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Sample records for meningitis por streptococcus

  1. Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Guevara, Jose M.; Tilley, Drake H.; Briceno, Jesus A.; Zunt, Joseph R.; Montano, Silvia M.

    2013-01-01

    A 59-year-old man with a history of fever, unsteadiness, hemiparesis, motor aphasia and consciousness disturbance was hospitalized for Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus meningitis. He denied contact with farm animals, but had a practice of consuming unpasteurized goats’ cheese from an uncertain source. PMID:23105024

  2. [Adult purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in Dakar, Senegal].

    PubMed

    Manga, N M; Ndour, C T; Diop, S A; Ka-Sall, R; Dia, N M; Seydi, M; Soumare, M; Diop, B M; Sow, A I; Sow, P S

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe epidemiological, clinical, bacteriological and outcome features of purulent meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in adult patients hospitalized in the infectious diseases clinic of the Fann University Hospital in Dakar, Senegal from 1995 to 2004. A total of 73 cases of pneumococcal meningitis were recorded during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the second cause of purulent meningitis after meningococcal infection. Sickle-cell disease (n=3) and HIV infection (n=9) were the main underlying factors and pneumonia was the main portal of entry into the CNS (51.8%). Coma was a frequent complication (61.6%). Penicillin-nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PNSP) accounted for 27.3% of isolated strains. However strains were sensitive to third-generation cephalosporin (100%) and chloramphenicol (68.2%) which were the most frequently used antibiotics. The mortality rate was 69.8% and neurological complications occurred in 13.7% of patients. The main unfavorable prognostic factors were cardiovascular collapse and/or coma at the time of admission and detection of pneumococcal strains by direct examination of CSF. The high mortality of pneumococcal meningitis in adult patients in Dakar shows the need to improve intensive care facilities and the growing incidence of PNSP underlines the requirement for better control of antibiotic prescription. PMID:19639833

  3. Streptococcus suis Meningitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; Schultsz, Constance; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis is the most common cause of meningitis in pork consuming and pig rearing countries in South-East Asia. We performed a systematic review of studies on S. suis meningitis to define the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome. Methodology Studies published between January 1, 1980 and August 1, 2015 were identified from main literature databases and reference lists. Studies were included if they were written in West-European languages and described at least 5 adult patients with S. suis meningitis in whom at least one clinical characteristic was described. Findings We identified 913 patients with S. suis meningitis included in 24 studies between 1980 and 2015. The mean age was 49 years and 581 of 711 patients were male (82%). Exposure to pigs or pork was present in 395 of 648 patients (61%) while other predisposing factors were less common. 514 of 528 patients presented with fever (97%), 429 of 451 with headache (95%), 462 of 496 with neck stiffness (93%) and 78 of 384 patients (20%) had a skin injury in the presence of pig/pork contact. The case fatality rate was 2.9% and hearing loss was a common sequel occurring in 259 of 489 patients (53%). Treatment included dexamethasone in 157 of 300 (52%) of patients and was associated with reduced hearing loss in S. suis meningitis patients included in a randomized controlled trial. Conclusion S. suis meningitis has a clear association with pig and pork contact. Mortality is low, but hearing loss occurs frequently. Dexamethasone was shown to reduce hearing loss. PMID:26505485

  4. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and sphenoid sinus mucocele. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Conte, Aristide; Chinello, Pierangelo; Civljak, Rok; Bellussi, Angelo; Noto, Pasquale; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis caused by Streptococcus salivarius in a 49-year-old woman with a previously undiagnosed cerebrospinal fluid fistula due to a sphenoid mucocele. We reviewed the literature concerning meningitis caused by this uncommon organism and to the best of our knowledge this is the first case of S. salivarius meningitis associated with sphenoid mucocele. PMID:15936084

  5. Streptococcus pneumoniae Meningitis Presenting with Acute Urinary Retention and Emphysematous Cystitis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yasushi; Doi, Asako; Endo, Akiko; Nishioka, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A combination of acute urinary retention and aseptic meningitis has occasionally been described, which is referred to as meningitis-retention syndrome. In contrast, acute urinary retention has rarely been reported in bacterial meningitis. We herein report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis presenting with acute urinary retention which led to emphysematous cystitis in an elderly woman. She presented with impaired consciousness and a distended lower abdomen. She was diagnosed with pneumococcal meningitis by lumbar puncture. Abdominal computed tomography revealed the presence of emphysematous cystitis. She completely recovered with antibiotic therapy without any complications. Acute urinary retention can occur secondary to pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27477423

  6. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Lucy J; Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G; Täuber, Martin G; Leib, Stephen L

    2016-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniaebacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  7. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G.; Täuber, Martin G.; Leib, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  8. Identification of Streptococcus suis Meningitis through Population-Based Surveillance, Togo, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Tall, Haoua; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mounkoro, Didier; Tidjani, Loukoumane; Agbenoko, Kodjo; Alassani, Issifou; Amidou, Moussa; Tamekloe, Stanislas; Laing, Kenneth G.; Witney, Adam A.; Hinds, Jason; van der Linden, Mark P.G.; Gessner, Bradford D.

    2016-01-01

    During 2010–2014, we enrolled 511 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis into surveillance in 2 districts of northern Togo. We identified 15 persons with Streptococcus suis infection; 10 had occupational contact with pigs, and 12 suffered neurologic sequelae. S. suis testing should be considered in rural areas of the African meningitis belt. PMID:27314251

  9. Identification of Streptococcus suis Meningitis through Population-Based Surveillance, Togo, 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Tall, Haoua; Njanpop-Lafourcade, Berthe-Marie; Mounkoro, Didier; Tidjani, Loukoumane; Agbenoko, Kodjo; Alassani, Issifou; Amidou, Moussa; Tamekloe, Stanislas; Laing, Kenneth G; Witney, Adam A; Hinds, Jason; van der Linden, Mark P G; Gessner, Bradford D; Moïsi, Jennifer C

    2016-07-01

    During 2010-2014, we enrolled 511 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis into surveillance in 2 districts of northern Togo. We identified 15 persons with Streptococcus suis infection; 10 had occupational contact with pigs, and 12 suffered neurologic sequelae. S. suis testing should be considered in rural areas of the African meningitis belt. PMID:27314251

  10. Spontaneous meningitis due to Streptococcus salivarius subsp. salivarius: cross-reaction in an assay with a rapid diagnostic kit that detected Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens.

    PubMed

    Shirokawa, Taijiro; Nakajima, Jun; Hirose, Kazuhito; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Nagaoka, Shoko; Suzuki, Masatsune

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius subsp. salivarius occasionally causes meningitis associated with iatrogenic or traumatic events. We herein describe a case of meningitis caused by this organism in a patient without any apparent risk factors. In an assay of the patient's cerebrospinal fluid, cross-reaction occurred with Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen-coated latex particles in the Pastorex Meningitis Kit. In the in vitro assays, three of the five clinically isolated S. salivarius strains showed cross-reactions with the kit, indicating that these strains expressed pneumococcal antigen-like antigens. This case shows that meningitis caused by S. salivarius can occur spontaneously and it may sometimes be misdiagnosed as S. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24492701

  11. Clinical and laboratory features of Streptococcus salivarius meningitis: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M

    2012-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  12. Clinical and Laboratory Features of Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Megan; Martin, Ryan; Walk, Seth T.; Young, Carol; Grossman, Sylvia; McKean, Erin Lin; Aronoff, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a normal member of the human oral microbiome that is an uncommon cause of invasive infections. Meningitis is a rare but increasingly reported infection caused by S. salivarius. Despite the growing number of reported cases, a comprehensive review of the literature on S. salivarius meningitis is lacking. We sought to gain a better understanding of the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of S. salivarius meningitis by analyzing previously reported cases. In addition to a single case reported here, 64 previously published cases of meningitis were identified for this review. The collected data confirm that most patients presented with classical signs and symptoms of bacterial meningitis with a predominance of neutrophils in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and hypoglycorrhachia. The majority of cases followed iatrogenic or traumatic CSF contamination. Most cases were diagnosed by CSF culture within one day of symptom onset. There was no clear evidence of predisposing co-morbid conditions in patients with meningitis, although in most case reports, limited information was given on the medical history of each patient. Outcomes were generally favorable with antibiotic management. Clinicians should suspect S. salivarius meningitis in patients presenting acutely after medical or surgical procedures involving the meninges. PMID:21817122

  13. Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Case Strain Traced to Oral Flora of Anesthesiologist▿

    PubMed Central

    Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Gertz, Robert E.; Kim, Clara Y.; de Fijter, Sietske; DiOrio, Mary; Moore, Matthew R.; Beall, Bernard W.

    2010-01-01

    Two women in labor received intrapartum spinal anesthesia from the same anesthesiologist approximately 1 h apart. Within 15 h, both patients developed Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and one patient died. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from both patients and tongue swab specimens from the anesthesiologist yielded isolates of an indistinguishable S. salivarius strain. PMID:20504987

  14. Streptococcus salivarius meningitis case strain traced to oral flora of anesthesiologist.

    PubMed

    Shewmaker, Patricia L; Gertz, Robert E; Kim, Clara Y; de Fijter, Sietske; DiOrio, Mary; Moore, Matthew R; Beall, Bernard W

    2010-07-01

    Two women in labor received intrapartum spinal anesthesia from the same anesthesiologist approximately 1 h apart. Within 15 h, both patients developed Streptococcus salivarius meningitis and one patient died. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from both patients and tongue swab specimens from the anesthesiologist yielded isolates of an indistinguishable S. salivarius strain. PMID:20504987

  15. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... system, infecting the meninges and causing meningitis. continue Bacteria and Viruses Many viruses can cause viral meningitis. ... examined under a microscope to see if any bacteria, cells, or substances that indicate inflammation or infection ...

  16. Streptococcus suis toxic-shock syndrome and meningitis.

    PubMed

    Leelarasamee, A; Nilakul, C; Tien-Grim, S; Srifuengfung, S; Susaengrat, W

    1997-01-01

    Three cases with S. suis bacteremia and meningitis were reported. The first case was a 23-year-old butcher who was a regular drinker of alcohol for two years and developed streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome. The organism was transmitted to him through a minor cut in his right arm. The second cases was a 49-year-old female laborer who had been consuming locally produced alcohol for 20 years and developed fever and meningitis. Unfortunately, she succumbed in seven days despite intensive supportive and cefotaxime treatments. The third case was a 45-year-old regular alcoholic drinker and car painter who was seen at a private hospital due to contusion at his left lateral chest wall. However, fever and confusion due to meningitis was detected upon admission. Irreversible deafness developed within 48 hours of ceftriaxone therapy for meningitis. He finally recovered with deafness. S. suis was isolated from blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures in all three cases though initially reported to be viridans group of streptococci. PMID:9078819

  17. Streptococcus bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis

    SciTech Connect

    Jadeja, L.; Kantarjian, H.; Bolivar, R.

    1983-12-01

    We describe the first patient with simultaneous S bovis septicemia and meningitis associated with chronic radiation enterocolitis. This case underlines the value of a thorough gastrointestinal evaluation of all patients with S bovis infection, and the need for a neurologic investigation even with minor neurologic manifestations.

  18. Interferon-γ from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-γ in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-γ to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 104 colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-γ mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-γ antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-γ produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  19. Interferon-γ from Brain Leukocytes Enhances Meningitis by Type 4 Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Cuppone, Anna Maria; Iannelli, Francesco; Medaglini, Donata; Pozzi, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease with high rates of mortality and neurological sequelae. Immune targeting of S. pneumoniae is essential for clearance of infection; however, within the brain, the induced inflammatory response contributes to pathogenesis. In this study we investigate the local inflammatory response and the role of IFN-γ in a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis induced by intracranial injection of type 4 S. pneumoniae. Lymphoid and myeloid cell populations involved in meningitis, as well as cytokine gene expression, were investigated after infection. Animals were treated with a monoclonal antibody specific for murine IFN-γ to evaluate its role in animal survival. Intracranial inoculation of 3 × 10(4) colony-forming units of type 4 strain TIGR4 caused 75% of mice to develop meningitis within 4 days. The amount of lymphocytes, NK cells, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages in the brain increased 48 h post infection. IFN-γ mRNA levels were about 240-fold higher in brains of infected mice compared to controls. Pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α, and TLR2 were also upregulated. In vivo treatment with anti-IFN-γ antibody increased survival of infected mice. This study shows that IFN-γ produced during meningitis by type 4 S. pneumoniae enhances bacterial pathogenesis exerting a negative effect on the disease outcome. PMID:26648922

  20. Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis in adults: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Samkar, A; Brouwer, M C; Pannekoek, Y; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2015-12-01

    We describe the incidence and patient characteristics of Streptococcus gallolyticus meningitis. We identified S. gallolyticus meningitis in a nationwide cohort of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all reported adult cases in the literature. Five cases were identified (0.3%) in a cohort of 1561 episodes of bacterial meningitis. In one patient, bowel disease (colon polyps) was identified as a predisposing condition for S. gallolyticus infection, whereas no patients were diagnosed with endocarditis. In a combined analysis of our patients and 37 reported in the literature, we found that the median age was 59 years. Predisposing factors were present in 21 of 42 patients (50%), and mainly consisted of immunosuppressive therapy (seven patients), cancer (four patients), and alcoholism (four patients). Colon disease was identified in 15 of 24 patients (63%) and endocarditis in five of 27 patients (18%). Co-infection with Strongyloides stercoralis was identified in 14 of 34 patients (41%), ten of whom were infected with human immunodeficiency virus or human T-lymphotropic virus. Outcomes were described for 37 patients; eight died (22%) and one (3%) had neurological sequelae. S. gallolyticus is an uncommon cause of bacterial meningitis, with specific predisposing conditions. When it is identified, consultation with a cardiologist and gastroenterologist is warranted to rule out underlying endocarditis or colon disease. Stool examinations for Strongyloides stercoralis should be performed in patients who have travelled to or originate from endemic areas. PMID:26314916

  1. The surface protein HvgA mediates group B streptococcus hypervirulence and meningeal tropism in neonates

    PubMed Central

    Tazi, Asmaa; Disson, Olivier; Bellais, Samuel; Bouaboud, Abdelouhab; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Dramsi, Shaynoor; Mistou, Michel-Yves; Khun, Huot; Mechler, Charlotte; Tardieux, Isabelle; Trieu-Cuot, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS) is a normal constituent of the intestinal microflora and the major cause of human neonatal meningitis. A single clone, GBS ST-17, is strongly associated with a deadly form of the infection called late-onset disease (LOD), which is characterized by meningitis in infants after the first week of life. The pathophysiology of LOD remains poorly understood, but our epidemiological and histopathological results point to an oral route of infection. Here, we identify a novel ST-17–specific surface-anchored protein that we call hypervirulent GBS adhesin (HvgA), and demonstrate that its expression is required for GBS hypervirulence. GBS strains that express HvgA adhered more efficiently to intestinal epithelial cells, choroid plexus epithelial cells, and microvascular endothelial cells that constitute the blood–brain barrier (BBB), than did strains that do not express HvgA. Heterologous expression of HvgA in nonadhesive bacteria conferred the ability to adhere to intestinal barrier and BBB-constituting cells. In orally inoculated mice, HvgA was required for intestinal colonization and translocation across the intestinal barrier and the BBB, leading to meningitis. In conclusion, HvgA is a critical virulence trait of GBS in the neonatal context and stands as a promising target for the development of novel diagnostic and antibacterial strategies. PMID:20956545

  2. Interaction of fibrinogen and muramidase-released protein promotes the development of Streptococcus suis meningitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Kong, Decong; Zhang, Shengwei; Jiang, Hua; Zheng, Yuling; Zang, Yating; Hao, Huaijie; Jiang, Yongqiang

    2015-01-01

    Muramidase-released protein (MRP) is as an important virulence marker of Streptococcus suis (S. suis) serotype 2. Our previous works have shown that MRP can bind human fibrinogen (hFg); however, the function of this interaction in S. suis meningitis is not known. In this study, we found that the deletion of mrp significantly impairs the hFg-mediated adherence and traversal ability of S. suis across human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3). Measurement of the permeability to Lucifer yellow in vitro and Evans blue extravasation in vivo show that the MRP-hFg interaction significantly increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In the mouse meningitis model, wild type S. suis caused higher bacterial loads in the brain and more severe histopathological signs of meningitis than the mrp mutant at day 3 post-infection. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence observations reveal that the MRP-hFg interaction can destroy the cell adherens junction protein p120-catenin of hCMEC/D3. These results indicate that the MRP-hFg interaction is important in the development of S. suis meningitis. PMID:26441928

  3. Streptococcus agalactiae Meningitis in Adult Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of group B streptococcus meningitis in a 72-year-old female patient who was admitted in our hospital with a 21-day history of bilateral lower thigh pain and swelling associated with fever, headache, and vomiting. Her past medical history was remarkable for DM type 2, hypertension, and hypothyroidism. Upon admission, examination showed bilateral warmth and tender soft tissue swelling around the knees and MRI showed cellulitis of distal thirds of both thighs. The next day, the patient became drowsy. Neurologic examination showed neck rigidity and right sided hemiparesis. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood cultures yielded group B streptococcus sensitive to ceftriaxone, penicillin G, and vancomycin. The patient received ceftriaxone for a total of 14 days after which she improved and was discharged from the hospital with right sided weakness. PMID:26904325

  4. Streptococcus agalactiae Meningitis in Adult Patient: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of group B streptococcus meningitis in a 72-year-old female patient who was admitted in our hospital with a 21-day history of bilateral lower thigh pain and swelling associated with fever, headache, and vomiting. Her past medical history was remarkable for DM type 2, hypertension, and hypothyroidism. Upon admission, examination showed bilateral warmth and tender soft tissue swelling around the knees and MRI showed cellulitis of distal thirds of both thighs. The next day, the patient became drowsy. Neurologic examination showed neck rigidity and right sided hemiparesis. Cerebrospinal fluid and blood cultures yielded group B streptococcus sensitive to ceftriaxone, penicillin G, and vancomycin. The patient received ceftriaxone for a total of 14 days after which she improved and was discharged from the hospital with right sided weakness. PMID:26904325

  5. Comparative Genomics of the Mucoid and Nonmucoid Strains of Streptococcus pyogenes, Isolated from the Same Patient with Streptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Haruno; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Takizawa, Asako; Moro, Kunihiko; Kishi, Yuki; Takahashi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mucoid (MTB313) and nonmucoid (MTB314) strains of group A streptococcus emm type 1 were simultaneously isolated from a single patient suffering from streptococcal meningitis. Whole-genome sequencing revealed that MTB313 carried a nucleotide substitution within rocA, which generated an amber termination codon. PMID:25883280

  6. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be caused by: Chemical irritation Drug allergies Fungi Parasites Tumors Many types of viruses can cause meningitis: Enteroviruses: These are viruses that also can cause intestinal illness. Herpes viruses: These are the same viruses ...

  7. Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medications. Viral meningitis is caused by viruses like enteroviruses , which are very common in summer and early ... or when they sneeze without covering their mouths. Enteroviruses begin to multiply in the digestive tract and ...

  8. Pathophysiology of acute meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and adjunctive therapy approaches.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Collodel, Allan; Moreira, Ana Paula; Almeida, Sérgio Monteiro de

    2012-05-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a life-threatening disease characterized by an acute purulent infection affecting piamater, arachnoid and the subarachnoid space. The intense inflammatory host's response is potentially fatal and contributes to the neurological sequelae. Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx, followed by bacteremia, microbial invasion and blood-brain barrier traversal. S. pneumoniae is recognized by antigen-presenting cells through the binding of Toll-like receptors inducing the activation of factor nuclear kappa B or mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and subsequent up-regulation of lymphocyte populations and expression of numerous proteins involved in inflammation and immune response. Many brain cells can produce cytokines, chemokines and others pro-inflammatory molecules in response to bacteria stimuli, as consequence, polymorphonuclear are attracted, activated and released in large amounts of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, leading to the peroxynitrite formation, generating oxidative stress. This cascade leads to lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial damage, blood-brain barrier breakdown contributing to cell injury during pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:22618789

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 1 Burden in the African Meningitis Belt: Exploration of Functionality in Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Moïsi, J. C.; Roalfe, L.; Zancolli, M.; Johnson, M.; Burbidge, P.; Borrow, R.; Yaro, S.; Mueller, J. E.; Gessner, B. D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 1 (Sp1) constitutes an important cause of seasonal endemic meningitis in all age groups in the African meningitis belt. Despite a higher meningitis incidence, the Burkinabé population has an Sp1-specific antibody seroprevalence similar to that reported in the United Kingdom (UK). We aimed to establish whether the opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) of pneumococcal IgG naturally present in Burkina Faso differs from that seen in individuals in the UK and to compare the OPAs generated by natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Samples collected from pneumococcal vaccine-naive Burkinabé and UK subjects were matched for age (1 to 39 years) and anti-Sp1 IgG level, analyzed for OPA to 3 S. pneumoniae serotypes (1, 5, and 19A), and compared to postvaccine samples. Furthermore, the Burkinabé samples were assessed for IgG avidity and serotype-specific IgM concentrations. One hundred sixty-nine matched serum samples from both populations were selected. A greater proportion of Burkinabé subjects aged 1 to 19 years had functional Sp1 activity (OPA ≥ 8) compared to UK subjects (12% versus 2%, P < 0.001); however, the proportions were similar among adults (9%). The correlation between Sp1 IgG concentration and OPA was good (P < 0.001), but many individuals had nonfunctional IgG, which was not related to avidity. While the Sp1 IgM concentrations correlated with OPA, not all of the function in serum samples with low IgG could be attributed to IgM. Finally, vaccine-induced Sp1-specific IgG was more functional than equivalent amounts of naturally occurring IgG. In conclusion, despite a substantially higher pneumococcal meningitis incidence, no decreased functional immunity to Sp1 could be evidenced in the Burkinabé population compared to that in the population from the UK. Furthermore, the naturally induced antibodies were less functional than vaccine-induced antibodies. PMID:25651921

  10. A Case Report on the Successful Treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Infectious Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Initially Presenting with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms often present with abdominal and lower back pain, but prolonged fever may be the only symptom. Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms initially presenting with meningitis are extremely rare; there are no reports of their successful treatment. Cases with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative bacteria are even rarer with a higher mortality rate than those caused by other bacteria. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with lower limb weakness and back pain. Examination revealed fever and neck stiffness. Cerebrospinal fluid showed leukocytosis and low glucose levels. The patient was diagnosed with meningitis and bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with antibiotics. Fever, inflammatory response, and neurologic findings showed improvement. However, abdominal computed tomography revealed an aneurysm not present on admission. Antibiotics were continued, and a rifampicin soaked artificial vascular graft was implanted. Tissue cultures showed no bacteria, and histological findings indicated inflammation with high leukocyte levels. There were no postoperative complications or neurologic abnormalities. Physical examination, blood tests, and computed tomography confirmed there was no relapse over the following 13 months. This is the first reported case of survival of a patient with an infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm initially presenting with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26779361

  11. Streptococcus suis, an Important Cause of Adult Bacterial Meningitis in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Wertheim, Heiman F. L.; Nguyen, Huyen Nguyen; Taylor, Walter; Lien, Trinh Thi Minh; Ngo, Hoa Thi; Nguyen, Thai Quoc; Nguyen, Bich Ngoc Thi; Nguyen, Ha Hong; Nguyen, Ha Minh; Nguyen, Cap Trung; Dao, Trinh Tuyet; Nguyen, Trung Vu; Fox, Annette; Farrar, Jeremy; Schultsz, Constance; Nguyen, Hien Duc; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Horby, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis can cause severe systemic infection in adults exposed to infected pigs or after consumption of undercooked pig products. S. suis is often misdiagnosed, due to lack of awareness and improper testing. Here we report the first fifty cases diagnosed with S. suis infection in northern Viet Nam. Methodology/Principal Findings In 2007, diagnostics for S. suis were set up at a national hospital in Hanoi. That year there were 43 S. suis positive cerebrospinal fluid samples, of which S. suis could be cultured in 32 cases and 11 cases were only positive by PCR. Seven patients were blood culture positive for S. suis but CSF culture and PCR negative; making a total of 50 patients with laboratory confirmed S. suis infection in 2007. The number of S. suis cases peaked during the warmer months. Conclusions/Significance S. suis was commonly diagnosed as a cause of bacterial meningitis in adults in northern Viet Nam. In countries where there is intense and widespread exposure of humans to pigs, S. suis can be an important human pathogen. PMID:19543404

  12. Meningitis caused by Neisseria Meningitidis, Hemophilus Influenzae Type B and Streptococcus Pneumoniae during 2005–2012 in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Gürler, Nezahat; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Keser, Melike; Aycan, Ahmet Emre; Gurbuz, Venhar; Salman, Nuran; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Ozkan, Sengul; Sensoy, Gulnar; Belet, Nursen; Alhan, Emre; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa; Celebi, Solmaz; Uzun, Hakan; Faik Oner, Ahmet; Kurugol, Zafer; Ali Tas, Mehmet; Aygun, Denizmen; Oncel, Eda Karadag; Celik, Melda; Yasa, Olcay; Akin, Fatih; Coşkun, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Successful vaccination policies for protection from bacterial meningitis are dependent on determination of the etiology of bacterial meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained prospectively from children from 1 month to ≤ 18 years of age hospitalized with suspected meningitis, in order to determine the etiology of meningitis in Turkey. DNA evidence of Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), and Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 1452 CSF samples were evaluated and bacterial etiology was determined in 645 (44.4%) cases between 2005 and 2012; N. meningitidis was detected in 333 (51.6%), S. pneumoniae in 195 (30.2%), and Hib in 117 (18.1%) of the PCR positive samples. Of the 333 N. meningitidis positive samples 127 (38.1%) were identified as serogroup W-135, 87 (26.1%) serogroup B, 28 (8.4%) serogroup A and 3 (0.9%) serogroup Y; 88 (26.4%) were non-groupable. As vaccines against the most frequent bacterial isolates in this study are available and licensed, these results highlight the need for broad based protection against meningococcal disease in Turkey. PMID:25483487

  13. Successful off-label use of the Cepheid Xpert GBS in a late-onset neonatal meningitis by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; D'Incecco, Carmine; Fazii, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a late-onset neonatal meningitis by Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus - GBS) that was diagnosed with a latex agglutination assay (on cerebrospinal fluid, CSF), as well as by using, for the first time, Xpert GBS (Cepheid, US) on CSF. Due to empirical antibiotics given before sampling, both CSF and blood culture were negative, so the abovementioned diagnostics was crucial. Moreover, the Xpert GBS assay, performed according to an off-label, modified protocol (the system is designed for GBS-carriage intrapartum screening, based on a completely automated real time-Polymerase Chain Reaction) quickly detected the organism's genome target. Although further investigation on this test's performace on CSF is required, then, we trust it may be a promising, quick and precise diagnostic method for infections in newborns. PMID:25197396

  14. Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae as leading causes of pediatric bacterial meningitis in nine Mexican hospitals following 3 years of active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Chacon-Cruz, Enrique; Martinez-Longoria, Cesar Adrian; Llausas-Magana, Eduardo; Luevanos-Velazquez, Antonio; Vazquez-Narvaez, Jorge Alejandro; Beltran, Sandra; Limon-Rojas, Ana Elena; Urtiz-Jeronimo, Fernando; Castaneda-Narvaez, Jose Luis; Otero-Mendoza, Francisco; Aguilar-Del Real, Fernando; Rodriguez-Chagoyan, Jesus; Rivas-Landeros, Rosa Maria; Volker-Soberanes, Maria Luisa; Hinojosa-Robles, Rosa Maria; Arzate-Barbosa, Patricia; Aviles-Benitez, Laura Karina; Elenes-Zamora, Fernando Ivan; Becka, Chandra M.; Ruttimann, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Meningococcal meningitis is reported as a rare condition in Mexico. There are no internationally published studies on bacterial causes of meningitis in the country based on active surveillance. This study focuses on finding the etiology of bacterial meningitis in children from nine Mexican Hospitals. Methods: From January 2010 to February 2013, we conducted a three years of active surveillance for meningitis in nine hospitals throughout Mexico. Active surveillance started at the emergency department for every suspected case, and microbiological studies confirmed/ruled out all potentially bacterial pathogens. We diagnosed based on routine cultures from blood and cerebrospinal fluid (not polymerase chain reaction or other molecular diagnostic tests), and both pneumococcal serotyping and meningococcal serogrouping by using standard methods. Results: Neisseria meningitidis was the leading cause, although 75% of cases occurred in the northwest of the country in Tijuana on the US border. Serogroup C was predominant. Streptococcus pneumoniae followed Neisseria meningitides, but was uniformly distributed throughout the country. Serotype 19A was the most incident but before universal implementation of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. Other bacteria were much less common, including Enterobacteriaceae and Streptococcus agalactiae (these two affecting mostly young infants). Conclusions: Meningococcal meningitis is endemic in Tijuana, Mexico, and vaccination should be seriously considered in that region. Continuous universal vaccination with the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine should be nationally performed, and polymerase chain reaction should be included for bacterial detection in all cultures – negative but presumably bacterial meningitis cases. PMID:27551428

  15. The Three Major Spanish Clones of Penicillin-Resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae Are the Most Common Clones Recovered in Recent Cases of Meningitis in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Enright, Mark C.; Fenoll, Asunción; Griffiths, David; Spratt, Brian G.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred six isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered in Spain from patients with meningitis in 1997 and 1998 were characterized by multilocus sequence typing. A heterogeneous collection of genotypes was associated with meningitis in Spain: 65 different sequence types were resolved and, even at a genetic distance of 0.43, there were 37 distinct lineages. Thirty-eight percent of the isolates, including all isolates of serotypes 6B, 9V, 14, and 23F, were resistant to penicillin, and 24% of the isolates were members of the three major Spanish penicillin-resistant or multidrug-resistant clones of serotypes 6B, 9V, and 23F or serotype variants of these clones. These three clones (MICs, 1 to 2 μg of penicillin/ml) were the most common clones associated with pneumococcal meningitis in Spain during 1997 and 1998. Only two of the other clones associated with meningitis were penicillin resistant (MICs, 0.12 to 0.5 μg/ml). One of the two most prevalent penicillin-susceptible clones causing meningitis (serotype 3) has not been detected outside of Spain, whereas the other (serotype 18C) has been recovered from patients with meningitis in the United Kingdom, The Netherlands, and Denmark. The prevalence of meningitis caused by isolates of the three major Spanish penicillin-resistant or multiply antibiotic-resistant clones, which are now globally distributed, is disturbing and clearly establishes their ability to cause life-threatening disease. PMID:10488179

  16. Evaluation of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor and memory in adult rats survivors of the neonatal meningitis by Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Lemos, Joelson C; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Carradore, Mirelle M; Moreira, Ana Paula; Collodel, Allan; Zanatta, Jessiele R; Valvassori, Samira S; Quevedo, João

    2013-03-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (GBS) is a major cause of severe morbidity and mortality in neonates and young infants, causing sepsis, pneumonia and meningitis. The survivors from this meningitis can suffer serious long-term neurological consequences, such as, seizures, hearing loss, learning and memory impairments. Neurotrophins, such as nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) control the neuronal cell death during the brain development and play an important role in neuronal differentiation, survival and growth of neurons. Neonate Wistar rats, received either 10μL of sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of GBS suspension at a concentration of 1×10(6)cfu/mL. Sixty days after induction of meningitis, the animals underwent behavioral tests, after were killed and the hippocampus and cortex were retired for analyze of the BDNF and NGF levels. In the open-field demonstrated no difference in motor, exploratory activity and habituation memory between the groups. The step-down inhibitory avoidance, when we evaluated the long-term memory at 24h after training session, we found that the meningitis group had a decrease in aversive memory when compared with the long-term memory test of the sham group. BDNF levels decreased in hippocampus and cortex; however the NGF levels decreased only in hippocampus. These findings suggest that the meningitis model could be a good research tool for the study of the biological mechanisms involved in the behavioral alterations secondary to GBS meningitis. PMID:22683802

  17. β-lactam Resistance, Serotype Distribution, and Genotypes of Meningitis-causing Streptococcus pneumoniae, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, David E.; Godoy, Daniel; Castiñeiras, Terezinha M. P. P.; Tulenko, Mary M.; Rebelo, Maria C.; Harrison, Lee H.

    2016-01-01

    Background Here, we report a laboratory-based study of Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from patients with meningitis in Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Methods The aim of this study was to determine the evolution of β-lactam resistance, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, serotypes, and genetic diversity of S. pneumoniae, isolated from meningitis patients between 2000 and 2008. Results A total of 264 S. pneumoniae recovered from patients between 2000 and 2008 were included. Susceptibility testing (E-test) of S. pneumoniae showed resistance to penicillin, ceftriaxone, oxacillin, cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, ofloxacin, erythromycin, chloramphenicol, and rifampicin. Penicillin resistance (PEN-R, minimal inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥0.12 μg/mL) increased from 8% of isolates in 2000–2002, to 12% in 2003–2005, and to 20% in 2006–2008. Ceftriaxone resistance (MIC ≥1.0 μg/mL) was detected among some PEN-R isolates (13%) from 2004 onward. Within the PEN-R isolates, serotypes that are included in 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine predominated (90%), and resistance was detected mostly in isolates of serotypes 14 (61%), 23F (16%), 6B (10%), and 19F (3%). Multilocus sequence typing showed that 52% of the PEN-R isolates, and 89% of those with MICs ≥0.5 μg/mL, were sequence type (ST)-156 or single-locus variants of this ST (ST-557 or ST-4388); all of these isolates were serotype 14 and were assigned to the Spain9V-3 clone. Conclusions β-lactam resistance increased recently among cerebrospinal fluid isolates and was mainly due to the surge of the ST-4388, a previously undescribed gki single-locus variants of ST-156. Regional surveillance is shown to be essential to provide optimal antimicrobial therapy, monitor highly successful clones, and formulate adequate vaccination strategy. PMID:21860337

  18. Using PCR-based detection and genotyping to trace Streptococcus salivarius meningitis outbreak strain to oral flora of radiology physician assistant.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz, Robert E; Shewmaker, Patricia L; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  19. Using PCR-Based Detection and Genotyping to Trace Streptococcus salivarius Meningitis Outbreak Strain to Oral Flora of Radiology Physician Assistant

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Velusamy; Gertz Jr., Robert E.; Shewmaker, Patricia L.; Patrick, Sarah; Chitnis, Amit S.; O'Connell, Heather; Benowitz, Isaac; Patel, Priti; Guh, Alice Y.; Noble-Wang, Judith; Turabelidze, George; Beall, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    We recently investigated three cases of bacterial meningitis that were reported from a midwestern radiology clinic where facemasks were not worn during spinal injection of contrast agent during myelography procedures. Using pulsed field gel electrophoresis we linked a case strain of S. salivarius to an oral specimen of a radiology physician assistant (RPA). We also used a real-time PCR assay to detect S. salivarius DNA within a culture-negative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimen. Here we extend this investigation through using a nested PCR/sequencing strategy to link the culture-negative CSF specimen to the case strain. We also provide validation of the real-time PCR assay used, demonstrating that it is not solely specific for Streptococcus salivarius, but is also highly sensitive for detection of the closely related oral species Streptococcus vestibularis. Through using multilocus sequence typing and 16S rDNA sequencing we further strengthen the link between the CSF case isolate and the RPA carriage isolate. We also demonstrate that the newly characterized strains from this study are distinct from previously characterized S. salivarius strains associated with carriage and meningitis. PMID:22384169

  20. Efficacy of GM6001 as an adjuvant to ceftriaxone in a neonatal rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjie; Han, Qizheng

    2014-01-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to the pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis; therefore, MMP inhibitors may be a neuroprotective treatment for brain injury caused by meningitis because of their antiinflammatory effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the MMP inhibitor GM6001 in a rat model of S. pneumoniae meningitis. For these experiments, 7-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into an uninfected group, meningitis group, antibiotic group and GM6001+antibiotic group. Uninfected animals were sham infected with sterile saline. Rats in the other three groups were inoculated with S. pneumoniae and left untreated, treated with ceftriaxone, or treated with ceftriaxone combined with GM6001. Rats in the meningitis group were severely ill, and MMP-9 was significantly up-regulated. The change in brain water content was consistent with the MMP-9 level. A significant loss of neurons and impaired learning function were observed in the meningitis group. Treatment with the antibiotic and GM6001 significantly down-regulated the level of MMP-9, decreased the brain water content, attenuated neuronal injury and improved learning. Conclusions: GM6001 protected the brain from damage caused by S. pneumoniae, and this effect may occur via downregulating MMP-9 and decreasing brain water content. PMID:25576979

  1. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 deficiency impairs host defense mechanisms against Streptococcus pneumoniae in a mouse model of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Tobias; Spreer, Annette; Azeh, Ivo; Nau, Roland; Gerber, Joachim

    2003-03-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) appears to contribute to blood-brain barrier damage and neuronal injury in bacterial meningitis. To further explore the function of MMP-9 in meningeal inflammation, we injected 10(4) colony forming units (CFU) of a Streptoccocus pneumoniae type 3 strain into the right forebrain of MMP-9 deficient mice (MMP-9(-/-), n=16) and wild-type controls (129 x B6, n=15). The clinical course of the disease, leukocyte recruitment into the subarachnoid space and bacterial titers in the brain did not differ. Yet, clearance of the bacteria from blood (log CFU/ml 4.7 [3.8/5.4] vs. 3.6 [3.0/4.0]; P=0.005) and spleen homogenates (log CFU/ml 5.3 [4.8/5.5] vs. 4.0 [2.8/4.7]; P=0.01) was reduced in MMP-9 deficient mice. A reduced systemic bacterial clearance of MMP-9(-/-) mice was confirmed in experimental S. pneumoniae peritonitis/sepsis. This implies a compromised systemic, but not intracerebral host response against S. pneumoniae in MMP-9 deficiency. PMID:12581831

  2. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... and older People at high risk for pneumococcus infection Alternative Names Pneumococcal meningitis Images Pneumococci organism Pneumococcal pneumonia References Swartz MN. Meningitis: bacterial, ...

  3. Bacterial Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... group B Streptococcus , Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae , and Listeria monocytogenes . In the United States, about 4,100 ... Newborns Group B Streptococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes Infants and Children Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, ...

  4. Pathophysiology and Treatment of Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency requiring immediate diagnosis and immediate treatment. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are the most common and most aggressive pathogens of meningitis. Emerging antibiotic resistance is an upcoming challenge. Clinical and experimental studies have established a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms resulting in brain damage, sequelae and neuropsychological deficits. We summarize the current pathophysiological concept of acute bacterial meningitis and present current treatment strategies. PMID:21180625

  5. Viral Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially from late spring to fall when these viruses spread most often. However, only a small number ... infected with enteroviruses will actually develop meningitis. Other viruses that can cause meningitis are Mumps virus Herpesviruses, ...

  6. Viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, David R

    2005-01-01

    Viruses probably account for most cases of acute meningitis. Viral meningitis is often assumed to be a largely benign disease. For the commonest pathogens causing meningitis, enteroviruses, this is usually the case; however, for many of the other pathogens causing viral meningitis, and for common pathogens in the immunocompromised or infants, viral meningitis is frequently associated with substantial neurological complications and a significant mortality. Diagnostic methods for rapid and accurate identification of pathogens have improved over recent years, permitting more precise and earlier diagnoses. There have been fewer developments in therapies for viral meningitis, and there remain no effective therapies for most pathogens, emphasising the importance of prevention and early diagnosis. This review focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and management of viral meningitis and also covers the prevention of meningitis for pathogens where effective vaccines are available. PMID:16474042

  7. Cryptococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Reviewed May 19, 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 503 Cryptococcal Meningitis WHAT IS CRYPTOCOCCAL MENINGITIS? HOW ... as part of the immune reconstitution syndrome (see fact sheet 483 .) A study in 2011 showed that starting ...

  8. Meningitis - staphylococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Staphylococcal meningitis is caused by Staphylococcus bacteria. When it is caused by Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteria, it usually develops as a complication of surgery or ...

  9. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... History of meningitis Infection of a heart valve Injury or trauma to the head Meningitis in which there is leakage of spinal fluid Recent ear infection Recent pneumonia Recent upper respiratory infection Spleen removal or a spleen that does not function

  10. Rheumatoid meningitis.

    PubMed

    Nihat, Akin; Chinthapalli, Krishna; Bridges, Leslie; Johns, Paul; Sofat, Nidhi; Moynihan, Barry

    2016-08-01

    Rheumatoid meningitis is a rare, potentially treatable condition that can mimic a wide range of neurological conditions, including vascular syndromes and encephalopathies. Despite a concurrent history of rheumatoid arthritis, patients often have no active synovitis. Here we describe a patient with rheumatoid meningitis who presented to a hyperacute stroke unit with dysarthria on waking and transient facial droop. PMID:27029468

  11. Meningitis - meningococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... spring. It may cause local epidemics at boarding schools, college dormitories, or military bases. Risk factors include ... and close contacts (especially in health care or school settings) of people with this type of meningitis ...

  12. Treating Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ways to treat bacterial meningitis. 1 They compared steroids (dexamethasone) with pla- cebo. The doctors gave medication ( ... compared anti- biotics by themselves with antibiotics plus steroids. Dr. Fritz and colleagues compared the mortality (deaths) ...

  13. Meningococcal Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. The extended meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa, stretching from Senegal in the west to Ethiopia ... ampicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone. Under epidemic conditions in Africa in areas with limited health infrastructure and resources, ...

  14. Meningitis - meningococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most commonly used antibiotics for meningococcal meningitis. Penicillin in high doses is almost always effective, too. If the patient is allergic to penicillin, chloramphenicol may be used. Sometimes corticosteroids may be ...

  15. Meningitis - cryptococcal

    MedlinePlus

    Antifungal medicines are used to treat this form of meningitis. Intravenous (IV, through a vein) therapy with ... treatment. It is often combined with an oral antifungal medicine called 5-flucytosine. Another oral medication, fluconazole, ...

  16. Future challenges in the elimination of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, Matthew J; Serruto, Davide; Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio Palazzi; Klugman, Keith P

    2012-05-30

    Despite the widespread implementation of several effective vaccines over the past few decades, bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Group B Streptococcus (GBS) still results in unacceptably high levels of human mortality and morbidity. A residual disease burden due to bacterial meningitis is also apparent due to a number of persistent or emerging pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella spp. and Streptococcus suis. Here, we review the current status of bacterial meningitis caused by these pathogens, highlighting how past and present vaccination programs have attempted to counter these pathogens. We discuss how improved pathogen surveillance, implementation of current vaccines, and development of novel vaccines may be expected to further reduce bacterial meningitis and related diseases in the future. PMID:22607903

  17. Neonatal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heath, P T; Nik Yusoff, N K; Baker, C J

    2003-05-01

    Twelve years ago an annotation was published in Archives of Disease in Childhood regarding the antibiotic treatment of suspected neonatal meningitis. The authors recommended the use of cephalosporins rather than chloramphenicol and advocated intraventricular aminoglycoside treatment in selected cases. They noted the absence of clinical trials with third generation cephalosporins that showed an improvement in mortality or neurological outcome. PMID:12719388

  18. Meningitis - gram-negative

    MedlinePlus

    Gram-negative meningitis ... Acute bacterial meningitis can be caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Meningococcal and H. influenzae meningitis are caused by Gram-negative bacteria and are covered in detail in other articles. This article ...

  19. Genetic diversity of rRNA operons of unrelated Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated from cerebrospinal fluid of neonates suffering from meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Chatellier, S; Huet, H; Kenzi, S; Rosenau, A; Geslin, P; Quentin, R

    1996-01-01

    The genetic diversity of a collection of 54 unrelated Streptococcus agalactiae strains isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of neonates and of 60 unrelated carrier strains was evaluated by investigating the restriction fragment length polymorphism of the rRNA gene region. Three restriction enzymes were selected for use: PstI, HindIII, and CfoI. Clustering analysis revealed two phylogenetic groups of strains with 40% divergence. Group I contained two clusters, A and B, and group II contained three clusters, C, D, and E. Strains of serotype Ia were mostly distributed in cluster A, and strains of serotype Ib were mostly distributed in cluster E. Serotype III isolates did not cluster. Nevertheless, 37 of 39 isolates belonging to cluster B were serotype III. With HindIII, two rRNA gene banding patterns characterized 38 of the 39 strains of cluster B, which represents a high-virulence group. In addition, two rRNA gene banding patterns with each enzyme and/or a pair of CfoI fragments of 905 and 990 bp identified 81% of the invasive strains. On account of the genetic homogeneity of the cerebrospinal fluid strains, ribotyping is a powerful typing method for investigation of nosocomial or epidemic invasive infections only when all three enzymes are used or when PstI and HindIII or PstI and CfoI are combined with serotyping (index of discrimination, > 0.95). PMID:8897176

  20. Endolymphatic sac involvement in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Møller, Martin Nue; Brandt, Christian; Østergaard, Christian; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-04-01

    The commonest sequelae of bacterial meningitis are related to the inner ear. Little is known about the inner ear immune defense. Evidence suggests that the endolymphatic sac provides some protection against infection. A potential involvement of the endolymphatic sac in bacterial meningitis is largely unaccounted for, and thus the object of the present study. A well-established adult rat model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis was employed. Thirty adult rats were inoculated intrathecally with Streptococcus pneumoniae and received no additional treatment. Six rats were sham-inoculated. The rats were killed when reaching terminal illness or on day 7, followed by light microscopy preparation and PAS-Alcian blue staining. The endolymphatic sac was examined for bacterial invasion and leukocyte infiltration. Neither bacteria nor leukocytes infiltrated the endolymphatic sac during the first days. Bacteria invaded the inner ear through the cochlear aquaduct. On days 5-6, the bacteria invaded the endolymphatic sac through the endolymphatic duct subsequent to invasion of the vestibular endolymphatic compartment. No evidence of direct bacterial invasion of the sac through the meninges was found. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurred prior to bacterial invasion. During meningitis, bacteria do not invade the endolymphatic sac through the dura, but solely through the endolymphatic duct, following the invasion of the vestibular system. Leukocyte infiltration of the sac occurs prior to, as well as concurrent with bacterial invasion. The findings support the endolymphatic sac as part of an innate immune defense system protecting the inner ear from infection. PMID:24452771

  1. Host-pathogen interactions in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Doran, Kelly S; Fulde, Marcus; Gratz, Nina; Kim, Brandon J; Nau, Roland; Prasadarao, Nemani; Schubert-Unkmeir, Alexandra; Tuomanen, Elaine I; Valentin-Weigand, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a devastating disease occurring worldwide with up to half of the survivors left with permanent neurological sequelae. Due to intrinsic properties of the meningeal pathogens and the host responses they induce, infection can cause relatively specific lesions and clinical syndromes that result from interference with the function of the affected nervous system tissue. Pathogenesis is based on complex host-pathogen interactions, some of which are specific for certain bacteria, whereas others are shared among different pathogens. In this review, we summarize the recent progress made in understanding the molecular and cellular events involved in these interactions. We focus on selected major pathogens, Streptococcus pneumonia, S. agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus), Neisseria meningitidis, and Escherichia coli K1, and also include a neglected zoonotic pathogen, Streptococcus suis. These neuroinvasive pathogens represent common themes of host-pathogen interactions, such as colonization and invasion of mucosal barriers, survival in the blood stream, entry into the central nervous system by translocation of the blood-brain and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and induction of meningeal inflammation, affecting pia mater, the arachnoid and subarachnoid spaces. PMID:26744349

  2. Neutrophilic bacterial meningitis: pathology and etiologic diagnosis of fatal cases.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Liu, Lindy; Bhatnagar, Julu; Jones, Tara; Patel, Mitesh; DeLeon-Carnes, Marlene; Zaki, Sherif R

    2013-08-01

    The frequency of fatalities due to acute bacterial meningitis has decreased significantly due to vaccinations, early diagnoses, and treatments. We studied brain tissues of patients with fatal neutrophilic meningitis referred to the Centers for Disease Control for etiologic diagnosis from 2000-2009 to highlight aspects of the disease that may be preventable or treatable. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were extracted from records. Of 117 cases in the database with a diagnosis of meningitis or meningoencephalitis, 39 had neutrophilic inflammation in the meninges. Inflammatory cells infiltrated the superficial cortex in 16 of 39 (41%) cases. Bacteria were found using Gram and bacterial silver stains in 72% of cases, immunohistochemistry in 69% (including two cases where the meningococcus was found outside the meninges), and PCR in 74%. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the cause of the meningitis in 14 patients and Neisseria meningitidis in 9. In addition, Streptococcus spp. were found to be the cause in six cases, while Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Fusobacterium were the cause of one case each. There were six cases in which no specific etiological agent could be determined. The mean age of the patients with S. pneumoniae was 39 years (range 0-65), with N. meningitidis was 19 years (range 7-51), whereas that for all others was 31 years (range 0-68). In summary, our study shows that S. pneumoniae continues to be the most frequent cause of fatal neutrophilic bacterial meningitis followed by N. meningitidis, both vaccine preventable diseases. PMID:23558577

  3. Neuroimaging in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Jain, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous meningitis is a serious infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is the key to success of treatment. Neuroimaging plays a crucial role in the early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis and its disabling complications. Magnetic resonance imaging is considered superior to computed tomography. Neuroimaging characteristics include leptomeningeal and basal cisternal enhancement, hydrocephalus, periventricular infarcts, and tuberculoma. Partially treated pyogenic meningitis, cryptococcal meningitis, viral encephalitis, carcinomatous, and lymphomatous meningitis may have many similar neuroimaging characteristics, and differentiation from tuberculous meningitis at times on the basis of neuroimaging characteristics becomes difficult. PMID:26954796

  4. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... No. 04-4840 Back to Meningitis and Encephalitis Information Page See a list of all NINDS Disorders Publicaciones en Español Meningitis y Encefalitis Prepared by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  5. Meningitis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cord. Most cases are caused by bacteria or viruses, but some can be due to certain medications or illnesses. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but is usually serious and can be life threatening if not treated right away. Viral meningitis ( ...

  6. Meningitis Myths and Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diseases Infographic Prevention and Control of Meningococcal Disease Meningitis Myths and Facts Myth: Meningococcal disease is easy ... infected person, such as shaking hands. Fact: Meningococcal meningitis is spread through air droplets and direct contact ...

  7. Human Streptococcus agalactiae isolate in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus agalactiae, the Lancefield group B Streptococcus (GBS), long recognized as a mammalian pathogen, is an emerging pathogen to fish. We show that a GBS serotype Ia, multilocus sequence type ST-7 isolate from a human neonatal meningitis clinical case causes disease signs and mortality in N...

  8. Five Cases of Recurrent Meningitis Associated with Chronic Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Shimasaki, Teppei; Chung, Heath; Shiiki, Soichi

    2015-01-01

    Although meningitis secondary to chronic strongyloidiasis is a rare complication, it is associated with a high mortality rate. Recurrent meningitis can occur if the underlying parasitic infection is left untreated. We report five cases of recurrent meningitis related to chronic strongyloidiasis that were associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Common causative organisms are Escherichia coli, Streptococcus bovis, and Klebsiella pneumonia. One patient died during the second episode of meningitis. Three patients showed significant gastrointestinal and respiratory symptoms before developing headache and fever. In four cases, patients developed multiple recurrences even with the treatment of thiabendazol. Ivermectin seems to be a better agent compared with thiabendazol to achieve eradication of strongyloidiasis. PMID:25548379

  9. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-07-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  10. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  11. Pneumococcal meningitis: development of a new animal model

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Benjamin P.C.; Shepherd, Robert K.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Clark, Graeme M.; O’Leary, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Hypothesis The rat is a suitable animal to establish a model for the study of pneumococcal meningitis post cochlear implantation Background There has been an increase in the number of cases of cochlear implant-related meningitis. The most common organism identified was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Whether cochlear implantation increases the risk of pneumococcal meningitis in healthy subjects without other risk factors remains to be determined. Previous animal studies do not focus on the pathogenesis and risk of pneumococcal meningitis post implantation and are based on relatively small animal numbers, making it difficult to assess the cause and effect relationship. There is, therefore, a need to develop a new animal model allowing direct examination of the pathogenesis of meningitis in the presence of a cochlear implant. Methods Eighteen non-implanted rats were infected with 1× 106 and 1 × 108 colony forming units (CFU) of a clinical isolate of S. pneumoniae via three different inoculation routes (middle ear, inner ear and intraperitoneal) to examine for evidence of meningitis over 24 hours. Six implanted rats were infected with the highest amount of bacteria possible for each route of inoculation (4 × 1010 CFU intraperitoneal, 3 × 108CFU middle ear, 1 × 106 CFU inner ear) to examine for evidence of meningitis with the presence of an implant. Histological pattern of cochlear infections for each of the three different inoculating routes were examined. Results Pneumococcal meningitis was evident in all 6 implanted animals for each of the three different routes of inoculation. Once in the inner ear, bacteria were found to enter the central nervous system either via the cochlear aqueduct or canaliculi perforantes of osseous spiral lamina, reaching the perineural and perivascular space then the internal acoustic meatus. The rate, extent and pattern of infection within the cochleae depended on the route of inoculation. Finally, there was no evidence of pneumococcal

  12. Laminin receptor initiates bacterial contact with the blood brain barrier in experimental meningitis models

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela, Carlos J.; Mahdavi, Jafar; Thornton, Justin; Mann, Beth; Wooldridge, Karl G.; Abouseada, Noha; Oldfield, Neil J.; Self, Tim; Ala’Aldeen, Dlawer A.A.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2009-01-01

    A diverse array of infectious agents, including prions and certain neurotropic viruses, bind to the laminin receptor (LR), and this determines tropism to the CNS. Bacterial meningitis in childhood is almost exclusively caused by the respiratory tract pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae, but the mechanism by which they initiate contact with the vascular endothelium of the blood brain barrier (BBB) is unknown. We hypothesized that an interaction with LR might underlie their CNS tropism. Using affinity chromatography, coimmunoprecipitation, retagging, and in vivo imaging approaches, we identified 37/67-kDa LR as a common receptor for all 3 bacteria on the surface of rodent and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. Mutagenesis studies indicated that the corresponding bacterial LR-binding adhesins were pneumococcal CbpA, meningococcal PilQ and PorA, and OmpP2 of H. influenzae. The results of competitive binding experiments suggest that a common adhesin recognition site is present in the carboxyl terminus of LR. Together, these findings suggest that disruption or modulation of the interaction of bacterial adhesins with LR might engender unexpectedly broad protection against bacterial meningitis and may provide a therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of disease. PMID:19436113

  13. Streptococcus iniae and Streptococcus agalactiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae are economically important Gram positive bacterial pathogens of cultured and wild fish with a worldwide distribution. Both bacteria are potential zoonotic pathogens and have been associated most often with infections in immunocompromised people. Streptococcus in...

  14. Syphilitic aseptic meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    Syphilitic aseptic meningitis is a complication of untreated syphilis. It involves inflammation of the tissues covering the ... Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the spirochete bacteria Treponema pallidum . Syphilis has three main ...

  15. Meningitis - H. influenzae

    MedlinePlus

    ... and close contacts (especially in health care or school settings) of people with this type of meningitis ... first visit. Close contacts in the same household, school, or day care center should be watched for ...

  16. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Non-Infectious Meningitis ... confusion) Top of Page Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis File Formats Help: ...

  17. Meningitis and Encephalitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Meningitis and Encephalitis ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  18. Vaccine preventable meningitis in Malaysia: epidemiology and management.

    PubMed

    McNeil, Hannah C; Jefferies, Johanna M C; Clarke, Stuart C

    2015-06-01

    Worldwide bacterial meningitis accounts for more than one million cases and 135,000 deaths annually. Profound, lasting neurological complications occur in 9-25% of cases. This review confirms the greatest risk from bacterial meningitis is in early life in Malaysia. Much of the disease burden can be avoided by immunization, particularly against Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Despite inclusion of the Hib vaccine in the National Immunisation Programme and the licensure of pneumococcal vaccines, these two species are the main contributors to bacterial meningitis in Malaysia, with Neisseria meningitidis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing a smaller proportion of disease. The high Hib prevalence may partly be due to dated, small-scale studies limiting the understanding of the current epidemiological situation. This highlights the need for larger, better quality surveillance from Malaysia to evaluate the success of Hib immunization and to help guide immunization policy for vaccines against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. PMID:25962101

  19. DISCUSSION ON MENINGITIS

    PubMed Central

    1929-01-01

    (1) Meningitis: two groups of cases. (2) A method of washing out the subarachnoid space in cases of septic meningitis secondary to infection of the ear. (3) Discussion on the value of maintaining a positive pressure of the cerebrospinal fluid when operating on a septic region communicating with the subarachnoid space. (4) Leaking cerebrospinal fluid from the region of the ear: operative treatment. PMID:19986899

  20. Approach to Chronic Lymphocytic Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Nadkarni, Nilesh

    2015-09-01

    Chronic meningitis is a common clinical problem. Early diagnosis and appropriate therapy is important in improving the overall outcome and to prevent long-lasting sequels. As many etiological agents lead to the development of chronic lymphocytic meningitis, it is important to develop a systematic approach to the diagnosis; taking clues from history, examination and laboratory tests, to make an accurate diagnosis and institute appropriate therapy. This review focuses on the diagnostic approach towards the commonly encountered situation of chronic lymphocytic meningitis. Chronic meningitis is defined as meningeal inflammation that persists for more than 4 weeks. Chronic meningitis accounts for less than 10% of all the cases of meningitis.1 Causes of chronic lymphocytic meningitis are mainly divided into infectious and non-infectious listed in Table 1.2 Due to advancement in investigations, diseases causing chronic meningitis may be diagnosed earlier than 4 weeks and hence the definition should be considered as a rough guideline. PMID:27608867

  1. Usefulness of inflammatory biomarkers in discriminating between bacterial and aseptic meningitis in hospitalized children from a population with low vaccination coverage

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Jacek; Avonts, Dirk; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Michalak, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae are the most frequent pathogens responsible for meningitis beyond the neonatal period. Aseptic meningitis is a disabling condition, but bacterial meningitis if left untreated is 100% fatal. The aim of the study was to analyze the usefulness of biochemical and hematological parameters in distinguishing between bacterial and non-bacterial meningitis in children with meningitis from a population with low rates of vaccination against S. pneumoniae and N. meningitidis. Material and methods This study is a retrospective chart review of children hospitalized with meningitis. In patients with aseptic and bacterial meningitis the following parameters were compared: C-reactive protein, D-dimers, fibrinogen, glucose level, and leukocyte level, and in cerebrospinal fluid, protein, glucose, and leukocyte concentrations were analyzed. Number of points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score (BMS) was calculated. The predictive value of each parameter to distinguish between bacterial and aseptic meningitis was evaluated. Results In total, 129 patients were included in the study: 65 diagnosed with bacterial meningitis and 64 with aseptic meningitis. Bacterial and aseptic meningitis were statistically significantly different based on each analyzed parameter (p < 0.000001). Among children with aseptic meningitis 42 (66%) scored 0 points in the BMS, while all the children with bacterial meningitis had at least one point. Conclusions In children with meningitis inflammatory biomarkers differ statistically significantly depending on the etiology – bacterial or aseptic. Serum concentration of C-reactive protein higher than 80 mg/dl is a useful marker of bacterial etiology of meningitis. A high Bacterial Meningitis Score is indicative for bacterial meningitis. PMID:27186188

  2. Cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Leonhard, Sonja E.; Fritz, Daan; van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon but severe complication of sarcoidosis. Methods: We present 2 patients with cryptococcal meningitis complicating sarcoidosis and compared findings with 38 cases reported in the literature. Results: When analyzing our patients and 38 cases reported in the literature, we found that median age of sarcoidosis patients with cryptococcal meningitis was 39 years (range 30–48); 27 of 33 reported cases (82%) had a history of sarcoidosis. Only 16 of 40 patients (40%) received immunomodulating therapy at the time of diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis. The diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis was delayed in 17 of 40 patients (43%), mainly because of the initial suspicion of neurosarcoidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination showed mildly elevated white blood cell count (range 23–129/mm3). Twenty-nine of 32 cases (91%) had a positive CSF culture for Cryptococcus neoformans and 25 of 27 cases (93%) had a positive CSF C neoformans antigen test. CD4 counts were low in all patients in whom counts were performed (84–228/mL). Twelve patients had an unfavorable outcome (32%), of which 7 died (19%) and 24 patients (65%) had a favorable outcome. The rate of unfavorable outcome in patients with a delayed diagnosis was 7 of 17 (41%) compared to 5 of 28 (21%) in patients in whom diagnosis was not delayed. Conclusion: Cryptococcal meningitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of sarcoidosis. Patients were often initially misdiagnosed as neurosarcoidosis, which resulted in considerable treatment delay and worse outcome. CSF cryptococcal antigen tests are advised in patients with sarcoidosis and meningitis. PMID:27583871

  3. Hypopituitarism as consequence of late neonatal infection by Group B streptococcus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Amanda Santana; Fernandes, Ana Lourdes Lima Araújo; Guaragna-Filho, Guilherme

    2015-01-01

    Hypopituitarism is a condition characterized by dysfunction of the pituitary gland hormone production. The insults of the perinatal period, which includes the late infection by Group B Streptococcus, consists in a rare etiology of this condition. We present the case of a 39-days-old infant with meningitis caused by Streptococcus Group B, which showed, among other consequences, hypopituitarism. PMID:26161231

  4. Streptococcus suis infection

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Youjun; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Zuowei; Wang, Shihua; Cao, Min; Hu, Dan; Wang, Changjun

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis (S. suis) is a family of pathogenic gram-positive bacterial strains that represents a primary health problem in the swine industry worldwide. S. suis is also an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe human infections clinically featuring with varied diseases/syndromes (such as meningitis, septicemia, and arthritis). Over the past few decades, continued efforts have made significant progress toward better understanding this zoonotic infectious entity, contributing in part to the elucidation of the molecular mechanism underlying its high pathogenicity. This review is aimed at presenting an updated overview of this pathogen from the perspective of molecular epidemiology, clinical diagnosis and typing, virulence mechanism, and protective antigens contributing to its zoonosis. PMID:24667807

  5. [Endocarditis, meningitis, pneumopathy and pneumococcal cerebral abscess in an alcoholic smoker].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Roth, S; Montagne, N

    2001-10-01

    We report a case of mitral endocarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in a 43 year old man with history of alcohol abuse and cigarette smoking. The pneumococcal endocarditis was associated with pneumonia, meningitis and brain abscess. Only transesophageal echocardiography could confirm the presence of vegetation. The patient was treated medically with good results. PMID:11887774

  6. [Angiostrongylosis or eosinophilic meningitis].

    PubMed

    Bourée, Patrice; Dumazedier, Déborah; Dahane, Naïma

    2010-04-20

    Eosinophilic meningitis, or angiostrongyliasis, is a common disease in Asia, in the Caribbean and in the Pacific islands. It is caused by a rat lungworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis. Infection occurs by consumption of raw or undercooked snails. Diagnosis is based on epidemiological criteria, clinical manifestations, elevated count of eosinophils in the cerebrospinal fluid and serological tests. Treatment is symptomatic and supportive. PMID:20465114

  7. Gemifloxacin Is Effective in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, A.; Wellmer, A.; Gerber, J.; Maier, K.; Henne, S.; Nau, R.

    2000-01-01

    In a rabbit model of Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis, 5 mg of gemifloxacin mesylate (SB-265805) per kg/h reduced the bacterial titers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) almost as rapidly as 10 mg of ceftriaxone per kg/h (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± standard deviation [SD], −0.25 ± 0.09 versus −0.38 ± 0.11; serum and CSF concentrations of gemifloxacin were 2.1 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.59 ± 0.38 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h). Coadministration of 1 mg of dexamethasone per kg did not affect gemifloxacin serum and CSF levels (2.7 ± 1.4 mg/liter and 0.75 ± 0.34 mg/liter, respectively, at 24 h) or activity (Δlog CFU/ml/h ± SD, −0.26 ± 0.11). PMID:10681354

  8. Aetiological agents of cerebrospinal meningitis: a retrospective study from a teaching hospital in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstracts Background Meningitis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in low-resource settings. In sub-Saharan Africa, the meningitis belt has been characterized by particularly high and seasonal incidences of bacterial meningitis extending throughout life. Despite the progress being made in treating the condition, the mortality rates continue to be high, ranging between 2% and 30% globally. In Ghana, the mortality rate of meningitis has been estimated to range from 36% to 50%. However little information is available on the pathogens contributing to meningitis and their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Updated information is essential to adjust the recommendations for empirical treatment or prevention of meningitis which could have immense implications for local and global health. Methods We retrospectively reviewed laboratory records of all patients suspected of bacterial meningitis who underwent a lumbar puncture from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2010. Data were retrieved from laboratory record books and double entered into a Microsoft® excel spreadsheet. Results Records of 4,955 cerebrospinal fluid samples were analysed. Of these, 163 (3.3%, 95%CI: 2.8% to 3.8%) were confirmed meningitis and 106 (2.1%, 95%CI: 1.7% to 2.6%) were probable meningitis cases. Confirmed meningitis cases were made up of 117 (71.8%) culture positive bacteria, 19 (11.7%) culture positive Cryptococcus neoformans and 27(16.6%) Gram positive bacteria with negative culture. The most prevalent bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae 91 (77.7%), followed by E.coli 4 (3.4%), Salmonella species 4 (3.4%), Neisseria meningitidis 3 (2.5%), Pseudomonas species 3(2.5%) and others. Pneumococcal isolates susceptibility to penicillin, chloramphenicol and ceftriaxone were 98.9% (95%CI: 94.0% to 100.0%), 83.0% (95%CI: 73.4% to 90.1%) and 100.0% (95%CI: 95.8% to 100.0%) respectively. Conclusion Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important cause of meningitis among all age groups and its

  9. Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis in Alcoholic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients). Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4%) and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001). A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% P<0.001). Alcoholics were more likely to have meningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01) and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005), whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01). A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04), often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01). Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients. PMID:20161709

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype III, Multilocus Sequence Type 283 Strain SG-M1

    PubMed Central

    Mehershahi, Kurosh S.; Hsu, Li Yang; Koh, Tse Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) is a common commensal strain in the human gastrointestinal tract that can also cause invasive disease in humans and other animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of S. agalactiae SG-M1, a serotype III, multilocus sequence type 283 strain, isolated from a Singaporean patient suffering from meningitis. PMID:26494662

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptococcus agalactiae Serotype III, Multilocus Sequence Type 283 Strain SG-M1.

    PubMed

    Mehershahi, Kurosh S; Hsu, Li Yang; Koh, Tse Hsien; Chen, Swaine L

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus) is a common commensal strain in the human gastrointestinal tract that can also cause invasive disease in humans and other animals. We report here the complete genome sequence of S. agalactiae SG-M1, a serotype III, multilocus sequence type 283 strain, isolated from a Singaporean patient suffering from meningitis. PMID:26494662

  12. Diagnostic performance of a multiplex PCR assay for meningitis in an HIV-infected population in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Rhein, Joshua; Bahr, Nathan C; Hemmert, Andrew C; Cloud, Joann L; Bellamkonda, Satya; Oswald, Cody; Lo, Eric; Nabeta, Henry; Kiggundu, Reuben; Akampurira, Andrew; Musubire, Abdu; Williams, Darlisha A; Meya, David B; Boulware, David R

    2016-03-01

    Meningitis remains a worldwide problem, and rapid diagnosis is essential to optimize survival. We evaluated the utility of a multiplex PCR test in differentiating possible etiologies of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 69 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with meningitis was collected at diagnosis (n=51) and among persons with cryptococcal meningitis during therapeutic lumbar punctures (n=68). Cryopreserved CSF specimens were analyzed with BioFire FilmArray® Meningitis/Encephalitis panel, which targets 17 pathogens. The panel detected Cryptococcus in the CSF of patients diagnosed with a first episode of cryptococcal meningitis by fungal culture with 100% sensitivity and specificity and differentiated between fungal relapse and paradoxical immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in recurrent episodes. A negative FilmArray result was predictive of CSF sterility on follow-up lumbar punctures for cryptococcal meningitis. EBV was frequently detected in this immunosuppressed population (n=45). Other pathogens detected included: cytomegalovirus (n=2), varicella zoster virus (n=2), human herpes virus 6 (n=1), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (n=1). The FilmArray Meningitis/Encephalitis panel offers a promising platform for rapid meningitis diagnosis. PMID:26711635

  13. Carcinomatosis of the Meninges

    PubMed Central

    Dinsdale, Henry B.; Taghavy, Ahmad

    1964-01-01

    Some clinical and pathological features of carcinomatosis of the meninges are reviewed along with a report of four cases. This condition usually presents in middle age as a subacute meningitis with cranial nerve involvement, but the diagnostic importance of the various mental disturbances which may be encountered early in its course are noted. The acute or subacute course may reflect a widespread mechanical interference with normal cerebral metabolism, a notion which is supported by recent clinical measurements in these patients of the rate of glucose transport across the blood-brain barrier. It is probable that the route taken by tumour cells to reach the meningeal spaces is a relatively unimportant factor in determining this pattern of growth and that the intrinsic growth characteristics of the primary tumour, its nutritional needs, and gravity probably play the major roles in production of this unusual type of secondary invasion. Greater therapeutic use of irradiation for these patients is encouraged. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:14118690

  14. Acute bacterial meningitis in adults: a hospital based study in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Abdulrab, Amin; Algobaty, Faker; Salem, Ahmed K; Mohammed, Y A K

    2010-03-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis is an important cause of mortality and morbidity with high rates of long-term neurological sequelae. To determine the clinical presentation, complications, and outcome of acute meningitis in Yemen, a retrospective study in patients 15 years or older with acute bacterial meningitis who were admitted into Al-Thawra Teaching Hospital in Sana'a from January 2006 to December 2007 was carried out. There were 121 patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Lumbar puncture was performed in 112 (92.6%). The most common pathogen was Streptococcus pneumoniae found in 47.4% of positive cultures, Neisseria meningitidis in 33.9%, and Haemophilus influenzae in 10.2%. The classical triad of acute bacterial meningitis was found in 65% of cases. The mortality rate was 22.3%, with 27 patients dying during hospitalization. S. pneumoniae had a case fatality rate of 35.7%. Frequent complications were impaired consciousness, recurrent convulsion, and chest infection, which occurred in 30.6, 16.5, and 10.7% of the patients, respectively. Risk factors for death among those with acute bacterial meningitis included older age (>or=45 years), altered mental status, chest infection, and S. pneumoniae infection. This study highlights the importance of bacterial meningitis as a serious disease of adults in Yemen and the need for effective methods to prevent its complications. PMID:20332577

  15. Meningococcal meningitis outbreak control strategies.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, S; Kumar, R; Roy, P; Varma, S; Sharma, B K

    2000-12-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has been occurring worldwide in both endemic and epidemic forms. Serogroup A accounts for majority of cases of epidemic as well as endemic Meningococcal meningitis in developing nations, whereas group C and group B causes epidemic and endemic meningococcal meningitis in developed countries. Person to person spread of N. meningitides generally occurs through inhalation of droplets of infected nasopharyngeal secretions by direct or indirect oral contact. Incubation period varies from 2 to 10 days. N. meningitides typically causes acute infective illness characterized by sequential development of upper respiratory tract infection, meningococcemia, meningitis and focal neurological deficit. Over 90 per cent cases of adult meningococcal infections have cerebrospinal meningitis, whereas in children prevalence of meningitis is much lower (50 per cent). Acute meningitis manifests with fever, severe headache, vomiting and neck stiffness. Presentations may be non-specific in infants, elderly and in patients with fulminant meningococcemia. Diagnosis is confirmed with cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Overall mortality due to meningitis is usually around 10 per cent. In meningococcal septicemia, the case fatality rate may exceed 50 per cent. Preventive strategies include vaccination, chemoprophylaxis and early detection and treatment. Mass vaccination campaign, if appropriately carried out, has been documented to halt an epidemic of meningococcal disease due to serogroup A or C. In the present review we have discussed the available evidence with regards to prevention at primary, secondary and tertiary level. Public health approach to an outbreak of meningococcal meningitis in a community or an organization is also outlined. PMID:11668937

  16. Pneumococcal meningitis in an adolescent with fever and foot ache.

    PubMed

    Dias, Catarina; Pedrosa, Cláudia; Romariz, Jorge; Santos, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement. PMID:23956909

  17. Pneumococcal Meningitis in an Adolescent with Fever and Foot Ache

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Catarina; Pedrosa, Cláudia; Romariz, Jorge; Santos, Mafalda; Rodrigues, Lúcia

    2013-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease predominantly affects younger children, elderly, and immunocompromised patients. Pneumococcal meningitis is a particularly important form of presentation, considering its high rate of morbimortality. We present the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old adolescent male who was hospitalized due to suspicion of osteoarticular infection in his left foot. A few hours later, he developed meningeal signs, exhibiting slight pleocytosis and Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in both cerebrospinal fluid and blood. Imaging studies were inconclusive regarding the nature of the foot disorder. We considered the hypothesis of osteomyelitis of the navicular bone as the most likely, for which he completed six weeks of antibiotic therapy. There was a favorable clinical evolution, along with complete absence of osteoarticular or neurological sequelae. The relevance of this clinical case resides in the unusual presentation of invasive pneumococcal disease in this age group, as well as in the rare form of orthopedic involvement. PMID:23956909

  18. Group-A-streptococcal meningitis in a 7-year-old child – a rare pathogen in a non-immune compromised patient

    PubMed Central

    van Zitteren, Leonarda Maria (LM); Arents, Niek LA; Halbertsma, Feico

    2011-01-01

    A case is presented of meningitis in a 7-year-old female child caused by Group A streptococcus (GAS), a rare bacterial cause of meningitis, with a high rate of morbidity (46%) and mortality (10%). GAS is susceptible for empiric antibiotic therapy aimed at the most prevalent pathogens of meningitis. As GAS meningitis is typically associated with ear-nose-throat (ENT) infections, specific search for a reservoir is advised. Bacterial typification often demonstrates M-protein gene sequence type (EMM type) 1.0 associated with upper respiratory tract infections and also severe, invasive GAS infections. Follow-up investigation including neurologic developmental status and audiologic testing is necessary. Although GAS is a very uncommon cause of acute bacterial meningitis in children, high morbidity and mortality have been reported. Being associated with ENT infections, a search for a GAS reservoir is proposed. GASs are susceptible for common empiric antibiotic therapies in meningitis. Follow-up investigation is necessary. PMID:22674699

  19. Changing etiology of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a nationwide multicenter study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Moon, S-Y; Chung, D R; Kim, S-W; Chang, H H; Lee, H; Jung, D S; Kim, Y-S; Jung, S I; Ryu, S Y; Heo, S T; Moon, C; Ki, H K; Son, J S; Kwon, K T; Shin, S Y; Lee, J S; Lee, S S; Rhee, J-Y; Lee, J-A; Joung, M K; Cheong, H S; Peck, K R; Song, J-H

    2010-07-01

    Epidemiologic data on the etiologic organisms is important for appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment of bacterial meningitis. We identified the etiologies of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in Korean adults and the associated epidemiological factors. A retrospective, multicenter nationwide study was carried out. Patients 18 years of age or older with community-acquired bacterial meningitis with a confirmed pathogen were enrolled. Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were collected. One hundred and ninety-five cases were collected. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common pathogen (50.8%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (10.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (7.7%), Listeria monocytogenes (6.7%), and group B Streptococcus (3.1%). The penicillin resistance rate of the S. pneumoniae was 60.3%; 40.0% of the organisms were not susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins. The combination of third-generation cephalosporin with vancomycin was used in 76.3% of cases. Steroids were given before or with the first dose of antibiotics in 37.4% of patients. The 30-day mortality rate was 20.5% and neurological sequelae developed in 15.6% of cases. S. pneumoniae was the most common organism identified in community-acquired bacterial meningitis among Korean adults. S. aureus, K. pneumoniae, L. monocytogenes, and group B Streptococcus were also common. S. pneumoniae had high rates of resistance to penicillin and third-generation cephalosporins. PMID:20432052

  20. Recognising early meningitis: a missed opportunity to diagnose meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ponnampalam, Anusha; de Sousa, Paula; Carroll, Will

    2016-01-01

    There are ∼250 cases of neonatal bacterial meningitis each year in the UK. Clinical evaluation of signs and symptoms of meningitis is challenging, particularly, during the neonatal period. Although uncommon, it is recognised that bacterial meningitis can be present in a child with an apparently normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) initially.We report the case of a newborn baby girl who was admitted with concerns regarding 2 dusky episodes. She underwent blood tests, a lumbar puncture and was started on intravenous antibiotics. With negative cultures, normal blood results and following a significant clinical improvement, antibiotics were discontinued after 48 hours and the baby was discharged home. She re-presented to the children's emergency department 7 hours later with a history of an apnoeic episode. A second CSF sample was suggestive of bacterial meningitis. We will discuss the published literature and the potential drawbacks of lumbar punctures and ways to diagnose meningitis early. PMID:27516108

  1. The Meningitis Vaccine Project.

    PubMed

    LaForce, F Marc; Konde, Kader; Viviani, Simonetta; Préziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Epidemic meningococcal meningitis is an important public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Current control measures rely on reactive immunizations with polysaccharide (PS) vaccines that do not induce herd immunity and are of limited effectiveness in those under 2 years of age. Conversely, polysaccharide conjugate vaccines are effective in infants and have consistently shown an important effect on decreasing carriage, two characteristics that facilitate disease control. In 2001 the Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was created as a partnership between PATH and the World Health Organization (WHO) with the goal of eliminating meningococcal epidemics in Africa through the development, licensure, introduction, and widespread use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines. Since group A Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) is the dominant pathogen causing epidemic meningitis in Africa MVP is developing an affordable (US$ 0.40 per dose) meningococcal A (Men A) conjugate vaccine through an innovative international partnership that saw transfer of a conjugation and fermentation technology to a developing country vaccine manufacturer. A Phase 1 study of the vaccine in India has shown that the product is safe and immunogenic. Phase 2 studies have begun in Africa, and a large demonstration study of the conjugate vaccine is envisioned for 2008-2009. After extensive consultations with African public health officials a vaccine introduction plan has been developed that includes introduction of the Men A conjugate vaccine into standard Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) schedules but also emphasizes mass vaccination of 1-29 years old to induce herd immunity, a strategy that has been shown to be highly effective when the meningococcal C (Men C) conjugate vaccine was introduced in several European countries. The MVP model is a clear example of the usefulness of a "push mechanism" to finance the development of a needed vaccine for the developing world. PMID:17521780

  2. Campylobacter Fetus Meningitis in Adults

    PubMed Central

    van Samkar, Anusha; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, predisposing factors and outcome of C fetus meningitis in adults. We report cases of C fetus meningitis in a nationwide cohort study of adult bacterial meningitis patients in the Netherlands and performed a review of the literature. Two patients with C fetus meningitis were identified from January 2006 through May 2015. The calculated annual incidence was 0.02 per million adults. Combined with the literature, we identified 22 patients with a median age of 48 years. An immunocompromised state was present in 16 patients (73%), mostly due to alcoholism (41%) and diabetes mellitus (27%). The source of infection was identified in 13 out of 19 patients (68%), consisting of regular contact with domestic animals in 5 and working on a farm in 4. Recurrent fever and illness was reported in 4 patients (18%), requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment. Two patients died (9%) and 3 survivors (15%) had neurological sequelae. C fetus is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis and is associated with an immunocompromised state. Based on the apparent slow clinical response seen in this limited number of cases, the authors of this study recommend a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy when C fetus is identified as a causative agent of bacterial meningitis. Cases appeared to do best with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26937916

  3. [Meningitis and encephalitis in the years 1983-1990. Clinical observations].

    PubMed

    Kepa, L; Wilczek, K; Karasińska, M

    1991-01-01

    From 1983 to 1990, at the I Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Silesian Academy of Medicine in Bytom, 995 patients with meningitis and encephalitis were treated; the average age was 17.86 years. After cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examinations the patients were divided into groups. The first group consisted of patients with suppurative meningitis and encephalitis (202-20.30%), the other group were patients with aseptic meningitis (309-31.06%), a separate group consisted of patients with mumps meningitis (484-48.06% cases). In the group with suppurative meningitis and encephalitis etiological agents were isolated (Gram stain smear and/or culture of CSF) in 50.99% of cases. The most common causes of suppurative neuroinfections were: Neisseria meningitides and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 23.76% cases). The increasing number of bacteriological tests positive results was observed during the analyzed period. The etiology of aseptic inflammation diseases of the central nervous system was defined with the help of serologic blood tests in 10-15%, and serologic confirmation of mumps meningitis was as high as 80% of cases. In the group of purulent neuroinfections, during the 8-year observation, 36 deaths occurred (17.82% of these patients). The observed tendency of the death rate decrease is concerned to be a result of better microbiological diagnostics and the possibility of an early aimed antibiotic therapy. PMID:1819814

  4. Concurrent meningitis and vivax malaria

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Tuhin; Datta, Sumana; Agrawal, Neha; Bar, Mita; Kar, Arnab; Adhikary, Apu; Ranjan, Kunal

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is an endemic infectious disease in India. It is often associated with other infective conditions but concomitant infection of malaria and meningitis are uncommon. We present a case of meningitis with vivax malaria infection in a 24-year-old lady. This case emphasizes the importance of high index of clinical suspicion to detect other infective conditions like meningitis when fever does not improve even after anti-malarial treatment in a patient of malaria before switching therapy suspecting drug resistance, which is quite common in this part of world. PMID:26985423

  5. Rheumatoid meningitis associated with infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Stroberg, Edana; Metting, Austin

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient who had rheumatoid meningitis while on infliximab, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) inhibitor, which initially presented as transient ischemic attacks. Although our patient had been stable on infliximab for several years, her neurologic symptoms improved when her infliximab was held due to active infection and then recurred after reinitiation of therapy. Rheumatoid meningitis is exceedingly rare; however, there have been several other reports of rheumatoid meningitis developing in patients on TNF-α inhibitor therapy. PMID:27034572

  6. Angiostrongylus cantonensis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pien, F D; Pien, B C

    1999-01-01

    In the past 50 years, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis, has spread from Southeast Asia to the South Pacific, Africa, India, the Caribbean, and recently, to Australia and North America, mainly carried by cargo ship rats. Humans are accidental, "dead-end" hosts infected by eating larvae from snails, slugs, or contaminated, uncooked vegetables. These larvae migrate to the brain, spinal cord, and nerve roots, causing eosinophilia in both spinal fluid and peripheral blood. Infected patients present with severe headache, vomiting, paresthesias, weakness, and occasionally visual disturbances and extraocular muscular paralysis. Most patients have a full recovery; however, heavy infections can lead to chronic, disabling disease and even death. There is no proven treatment for this disease. In the authors' experience, corticosteroids have been helpful in severe cases to relieve intracranial pressure as well as neurologic symptoms due to inflammatory responses to migrating and eventually dying worms. PMID:10460929

  7. Considering syphilis in aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tayal, Sarup; Chadwick, David; Chawla, Girish

    2009-12-01

    Clinicians need to consider syphilis in the differential diagnosis of macular or papular rashes with neurological conditions, particularly aseptic meningitis, as early diagnosis and treatment lead to a better prognosis. PMID:20095316

  8. Adjunctive N-acetyl-L-cysteine in treatment of murine pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Högen, Tobias; Demel, Cornelia; Giese, Armin; Angele, Barbara; Pfister, Hans-Walter; Koedel, Uwe; Klein, Matthias

    2013-10-01

    Despite antibiotic therapy, acute and long-term complications are still frequent in pneumococcal meningitis. One important trigger of these complications is oxidative stress, and adjunctive antioxidant treatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine was suggested to be protective in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. However, studies of effects on neurological long-term sequelae are limited. Here, we investigated the impact of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine on long-term neurological deficits in a mouse model of meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Eighteen hours after infection, mice were treated with a combination of ceftriaxone and placebo or ceftriaxone and N-acetyl-l-cysteine, respectively. Two weeks after infection, neurologic deficits were assessed using a clinical score, an open field test (explorative activity), a t-maze test (memory function), and auditory brain stem responses (hearing loss). Furthermore, cochlear histomorphological correlates of hearing loss were assessed. Adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine reduced hearing loss after pneumococcal meningitis, but the effect was minor. There was no significant benefit of adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine treatment in regard to other long-term complications of pneumococcal meningitis. Cochlear morphological correlates of meningitis-associated hearing loss were not reduced by adjunctive N-acetyl-l-cysteine. In conclusion, adjunctive therapy with N-acetyl-l-cysteine at a dosage of 300 mg/kg of body weight intraperitoneally for 4 days reduced hearing loss but not other neurologic deficits after pneumococcal meningitis in mice. These results make a clinical therapeutic benefit of N-acetyl-l-cysteine in the treatment of patients with pneumococcal meningitis questionable. PMID:23877681

  9. Spinal perineurial and meningeal cysts.

    PubMed

    Tarlov, I M

    1970-12-01

    Perineurial cysts may be responsible for clinical symptoms and a cure effected by their removal. They do not fill on initial myelography but may fill with Pantopaque some time, days or weeks, after Pantopaque has been instilled into the subarachnoid space. Perineurial cysts arise at the site of the posterior root ganglion. The cyst wall is composed of neural tissue. When initial myelography fails to reveal an adequate cause for the patient's symptoms and signs referable to the caudal nerve roots, then about a millilitre of Pantopaque should be left in the canal for delayed myelography which may later reveal a sacral perineurial cyst or, occasionally, a meningeal cyst. Meningeal diverticula occur proximal to the posterior root ganglia and usually fill on initial myelography. They are in free communication with the subarachnoid space and are rarely in my experience responsible for clinical symptoms. Meningeal diverticula and meningeal cysts appear to represent a continuum. Pantopaque left in the subarachnoid space may convert a meningeal diverticulum into an expanding symptomatic meningeal cyst, as in the case described. Many cases described as perineurial cysts represent abnormally long arachnoidal prolongations over nerve roots or meningeal diverticula. In general, neither of the latter is of pathological significance. Perineurial, like meningeal cysts and diverticula, may be asymptomatic. They should be operated upon only if they produce progressive or disabling symptoms or signs clearly attributable to them. When myelography must be done, and this should be done only as a preliminary to a probable necessary operation, then patient effort should be made to remove the Pantopaque. PMID:5531903

  10. PCR-based national bacterial meningitis surveillance in Turkey: years 2006 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Toprak, Demet; Soysal, Ahmet; Torunoğlu, Mehmet Ali; Turgut, Mehmet; Türkoğlu, Salih; Pimenta, Fabiana Cristina; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard; Altnkanat, Gülşen; Söyletir, Güner; Mete, Birgül; Bakr, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-based surveillance for bacterial meningitis including 841 children revealed 246 with bacterial DNA in cerebrospinal fluid samples of which 53% were Streptococcus pneumoniae, 19% Neisseria meningitidis, and 16% Haemophilus influenzae type b. The most common S. pneumoniae serotypes/serogroups were 1, 19F, 6A/6B, 23F, 5, 14, 18 and 19A. Among 47 meningococci, 86% were serogroup B, 6% serogroup C, 3% serogroup A, 3% serogroup X and 3% serogroup W. PMID:25361189

  11. Streptococcus tigurinus, a Novel Member of the Streptococcus mitis Group, Causes Invasive Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Nicolas J.; Tarr, Philip E.; Eich, Gerhard; Schulthess, Bettina; Bahlmann, Anna S.; Keller, Peter M.; Bloemberg, Guido V.

    2012-01-01

    We recently described the novel species Streptococcus tigurinus sp. nov. belonging to the Streptococcus mitis group. The type strain AZ_3aT of S. tigurinus was originally isolated from a patient with infective endocarditis. According to its phenotypic and molecular characteristics, S. tigurinus is most closely related to Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus infantis. Accurate identification of S. tigurinus is facilitated by 16S rRNA gene analysis. We retrospectively analyzed our 16S rRNA gene molecular database, which contains sequences of all clinical samples obtained in our institute since 2003. We detected 17 16S rRNA gene sequences which were assigned to S. tigurinus, including sequences from the 3 S. tigurinus strains described previously. S. tigurinus originated from normally sterile body sites, such as blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or heart valves, of 14 patients and was initially detected by culture or broad-range 16S rRNA gene PCR, followed by sequencing. The 14 patients had serious invasive infections, i.e., infective endocarditis (n = 6), spondylodiscitis (n = 3), bacteremia (n = 2), meningitis (n = 1), prosthetic joint infection (n = 1), and thoracic empyema (n = 1). To evaluate the presence of Streptococcus tigurinus in the endogenous oral microbial flora, we screened saliva specimens of 31 volunteers. After selective growth, alpha-hemolytic growing colonies were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and subsequent molecular methods. S. tigurinus was not identified among 608 strains analyzed. These data indicate that S. tigurinus is not widely distributed in the oral cavity. In conclusion, S. tigurinus is a novel agent of invasive infections, particularly infective endocarditis. PMID:22760039

  12. [Normal and abnormal meningeal enhancement: MRI features].

    PubMed

    Dietemann, J L; Correia Bernardo, R; Bogorin, A; Abu Eid, M; Koob, M; Nogueira, Th; Vargas, M I; Fakhoury, W; Zöllner, G

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe normal imaging of the meninges and meningeal spaces and MR (magnetic resonance) imaging findings in tumoral and nontumoral diseases. Dural or/and pial enhancement may be related to tumoral, infectious or granulomatous diseases. PMID:16269979

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of the Clinical Streptococcus salivarius Strain CCHSS3 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P.; Ehrlich, S. Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  14. Complete genome sequence of the clinical Streptococcus salivarius strain CCHSS3.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Christine; Guédon, Eric; Pons, Nicolas; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Loux, Valentin; Chiapello, Hélène; Poyart, Claire; Gautier, Céline; Sanchez, Nicolas; Almeida, Mathieu; Kennedy, Sean P; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Gibrat, Jean-François; Wincker, Patrick; Renault, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is a commensal species commonly found in the human oral cavity and digestive tract, although it is also associated with human infections such as meningitis, endocarditis, and bacteremia. Here, we report the complete sequence of S. salivarius strain CCHSS3, isolated from human blood. PMID:21742894

  15. Clinical features of group B Streptococcus prosthetic joint infections and molecular characterization of isolates.

    PubMed

    Corvec, S; Illiaquer, M; Touchais, S; Boutoille, D; van der Mee-Marquet, N; Quentin, R; Reynaud, A; Lepelletier, D; Bémer, P

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  16. Clinical Features of Group B Streptococcus Prosthetic Joint Infections and Molecular Characterization of Isolates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Corvec, S.; Illiaquer, M.; Touchais, S.; Boutoille, D.; van der Mee-Marquet, N.; Quentin, R.; Reynaud, A.; Lepelletier, D.; Bémer, P.

    2011-01-01

    Twelve group B Streptococcus (GBS) prosthetic joint infection (PJI) cases are reported. The mean patient age was 55 years. Eleven infections were caused by GBS alone. The associated isolates belonged to phylogenetic lineages different from those that cause neonatal meningitis. The clinical outcome was favorable for the eight patients for whom follow-up data were available. PMID:21068273

  17. [Bacterial meningitis in adults: a retrospective multicentric study in Tuscany (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, L; Meini, M; Luchi, S; Scasso, A; Corbisiero, R; Mencarelli, M; Cellesi, C; Aquilini, D; Carbonai, S; Paladini, A; Bresci, S; Panunzi, I; Leoncini, F; Trezzi, M; Nencioni, C; Toti, M; Maccanti, O; Pardelli, R; Sani, S; Pippi, L; Esperti, F; Messeri, D; Dionisio, D; Pippi, F; Ble, C; Pienotti, P; Mazzotta, F

    2006-06-01

    The Infectious Diseases Unit of Lucca Hospital conducted a multicentric retrospective study to evaluate the epidemiological and clinical features of adult patients affected by bacterial meningitis attending all the Infectious Diseases Units of Tuscany (Italy) from July 1999 to June 2004. A specific questionnaire was sent to all the units to collect information about each case of bacterial meningitis occurring in patients older than sixteen. Patients with meningitis by Mycobacterium tuberculosis were excluded from the analysis. Nine out of 12 Infectious Diseases Units of Tuscany took part in the study and 197 cases were identified. Most cases of meningitis occurred during 2002 with a slight reduction in cases in subsequent years. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis were the most frequently isolated pathogens with an increase in diagnosis from 1999 to 2004; in 23.8% of patients no pathogens were isolated, with a reduction in meningitis from unknown aetiology from 1999 to 2004. Most patients were treated with a combination of two antibiotics, and corticosteroid drugs were added to the therapy; in the group of patients treated with corticosteroid drugs invalidating complications occurred in 23% of cases and 5% of patients died. In all, 27 out of 197 subjects (13.7%) developed invalidating complications and 20 out of 197 patients (10.2%) died. PMID:16891852

  18. Genomic pneumococcal load and CSF cytokines are not related to outcome in Malawian adults with meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Emma C.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Scarborough, Matthew; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine M.B.; Mukaka, Mavuto; Corless, Caroline; Lalloo, David G.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective Bacterial meningitis in sub-Saharan Africa is predominantly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, is often associated with HIV co-infection and mortality rates are double those seen in better resourced settings. Methods To investigate the cause of this excessive mortality we quantified the pneumococcal DNA load and six common pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of Malawian adults with culture proven pneumococcal meningitis and correlated the results to clinical parameters and outcome. There are currently no published data relating bacterial load to outcome in adults with pneumococcal meningitis. Results The mean age of patients was 32 years, 82% were HIV infected and 49% had died by day 40. CSF bacterial loads were high (median 6.5 × 105 copies/ml CSF) and there was no significant variation in bacterial load between survivors and non-survivors. All pro-inflammatory CSF cytokines were elevated in the CSF, with no clinically important differences between survivors and non-survivors. HIV status did not affect the CSF bacterial load or cytokine response. Conclusion Mortality from pneumococcal meningitis in adults in sub-Saharan Africa is not related to pneumococcal bacterial load. More research is needed to understand the very high mortality from meningitis in this region. PMID:24975177

  19. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    PubMed

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  20. Identification of a novel pneumococcal vaccine antigen preferentially expressed during meningitis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Layla K.; Wang, Hui; Van der Hoek, Mark B.; Paton, James C.; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of severe bacterial meningitis in children, the elderly, and immunocompromised individuals. To identify virulence factors preferentially expressed during meningitis, we conducted niche-specific genome-wide in vivo transcriptomic analysis after intranasal infection of mice with serotype 4 or 6A pneumococci. The expression of 34 bacterial genes was substantially altered in brain tissue of mice infected with either of the 2 strains. Ten upregulated genes were common to both strains, 7 of which were evaluated for their role in the development of meningitis. One previously uncharacterized protein, α-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO), was cytotoxic for human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) via generation of H2O2. A glpO deletion mutant was defective in adherence to HBMECs in vitro as well as in progression from the blood to the brain in vivo. Mutant bacteria also induced markedly reduced meningeal inflammation and brain pathology compared with wild type, despite similar levels of bacteremia. Immunization of mice with GlpO protected against invasive pneumococcal disease and provided additive protection when formulated with pneumolysin toxoid. Our results provide the basis of a strategy that can be adapted to identify genes that contribute to the development of meningitis caused by other pathogens. PMID:22622042

  1. Imipramine reverses depressive-like parameters in pneumococcal meningitis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Milioli, Graziele; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Cipriano, Andreza L; Costa, Caroline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Comim, Clarissa M; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio; Quevedo, João

    2012-06-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious disease of the central nervous system, associated with acute inflammation and might cause damage to the host, such as deafness, blindness, seizure, and learning deficits. However, infectious diseases can play a significant role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disturbances. In this context, we evaluated depressive-like parameters; corticosterone and ACTH levels in pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats. Wistar rats underwent a magna cistern tap receiving either 10 μL sterile saline or a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at the concentration of 5 × 10(9) cfu/mL. After 3 days of meningitis induction procedure, the animals were treated with imipramine at 10 mg/kg or saline for 14 days (3rd-17th day). The consumption of sweet food was measured for 7 days (10th-17th day). The meningitis group decreased the sucrose intake and increased the levels of corticosterone and ACTH levels in the serum and TNF-α in the cortex; however, the treatment with imipramine reverted the reduction of sweet food consumption, normalized hormonal levels and TNF-α in the cortex. Our results supported the hypothesis that the pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats showed depressive-like behavior and alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. PMID:22160551

  2. An unusual case of meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Pond, Eric DR; El-Bailey, Sameh; Webster, Duncan

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a rare cause of bacterial meningitis. A 56-year-old man with several pets developed a profoundly decreased level of consciousness following left tympanomastoidectomy. Lumbar puncture produced cerebrospinal fluid with the typical findings of meningitis (low glucose, high protein, high leukocytes). Cultures from the cerebrospinal fluid and a swab of the left ear revealed Gram-negative coccobacillus identified as P multocida. The organism was sensitive to ceftriaxone, ampicillin and penicillin, and a 14-day course of intravenous penicillin was used as definitive treatment, resulting in full recovery. Although rare, P multocida should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis in patients with animal exposure, particularly in the setting of recent cranial surgery. PMID:26236360

  3. Streptococcus Adherence and Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Nobbs, Angela H.; Lamont, Richard J.; Jenkinson, Howard F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Streptococci readily colonize mucosal tissues in the nasopharynx; the respiratory, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary tracts; and the skin. Each ecological niche presents a series of challenges to successful colonization with which streptococci have to contend. Some species exist in equilibrium with their host, neither stimulating nor submitting to immune defenses mounted against them. Most are either opportunistic or true pathogens responsible for diseases such as pharyngitis, tooth decay, necrotizing fasciitis, infective endocarditis, and meningitis. Part of the success of streptococci as colonizers is attributable to the spectrum of proteins expressed on their surfaces. Adhesins enable interactions with salivary, serum, and extracellular matrix components; host cells; and other microbes. This is the essential first step to colonization, the development of complex communities, and possible invasion of host tissues. The majority of streptococcal adhesins are anchored to the cell wall via a C-terminal LPxTz motif. Other proteins may be surface anchored through N-terminal lipid modifications, while the mechanism of cell wall associations for others remains unclear. Collectively, these surface-bound proteins provide Streptococcus species with a “coat of many colors,” enabling multiple intimate contacts and interplays between the bacterial cell and the host. In vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated direct roles for many streptococcal adhesins as colonization or virulence factors, making them attractive targets for therapeutic and preventive strategies against streptococcal infections. There is, therefore, much focus on applying increasingly advanced molecular techniques to determine the precise structures and functions of these proteins, and their regulatory pathways, so that more targeted approaches can be developed. PMID:19721085

  4. Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial Meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Meningococcal Disease (Bacterial meningitis) Vaccine and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby ... advice from your health care provider. What is meningitis? Meningitis is an infection of the lining that ...

  5. Computational approaches to identify common subunit vaccine candidates against bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Munikumar, Manne; Priyadarshini, I Vani; Pradhan, Dibyabhaba; Umamaheswari, Amineni; Vengamma, Bhuma

    2013-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis, an infection of the membranes (meninges) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) surrounding the brain and spinal cord, is a major cause of death and disability all over the world. From perinatal period to adult, four common organisms responsible for most of the bacterial meningitis are Streptococcus pneumonia, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenza and Staphylococcus aureus. As the disease is caused by more organisms, currently available vaccines for bacterial meningitis are specific and restricted to some of the serogroups or serotypes of each bacterium. In an effort to design common vaccine against bacterial meningitis, proteomes of the four pathogens were compared to extract seven common surface exposed ABC transporter proteins. Pro-Pred server was used to investigate the seven surface exposed proteins for promiscuous T-cell epitopes prediction. Predicted 22 T-cell epitopes were validated through published positive control, SYFPEITHI and immune epitope database to reduce the epitope dataset into seven. T-cell epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170 of spermidine/putrescine ABC transporter permease (potH) protein was conserved across the four selected pathogens of bacterial meningitis. Hence, structural analysis was extended for epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170. Crystal structures of HLA-DRB alleles were retrieved and structure of potH was modeled using Prime v3.0 for structural analysis. Computational docking of HLA-DRB alleles and epitope 162-FMILPIFNV-170 of potH was performed using Glide v5.7. RMSD and RMSF of simulation studies were analyzed by Desmond v3.2. The docking and simulation results revealed that the HLA-DRB-epitope complex was stable with interaction repressive function of HLA. Thus, the epitope would be ideal candidate for T-cell driven subunit vaccine design against bacterial meningitis. PMID:23740398

  6. Epidemiological, clinical and prognostic profile of childhood acute bacterial meningitis in a resource poor setting

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Bankole Peter; Bello, Emmanuel Olasehinde; Jegede, Tolulope Opeoluwa; Olubosede, Omolayo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Childhood bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency that continues to kill and maims children particularly in developing countries with poor immunization coverage. Objective: This study set out to assess the hospital incidence, pattern of presentation, etiologic agents, outcome and determinants of mortality among the children admitted with bacterial meningitis at the Wesley Guild Hospital (WGH), Ilesa. Patients and Methods: We carried out a retrospective review of admitted cases of bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 15 years at the WGH, Ilesa over a three year period by looking at the hospital records. Factors in the history and examinations were compared among survivors and those that died to determine factors significantly associated with mortality in these children. Results: Eighty-one (5.5%) of the 1470 childhood admissions during the study period had bacterial meningitis. Male preponderance was observed and two-thirds of the children were infants. More cases were admitted during the wet rainy season than during the dry harmattan season. Haemophilus influenzae type B and Streptococcus pneumoniae were the leading etiologic agents and ciprofloxacin and ceftriaxone adequately cover for these organisms. Twenty-two (27.2%) of the 81 children died, while 34 (42.0%) survived with neurologic deficits. Children with multiple seizures, coma, neck retraction, hyponatremia, hypoglycorrhachia, turbid CSF as well as Gram positive meningitis at presentation were found to more likely to die (P < 0.05). None of these factors however independently predict mortality. Conclusion: Childhood bacterial meningitis often results in death and neurologic deficit among infants and young children admitted at the WGH, Ilesa. Children diagnosed with meningitis who in addition had multiple seizures, neck retraction and coma at presentation are at increased risk of dying. PMID:26752902

  7. Meningitis, clinical presentation of tetanus.

    PubMed

    Moniuszko, Anna; Zajkowska, Agata; Tumiel, Ewa; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Czupryna, Piotr; Pancewicz, Sławomir; Rutkowski, Ryszard; Zdrodowska, Agnieszka; Zajkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tetanus is an acute disease caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus immunization has been available since the late 1930s but sporadic cases still occur, usually in incompletely vaccinated or unvaccinated individuals. Case Report. An elderly previously vaccinated female contracted tetanus following foot injury. Clinically she presented with meningitis causing diagnostic and therapeutic delays. Why Should Physician Be Aware of This? Even in developed countries the differential diagnosis of meningitis, especially in the elderly, should include tetanus. Treatment in intensive care unit is required. General population might benefit from vaccine boosters and education on this potentially fatal disease. PMID:25789186

  8. Identification of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis in Culture-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Meningitis is a serious communicable disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is an endemic disease in Egypt caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. In some settings, bacterial meningitis is documented depending mainly on positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results or CSF positive latex agglutination test, missing the important role of prior antimicrobial intake which can yield negative culture and latex agglutination test results. This study aimed to utilize molecular technology in order to diagnose bacterial meningitis in culture-negative CSF samples. Materials and Methods. Forty culture-negative CSF samples from suspected cases of bacterial meningitis were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for the presence of lytA, bexA, and ctrA genes specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively. Results. Positive real-time PCR results for Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected in 36 (90%) of culture-negative CSF samples while no positive results for Haemophilus influenzae or Neisseria meningitidis were detected. Four (10%) samples were negative by real-time PCR for all tested organisms. Conclusion. The use of molecular techniques as real-time PCR can provide a valuable addition to the proportion of diagnosed cases of bacterial meningitis especially in settings with high rates of culture-negative results. PMID:27563310

  9. Identification of Common Bacterial Pathogens Causing Meningitis in Culture-Negative Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Khater, Walaa Shawky; Elabd, Safia Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background. Meningitis is a serious communicable disease with high morbidity and mortality rates. It is an endemic disease in Egypt caused mainly by Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. In some settings, bacterial meningitis is documented depending mainly on positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture results or CSF positive latex agglutination test, missing the important role of prior antimicrobial intake which can yield negative culture and latex agglutination test results. This study aimed to utilize molecular technology in order to diagnose bacterial meningitis in culture-negative CSF samples. Materials and Methods. Forty culture-negative CSF samples from suspected cases of bacterial meningitis were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (real-time PCR) for the presence of lytA, bexA, and ctrA genes specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Neisseria meningitidis, respectively. Results. Positive real-time PCR results for Streptococcus pneumoniae were detected in 36 (90%) of culture-negative CSF samples while no positive results for Haemophilus influenzae or Neisseria meningitidis were detected. Four (10%) samples were negative by real-time PCR for all tested organisms. Conclusion. The use of molecular techniques as real-time PCR can provide a valuable addition to the proportion of diagnosed cases of bacterial meningitis especially in settings with high rates of culture-negative results. PMID:27563310

  10. Neuroimaging features of tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sobri, M; Merican, J S; Nordiyana, M; Valarmathi, S; Ai-Edrus, S A

    2006-03-01

    Tuberculous meningitis leads to a high mortality rate. However, it responds well to chemotherapy if the treatment is started early. Neuroimaging is one of the most important initial investigations. There were 42 patients diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis in Kuala Lumpur Hospital based on clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid analysis and response to anti-tuberculous treatment over a 7 year period. Relevant information was obtained from patients' medical case notes and neuroimaging findings were evaluated. Male to female ratio was 3:1. The three major ethnics and the immigrant groups in Malaysia were represented in this study. The majority of the cases involved the Malays followed by immigrants, Chinese and Indians. The patients' age ranged from 18 to 62 years old with the mean age of 34.4 years. There were 95.2% (n = 40) of patients who presented with various neuroimaging abnormalities and only 2 (4.8%) patients had normal neuroimaging findings. Hydrocephalus and meningeal enhancement were the two commonest neuroimaging features. Other features include infarction, enhancing lesion, tuberculoma, abcess, oedema and calcification. Contrasted CT scan is an adequate neuroimaging tool to unmask abnormal findings in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:16708732

  11. Recurrent pneumococcal meningitis in a splenectomised HIV-infected patient

    PubMed Central

    Morand, Philippe C; Veuillez, Veronique; Poyart, Claire; Abachin, Eric; Quesne, Gilles; Dupont, Bertrand; Berche, Patrick; Viard, Jean-Paul

    2003-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of human disease, especially in pre-school children and elderly people, as well as in special risk groups such as asplenic, antibody deficient patients, or presenting disruption of natural barriers. The occurrence of pneumococcal disease has increased with the onset of the HIV epidemic and the emergence of drug-resistance. Case presentation We report the case of an HIV-1-infected patient who experienced three episodes of recurrent pneumococcal meningitis over a 4-year period, despite chemoprophylaxis and capsular vaccination. Conclusions Efficacy of anti-pneumococcal chemoprophylaxis and vaccination in HIV-infected patients are discussed in the light of this particular case. PMID:14613586

  12. Vitamin B6 reduces hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bacterial meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to death in up to 30% of patients and leaves up to half of the survivors with neurological sequelae. The inflammatory host reaction initiates the induction of the kynurenine pathway and contributes to hippocampal apoptosis, a form of brain damage that is associated with learning and memory deficits in experimental paradigms. Vitamin B6 is an enzymatic cofactor in the kynurenine pathway and may thus limit the accumulation of neurotoxic metabolites and preserve the cellular energy status. The aim of this study in a pneumococcal meningitis model was to investigate the effect of vitamin B6 on hippocampal apoptosis by histomorphology, by transcriptomics and by measurement of cellular nicotine amide adenine dinucleotide content. Methods and results Eleven day old Wistar rats were infected with 1x106 cfu/ml of S. pneumoniae and randomized for treatment with vitamin B6 or saline as controls. Vitamin B6 led to a significant (p > 0.02) reduction of hippocampal apoptosis. According to functional annotation based clustering, vitamin B6 led to down-regulation of genes involved in processes of inflammatory response, while genes encoding for processes related to circadian rhythm, neuronal signaling and apoptotic cell death were mostly up-regulated. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that attenuation of apoptosis by vitamin B6 is multi-factorial including down-modulation of inflammation, up-regulation of the neuroprotective brain-derived neurotrophic factor and prevention of the exhaustion of cellular energy stores. The neuroprotective effect identifies vitamin B6 as a potential target for the development of strategies to attenuate brain injury in bacterial meningitis. PMID:23977941

  13. Evaluation of meningitis surveillance before introduction of serogroup a meningococcal conjugate vaccine - Burkina Faso and Mali.

    PubMed

    2012-12-21

    Each year, 450 million persons in a region of sub-Saharan Africa known as the "meningitis belt" are at risk for death and disability from epidemic meningitis caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. In 2009, the first serogroup A meningococcal conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) developed solely for Africa (MenAfriVac, Serum Institute of India, Ltd.), was licensed for persons aged 1-29 years. During 2010-2011, the vaccine was introduced in the hyperendemic countries of Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger through mass campaigns. Strong meningitis surveillance is critical for evaluating the impact of PsA-TT because it was licensed based on safety and immunogenicity data without field effectiveness trials. Case-based surveillance, which includes the collection of epidemiologic and laboratory data on individual cases year-round, is recommended for countries that aim to evaluate the vaccine's impact. A key component of case-based surveillance is expansion of laboratory confirmation to include every case of bacterial meningitis because multiple meningococcal serogroups and different pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae cause meningitis that is clinically indistinguishable from that caused by serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis. Before the introduction of PsA-TT, evaluations of the existing meningitis surveillance in Burkina Faso and Mali were conducted to assess the capacity for case-based surveillance. This report describes the results of those evaluations, which found that surveillance infrastructures were strong but opportunities existed for improving data management, handling of specimens shipped to reference laboratories, and laboratory capacity for confirming cases. These findings underscore the need to evaluate surveillance before vaccine introduction so that activities to strengthen surveillance are tailored to a country's needs and capacities. PMID:23254257

  14. Corticosteroids for managing tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Kameshwar; Singh, Mamta B; Ryan, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculous meningitis is a serious form of tuberculosis (TB) that affects the meninges that cover a person's brain and spinal cord. It is associated with high death rates and with disability in people who survive. Corticosteroids have been used as an adjunct to antituberculous drugs to treat people with tuberculous meningitis, but their role has been controversial. Objectives To evaluate the effects of corticosteroids as an adjunct to antituberculous treatment on death and severe disability in people with tuberculous meningitis. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register up to the 18 March 2016; CENTRAL; MEDLINE; EMBASE; LILACS; and Current Controlled Trials. We also contacted researchers and organizations working in the field, and checked reference lists. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials that compared corticosteroid plus antituberculous treatment with antituberculous treatment alone in people with clinically diagnosed tuberculous meningitis and included death or disability as outcome measures. Data collection and analysis We independently assessed search results and methodological quality, and extracted data from the included trials. We analysed the data using risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and used a fixed-effect model. We performed an intention-to-treat analysis, where we included all participants randomized to treatment in the denominator. This analysis assumes that all participants who were lost to follow-up have good outcomes. We carried out a sensitivity analysis to explore the impact of the missing data. Main results Nine trials that included 1337 participants (with 469 deaths) met the inclusion criteria. At follow-up from three to 18 months, steroids reduce deaths by almost one quarter (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.87; nine trials, 1337 participants, high quality evidence). Disabling neurological deficit is not common in survivors, and steroids may have little or no

  15. Diagnostic Clinical and Laboratory Findings in Response to Predetermining Bacterial Pathogen: Data from the Meningitis Registry

    PubMed Central

    Karanika, Maria; Vasilopoulou, Vasiliki A.; Katsioulis, Antonios T.; Papastergiou, Panagiotis; Theodoridou, Maria N.; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Childhood Meningitis continues to be an important cause of mortality in many countries. The search for rapid diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis has lead to the further exploration of prognostic factors. This study was scheduled in an attempt to analyze various clinical symptoms as well as rapid laboratory results and provide an algorithm for the prediction of specific bacterial aetiology of childhood bacterial meningitis. Methodology and Principal Findings During the 32 year period, 2477 cases of probable bacterial meningitis (BM) were collected from the Meningitis Registry (MR). Analysis was performed on a total of 1331 confirmed bacterial meningitis cases of patients aged 1 month to 14 years. Data was analysed using EPI INFO (version 3.4.3-CDC-Atlanta) and SPSS (version 15.0 - Chicago) software. Statistically significant (p<0.05) variables were included in a conditional backward logistic regression model. A total of 838 (63.0%) attributed to Neisseria meningitidis, 252 (18.9%) to Haemophilus influenzae, 186 (14.0%) to Streptococcus pneumoniae and 55 (4.1%) due to other bacteria. For the diagnosis of Meningococcal Meningitis, the most significant group of diagnostic criteria identified included haemorrhagic rash (OR 22.36), absence of seizures (OR 2.51), headache (OR 1.83) and negative gram stain result (OR 1.55) with a Positive Predictive Value (PPV) of 96.4% (95%CI 87.7–99.6). For the diagnosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most significant group of diagnostic criteria identified included absence of haemorrhagic rash (OR 13.62), positive gram stain (OR 2.10), coma (OR 3.11), seizures (OR 3.81) and peripheral WBC≥15000/µL (OR 2.19) with a PPV of 77.8% (95%CI 40.0–97.2). For the diagnosis of Haemophilus influenzae, the most significant group of diagnostic criteria included, absence of haemorrhagic rash (OR 13.61), age≥1year (OR 2.04), absence of headache (OR 3.01), CSF Glu<40 mg/dL (OR 3.62) and peripheral WBC<15000/µL (OR 1.74) with a

  16. Streptococcal meningitis following myelogram procedures.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer; Jensen, Bette; Arduino, Matthew; Bergeron, Toni; Fox, Teresa; Gum, Greg; Pischke, Vera; Potts, David; Townes, John; Srinivasan, Arjun

    2007-05-01

    In September of 2004, we investigated 7 cases of post-myelography meningitis. Streptococcal species were recovered from blood or cerebrospinal fluid in all cases. Our findings suggest that droplet transmission of the oral flora of the clinician performing the procedure was the most likely source of these infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the use of face masks by those performing myelograms. PMID:17464927

  17. Early antibiotic administration prevents cognitive impairment induced by meningitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Silva, Geruza Z; Batista, Ana L; Savi, Geovana D; Feier, Gustavo; Comim, Clarissa M; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2009-11-01

    Neurological deficit and alterations in the hippocampus still frequently occur following bacterial meningitis in children, despite the antibiotic treatment. We investigated the long-term outcomes using early versus late antibiotic therapy in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. To this aim, male Wistar rats underwent a basilar cistern tap receiving either sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension. Antibiotics were started 8 or 16 h after infection and the animals were followed for 10 days to the determination of long-term cognitive outcomes. The animals were submitted to the habituation of an open-field as an index of long-term cognitive function. Early antibiotic administration (8 h after inoculation) when compared to late antibiotic administration (16 h after inoculation) prevented cognitive impairment induced by pneumococcal meningitis in Wistar rats. The findings from this study suggest that early antibiotic administration is an effective strategy to prevent long-term cognitive impairment in a meningitis animal model. PMID:19733213

  18. Antagonism of ampicillin and chloramphenicol for meningeal isolates of group B streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, J L; Mason, E O; Baker, C J

    1981-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of ampicillin-resistant Haemophilus influenzae type b has led to the recommendation that ampicillin and chloramphenicol be given as the initial therapy for suspected bacterial meningitis in infants and children. However, during the first 2 months of life, H. influenzae type b is a rare cause of meningitis, whereas group B streptococcus is the most frequently isolated agent. Since ampicillin and chloramphenicol have been shown to be antagonistic for other streptococci, an in vitro study of their effect on group B streptococci was performed. The effect of ampicillin and chloramphenicol, alone and in combination, on 18 meningeal isolates was determined for 2 different inocula of group B streptococci, using microtiter broth dilution and growth kinetic assays. Isoboles, fractional lethal concentration indices, or both indicated antagonism for all strains. Growth kinetic assays for two representative strains demonstrated inhibition of the early bactericidal activity of ampicillin by chloramphenicol. These findings of in vitro antagonism suggest that this combination may be contraindicated for the treatment of infants with group B streptococcal meningitis. PMID:7030197

  19. Diagnostic value of latex agglutination test in diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Syeda Fasiha; Patil, Asha B.; Nadagir, Shobha D.; Nandihal, Namrata; Lakshminarayana, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To know the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children below five years of age. To compare conventional culture and antigen detection methods (Latex agglutination test). Materials and Methods: 100 CSF samples of clinically suspected meningitis cases in children below 5 years of age were included. The samples were subjected to cell count, Gram stain, culture and LAT. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized according to standard procedures. Results: Of the 100 cases studied, 31 cases were diagnosed as ABM by Gram stain, culture and latex agglutination test as per WHO criteria. The hospital frequency of ABM was 1.7%. 15 (48.38) cases were culture positive. Gram stain was positive in 22(70.96) cases and LAT in 17(54.83) cases. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common causative agent of acute bacterial meningitis followed by S.pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 45.16%. The sensitivity and specificity of LAT was 66.66% and 87.91% respectively. Conclusion: Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and early diagnosis and treatment is life saving and reduces chronic morbidity. LAT was more sensitive compared to conventional Gram stain and Culture technique in identifying the fastidious organisms like H.influenzae, S.pneumoniae and Group B Streptococcus. However, the combination of Gram stain, Culture and LAT proved to be more productive than any of the single tests alone. PMID:24339598

  20. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lundbo, Lene F.; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Hougaard, David M.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Methods Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified by linking Danish national registries. DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. The association between SNPs and susceptibility to IPD and IMD, mortality and pneumococcal serotypes was investigated. Results 372 children with pneumococcal meningitis, 907 with pneumococcal bacteremia and 1273 controls were included. We included 406 cases with meningococcal meningitis, 272 with meningococcal bacteremia, and 672 controls. The NFKBIE SNP was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis (aOR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20–2.36), but not bacteremia (aOR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.86–1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. Conclusions A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:26870821

  1. Gallium-67 uptake in meningeal sarcoidosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.G.; Hicks, B.H.; Maisey, M.N.

    1986-07-01

    A case of sarcoidosis limited to the central nervous system is described in which the diagnosis was suggested by high Ga-67 uptake in the cranial and spinal meninges. The diagnosis was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. Treatment with oral corticosteroids resulted in clinical improvement and marked reduction in Ga-67 uptake in the meninges. This is the first reported case of the central nervous system sarcoid diagnosed by Ga-67 imaging.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of an Atypical Strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 19A Isolated from Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Hinojosa-Robles, Rosa Maria; Barcenas-Walls, Jose Ramon; Rojas-Martinez, Augusto; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain MTY32702340SN814 isolated in Monterrey, Mexico, from a girl with bacterial meningitis. The strain belongs to the atypical and multidrug-resistant serogroup 19A. This is the first report in the literature of sequence type 3936 (ST3936) in S. pneumoniae serotype 19A. PMID:27103715

  3. Antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) isolates in Namibia: implications for empirical antibiotic treatment of meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency associated with high mortality rates. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture is the “gold standard” for diagnosis of meningitis and it is important to establish the susceptibility of the causative microorganism to rationalize treatment. The Namibia Standard Treatment Guidelines (STGs) recommends initiation of empirical antibiotic treatment in patients with signs and symptoms of meningitis after taking a CSF sample for culture and sensitivity. The objective of this study was to assess the antimicrobial sensitivity patterns of microorganisms isolated from CSF to antibiotics commonly used in the empirical treatment of suspected bacterial meningitis in Namibia. Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of routinely collected antibiotic susceptibility data from the Namibia Institute of Pathology (NIP) database. Results of CSF culture and sensitivity from January 1, 2009 to May 31, 2012, from 33 state hospitals throughout Namibia were analysed. Results The most common pathogens isolated were Streptococcus species, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus, and Escherichia coli. The common isolates from CSF showed high resistance (34.3% –73.5%) to penicillin. Over one third (34.3%) of Streptococcus were resistance to penicillin which was higher than 24.8% resistance in the United States. Meningococci were susceptible to several antimicrobial agents including penicillin. The sensitivity to cephalosporins remained high for Streptococcus, Neisseria, E. coli and Haemophilus. The highest percentage of resistance to cephalosporins was seen among ESBL K. pneumoniae (n = 7, 71%–100%), other Klebsiella species (n = 7, 28%–80%), and Staphylococcus (n = 36, 25%–40%). Conclusions The common organisms isolated from CSF were Streptococcus Pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. All common organisms isolated from CSF showed high

  4. Vaccination in Southeast Asia--reducing meningitis, sepsis and pneumonia with new and existing vaccines.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Alice; Morris, Denise E; Clarke, Stuart C

    2014-07-16

    Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae type b and Neisseria meningitidis are leading causes of vaccine-preventable diseases such as meningitis, sepsis and pneumonia. Although there has been much progress in the introduction of vaccines against these pathogens, access to vaccines remains elusive in some countries. This review highlights the current S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae type b, and N. meningitidis immunization schedules in the 10 countries belonging to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Epidemiologic studies may be useful for informing vaccine policy in these countries, particularly when determining the cost-effectiveness of introducing new vaccines. PMID:24907487

  5. Japanese encephalitis virus in meningitis patients, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Masaru; Ito, Mikako; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie; Fukuda, Shinji; Miyazaki, Kazuo; Kurane, Ichiro; Takasaki, Tomohiko

    2005-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid specimens from 57 patients diagnosed with meningitis were tested for Japanese encephalitis virus. Total RNA was extracted from the specimens and amplified. Two products had highest homology with Nakayama strain and 2 with Ishikawa strain. Results suggest that Japanese encephalitis virus causes some aseptic meningitis in Japan. PMID:15757569

  6. Full recovery from Baylisascaris procyonis eosinophilic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Poulomi J; Blackburn, Brian G; Kazacos, Kevin R; Warrier, Rajasekharan P; Bégué, Rodolfo E

    2007-06-01

    Infection by Baylisascaris procyonis is an uncommon but devastating cause of eosinophilic meningitis. We report the first case-patient, to our knowledge, who recovered from B. procyonis eosinophilic meningitis without any recognizable neurologic deficits. The spectrum of illness for this organism may be wider than previously recognized. PMID:17553240

  7. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 prevents cognitive impairment induced by pneumococcal meningitis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Michelon, Cleonice M; Simões, Lutiana R; Elias, Samuel G; Vuolo, Franciele; Comim, Clarissa M; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2014-02-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a relevant clinical disease characterized by an intense inflammatory reaction into the subarachnoid and ventricular spaces, leading to blood-brain barrier breakdown, hearing loss, and cognitive impairment. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are capable of degrading components of the basal laminin, thus contributing to BBB damage and neuronal injury. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of MMP-2, MMP-9, and MMP-2/9 inhibitors on BBB integrity, learning, and memory in Wistar rats subjected to pneumococcal meningitis. The animals underwent a magna cistern tap and received either 10 µL sterile saline as a placebo or an equivalent volume of a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at a concentration of 5 × 10(9)cfu/mL. The rats were randomized into different groups that received adjuvant treatment with MMP-2, MMP-9 or MMP-2/9 inhibitors. The BBB integrity was evaluated, and the animals were habituated to open-field and object recognition tasks 10 days after meningitis induction. Adjuvant treatments with inhibitors of MMP-2 or MMP-2/9 prevented BBB breakdown in the hippocampus, and treatments with inhibitors of MMP-2, MMP-9 or MMP-2/9 prevented BBB breakdown in the cortex. Ten days after meningitis induction, the animals that received adjuvant treatment with the inhibitor of MMP-2/9 demonstrated that animals habituated to the open-field task faster and enhanced memory during short-term and long-term retention test sessions in the object recognition task. Further investigation is necessary to provide support for MMP inhibitors as an alternative treatment for bacterial meningitis; however, these findings suggest that the meningitis model could be a good research tool for studying the biological mechanisms involved in the behavioral alterations associated with pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:24419461

  8. Cryptococcal Meningitis: Diagnosis and Management Update

    PubMed Central

    Abassi, Mahsa; Boulware, David R; Rhein, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cryptococcal meningitis are promising and have been improving long-term survival. Point of care testing has made diagnosing cryptococcal meningitis rapid, practical, and affordable. Targeted screening and treatment programs for cryptococcal antigenemia are a cost effective method for reducing early mortality on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Optimal initial management with amphotericin and flucytosine improves survival against alternative therapies, although amphotericin is difficult to administer and flucytosine is not available in middle or low income countries, where cryptococcal meningitis is most prevalent. Controlling increased intracranial pressure with serial therapeutic lumbar punctures has a proven survival benefit. Delaying ART initiation for 4 weeks after the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis is associated with improved survival. Fortunately, new approaches have been leading the way toward improving care for cryptococcal meningitis patients. New trials utilizing different combinations of antifungal therapy are reviewed, and we summarize the efficacy of different regimens. PMID:26279970

  9. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-induced aseptic meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Wambulwa, Charles; Bwayo, Salome; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O.; Lombardo, Fredric

    2005-01-01

    We present a 46-year-old African-American man with AIDS who was admitted on two different occasions within three weeks for signs and symptoms of meningitis after using trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). TMP/SMX is primarily used for the treatment of pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis in AIDS patients. Drug-induced aseptic meningitis (DIAM) is commonly seen with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), antibiotics (with TMP/SMX being the most frequently implicated), intravenous immunoglobulins and OKT3 antibodies. However, the implication of TMP/SMX inducing aseptic meningitis has been underreported to FDA/MEDWATCH program. This might be due to the fact that it has also been used to treat bacterial meningitis from organisms like Listeria monocytogenes, which is a common pathogen in the elderly and in infants. We reviewed the literature in an attempt to characterize the pattern and predictors of TMP/SMX-induced aseptic meningitis. PMID:16396068

  10. Towards a meningitis free world--can we eliminate meningococcal meningitis?: contribution of the meningitis patient groups.

    PubMed

    Davie, Sue; Glennie, Linda; Rowland, Kate

    2012-05-30

    Patient groups play a critical part in the fight against meningitis in all its forms. The UK has the world's three largest meningitis patient groups, which over the past 3 decades have worked tirelessly in the fight against meningitis. Within the UK, where the patient groups work to prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by meningitis and septicaemia, their work is in three areas: continued research; demonstrating burden; and awareness-raising and advocacy. The research relates to developing and improving vaccines, and to improving outcomes for forms of meningitis that are not vaccine preventable. Demonstrating burden - showing the real impact of meningitis from a human perspective - highlights the need for vaccines to prevent the disease. Lives are saved by raising awareness of signs and symptoms and of the need for fast action, whilst advocacy can bring about change to improve the quality of life of those affected by meningitis. Awareness raising and advocacy also have the wider benefit of creating a climate in which people recognise the need for vaccines to prevent this dreadful disease. In addition, the patient groups seek to influence the early introduction and uptake of vaccines as they are licensed and approved by the expert bodies, the UK body being the Joint Committee for Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). Each area of activity is explored, and examples given from each of the patient groups of work they have done or are doing in that area. PMID:22607905

  11. In Brief: Forecasting meningitis threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-12-01

    The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), in conjunction with a team of health and weather organizations, has launched a project to provide weather forecasts to medical officials in Africa to help reduce outbreaks of meningitis. The forecasts will enable local health care providers to target vaccination programs more effectively. In 2009, meteorologists with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, which is managed by UCAR, will begin issuing 14-day forecasts of atmospheric conditions in Ghana. Later, UCAR plans to work closely with health experts from several African countries to design and test a decision support system to provide health officials with useful meteorological information. ``By targeting forecasts in regions where meningitis is a threat, we may be able to help vulnerable populations. Ultimately, we hope to build on this project and provide information to public health programs battling weather-related diseases in other parts of the world,'' said Rajul Pandya, director of UCAR's Community Building Program. Funding for the project comes from a $900,000 grant from Google.org, the philanthropic arm of the Internet search company.

  12. Climate Change and Cerebrospinal Meningitis in the Ghanaian Meningitis Belt

    PubMed Central

    Codjoe, Samuel Nii Ardey; Nabie, Vivian Adams

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal meningitis (CSM) is one of the infectious diseases likely to be affected by climate change. Although there are a few studies on the climate change-CSM nexus, none has considered perceptions of community members. However, understanding public perception in relation to a phenomenon is very significant for the design of effective communication and mitigation strategies as well as coping and adaptation strategies. This paper uses focus group discussions (FGDs) to fill this knowledge lacuna. Results show that although a few elderly participants ascribed fatal causes (disobedience to gods, ancestors, and evil spirits) to CSM infections during FGDs, majority of participants rightly linked CSM infections to dry, very hot and dusty conditions experienced during the dry season. Finally, community members use a suite of adaptation options to curb future CSM epidemics. PMID:25003550

  13. Adjuvant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor therapy results in improved spatial learning and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Anna Kathrin; Reich, Arno; Falkenburger, Björn; Schulz, Jörg B; Brandenburg, Lars Ove; Ribes, Sandra; Tauber, Simone C

    2015-01-01

    Despite the development of new antibiotic agents, mortality of pneumococcal meningitis remains high. In addition, meningitis results in severe long-term morbidity, most prominently cognitive deficits. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) stimulates proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitor cells and increases the number of circulating neutrophil granulocytes. This study investigated the effect of adjuvant G-CSF treatment on cognitive function after pneumococcal meningitis. C57BL/6 mice were infected by subarachnoid injection of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 3 and treated with ceftriaxone and G-CSF subcutaneously or ceftriaxone alone for 5 days. Clinical scores, motor performance, and mortality during bacterial meningitis were unaffected by adjuvant G-CSF treatment. No effect of G-CSF treatment on production of proinflammatory cytokines or activation of microglia or astrocytes was observed. The G-CSF treatment did, however, result in hippocampal neurogenesis and improved spatial learning performance 6 weeks after meningitis. These results suggest that G-CSF might offer a new adjuvant therapeutic approach in bacterial meningitis to reduce long-term cognitive deficits. PMID:25470346

  14. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia: rare cause of meningitis.

    PubMed

    Correia, Cátia Rodrigues; Ferreira, Sara Tavares; Nunes, Paula

    2014-08-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative bacillus, which is an extremely rare cause of meningitis. To our knowledge, there are only five previous pediatrics cases. Here, we describe the case of a 4-year-old boy who developed meningitis associated with this organism, after several neurosurgical procedures and previous treatment with a broad-spectrum antibiotic. He was treated successfully with a combination of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ceftazidime and levofloxacin. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia should be considered as a potential cause of meningitis, especially among severely debilitated or immunosuppressed patients. Antimicrobial therapy is complicated by the high resistance of the organism to multiple antibiotics. PMID:25252064

  15. Chronic Meningitis: Simplifying a Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Kelly; Whiting, Chris

    2016-03-01

    Chronic meningitis can be a diagnostic dilemma for even the most experienced clinician. Many times, the differential diagnosis is broad and encompasses autoimmune, neoplastic, and infectious etiologies. This review will focus on a general approach to chronic meningitis to simplify the diagnostic challenges many clinicians face. The article will also review the most common etiologies of chronic meningitis in some detail including clinical presentation, diagnostic testing, treatment, and outcomes. By using a case-based approach, we will focus on the key elements of clinical presentation and laboratory analysis that will yield the most rapid and accurate diagnosis in these complicated cases. PMID:26888190

  16. Streptococcus agalactiae infection in zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Brandon J; Hancock, Bryan M; Cid, Natasha Del; Bermudez, Andres; Traver, David; Doran, Kelly S

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is an encapsulated, Gram-positive bacterium that is a leading cause of neonatal pneumonia, sepsis and meningitis, and an emerging aquaculture pathogen. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is a genetically tractable model vertebrate that has been used to analyze the pathogenesis of both aquatic and human bacterial pathogens. We have developed a larval zebrafish model of GBS infection to study bacterial and host factors that contribute to disease progression. GBS infection resulted in dose dependent larval death, and GBS serotype III, ST-17 strain was observed as the most virulent. Virulence was dependent on the presence of the GBS capsule, surface anchored lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and toxin production, as infection with GBS mutants lacking these factors resulted in little to no mortality. Additionally, interleukin-1β il1b and CXCL-8 (cxcl8a) were significantly induced following GBS infection compared to controls. We also visualized GBS outside the brain vasculature, suggesting GBS penetration into the brain during the course of infection. Our data demonstrate that zebrafish larvae are a valuable model organism to study GBS pathogenesis. PMID:25617657

  17. Streptococcus pluranimalium: A novel human pathogen?

    PubMed Central

    Aryasinghe, Lasanthi; Sabbar, Saweera; Kazim, Yasmin; Awan, Liaqat Mahmood; Khan, Hammad Khan Nadir

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We present the first case of a subdural empyema caused by Streptococcus pluranimalium, in a healthy adolescent male as a possible complication of subclinical frontal sinusitis. Clinical features, diagnostic approach and management of subdural empyema are discussed. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 17-year-old male with a 2 day history of headache and nausea was referred to our Emergency Department (ED) as a case of possible meningitis. He was afebrile, lethargic and drowsy with significant neck stiffness on examination. Computerized tomography (CT) revealed a large frontotemporoparietal subdural fluid collection with significant midline shift. Subsequent contrast-enhanced CT established the presence of intracranial empyema; the patient underwent immediate burr-hole evacuation of the pus and received 7 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, recovering with no residual neurological deficit. DISCUSSION The diagnosis of subdural empyema as a complication of asymptomatic sinusitis in an immunocompetent patient with no history of fever or upper respiratory symptoms was unanticipated. Furthermore, the organism Streptococcus pluranimalium that was cultured from the pus has only been documented twice previously in medical literature to cause infection in humans, as it is primarily a pathogen responsible for infection in bovine and avian species. CONCLUSION Subdural empyema represents a neurosurgical emergency and if left untreated is invariably fatal. Rapid diagnosis, surgical intervention and intensive antibiotic therapy improve both morbidity and mortality. PMID:25437686

  18. Meningococcal carriage in the African meningitis belt

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    êcher le portage pharyngé devrait être déterminé. Pour résoudre ce problème, le consortium MenAfriCar (Consortium Africain du Portage Méningococcique) a été établi en 2009 pour étudier le mode de portage du méningocoque dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite avant et après l’ introduction de PsA-TT. Cet article décrit comment le consortium a été établi, ses objectifs et les méthodes de laboratoire et de terrain standardisées qui ont été utilisées pour atteindre ces objectifs. L’ expérience du consortium MenAfriCar aidera à planifier les futures études sur l’ épidémiologie du portage du méningocoque dans les pays de la ceinture africaine de la méningite et d’ ailleurs. Se está utilizando una vacuna meningocócica conjugada (MenAfriVac™) de polisacárido del serogrupo A / tétano toxoide (PsA-TT) en países del cinturón Africano de meningitis. Las experiencias obtenidas con otras vacunas conjugadas polisacárido/proteína han demostrado que una parte importante de su éxito se debe a su habilidad para prevenir la colonización faríngea de los portadores, acabando por lo tanto con la transmisión, y a la de inducir la protección de rebaño. Si PsA-TT ha de cumplir el objetivo de prevenir epidemias, debe ser capaz de prevenir el estado de portador faríngeo, al igual que la enfermedad invasiva por meningococo, y para ello es necesario determinar si la PsA-TT puede prevenir la colonización faríngea. Con el fin de abordar esta cuestión se estableció un consorcio africano en el 2009 - el MenAfriCar (African Meningococcal Carriage Consortium) – para investigar los patrones del estado de portador de meningococo en paí

  19. Streptococcus anginosus ("Streptococcus milleri"): the unrecognized pathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L

    1988-01-01

    "Streptococcus milleri" is an unofficial name that has been applied to a group of streptococci which, although basically similar, show various hemolytic, serological, and physiological characteristics. The species name Streptococcus anginosus has recently been recognized as the approved name for these organisms. Streptococci known as "S. milleri" have been implicated as etiologic agents in a variety of serious purulent infections, but because of their heterogeneous characteristics, these organisms may be unrecognized or misidentified by clinical laboratorians. This review describes the bacteriological aspects of organisms known as "S. milleri," their clinical significance, and the problems encountered with their identification in the clinical laboratory. PMID:3060239

  20. [Pasteurella multocida meningitis with cerebral abscesses].

    PubMed

    Nguefack, S; Moifo, B; Chiabi, A; Mah, E; Bogne, J-B; Fossi, M; Fru, F; Mbonda, E; Djientcheu, V-P

    2014-03-01

    Pasteurella multocida is classically responsible for local soft tissue infections secondary to dog bites or cat scratches. It can be responsible for meningitis in infants and elderly persons. We report the case history of a 5-year-old male child admitted to our pediatric unit for meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed an infection with P. multocida. The suspected mode of contamination was either from the saliva of a pet dog or through an unnoticed skull fracture sustained after an accident 1 year prior to the occurrence of meningitis. In spite of the neurologic complication (cerebral abscess), the progression was favorable after drainage of the abscess, 5 weeks of parenteral treatment, and 3 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy. Meningitis due to Pasteurella sp. is rare and can lead to neurologic complications. The notion of bites or scratches can be absent and the mode of contamination is sometimes difficult to unveil. PMID:24457110

  1. Hemi-meningitis with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Ozan; Yarar, Coskun; Yimenicioğlu, Sevgi; Ekici, Arzu; Bör, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder. HLH may occur as a complication of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), particularly in patients with immunodeficiencies. Herein, we describe a 16-year-old girl with neurological complications associated EBV-induced HLH. Her cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed contrast-enhanced axial T1-weighted images with enhancement of meningeal surface in the right hemisphere that was consistent with right hemi-meningitis. Hydrocephalus, dilated subdural spaces, delayed myelination, edema, diffuse parenchymal atrophy, calcifications, diffuse/patchy white matter abnormalities have all been previously described with HLH. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of hemi-meningitis associated with HLH. We suggest that clinicians should consider HLH with vascular disorders when they determine unilateral meningitis on a brain MRI. PMID:27570395

  2. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients’ medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients’ outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  3. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them. PMID:27610176

  4. Environmental Risk and Meningitis Epidemics in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Molesworth, Anna M.; Cuevas, Luis E.; Connor, Stephen J.; Morse, Andrew P.

    2003-01-01

    Epidemics of meningococcal meningitis occur in areas with particular environmental characteristics. We present evidence that the relationship between the environment and the location of these epidemics is quantifiable and propose a model based on environmental variables to identify regions at risk for meningitis epidemics. These findings, which have substantial implications for directing surveillance activities and health policy, provide a basis for monitoring the impact of climate variability and environmental change on epidemic occurrence in Africa. PMID:14609465

  5. Identification of etiological agents by LPA and PCR in childhood meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashal; A. Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Pardhan, Khatidja; Ahmed Memon, Ashfaque

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the etiological agents by Latex Particle Agglutination (LPA) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in patients admitted with Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) culture negative bacterial meningitis Methods: This descriptive case series was conducted at National Institute of Child Health, Karachi from January 2010 to December 2012. Patients meeting the WHO case definition of suspected meningitis from one month to 59 months of age were included in the study. CSF examination and culture was carried out on every patient and CSF culture negative patients were enrolled. Demographic data, clinical signs & symptoms and laboratory findings were entered into the proforma. Data was analyzed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 17. P-value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: A total of 166 patients were included. Male were 96 and female were 76 with the male to female ratio of 1.26. The mean age of patient was ± SD 14.6 ± 14.5 months. The etiological agents identified by LPA were in 26/166 (15.66%) cases and the organisms were H. influenzae type b 10 cases, streptococcus pneumoniae 15 cases and meningococcus only one case respectively. The organisms identified by PCR were in 65/166 (39.15%) cases and the isolates were H. influenzae type b 16 cases, streptococcus pneumoniae 48 cases and meningococcus 01 case respectively. Conclusion: LPA and PCR are superior and useful diagnostic tools in microbiology. They can be used for rapid etiological diagnosis of bacterial meningitis for the early administration of proper antibiotic. Abbreviation: LPA = Latex Particle Agglutination, PCR = Polymerase Chain Reaction, CSF = Cerebrospinal Fluid, CNS = Central Nervous System. PMID:24353712

  6. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Tunkel, A R; Scheld, W M

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis remains a disease with associated unacceptable morbidity and mortality rates despite the availability of effective bactericidal antimicrobial therapy. Through the use of experimental animal models of infection, a great deal of information has been gleaned concerning the pathogenic and pathophysiologic mechanisms operable in bacterial meningitis. Most cases of bacterial meningitis begin with host acquisition of a new organism by nasopharyngeal colonization followed by systemic invasion and development of a high-grade bacteremia. Bacterial encapsulation contributes to this bacteremia by inhibiting neutrophil phagocytosis and resisting classic complement-mediated bactericidal activity. Central nervous system invasion then occurs, although the exact site of bacterial traversal into the central nervous system is unknown. By production and/or release of virulence factors into and stimulation of formation of inflammatory cytokines within the central nervous system, meningeal pathogens increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, thus allowing protein and neutrophils to move into the subarachnoid space. There is then an intense subarachnoid space inflammatory response, which leads to many of the pathophysiologic consequences of bacterial meningitis, including cerebral edema and increased intracranial pressure. Attenuation of this inflammatory response with adjunctive dexamethasone therapy is associated with reduced concentrations of tumor necrosis factor in the cerebrospinal fluid, with diminished cerebrospinal fluid leukocytosis, and perhaps with improvement of morbidity, as demonstrated in recent clinical trials. Further information on the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of bacterial meningitis should lead to the development of more innovative treatment and/or preventive strategies for this disorder. Images PMID:8472245

  7. Diagnostic Accuracy of Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Versus Nonbacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting-Ting; Hu, Zhi-De; Qin, Bao-Dong; Ma, Ning; Tang, Qing-Qin; Wang, Li-Li; Zhou, Lin; Zhong, Ren-Qian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have investigated the diagnostic accuracy of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in bacterial meningitis (BM), but the results were heterogeneous. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the diagnostic accuracy of PCT as a marker for BM detection. A systematic search of the EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, and PubMed databases was performed to identify studies published before December 7, 2015 investigating the diagnostic accuracy of PCT for BM. The quality of the eligible studies was assessed using the revised Quality Assessment for Studies of Diagnostic Accuracy method. The overall diagnostic accuracy of PCT detection in CSF or blood was pooled using the bivariate model. Twenty-two studies involving 2058 subjects were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. The overall specificities and sensitivities were 0.86 and 0.80 for CSF PCT, and 0.97 and 0.95 for blood PCT, respectively. Areas under the summary receiver operating characteristic curves were 0.90 and 0.98 for CSF PCT and blood PCT, respectively. The major limitation of this systematic review and meta-analysis was the small number of studies included and the heterogeneous diagnostic thresholds adopted by eligible studies. Our meta-analysis shows that PCT is a useful biomarker for BM diagnosis. PMID:26986140

  8. Meningitis and Climate: From Science to Practice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez Garcia-Pando, Carlos; Thomson, Madeleine C.; Stanton, Michelle C.; Diggle, Peter J.; Hopson, Thomas; Pandya, Rajul; Miller, Ron L.; Hugonnet, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis is a climate sensitive infectious disease. The regional extent of the Meningitis Belt in Africa, where the majority of epidemics occur, was originally defined by Lapeysonnie in the 1960s. A combination of climatic and environmental conditions and biological and social factors have been associated to the spatial and temporal patterns of epidemics observed since the disease first emerged in West Africa over a century ago. However, there is still a lack of knowledge and data that would allow disentangling the relative effects of the diverse risk factors upon epidemics. The Meningitis Environmental Risk Information Technologies Initiative (MERIT), a collaborative research-to-practice consortium, seeks to inform national and regional prevention and control strategies across the African Meningitis Belt through the provision of new data and tools that better determine risk factors. In particular MERIT seeks to consolidate a body of knowledge that provides evidence of the contribution of climatic and environmental factors to seasonal and year-to-year variations in meningococcal meningitis incidence at both district and national scales. Here we review recent research and practice seeking to provide useful information for the epidemic response strategy of National Ministries of Health in the Meningitis Belt of Africa. In particular the research and derived tools described in this paper have focused at "getting science into policy and practice" by engaging with practitioner communities under the umbrella of MERIT to ensure the relevance of their work to operational decision-making. We limit our focus to that of reactive vaccination for meningococcal meningitis. Important but external to our discussion is the development and implementation of the new conjugate vaccine, which specifically targets meningococcus A

  9. Group B streptococcus neonatal invasive infections, France 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Joubrel, C; Tazi, A; Six, A; Dmytruk, N; Touak, G; Bidet, P; Raymond, J; Trieu Cuot, P; Fouet, A; Kernéis, S; Poyart, C

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus (GBS)) is the leading cause of invasive infections among newborns in industrialized countries, with two described syndromes: early-onset disease (EOD) and late-onset disease (LOD). Since the introduction in many countries of intrapartum antibioprophylaxis (IAP), the incidence of EOD has dramatically decreased, whereas that of LOD remains unchanged. We describe the clinical and bacteriological characteristics of 438 GBS neonatal invasive infections notified to the French National Reference Centre for Streptococci in France from 2007 to 2012. Clinical data were retrieved from hospitalization reports or questionnaires. Capsular type, assignment to the hypervirulent clonal complex (CC)17 and antibiotic susceptibility profiles were determined. One hundred and seventy-four (39.7%) and 264 (60.3%) isolates were responsible for EOD, including death in utero, and LOD, respectively. EOD was associated with bacteraemia (n = 103, 61%) and LOD with meningitis (n = 145, 55%). EOD was mainly due to capsular polysaccharide (CPS) III isolates (n = 99, 57%) and CPS Ia isolates (n = 40, 23%), and CPS III isolates were responsible for 80% (n = 211) of LOD cases. CC17 accounted for 80% (n = 121) of CPS III isolates responsible for meningitis (n = 151; total cases of meningitis, 188). Bad outcome risk factors were low gestational age and low birthweight. LOD represents almost 60% of cases of neonatal GBS disease in France and other countries in which IAP has been implemented. This observation reinforces the need to develop new prevention strategies targeting CC17, which is predominant in GBS neonatal infections. PMID:26055414

  10. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  11. [A case of recurrent aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Tagawa, Asako; Hashimoto, Ritsuo; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman with recurrent aseptic meningitis that was caused by ergot agents. She miscarried at age 27, and the uterus constrictor methylergometrine was prescribed. Three days later, she developed aseptic meningitis and was hospitalized. Two years later, she again developed aseptic meningitis the day after she took ergotamine tartrate. In both events, her symptoms improved rapidly when the medication was stopped. The drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test for methylergometrine yielded a value of 180%. Drug-induced meningitis is a rare form of recurrent aseptic meningitis. Many studies have reported cases of meningitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but many other drugs can induce aseptic meningitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of aseptic meningitis induced by ergot agents. PMID:26103816

  12. Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Language: English Español ( ... Compartir 2002 Study of the Risk of Bacterial Meningitis in Children with Cochlear Implants Many people have ...

  13. Postsurgical Pantoea calida meningitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pantoea calida, a recently described environmental Enterobacteriaceae organism, has not yet been associated with human infection. Case presentation We report a case of postoperative meningitis caused by P. calida. After pituitary adenoma resection, a 52-year-old Caucasian woman developed febrile meningitis confirmed by cerebrospinal fluid analysis. P. calida was grown in pure culture from this fluid and was firmly identified with partial rpoB gene sequencing. She was cured by a 14-day course of meropenem. Conclusions P. calida must be added to the list of opportunistic Enterobacteriaceae pathogens responsible for postsurgical meningitis. It is easily identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. PMID:24934580

  14. Meningitis after cochlear implantation in Mondini malformation.

    PubMed

    Page, E L; Eby, T L

    1997-01-01

    Although the potential for CSF leakage and subsequent meningitis after cochlear implantation in the malformed cochlea has been recognized, this complication has not been previously reported. We report a case of CSF otorhinorrhea and meningitis after minor head trauma developing 2 years after cochlear implantation in a child with Mondini malformation. Leakage of CSF was identified from the cochleostomy around the electrode of the implant, and this leak was sealed with a temporalis fascia and muscle plug. Although this complication appears to be rare, care must be taken to seal the cochleostomy in children with inner ear malformations at the initial surgery, and any episode of meningitis after surgery must be thoroughly investigated to rule out CSF leakage from the labyrinth. PMID:9018266

  15. Evaluation and Treatment of Chronic Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Zunt, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic meningitis is defined as an inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) profile that persists for at least 1 month. The presentation often includes headache, nausea, vomiting, cranial neuropathies, symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure, or focal neurologic deficits. The most common etiologies of chronic meningitis fall into 3 broad categories: infectious, autoimmune, and neoplastic. Evaluation of the patient with suspected chronic meningitis should include a detailed history and physical examination as well as repeated CSF diagnostics, serologic studies, and biopsy of the brain or other abnormal tissue (eg, lymph node or lung), when indicated. Early identification of the etiology and rapid treatment are crucial for improving morbidity and mortality, but potential infectious and neoplastic conditions should be excluded prior to empirically starting steroids or immunosuppressive medications. PMID:25360204

  16. [Purulent meningitis, caused by Corynebacterium xerosis, after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Vukmirovits, G; Todorova, R; Arányi, Z; Káli, G

    1991-12-30

    A previously healthy 25 year old sportsman is reported who developed Corynebacterium xerosis meningitis with coma and seizures after spinal anaesthesia. The adequate therapy (dexamethason, penicillin, ampicillin, mannitol, intensive care, hyperventillation) resulted in a complete recovery. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case of Corynebacterium xerosis meningitis and the first bacterial meningitis reported after spinal anaesthesia in Hungary. PMID:1766661

  17. Meningitis-Retention Syndrome as a Presentation of West Nile Virus Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Laengvejkal, Pavis; Argueta, Erwin; Limsuwat, Chok; Nugent, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A 26-year-old previously healthy man presented with fever, urinary retention, nuchal rigidity, and hyperreflexia but with a clear sensorium. His initial spinal fluid results were consistent with aseptic meningitis from West Nile virus infection, and this was confirmed by serological studies on blood and cerebrospinal fluid. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies were unremarkable. He received supportive care and urinary catheterization to prevent bladder injury from overdistension. He was discharged home without recurrence of urinary retention after five days of hospitalization. Therefore, this case report describes the first case of West Nile virus meningitis in a patient with the meningitis-retention syndrome. PMID:23983716

  18. Asymptomatic (Subclinical) Meningitis in One of Premature Triplets with Simultaneous Enteroviral Meningitis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ashish; Tolan, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Most enterovirus infection in the neonate and young infant is asymptomatic, but serious disease may occur, especially if acquired perinatally. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of asymptomatic enterovirus aseptic meningitis, and of concurrent enterovirus aseptic meningitis in premature triplets. Ten-week-old, 31-week-estimated gestational age premature triplet boys were diagnosed with enterovirus aseptic meningitis on the same day. Two of the triplets developed symptoms on the day of admission, while the third remained symptom free throughout the infection. All three recovered completely and are healthy more than a decade later. PMID:23946897

  19. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  20. Meningitis-retention Syndrome; A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Gen; Hata, Kenichi; Aoki, Soichiro; Suzuki, Masayasu; Kimura, Takahiro; Egawa, Shin

    2016-05-01

    We report a case of meningitis-retention syndrome followed by urodynamic tests. A 48-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for an undiagnosed fever with headache and urinary retention. Aseptic meningitis was suspected according to cerebrospinal fluid analyses, and urodynamic test showed an underactive detrusor, leading to inadequate contraction of the bladder on voiding in spite of a normal sensation during bladder filling. Clean intermittent self-catheterization was required temporarily, but normal urinary voiding without the need for medication was restored in 2 weeks after discharge from the hospital, when urodynamic tests showed normal contractility of the bladder during voiding. PMID:27175342

  1. FDG PET in Intracranial Carcinomatous Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heimburger, Céline; Bund, Caroline; Namer, Izzie Jacques

    2016-01-01

    A 63-year-old white man, diagnosed with pT3N2 squamous cell lung carcinoma, underwent right upper lobectomy with adjuvant radiochemotherapy. After a partial epileptic seizure, MRI revealed a solitary right frontal metastasis that was treated with surgical resection followed by stereotaxic radiotherapy. Three months later, the patient presented weight loss, weakness, and headache. He underwent a whole-body FDG PET/CT for restaging. It showed intense FDG uptakes on the brain periphery corresponding to nodular meningeal contrast enhancement on MRI leading to the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis, despite negative cerebrospinal fluid cytology. PMID:26447391

  2. [Bacterial meningitis in patients with sepsis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Olejnik, Z; Janeczko, J; Lipowski, D; Przyjałkowski, W; Strzelecki, R; Romanowska, B; Pogorzelska, E

    1994-01-01

    The authors discuss problems connected with diagnosis, management and treatment of bacterial meningitis among patients with the sepsis syndrome. Considering secondary organ changes bacterial meningitis belongs to the severest one and as a life-threathing sequel of sepsis demands immediate use of proper casual treatment. The authors show the therapeutic difficulties in this group of patients particularly when the etiological organism is unknown. They discuss this problems and present their own schemes of tretment. They indicate the value of passive immunotherapy and surgical removal of the primary source of infection. They emphasize final result depends on secondary organ changes, age, immunity of patient and the kind of etiological agent. PMID:7938619

  3. CSF cytology versus immunocytochemistry in meningeal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed Central

    Boogerd, W; Vroom, T M; van Heerde, P; Brutel de la Rivière, G; Peterse, J L; van der Sande, J J

    1988-01-01

    CSF immunocytochemistry with monoclonal antibodies was compared with conventional cytology to determine its sensitivity in detecting malignant cells in patients with meningeal carcinomatosis. One hundred and eighteen samples were investigated. Cytology was tumour positive in 83 samples and immunocytochemistry in 85. Dissimilar results between the two diagnostic methods were noted in 12 specimens, invariably occurring in samples with a low cell count and obtained from treated patients. Combined use of the two methods led to a 9% increase of sensitivity in detecting malignant cells compared with cytology alone. It is concluded that immunocytochemistry is of minor help in the problem of false-negative cytology in meningeal carcinomatosis. PMID:2832546

  4. A novel automated test battery reveals enduring behavioural alterations and cognitive impairments in survivors of murine pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Too, L K; Ball, H J; McGregor, I S; Hunt, N H

    2014-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis, caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, is a major form of lethal bacterial meningitis. Survivors are predisposed to developing lifelong disabling sequelae, including cognitive impairment, psychological problems and motor deficits. In our experimental model, ventricular inoculation of 10(5) colony-forming units of S. pneumoniae type 3 caused 90% of mice to develop life-threatening meningitis within 48 h. Antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone 20 h post infection reduced the incidence of severe meningitis to <10%. At the time of treatment, upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines was detected, including interleukin-1β, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor. We evaluated the long-term behavioural and cognitive sequelae in control mice and those surviving meningitis using an automated system (the IntelliCage) in which mice perform a range of behavioural and spatial tasks to obtain water rewards from conditioning units in their home cage. Surviving mice showed a number of altered behaviours relative to controls, including (i) hypoexploration when first exposed to the IntelliCage, (ii) altered activity patterns (fewer visits to conditioning stations during the light phase and more in the dark phase), (iii) avoidance of light (a constant or flashing LED stimulus), (iv) impaired spatial learning (a complex patrolling task), and (v) impaired discrimination reversal learning. Overall these results suggest photophobia and weakened learning ability in post-meningitic mice, particularly on tasks engaging hippocampal and prefrontal neural substrates. This study also demonstrates a standardised and comprehensive battery of tests that can be readily used to investigate neurological sequelae in undisturbed mice residing in a complex home cage environment. PMID:24060586

  5. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Andam, Cheryl P.; Hanage, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25461843

  6. Mechanisms of genome evolution of Streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Andam, Cheryl P; Hanage, William P

    2015-07-01

    The genus Streptococcus contains 104 recognized species, many of which are associated with human or animal hosts. A globally prevalent human pathogen in this group is Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). While being a common resident of the upper respiratory tract, it is also a major cause of otitis media, pneumonia, bacteremia and meningitis, accounting for a high burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Recent findings demonstrate the importance of recombination and selection in driving the population dynamics and evolution of different pneumococcal lineages, allowing them to successfully evade the impacts of selective pressures such as vaccination and antibiotic treatment. We highlight the ability of pneumococci to respond to these pressures through processes including serotype replacement, capsular switching and horizontal gene transfer (HGT) of antibiotic resistance genes. The challenge in controlling this pathogen also lies in the exceptional genetic and phenotypic variation among different pneumococcal lineages, particularly in terms of their pathogenicity and resistance to current therapeutic strategies. The widespread use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, which target only a small subset of the more than 90 pneumococcal serotypes, provides us with a unique opportunity to elucidate how the processes of selection and recombination interact to generate a remarkable level of plasticity and heterogeneity in the pneumococcal genome. These processes also play an important role in the emergence and spread of multi-resistant strains, which continues to pose a challenge in disease control and/or eradication. The application of population of genomic approaches at different spatial and temporal scales will help improve strategies to control this global pathogen, and potentially other pathogenic streptococci. PMID:25461843

  7. Meningococcal Meningitis Surveillance in the African Meningitis Belt, 2004–2013

    PubMed Central

    Lingani, Clément; Bergeron-Caron, Cassi; Stuart, James M.; Fernandez, Katya; Djingarey, Mamoudou H.; Ronveaux, Olivier; Schnitzler, Johannes C.; Perea, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Background. An enhanced meningitis surveillance network was established across the meningitis belt of sub-Saharan Africa in 2003 to rapidly collect, disseminate, and use district weekly data on meningitis incidence. Following 10 years’ experience with enhanced surveillance that included the introduction of a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), in 2010, we analyzed the data on meningitis incidence and case fatality from countries reporting to the network. Methods. After de-duplication and reconciliation, data were extracted from the surveillance bulletins and the central database held by the World Health Organization Inter-country Support Team in Burkina Faso for countries reporting consistently from 2004 through 2013 (Benin, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Togo). Results. The 10 study countries reported 341 562 suspected and confirmed cases over the 10-year study period, with a marked peak in 2009 due to a large epidemic of group A Neisseria meningitidis (NmA) meningitis. Case fatality was lowest (5.9%) during this year. A mean of 71 and 67 districts annually crossed the alert and epidemic thresholds, respectively. The incidence rate of NmA meningitis fell >10-fold, from 0.27 per 100 000 in 2004–2010 to 0.02 per 100 000 in 2011–2013 (P < .0001). Conclusions. In addition to supporting timely outbreak response, the enhanced meningitis surveillance system provides a global overview of the epidemiology of meningitis in the region, despite limitations in data quality and completeness. This study confirms a dramatic fall in NmA incidence after the introduction of PsA-TT. PMID:26553668

  8. Infective Meningitis Caused by Phialemonium curvatum

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yueli; Bu, Hui; He, Yunying; Guo, Li

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by rarely encountered fungal pathogens have increased in recent decades. Phialemonium species are widely distributed in the environment and are also involved in human infections, affecting both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. The present study describes a case of meningitis caused by Phialemonium curvatum. PMID:24850352

  9. Citrobacter koseri meningitis: another freediving risk?

    PubMed

    Pollara, Gabriele; Savy, Lloyd; Cropley, Ian; Hopkins, Susan

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of meningitis caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult who had recently been freediving. Middle ear pressure changes from this recreational activity, and the subsequent inflammatory response, are likely to have provided this environmental organism access to the central nervous system, and thus the ability to cause clinically significant infection. PMID:20933000

  10. Tuberculous meningitis in a Filipino maid.

    PubMed

    Sheu, J J; Yuan, R Y; Lu, J J; Chung, C L; Hsu, C Y

    1999-11-01

    Tuberculous meningitis, while not uncommon in Taiwan, has not been reported among foreign workers. We report the first case of tuberculous meningitis in a 37-year-old Filipino maid in Taiwan, who presented with headache, fever and vomiting. She had been well before this episode and the small screening films of the chest radiograph obtained on her arrival in Taiwan 15 months previously, and every 6 months thereafter showed no evidence of tuberculosis. The suspicion of tuberculous meningitis was delayed until disturbance of consciousness manifested and a standard chest radiograph showed a diffuse miliary pattern in both lung fields. A cerebrospinal fluid sample that was sent for a polymerase chain reaction-based assay specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis showed a positive result. The patient recovered with sequelae of mildly incoherent speech and urinary incontinence after antituberculous medication and short-course steroid treatment. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of tuberculous meningitis in foreign workers with complaints of fever and headache. Because high-quality chest radiographs are a prerequisite for early detection of pulmonary tuberculosis, we recommended that standard posterior-anterior chest radiographs should be obtained as part of the routine health examination for foreign workers. PMID:10705697

  11. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-01-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  12. A Novel α-Hemolytic Streptococcus Species (Streptococcus azizii sp. nov.) Associated with Meningoencephalitis in Naïve Weanling C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Arbona, Rodolfo Ricart; Lepherd, Michelle; Monette, Sébastien; Toma, Aziz; Fox, James G; Dewhirst, Floyd E; Lipman, Neil S

    2015-06-01

    During 1 year, experimentally naïve C57BL/6NCrl weanlings born to timed-pregnant dams from a single vendor demonstrated markedly increased mortality associated with runting, abnormal gait, and decreased activity. Gram-positive, aerobic, α-hemolytic, coccoid bacteria were isolated from the meninges (n = 16), blood (n = 1), and kidneys (n = 1) of clinically affected weanlings (n = 15); from the uterus (n = 1), meninges (n = 1), and oral cavity (n = 2) of 3 dams; and from the meninges and oral cavity of a clinically affected 86-d-old mouse in the same colony. Multifocal, necrosuppurative meningoencephalitis and ventriculitis with intralesional gram-positive coccoid bacteria were present in all but 2 affected animals. The bacterium also was isolated from the oral cavity of an asymptomatic timed-pregnant dam (1 of 23) from the same vendor and from 8 mice at the vendor's facility. All isolates (n = 25) were identified by using 2 semiautomated rapid-identification systems, one of which consistently identified the causative bacterium as Aerococcus viridans 2 (n = 12) or 3 (n = 13), with probabilities of 55.7% to 98.3%. The bacterium did not grow in 6.5% NaCl at 10 °C, thus suggesting a Streptococcus species. Partial 16S rRNA sequencing of 4 isolates suggested S. hyointestinalis (probability, 93.4%) and S. gallinaceus (99.5%). Full 16S rRNA sequences for 3 isolates identified the bacterium as a novel Streptococcus species most closely related to S. acidominimus strain LGM (96.5%) and Streptococcus species strain Smarlab 3301444 (96.3%) and for which we propose the name S. azizii. PMID:26141443

  13. Meninges: from protective membrane to stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Decimo, Ilaria; Fumagalli, Guido; Berton, Valeria; Krampera, Mauro; Bifari, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Meninges are a three tissue membrane primarily known as coverings of the brain. More in depth studies on meningeal function and ultrastructure have recently changed the view of meninges as a merely protective membrane. Accurate evaluation of the anatomical distribution in the CNS reveals that meninges largely penetrate inside the neural tissue. Meninges enter the CNS by projecting between structures, in the stroma of choroid plexus and form the perivascular space (Virchow-Robin) of every parenchymal vessel. Thus, meninges may modulate most of the physiological and pathological events of the CNS throughout the life. Meninges are present since the very early embryonic stages of cortical development and appear to be necessary for normal corticogenesis and brain structures formation. In adulthood meninges contribute to neural tissue homeostasis by secreting several trophic factors including FGF2 and SDF-1. Recently, for the first time, we have identified the presence of a stem cell population with neural differentiation potential in meninges. In addition, we and other groups have further described the presence in meninges of injury responsive neural precursors. In this review we will give a comprehensive view of meninges and their multiple roles in the context of a functional network with the neural tissue. We will highlight the current literature on the developmental feature of meninges and their role in cortical development. Moreover, we will elucidate the anatomical distribution of the meninges and their trophic properties in adult CNS. Finally, we will emphasize recent evidences suggesting the potential role of meninges as stem cell niche harbouring endogenous precursors that can be activated by injury and are able to contribute to CNS parenchymal reaction. PMID:23671802

  14. Enterovirus meningitis in Brazil, 1998-2003.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Gina P L; Skraba, Irene; Oliveira, Denise; Lima, Ana A F; de Melo, Maria Mabel M; Kmetzsch, Claudete I; da Costa, Eliane V; da Silva, Edson E

    2006-01-01

    Acute viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as acute flaccid paralysis, meningitis, and encephalitis, are responsible for a high morbidity, particularly in children. Non-Polio enteroviruses (NPEV) are known to be responsible for over 80% of viral meningitis in which the etiologic agent is identified. In the present study, we show the frequency of enterovirus meningitis in Brazil from December 1998 to December 2003. Enterovirus were isolated from 162 (15.8%), of a total of 1,022 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens analyzed. Echovirus 30 was identified in 139 of these isolates (139/162-85.2%). Other identified enteroviruses were: Coxsackievirus B5 (3.7%), Echovirus 13 (3.7%), Echovirus 18 (3%), Echovirus 6 (1.2%), Echovirus 25 (1.2%), Echovirus 1 (0.6%), and Echovirus 4 (0.6%). Patients's age ranged from 28 days to 68 years old. The most frequent symptoms were fever (77%), headache (69.5%), vomiting (71.3%), neck stiffness (41.3%), convulsion (7.1%), and diarrhea (3.7%). Although, the majority of the patients recovered without any complication or permanent squeal, five deaths occurred. Throughout the surveillance period, five viral meningitis outbreaks were confirmed: four in the Southern Brazil and one in the Northeast Brazil. Echovirus 30 was responsible for four out of the five outbreaks while Echovirus 13 caused the fifth one. Besides the outbreaks, 734 sporadic cases were also identified during the study period and 59 of these were positive for virus isolation (8%). Echovirus 30 accounted for 70% of the isolates. Our results showed that Echovirus 30 was the most prevalent etiological agent of viral meningitis in Brazil, causing both outbreaks and sporadic cases. PMID:16299728

  15. Streptococcus iniae vaccine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcus iniae is among the most important emergent pathogens that affects many fish species worldwide, especially in warm-water regions. In marine and freshwater systems, this Gram-positive bacterium causes significant economic losses, estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Inf...

  16. Phenotypic differentiation of Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus, and Streptococcus anginosus strains within the "Streptococcus milleri group".

    PubMed Central

    Whiley, R A; Fraser, H; Hardie, J M; Beighton, D

    1990-01-01

    A biochemical scheme was developed by which strains of Streptococcus constellatus, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus anginosus can reliably be distinguished from within the "Streptococcus milleri group." Strains identified as S. intermedius were differentiated by the ability to produce detectable levels of alpha-glucosidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-D-fucosidase, beta-N-acetylgalactosaminidase, beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase, and sialidase with 4-methylumbelliferyl-linked fluorogenic substrates in microdilution trays after 3 h of incubation at 37 degrees C, together with the production of hyaluronidase. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were differentiated by the production of alpha-glucosidase and hyaluronidase by the former and the production of beta-glucosidase by the latter. The majority of strains of the S. milleri group obtained from dental plaque were identified as S. intermedius, as were most strains isolated from abscesses of the brain and liver. Strains of S. constellatus and S. anginosus were from a wider variety of infections, both oral and nonoral, than were strains of S. intermedius, with the majority of strains from urogenital infections being identified as S. anginosus. PMID:2380375

  17. Pneumococcal meningitis is promoted by single cocci expressing pilus adhesin RrgA.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Federico; Hammarlöf, Disa L; Garriss, Genevieve; Brovall, Sarah; Nannapaneni, Priyanka; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the primary cause of bacterial meningitis. Pneumococcal bacteria penetrates the blood-brain barrier (BBB), but the bacterial factors that enable this process are not known. Here, we determined that expression of pneumococcal pilus-1, which includes the pilus adhesin RrgA, promotes bacterial penetration through the BBB in a mouse model. S. pneumoniae that colonized the respiratory epithelium and grew in the bloodstream were chains of variable lengths; however, the pneumococci that entered the brain were division-competent, spherical, single cocci that expressed adhesive RrgA-containing pili. The cell division protein DivIVA, which is required for an ovoid shape, was localized at the poles and septum of pneumococcal chains of ovoid, nonseparated bacteria, but was absent in spherical, single cocci. In the bloodstream, a small percentage of pneumococci appeared as piliated, RrgA-expressing, DivIVA-negative single cocci, suggesting that only a minority of S. pneumoniae are poised to cross the BBB. Together, our data indicate that small bacterial cell size, which is signified by the absence of DivIVA, and the presence of an adhesive RrgA-containing pilus-1 mediate pneumococcal passage from the bloodstream through the BBB into the brain to cause lethal meningitis. PMID:27348589

  18. Epistaxis as the only initial symptom in pediatric naso-orbital-ethmoid fracture complicated with meningitis.

    PubMed

    Chou, Erh-Kang; Wu, Chao-I; Yu, Jack Chung-Kai; Chang, Sophia Chia-Ning

    2009-05-01

    Epistaxis is a frequent finding in patients with facial trauma. Herein, we report an unusual presentation of pediatric naso-orbital-ethmoid (NOE) fracture with epistaxis as the only initial symptom. The course of the patient's condition was later complicated by meningitis, related in part to the delay in diagnosis. A 3-year-old girl with preexisting upper respiratory symptoms was involved in a traffic accident, sustaining blunt trauma to the right side of her face. During the initial examination, only right-sided epistaxis was noted. Five days later, she developed febrile convulsion and was admitted to the intensive care unit with other signs of meningitis such as mental status change and neck stiffness. Her craniofacial computed tomographic scan showed a right-sided NOE fracture with minimal displacement and without dura tear. The cerebrospinal fluid culture grew Streptococcus pneumoniae, which may be due to ascending infection as a result of cribriform plate fracture. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was initiated with good response, and she was discharged from the hospital after 2 weeks. The presence of epistaxis and periorbital bruise, together with other symptoms and signs, helps in the identification of NOE and cribriform plate fracture. A high index of suspicion with repetitive computed tomographic scans is necessary to achieve correct early diagnosis. Parental antibiotic therapy is indicated if ascending cerebrospinal fluid infection develops. PMID:19461340

  19. Inhibition of Hippocampal Regeneration by Adjuvant Dexamethasone in Experimental Infant Rat Pneumococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Bally, Lia; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis (PM) causes neurological sequelae in up to half of surviving patients. Neuronal damage associated with poor outcome is largely mediated by the inflammatory host response. Dexamethasone (DXM) is used as an adjuvant therapy in adult PM, but its efficacy in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis in children is controversially discussed. While DXM has previously been shown to enhance hippocampal apoptosis in experimental PM, its impact on hippocampal cell proliferation is not known. This study investigated the impact of DXM on hippocampal proliferation in infant rat PM. Eleven-day-old nursing Wistar rats (n = 90) were intracisternally infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae to induce experimental meningitis. Treatment with DXM or vehicle was started 18 h after infection, concomitantly with antibiotics (ceftriaxone 100 mg/kg of body weight twice a day [b.i.d.]). Clinical parameters were monitored, and the amount of cells with proliferating activity was assessed using in vivo incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and an in vitro neurosphere culture system at 3 and 4 d postinfection. DXM significantly worsened weight loss and survival. Density of BrdU-positive cells, as an index of cells with proliferating activity, was significantly lower in DXM-treated animals compared to vehicle controls (P < 0.0001). In parallel, DXM reduced neurosphere formation as an index for stem/progenitor cell density compared to vehicle treatment (P = 0.01). Our findings provide clear evidence that DXM exerts an antiproliferative effect on the hippocampus in infant rat PM. We conclude that an impairment of regenerative hippocampal capacity should be taken into account when considering adjuvant DXM in the therapeutic regimen for PM in children. PMID:26824948

  20. Effect of dexamethasone on the efficacy of daptomycin in the therapy of experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Vivas, M; Force, E; Tubau, F; El Haj, C; Ariza, J; Cabellos, C

    2015-07-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of dexamethasone in combination with low-dose or high-dose daptomycin for the treatment of penicillin- and cephalosporin-resistant pneumococcal meningitis. Efficacy (ΔCFU/mL) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of daptomycin at 15mg/kg and 25mg/kg were studied in a rabbit model of pneumococcal meningitis, comparing them with the same doses in combination with dexamethasone at 0.125mg/kg every 12h over a 26-h period against two different Streptococcus pneumoniae strains, HUB 2349 and ATCC 51916 with daptomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 0.09mg/L and 0.19mg/L, respectively. Daptomycin levels in CSF were lower when dexamethasone was given concurrently. Against strain HUB 2349, therapeutic failure occurred with daptomycin 15mg/kg+dexamethasone; daptomycin 25mg/kg+dexamethasone was better at reducing bacterial counts than the lower dose throughout treatment. Against the highly cephalosporin-resistant ATCC 51916 strain, daptomycin 15mg/kg+dexamethasone achieved a lower bacterial decrease than daptomycin 15mg/kg alone, and therapeutic failure at 24h occurred in the daptomycin 15mg/kg+dexamethasone group. Addition of dexamethasone to a 25mg/kg daptomycin dose did not affect the efficacy of daptomycin: it remained bactericidal throughout treatment. In conclusion, against the studied strains, low-dose (15mg/kg/day) daptomycin is affected by concomitant use of dexamethasone: CSF levels are reduced and its bacterial efficacy is affected. At a higher daptomycin dose (25mg/kg/day), however, the use of dexamethasone does not alter efficacy; the combination appears to be a good choice for the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:25813395

  1. The Mood-Stabilizer Lithium Prevents Hippocampal Apoptosis and Improves Spatial Memory in Experimental Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Liechti, Fabian D.; Stüdle, Nicolas; Theurillat, Regula; Grandgirard, Denis; Thormann, Wolfgang; Leib, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Brain damage caused by this disease is characterized by apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, a morphological correlate of learning deficits in experimental paradigms. The mood stabilizer lithium has previously been found to attenuate brain damage in ischemic and inflammatory diseases of the brain. An infant rat model of pneumococcal meningitis was used to investigate the neuroprotective and neuroregenerative potential of lithium. To assess an effect on the acute disease, LiCl was administered starting five days prior to intracisternal infection with live Streptococcus pneumoniae. Clinical parameters were recorded, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled, and the animals were sacrificed 42 hours after infection to harvest the brain and serum. Cryosections of the brains were stained for Nissl substance to quantify brain injury. Hippocampal gene expression of Bcl-2, Bax, p53, and BDNF was analyzed. Lithium concentrations were measured in serum and CSF. The effect of chronic lithium treatment on spatial memory function and cell survival in the dentate gyrus was evaluated in a Morris water maze and by quantification of BrdU incorporation after LiCl treatment during 3 weeks following infection. In the hippocampus, LiCl significantly reduced apoptosis and gene expression of Bax and p53 while it increased expression of Bcl-2. IL-10, MCP-1, and TNF were significantly increased in animals treated with LiCl compared to NaCl. Chronic LiCl treatment improved spatial memory in infected animals. The mood stabilizer lithium may thus be a therapeutic alternative to attenuate neurofunctional deficits as a result of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:25409333

  2. Determination of bacterial meningitis: a retrospective study of 80 cerebrospinal fluid specimens evaluated by four in vitro methods.

    PubMed Central

    Wasilauskas, B L; Hampton, K D

    1982-01-01

    A total of 80 cerebrospinal fluid specimens were analyzed for bacterial meningitis by four procedures readily available to most laboratories. These tests included routine culturing. Gram staining, countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis, staphylococcal coagglutination (CoA) with laboratory-prepared reagents, and CoA with Pharmacia Diagnostics reagents. A total of 56 specimens were positive for bacterial agents by routine culturing: Gram stain results were positive for 64% of all specimens positive by culturing. For 36 specimens from patients with suspected meningitis due to either Haemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, or group B streptococci, detection was 97% with Pharmacia CoA reagents, 94% with laboratory-prepared CoA reagents, 89% with routine culturing, 78% with countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis, and 75% with Gram staining. One specimen which contained Klebsiella pneumoniae was false positive for S. pneumoniae in tests with both of the CoA reagents and in countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis. A Gram stain of this specimen clearly showed gram-negative bacilli, which were confirmed by culturing. Although a positive culture and a positive Gram stain are definitive evidence of bacterial meningitis, rapid immunological tests can provide valuable clinical information as an adjunct to culture and Gram stain results. Serological tests with Pharmacia CoA reagents produced more positive results than either laboratory-prepared CoA reagents or countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis. PMID:6752193

  3. Modulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 regulatory protein 2 (Faim2) in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis. PMID:24335530

  4. Streptococcus suis infection in swine. A sixteen month study.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R; Gottschalk, M; Mittal, K R; Beaudoin, M

    1990-01-01

    A total of 349 isolates of Streptococcus suis retrieved from different tissues from diseased pigs were examined in this study. Only 48% of them could be categorized as one of serotypes 1 to 8 and 1/2. Among typable isolates, serotype 2 was the most prevalent (23%), followed by serotype 3 (10%). The majority of all isolates originated from lungs, meninges/brain, and multiple tissues. Forty-one percent of typable isolates and 33% of untypable isolates were retrieved in pure culture. Other isolates were found in conjunction with Pasteurella multocida, Escherichia coli, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Actinomyces pyogenes, and other streptococci. Typable S. suis isolates were more frequently isolated from pigs between five and ten weeks of age, while untypable isolates were mostly found in animals aged more than 24 weeks. No obvious monthly and/or seasonal variation of the prevalence of isolation of S. suis could be detected. PMID:2306668

  5. Structural and Functional Analysis of Cell Wall-anchored Polypeptide Adhesin BspA in Streptococcus agalactiae.

    PubMed

    Rego, Sara; Heal, Timothy J; Pidwill, Grace R; Till, Marisa; Robson, Alice; Lamont, Richard J; Sessions, Richard B; Jenkinson, Howard F; Race, Paul R; Nobbs, Angela H

    2016-07-29

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus, GBS) is the predominant cause of early-onset infectious disease in neonates and is responsible for life-threatening infections in elderly and immunocompromised individuals. Clinical manifestations of GBS infection include sepsis, pneumonia, and meningitis. Here, we describe BspA, a deviant antigen I/II family polypeptide that confers adhesive properties linked to pathogenesis in GBS. Heterologous expression of BspA on the surface of the non-adherent bacterium Lactococcus lactis confers adherence to scavenger receptor gp340, human vaginal epithelium, and to the fungus Candida albicans Complementary crystallographic and biophysical characterization of BspA reveal a novel β-sandwich adhesion domain and unique asparagine-dependent super-helical stalk. Collectively, these findings establish a new bacterial adhesin structure that has in effect been hijacked by a pathogenic Streptococcus species to provide competitive advantage in human mucosal infections. PMID:27311712

  6. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Chuan T.; Burrell, Louise M.; Johnson, Douglas F.

    2016-01-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  7. An unusual presentation of carcinomatous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Foo, Chuan T; Burrell, Louise M; Johnson, Douglas F

    2016-08-01

    A 67-year old previously well male presented with a 1 week history of confusion on a background of 3 weeks of headache. Past history included two superficial melanomas excised 5 years ago. Treatment for meningoencephalitis was commenced based on lumbar puncture (LP) and non-contrast brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. Lack of a clinical response to antibiotics resulted in a second LP and contrast brain MRI which demonstrated hydrocephalus and leptomeningeal disease. Ongoing deterioration led to a whole-body computed tomographic and spinal MRI that showed widespread metastatic disease and extensive leptomeningeal involvement of the spinal cord. The diagnosis of metastatic melanoma with carcinomatous meningitis was made based on cytological analysis of cerebrospinal fluid. He died 2 weeks later in a palliative care facility. This case illustrates that the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis can be difficult to make as the heterogeneous nature of its presentation often delays the diagnosis. PMID:27574561

  8. Meningitis C vaccine (North American vaccine).

    PubMed

    Lattanzi, Maria; Del Giudice, Giuseppe

    2002-01-01

    North American Vaccine Inc (NAVI) has launched a conjugate polysaccharide vaccinefor the prevention of meningitis caused by group C meningococcal bacteria [433475]. The vaccine is based upon conjugate technology, incorporating the serogroup C polysaccharide (CPS) of all three major serogroups. Antibody-dependent, complement-mediated activity was demonstrated in mice and non-human primates, with no detectable adverse effects [277193]. Approval was filed for in the UK in January 2000 [353305]. In July 2000, Baxter received approval for NeisVac-C in the UK, and by September 2000 the vaccine was expected to be incorporated into the NHS's immunization campaign against meningitis C [381225]. NeisVac-C will initially appear labeled from NAVI; Baxter completed its acquisition of NAVI in June 2000 [375389]. Baxter estimates the worldwide global market for the vaccine at US $600 million per year [376204]. PMID:12054072

  9. Neurosyphilis: An Unresolved Case of Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Shagufta; Burrascano, Joesph

    2015-01-01

    Neurosyphilis can cause both symptomatic and asymptomatic meningitis. However the epidemiology of modern neurosyphilis is not well defined because of the paucity of population-based data. The majority of neurosyphilis cases have been reported in HIV-infected patients. Here we present a case of early neurosyphilis/symptomatic syphilitic meningitis in a non-HIV patient who presented with rash but was mistakenly treated for early latent or secondary syphilis. Syphilis presenting with a skin rash and an extremely high RPR titer could indicate CNS infection rather than simply secondary syphilis because rash is a nonspecific manifestation of disseminated infection. Given the effectiveness of penicillin therapy, why is the rate of syphilis continuing to increase? Is it due to a failure of prevention or could it be also because of failure to diagnose and treat syphilis adequately, as in this case? PMID:26075118

  10. Cryptococcal meningitis: epidemiology and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Derek J; Parris, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis causes morbidity and mortality worldwide. The burden of disease is greatest in middle- and low-income countries with a high incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Patients taking immunosuppressive drugs and some immunocompetent hosts are also at risk. Treatment of cryptococcal meningitis consists of three phases: induction, consolidation, and maintenance. Effective induction therapy requires potent fungicidal drugs (amphotericin B and flucytosine), which are often unavailable in low-resource, high-endemicity settings. As a consequence, mortality is unacceptably high. Wider access to effective treatment is urgently required to improve outcomes. For human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, judicious management of asymptomatic cryptococcal antigenemia and appropriately timed introduction of antiretroviral therapy are important. PMID:24872723

  11. Cognitive impairment in adults with good recovery after bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    van de Beek, Diederik; Schmand, Ben; de Gans, Jan; Weisfelt, Martijn; Vaessen, Heleen; Dankert, Jacob; Vermeulen, Marinus

    2002-10-01

    Adults without neurologic sequelae after bacterial meningitis are supposed to live without restrictions. Neuropsychological outcome was assessed in 51 adults from a prospective cohort with good recovery, defined as Glasgow Outcome Scale score 5, after pneumococcal or meningococcal meningitis. Patients who recovered well after pneumococcal meningitis showed cognitive slowness (P=.001). A cognitive disorder was found in 27% of these patients. Patients who previously had meningococcal meningitis were not significantly different from control subjects. Scores on general health and quality of life questionnaires revealed lower scores for patients with meningitis, which were related to cognitive slowing (R, -0.46 to -0.38). In conclusion, adults surviving pneumococcal meningitis were at significant risk of neuropsychological abnormalities, even if they were clinically well recovered. PMID:12232850

  12. Cryptococcal meningitis in a patient with sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Maeghan

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a multisystem granulomatous disease characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas. Case reports have previously described an association between sarcoidosis and cryptococcal infection, but many of these patients were receiving immunosuppression at the time of diagnosis or had limited cutaneous disease. We report a case of cryptococcal meningitis in a 65-year-old man with a new presentation of sarcoidosis who was not receiving immunosuppressive medications. PMID:27034573

  13. Testing for Meningitis in Children with Bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Stefanski, Michael; Williams, Ronald; McSherry, George; Geskey, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Viral bronchiolitis accounts for almost 20% of all-cause hospitalizations of infants (ie, children younger than age 1 year). The annual incidence of fever in viral bronchiolitis has been documented at 23% to 31%. However the incidence of concurrent serious bacterial infections is low (1%–7%), with meningitis occurring in less than 1% to 2% of cases, but lumbar puncture is performed in up to 9% of viral bronchiolitis cases. To our knowledge, no study has examined clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. We present a retrospective, case-control study of hospitalized infants younger than one year diagnosed with viral bronchiolitis who underwent lumbar puncture as part of an evaluation for meningitis. The objective of the study was to determine clinical factors that influence a physician’s decision to perform a lumbar puncture in the setting of viral bronchiolitis. Although the presence of apnea, cyanosis, meningeal signs, positive urine culture results, and young age were factors found to be preliminarily associated with the performance of a lumbar puncture in the setting of bronchiolitis, young age was the only significant clinical factor found after multivariable regression; no other demographic, clinical, laboratory, or radiologic variables were found to be significant. PMID:25662522

  14. Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Chang, W N; Lu, C H; Huang, C R; Chuang, Y C

    2000-01-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis in adults is an extremely rare infection of the central nervous system (CNS). Here we report one adult case of this rare CNS infection and review the clinical data of another seven cases reported in the English language literature. In total, eight patients (six men and two women) aged between 19 and 63 years were studied. The causative pathogen in our patient was Acinetobacter baumannii; in the other reported cases they were most likely Acinetobacter Iwoffii, Acinetobacter johnsonii, Acinetobacter junii, a genomic species 3 or 6. No underlying disease was found in seven of the eight cases and six of the eight patients acquired the infections before the age of 30 years. Fever and consciousness disturbance were the most common clinical manifestations. Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome (WFS) was found in two cases. Unlike the Acinetobacter strains found in nosocomial infections, the strain of Acinetobacter meningitis in the community-acquired case did not show multiple antibiotic resistance. Most adult patients with community-acquired Acinetobacter meningitis can be saved by timely therapy with appropriate antibiotics before deterioration of the systemic condition and impairment of consciousness. PMID:11139162

  15. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infections of children in central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Ma, J S; Chen, P Y; Chi, C S; Lin, J F; Lau, Y J

    2000-09-01

    We carried out a retrospective study on childhood invasive pneumococcal infections (IPI) diagnosed from the January 1990 through the April 2000 at a medical center in central Taiwan. Their clinical features, outcome of the patients and the resistance patterns of the isolates were analyzed. A total of 95 clinical isolates from 72 patients younger than 14 years of age were included in this study. Of these 72 patients, 51 had bacteremia, 28 meningitis, 14 bacteremic pneumonia, 12 pleural empyema, eight otitis media, four arthritis, three sinusitis, two periorbital abscesses, one deep neck infection, one psoas muscle abscess, one peritonitis, one urinary tract infection, and one cutaneous infection. Ancillary diagnostic tests, including Gram stain smears and latex agglutination tests, were applied and the sensitivities were 86.2% and 54.3%, respectively. The prevalence rate of penicillin nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae has increased dramatically since 1995 in central Taiwan, with rates of 5.6% and 74.1% before and after 1995, and the overall mortality rate was 20.8% and 53.3% respectively. Ten of 19 children (52.6%) with pneumococcal meningitis who survived had long-term sequelae. PMID:11045380

  16. Streptococcus suis Type 2 Infection in Swine in Ontario: A Review of Clinical and Pathological Presentations

    PubMed Central

    John, V.S. St.; Wilcock, B.; Kierstead, M.

    1982-01-01

    Over an 18 month period Streptococcus suis type 2 was isolated in pure or mixed culture in 19 disease outbreaks in pigs. Morbidity and case fatality were variable. Clinical signs were of a nervous or respiratory disease or of death with no premonitory signs. Gross and microscopic findings included one or more of fibrinous polyserositis, fibrinous or hemmorhagic bronchopneumonia, purulent meningitis, myocardial necrosis, focal myocarditis and valvular endocarditis. Brain, cerebrospinal fluid and lung were most reliable sites for isolation of the organism. PMID:17422123

  17. From Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa to the Meningitis Vaccine Project

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, M. Teresa; Jodar, Luis; Granoff, Dan; Rabinovich, Regina; Ceccarini, Costante; Perkin, Gordon W.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Polysaccharide vaccines had been used to control African meningitis epidemics for >30 years but with little or modest success, largely because of logistical problems in the implementation of reactive vaccination campaigns that are begun after epidemics are under way. After the major group A meningococcal meningitis epidemics in 1996–1997 (250 000 cases and 25 000 deaths), African ministers of health declared the prevention of meningitis a high priority and asked the World Health Organization (WHO) for help in developing better immunization strategies to eliminate meningitis epidemics in Africa. Methods. WHO accepted the challenge and created a project called Epidemic Meningitis Vaccines for Africa (EVA) that served as an organizational framework for external consultants, PATH, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF). Consultations were initiated with major vaccine manufacturers. EVA commissioned a costing study/business plan for the development of new group A or A/C conjugate vaccines and explored the feasibility of developing these products as a public–private partnership. Representatives from African countries were consulted. They confirmed that the development of conjugate vaccines was a priority and provided information on preferred product characteristics. In parallel, a strategy for successful introduction was also anticipated and discussed. Results. The expert consultations recommended that a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine be developed and introduced into the African meningitis belt. The results of the costing study indicated that the “cost of goods” to develop a group A – containing conjugate vaccine in the United States would be in the range of US$0.35–$1.35 per dose, depending on composition (A vs A/C), number of doses/vials, and presentation. Following an invitation from BMGF, a proposal was submitted in the spring of 2001. Conclusions. In June 2001

  18. Lack of Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-6 or Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-1 Results in a Failure of the Innate Immune Response after Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Lea-Jessica; Tauber, Simone C.; Merres, Julika; Kress, Eugenia; Stope, Matthias B.; Jansen, Sandra; Pufe, Thomas; Brandenburg, Lars-Ove

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent pathogen that causes bacterial meningitis is the Gram-positive bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae. By entering the brain, host cells will be activated and proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are released. The goal of the current study was to examine the interaction between IL-6 and TNFR1 as receptor for TNF-α and the innate immune response in vivo in a model of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced meningitis. For the experiments IL-6−/−, TNFR1−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− KO mice were used. Our results revealed higher mortality rates and bacterial burden after infection in TNFR1−/−, IL-6−/−, and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice and a decreased immune response including lower neutrophil infiltration in the meninges of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice in contrast to IL-6−/− and wild type mice. Furthermore, the increased mortality of TNFR1−/− and TNFR1-IL-6−/− mice correlated with decreased glial cell activation compared to IL-6−/− or wild type mice after pneumococcal meningitis. Altogether, the results show the importance of TNFR1 and IL-6 in the regulation of the innate immune response. The lack of TNFR1 and IL-6 results in higher mortality by weakened immune defence, whereas the lack of TNFR1 results in more severe impairment of the innate immune response than the lack of IL-6 alone. PMID:27057100

  19. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  20. Abducens Nerve Palsy and Meningitis by Rickettsia typhi

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Wai Lun; Ooi, Say Tat

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rickettsial infection may present with encephalitis or meningitis but neurologic involvement is rare in murine typhus. Here, we report two patients with Rickettsia typhi meningitis who presented with cranial neuropathy, presumably caused by two distinct disease processes. Recognition of the disease manifestations is important because rickettsial infections are potentially associated with significant morbidity. Simple effective treatments are available. PMID:25548377

  1. Meningitis in a College Student in Connecticut, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Lynn E.; Gupta, Shaili; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Hadler, James L.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe a case of aseptic meningitis in a college student that was ultimately attributed to infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The authors also provide a review of LCMV infection, epidemiology, and public health implications. Providers should be aware of LCMV as a cause of meningitis in college students,…

  2. Quantitative proteomics for identifying biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous meningitis is a frequent extrapulmonary disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and is associated with high mortality rates and severe neurological sequelae. In an earlier study employing DNA microarrays, we had identified genes that were differentially expressed at the transcript level in human brain tissue from cases of tuberculous meningitis. In the current study, we used a quantitative proteomics approach to discover protein biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. Methods To compare brain tissues from confirmed cased of tuberculous meningitis with uninfected brain tissue, we carried out quantitative protein expression profiling using iTRAQ labeling and LC-MS/MS analysis of SCX fractionated peptides on Agilent’s accurate mass QTOF mass spectrometer. Results and conclusions Through this approach, we identified both known and novel differentially regulated molecules. Those described previously included signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPA) and protein disulfide isomerase family A, member 6 (PDIA6), which have been shown to be overexpressed at the mRNA level in tuberculous meningitis. The novel overexpressed proteins identified in our study included amphiphysin (AMPH) and neurofascin (NFASC) while ferritin light chain (FTL) was found to be downregulated in TBM. We validated amphiphysin, neurofascin and ferritin light chain using immunohistochemistry which confirmed their differential expression in tuberculous meningitis. Overall, our data provides insights into the host response in tuberculous meningitis at the molecular level in addition to providing candidate diagnostic biomarkers for tuberculous meningitis. PMID:23198679

  3. Meningococcal meningitis C in Tamil Nadu, public health perspectives.

    PubMed

    David, Kirubah Vasandhi; Pricilla, Ruby Angeline; Thomas, Beeson

    2014-01-01

    Meningococcal meningitis has rarely been reported in Tamil Nadu. We report here two children diagnosed with meningococcal meningitis in Vellore, Tamil Nadu, on May 2014. The causative strain was Neisseria meningitidis serotype C. The role of the primary care physician in early diagnosis, appropriate referral, and preventive measures of this disease to the immediate family and community is stressed. PMID:25657960

  4. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving. PMID:24750320

  5. Phospholipids of Streptococcus faecalis

    PubMed Central

    Mota, J. M. dos Santos; Den Kamp, J. A. F. Op; Verheij, H. M.; Van Deenen, L. L. M.

    1970-01-01

    Autoradiograms of total lipid extracts from Streptococcus faecalis ATCC 9790, harvested in the stationary phase from a medium containing 32P-orthophosphate, showed six major spots. The corresponding compounds were identified as diphosphatidylglycerol (possibly with a penta acyl structure); phosphatidylglycerol; a provisionally identified mixture of alanylphosphatidylglycerol and of the 2′-lysyl-derivative of phosphatidylglycerol; the 3′-lysyl-derivative of phosphatidylglycerol, probably together with some arginylphosphatidylglycerol; a diglucosyl derivative of phosphatidylglycerol; and a compound which was tentatively identified as the 2′,3′-dilysyl derivative of phosphatidylglycerol. Images PMID:4321329

  6. Meningeal Melanocytes in the Mouse: Distribution and Dependence on Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Gudjohnsen, Stefán A. H.; Atacho, Diahann A. M.; Gesbert, Franck; Raposo, Graca; Hurbain, Ilse; Larue, Lionel; Steingrimsson, Eirikur; Petersen, Petur Henry

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Melanocytes are pigment producing cells derived from the neural crest. They are primarily found in the skin and hair follicles, but can also be found in other tissues including the eye, ear and heart. Here, we describe the distribution of pigmented cells in C57BL/6J mouse meninges, the membranes that envelope the brain. These cells contain melanosomes of all four stages of development and they depend on Microphthalmia associated transcription factor (MITF), the master regulator of melanocyte development, suggesting that they are bona-fide melanocytes. The location of these pigmented cells is consistent with the location of meningeal melanomas in humans and animal models. Significance: Here, we document and define pigmented cells in the meninges of the mouse brain and confirm that they are melanocytes. This is important for understanding the role of this cell type and for understanding primary meningeal melanoma, a rare disease that likely arises from normal meningeal melanocytes. PMID:26635543

  7. Brain Abscesses Complicating Acute Pneumococcal Meningitis During Etanercept Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kasirye, Yusuf; Epperla, Narendranath; Manne, Janaki Ram; Bapani, Sowjanya; Garcia-Montilla, Romel J

    2012-01-01

    Brain abscess formation as a sequelae of community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis is extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all meningitis complications. Although metastatic seeding from a distal peripheral septic focus has been observed, this phenomenon most commonly occurs in the context of ear, nose and throat infections, post-cranial neurosurgical procedures, traumatic open cranial injury, or immunosuppression. We present the case of a man, 61 years old, on etanercept therapy for ankylosing spondylitis who developed multiple brain abscesses as a complication of pneumococcal meningitis. We believe that the predisposition to this extremely rare complication of a particularly aggressive pneumococcal meningitis was most likely due to the underlying immunosuppression resulting from etanercept therapy. As far as we know, this case is the first report linking multiple brain abscess formation in a patient with community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis with etanercept therapy. PMID:22634540

  8. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-gamma is an important driver of neuropathology and behavioural sequelae in experimental pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Too, L K; Ball, Helen J; McGregor, Iain S; Hunt, Nicholas H

    2014-08-01

    Interferon-gamma is known to play a complex modulatory role in immune defence during microbial infections. Its actions in pneumococcal meningitis, however, remain ill-defined. Here, a pathological role for IFN-γ was demonstrated using a murine model of pneumococcal meningitis, in that C57BL/6J mice deficient in this pro-inflammatory cytokine (IFN-γ(-/-)) showed less severe acute and long-term neuropathology following intracerebral challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The absence of IFN-γ significantly lengthened the survival of mice that otherwise would have developed fatal clinical signs within two days of CNS infection. Compared to their wild-type counterparts, IFN-γ(-/-) mice showed a diminished inflammatory response (attenuated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cerebrospinal fluid) and milder brain pathologies (less BBB permeability to protein and brain haemorrhage) during the acute phase of disease. Following a full regime of antibiotic treatment, we found substantial brain injuries in the wild-type mice 10days after infection. IFN-γ(-/-) mice, however, showed decreased neuronal damage in both hippocampus and cortex. In the longer term (≈10weeks p.i.), the wild-type mice that had survived meningitis due to antibiotic treatment had neurobehavioural abnormalities including diurnal hypoactivity, nocturnal hyperactivity and impaired performance in a discrimination reversal task. IFN-γ(-/-) mice, concomitantly tested in the automated IntelliCage platform, had reduced behavioural and cognitive disorders compared to wild-type mice. Both IFN-γ(-/-) and wild-type survivors of pneumococcal meningitis showed impaired working memory in the IntelliCage-based complex patrolling task. These observations indicate an association between IFN-γ-driven acute brain pathology and the long-term neurological sequelae resulting from pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:24607660

  9. Severe Cysticercal Meningitis: Clinical and Imaging Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Graciela; Jung, Helgi; Ríos, Camilo; Fleury, Agnes; Soto-Hernández, José Luís

    2010-01-01

    In disease-endemic areas, severe cysticercal meningitis (SCM) is characterized by intense inflammatory cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and negative bacterial and fungal cultures. There have been no systematic studies of SCM. We characterized patients with SCM and compare them with neurocysticercosis (NC) patients with mild CSF abnormalities by conducting a nine-year retrospective review at a neurological referral center. Two groups of patients were compared: group A, those with severe CSF pleocytosis > 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 12), and group B, those with CSF pleocytosis ≤ 1,000 cells/mm3 (n = 126). All patients had positive CSF results in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for cysticercal antigens and negative CSF cultures for bacteria, fungi, and mycobacteria. Intracranial hypertension, meningeal signs, CSF hypoglycorrachia, and a longer clinical course of NC were more frequently seen in group A. It is likely that SCM often goes unrecognized. Its correct identification may reduce morbidity and risks of unnecessary surgery in patients with chronic NC and CSF shunts. PMID:20065006

  10. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  11. Identification of Streptococcus bovis and Streptococcus salivarius in clinical laboratories.

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, K L; Ferraro, M J; Holden, J; Kunz, L J

    1984-01-01

    Streptococci identified as Streptococcus bovis, S. bovis variant, and Streptococcus salivarius were examined with respect to physiological and serological characteristics and cellular fatty acid content. Similarities in physiological reactions and problems encountered in serological analysis were noted, suggesting that an expanded battery of physiological tests is needed to definitively identify these streptococci. Cellular fatty acid analysis provided an accurate method for distinguishing S. salivarius from S. bovis and S. bovis variant. PMID:6490816

  12. Genetic Manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (The Group A Streptococcus, GAS)

    PubMed Central

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S.

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  13. Genetic manipulation of Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS).

    PubMed

    Le Breton, Yoann; McIver, Kevin S

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (the Group A Streptococcus, GAS) is a Gram-positive bacterium responsible for a wide spectrum of diseases ranging from mild superficial infections (pharyngitis, impetigo) to severe, often life-threatening invasive diseases (necrotizing fasciitis, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome) in humans. This unit describes molecular techniques for the genetic manipulation of S. pyogenes with detailed protocols for transformation, gene disruption, allelic exchange, transposon mutagenesis, and genetic complementation. PMID:24510894

  14. Epidemiology of Meningitis in an HIV-Infected Ugandan Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rajasingham, Radha; Rhein, Joshua; Klammer, Kate; Musubire, Abdu; Nabeta, Henry; Akampurira, Andrew; Mossel, Eric C.; Williams, Darlisha A.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Crabtree, Mary B.; Miller, Barry R.; Rolfes, Melissa A.; Tengsupakul, Supatida; Andama, Alfred O.; Meya, David B.; Boulware, David R.

    2015-01-01

    There is limited understanding of the epidemiology of meningitis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected populations in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-infected adults with suspected meningitis in Uganda, to comprehensively evaluate the etiologies of meningitis. Intensive cerebrospiral fluid (CSF) testing was performed to evaluate for bacterial, viral, fungal, and mycobacterial etiologies, including neurosyphilis,16s ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for bacteria, Plex-ID broad viral assay, quantitative-PCR for HSV-1/2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), and Toxoplasma gondii; reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) for Enteroviruses and arboviruses, and Xpert MTB/RIF assay. Cryptococcal meningitis accounted for 60% (188 of 314) of all causes of meningitis. Of 117 samples sent for viral PCR, 36% were EBV positive. Among cryptococcal antigen negative patients, the yield of Xpert MTB/RIF assay was 22% (8 of 36). After exclusion of cryptococcosis and bacterial meningitis, 61% (43 of 71) with an abnormal CSF profile had no definitive diagnosis. Exploration of new TB diagnostics and diagnostic algorithms for evaluation of meningitis in resource-limited settings remains needed, and implementation of cryptococcal diagnostics is critical. PMID:25385864

  15. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit. PMID:25861890

  16. Molecular epidemiology of group B streptococcal meningitis in children beyond the neonatal period from Angola.

    PubMed

    Florindo, Carlos; Gomes, João P; Rato, Márcia G; Bernardino, Luís; Spellerberg, Barbara; Santos-Sanches, Ilda; Borrego, Maria J

    2011-09-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a major pathogen of neonates and immunocompromised adults. Prior studies have demonstrated that, beyond the neonatal period, S. agalactiae rarely causes invasive infections in children. However, during 2004-2005, S. agalactiae was the causative agent of 60 meningitis episodes in children aged 3 months to 12 years from Angola. To identify and study the specific causative genetic lineages of S. agalactiae childhood meningitis, which lack characterization to date, we conducted an extensive molecular analysis of the recovered isolates (n = 21). This constitutes what we believe to be the first molecular study of the population structure of invasive S. agalactiae isolates from Africa. A low genetic diversity was observed among the isolates, where the majority belonged to clonal complex (CC) 17 presenting the capsular subtype III-2 (86 % of cases) and marked by the intron group II GBSi1, which has previously been observed to be associated with neonatal hosts. The predominance of single-locus variants of sequence type (ST) 17 suggested the local diversification of this hypervirulent clone, which displayed novel alleles of the fbsB and sip virulence genes. The absence of the scpB-lmb region in two S. agalactiae isolates with the Ia/ST23 genotype is more typical of cattle than human isolates. Globally, these data provide novel information about the enhanced invasiveness of the CC17 genetic lineage in older children and suggest the local diversification of this clone, which may be related to the future emergence of a novel epidemic clone in Angola. PMID:21474607

  17. [Streptococcus pyogenes pathogenic factors].

    PubMed

    Bidet, Ph; Bonacorsi, S

    2014-11-01

    The pathogenicity of ß-hemolytic group A streptococcus (GAS) is particularly diverse, ranging from mild infections, such as pharyngitis or impetigo, to potentially debilitating poststreptococcal diseases, and up to severe invasive infections such as necrotizing fasciitis or the dreaded streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. This variety of clinical expressions, often radically different in individuals infected with the same strain, results from a complex interaction between the bacterial virulence factors, the mode of infection and the immune system of the host. Advances in comparative genomics have led to a better understanding of how, following this confrontation, GAS adapts to the immune system's pressure, either peacefully by reducing the expression of certain virulence factors to achieve an asymptomatic carriage, or on the contrary, by overexpressing them disproportionately, resulting in the most severe forms of invasive infection. PMID:25456681

  18. Mutacins of Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Regianne Umeko; Taiete, Tiago; Gonçalves, Reginaldo Bruno

    2011-01-01

    The colonization and accumulation of Streptococcus mutans are influenced by various factors in the oral cavity, such as nutrition and hygiene conditions of the host, salivary components, cleaning power and salivary flow and characteristics related with microbial virulence factors. Among these virulence factors, the ability to synthesize glucan of adhesion, glucan-binding proteins, lactic acid and bacteriocins could modify the infection process and pathogenesis of this species in the dental biofilm. This review will describe the role of mutacins in transmission, colonization, and/or establishment of S. mutans, the major etiological agent of human dental caries. In addition, we will describe the method for detecting the production of these inhibitory substances in vitro (mutacin typing), classification and diversity of mutacins and the regulatory mechanisms related to its synthesis. PMID:24031748

  19. Neuropsychological sequelae of bacterial and viral meningitis.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, H; Heimann, B; Djukic, M; Mazurek, C; Fels, C; Wallesch, C-W; Nau, R

    2006-02-01

    Survivors of meningitis often complain about neurological and neuropsychological consequences. In this study, the extent of these sequelae was quantified and correlated to MRI findings. Neurological, neuropsychological and neuroradiological examinations were performed with adult patients younger than 70 years, 1-12 years after recovery from bacterial meningitis (BM; n = 59), or from viral meningitis (VM; n = 59). Patients with other potential causes for neuropsychological deficits (e.g. alcoholism) were carefully excluded. Patients were compared to 30 healthy subjects adjusted for age, gender and length of school education. With the exception of attention functions, both patient groups showed more frequently pathological results than the control group for all domains examined. Applying an overall cognitive sum score, patients after BM did not differ significantly in their performance from patients after VM. Separate analyses of various cognitive domains, however, revealed a higher rate of persistent disturbances in short-term and working memory after BM than after VM. Moreover, patients after BM exhibited greater impairment of executive functions. Associative learning of verbal material was also reduced. These deficits could not be ascribed to impaired alertness functions or decreased motivation in BM patients. Applying a logistic regression model, the neuropsychological outcome was related to the neurological outcome. Patients with a Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) of <5 had more frequently impaired test results for non-verbal learning and memory. GOS was also correlated with performance in executive functions. Brain volume was lower and ventricular volume was higher in the bacterial than in the VM group, and cerebral volume and the amount of white matter lesions of patients after BM were negatively correlated with short-term and working memory. In conclusion, patients after both BM and VM with favourable outcome showed affected learning and memory functions. More

  20. Ibuprofen-induced meningitis in mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M; Gray, R G

    1982-06-01

    A young Black woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) developed an aseptic meningitis after receiving ibuprofen. The meningeal reaction, reported infrequently in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and only once previously in MCTD, was characterized by a predominantly polymorphonuclear cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis and depression of CSF glucose. Reversible renal insufficiency also occurred. Features suggestive of a hypersensitivity reaction included pruritus, conjunctivitis, facial oedema, desquamation of the palms and soles, and subsequent near total alopecia. Meningeal signs responded rapidly to systemic corticosteroid therapy. Patients with MCTD as well as those with SLE may be at peculiar risk of developing this uncommon reaction to ibuprofen. PMID:6985377

  1. Intracranial meningeal chondrosarcoma--probable mesenchymal type.

    PubMed

    Rodda, R A; Franklin, C I

    1984-08-01

    A 12 year old girl with episodes of left hemiparesis for 9 months was found to have a large, partly calcified brain tumour which at craniotomy presented on the parasagittal and medial surfaces of the right frontal lobe. No dural or falx attachment could be found and naked eye removal of the tumour was achieved. At a second craniotomy 10 weeks later there was recurrent tumour attached to the falx and involving the sagittal sinus. She died 5 months later. Pathologically, almost all this malignant intracranial neoplasm comprised differentiated cartilaginous tumour. Although only a very small amount of undifferentiated mesenchymal tissue was found in the surgical material available for histological study, it is suggested the tumour can be regarded as a predominantly mature mesenchymal chondrosarcoma of the meninges. PMID:6593035

  2. Bacterial meningitis: a new risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Mehrabi-Tavana, Ali; Izadi, Morteza; Hosseini, Sayed Mohammad Javad; Ataee, Mohammad Hossein

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to discuss a possible new risk factor for the bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Cerebrospinal fluid collected from 270 patients was assayed. An enzyme immunosorbent assay for the detection of Staphylococcal enterotoxins A to E was used. RESULTS: The results indicated that the frequency of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (CoNS) was 35 (20.46%). An important finding of this research was that the CoNS isolates produced enterotoxin C and D or enterotoxin C and E. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of enterotoxin-producing Coagulase Negative Staphylococci isolated from CSF patients. Therefore, these enterotoxins probably act as risk factors in the bacterial invasion into central nervous system. PMID:22091233

  3. Specific detection of common pathogens of acute bacterial meningitis using an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Hamidreza; Ghaznavi-Rad, Ehsanollah; Mondanizadeh, Mahdieh; MirabSamiee, Siamak; Khansarinejad, Behzad

    2016-08-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis is critical for antimicrobial treatment of patients. Although PCR-based methods have been widely used for the diagnosis of acute meningitis caused by bacterial pathogens, the main disadvantage of these methods is their high cost. This disadvantage has hampered the widespread use of molecular assays in many developing countries. The application of multiplex assays and "in-house" protocols are two main approaches that can reduce the overall cost of a molecular test. In the present study, an internally controlled tetraplex-PCR was developed and validated for the specific detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. The analysis of a panel of other human pathogens showed no cross-reactivity in the assay. The analytical sensitivity of the in-house assay was 792.3 copies/ml, when all three bacteria were presentin the specimens. This value was calculated as 444.5, 283.7, 127.8 copies/ml when only S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis and H. influenzae, respectively, were present. To demonstrate the diagnostic performance of the assay, a total of 150 archival CSF samples were tested and compared with a commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit. A diagnostic sensitivity of 92.8% and a specificity of 95.1% were determined for the present tetraplex-PCR assay. The results indicate that the established method is sensitive, specific and cost-effective, and can be used particularly in situations where the high cost of commercial kits prevents the use of molecular methods for the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. PMID:27401970

  4. Use of Intrathecal Fluorescein in Recurrent Meningitis after Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Swati; Singh, Satinder; Sharma, Shalabh; Lahiri, Asish K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Congenital anomalies of the cochlea and labyrinth can be associated with meningitis and varying degrees of hearing loss or deafness. Despite antibiotics, meningitis remains a life threatening complication. Case Report: We report a case of recurrent meningitis following episodes of otitis media in a cochlear implantee child with bilateral vestibulocochlear malformation, due to fistula in the stapes footplate. Intrathecal fluorescin was used to identify the leak site. Conclusion: Recurrent meningitis can indicate for possible immunological or anatomical abnormalities as well for chronic parameningeal infections. Intraoperative use of intrathecal fluorescin is an ideal investigative tool to demonstrate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak site in patients in whom other investigations fail to do so. PMID:27429952

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid "leaks" and meningitis following acoustic tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Hughes, G B; Glasscock, M E; Hays, J W; Jackson, C G; Sismanis, A

    1982-01-01

    We reviewed 271 intracanalicular and cerebellopontine angle lesions removed over the past ten years, 237 by the translabyrinthine or combined approach which created a mastoid defect. The patients were divided into three groups with the following results: (1) obliteration of the mastoid defect combined with older wound closure techniques in the first 188 patients produced CSF leakage in 25% and meningitis in 16% of cases; (2) not obliterating the defect intentionaly in 16 patients produced CSF leakage in 50% and meningitis in 25% of cases; (3) obliteration of the defect combined with newer packing and closure techniques in the last 33 patients produced CSF leakage and meningitis in only 6% of cases. Four problem areas were identified: the eustachian tube, middle ear, mastoid defect, and postauricular wound. Of these, obliteration of the mastoid defect was most important in minimizing postoperative CSF wound leakage, CSF rhinorrhea, and meningitis. PMID:6806745

  6. A Case of Tuberculous Meningitis with Tuberculoma in Nonimmunocompromised Immigrant

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Hammad; Bihler, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of tuberculous (TB) meningitis in nonimmunocompromised immigrant worker who initially presented with headache and later with generalized tonic clonic seizures and disseminated tuberculosis. PMID:27413568

  7. A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Gayford, Kylie; McCarthy, Ana; Hague, William M

    2011-01-01

    A case of postpartum Group B streptococcal meningitis, a rare complication of an invasive infection by a common maternal commensal bacterium, which demonstrates the need to develop rapid and accurate antepartum and intrapartum screening methods for this organism.

  8. Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis in an immunocompetent host: a case report.

    PubMed

    Antonello, Vicente Sperb; Zenkner, Francis de Moura; França, Josiane; Santos, Breno Riegel

    2010-01-01

    We describe a rare case of a 53-year-old man with a long history of alcohol abuse, with Enterococcus gallinarum meningitis, an organism that rarely causes human infection and is primarily found in the gastrointestinal tract of poultry. The patient improved with high-dose ampicillin and gentamicin therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first Brazilian reported case of E. gallinarum meningitis and probably the first case described in an immunocompetent host. PMID:20464133

  9. An aseptic meningitis picture from incipient brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Singer, J I

    1992-08-01

    A preadolescent with headache and stiff neck presented for emergency department care. The presumptive diagnosis of viral meningitis was entertained on the basis of clinical examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Events subsequent to his release from the department formed the stimulus for this report. It is apparent that patients with complicated sinusitis may present with a constellation of findings consistent with viral meningitis. PMID:1513739

  10. Liver metastasis of meningeal hemangiopericytoma: a study of 5 cases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Regina C.; Suriawinata, Arief A.; Rubin, Brian P.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal tumors in the liver, whether primary or metastatic, are rare. Meningeal hemangiopericytoma (HPC) is characteristically associated with delayed metastasis and the liver is one of the most common sites. Despite its consistent histological features, a pathological diagnosis of HPC in the liver is sometimes not straightforward due to its rarity and usually remote medical history of the primary meningeal tumor. In this report, the clinicopathological features of 5 cases of metastatic HPC to the liver were reviewed and described. PMID:27044772