondary organ changes bacterial meningitis belongs to the severest one and as a life-threathing sequel of sepsis demands immediate use of proper casual treatment. The authors show the therapeutic difficulties in this group of patients particularly when the etiological organism is unknown. They discuss this problems and present their own schemes of tretment. They indicate the value of passive immunotherapy and surgical removal of the primary source of infection. They emphasize final result depends on secondary organ changes, age, immunity of patient and the kind of etiological agent. PMID:7938619

  11. CSF cytology versus immunocytochemistry in meningeal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, W; Vroom, T M; van Heerde, P; Brutel de la Rivière, G; Peterse, J L; van der Sande, J J

    1988-01-01

    CSF immunocytochemistry with monoclonal antibodies was compared with conventional cytology to determine its sensitivity in detecting malignant cells in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. One hundred and eighteen samples were investigated. Cytology was tumour positive in 83 samples and immunocytochemistry in 85. Dissimilar results between the two diagnostic methods were noted in 12 specimens, invariably occurring in samples with a low cell count and obtained from treated patients. Combined use of the two methods led to a 9% increase of sensitivity in detecting malignant cells compared with cytology alone. It is concluded that immunocytochemistry is of minor help in the problem of false-negative cytology in meningeal carcinomatosis. PMID:2832546

  12. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M.; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C.; Perea, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years’ experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. Methods. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). Results. The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100 000 in 2004–2010 to 0.02 per 100 000 in 2011–2013 (P < .0001). Conclusions. In addition to supporting timely outbreak response, the enhanced meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. PMID:26553668

  13. Infective Meningitis Caused by Phialemonium curvatum

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yueli; Bu, Hui; He, Yunying; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by rarely encountered fungal pathogens have increased in recent decades. Phialemonium species are widely distributed in the environment and are also involved in human infections, affecting both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The present study describes a case of meningitis caused by Phialemonium curvatum. PMID:24850352

  14. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-07-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  15. Citrobacter koseri meningitis: another freediving risk?

    PubMed

    Pollara, Gabriele; Savy, Lloyd; Cropley, Ian; Hopkins, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of meningitis caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult who had recently been freediving. Middle ear pressure changes from this recreational activity, and the subsequent inflammatory response, are likely to have provided this environmental organism access to the central nervous system, and thus the ability to cause clinically significant infection. PMID:20933000

  16. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Jose M.; Tilley, Drake H.; Briceno, Jesus A.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Montano, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats’ cheese from an uncertain source. PMID:23105024

  17. Tuberculous meningitis in a Filipino maid.

    PubMed

    Sheu, J J; Yuan, R Y; Lu, J J; Chung, C L; Hsu, C Y

    1999-11-01

    Tuberculous meningitis, while not uncommon in Taiwan, has not been reported among foreign workers. We report the first case of tuberculous meningitis in a 37-year-old Filipino maid in Taiwan, who presented with headache, fever and vomiting. She had been well before this episode and the small screening films of the chest radiograph obtained on her arrival in Taiwan 15 months previously, and every 6 months thereafter showed no evidence of tuberculosis. The suspicion of tuberculous meningitis was delayed until disturbance of consciousness manifested and a standard chest radiograph showed a diffuse miliary pattern in both lung fields. A cerebrospinal fluid sample that was sent for a polymerase chain reaction-based assay specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed a positive result. The patient recovered with sequelae of mildly incoherent speech and urinary incontinence after antituberculous medication and short-course steroid treatment. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of tuberculous meningitis in foreign workers with complaints of fever and headache. Because high-quality chest radiographs are a prerequisite for early detection of pulmonary tuberculosis, we recommended that standard posterior-anterior chest radiographs should be obtained as part of the routine health examination for foreign workers. PMID:10705697

  18. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  19. Food Safety for Moms to Be: While You're Pregnant - Listeria

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Moms-To-Be: While You're Pregnant - Listeria Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... Page What Is Foodborne Illness? | Listeria | Methylmercury | Toxoplasma Listeria : Frequently Asked Questions "What is Listeria monocytogenes?" It's ...

  20. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction. PMID:23671802

  1. Enterovirus meningitis in Brazil, 1998-2003.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Gina P L; Skraba, Irene; Oliveira, Denise; Lima, Ana A F; de Melo, Maria Mabel M; Kmetzsch, Claudete I; da Costa, Eliane V; da Silva, Edson E

    2006-01-01

    Acute viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as acute flaccid paralysis, meningitis, and encephalitis, are responsible for a high morbidity, particularly in children. Non-Polio enteroviruses (NPEV) are known to be responsible for over 80% of viral meningitis in which the etiologic agent is identified. In the present study, we show the frequency of enterovirus meningitis in Brazil from December 1998 to December 2003. Enterovirus were isolated from 162 (15.8%), of a total of 1,022 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens analyzed. Echovirus 30 was identified in 139 of these isolates (139/162-85.2%). Other identified enteroviruses were: Coxsackievirus B5 (3.7%), Echovirus 13 (3.7%), Echovirus 18 (3%), Echovirus 6 (1.2%), Echovirus 25 (1.2%), Echovirus 1 (0.6%), and Echovirus 4 (0.6%). Patients's age ranged from 28 days to 68 years old. The most frequent symptoms were fever (77%), headache (69.5%), vomiting (71.3%), neck stiffness (41.3%), convulsion (7.1%), and diarrhea (3.7%). Although, the majority of the patients recovered without any complication or permanent squeal, five deaths occurred. Throughout the surveillance period, five viral meningitis outbreaks were confirmed: four in the Southern Brazil and one in the Northeast Brazil. Echovirus 30 was responsible for four out of the five outbreaks while Echovirus 13 caused the fifth one. Besides the outbreaks, 734 sporadic cases were also identified during the study period and 59 of these were positive for virus isolation (8%). Echovirus 30 accounted for 70% of the isolates. Our results showed that Echovirus 30 was the most prevalent etiological agent of viral meningitis in Brazil, causing both outbreaks and sporadic cases. PMID:16299728

  2. Listeria Pathogenesis and Molecular Virulence Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Vázquez-Boland, José A.; Kuhn, Michael; Berche, Patrick; Chakraborty, Trinad; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Goebel, Werner; González-Zorn, Bruno; Wehland, Jürgen; Kreft, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    The gram-positive bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a highly fatal opportunistic foodborne infection. Pregnant women, neonates, the elderly, and debilitated or immunocompromised patients in general are predominantly affected, although the disease can also develop in normal individuals. Clinical manifestations of invasive listeriosis are usually severe and include abortion, sepsis, and meningoencephalitis. Listeriosis can also manifest as a febrile gastroenteritis syndrome. In addition to humans, L. monocytogenes affects many vertebrate species, including birds. Listeria ivanovii, a second pathogenic species of the genus, is specific for ruminants. Our current view of the pathophysiology of listeriosis derives largely from studies with the mouse infection model. Pathogenic listeriae enter the host primarily through the intestine. The liver is thought to be their first target organ after intestinal translocation. In the liver, listeriae actively multiply until the infection is controlled by a cell-mediated immune response. This initial, subclinical step of listeriosis is thought to be common due to the frequent presence of pathogenic L. monocytogenes in food. In normal indivuals, the continual exposure to listerial antigens probably contributes to the maintenance of anti-Listeria memory T cells. However, in debilitated and immunocompromised patients, the unrestricted proliferation of listeriae in the liver may result in prolonged low-level bacteremia, leading to invasion of the preferred secondary target organs (the brain and the gravid uterus) and to overt clinical disease. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii are facultative intracellular parasites able to survive in macrophages and to invade a variety of normally nonphagocytic cells, such as epithelial cells, hepatocytes, and endothelial cells. In all these cell types, pathogenic listeriae go through an intracellular life cycle involving early escape from the phagocytic vacuole

  3. [Multiplication of Listeria in milk products].

    PubMed

    Karpova, T I; Shustrova, N M; Snegireva, A E; Sheveleva, S A; Kubaeva, I B; Tartakovskiĭ, I S

    2001-01-01

    The results of the evaluation of the multiplication dynamics of Listeria cells in milk and Bifidok, a lactic acid product, are presented. The samples were inoculated on thioglycol agar and studied at different exposure time after incubation at 37 degrees C, 20 degrees C and 4 degrees C. The study revealed the intensive multiplication of Listeria cells in milk, also during storage in a household refrigerator. The presence of bifidobacteria mixed with kefir-producing culture in dairy products was shown to essentially inhibit the growth of Listeria cells which were not detected by bacteriological techniques on day 7. PMID:11236515

  4. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Chuan T.; Burrell, Louise M.; Johnson, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  5. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chuan T; Burrell, Louise M; Johnson, Douglas F

    2016-08-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  6. Meningitis C vaccine (North American vaccine).

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Maria; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    North American Vaccine Inc (NAVI) has launched a conjugate polysaccharide vaccinefor the prevention of meningitis caused by group C meningococcal bacteria [433475]. The vaccine is based upon conjugate technology, incorporating the serogroup C polysaccharide (CPS) of all three major serogroups. Antibody-dependent, complement-mediated activity was demonstrated in mice and non-human primates, with no detectable adverse effects [277193]. Approval was filed for in the UK in January 2000 [353305]. In July 2000, Baxter received approval for NeisVac-C in the UK, and by September 2000 the vaccine was expected to be incorporated into the NHS's immunization campaign against meningitis C [381225]. NeisVac-C will initially appear labeled from NAVI; Baxter completed its acquisition of NAVI in June 2000 [375389]. Baxter estimates the worldwide global market for the vaccine at US $600 million per year [376204]. PMID:12054072

  7. Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Shagufta; Burrascano, Joesph

    2015-01-01

    Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection. Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase? Is it due to a failure of prevention or could it be also because of failure to diagnose and treat syphilis adequately, as in this case? PMID:26075118

  8. Cryptococcal meningitis: epidemiology and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek J; Parris, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis causes morbidity and mortality worldwide. The burden of disease is greatest in middle- and low-income countries with a high incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Patients taking immunosuppressive drugs and some immunocompetent hosts are also at risk. Treatment of cryptococcal meningitis consists of three phases: induction, consolidation, and maintenance. Effective induction therapy requires potent fungicidal drugs (amphotericin B and flucytosine), which are often unavailable in low-resource, high-endemicity settings. As a consequence, mortality is unacceptably high. Wider access to effective treatment is urgently required to improve outcomes. For human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, judicious management of asymptomatic cryptococcal antigenemia and appropriately timed introduction of antiretroviral therapy are important. PMID:24872723

  9. Generation of airborne listeria from floor drains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes can colonize floor drains in poultry processing and further processing facilities remaining even after cleaning and disinfection. Therefore, during wash down, workers exercise caution to prevent escape and transfer of drain microflora to food contact surfaces. The objective ...

  10. Cognitive impairment in adults with good recovery after bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Diederik; Schmand, Ben; de Gans, Jan; Weisfelt, Martijn; Vaessen, Heleen; Dankert, Jacob; Vermeulen, Marinus

    2002-10-01

    Adults without neurologic sequelae after bacterial meningitis are supposed to live without restrictions. Neuropsychological outcome was assessed in 51 adults from a prospective cohort with good recovery, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale score 5, after pneumococcal or meningococcal meningitis. Patients who recovered well after pneumococcal meningitis showed cognitive slowness (P=.001). A cognitive disorder was found in 27% of these patients. Patients who previously had meningococcal meningitis were not significantly different from control subjects. Scores on general health and quality of life questionnaires revealed lower scores for patients with meningitis, which were related to cognitive slowing (R, -0.46 to -0.38). In conclusion, adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis were at significant risk of neuropsychological abnormalities, even if they were clinically well recovered. PMID:12232850

  11. Cryptococcal meningitis in a patient with sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Maeghan

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas. Case reports have previously described an association between sarcoidosis and cryptococcal infection, but many of these patients were receiving immunosuppression at the time of diagnosis or had limited cutaneous disease. We report a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a 65-year-old man with a new presentation of sarcoidosis who was not receiving immunosuppressive medications. PMID:27034573

  12. Testing for Meningitis in Children with Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Michael; Williams, Ronald; McSherry, George; Geskey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Viral bronchiolitis accounts for almost 20% of all-cause hospitalizations of infants (ie, children younger than age 1 year). The annual incidence of fever in viral bronchiolitis has been documented at 23% to 31%. However the incidence of concurrent serious bacterial infections is low (1%–7%), with meningitis occurring in less than 1% to 2% of cases, but lumbar puncture is performed in up to 9% of viral bronchiolitis cases. To our knowledge, no study has examined clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. We present a retrospective, case-control study of hospitalized infants younger than one year diagnosed with viral bronchiolitis who underwent lumbar puncture as part of an evaluation for meningitis. The objective of the study was to determine clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. Although the presence of apnea, cyanosis, meningeal signs, positive urine culture results, and young age were factors found to be preliminarily associated with the performance of a lumbar puncture in the setting of bronchiolitis, young age was the only significant clinical factor found after multivariable regression; no other demographic, clinical, laboratory, or radiologic variables were found to be significant. PMID:25662522

  13. Host-pathogen interactions in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Doran, Kelly S; Fulde, Marcus; Gratz, Nina; Kim, Brandon J; Nau, Roland; Prasadarao, Nemani; Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a devastating disease occurring worldwide with up to half of the survivors left with permanent neurological sequelae. Due to intrinsic properties of the meningeal pathogens and the host responses they induce, infection can cause relatively specific lesions and clinical syndromes that result from interference with the function of the affected nervous system tissue. Pathogenesis is based on complex host-pathogen interactions, some of which are specific for certain bacteria, whereas others are shared among different pathogens. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in these interactions. We focus on selected major pathogens, Streptococcus pneumonia, S. agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Escherichia coli K1, and also include a neglected zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus suis. These neuroinvasive pathogens represent common themes of host-pathogen interactions, such as colonization and invasion of mucosal barriers, survival in the blood stream, entry into the central nervous system by translocation of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and induction of meningeal inflammation, affecting pia mater, the arachnoid and subarachnoid spaces. PMID:26744349

  14. Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, W N; Lu, C H; Huang, C R; Chuang, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults is an extremely rare infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report one adult case of this rare CNS infection and review the clinical data of another seven cases reported in the English language literature. In total, eight patients (six men and two women) aged between 19 and 63 years were studied. The causative pathogen in our patient was Acinetobacter baumannii; in the other reported cases they were most likely Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter junii, a genomic species 3 or 6. No underlying disease was found in seven of the eight cases and six of the eight patients acquired the infections before the age of 30 years. Fever and consciousness disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (WFS) was found in two cases. Unlike the Acinetobacter strains found in nosocomial infections, the strain of Acinetobacter meningitis in the community-acquired case did not show multiple antibiotic resistance. Most adult patients with community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis can be saved by timely therapy with appropriate antibiotics before deterioration of the systemic condition and impairment of consciousness. PMID:11139162

  15. Rapid diagnosis of experimental meningitis by bacterial heat production in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Trampuz, Andrej; Steinhuber, Andrea; Wittwer, Matthias; Leib, Stephen L

    2007-01-01

    Background Calorimetry is a nonspecific technique which allows direct measurement of heat generated by biological processes in the living cell. We evaluated the potential of calorimetry for rapid detection of bacterial growth in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in a rat model of bacterial meningitis. Methods Infant rats were infected on postnatal day 11 by direct intracisternal injection with either Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis or Listeria monocytogenes. Control animals were injected with sterile saline or heat-inactivated S. pneumoniae. CSF was obtained at 18 hours after infection for quantitative cultures and heat flow measurement. For calorimetry, 10 μl and 1 μl CSF were inoculated in calorimetry ampoules containing 3 ml trypticase soy broth (TSB). Results The mean bacterial titer (± SD) in CSF was 1.5 ± 0.6 × 108 for S. pneumoniae, 1.3 ± 0.3 × 106 for N. meningitidis and 3.5 ± 2.2 × 104 for L. monocytogenes. Calorimetric detection time was defined as the time until heat flow signal exceeded 10 μW. Heat signal was detected in 10-μl CSF samples from all infected animals with a mean (± SD) detection time of 1.5 ± 0.2 hours for S. pneumoniae, 3.9 ± 0.7 hours for N. meningitidis and 9.1 ± 0.5 hours for L. monocytogenes. CSF samples from non-infected animals generated no increasing heat flow (<10 μW). The total heat was the highest in S. pneumoniae ranging from 6.7 to 7.5 Joules, followed by L. monocytogenes (5.6 to 6.1 Joules) and N. meningitidis (3.5 to 4.4 Joules). The lowest detectable bacterial titer by calorimetry was 2 cfu for S. pneumoniae, 4 cfu for N. meningitidis and 7 cfu for L. monocytogenes. Conclusion By means of calorimetry, detection times of <4 hours for S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis and <10 hours for Listeria monocytogenes using as little as 10 μl CSF were achieved. Calorimetry is a new diagnostic method allowing rapid and accurate diagnosis of bacterial meningitis from a small volume of CSF. PMID:17927816

  16. From Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa to the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, M. Teresa; Jodar, Luis; Granoff, Dan; Rabinovich, Regina; Ceccarini, Costante; Perkin, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Polysaccharide vaccines had been used to control African meningitis epidemics for >30 years but with little or modest success, largely because of logistical problems in the implementation of reactive vaccination campaigns that are begun after epidemics are under way. After the major group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics in 1996–1997 (250 000 cases and 25 000 deaths), African ministers of health declared the prevention of meningitis a high priority and asked the World Health Organization (WHO) for help in developing better immunization strategies to eliminate meningitis epidemics in Africa. Methods. WHO accepted the challenge and created a project called Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa (EVA) that served as an organizational framework for external consultants, PATH, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Consultations were initiated with major vaccine manufacturers. EVA commissioned a costing study/business plan for the development of new group A or A/C conjugate vaccines and explored the feasibility of developing these products as a public–private partnership. Representatives from African countries were consulted. They confirmed that the development of conjugate vaccines was a priority and provided information on preferred product characteristics. In parallel, a strategy for successful introduction was also anticipated and discussed. Results. The expert consultations recommended that a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine be developed and introduced into the African meningitis belt. The results of the costing study indicated that the “cost of goods” to develop a group A – containing conjugate vaccine in the United States would be in the range of US$0.35–$1.35 per dose, depending on composition (A vs A/C), number of doses/vials, and presentation. Following an invitation from BMGF, a proposal was submitted in the spring of 2001. Conclusions. In June 2001

  17. API Listeria, a new and promising one-day system to identify Listeria isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Bille, J; Catimel, B; Bannerman, E; Jacquet, C; Yersin, M N; Caniaux, I; Monget, D; Rocourt, J

    1992-01-01

    API Listeria is a new 10-test strip for 24-h biochemical identification of Listeria isolates. With this commercial system, 85% of 646 Listeria strains, including atypical isolates selected for this study, were recognized at the species and subspecies level without a complementary test. A new test differentiates Listeria monocytogenes from L. innocua on the basis of the absence of arylamidase from the former. With this system, 97.7% (252 of 258) of the L. monocytogenes strains tested were correctly identified and differentiated from 99.4% (175 of 176) of the L. innocua strains also tested. Gram-positive bacteria other than Listeria spp. gave quite different biochemical patterns. This system considerably reduced the time needed for conventional identification, since results were available within 18 to 24 h. PMID:1622261

  18. Occurrence and detection of viable Listeria in food scrap compost.

    PubMed

    Droffner, M L; Brinton, W F

    1996-11-01

    Listeria species (L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. seeligeri, and L. grayi) were readily detected in food scraps by Nucleic Acid Hybridization (NAH) probes using a standard Listeria selective medium (UVM-1) at ambient temperature. Various food scrap compost recipes artificially contaminated with Listeria at 10(7) cells per gram wet weight were composted in thermally insulated bench scale reactor vessels. These Listeria were not detected when the compost temperature became elevated. Different isolation methods for the Listeria showed this result to be a false negative occurring apparently because the heat stressed Listeria were unable to survive in the selective medium (UVM-1). Once incubated at 37 degrees C in Universal Listeria medium (ULM), the Listeria were detectable for a short period in compost at temperatures as high as 64 degrees C. PMID:9353544

  19. Detection of Listeria monocytogenes by using the polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Bessesen, M.T.; Luo, Q.; Blaser, M.J.; Ellison, R.T. III.; Rotbart. H.A. )

    1990-09-01

    A method was developed for detection of Listeria monocytogens by polymerase chain reaction amplification followed by agarose gel electrophoresis or dot blot analysis with {sup 32}P-labeled internal probe. The technique identified 95 of 95 L. monocytogenes strains, 0 of 12 Listeria strains of other species, and 0 of 12 non-Listeria strains.

  20. [Electrochemical detection of toxin gene in Listeria monocytogenes].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ling-Wei; Liu, Quan-Jun; Wu, Zhong-Wei; Lu, Zu-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a food-borne pathogen inducing listeriosis, an illness characterized by encephalitis, septicaemia, and meningitis. Listeriolysin O (LLO) is absolutely required for virulence by L. monocytogenes, and is found only in virulent strains of the species. One of the best ways to detect and confirm the pathogen is detection of one of the virulence factors, LLO, produced by the microorganism. This paper focused on the electrical method used to detect the LLO toxin gene in food products and organism without labeling the target DNA. The electrochemical sensor was obtained by immobilizing single-stranded oligonucleotides onto the gold electrode with the mercaptan activated by N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) and N-(3-dimethylamion)propyl-N'-ethyl carbodiimidehydrochloride (EDC). The hy-bridization reaction that occurred on the electrode surface was evidenced by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) analysis using [Co(phen)3](ClO4)3 as an indicator. The covalently immobilized single-stranded DNA could selectively hybridize to its complementary DNA in solution to form double-stranded DNA on the gold surface. A significant increase of the peak cur-rent of Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) upon hybridization of immobilized ssDNA with PCR amplification products in the solu-tion was observed. This peak current change was used to monitor the amount of PCR amplification products. Factors deter-mining the sensitivity of the electrochemical assay, such as DNA target concentration and hybridization conditions, were investigated. The coupling of DNA to the electrochemical sensors has the potential of the quantitative evaluation of gene. PMID:20466642

  1. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  2. Abducens Nerve Palsy and Meningitis by Rickettsia typhi

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Wai Lun; Ooi, Say Tat

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rickettsial infection may present with encephalitis or meningitis but neurologic involvement is rare in murine typhus. Here, we report two patients with Rickettsia typhi meningitis who presented with cranial neuropathy, presumably caused by two distinct disease processes. Recognition of the disease manifestations is important because rickettsial infections are potentially associated with significant morbidity. Simple effective treatments are available. PMID:25548377

  3. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  4. Quantitative proteomics for identifying biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous meningitis is a frequent extrapulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is associated with high mortality rates and severe neurological sequelae. In an earlier study employing DNA microarrays, we had identified genes that were differentially expressed at the transcript level in human brain tissue from cases of tuberculous meningitis. In the current study, we used a quantitative proteomics approach to discover protein biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. Methods To compare brain tissues from confirmed cased of tuberculous meningitis with uninfected brain tissue, we carried out quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis of SCX fractionated peptides on Agilent’s accurate mass QTOF mass spectrometer. Results and conclusions Through this approach, we identified both known and novel differentially regulated molecules. Those described previously included signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA) and protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 6 (PDIA6), which have been shown to be overexpressed at the mRNA level in tuberculous meningitis. The novel overexpressed proteins identified in our study included amphiphysin (AMPH) and neurofascin (NFASC) while ferritin light chain (FTL) was found to be downregulated in TBM. We validated amphiphysin, neurofascin and ferritin light chain using immunohistochemistry which confirmed their differential expression in tuberculous meningitis. Overall, our data provides insights into the host response in tuberculous meningitis at the molecular level in addition to providing candidate diagnostic biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23198679

  5. Meningococcal meningitis C in Tamil Nadu, public health perspectives.

    PubMed

    David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; Thomas, Beeson

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has rarely been reported in Tamil Nadu. We report here two children diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, on May 2014. The causative strain was Neisseria meningitidis serotype C. The role of the primary care physician in early diagnosis, appropriate referral, and preventive measures of this disease to the immediate family and community is stressed. PMID:25657960

  6. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving. PMID:24750320

  7. Harnessing Listeria monocytogenes to target tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gravekamp, Claudia; Paterson, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Because of its cytosolic localization, Listeria monocytogenes (LM) has long been considered an attractive tool for delivering tumor-associated antigens (TAA) antigens in vivoto combat cancer. LM directly infects antigen-presenting cells (APC) such as monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC), thereby delivering the TAA into their cytoplasm, resulting in processing, and presentation of the antigen to the immune system. This activates adaptive and innate immune responses to the TAA, mediating tumor cell cytolysis. Recently we discovered additional pathways by which Listeria can be harnessedto induce tumor cell death, which suggest new directions in the development of vaccines or therapies against cancer. In one approach, we have used Listeria to induce immune responses that destroy tumor vasculature. Another new pathway involves selective infection of cancer cells with Listeria, followed by tumor cell death through the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and through Listeria-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). This review will focus on the most recent studies on the multiple pathways of LM and how they can be harnessed in the battle against cancer. PMID:20139702

  8. Meningeal Melanocytes in the Mouse: Distribution and Dependence on Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Gudjohnsen, Stefán A. H.; Atacho, Diahann A. M.; Gesbert, Franck; Raposo, Graca; Hurbain, Ilse; Larue, Lionel; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Petersen, Petur Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Melanocytes are pigment producing cells derived from the neural crest. They are primarily found in the skin and hair follicles, but can also be found in other tissues including the eye, ear and heart. Here, we describe the distribution of pigmented cells in C57BL/6J mouse meninges, the membranes that envelope the brain. These cells contain melanosomes of all four stages of development and they depend on Microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF), the master regulator of melanocyte development, suggesting that they are bona-fide melanocytes. The location of these pigmented cells is consistent with the location of meningeal melanomas in humans and animal models. Significance: Here, we document and define pigmented cells in the meninges of the mouse brain and confirm that they are melanocytes. This is important for understanding the role of this cell type and for understanding primary meningeal melanoma, a rare disease that likely arises from normal meningeal melanocytes. PMID:26635543

  9. Brain Abscesses Complicating Acute Pneumococcal Meningitis During Etanercept Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Yusuf; Epperla, Narendranath; Manne, Janaki Ram; Bapani, Sowjanya; Garcia-Montilla, Romel J

    2012-01-01

    Brain abscess formation as a sequelae of community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all meningitis complications. Although metastatic seeding from a distal peripheral septic focus has been observed, this phenomenon most commonly occurs in the context of ear, nose and throat infections, post-cranial neurosurgical procedures, traumatic open cranial injury, or immunosuppression. We present the case of a man, 61 years old, on etanercept therapy for ankylosing spondylitis who developed multiple brain abscesses as a complication of pneumococcal meningitis. We believe that the predisposition to this extremely rare complication of a particularly aggressive pneumococcal meningitis was most likely due to the underlying immunosuppression resulting from etanercept therapy. As far as we know, this case is the first report linking multiple brain abscess formation in a patient with community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis with etanercept therapy. PMID:22634540

  10. [In vitro activity of doripenem against strains from pediatric diseases and strains causing purulent meningitis].

    PubMed

    Ohta, Merime; Toba, Shinsuke; Ito, Akinobu; Nakamura, Rio; Tsuji, Masakatsu

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the in vitro activity of doripenem (DRPM) against 200 Streptococcus pneumoniae and 197 Haemophilus influenzae from children and adults in 2007, 50 H. influenzae type b in 2006, 20 Listeria monocytogenes in 1990-2005, 23 Neisseria meningitidis in 2007-2009 and 83 Bordetella pertussis in 1989-2003. All strains were isolated from Japanese clinical facilities. We also investigated in vitro activity of other carbapenems (meropenem, imipenem, panipenem, biapenem), cephems (ceftriaxone, cefotaxime), ampicillin and clarithromycin. The all MICs were determined by a broth micro dilution method or an agar dilution method according to CLSI. The MIC90(s) of DRPM against S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae from children were 0.25 microg/mL, 1 microg/mL, respectively, which were similar to strains from adults. These results suggested that antibacterial activity of DRPM is not variable by patient's age. DRPM also showed excellent activities against H. influenzae type b, L. monocytogenes and N. meningitidis, which cause purulent meningitis, and B. pertussis causing whooping cough more than the other carbapenems. DRPM showed superior activities against serious strains of pediatric infection diseases. PMID:23593734

  11. Cytotoxicity of Rabbit Blood for Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Shultz, Leonard D.; Wilder, M. S.

    1971-01-01

    Our studies reveal that normal rabbit blood contains a potent bactericidin active against Listeria monocytogenes. The factor is present in greatest amounts in fresh undiluted serum but is absent in platelet extracts. A correlation was observed between the virulence of Listeria strains and their relative ability to survive in serum. The bactericidal titers obtained for plasma and plasma serum indicate that clotting must occur for optimum expression of antilisterial activity. The lethal action is not elevated after immunization with viable Listeria nor does it appear to depend on heat-labile components of complement. The active factor was removed from serum by filtration through a cellulose asbestos filter pad and further purified by carboxymethyl cellulose chromatography. Iron significantly diminishes serum lethality and completely abolishes the action of the purified component. The listericidal factor resembles β-lysin but may be a distinct part of a multiple system of similar bactericidins. PMID:5005312

  12. Severe Cysticercal Meningitis: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Graciela; Jung, Helgi; Ríos, Camilo; Fleury, Agnes; Soto-Hernández, José Luís

    2010-01-01

    In disease-endemic areas, severe cysticercal meningitis (SCM) is characterized by intense inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and negative bacterial and fungal cultures. There have been no systematic studies of SCM. We characterized patients with SCM and compare them with neurocysticercosis (NC) patients with mild CSF abnormalities by conducting a nine-year retrospective review at a neurological referral center. Two groups of patients were compared: group A, those with severe CSF pleocytosis > 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 12), and group B, those with CSF pleocytosis ≤ 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 126). All patients had positive CSF results in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cysticercal antigens and negative CSF cultures for bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Intracranial hypertension, meningeal signs, CSF hypoglycorrachia, and a longer clinical course of NC were more frequently seen in group A. It is likely that SCM often goes unrecognized. Its correct identification may reduce morbidity and risks of unnecessary surgery in patients with chronic NC and CSF shunts. PMID:20065006

  13. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  14. Phylogenomic grouping of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Doijad, Swapnil; Weigel, Markus; Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo; Blom, Jochen; Goesmann, Alexander; Hain, Torsten; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2015-09-01

    The precise delineation of lineages and clonal groups are a prerequisite to examine within-species genetic variations, particularly with respect to pathogenic potential. A whole-genome-based approach was used to subtype and subgroup isolates of Listeria monocytogenes. Core-genome typing was performed, employing 3 different approaches: total core genes (CG), high-scoring segment pairs (HSPs), and average nucleotide identity (ANI). Examination of 113 L. monocytogenes genomes available in-house and in public domains revealed 33 phylogenomic groups (PGs). Each PG could be differentiated into a number of genomic types (GTs), depending on the approach used: HSPs (n = 57 GTs), CG (n = 71 GTs), and ANI (n = 83 GTs). Demarcation of the PGs was concordant with the 4 known lineages and led to the identification of sublineages in the lineage groups I, II, and III. In addition, PG assignments had discriminatory power similar to multi-virulence-locus sequence typing types and clonal complexes of multilocus sequence typing. Clustering of genomically highly similar isolates from different countries, sources, and isolation dates using whole-genome-based PG suggested that dispersion of phylogenomic clones of L. monocytogenes preceded their subsequent evolution. Classification according to PG may act as a guideline for future epidemiological studies. PMID:26245135

  15. Pneumococcal meningitis: development of a new animal model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin P.C.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Clark, Graeme M.; O’Leary, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Hypothesis The rat is a suitable animal to establish a model for the study of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation Background There has been an increase in the number of cases of cochlear implant-related meningitis. The most common organism identified was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis in healthy subjects without other risk factors remains to be determined. Previous animal studies do not focus on the pathogenesis and risk of pneumococcal meningitis post implantation and are based on relatively small animal numbers, making it difficult to assess the cause and effect relationship. There is, therefore, a need to develop a new animal model allowing direct examination of the pathogenesis of meningitis in the presence of a cochlear implant. Methods Eighteen non-implanted rats were infected with 1× 106 and 1 × 108 colony forming units (CFU) of a clinical isolate of S. pneumoniae via three different inoculation routes (middle ear, inner ear and intraperitoneal) to examine for evidence of meningitis over 24 hours. Six implanted rats were infected with the highest amount of bacteria possible for each route of inoculation (4 × 1010 CFU intraperitoneal, 3 × 108CFU middle ear, 1 × 106 CFU inner ear) to examine for evidence of meningitis with the presence of an implant. Histological pattern of cochlear infections for each of the three different inoculating routes were examined. Results Pneumococcal meningitis was evident in all 6 implanted animals for each of the three different routes of inoculation. Once in the inner ear, bacteria were found to enter the central nervous system either via the cochlear aqueduct or canaliculi perforantes of osseous spiral lamina, reaching the perineural and perivascular space then the internal acoustic meatus. The rate, extent and pattern of infection within the cochleae depended on the route of inoculation. Finally, there was no evidence of pneumococcal

  16. Epidemiology of Meningitis in an HIV-Infected Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C.; Williams, Darlisha A.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Crabtree, Mary B.; Miller, Barry R.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. PMID:25385864

  17. Neutrophilic bacterial meningitis: pathology and etiologic diagnosis of fatal cases.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Liu, Lindy; Bhatnagar, Julu; Jones, Tara; Patel, Mitesh; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Zaki, Sherif R

    2013-08-01

    The frequency of fatalities due to acute bacterial meningitis has decreased significantly due to vaccinations, early diagnoses, and treatments. We studied brain tissues of patients with fatal neutrophilic meningitis referred to the Centers for Disease Control for etiologic diagnosis from 2000-2009 to highlight aspects of the disease that may be preventable or treatable. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were extracted from records. Of 117 cases in the database with a diagnosis of meningitis or meningoencephalitis, 39 had neutrophilic inflammation in the meninges. Inflammatory cells infiltrated the superficial cortex in 16 of 39 (41%) cases. Bacteria were found using Gram and bacterial silver stains in 72% of cases, immunohistochemistry in 69% (including two cases where the meningococcus was found outside the meninges), and PCR in 74%. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the cause of the meningitis in 14 patients and Neisseria meningitidis in 9. In addition, Streptococcus spp. were found to be the cause in six cases, while Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Fusobacterium were the cause of one case each. There were six cases in which no specific etiological agent could be determined. The mean age of the patients with S. pneumoniae was 39 years (range 0-65), with N. meningitidis was 19 years (range 7-51), whereas that for all others was 31 years (range 0-68). In summary, our study shows that S. pneumoniae continues to be the most frequent cause of fatal neutrophilic bacterial meningitis followed by N. meningitidis, both vaccine preventable diseases. PMID:23558577

  18. Validation of the ANSR® Listeria Method for Detection of Listeria spp. in Selected Foods.

    PubMed

    Caballero, Oscar; Alles, Susan; Wendorf, Michael; Gray, R Lucas; Walton, Kayla; Pinkava, Lisa; Mozola, Mark; Rice, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ANSR® Listeria was previously certified as Performance Tested Method(SM) 101202 for detection of Listeria spp. on selected environmental surfaces. This study proposes a matrix extension to the method for detection of Listeria spp. in selected food matrixes. The method is an isothermal nucleic acid amplification assay based on the nicking enzyme amplification reaction technology. Following single-step sample enrichment for 16-24 h, the assay is completed in less than 50 min, requiring only simple instrumentation. Inclusivity testing was performed using a panel of 51 strains of Listeria spp., representing the species L. grayi, L. innocua, L. ivanovii, L. monocytogenes, L. seeligeri, and L. welshimeri. All strains tested were detected by the ANSR assay. Exclusivity testing of 30 strains representing non-Listeria Gram-positive bacteria yielded no evidence of cross-reactivity. Performance of the ANSR method for detection of Listeria spp. was compared to that of reference culture procedures for pasteurized liquid egg, pasteurized 2% milk, Mexican-style cheese, ice cream, smoked salmon, lettuce, cantaloupe, and guacamole. Data obtained in these unpaired studies and analyzed using a probability of detection model demonstrated that there were no statistically significant differences in results between the ANSR and reference culture methods, except for milk at 16 h and cantaloupe. In milk and smoked salmon, ANSR sensitivity was low at 16 h and therefore the recommended incubation time is 24 h. In cantaloupe, ANSR was found to be more sensitive than the reference culture method at both 16 and 24 h in independent laboratory testing. The ANSR Listeria method can be used as an accurate, rapid, and simple alternative to standard culture methods for detection of Listeria spp. in selected food types. PMID:26525248

  19. Direct Identification in Food Samples of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes by Molecular Methods

    PubMed Central

    Cocolin, Luca; Rantsiou, Kalliopi; Iacumin, Lucilla; Cantoni, Carlo; Comi, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    A new molecular approach for the detection and identification of Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes in food is presented here. The method is based on the PCR amplification of a fragment of the iap gene from the five species belonging to the genus and on the analysis of the PCR products obtained by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The protocol was first optimized by using strains from international collections. Based on the differences present in the sequences amplified, it was possible to obtain species-specific DGGE migration that allowed fast and easy identification of L. monocytogenes, L. innocua, L. welshimeri, L. seeligeri, and L. ivanovii. Moreover, for L. monocytogenes serotypes, partial differentiation was possible. The optimized protocol was used for identification of Listeria strains traditionally isolated from food and for direct detection and identification of Listeria members in food after an overnight enrichment. Identification of 48 food isolates and direct detection of Listeria spp. in 73 food samples show the potential of the method that can be used as a fast screening test to investigate the presence of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes in food. PMID:12450852

  20. Neuropsychological sequelae of bacterial and viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Heimann, B; Djukic, M; Mazurek, C; Fels, C; Wallesch, C-W; Nau, R

    2006-02-01

    Survivors of meningitis often complain about neurological and neuropsychological consequences. In this study, the extent of these sequelae was quantified and correlated to MRI findings. Neurological, neuropsychological and neuroradiological examinations were performed with adult patients younger than 70 years, 1-12 years after recovery from bacterial meningitis (BM; n = 59), or from viral meningitis (VM; n = 59). Patients with other potential causes for neuropsychological deficits (e.g. alcoholism) were carefully excluded. Patients were compared to 30 healthy subjects adjusted for age, gender and length of school education. With the exception of attention functions, both patient groups showed more frequently pathological results than the control group for all domains examined. Applying an overall cognitive sum score, patients after BM did not differ significantly in their performance from patients after VM. Separate analyses of various cognitive domains, however, revealed a higher rate of persistent disturbances in short-term and working memory after BM than after VM. Moreover, patients after BM exhibited greater impairment of executive functions. Associative learning of verbal material was also reduced. These deficits could not be ascribed to impaired alertness functions or decreased motivation in BM patients. Applying a logistic regression model, the neuropsychological outcome was related to the neurological outcome. Patients with a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) of <5 had more frequently impaired test results for non-verbal learning and memory. GOS was also correlated with performance in executive functions. Brain volume was lower and ventricular volume was higher in the bacterial than in the VM group, and cerebral volume and the amount of white matter lesions of patients after BM were negatively correlated with short-term and working memory. In conclusion, patients after both BM and VM with favourable outcome showed affected learning and memory functions. More

  1. Ibuprofen-induced meningitis in mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M; Gray, R G

    1982-06-01

    A young Black woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) developed an aseptic meningitis after receiving ibuprofen. The meningeal reaction, reported infrequently in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and only once previously in MCTD, was characterized by a predominantly polymorphonuclear cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis and depression of CSF glucose. Reversible renal insufficiency also occurred. Features suggestive of a hypersensitivity reaction included pruritus, conjunctivitis, facial oedema, desquamation of the palms and soles, and subsequent near total alopecia. Meningeal signs responded rapidly to systemic corticosteroid therapy. Patients with MCTD as well as those with SLE may be at peculiar risk of developing this uncommon reaction to ibuprofen. PMID:6985377

  2. How does Listeria monocytogenes combat acid conditions?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a major foodborne pathogen, possesses a number of mechanisms which enable it to combat the challenges posed by acidic environments such as acidic foods and the acidity in the gastrointestinal tract. These mechanisms include the acid tolerance response, a two-component regula...

  3. Fatal Case of Listeria innocua Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient. PMID:14605191

  4. Gemifloxacin Is Effective in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, A.; Wellmer, A.; Gerber, J.; Maier, K.; Henne, S.; Nau, R.

    2000-01-01

    In a rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, 5 mg of gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805) per kg/h reduced the bacterial titers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost as rapidly as 10 mg of ceftriaxone per kg/h (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± standard deviation [SD], −0.25 ± 0.09 versus −0.38 ± 0.11; serum and CSF concentrations of gemifloxacin were 2.1 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.59 ± 0.38 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h). Coadministration of 1 mg of dexamethasone per kg did not affect gemifloxacin serum and CSF levels (2.7 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.75 ± 0.34 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h) or activity (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± SD, −0.26 ± 0.11). PMID:10681354

  5. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges. PMID:6593035

  6. Bacterial meningitis: a new risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Mehrabi-Tavana, Ali; Izadi, Morteza; Hosseini, Sayed Mohammad Javad; Ataee, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to discuss a possible new risk factor for the bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Cerebrospinal fluid collected from 270 patients was assayed. An enzyme immunosorbent assay for the detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxins A to E was used. RESULTS: The results indicated that the frequency of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS) was 35 (20.46%). An important finding of this research was that the CoNS isolates produced enterotoxin C and D or enterotoxin C and E. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of enterotoxin-producing Coagulase Negative Staphylococci isolated from CSF patients. Therefore, these enterotoxins probably act as risk factors in the bacterial invasion into central nervous system. PMID:22091233

  7. Use of Intrathecal Fluorescein in Recurrent Meningitis after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Swati; Singh, Satinder; Sharma, Shalabh; Lahiri, Asish K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital anomalies of the cochlea and labyrinth can be associated with meningitis and varying degrees of hearing loss or deafness. Despite antibiotics, meningitis remains a life threatening complication. Case Report: We report a case of recurrent meningitis following episodes of otitis media in a cochlear implantee child with bilateral vestibulocochlear malformation, due to fistula in the stapes footplate. Intrathecal fluorescin was used to identify the leak site. Conclusion: Recurrent meningitis can indicate for possible immunological or anatomical abnormalities as well for chronic parameningeal infections. Intraoperative use of intrathecal fluorescin is an ideal investigative tool to demonstrate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak site in patients in whom other investigations fail to do so. PMID:27429952

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid "leaks" and meningitis following acoustic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Glasscock, M E; Hays, J W; Jackson, C G; Sismanis, A

    1982-01-01

    We reviewed 271 intracanalicular and cerebellopontine angle lesions removed over the past ten years, 237 by the translabyrinthine or combined approach which created a mastoid defect. The patients were divided into three groups with the following results: (1) obliteration of the mastoid defect combined with older wound closure techniques in the first 188 patients produced CSF leakage in 25% and meningitis in 16% of cases; (2) not obliterating the defect intentionaly in 16 patients produced CSF leakage in 50% and meningitis in 25% of cases; (3) obliteration of the defect combined with newer packing and closure techniques in the last 33 patients produced CSF leakage and meningitis in only 6% of cases. Four problem areas were identified: the eustachian tube, middle ear, mastoid defect, and postauricular wound. Of these, obliteration of the mastoid defect was most important in minimizing postoperative CSF wound leakage, CSF rhinorrhea, and meningitis. PMID:6806745

  9. A Case of Tuberculous Meningitis with Tuberculoma in Nonimmunocompromised Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hammad; Bihler, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tuberculous (TB) meningitis in nonimmunocompromised immigrant worker who initially presented with headache and later with generalized tonic clonic seizures and disseminated tuberculosis. PMID:27413568

  10. Future challenges in the elimination of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Matthew J; Serruto, Davide; Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio Palazzi; Klugman, Keith P

    2012-05-30

    Despite the widespread implementation of several effective vaccines over the past few decades, bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Group B Streptococcus (GBS) still results in unacceptably high levels of human mortality and morbidity. A residual disease burden due to bacterial meningitis is also apparent due to a number of persistent or emerging pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. and Streptococcus suis. Here, we review the current status of bacterial meningitis caused by these pathogens, highlighting how past and present vaccination programs have attempted to counter these pathogens. We discuss how improved pathogen surveillance, implementation of current vaccines, and development of novel vaccines may be expected to further reduce bacterial meningitis and related diseases in the future. PMID:22607903

  11. A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gayford, Kylie; McCarthy, Ana; Hague, William M

    2011-01-01

    A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis, a rare complication of an invasive infection by a common maternal commensal bacterium, which demonstrates the need to develop rapid and accurate antepartum and intrapartum screening methods for this organism.

  12. Five Cases of Recurrent Meningitis Associated with Chronic Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Shimasaki, Teppei; Chung, Heath; Shiiki, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Although meningitis secondary to chronic strongyloidiasis is a rare complication, it is associated with a high mortality rate. Recurrent meningitis can occur if the underlying parasitic infection is left untreated. We report five cases of recurrent meningitis related to chronic strongyloidiasis that were associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Common causative organisms are Escherichia coli, Streptococcus bovis, and Klebsiella pneumonia. One patient died during the second episode of meningitis. Three patients showed significant gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms before developing headache and fever. In four cases, patients developed multiple recurrences even with the treatment of thiabendazol. Ivermectin seems to be a better agent compared with thiabendazol to achieve eradication of strongyloidiasis. PMID:25548379

  13. Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis in an immunocompetent host: a case report.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Zenkner, Francis de Moura; França, Josiane; Santos, Breno Riegel

    2010-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 53-year-old man with a long history of alcohol abuse, with Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis, an organism that rarely causes human infection and is primarily found in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. The patient improved with high-dose ampicillin and gentamicin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first Brazilian reported case of E. gallinarum meningitis and probably the first case described in an immunocompetent host. PMID:20464133

  14. An aseptic meningitis picture from incipient brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Singer, J I

    1992-08-01

    A preadolescent with headache and stiff neck presented for emergency department care. The presumptive diagnosis of viral meningitis was entertained on the basis of clinical examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Events subsequent to his release from the department formed the stimulus for this report. It is apparent that patients with complicated sinusitis may present with a constellation of findings consistent with viral meningitis. PMID:1513739

  15. Liver metastasis of meningeal hemangiopericytoma: a study of 5 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Regina C.; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Rubin, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal tumors in the liver, whether primary or metastatic, are rare. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is characteristically associated with delayed metastasis and the liver is one of the most common sites. Despite its consistent histological features, a pathological diagnosis of HPC in the liver is sometimes not straightforward due to its rarity and usually remote medical history of the primary meningeal tumor. In this report, the clinicopathological features of 5 cases of metastatic HPC to the liver were reviewed and described. PMID:27044772

  16. Management of meningitis due to antibiotic-resistant Acinetobacter species

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek-Nam; Peleg, Anton Y; Lodise, Thomas P; Lipman, Jeffrey; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger; Paterson, David L

    2009-01-01

    Acinetobacter meningitis is becoming an increasingly common clinical entity, especially in the postneurosurgical setting, with mortality from this infection exceeding 15%. Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines for therapy of postneurosurgical meningitis recommend either ceftazidime or cefepime as empirical coverage against Gram-negative pathogens. However, assessment of the pharmacodynamics of these cephalosporins in cerebrospinal fluid suggests that recommended doses will achieve pharmacodynamic targets against fewer than 10% of contemporary acinetobacter isolates. Thus, these antibiotics are poor options for suspected acinetobacter meningitis. From in vitro and pharmacodynamic perspectives, intravenous meropenem plus intraventricular administration of an aminoglycoside may represent a superior, albeit imperfect, regimen for suspected acinetobacter meningitis. For cases of meningitis due to carbapenem-resistant acinetobacter, use of tigecycline is not recommended on pharmacodynamic grounds. The greatest clinical experience rests with use of polymyxins, although an intravenous polymyxin alone is inadvisable. Combination with an intraventricularly administered antibiotic plus removal of infected neurosurgical hardware appears the therapeutic strategy most likely to succeed in this situation. Unfortunately, limited development of new antibiotics plus the growing threat of multidrug-resistant acinetobacter is likely to increase the problems posed by acinetobacter meningitis in the future. PMID:19324297

  17. Aetiology, Clinical Presentation, and Outcome of Meningitis in Patients Coinfected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwan, Smita; Naidoo, Kogieleum

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective review of confirmed HIV-TB coinfected patients previously enrolled as part of the SAPiT study in Durban, South Africa. Patients with suspected meningitis were included in this case series. From 642 individuals, 14 episodes of meningitis in 10 patients were identified. For 8 patients, this episode of meningitis was the AIDS defining illness, with cryptococcus (9/14 episodes) and tuberculosis (3/14 episodes) as the commonest aetiological agents. The combination of headache and neck stiffness (78.6%) was the most frequent clinical presentation. Relapsing cryptococcal meningitis occurred in 3/7 patients. Mortality was 70% (7/10), with 4 deaths directly due to meningitis. In an HIV TB endemic region we identified cryptococcus followed by tuberculosis as the leading causes of meningitis. We highlight the occurrence of tuberculous meningitis in patients already receiving antituberculous therapy. The development of meningitis heralded poor outcomes, high mortality, and relapsing meningitis despite ART. PMID:22216407

  18. Methods for detection, identification and specification of listerias

    DOEpatents

    Bochner, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to differential carbon source metabolism in the genus Listeria, metabolic, biochemical, immunological and genetic procedures to measure said differential carbon source metabolism and the use of these produces to detect, isolate and/or distinguish species of the genus Listeria as well as detect, isolate and/or distinguish strains of species of Listeria. The present invention also contemplates test kits and enrichment media to facilitate these procedures.

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis Presenting with Acute Urinary Retention and Emphysematous Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Endo, Akiko; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acute urinary retention and aseptic meningitis has occasionally been described, which is referred to as meningitis-retention syndrome. In contrast, acute urinary retention has rarely been reported in bacterial meningitis. We herein report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis presenting with acute urinary retention which led to emphysematous cystitis in an elderly woman. She presented with impaired consciousness and a distended lower abdomen. She was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis by lumbar puncture. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the presence of emphysematous cystitis. She completely recovered with antibiotic therapy without any complications. Acute urinary retention can occur secondary to pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27477423

  20. Discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species by ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Czajka, J; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1992-01-01

    A ligase chain reaction assay based on a single-base-pair difference in the V9 region of the 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) was developed to distinguish between Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. For this purpose, two pairs of primers were designed, with one primer of each pair being radioactively labeled. The ligated product was separated from the primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then detected by autoradiography. To achieve a higher sensitivity, the 16S rDNA was initially amplified by polymerase chain reaction prior to the ligase chain reaction. The ligase chain reaction was tested on 19 different Listeria species and strains and proved to be a highly specific diagnostic method for the detection of L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:1482171

  1. Redundant Roles for Met Docking Site Tyrosines and the Gab1 Pleckstrin Homology Domain in InlB-Mediated Entry of Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Basar, Tumay; Shen, Yang; Ireton, Keith

    2005-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes causes food-borne illnesses leading to gastroenteritis, meningitis, or abortion. Listeria induces its internalization into some mammalian cells through interaction of the bacterial surface protein InlB with host Met receptor tyrosine kinase. Binding of InlB leads to phosphorylation of Met and the adapter Gab1 and to activation of host phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinase. The mammalian ligand of Met, hepatocyte growth factor, promotes cell motility and morphogenesis in a manner dependent on phosphorylation of two docking site tyrosines at positions 1349 and 1356 in the receptor's cytoplasmic tail. Here we determined if these tyrosines were essential for Listeria entry. A derivative of the human cell line T47D stably expressing a truncated Met lacking most of its cytoplasmic domain was unable to support InlB-mediated signaling or entry. Surprisingly, cells expressing mutant Met containing phenylalanine substitutions in both tyrosines 1349 and 1356 (MetYF) allowed entry and InlB-induced Gab1 phosphorylation. However, in contrast to the situation in cells expressing wild-type Met, Gab1 phosphorylation in MetYF cells required PI 3-kinase activity. The Gab1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain was constitutively associated with the plasma membrane of cells in a PI 3-kinase-dependent manner. Overexpression of the PH domain blocked entry of Listeria into cells expressing MetYF but not into cells expressing wild-type Met. Taken together, these results indicate that the docking site tyrosines are dispensable for internalization when membrane localization of Gab1 is constitutive. Distinct pathways of recruitment by phosphorylated tyrosines in Met and PH domain ligands in the membrane are redundant for bacterial entry. PMID:15784547

  2. Approach to diagnosis of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid evaluation.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, J E

    1990-12-01

    CSF evaluation is the single most important aspect of the laboratory diagnosis of meningitis. Analysis of the CSF abnormalities produced by bacterial, mycobacterial, and fungal infections may greatly facilitate diagnosis and direct initial therapy. Basic studies of CSF that should be performed in all patients with meningitis include measurement of pressure, cell count and white cell differential; determination of glucose and protein levels; Gram's stain; and culture. In bacterial meningitis, Limulus lysate assay and tests to identify bacterial antigens may allow rapid diagnosis. Where there is strong suspicion of tuberculous or fungal meningitis, CSF should also be submitted for acid-fast stain, India ink preparation, and cryptococcal antigen; unless contraindicated by increased intracranial pressure, large volumes (up to 40-50 mL) should be obtained for culture. If a history of residence in the Southwest is elicited, complement-fixing antibodies to Coccidioides immitis should also be ordered. Newer tests based on immunologic methods or gene amplification techniques hold great promise for diagnosis of infections caused by organisms that are difficult to culture or present in small numbers. Despite the great value of lumbar puncture in the diagnosis of meningitis, injudicious use of the procedure may result in death from brain herniation. Lumbar puncture should be avoided if focal neurologic findings suggest concomitant mass lesion, as in brain abscess, and lumbar puncture should be approached with great caution if meningitis is accompanied by evidence of significant intracranial hypertension. Institution of antibiotic therapy for suspected meningitis should not be delayed while neuroradiologic studies are obtained to exclude abscess or while measures are instituted to reduce intracranial pressure. PMID:2277190

  3. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A meningococcal serogroup A polysaccharide/tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac#x2122;) is being deployed in countries of the African meningitis belt. Experience with other polysaccharide/protein conjugate vaccines has shown that an important part of their success has been their ability to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage and hence to stop transmission and induce herd immunity. If PsA-TT is to achieve the goal of preventing epidemics, it must be able to prevent the acquisition of pharyngeal carriage as well as invasive meningococcal disease and whether PsA-TT can prevent pharyngeal carriage needs to be determined. To address this issue, a consortium (the African Meningococcal Carriage (MenAfriCar) consortium) was established in 2009 to investigate the pattern of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt prior to and after the introduction of PsA-TT. This article describes how the consortium was established, its objectives and the standardised field and laboratory methods that were used to achieve these objectives. The experience of the MenAfriCar consortium will help in planning future studies on the epidemiology of meningococcal carriage in countries of the African meningitis belt and elsewhere. Un vaccin conjugué contenant un polysaccharide du sérogroupe A méningococcique et une anatoxine du tétanos (PsA-TT) (MenAfriVac™) est en cours de déploiement dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite. L’ expérience avec d’ autres vaccins conjugués polysaccharide/protéine a montré qu’ une partie importante de leur succès a été leur capacité à empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé et donc à arrêter la transmission et à induire une immunité de group. Si PsA-TT doit d’ atteindre l’ objectif de prévenir les épidémies, il devrait être en mesure d’ empêcher l’ acquisition du portage pharyngé ainsi que la méningococcie invasive et le fait que PsA-TT puisse emp

  4. Diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis: challenges and promises.

    PubMed

    Philip, N; William, T; William, D V

    2015-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infects primarily the lungs but it also affects other parts of the body. Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most severe form of TB and has the highest mortality and morbidity rate compared to other forms of TB. It is common in young children and HIV-infected patients, but is also seen in adults. Despite anti-tuberculosis treatment, TBM is still a major cause of death and neurological sequelae as treatment given to the patients is often delayed. Early diagnosis is challenging due to the non-specific symptoms of TBM and the low number of tubercle bacilli in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Until now, there is no established diagnostic method that can rapidly detect M. tuberculosis in TBM patients with high sensitivity and specificity. The emergence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains further complicates the diagnosis and treatment regimen of TBM. This review summarizes challenges of the currently used diagnostic methods and the potential future use of molecular diagnostic methods for TBM. PMID:25890607

  5. ISG15 counteracts Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Radoshevich, Lilliana; Impens, Francis; Ribet, David; Quereda, Juan J; Nam Tham, To; Nahori, Marie-Anne; Bierne, Hélène; Dussurget, Olivier; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Knobeloch, Klaus-Peter; Cossart, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-stimulated, linear di-ubiquitin-like protein, with anti-viral activity. The role of ISG15 during bacterial infection remains elusive. We show that ISG15 expression in nonphagocytic cells is dramatically induced upon Listeria infection. Surprisingly this induction can be type I interferon independent and depends on the cytosolic surveillance pathway, which senses bacterial DNA and signals through STING, TBK1, IRF3 and IRF7. Most importantly, we observed that ISG15 expression restricts Listeria infection in vitro and in vivo. We made use of stable isotope labeling in tissue culture (SILAC) to identify ISGylated proteins that could be responsible for the protective effect. Strikingly, infection or overexpression of ISG15 leads to ISGylation of ER and Golgi proteins, which correlates with increased secretion of cytokines known to counteract infection. Together, our data reveal a previously uncharacterized ISG15-dependent restriction of Listeria infection, reinforcing the view that ISG15 is a key component of the innate immune response. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06848.001 PMID:26259872

  6. Prevalence and Contamination Patterns of Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Catfish Fillets and their Processing Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Catfish skins, intestines, fresh fillets, processing surfaces at different production stages, chiller water and non-food contact surfaces were sampled for Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. Among 315 samples, prevalence of L. monocytogenes, Listeria innocua and a group of Listeria se...

  7. The Meninges: New Therapeutic Targets For Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Russi, Abigail E.; Brown, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    The CNS is largely comprised of non-regenerating cells, including neurons and myelin-producing oligodendrocytes, which are particularly vulnerable to immune cell mediated damage. To protect the CNS, mechanisms exist that normally restrict the transit of peripheral immune cells into the brain and spinal cord, conferring an “immune specialized” status. Thus, there has been a long-standing debate as to how these restrictions are overcome in several inflammatory diseases of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we highlight the role of the meninges, tissues that surround and protect the CNS and enclose the cerebral spinal fluid, in promoting chronic inflammation that leads to neuronal damage. Although the meninges have traditionally been considered structures that provide physical protection for the brain and spinal cord, new data has established these tissues as sites of active immunity. It has been hypothesized that the meninges are important players in normal immunosurveillance of the CNS but also serve as initial sites of anti-myelin immune responses. The resulting robust meningeal inflammation elicits loss of localized blood barrier integrity and facilitates a large-scale influx of immune cells into the CNS parenchyma. We propose that targeting of the cells and molecules mediating these inflammatory responses within the meninges offers promising therapies for MS that are free from the constraints imposed by the blood brain barrier. Importantly, such therapies may avoid the systemic immunosuppression often associated with the existing treatments. PMID:25241937

  8. Appearance of the canine meninges in subtraction magnetic resonance images.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Christopher R; Lam, Richard; Keenihan, Erin K; Frean, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The canine meninges are not visible as discrete structures in noncontrast magnetic resonance (MR) images, and are incompletely visualized in T1-weighted, postgadolinium images, reportedly appearing as short, thin curvilinear segments with minimal enhancement. Subtraction imaging facilitates detection of enhancement of tissues, hence may increase the conspicuity of meninges. The aim of the present study was to describe qualitatively the appearance of canine meninges in subtraction MR images obtained using a dynamic technique. Images were reviewed of 10 consecutive dogs that had dynamic pre- and postgadolinium T1W imaging of the brain that was interpreted as normal, and had normal cerebrospinal fluid. Image-anatomic correlation was facilitated by dissection and histologic examination of two canine cadavers. Meningeal enhancement was relatively inconspicuous in postgadolinium T1-weighted images, but was clearly visible in subtraction images of all dogs. Enhancement was visible as faint, small-rounded foci compatible with vessels seen end on within the sulci, a series of larger rounded foci compatible with vessels of variable caliber on the dorsal aspect of the cerebral cortex, and a continuous thin zone of moderate enhancement around the brain. Superimposition of color-encoded subtraction images on pregadolinium T1- and T2-weighted images facilitated localization of the origin of enhancement, which appeared to be predominantly dural, with relatively few leptomeningeal structures visible. Dynamic subtraction MR imaging should be considered for inclusion in clinical brain MR protocols because of the possibility that its use may increase sensitivity for lesions affecting the meninges. PMID:24833219

  9. Chronic candidal meningitis: an uncommon manifestation of candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Voice, R A; Bradley, S F; Sangeorzan, J A; Kauffman, C A

    1994-07-01

    Chronic meningitis is an uncommon manifestation of candidiasis. We present the case of an elderly woman who had symptoms such as headache, malaise, and fever for 8 months and was found to have Candida albicans meningitis, and we review 17 similar cases. An underlying illness or risk factor for candidiasis was present in only 13 (72%) of the 18 patients. Headache, fever, and nuchal rigidity were the predominant clinical findings. Analysis of CSF showed either mononuclear or neutrophilic pleocytosis, an elevated protein level, and a decreased level of glucose. Only 17% of CSF smears were positive, and only 44% of initial CSF cultures yielded Candida species. In four cases, Candida species grew only after special techniques were used; in three cases, CSF cultures remained negative. The overall mortality associated with candidal meningitis was 53%, but among 12 patients who were treated and followed, the rate was 33%. In addition to acute meningitis seen with disseminated infection, Candida species can cause chronic meningitis that mimics tuberculosis and the more common fungal meningitides, such as cryptococcosis. PMID:7948559

  10. Application of heat in postcook meat chillers reduces Listeria.

    PubMed

    Eglezos, Sofroni; Dykes, Gary A

    2011-06-01

    Electrical air-blowing heaters were used to heat and dry out holding chillers used for postcook commercial processed meats in an attempt to control the presence of Listeria. A baseline study of the prevalence of Listeria in holding chillers in seven facilities was undertaken. Listeria was detected in four of the seven chillers, and swab samples showed Listeria prevalence ranging from 7 (7.8%) of 90 to 6 (20%) of 30, depending on the facility. Two of the facilities with established Listeria contamination (A and E) were chosen for further studies. The heating trials consisted of three individual heating interventions at each of the two facilities, with 2 weeks of postintervention sampling after each treatment. The initial Listeria prevalence in chiller A was 19 (10.6%) of 180, and treatment at 37°C for 36 h reduced prevalence to 3 (1.7%) of 180. The initial Listeria prevalence in chiller E was 7 (7.8%) of 90, and treatment at 50°C for 2 h reduced prevalence to 0 of 90. Both reductions were statistically significant at P < 0.01. The incorporation of these two simple chiller heating protocols into these facilities' good manufacturing practices has effectively reduced prevalence of Listeria in chillers. PMID:21669080

  11. Prolongation of acquired cellular resistance to Listeria monocytogenes

    PubMed Central

    Willers, J. M. N.; Hofhuis, F. M. A.; Meer, C. Vander

    1982-01-01

    Intracutaneous immunization of mice with 105 or 106 viable listeria resulted in acquired cellular resistance (ACR) of short duration (7 days) and in delayed-type hypersensitivity (DH) lasting at least 27 days. The ACR was partially non-specific, as 50% of the mice were also protected against a lethal challenge with Salmonella enteritidis. The specific element of the ACR could be transferred by non-adherent spleen cells from immune mice to normal recipient mice. Such transfer was not possible with adherent spleen cells from immune mice or with spleen cells from normal mice. Two systems of multiple immunizations to extend the period during which mice were protected against a challenge with 50 LD50 listeria were used. In the first system, mice were immunized with 106 viable listeria and subsequently challenged with 50 LD50 (= 107) viable listeria. Mice surviving the challenge were actually boosted at the challenge injection for ACR. In the second system mice were immunized and boosted with 108 killed listeria mixed with the adjuvant dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide (DDA). In the former system after each booster injection with viable listeria the interval during which the mice were protected doubled and reached a maximum of 31 days. In the latter system all intervals between two booster injections were equally long and never exceeded 28 days. In both systems the existence of immunological memory was suggested. The difference in results obtained after immunization with viable listeria and killed listeria mixed with DDA are discussed. PMID:6809603

  12. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  15. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3355 - Listeria spp. serological reagents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Listeria spp. serological reagents. 866.3355 Section 866.3355 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3355 Listeria...

  17. Dementia and capsular genu ischemia in patients with severe bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Naito, Makoto; Johkura, Ken; Momoo, Takayuki; Nomiya, Tamaki; Kudo, Yosuke; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki

    2010-04-01

    Infarction in the genu of the internal capsule causes dementia that is characterized by abulia, lethargy and memory loss without obvious motor palsy (capsular genu syndrome). We found infarction or decreased cerebral blood flow in the genu of the internal capsule in 6 of 13 patients with severe bacterial meningitis. Four of these six patients developed post-meningitis dementia, characterized by abulia, lethargy, and memory loss. Of 24 patients with viral meningitis, none developed capsular genu ischemia or post-meningitis dementia. In patients with severe bacterial meningitis, capsular genu ischemia may play some role in the development of post-meningitis dementia. In patients with viral meningitis, absence of such ischemia may explain, at least in a part, the rarity of post-meningitis dementia. PMID:19838622

  18. CSF ADA Determination in Early Diagnosis of Tuberculous Meningitis in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Gopal Chandra; Sharma, Brijesh; Gupta, B. B.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous and Cryptococcal meningitis are common in HIV patients. A highly specific and sensitive rapid test for diagnosis of Tuberculous meningitis especially in setting of HIV is not available in developing countries where the burden of disease is high. We measured ADA (adenosine deaminase) levels using spectrophotometric method in the CSF of HIV patients with meningitis to differentiate Tuberculous meningitis from meningitis due to other causes. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare ADA values between tuberculous meningitis (TBM) and nontuberculous (non-TB) meningitis patients and a receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis curve was drawn from these values. Levels of ADA in the CSF of patients with TBM were significantly higher than those in patients with meningitis due to other causes. CSF ADA level determination with a cut-off value of 6 IU/L was found to be highly specific and fairly sensitive test for the diagnosis of TBM in HIV positive patients. PMID:27144055

  19. Listeria monocytogenes--threat to a safe food supply: a review.

    PubMed

    Pearson, L J; Marth, E H

    1990-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes can cause circling disease, encephalitis, meningitis, septicemia, and mastitis in dairy cattle. Shedding of the pathogen from the udder or contamination from the environment can lead to presence of L. monocytogenes in raw milk. Surveys indicate the pathogen is in about 4% of US raw milks. Although HTST pasteurization commonly inactivates L. monocytogenes, evidence suggests that under unusual circumstances minimal survival is possible. The pathogen grows well in liquid dairy products at 4 to 35 degrees C and achieves higher populations in chocolate than in unflavored milks. When present in cheese milk, growth of L. monocytogenes may be retarded but not stopped by lactic starter cultures. The pathogen is concentrated in the curd with only a small fraction of cells in milk appearing in whey. Once in curd, the behavior of the pathogen ranges from growth (feta cheese making) to death of most but not all cells (cottage cheese making). During ripening of cheese, the numbers of L. monocytogenes decrease gradually (as in Cheddar or Colby cheese), decrease precipitously early during ripening, and then stabilize (as in blue cheese) or increase markedly (as in Camembert cheese). Consumption of foods containing L. monocytogenes can lead to listeriosis in susceptible humans (adults with a compromised immune system), pregnant women, and infants). In large outbreaks of human listeriosis, mortality rates of ca. 30% are common. PMID:2111832

  20. Pregnancy - associated human listeriosis: Virulence and genotypic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes from clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Soni, Dharmendra Kumar; Singh, Durg Vijai; Dubey, Suresh Kumar

    2015-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a life-threatening pathogen, poses severe risk during pregnancy, may cause abortion, fetal death or neonatal morbidity in terms of septicemia and meningitis. The present study aimed at characterizing L. monocytogenes isolated from pregnant women based on serotyping, antibiotic susceptibility, virulence genes, in vivo pathogenicity test and ERIC- and REP-PCR fingerprint analyses. The results revealed that out of 3700 human clinical samples, a total of 30 (0.81%) isolates [12 (0.80%) from placental bit (1500), 18 (0.81%) from vaginal swab (2200)] were positive for L. monocytogenes. All the isolates belonged to serogroup 4b, and were + ve for virulence genes tested i.e. inlA, inlC, inlJ, plcA, prfA, actA, hlyA, and iap. Based on the mice inoculation tests, 20 isolates showed 100% and 4 isolates 60% relative virulence while 6 isolates were non-pathogenic. Moreover, 2 and 10 isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefoxitin, respectively, while the rest susceptible to other antibiotics used in this study. ERIC- and REP-PCR collectively depicted that the isolates from placental bit and vaginal swab had distinct PCR fingerprints except a few isolates with identical patterns. This study demonstrates prevalence of pathogenic strains mostly resistant to cefoxitin and/or ciprofloxacin. The results indicate the importance of isolating and characterizing the pathogen from human clinical samples as the pre-requisite for accurate epidemiological investigations. PMID:26231373

  1. Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes: A Real Challenge in Quality Control

    PubMed Central

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Szabó, Judit; Dombrádi, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen, and the detection and differentiation of this bacterium from the nonpathogenic Listeria species are of great importance to the food industry. Differentiation of Listeria species is very difficult, even with the sophisticated MALDI-TOF MS technique because of the close genetic relationship of the species and the usual gene transfer. The present paper emphasizes the difficulties of the differentiation through the standardized detection and confirmation according to ISO 11290-1:1996 and basic available L. monocytogenes detection methods and tests (such as API Listeria test, MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and hly gene PCR). With the increase of reports on the pathogenesis of atypical Listeria strains in humans, the significance of species level determination has become questionable, especially in food quality control, and the detection of pathogenic characteristics seems to be more relevant. PMID:27239376

  2. Foodborne Listeria monocytogenes: A Real Challenge in Quality Control.

    PubMed

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Szabó, Judit; Dombrádi, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen, and the detection and differentiation of this bacterium from the nonpathogenic Listeria species are of great importance to the food industry. Differentiation of Listeria species is very difficult, even with the sophisticated MALDI-TOF MS technique because of the close genetic relationship of the species and the usual gene transfer. The present paper emphasizes the difficulties of the differentiation through the standardized detection and confirmation according to ISO 11290-1:1996 and basic available L. monocytogenes detection methods and tests (such as API Listeria test, MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and hly gene PCR). With the increase of reports on the pathogenesis of atypical Listeria strains in humans, the significance of species level determination has become questionable, especially in food quality control, and the detection of pathogenic characteristics seems to be more relevant. PMID:27239376

  3. Highly selective medium for isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from food.

    PubMed Central

    al-Zoreky, N; Sandine, W E

    1990-01-01

    A new selective medium (Al-Zoreky-Sandine listeria medium [ASLM]) was formulated to recover Listeria monocytogenes from food specimens; the medium completely inhibited common food microflora. Recognition of Listeria colonies is evident by black discoloration of the medium due to esculin hydrolysis without need for special illuminating equipment. The medium contains acriflavin, ceftazidime, and moxalactam as selective agents. Compared with Listeria Selective Agar, ASLM was equally effective in recovering L. monocytogenes. However, ASLM inhibited micrococci, enterococci, and gram-negative bacteria, especially a strain that mimicked L. monocytogenes on Listeria Selective Agar. The new medium was able to recover heat injured cells with only 15% less count than the nonselective medium. Images PMID:2126701

  4. Stroke Secondary to Aseptic Meningitis After Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Aneurysm with Parent Artery Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Doenmez, Halil Mavili, Ertugrul Ikizceli, Tuerkan; Durak, Ahmet Candan; Kurtsoy, Ali

    2009-07-15

    Aseptic meningitis related to hydrogel-coated coils is a known complication, but it is extremely rare after platinum bare coil aseptic meningitis. Here we report the development of aseptic meningitis causing brain stem and cerebellar infarct in a patient with a giant aneurysm treated with bare platinum coils. We conclude that aneurysm size is an important factor affecting the occurrence of aseptic meningitis associated with stroke.

  5. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Wanis H; Elalamy, Osama R; Doiphode, Sanjay H; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis. PMID:21483588

  6. Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Wanis H.; Elalamy, Osama R.; Doiphode, Sanjay H.; Mobyaed, Hassan; Darweesh, Adham

    2010-01-01

    Acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia is a very rare manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, with only a few cases reported in the literature. In almost all previously reported cases, other clinical manifestations of meningitis, such as fever, headache, and neck stiffness preceded acute myelopathy. In this paper, we report a case of acute myelopathy with sudden paraplegia as the sole manifestation of meningococcal meningitis, in the absence of other clinical manifestations of meningitis. PMID:21483588

  7. The Evolution of the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    PubMed Central

    Tiffay, Kathleen; Jodar, Luis; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Socquet, Muriel; LaForce, F. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background. In 2001, the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was tasked to develop, test, license, and introduce a group A meningococcal (MenA) conjugate vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa. African public health officials emphasized that a vaccine price of less than US$0.50 per dose was necessary to ensure introduction and sustained use of this new vaccine. Methods. Initially, MVP envisioned partnering with a multinational vaccine manufacturer, but the target price and opportunity costs were problematic and formal negotiations ended in 2002. MVP chose to become a “virtual vaccine company,” and over the next decade managed a network of public–private and public–public partnerships for pharmaceutical development, clinical development, and regulatory submission. MVP supported the transfer of key know-how for the production of group A polysaccharide and a new conjugation method to the Serum Institute of India, Ltd, based in Pune, India. A robust staff structure supported by technical consultants and overseen by advisory groups in Europe and Africa ensured that the MenA conjugate vaccine would meet all international standards. Results. A robust project structure including a team of technical consultants and 3 advisory groups in Europe and Africa ensured that the MenA conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT, MenAfriVac) was licensed by the Drug Controller General of India and prequalified by the World Health Organization in June 2010. The vaccine was introduced in Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger in December 2010. Conclusions. The development, through a public–private partnership, of a safe, effective, and affordable vaccine for sub-Saharan Africa, PsA-TT, offers a new paradigm for the development of vaccines specifically targeting populations in resource-poor countries. PMID:26553666

  8. MICROBIOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR DETECTION OF LISTERIA SPP. AND LISTERIA MONOCYTOGENES IN A CULL SOWS PROCESS PLANT IN USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria spp. and Listeria monocytogenes present in a cull sow processing plant in the USA was evaluated by a PCR multiplex method. 160 cull sows were surveyed after slaughter. Samples were collected from sub-iliac node, ileocecal node, cecal contents and carcass swabs. Additionally, samples were...

  9. Rapid detection and differentiation of Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria species in deli meats by a new multiplex PCR method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes is an important foodborne pathogen. To effectively control this pathogen, it is necessary to have a method that can detect and differentiate L. monocytogenes from other Listeria species in food, environmental, and clinical samples. A new multiplex PCR method using new primers ...

  10. Prevalence and level of Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria sp. in ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables.

    PubMed

    Kovačević, Mira; Burazin, Jelena; Pavlović, Hrvoje; Kopjar, Mirela; Piližota, Vlasta

    2013-04-01

    Minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables can be contaminated with Listeria species bacteria including Listeria monocytogenes due to extensive handling during processing or by cross contamination from the processing environment. The objective of this study was to examine the microbiological quality of ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables from supermarkets in Osijek, Croatia. 100 samples of ready-to-eat vegetables collected from different supermarkets in Osijek, Croatia, were analyzed for presence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes. The collected samples were cut iceberg lettuces (24 samples), other leafy vegetables (11 samples), delicatessen salads (23 samples), cabbage salads (19 samples), salads from mixed (17 samples) and root vegetables (6 samples). Listeria species was found in 20 samples (20 %) and Listeria monocytogenes was detected in only 1 sample (1 %) of cut red cabbage (less than 100 CFU/g). According to Croatian and EU microbiological criteria these results are satisfactory. However, the presence of Listeria species and Listeria monocytogenes indicates poor hygiene quality. The study showed that these products are often improperly labeled, since 24 % of analyzed samples lacked information about shelf life, and 60 % of samples lacked information about storage conditions. With regard to these facts, cold chain abruption with extended use after expiration date is a probable scenario. Therefore, the microbiological risk for consumers of ready-to-eat minimally processed and refrigerated vegetables is not completely eliminated. PMID:23225207

  11. Probable acute disseminated encephalomyelitis due to Haemophilus influenzae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Beleza, Pedro; Ribeiro, Manuel; Pereira, João; Ferreira, Carla; Jordão, Maria José; Almeida, Fátima

    2008-05-01

    We report the case of a 17-year-old male on long-term steroid therapy for minimal lesion glomerulopathy who, after an upper respiratory infection, presented with Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis. Twenty-four hours later he developed depression of consciousness which progressed to coma and left hemiparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multiple lesions (hyperintense on T2 and slightly hypointense on Tl) involving mainly white matter suggestive of inflammation. MRI features were compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), although a differential diagnosis included cerebritis or vasculitis, secondary to bacterial meningitis. The patient was treated with high-dose steroids which resulted in a gradual improvement followed by complete clinical recovery. We propose a diagnosis of ADEM was the best diagnosis because of the radiological features and response to steroids. The occurrence of ADEM associated with acute meningitis, however rare, represents an important diagnostic challenge for the clinician. PMID:18355336

  12. Multiplex PCR for rapid diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kusum, Sharma; Aman, Sharma; Pallab, Ray; Kumar, Sharma Shiv; Manish, Modi; Sudesh, Prabhakar; Subhash, Varma; Meera, Sharma

    2011-10-01

    Rapid and specific diagnosis of tubercular meningitis is of paramount importance to decrease morbidity and mortality. The aim of the study was to evaluate multiplex PCR using protein b, MPB 64, and IS6110 primers directed against M. tuberculosis complex for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis (TBM). Multiplex PCR was performed on 18 TBM confirmed cases (culture was positive), 92 clinically suspected TBM cases and 100 non-TBM (control group) patients. Multiplex PCR had a sensitivity of 94.4% for confirmed cases and specificity of 100% for confirmed TBM cases. In 92 clinically diagnosed but unconfirmed TBM cases, multiplex PCR was positive in 84.78% cases. The overall sensitivity of microscopy, culture and multiplex cases were 1.81, 16.73, and 86.63% and specificity was 100, 100, and 100% respectively. Multiplex PCR using protein b, MPB 64, and IS6110 primers has a high sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of tubercular meningitis. PMID:21455603

  13. Preventing deaths from cryptococcal meningitis: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Roy, Monika; Chiller, Tom

    2011-09-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM), a fungal disease caused by Cryptococcus spp., is the most common form of meningitis and a leading cause of death among persons with HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. Detection of cryptococcal antigen, which is present several weeks before overt signs of meningitis develop, provides an opportunity to detect infection early. Screening persons with HIV for cryptococcal infection when they access healthcare can identify asymptomatic infected patients allowing for prompt treatment and prevention of death. A newly developed point-of-care assay for cryptococcal antigen, as well as growing evidence supporting the utility and cost-effectiveness of screening, are further reasons to consider broad implementation of cryptococcal screening in countries with a high burden of cryptococcal disease. PMID:21905781

  14. Severe cochlear dysplasia causing recurrent meningitis: a surgical lesson.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, D S; Proops, D W; Phelps, P D

    1993-08-01

    Meningitis may be the sole presenting sign of a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula of the temporal bone. An eight-year-old boy suffering from recurrent meningitis was found to have bilateral severe cochlear dysplasia. Bilateral tympanotomies were performed, planning to obliterate each vestibule. In the right ear a stapedectomy was performed, resulting in a torrential 'CSF gusher' and difficulty in packing the vestibule. CSF rhinorrhoea requiring revision surgery and two episodes of gram-negative bacterial meningitis complicated the post-operative management, resulting in a prolonged hospital stay. Subsequently, the left ear was managed in a different fashion, leaving the stapes in situ, with grafts placed to seal the oval window niche. We would recommend this alternative procedure in cases of severe cochlear dysplasia, where abnormalities of the vestibule and basal turn of the cochlea mean that performing a stapedectomy to pack the vestibule may result in a severe 'CSF gusher', by opening directly into the subarachnoid space. PMID:8409727

  15. Vaccine preventable meningitis in Malaysia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Hannah C; Jefferies, Johanna M C; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide bacterial meningitis accounts for more than one million cases and 135,000 deaths annually. Profound, lasting neurological complications occur in 9-25% of cases. This review confirms the greatest risk from bacterial meningitis is in early life in Malaysia. Much of the disease burden can be avoided by immunization, particularly against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite inclusion of the Hib vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme and the licensure of pneumococcal vaccines, these two species are the main contributors to bacterial meningitis in Malaysia, with Neisseria meningitidis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing a smaller proportion of disease. The high Hib prevalence may partly be due to dated, small-scale studies limiting the understanding of the current epidemiological situation. This highlights the need for larger, better quality surveillance from Malaysia to evaluate the success of Hib immunization and to help guide immunization policy for vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. PMID:25962101

  16. Recent advances in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Quagliarello, V J; Scheld, W M

    1986-11-01

    Bacterial meningitis continues to account for worldwide morbidity and mortality despite the advent of effective bactericidal antibiotic therapy. Recent advances over the past 10 years in the development of experimental animal models as well as basic investigation into critical bacterial surface virulence factors have begun to clarify a conceptual framework for understanding the mechanism of meningitis development in humans. Basic observations regarding competing host defenses and bacterial virulence factors have supported a pathogenetic sequence of mucosal colonization with a meningeal pathogen; systemic host invasion with intravascular replication; blood brain barrier penetration and unimpeded CSF proliferation amid the impaired host defenses in the CSF milieu; and pathophysiologic sequelae including vasogenic, cytotoxic, and interstitial brain edema (and other processes) accounting for irreversible neuronal injury and death. Only through continued basic investigation into each of these pathogenetic steps will significant reductions in morbidity and mortality ensue. PMID:3535498

  17. Citramalic acid in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Perlman, S; Carr, S A

    1984-07-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from uninfected patients and from patients with bacterial and viral meningitis was analyzed by gas-liquid chromatography, with use of a flame ionization detector, and by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The resulting profiles were consistent and reproducible. Hydroxy acids were the compounds found in greatest abundance in both normal and infected CSF. Control experiments to establish the sensitivity and efficiency of the extraction and derivatization methods are also presented. Constituents of CSF from patients with bacterial meningitis differed quantitatively and qualitatively from those of CSF from uninfected patients or patients with nonbacterial infections. CSF from seven of eight patients with bacterial meningitis contained citramalic acid, a compound not previously identified in either normal or infected CSF. The implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:6145530

  18. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and sphenoid sinus mucocele. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Conte, Aristide; Chinello, Pierangelo; Civljak, Rok; Bellussi, Angelo; Noto, Pasquale; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis caused by Streptococcus salivarius in a 49-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed cerebrospinal fluid fistula due to a sphenoid mucocele. We reviewed the literature concerning meningitis caused by this uncommon organism and to the best of our knowledge this is the first case of S. salivarius meningitis associated with sphenoid mucocele. PMID:15936084

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis Detection for Tuberculous Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guo-dong; Shi, Ming; Ma, Lei; Chen, Ping; Wang, Bing-ju; Zhang, Min; Chang, Xiao-lin; Su, Xiu-chu; Yang, Yi-ning; Fan, Xin-hong; Dai, Wen; Liu, Ting-ting; He, Ying; Bian, Ting; Duan, Li-xin; Li, Jin-ge; Hao, Xiao-ke; Liu, Jia-yun; Xue, Xin; Song, Yun-zhang; Wu, Hai-qin; Niu, Guo-qiang; Zhang, Li; Han, Cui-juan; Lin, Hong; Lin, Zhi-hui; Liu, Jian-jun; Jian, Qian; Zhang, Jin-she; Tian, Ye; Zhou, Bai-yu; Wang, Jing; Xue, Chang-hu; Han, Xiao-fang; Wang, Jian-feng; Wang, Shou-lian

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Early diagnosis and treatment of tuberculous meningitis saves lives, but current laboratory diagnostic tests lack sensitivity. Objectives: We investigated whether the detection of intracellular bacteria by a modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain and early secretory antigen target (ESAT)-6 in cerebrospinal fluid leukocytes improves tuberculous meningitis diagnosis. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with suspected tuberculous meningitis were stained by conventional Ziehl-Neelsen stain, a modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain involving cytospin slides with Triton processing, and an ESAT-6 immunocytochemical stain. Acid-fast bacteria and ESAT-6–expressing leukocytes were detected by microscopy. All tests were performed prospectively in a central laboratory by experienced technicians masked to the patients’ final diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Two hundred and eighty patients with suspected tuberculous meningitis were enrolled. Thirty-seven had Mycobacterium tuberculosis cultured from cerebrospinal fluid; 40 had a microbiologically confirmed alternative diagnosis; the rest had probable or possible tuberculous meningitis according to published criteria. Against a clinical diagnostic gold standard the sensitivity of conventional Ziehl-Neelsen stain was 3.3% (95% confidence interval, 1.6–6.7%), compared with 82.9% (95% confidence interval, 77.4–87.3%) for modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain and 75.1% (95% confidence interval, 68.8–80.6%) for ESAT-6 immunostain. Intracellular bacteria were seen in 87.8% of the slides positive by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain. The specificity of modified Ziehl-Neelsen and ESAT-6 stain was 85.0% (95% confidence interval, 69.4–93.8%) and 90.0% (95% confidence interval, 75.4–96.7%), respectively. Conclusions: Enhanced bacterial detection by simple modification of the Ziehl-Neelsen stain and an ESAT-6 intracellular stain improve the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis. PMID:24450377

  20. Streptococcus suis Meningitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Schultsz, Constance; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis is the most common cause of meningitis in pork consuming and pig rearing countries in South-East Asia. We performed a systematic review of studies on S. suis meningitis to define the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome. Methodology Studies published between January 1, 1980 and August 1, 2015 were identified from main literature databases and reference lists. Studies were included if they were written in West-European languages and described at least 5 adult patients with S. suis meningitis in whom at least one clinical characteristic was described. Findings We identified 913 patients with S. suis meningitis included in 24 studies between 1980 and 2015. The mean age was 49 years and 581 of 711 patients were male (82%). Exposure to pigs or pork was present in 395 of 648 patients (61%) while other predisposing factors were less common. 514 of 528 patients presented with fever (97%), 429 of 451 with headache (95%), 462 of 496 with neck stiffness (93%) and 78 of 384 patients (20%) had a skin injury in the presence of pig/pork contact. The case fatality rate was 2.9% and hearing loss was a common sequel occurring in 259 of 489 patients (53%). Treatment included dexamethasone in 157 of 300 (52%) of patients and was associated with reduced hearing loss in S. suis meningitis patients included in a randomized controlled trial. Conclusion S. suis meningitis has a clear association with pig and pork contact. Mortality is low, but hearing loss occurs frequently. Dexamethasone was shown to reduce hearing loss. PMID:26505485

  1. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kloek, Anne T; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Valls Serón, Mercedes; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10(-7)). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10(-6); G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05-5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10(-5); G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54-0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10(-7)). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  2. [A meningitis case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection].

    PubMed

    Karsen, Hasan; Karahocagil, Mustafa Kasim; Irmak, Hasan; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2008-10-01

    Turkey is located at an endemic area for brusellosis and tuberculosis which are both important public health problems. Meningitis caused by Brucella and Mycobacterium spp. may be confused since the clinical and laboratory findings are similar. In this report, a meningitis case with Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection has been presented. A 19-years-old woman was admitted to our clinic with severe headache, fever, vomiting, meningeal irritation symptoms, confusion and diplopia. The patient was initially diagnosed as Brucella meningitis based on her history (stockbreeding, consuming raw milk products, clinical symptoms concordant to brucellosis lasting for 4-5 months), physical examination and laboratory findings of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Standard tube agglutination test for brucellosis was positive at 1/80 titer in CSF and at 1/640 titer in serum, whereas no growth of Brucella spp. was detected in CSF and blood cultures. Antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, rifampicin and doxycyclin was started, however, there was no clinical improvement and agitation and confusion of the patient continued by the end of second day of treatment. Repeated CSF examination yielded acid-fast bacteria. The patient was then diagnosed as meningitis with double etiology and the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone, streptomycin, morphozinamide, rifampicin and isoniazid for thirty days. Tuberculosis meningitis was confirmed with the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on the 14th day of cultivation (BACTEC, Becton Dickinson, USA) of the CSF sample. On the 30th day of treatment she was discharged on anti-tuberculous treatment with isoniazid and rifampicin for 12 months. The follow-up of the patient on the first and third months of treatment revealed clinical and laboratory improvement. Since this was a rare case of Brucella and tuberculosis co-infection, this report emphasizes that such co-infections should be kept in mind especially in the endemic areas for tuberculosis and brucellosis

  3. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10−7). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10−6; G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05–5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10−5; G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54–0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10−7). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  4. Bacterial meningitis as a first presentation of pituitary macroprolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Margari, Niki

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 56-year-old man was brought to the Emergency Department after being found collapsed at his office with a reduced level of consciousness. From clinical examination and initial investigations, he was diagnosed as having bacterial meningitis and was promptly commenced on empirical i.v. antibiotics. Computed tomography of the brain revealed a parenchymal mass at the base of the skull and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging of the head 4 days later confirmed a large soft tissue mass, which extended through to the cavernous sinus. Examination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) following lumbar puncture confirmed pneumococcal meningitis and antibiotics were continued for 2 weeks in total. During the admission, hormone profiling revealed a grossly elevated prolactin. When coupled with the initial results of the brain imaging, this result helped to confirm a macroprolactinoma that was invading the postnasal space. A final diagnosis of pneumococcal meningitis secondary to invading prolactinoma was made. The patient was started on cabergoline and was followed up in the outpatient clinic upon discharge. He made a full recovery from the meningitis. Over the next few months, prolactin levels returned to be normal and the prolactinoma shrank significantly in size. The patient remains on cabergoline that will most likely be continued indefinitely. Learning points Bacterial meningitis is a rare first presentation of pituitary macroprolactinoma.Patients with invasive macroprolactinoma do not always present with CSF leakage.Prompt treatment with antibiotics and a dopamine agonist is of great importance for a favourable outcome.Close monitoring of the patient for signs of raised intracranial pressure is essential in the management of macroprolactinoma.Note the risk of CSF leakage after initiation of dopamine agonist therapy irrespective of concomitant meningitis in macroprolactinoma. PMID:24963397

  5. Herpes simplex virus 2 meningitis: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephanie; Mateen, Farrah J; Aksamit, Allen J

    2013-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 is a leading cause of viral meningitis and the most commonly recognized infectious cause of benign, recurrent meningitis. We report a retrospective, observational cohort study of patients with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) meningitis, confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The terms "herpes simplex," "meningitis," or "encephalitis" were searched in the medical records system of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota (1995-2008). Patients were included if they had a clinical diagnosis of meningitis and HSV-2 detected by PCR in the CSF. There were 28 patients with 33 episodes identified (83 % female; mean age at presentation of meningitis 36 years, range 17-53; mean time to HSV2 detection from symptom onset 3 days, range 0-6; history of genital herpes 23 %). No patient took oral antiviral treatment at the time of presentation. Episodes were most likely to include headache (100 %), photophobia (47 %), self-reported fever (45 %), meningismus (44 %), and nausea and/or vomiting (29 %). CSF at the time of meningitis was notable for elevated protein (mean 156 g/dL, range 60-258) and white cell count (mean 504 cells/μL, range 86-1,860) with normal glucose (mean 54 mg/dL, range 32-80). Mollaret cells were never detected. Neuroimaging was most often normal (83 %) when performed, although some cases showed nonspecific (14 %) or meningeal changes (3 %). There was no consistent relationship to genital herpes. The duration of treatment with intravenous acyclovir ranged from 3 to 14 days for the first meningitic episode (daily dose range from 500 to 1,000 mg and total dose range from 500 mg q8h for 3 days to 800 mg q8h for 14 days). For subsequent episodes, the duration of treatment of intravenous acyclovir ranged from less than 1 to 14 days (total dose range from 1,390 mg for 1 day to 900 mg q8h for 10 days). The dose of valacyclovir ranged from 500 mg once daily to 500 mg four times daily. The median duration

  6. Group A streptococcal meningitis in a patient with palmoplantar pustulosis.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Otsuka, Fumio

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old man with a 10-year history of palmoplantar pustulosis, a recent history of cranial surgery and a persistent upper airway infection presented with a high fever and deep coma. The patient was diagnosed with Group A Streptococcal meningitis and promptly treated with antibiotics. Although his general condition recovered well, sensorineural hearing loss and facial palsy remained. Group A Streptococcal meningitis is a rare condition, and its typical clinical picture and epidemiological features remain poorly understood. Physicians need to be more aware of this infection, which is extremely rare but frequently causes various complications and yields a high mortality. PMID:24292762

  7. Detectability of early brain meningitis with magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Runge, V.M.; Wells, J.W.; Williams, N.M.

    1995-08-01

    The ability of high-field (1.5 T) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect early brain meningitis was evaluated in a canine model. Contrast dose, timing postinjection, and imaging technique (specifically the use of magnetization transfer) were assessed. Imaging of five canines was performed at 1.5 T 24 hours after injection of Cowans staphylococcus into the cisterna magna. Two control animals also were imaged using the same protocol. Contrast doses of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.8 mmol/kg gadoteridol were compared. Scans were performed at 2, 13, and 22 minutes after an initial injection of 0.1 mmol/kg. Thirty minutes after the initial injection of contrast, a supplemental dose of 0.2 mmol/kg was given. Scans were then repeated at 2, 12, and 22 minutes after this dose was administered. A second supplemental contrast injection of 0.5 mmol/kg was given at 70 minutes, and immediate postinjection scans with and without MT were acquired. Results. In the animals receiving a cisternal injection of bacteria, the degree of meningeal enhancement was greatest at 0.8 mmol/kg, intermediate at 0.3 mmol/kg, and least at 0.1 mmol/kg. Scans in control studies did not demonstrate abnormal meningeal enhancement. High-contrast dose, MT, and acquisition of immediate postcontrast scans all resulted in statistically significant improvement. On masked film review, abnormal meningeal enhancement was noted in only 2 of 5 experimental dogs at a dose of 0.1 mmol/kg (regardless of the use of MT) compared with all animals at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg. In 18 of 37 dogs (paired scans with and without MT), when abnormal enhancement was noted, the use of MT improved the visualization of abnormal meningeal enhancement. In early brain meningitis, high-contrast dose (0.3 mmol/kg), MT, and scanning immediately after injection improve detection of abnormal meningeal enhancement, thus facilitating the diagnosis of meningitis. Of these factors, contrast dose is the most important. 14 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis meningitis: Gram staining as a useful initial diagnostic clue for tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Sayoko; Kawamura, Yasuyosi; Nishiyama, Kyouhei; Hatanaka, Hiroki; Fujisaki, Ryuichi; Ono, Yasuo; Miyazawa, Yukihisa; Nishiya, Hajime

    2012-12-01

    A 32-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of fever, headache, and loss of consciousness. Four days before admission, he had had difficulty speaking. On the day of admission, his colleague had found him to be unconscious and lying on his back. He was admitted to our hospital. The temperature at the eardrum was 35.2°C. Neurologic evaluation was negative. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain showed slight ventricular enlargement bilaterally. An X-ray film of the chest showed no abnormality. On the second hospital day, neck stiffness was noted. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contained 870 white cells/μl, most of which were neutrophils; the glucose level in the CSF was 10 mg/dl, and the protein level was 140 mg/dl. Stained smears of the CSF, including Gram staining and India-ink preparations, disclosed no microorganisms. Capsular antigen tests for several bacteria were negative. Antimicrobial agents were started. However, by changing the microscope focus slightly while viewing Gram stains of the CSF, we could see brightened and Gram-positive bacilli that had been phagocytosed by neutrophils. This finding suggested the presence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Ziehl-Neelsen staining of the CSF and gastric juice revealed anti-acid bacilli. Polymerase chain reaction for M. tuberculosis in the gastric juice was positive. This case showed that Gram staining could be useful as an initial adjunct for the diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis, particularly when the CSF shows predominantly neutrocytic pleocytosis, but no other evidence of bacterial meningitis. PMID:22476652

  9. Using Relative Humidity Forecasts to Manage Meningitis in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, R. E.; Adams-Forgor, A.; Akweogno, P.; Awine, T.; Dalaba, M.; Dukic, V.; Dumont, A.; Hayden, M.; Hodgson, A.; Hopson, T. M.; Hugonnet, S.; Yoksas, T. C.

    2012-12-01

    Meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur quasi-regularly and with devastating impact. In 2008, for example, eighty-eight thousand people contracted meningitis and over five thousand died. Until very recently, the protection provided by the only available vaccine was so limited and short-lived that the only practical strategy for vaccination was reactive: waiting until an epidemic occurred in the region and then vaccinating in that region to prevent the epidemic's further growth. Even with that strategy, there were still times when demand outpaced available vaccine. While a new vaccine has recently been developed that is effective and inexpensive enough to be used more broadly and proactively, it is only effective against the strain of bacteria that causes the most common kind of bacterial meningitis. As a result, there will likely be continued need for reactive vaccination strategies. It is widely known that meningitis epidemics in the Sahel occur only in the dry season. Our project investigated this relationship, and several independent lines of evidence demonstrate a robust relationship between the onset of the rainy season, as marked by weekly average relative humidity above 40%, and the end of meningitis epidemics. These lines of evidence include statistical analysis of two years of weekly meningitis and weather data across the Sahel, cross-correlation of ten years of meningitis and weather data in the Upper East region of northern Ghana, and high-resolution weather simulations of past meningitis seasons to interpolate available weather data. We also adapted two techniques that have been successfully used in public health studies: generalized additive models, which have been used to relate air quality and health, and a linearized version of the compartmental epidemics model that has been used to understand MRSA. Based on these multiple lines of evidence, average weekly relative humidity forecast two weeks in advance appears consistently and strongly related to

  10. Listeria as an enteroinvasive gastrointestinal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Barbuddhe, Sukhadeo B; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2009-01-01

    The bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is the causative agent of listeriosis, a highly fatal opportunistic foodborne infection. Listeria spp. are isolated from a diversity of environmental sources, including soil, water, effluents, a large variety of foods, and the feces of humans and animals. Recent outbreaks demonstrated that L. monocytogenes can cause gastroenteritis in otherwise healthy individuals and more severe invasive disease in immunocompromised patients. Common symptoms include fever, watery diarrhea, nausea, headache, and pains in joints and muscles. The intestinal tract is the major portal of entry for L. monocytogenes, whereby strains penetrate the mucosal tissue either directly, via invasion of enterocytes, or indirectly, via active penetration of the Peyer's patches. Studies have revealed the strategy taken by the bacteria to overcome changes in oxygen tension, osmolarity, acidity, and the sterilizing effects of bile or antimicrobial peptides to adapt to conditions in the gut. In addition, L. monocytogenes has evolved species-specific strategies for intestinal entry by exploiting the interaction between the internalin protein and its receptor E-cadherin, or inducing diarrhea and an inflammatory response via the activity of its hemolytic toxin, listeriolysin. The ability of these bacteria to survive in bile-rich environments, and to induce depletion of sentinel cells such as Paneth cells that monitor the luminal burden of commensal bacteria, suggest strategies that have evolved to promote intestinal survival. Preexisting gastrointestinal disease may be a risk factor for infection of the gastrointestinal tract with L. monocytogenes. Currently, there is enough evidence to warrant consideration of L. monocytogenes as a possible etiology in outbreaks of febrile gastroenteritis, and for further studies to examine the genetic structure of Listeria strains that have a propensity to cause gastrointestinal versus systemic infections. PMID:19812983

  11. Diversity of Listeria Species in Urban and Natural Environments

    PubMed Central

    Overdevest, Jon; Fortes, Esther; Windham, Katy; Schukken, Ynte; Lembo, Arthur; Wiedmann, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A total of 442 Listeria isolates, including 234 Listeria seeligeri, 80 L. monocytogenes, 74 L. welshimeri, 50 L. innocua, and 4 L. marthii isolates, were obtained from 1,805 soil, water, and other environmental samples collected over 2 years from four urban areas and four areas representing natural environments. Listeria spp. showed similar prevalences in samples from natural (23.4%) and urban (22.3%) environments. While L. seeligeri and L. welshimeri were significantly associated with natural environments (P ≤ 0.0001), L. innocua and L. monocytogenes were significantly associated with urban environments (P ≤ 0.0001). Sequencing of sigB for all isolates revealed 67 allelic types with a higher level of allelic diversity among isolates from urban environments. Some Listeria spp. and sigB allelic types showed significant associations with specific urban and natural areas. Nearest-neighbor analyses also showed that certain Listeria spp. and sigB allelic types were spatially clustered within both natural and urban environments, and there was evidence that these species and allelic types persisted over time in specific areas. Our data show that members of the genus Listeria not only are common in urban and natural environments but also show species- and subtype-specific associations with different environments and areas. This indicates that Listeria species and subtypes within these species may show distinct ecological preferences, which suggests (i) that molecular source-tracking approaches can be developed for Listeria and (ii) that detection of some Listeria species may not be a good indicator for L. monocytogenes. PMID:22504820

  12. The Risk of Meningitis Following Expanded Endoscopic Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Leon T.; Trooboff, Spencer; Morgan, Michael K.; Harvey, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the risk of postoperative meningitis following expanded endoscopic endonasal skull base (EESB) surgery. Setting A systematic analysis of publications identified through searches of the electronic databases from Embase (1980–July 17, 2012), Medline (1950–July 17, 2012), and references of review articles. Main Outcome Measures Incidence of meningitis following EESB surgery. Results A total of 2,444 manuscripts were selected initially, and full-text analysis produced 67 studies with extractable data. Fifty-two contained data regarding the frequency of postoperative meningitis. The overall risk of postoperative meningitis following EESB surgery was 1.8% (36 of 2,005). For those reporting a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, meningitis occurred in 13.0% (35 of 269). For those not reporting a CSF leak, meningitis occurred in 0.1% (1 of 1,736). The odds ratio for the development of meningitis in the presence of a postoperative CSF leak was 91.99 (95% confidence interval, 11.72–721.88; p < 0.01). There was no difference in reported incidence of meningitis or CSF leak between anterior and posterior cranial fossa surgery. There was one reported case of meningitis-related mortality following EESB surgery. Conclusion The evidence in skull base surgery is limited. This study demonstrates a low incidence of meningitis (1.8%) following EESB procedures. The incidence of meningitis from EESB surgery without an associated CSF leak is uncommon. PMID:24498585

  13. [Revival of old diagnostic markers in the cerebrospinal fluid for the detection of infectious meningitis].

    PubMed

    Sakushima, Ken; Yabe, Ichiro; Sasaki, Hidenao

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis and tubercular meningitis are still neurological emergencies characterized by severe mortality and morbidity. Recent studies of meta-analysis have shown the usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lactate and CSF adenosine deaminase (ADA) as markers for the detection of bacterial meningitis and tubercular meningitis, respectively. CSF lactate has a high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis, but the sensitivity can be reduced by antibiotic pretreatment. CSF-ADA has a moderate sensitivity but a high specificity and is reliable for the diagnosis of tubercular meningitis. These old diagnostic markers can be evaluated in resource-poor settings including small general hospitals and non-specialized hospitals for infectious diseases, and they can contribute to the quick and accurate diagnosis of infectious meningitis. PMID:22260972

  14. Pneumococcal meningitis: clinical-pathological correlations (MeninGene-Path).

    PubMed

    Engelen-Lee, Joo-Yeon; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Aronica, Eleonora; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. We systematically assessed brain histopathology of 31 patients who died of pneumococcal meningitis from a nationwide study (median age 67 years; 21 (67 %) were male) using a pathology score including inflammation and vascular damage. Of the 27 patients with known time from the admission to death, 14 patients died within 7 days of admission and 13 after 7 days of admission. Eleven of 25 (44 %) patients had been treated with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy. Observed pathological processes were inflammation of medium-large arteries in 30 brains (97 %), cerebral haemorrhage in 24 (77 %), cerebritis in 24 (77 %), thrombosis in 21 (68 %), infarction in 19 (61 %) and ventriculitis in 19 (of 28 cases, 68 %). Inflammation of medium-large arteries led to obstruction of the vascular lumen in 14 (of 31 cases, 45 %). Vascular inflammation was associated with infarction and thrombosis of brain parenchymal vessels. Hippocampal dentate gyrus apoptosis between patients treated with and without dexamethasone was similar (p = 0.66); however, dexamethasone treated patients had higher total pathology score than non-dexamethasone treated patients (p = 0.003). Our study shows that vascular damage is key in the process of brain damage in pneumococcal meningitis. Data and material of this study will be made open-access for translational research in pneumococcal meningitis (MeninGene-Path). PMID:27001057

  15. Streptococcus suis toxic-shock syndrome and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Leelarasamee, A; Nilakul, C; Tien-Grim, S; Srifuengfung, S; Susaengrat, W

    1997-01-01

    Three cases with S. suis bacteremia and meningitis were reported. The first case was a 23-year-old butcher who was a regular drinker of alcohol for two years and developed streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome. The organism was transmitted to him through a minor cut in his right arm. The second cases was a 49-year-old female laborer who had been consuming locally produced alcohol for 20 years and developed fever and meningitis. Unfortunately, she succumbed in seven days despite intensive supportive and cefotaxime treatments. The third case was a 45-year-old regular alcoholic drinker and car painter who was seen at a private hospital due to contusion at his left lateral chest wall. However, fever and confusion due to meningitis was detected upon admission. Irreversible deafness developed within 48 hours of ceftriaxone therapy for meningitis. He finally recovered with deafness. S. suis was isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures in all three cases though initially reported to be viridans group of streptococci. PMID:9078819

  16. [Systemic candidiasis with meningeal involvement in a newborn infant].

    PubMed

    Kacprzak-Bergman, I; Szychowska, Z; Rudkowski, Z

    1989-04-24

    The newborn with sepsis (E. coli) and salmonellosis was described. After treatment with broad-spectrum antibiotics it was suffered from Candida albicans (Meningitis with Hydrocephalus internus, Chorioretinitis and Ostitis). The authors difficulties connected with diagnosis and anti-fungal therapy have showed. They have punctated the necessity of combined anti-mycotic therapy. PMID:2626360

  17. [Adult purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Dakar, Senegal].

    PubMed

    Manga, N M; Ndour, C T; Diop, S A; Ka-Sall, R; Dia, N M; Seydi, M; Soumare, M; Diop, B M; Sow, A I; Sow, P S

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe epidemiological, clinical, bacteriological and outcome features of purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in adult patients hospitalized in the infectious diseases clinic of the Fann University Hospital in Dakar, Senegal from 1995 to 2004. A total of 73 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were recorded during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the second cause of purulent meningitis after meningococcal infection. Sickle-cell disease (n=3) and HIV infection (n=9) were the main underlying factors and pneumonia was the main portal of entry into the CNS (51.8%). Coma was a frequent complication (61.6%). Penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PNSP) accounted for 27.3% of isolated strains. However strains were sensitive to third-generation cephalosporin (100%) and chloramphenicol (68.2%) which were the most frequently used antibiotics. The mortality rate was 69.8% and neurological complications occurred in 13.7% of patients. The main unfavorable prognostic factors were cardiovascular collapse and/or coma at the time of admission and detection of pneumococcal strains by direct examination of CSF. The high mortality of pneumococcal meningitis in adult patients in Dakar shows the need to improve intensive care facilities and the growing incidence of PNSP underlines the requirement for better control of antibiotic prescription. PMID:19639833

  18. Staphylococcal meningitis following Synchromed intrathecal pump implant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bennett, M I; Tai, Y M; Symonds, J M

    1994-02-01

    Staphylococcal meningitis associated with implantation of an intrathecal drug pump for spasticity was successfully treated by intrathecal vancomycin delivered by the same pump. This produced high CSF antibiotic levels, and the pump and catheter system did not have to be removed. We are unable to identify a similar case reported in the literature to date. PMID:8008414

  19. Pituitary abscess: an unusual presentation of "aseptic meningitis".

    PubMed

    Schwartz, I D; Zalles, M C; Foster, J L; Burry, V F

    1995-01-01

    Granulomatous inflammation of the pituitary and pituitary abscesses are rare entities. These conditions are found even more rarely in the pediatric aged population. We report a case of a radiographic and clinical, sterile pituitary abscess with non-caseating granulomatous inflammation in a girl who presented with hypopituitarism, meningeal irritation, and symptoms of pituitary apoplexy. PMID:7584709

  20. Recurrent Lymphocytic Meningitis Positive for Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    PubMed Central

    Seppänen, Mikko; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lappalainen, Maija; Valtonen, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Kalso, Eija

    2009-01-01

    We found the prevalence of recurrent lymphocytic meningitis associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was 2.2/100,000 population in Finland during 1996–2006, higher than previous estimates. PCR was most sensitive in detecting HSV-2 DNA from cerebrospinal fluid if the sample was taken 2–5 days after symptom onset. PMID:19624935

  1. Recurrent lymphocytic meningitis positive for herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Kallio-Laine, Katariina; Seppänen, Mikko; Kautiainen, Hannu; Lokki, Marja Liisa; Lappalainen, Maija; Valtonen, Ville; Färkkilä, Markus; Kalso, Eija

    2009-07-01

    We found the prevalence of recurrent lymphocytic meningitis associated with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) was 2.2/100,000 population in Finland during 1996-2006, higher than previous estimates. PCR was most sensitive in detecting HSV-2 DNA from cerebrospinal fluid if the sample was taken 2-5 days after symptom onset. PMID:19624935

  2. Real-time PCR for Strongyloides stercoralis-associated meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nadir, Eyal; Grossman, Tamar; Ciobotaro, Pnina; Attali, Malka; Barkan, Daniel; Bardenstein, Rita; Zimhony, Oren

    2016-03-01

    Four immunocompromised patients, immigrants from Ethiopia, presented with diverse clinical manifestations of meningitis associated with Strongyloides stercoralis dissemination as determined by identification of intestinal larvae. The cerebrospinal fluid of 3 patients was tested by a validated (for stool) real-time PCR for S. stercoralis and was found positive, establishing this association. PMID:26704620

  3. Prevention of bacterial meningitis: an overview of Cochrane systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Karlupia, Neha

    2007-10-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is an acute inflammation of leptomeninges caused by bacteria, and has a case fatality rate of 10-30%. Prevention strategies, such as vaccination and prophylactic antibiotics, can prevent ABM and have substantial public health impact by reducing the disease burden associated with it. The aim of this paper is to summarize the main findings from Cochrane systematic reviews that have considered the evidence for measures to prevent ABM. We assessed the evidence available in the Cochrane Library. We found five Cochrane reviews focused on the prevention of ABM; three with use of vaccination and two with prophylactic antibiotics. Polysaccharide serogroup A vaccine is strongly protective for the first year, against serogroup A meningococcal meningitis in adults and children over 5 years of age. Meningococcal serogroup C conjugate (MCC) vaccine is safe and effective in infants. Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine is safe and effective against Hib-invasive disease at all ages. Ceftriaxone, rifampicin and ciprofloxacin are the most effective prophylactic antibiotics against Neisseria meningitidis. There is sufficient evidence to use polysaccharide serogroup A vaccine to prevent serogroup A meningococcal meningitis, MCC conjugate vaccines to prevent meningococcal C meningitis and Hib conjugate vaccine to prevent Hib infections. More studies are needed to evaluate the effects of Hib conjugate vaccine on mortality. Further, studies are required to compare the relative effectiveness of ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin and rifampicin in chemoprophylaxis against meningococcal infection. PMID:17706408

  4. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-12-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations.

  5. Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia Complicated by Spondylodiscitis, Psoas Abscess, and Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Korman, T. M.; Junckerstorff, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta bacteremia is uncommon and generally associated with abdominal sepsis. The organism and its clinical significance have not been well characterized due to historical difficulties with identification. We report a case of severe infection in a paraplegic man complicated by psoas abscess, osteomyelitis, and meningitis and discuss treatment challenges. PMID:24430458

  6. One Family's Crusade To Inform the Public about Meningococcal Meningitis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skowronek, Linda and Carl

    2001-01-01

    Describes meningococcal meningitis, which strikes over 100 college students yearly. Living in dormitories puts students at risk for contracting the disease. The current vaccine protects against the four main types of the infection, though it is not perfect protection. Some states have adopted legislation requiring all incoming college freshmen and…

  7. Variations of relative humidity in relation to meningitis in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seefeldt, M. W.; Hopson, T. M.

    2011-12-01

    The meningitis belt is a region covering Sub-Saharan Africa from the Sahel of West Africa eastward to western Ethiopia. The region is prone to meningitis epidemics during the dry season extending from approximately January to May, depending on the region. Relative humidity has been found to be a critical environmental factor indicating the susceptibility of a region to meningitis epidemics. This study evaluates the variation of relative humidity across West Africa over 30 dry-seasons (1979 - 2009) using the NASA-MERRA dataset. The method of self-organizing maps is employed to characterize the changes in relative humidity patterns across the region within a given dry season as well as changes over the 30 years. A general pattern of changes in relative humidity is indicated as the rainbelt retreats to the south at the onset of the dry season and then returns to the region at the end of the dry season. Within each dry season there is a unique pattern. The climatological conditions of relative humidity at the onset of the dry season provide an indication of the moisture environment for the entire dry season. Year to year variation in the relative humidity patterns are found to be gradual. Future applications involve using the results from the SOM evaluation to be used for future decisions involving prevention of meningitis epidemics.

  8. Vaccine May Reduce Incidence of Meningitis-Related Hearing Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dorothy

    1988-01-01

    Hearing loss as a result of meningitis, now the leading nongenetic cause of deafness in infants and young children, may be reduced by the introduction of the HiB (Hemophilus influenzae type B) vaccine. It is highly effective, relatively safe, and recommended for most children over 24 months and high risk children 18-24 months old. (VW)

  9. Cytomegalovirus Meningitis in an Infant with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Vicetti Miguel, Claudia P; Mejias, Asuncion; Ramilo, Octavio; Ardura, Monica I; Sánchez, Pablo J

    2016-06-01

    A 35-day-old female with severe combined immunodeficiency developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) meningitis before undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Strategies for timely diagnosis of neonates with congenital or acquired CMV infection and prevention of CMV acquisition in the era of universal newborn severe combined immunodeficiency screening are needed. PMID:26996725

  10. [Salmonella meningitis in an infant due to a pet turtle].

    PubMed

    Ricard, C; Mellentin, J; Ben Abdallah Chabchoub, R; Kingbede, P; Heuclin, T; Ramdame, A; Bouquet, A; Couttenier, F; Hendricx, S

    2015-06-01

    In humans, Salmonella most often causes self-limiting gastroenteritis, but more severe symptoms such as sepsis and meningitis can also occur and can sometimes have a fatal outcome. Even if the meningitis is not fatal, sequelae such as epilepsy, cranial nerve palsies, and hydrocephalus can occur. In the United States, it has been estimated that approximately 6% of the human cases of salmonellosis can be attributed to contact with reptiles or amphibians. The infection may take place by direct contact between reptile and human or indirectly via contact with an environment contaminated with Salmonella from a reptile. Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serotype Vitkin is a common gut inhabitant of reptiles. Though human cases due to this organism are exceedingly rare, it may infect young infants and immunocompromised individuals with a history of intimate associations with reptiles. Gastroenteritis is the most common presentation ; others include peritonitis, meningitis and bacteremia. We report a case of meningitis caused by S. enterica subsp. enterica serotype Vitkin in a 1-month-old child due to a pet turtle. PMID:26014646