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1

Perinatal depression: implications for child mental health  

PubMed Central

Perinatal depression is common and primary care holds a crucial role for detecting, treating or, if necessary, providing referrals to mental health care for affected women. Family doctors should be aware of risk factors for peripartum depression, including previous history of depression, life events and interpersonal conflict. Perinatal depression has been associated with many poor outcomes, including maternal, child and family unit challenges. Infants and young children of perinatally depressed mothers are more likely to have a difficult temperament, as well as cognitive and emotional delays. The primary care setting is uniquely poised to be the screening and treatment site for perinatal depression; however, several obstacles, both at patient and systems level, have been identified that interfere with women's treatment engagement. Current published treatment guidelines favour psychotherapy above medicines as first line treatment for mild to moderate perinatal depression, while pharmacotherapy is first choice for severe depression, often in combination with psychosocial or integrative approaches. Among mothers who decide to stop taking their antidepressants despite ongoing depression during the perinatal period, the majority suffer from relapsing symptoms. If depression continues post?partum, there is an increased risk of poor mother–infant attachment, delayed cognitive and linguistic skills in the infant, impaired emotional development and risk for behavioural problems in later life. Complex, comprehensive and multilevel algorithms are warranted to treat perinatal depression. Primary care doctors are best suited to initiate, carry out and evaluate the effectiveness of such interventions designed to prevent adverse outcomes of maternal perinatal depression on mother and child wellbeing. PMID:22477948

2010-01-01

2

Minor depression during adolescence and mental health outcomes during adulthood  

PubMed Central

Data from a community-based prospective longitudinal study were used to investigate the association of minor depressive disorder during adolescence with adverse mental health outcomes during adulthood. Structured diagnostic interviews were administered to a community-based sample of 755 individuals during adolescence and adulthood. Results indicated that minor depressive disorder during adolescence was associated with elevated risk for subsequent psychiatric disorders during adulthood, including major depressive disorder, ?1 disruptive disorders and clinically relevant impairment after corresponding and co-occurring disorders were controlled statistically. PMID:19721119

Johnson, Jeffrey G.; Cohen, Patricia; Kasen, Stephanie

2009-01-01

3

Overeducation and depressive symptoms: diminishing mental health returns to education.  

PubMed

In general, well-educated people enjoy better mental health than those with less education. As a result, some wonder whether there are limits to the mental health benefits of education. Inspired by the literature on the expansion of tertiary education, this article explores marginal mental health returns to education and studies the mental health status of overeducated people. To enhance the validity of the findings we use two indicators of educational attainment - years of education and ISCED97 categories - and two objective indicators of overeducation (the realised matches method and the job analyst method) in a sample of the working population of 25 European countries (unweighted sample N = 19,089). Depression is measured using an eight-item version of the CES-D scale. We find diminishing mental health returns to education. In addition, overeducated people report more depression symptoms. Both findings hold irrespective of the indicators used. The results must be interpreted in the light of the enduring expansion of education, as our findings show that the discussion of the relevance of the human capital perspective, and the diploma disease view on the relationship between education and modern society, is not obsolete. PMID:23909439

Bracke, Piet; Pattyn, Elise; von dem Knesebeck, Olaf

2013-11-01

4

Screening for Anxiety and Depression in Community Mental Health: The Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Accurate diagnosis is key to providing quality services in community mental health. This research examined the ability of\\u000a the Beck Anxiety and Depression Inventories to identify anxiety and depression in community settings. The diagnostic accuracy\\u000a of these instruments was compared with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV in a sample of 288 distressed women seeking\\u000a treatment for their children. Operating

Shaun M. Eack; Jonathan B. Singer; Catherine G. Greeno

2008-01-01

5

National Health Priority Areas Report, 1998--Mental Health: A Report Focusing on Depression, 1998.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents procedures for national mental health that involve many levels of government and draws advice from a range of professional organizations. Due to the enormous impact of depression on the social, human, economic, and public health costs to Australians and the Australian government, this initiative focuses efforts on dealing with…

Australian Dept. of Health and Ageing, Canberra.

6

Utilization and Barriers to Mental Health Services Among Depressed Medical Interns: A Prospective Multisite Study  

PubMed Central

Background Compared with graduate students and young adults in the general population, depression is more prevalent among training physicians, yet physicians are often reluctant to seek mental health treatment. The purpose of this study is to identify perceived barriers to mental health treatment among depressed training physicians. Methods Subjects for this study were drawn from intern classes during the 2007–2008 and 2008–2009 academic years from 6 and 13 participating community and university hospitals, respectively. At 3-month intervals throughout the intern year, participants completed the Patient Health Questionnaire regarding current depressive symptoms and questions regarding current mental health treatment. We explored potential barriers to mental health treatment at the end of the intern year and determined the proportion of subjects screening positive for depression and seeking treatment through analysis of subject responses. Stepwise binary logistic regression was conducted to compare baseline characteristics among depressed interns who sought mental health treatment and those that did not. Results Of the 42.5% (278 of 654) of interns who screened positive for depression, 22.7% (63 of 278) reported receiving treatment during the intern year. The most frequently cited barriers to seeking treatment were time (91.5%), preference to manage problems on their own (75.1%), lack of convenient access (61.8%), and concerns about confidentiality (57.3%). Interns who had previously sought treatment for depression were more likely to seek treatment during internship. Conclusions Despite high rates of depression, few interns appear to seek mental health treatment due to time constraints, lack of convenient access, concerns about confidentiality, and a preference to manage problems on their own. By identifying barriers to mental health treatment we can begin to remove obstacles to the delivery of evidence-based treatments and implement prevention, screening, and early detection programs to improve the mental health of physicians in training. PMID:21975622

Guille, Constance; Speller, Heather; Laff, Rachel; Epperson, C. Neill; Sen, Srijan

2010-01-01

7

Recession Depression: Mental Health Effects of the 2008 Stock Market Crash*  

PubMed Central

Do sudden, large wealth losses affect mental health? We use exogenous variation in the interview dates of the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to assess the impact of large wealth losses on mental health among older U.S. adults. We compare cross-wave changes in wealth and mental health for respondents interviewed before and after the October 2008 stock market crash. We find that the crash reduced wealth and increased feelings of depression and use of antidepressant drugs, and that these effects were largest among respondents with high levels of stock holdings prior to the crash. These results suggest that sudden wealth losses cause immediate declines in subjective measures of mental health. However, we find no evidence that wealth losses lead to increases in clinically-validated measures of depressive symptoms or indicators of depression. PMID:24113241

McInerney, Melissa; Mellor, Jennifer M.; Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

2013-01-01

8

Recession depression: mental health effects of the 2008 stock market crash.  

PubMed

Do sudden, large wealth losses affect mental health? We use exogenous variation in the interview dates of the 2008 Health and Retirement Study to assess the impact of large wealth losses on mental health among older U.S. adults. We compare cross-wave changes in wealth and mental health for respondents interviewed before and after the October 2008 stock market crash. We find that the crash reduced wealth and increased feelings of depression and use of antidepressant drugs, and that these effects were largest among respondents with high levels of stock holdings prior to the crash. These results suggest that sudden wealth losses cause immediate declines in subjective measures of mental health. However, we find no evidence that wealth losses lead to increases in clinically-validated measures of depressive symptoms or indicators of depression. PMID:24113241

McInerney, Melissa; Mellor, Jennifer M; Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

2013-12-01

9

Engaging Women Who Are Depressed and Economically Disadvantaged in Mental Health Treatment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women disadvantaged by poverty, as well as racial or ethnic minority status, are more likely to experience depression than the rest of the U.S. population. At the same time, they are less likely to seek or remain in treatment for depression in traditional mental health settings. This article explores a therapeutic, psychosocial engagement strategy…

Grote, Nancy K.; Zuckoff, Allan; Swartz, Holly; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Geibel, Sharon

2007-01-01

10

Women's Use of Multi sector Mental Health Services in a Community-Based Perinatal Depression Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Low-income and ethnic minority women have been described as at risk for experiencing depression during and around the time of pregnancy, a finding complicated by low levels of mental health service use within this population. This study retrospectively examined data from a community-based perinatal depression project targeting low-income women in…

Price, Sarah Kye

2010-01-01

11

Migration and Mental Health: An Empirical Test of Depression Risk Factors Among Immigrant Mexican Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Critical issues and methodological problems concerning migration and mental health are examined. A model for determining predictor variables of depression in immigrant Mexican women is tested. Demographic, economic, and interpersonal factors are isolated as a subset of depression predictors within the model. (VM)

Vega, William A.; And Others

1987-01-01

12

Mutuality as background music in women's lived experience of mental health and depression.  

PubMed

Mental health problems, especially depression, have turned into an extensive public health problem, affecting women in particular. The aim of this study was to obtain a deeper understanding of mental health phenomena through elderly women's lived experiences of mental health and depression. The phenomenological approach was chosen for collecting experience-based and person-centred descriptions from 21 women, focusing on mental health and depression. The interviews were analysed using Giorgi's phenomenological descriptive method. Mutuality in their relationships with themselves and others emerged as a major element in the women's experience of mental health and depression. When the women's existence and value were confirmed in relation to themselves and others, mental health appeared as an ascending spiral. When the women's value and self-esteem in relation to themselves and others were violated, the result was a descending spiral. Metaphorically speaking, 'mutuality' provided the 'background music' to the women's lives. Being a skilled professional psychiatric nurse means making the best use of mutuality as a creative power in the nurse-patient relationship. This means that the nurse must be aware that her/his attitude, appearance and behaviour are interpreted as a confirmation of the patient's worthiness or worthlessness. PMID:12755916

Hedelin, B; Jonsson, I

2003-06-01

13

Depression and Chronic Diseases: It Is Time for a Synergistic Mental Health and Primary Care Approach  

PubMed Central

Objective: To identify the growing significance of depression as a global leading cause of years lost to disability and its role as a major independent risk factor in many chronic illnesses. The distinct effects of depression on morbidity and mortality in cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke are investigated, including behavioral factors and plausible biological mechanisms (psychoneuroimmunology of depression). Data Sources: PubMed articles in English were searched from 1992 to 2012 (20-year span) using the following search criteria: psychoneuroimmunology of depression, immune-mediated inflammation, depression treatment recommendations, depression screening, years lost to disability, underserved populations and depression, chronic illnesses and depression, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and immune system. Data Synthesis: Evidence of the robust bidirectional relationship between depression and individual chronic diseases is presented and discussed. A brief overview of currently recommended psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment approaches in regard to depression in chronic diseases is provided. Results: Discordance between mental health and primary care within the US public health system is a systematic problem that must be addressed. This situation leads to a potentially high hidden prevalence of underdiagnosed and undertreated depression, especially in the underserved populations. Conclusion: Measures must be implemented across the communities of mental health and primary care practitioners in order to achieve a synergistic approach to depression. PMID:23930236

Richie, William D.; Bailey, Rahn K.

2013-01-01

14

Gender differences in general and specialty outpatient mental health service use for depression  

PubMed Central

Background This study ascertain gender-specific determinants of outpatient mental health (MH) service use for depression to highlight gender disparities in barriers to care and explain how depressed men and women in need of care might differ in their help-seeking behaviour. Methods Data used in this study came from the Canadian Community Health Survey on Mental Health and Well Being, cycle 1.2 (CCHS 1.2) conducted by Statistics Canada in 2002 (N =?36,984). The sample was limited to respondents filling the criteria for a probable major depression in the 12 months prior to the interview (n =?1743). Gender-specific multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results The results showed that 54.3% of respondents meeting criteria for major depression had consulted for mental health reasons in the year prior to interview. When looking at type of outpatient mental health service use, males were more likely to consult a general practitioner and a mental health specialist in the past year as opposed to females. However, females were more likely to consult a general practitioner only as opposed to no service use than males. Gender specific differences in determinants associated with outpatient service use included for males, lower adjusted household income, and for females, a younger age, the presence of social support, self-reported availability barriers, the presence of self-reported suicidal thoughts or attempt and a poorer self- perceived mental health. Conclusions It is concluded that continued efforts to promote access to mental health care are needed for men and women affected by depression, and this, to target specific vulnerable populations and increase utilization rates. PMID:24884891

2014-01-01

15

Attitudes and beliefs about mental health among African American older adults suffering from depression  

PubMed Central

Depression among older adults is a major public health concern leading to increased disability and mortality. Less than 3% of older adults utilize professional mental health services for the treatment of depression, less than any other adult age group. And despite similar rates of depression, African Americans are significantly less likely to seek, engage and be retained in professional mental health services than their white counterparts. Cultural differences in the way depression symptoms are manifested, defined, interpreted and labeled may in part explain some of these racial differences in help-seeking behaviors. Focus group methodology was utilized to identify and explore attitudes and beliefs about depression and mental health treatment utilization among 42 older African Americans who had recently suffered a major depressive episode. Thematic analysis of identified six overarching themes: (a) perceptions of depression, (b) the African American experience, (c) seeking treatment as a last resort, (d) myths about treatment, (e) stigma associated with seeking treatment and (f) culturally appropriate coping strategies. We discuss implications for practice, education and research. PMID:21423819

Conner, Kyaien O.; Lee, Brenda; Mayers, Vanessa; Robinson, Deborah; Reynolds, Charles F.; Albert, Steve; Brown, Charlotte

2011-01-01

16

Mental health literacy and postpartum depression: a qualitative description of views of lower income women.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to understand mental health literacy (MHL) (Jorm, 2000) in lower income women postpartum and share participant experiences of recognizing and seeking help for depressive symptoms. Focus group textual data were received from 25 participants who completed a weight and psychosocial health longitudinal study. Iterative content data analysis using Jorm's framework provided thematic understandings descriptive of MHL. Women recognized behavioral changes indicating mental distress, but fears prevented them from seeking help, and some resorted to risky behaviors. This framework could guide providers to identify women who may benefit from early intervention for postpartum depressive symptoms. PMID:25017559

Guy, Sarah; Sterling, Bobbie Sue; Walker, Lorraine O; Harrison, Tracie C

2014-08-01

17

Mental Health Literacy in Hmong and Cambodian Elderly Refugees: A Barrier to Understanding, Recognizing, and Responding to Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to explore mental health literacy, specifically focusing on depression, among Southeast Asian (SEA) elderly refugees residing in the Twin Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Three focus groups were held with nine mental health professionals who work with SEA elders. Jorm's mental health literacy framework guided the…

Lee, Hee Yun; Lytle, Kathy; Yang, Pa Nhia; Lum, Terry

2010-01-01

18

Does family history of depression predict major depression in midlife women? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study (SWAN MHS).  

PubMed

This study aims to determine whether family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women independent of psychosocial and health profiles at midlife. Participants were 303 African American and Caucasian women (42-52 years at baseline) recruited into the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and the Women's Mental Health Study (MHS) in Pittsburgh. Major depression was assessed annually with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Family mental health history was collected at the ninth or tenth follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether family history of depression predicted major depression in midlife, adjusting for covariates. The odds of experiencing major depression during the study were three times greater for those with a family history than for those without a family history (OR?=?3.22, 95% CI?=?1.95-5.31). Family history predicted depression (OR?=?2.67, 95% CI?=?1.50-4.78) after adjusting for lifetime history of depression, age, trait anxiety, chronic medical conditions, and stressful life events. In analyses stratified by lifetime history of depression, family history significantly predicted depression only among women with a lifetime history of depression. Family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women generally, but particularly in those with a lifetime history of depression prior to midlife. PMID:24952069

Colvin, Alicia; Richardson, Gale A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Youk, Ada; Bromberger, Joyce T

2014-08-01

19

Maternal Depressive Symptoms when Caring for a Child with Mental Health Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As primary caregivers of children with mental health problems, mothers face challenges that put them at risk for depression, which is rarely identified or addressed. The aims of this paper were to (a) identify mean differences among demographic, stressor, threat, and resource variables specified in a theoretical model and thought to be associated…

Gerkensmeyer, Janis E.; Perkins, Susan M.; Day, Jennifer; Austin, Joan K.; Scott, Eric L.; Wu, Jingwei

2011-01-01

20

Psychotherapy Process in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined psychotherapy process in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program. Transcripts of brief interpersonal and cognitive–behavioral therapies were rated using the Psychotherapy Process Q Set (PQS), an instrument designed to provide a standard language for describing therapy process. Results demonstrated that there were important areas of overlap and key differences in the

J. Stuart Ablon; Enrico E. Jones

1999-01-01

21

Therapist effects in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent psychotherapy research literature has stressed the importance of therapist effects (i.e., the impact of the individual therapist on treatment outcome). The authors report an analysis of therapist effects in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program using hierarchical linear modeling. In addition to studying overall therapist effects, they investigate the possible interaction of therapists

Irene Elkin; Lydia Falconnier; Zoran Martinovich; Colleen Mahoney

2006-01-01

22

Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health Treatment in an Ethnoracially Diverse College Student Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To study (a) the prevalence of depressive symptoms and (b) the utilization of mental health treatment in an ethnoracially diverse sample consisting primarily of Asian Americans, European Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Participants: Five hundred eighty-nine college students. Method: A questionnaire packet that…

Herman, Steve; Archambeau, Olga G.; Deliramich, Aimee N.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Chiu, Pearl H.; Frueh, B. Christopher

2011-01-01

23

Have Mental Health Education Programs Influenced the Mental Health Literacy of Those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation? A Comparison between 1998 and 2008 in South Australia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental health literacy is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid their recognition, management, or prevention and is considered to be an important determinant of help-seeking. This has relevance in suicide prevention, as depression, the clinical condition most frequently associated with suicidality, has been the target of…

Chamberlain, Peter N.; Goldney, Robert D.; Taylor, Anne W.; Eckert, Kerena A.

2012-01-01

24

Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5-year  

E-print Network

Long working hours & mental health Long working hours and symptoms of anxiety and depression: a 5 Kivimäki2 1 Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland; 2 University College London. Marianna Virtanen Finnish Institute of Occupational Health / Work and Mental Health Team Topeliuksenkatu 41

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Gender and Racial\\/Ethnic Differences in Use of Outpatient Mental Health and Substance Use Services by Depressed Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines depressed adults’ use of mental health services, focusing on Latinos and African Americans. Self-report data for adults meeting CIDI criteria for major depression or dysthymia from the 1997–98 HealthCare for Communities Survey were analyzed. Gender stratified logistic regression models examined the relationship between race\\/ethnicity and outpatient mental health service use, controlling for sociodemographic, health status, insurance, and

Victoria D. Ojeda; Thomas G. McGuire

2006-01-01

26

Associations between early exposure to intimate partner violence, parental depression and subsequent mental health outcomes  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the association between parent reports of intimate partner violence (IPV) and depressive symptoms within the first 3 years of a child’s life with subsequent mental health conditions and psychotropic drug treatment. Design Prospective cohort study linking parental IPV and depression with subsequent billing and pharmacy data. Setting 4 pediatric clinics between November 2004 and June 2012 Patients/Participants 2,422 children Main Exposure Any report of IPV and/or parental depressive symptoms from birth to 3 years of age. Main Outcome Measures ICD-9 mental health diagnoses and any psychotropic drug treatment between 3 and 6 years of age. Results 2.4% of caregivers (n=58) reported both IPV and depressive symptoms before their children were 3 years of age, 3% (n=69) of caregivers reported IPV only, 29% (n=704) reported depressive symptoms only, and 65.7% (n=1,591) reported neither exposure. Children of parents reporting both IPV and depressive symptoms were more likely to have a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (AOR 4.0; 95% CI: 1.5–10.9), even after adjusting for child gender, race/ethnicity, and insurance type. Children whose parents reported depressive symptoms were more likely to have been prescribed psychotropic medication (AOR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0–3.4). Conclusions Exposure to both IPV and depression before 3 years is associated with preschool-onset ADHD; and early exposure to parental depression is associated with being prescribed psychotropic medication. PMID:23381234

Bauer, Nerissa S.; Gilbert, Amy L.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

2014-01-01

27

Omega-3 fatty acids and major depression: A primer for the mental health professional  

PubMed Central

Omega-3 fatty acids play a critical role in the development and function of the central nervous system. Emerging research is establishing an association between omega-3 fatty acids (alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic) and major depressive disorder. Evidence from epidemiological, laboratory and clinical studies suggest that dietary lipids and other associated nutritional factors may influence vulnerability and outcome in depressive disorders. Research in this area is growing at a rapid pace. The goal of this report is to integrate various branches of research in order to update mental health professionals. PMID:15535884

2004-01-01

28

The role of family history in mental health service utilization for major depression. Elena Prokofyeva M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.1,2  

E-print Network

1 The role of family history in mental health service utilization for major depression. Elena family history of major depressive disorder (MDD) and mental health service utilization for MDD. Methods history. Mental health service utilization among participants with lifetime MDD was studied. Data were

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

29

Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

30

Comparison of depression, anxiety, quality of life, vitality and mental health between premenopausal and postmenopausal women.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective The purpose of this research was to investigate and compare the rates of depression, anxiety, quality of life, vitality and mental health between premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Method The sample included 218 women selected randomly from the cultural center of Tehran in November and December 2013 and was divided into two groups. The first group included 110 postmenopausal women (45-55 years old). One year had passed since their last monthly period and they had not used any hormones. The second group included 108 premenopausal women (35-45 years old) who had not yet experienced menopause. In order to assess data, three tests were used: the Zung Anxiety Self-Report scale, the Beck Depression Inventory and the Quality of Life questionnaire (SF-36). The gathered data were analyzed with the T-test for independent groups. Results The results indicated that all five hypotheses were confirmed. There were significant differences between the scores of anxiety, depression, quality of life, vitality and mental health between the two groups. Conclusion Since menopausal women spend almost one-third of their long life in this situation, it can be useful to recognize the causes of these disorders in women and their influences on their families. We can also increase their motivation and self-efficacy in order to improve their quality of life. PMID:24673509

Jafari, F; Hadizadeh, M H; Zabihi, R; Ganji, K

2014-12-01

31

Interpersonal Factors in Brief Treatment of Depression: Further Analyses of the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous analyses of data from the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program indicate minimal differences in therapeutic outcome among 3 brief treatments for depression, but patients’ pretreatment level of perfectionism had a significant negative relationship with residualized measures of clinical improvement. The present analyses indicate that the quality of the therapeutic relationship reported by patients

Sidney J. Blatt; David C. Zuroff; Donald M. Quinlan; Paul A. Pilkonis

1996-01-01

32

Improving responses to depression and related disorders: evaluation of a innovative, general, mental health care workers training program  

PubMed Central

Background Australian General Practitioners have been beneficiaries of extensive training in mental health care delivery over the last few years but less so other workers who support those with mental illness. Training is needed as it is widely recognised that the most effective interventions to prevent and treat mental disorders are often not readily available. The Mental Health Aptitudes into Practice (MAP) training package is a broad, innovative, interdisciplinary, general mental health training aimed at improving responses to individuals with depression and related disorders. The modular structure of this training program meant that such training could be targeted at those with varied backgrounds. Two hundred and seventy one days of free MAP training was delivered across Victoria in 2004/2005. The evaluation reported here assessed whether changes occurred in the trainees' confidence, mental health literacy, attitudes towards effective treatments, mental health knowledge and skills and community mental health ideology following training. Methods These elements were assessed using pen and paper tests prior, immediately following, 6 months after and then 12 months after the training. Trainees' confidence, mental health literacy and social distance were measured using scales that have been used in evaluations of Mental Health First Aid Training. Community mental health ideology was measured using a sub-scale of the Community Attitudes to the Mentally Ill (CAMI) scale. The trainees' knowledge and skills were accessed using instrumentation specifically designed for this evaluation. Results Following training, participants had more confidence in their ability to work with those who have mental health issues and less desire for social distance from them. Participants' knowledge and skills in relation to the treatment of mental disorders increased. These changes were observed immediately after training. The limited existing evidence suggests these changes were sustained six and twelve months later. Conclusions MAP training can be used to develop the capacity and capabilities of mental health workers. PMID:20822546

2010-01-01

33

Six-Month Longitudinal Patterns of Mental Health Service Utilization by Older Adults with Depressive Symptoms  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE For community-dwelling older adults with depressive symptoms, aims were to: describe behavioral health service utilization patterns over a six-month period; and identify factors associated with service use, guided by a multidimensional, comprehensive theoretical model emphasizing the dynamic nature of service use patterns over time and social context. METHODS 144 participants with depressive symptoms completed an in-person baseline interview and six monthly telephone follow-up interviews. Outcomes included use of antidepressants or counseling at each follow-up. Covariates included individual (demographic, need, prior treatment experience, intentions) and social context (stigma, advice) variables. RESULTS Approximately half of participants received no formal service (antidepressant or counseling; n = 70, 48%). Service use or non-use did not change for most participants. More participants with severe symptoms received antidepressants (25–37%) than those with milder symptoms (10–14%), although more of the milder cases started (62% vs. 49%) and stopped antidepressants (77% vs. 26%) at least once. Fewer individuals received counseling overall, with no clear patterns by symptom severity. In multivariate longitudinal analyses, service use at follow-up was independently associated with younger age, current major depressive episode, baseline use of antidepressant, intention to begin a new service at baseline, and receipt of advice to use services over follow-up. CONCLUSIONS Over a six-month period, the majority of older adults with depressive symptoms in this study continued use or non-use of mental health services. Demographic, need, attitudinal and social variables were related to service use over time. Addressing intentions and providing advice may facilitate uptake of services. PMID:22211216

Gum, Amber M.; Iser, Lindsay; King-Kallimanis, Bellinda; Petkus, Andrew; DeMuth, Anne; Schonfeld, Lawrence

2014-01-01

34

Older depressed Latinos’ experiences with primary care visits for personal, emotional and/or mental health problems: a qualitative analysis  

PubMed Central

Objective To describe salient experiences with a primary care visit (e.g., the context leading up to the visit, the experience and/or outcomes of that visit) for emotional, personal and/or mental health problems older Latinos with a history of depression and recent depressive symptoms and/or antidepressant medication use reported 10 years after enrollment into a randomized controlled trial of quality-improvement for depression in primary care. Design Secondary analysis of existing qualitative data from the second stage of the continuation study of Partners in Care (PIC). Participants Latino ethnicity, age ? 50 years, recent depressive symptoms and/or antidepressant medication use, and a recent primary care visit for mental health problems. Of 280 second-stage participants, 47 were eligible. Both stages of the continuation study included participants from the PIC parent study control and 2 intervention groups, and all had a history of depression. Methods Data analyzed by a multidisciplinary team using grounded theory methodology. Results Five themes were identified: beliefs about the nature of depression; prior experiences with mental health disorders/treatments; sociocultural context (e.g., social relationships, caregiving, the media); clinic-related features (e.g., accessibility of providers, staff continuity, amount of visit time); provider attributes (e.g., interpersonal skills, holistic care approach). Conclusions Findings emphasize the importance of key features for shaping the context leading up to primary care visits for help-seeking for mental health problems, and the experience and/or outcomes of those visits, among older depressed Latinos at long-term follow-up, and may help tailor chronic depression care for the clinical management of this vulnerable population. PMID:24620453

Izquierdo, Adriana; Sarkisian, Catherine; Ryan, Gery; Wells, Kenneth B.; Miranda, Jeanne

2014-01-01

35

Seniors (Mental Health)  

MedlinePLUS

... also is possible that depression is an early symptom of Alzheimer’s disease or vascular dementia. Conclusion Having good mental health ... life does not ensure immunity from severe depression, Alzheimer’s disease, ... could be symptoms of conditions for which help is available. Seniors ...

36

Predicting the Impact of the 2011 Conflict in Libya on Population Mental Health: PTSD and Depression Prevalence and Mental Health Service Requirements  

PubMed Central

Background Mental disorders are likely to be elevated in the Libyan population during the post-conflict period. We estimated cases of severe PTSD and depression and related health service requirements using modelling from existing epidemiological data and current recommended mental health service targets in low and middle income countries (LMIC’s). Methods Post-conflict prevalence estimates were derived from models based on a previously conducted systematic review and meta-regression analysis of mental health among populations living in conflict. Political terror ratings and intensity of exposure to traumatic events were used in predictive models. Prevalence of severe cases was applied to chosen populations along with uncertainty ranges. Six populations deemed to be affected by the conflict were chosen for modelling: Misrata (population of 444,812), Benghazi (pop. 674,094), Zintan (pop. 40,000), displaced people within Tripoli/Zlitan (pop. 49,000), displaced people within Misrata (pop. 25,000) and Ras Jdir camps (pop. 3,700). Proposed targets for service coverage, resource utilisation and full-time equivalent staffing for management of severe cases of major depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are based on a published model for LMIC’s. Findings Severe PTSD prevalence in populations exposed to a high level of political terror and traumatic events was estimated at 12.4% (95%CI 8.5–16.7) and was 19.8% (95%CI 14.0–26.3) for severe depression. Across all six populations (total population 1,236,600), the conflict could be associated with 123,200 (71,600–182,400) cases of severe PTSD and 228,100 (134,000–344,200) cases of severe depression; 50% of PTSD cases were estimated to co-occur with severe depression. Based upon service coverage targets, approximately 154 full-time equivalent staff would be required to respond to these cases sufficiently which is substantially below the current level of resource estimates for these regions. Discussion This is the first attempt to predict the mental health burden and consequent service response needs of such a conflict, and is crucially timed for Libya. PMID:22808201

Charlson, Fiona J.; Steel, Zachary; Degenhardt, Louisa; Chey, Tien; Silove, Derrick; Marnane, Claire; Whiteford, Harvey A.

2012-01-01

37

The Role of Mental Health Patient Organizations in Disease Management: Focus on the US National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mood disorders are serious chronic illnesses that are the leading cause of disability worldwide. Up to two-thirds of all people with a mood disorder are undiagnosed. In the US, there are three suicides for every two homicides, with 70% of these deaths attributed to untreated depression. Mental health advocacy organizations play an important role in the management of these disorders

Lydia Lewis

2001-01-01

38

Impact of Perfectionism and Need for Approval on the Brief Treatment of Depression: The National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program Revisited  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program (TDCRP) were administered at intake with the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS; A. N. Weissman & A. T. Beck, 1978). Factor analyses of the DAS in the TDCRP data as well as in several independent samples reveal two primary factors: an interpersonal factor, Need for Approval, and

Sidney J. Blatt; Donald M. Quinlan; Paul A. Pilkonis; M. Tracie Shea

1995-01-01

39

Korean American parental depressive symptoms and children's mental health: the mediating role of parental acceptance-rejection.  

PubMed

This study explored the mediating role of parental acceptance-rejection in the relationship between parental depressive symptoms and children's mental health. Self-report data were gathered from 95 mothers and 91 fathers of children (ages 5-10 years) in Korean American families. For mothers and fathers, the relationship between parental depressive symptoms and child psychosocial problems was mediated by parenting behaviors, with parental rejection being a much stronger mediator than parental acceptance. For fathers, the relationship between fathers' depressive symptoms and child social competence was mediated by parenting, with fathers' parental rejection being a slightly stronger mediator than fathers' parental acceptance. PMID:22608945

Kim, Eunjung

2013-01-01

40

Factors Associated with Use of Mental Health Services for Depressed and\\/or Suicidal Youth Aged 15–24  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using data from a national survey, this study examined different factors and their association with mental health service\\u000a use in youth aged 15–24 with depression and\\/or suicidality. Our sample consisted of 1,252 youth with depression and\\/or suicidality.\\u000a In youth aged 15–18 years old, two factors influenced service use: (1) co-occurrence of depression and suicidality (OR 3.23,\\u000a 95% CI 1.43, 7.32) and

Amy Cheung; Carolyn Dewa; John Cairney; Scott Veldhuizen; Ayal Schaffer

2009-01-01

41

Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Video Games Video Sharing Sites Webcasts/ Webinars Widgets Wikis Follow Us on New Media News & Events Awareness ... mental health should be part of your complete medical evaluation before starting antiretroviral medications. And you should ...

42

Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... coming back, you should talk to a counselor in the health services/center. They see lots of students who are anxious, stressed or depressed at college. What if it's more serious than feeling down— ...

43

Depressive Symptoms in a Sample of Social Work Students and Reasons Preventing Students from Using Mental Health Services: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Limited research exists on social work students' level of depression and help-seeking beliefs. This study empirically examined the rates of depression among 215 BSW students and explored students' reasons for not using mental health services. Approximately 50% scored at or above the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale cutoff;…

Ting, Laura

2011-01-01

44

Depression: A Social or a Mental Health Problem? Implications for the Health of Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is no doubt that women have more depression than men--both treated and untreated--and that depression affects women in their most productive years, impairing personal satisfaction and ability to fulfill social roles. A review of the various therapeutic approaches to depression shows that there is good evidence that the traditional…

Weissman, Myrna M.

45

The Efficacy of Group Metacognitive Therapy on Self-Esteem and Mental Health of Patients Suffering from Major Depressive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective: The present research aims to analyze the efficacy of group metacognitive therapy (MCT) on self-esteem and mental Health of those who suffer from major depressive disorder. Methods: The research was a randomized clinical controlled trial, using pretest and posttest with 2 months of follow-up. Twenty-two patients with major depressive disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria were selected through available sampling from patients of two psychiatric hospitals of Mashhad, Iran, in 2011. They were allocated randomly into two groups of trial (n = 11) and control (n = 11). Citalopram and sertraline were prescribed as antidepressant to both groups. The experimental group also attended nine 90-minute sessions of MCT (a 5-week program). Eysenck self-esteem scale (ESES) and Mental Health Checklist (MHC) were used in pretest, posttest, and follow-up as the study instrument. The data were analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using SPSS. Results: ANCOVA revealed that the patients receiving group MCT had significantly increased (p < 0.001) self-esteem in posttest, which remained significant in the follow up (p < 0.001). Moreover, mental health scores had increased in the MCT group (posttest, p < 0.001; follow up, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Group MCT has beneficial therapeutic roles in improving the self-steam and recuperation of mental health in MDD patients. PMID:25053952

Farahmand, Vahid; Hassanzadeh, Ramezan; Mirzaian, Bahram; Fayyazi Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Feizi, Jaleh

2014-01-01

46

Depressive Symptomatology and Mental Health Help-Seeking Patterns of U.S.- and Foreign-Born Mothers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: This report presents the national estimates of maternal depressive symptomatology prevalence and its socio-demographic correlates\\u000a among major racial\\/ethnic-nativity groups in the United States. We also examined the relationship of mental health-seeking\\u000a patterns by race\\/ethnicity and nativity. Methods: Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Survey-Birth Cohort Nine-month data, we present the distribution of Center for Epidemiological\\u000a Study-Depression (CES-D) score by new

Zhihuan Jennifer Huang; Frank Y. Wong; Cynthia R. Ronzio; Stella M. Yu

2007-01-01

47

Web Sites Related to Mental Health Web Sites Related to Mental Health  

E-print Network

Web Sites Related to Mental Health Web Sites Related to Mental Health American Academy of Child://www.psychologicalscience.org/ Canadian Mental Health Association http://www.cmha.ca/ Center for Mental Health Services Research http://gwbweb.wustl.edu/Users/cmhsr/ Depression and Related Affective Disorders Association http://www.drada.org/ Disaster Mental Health http

de Lijser, Peter

48

An interprofessional nurse-led mental health promotion intervention for older home care clients with depressive symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Depressive symptoms in older home care clients are common but poorly recognized and treated, resulting in adverse health outcomes, premature institutionalization, and costly use of health services. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a new six-month interprofessional (IP) nurse-led mental health promotion intervention, and to explore its effects on reducing depressive symptoms in older home care clients (??70 years) using personal support services. Methods A prospective one-group pre-test/post-test study design was used. The intervention was a six-month evidence-based depression care management strategy led by a registered nurse that used an IP approach. Of 142 eligible consenting participants, 98 (69%) completed the six-month and 87 (61%) completed the one-year follow-up. Outcomes included depressive symptoms, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and the costs of use of all types of health services at baseline and six-month and one-year follow-up. An interpretive descriptive design was used to explore clients’, nurses’, and personal support workers’ perceptions about the intervention’s appropriateness, benefits, and barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results Of the 142 participants, 56% had clinically significant depressive symptoms, with 38% having moderate to severe symptoms. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to older home care clients with depressive symptoms. It was effective in reducing depressive symptoms and improving HRQoL at six-month follow-up, with small additional improvements six months after the intervention. The intervention also reduced anxiety at one year follow-up. Significant reductions were observed in the use of hospitalization, ambulance services, and emergency room visits over the study period. Conclusions Our findings provide initial evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, and sustained effects of the nurse-led mental health promotion intervention in improving client outcomes, reducing use of expensive health services, and improving clinical practice behaviours of home care providers. Future research should evaluate its efficacy using a randomized clinical trial design, in different settings, with an adequate sample of older home care recipients with depressive symptoms. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01407926. PMID:24886344

2014-01-01

49

Florida Mental Health Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Mental Health Institute, dedicated to research, training and program development for improving psychological wellbeing, has four main divisions: Aging and Mental Health, Child and Family Studies, Community Mental Health, and Mental Health Law and Policy.

2007-03-16

50

Women and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... About Us Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and ... olearyk@mail.nih.gov Share Science News About Women's Mental Health Bundling HIV Prevention with Prenatal Care ...

51

Mental health in the tropics.  

PubMed

Although problems in mental health constitute 14% of the global burden of disease, mental health has been largely missing from the international health agenda. The burden from mental illness is largely attributable to the chronically disabling nature of depression and other common mental disorders, alcohol-use and substance-use disorders, and psychoses. The last decade has seen some progress in addressing this gap. In 2001, the World Health Report, Mental Health: New Understanding, New Hope, drew attention to the situation, with an appeal from the World Health Organization's Director General that 'mental health - neglected for far too long - is crucial to the overall well-being of individuals, societies and countries and must be universally regarded in a new light.' In September 2007, the journal Lancet launched the global mental health series, which highlighted the public-health dimension of mental health, identified barriers to receiving treatment, and gave a call for action to the nations of the world, to make a major commitment to upgrade the quality of mental-health services, to develop evidence-based treatment and preventive measures, to provide support for research in mental health, and to develop indicators to monitor progress. In October 2008, the World Health Organization launched the Mental Health Gap Action Programme, with the aim of scaling up the services for mental, neurological and substance-use disorders in all countries but especially those with low and middle incomes. The programme aims to develop evidence-based packages of care, psycho-social interventions and pharmacotherapy for tens of millions who could be treated for depression, schizophrenia and epilepsy, prevented from suicide, and begin to lead normal lives - even in very poor countries. While there is cause for optimism, much remains to be done. Most of all, there needs to be awareness amongst health providers and planners that mental health is an integral part of general health concerns, and that there can be no health without mental health. PMID:19208294

Rahman, A; Prince, M

2009-03-01

52

Use of mental health telemetry to enhance identification and predictive value of early changes during augmentation treatment of major depression.  

PubMed

Standard clinical trial methodology in depression does not allow for careful examination of early changes in symptom intensity. The purpose of this study was to use daily "Mental Health Telemetry" (MHT) to prospectively record change in depressive and anxiety symptoms for depressed patients receiving augmentation treatment, and determine the extent and predictive capacity of early changes. We report results of a 6-week, open-label study of the addition of quetiapine XR (range, 50-300 mg) for adult patients (n = 26) with major depressive disorder who were nonresponsive to antidepressant treatment. In addition to regular study visits, all participants completed daily, wirelessly transmitted self-report ratings of symptoms on a Smartphone. Daily and 3-day moving average mean scores were calculated, and associations between early symptom change and eventual response to treatment were determined. Improvement in depressive and anxiety symptoms was identified as early as day 1 of treatment. Of the total decline in depression severity over 6 weeks, 9% was present at day 1, 28% at day 2, 39% at days 3 and 4, 65% at day 7, and 80% at day 10. Self-report rating of early improvement (?20%) in depressive symptoms at day 7 significantly predicted responder status at week 6 (P = 0.03). Clinician-rated depressive and anxiety symptoms only became significantly associated with responder status at day 14. In conclusion, very early changes in depressive symptoms were identified using MHT, early changes accounted for most of total change, and MHT-recorded improvement as early as day 7 significantly predicted response to treatment at study end point. PMID:24100787

Schaffer, Ayal; Kreindler, David; Reis, Catherine; Levitt, Anthony J

2013-12-01

53

Polyunsaturated fatty acid status in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and Alzheimer's disease: towards an omega-3 index for mental health?  

PubMed

Interest in the role of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), particularly long-chain (LC) omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs, in mental health is increasing. This review investigates whether n-3 PUFA levels are abnormal in people with three prevalent mental health problems - attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression, and dementia. Data sources included PubMed, Web of Science, and bibliographies of papers published in English that describe PUFA levels in the circulation of individuals who have these mental health conditions. Although abnormal blood PUFA levels were reported in a number of studies, weighted comparisons of PUFA status showed no significant differences overall between people with mental health problems and controls. Whether those with low n-3 PUFA status are likely to be more responsive to n-3 PUFA supplementation is not yet resolved. Further studies assessing PUFA levels and mental status with greater uniformity are required in order to clarify the relationship between LC n-3 PUFA status and mental health. PMID:19785689

Milte, Catherine M; Sinn, Natalie; Howe, Peter R C

2009-10-01

54

Child Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... mental illnesses in children early on. Once mental illness develops, it becomes a regular part of your ... often Repeated thoughts of death To diagnose mental health problems, the doctor or mental health specialist looks ...

55

Improving responses to depression and related disorders: evaluation of a innovative, general, mental health care workers training program  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Australian General Practitioners have been beneficiaries of extensive training in mental health care delivery over the last few years but less so other workers who support those with mental illness. Training is needed as it is widely recognised that the most effective interventions to prevent and treat mental disorders are often not readily available. The Mental Health Aptitudes into

Annette L Graham; John Julian; Graham Meadows

2010-01-01

56

Early Cannabis Use and Estimated Risk of Later Onset of Depression Spells: Epidemiologic Evidence From the Population-based World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative  

PubMed Central

Early-onset cannabis use is widespread in many countries and might cause later onset of depression. Sound epidemiologic data across countries are missing. The authors estimated the suspected causal association that links early-onset (age <17 years) cannabis use with later-onset (age ?17 years) risk of a depression spell, using data on 85,088 subjects from 17 countries participating in the population-based World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative (2001–2005). In all surveys, multistage household probability samples were evaluated with a fully structured diagnostic interview for assessment of psychiatric conditions. The association between early-onset cannabis use and later risk of a depression spell was studied using conditional logistic regression with local area matching of cases and controls, controlling for sex, age, tobacco use, and other mental health problems. The overall association was modest (controlled for sex and age, risk ratio = 1.5, 95% confidence interval: 1.4, 1.7), was statistically robust in 5 countries, and showed no sex difference. The association did not change appreciably with statistical adjustment for mental health problems, except for childhood conduct problems, which reduced the association to nonsignificance. This study did not allow differentiation of levels of cannabis use; this issue deserves consideration in future research. PMID:20534820

de Graaf, Ron; Radovanovic, Mirjana; van Laar, Margriet; Fairman, Brian; Degenhardt, Louisa; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Fayyad, John; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Huang, Yueqin; Kostychenko, Stanislav; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Neumark, Yehuda; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, Jose; Stein, Dan J.; Tachimori, Hisateru; Wells, J. Elisabeth; Anthony, James C.

2010-01-01

57

Adolescent Mental Health Facts  

MedlinePLUS

... Care Positive Mental Health: Resilience In the States Adolescent Health Topics Reproductive Health Mental Health Physical Health and ... Insurance Marketplace Scroll Left Scroll Right Office of Adolescent Health 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700 Rockville, MD 20852 ...

58

Teen Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

59

Depression and Psychological Trauma: An Overview Integrating Current Research and Specific Evidence of Studies in the Treatment of Depression in Public Mental Health Services in Chile  

PubMed Central

In the last two decades, different research has demonstrated the high prevalence of childhood trauma, including sexual abuse, among depressive women. These findings are associated with a complex, severe, and chronic psychopathology. This can be explained considering the neurobiological changes secondary to early trauma that can provoke a neuroendocrine failure to compensate in response to challenge. It suggests the existence of a distinguishable clinical-neurobiological subtype of depression as a function of childhood trauma that requires specific treatments. Among women with depression and early trauma receiving treatment in a public mental health service in Chile, it was demonstrated that a brief outpatient intervention (that screened for and focused on childhood trauma and helped patients to understand current psychosocial difficulties as a repetition of past trauma) was effective in reducing psychiatric symptoms and improving interpersonal relationships. However, in this population, this intervention did not prevent posttraumatic stress disorder secondary to the extreme earthquake that occurred in February 2010. Therefore in adults with depression and early trauma, it is necessary to evaluate prolonged multimodal treatments that integrate pharmacotherapy, social support, and interpersonal psychotherapies with trauma focused interventions (specific interventions for specific traumas). PMID:24695633

Vitriol, Veronica; Cancino, Alfredo; Weil, Kristina; Salgado, Carolina; Asenjo, Maria Andrea; Potthoff, Soledad

2014-01-01

60

Mental health in Egypt.  

PubMed

The concepts and management of mental health in Egypt are presented from the Pharaonic era through the Islamic Renaissance until today. Papyri from the Pharaonic period show that Soma and Psyche were not differentiated and mental disorders were described as symptoms of the heart and uterus. Although theories of causation were of a mystical nature, mental disorders were treated on a somatic basis. In the Islamic era, mental patients were neither maltreated nor tortured as a consequence of the belief that they may be possessed by a good Moslem genie. In the 14th century mental disorders was one of the four departments in Cairo's Kalawoon Hospital, a precursor of the place of psychiatry in general hospitals that was accepted in Europe six centuries later. The mental health services in Egypt today are described, and transcultural studies carried out in Egypt of the prevalence and phenomenology of anxiety, schizophrenia, depression, suicide, conversion and obsessive compulsive disorders are reviewed. The psychiatric services for children are in their infancy. Since 1983 the common and semi-accepted use of hashish has been joined by abuse by heroin and other substances. PMID:16342608

Okasha, Ahmed

2005-01-01

61

Mental health in hypertension: assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress on anti-hypertensive medication adherence  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with chronic conditions like hypertension may experience many negative emotions which increase their risk for the development of mental health disorders particularly anxiety and depression. For Ghanaian patients with hypertension, the interaction between hypertension and symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress remains largely unexplored. To fill this knowledge gap, the study sought to ascertain the prevalence and role of these negative emotions on anti-hypertensive medication adherence while taking into account patients’ belief systems. Methods The hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 400 hypertensive patients was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Ghana. Data were gathered on patient’s socio-demographic characteristics, anxiety, depression and stress symptoms, spiritual beliefs, and medication adherence. Results Hypertensive patients experienced symptoms of anxiety (56%), stress (20%) and depression (4%). As a coping mechanism, a significant relation was observed between spiritual beliefs and anxiety (x2?=?13.352, p?=?0.010), depression (x2?=?6.205, p?=?0.045) and stress (x2?=?14.833, p?=?0.001). Stress among patients increased their likelihood of medication non-adherence [odds ratio (OR)?=?2.42 (95% CI 1.06 – 5.5), p?=?0.035]. Conclusion The study has demonstrated the need for clinicians to pay attention to negative emotions and their role in medication non-adherence. The recommendation is that attention should be directed toward the use of spirituality as a possible mechanism by which negative emotions could be managed among hypertensive patients. PMID:24987456

2014-01-01

62

Engagement with Online Mental Health Interventions: An Exploratory Clinical Study of a Treatment for Depression  

E-print Network

for Depression Gavin Doherty Trinity College Dublin College Green, Dublin 2 gavin.doherty@tcd.ie David Coyle for depression. Pre and post-treatment assessments, using the Beck Depression Inventory, indicate a statistically significant improvement in depressive symptoms, with a large effect size, for the moderate-to- severe clinical

Subramanian, Sriram

63

ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS MENTAL HEALTH INFORMATION  

E-print Network

ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS MENTAL HEALTH INFORMATION Item No Req Price Total £ Help is at Hand? Helping you get through it Feeling overwhelmed: Helping you stay safe Men and depression Mental health in pregnancy Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Personality disorders Physical illness and mental health Post

Chittka, Lars

64

Identifying Depression in Students with Mental Retardation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Offers guidelines to teachers for identifying depression in students with mental retardation. Discusses prevalence and symptoms of depression, causes of depression, difficulty of diagnosis in students with mental retardation, detecting symptoms in the classroom, treatment of depression, and psychological services. Inserts list ideas for helping…

Stough, Laura M.; Baker, Lynn

1999-01-01

65

[Mental health problems].  

PubMed

This paper describes current issues in occupational mental health, occupational mental health activities currently underway, and priorities to improve the situation in Japan. A new tool to support these activities is then discussed. The incidence of employee mental health problems is rising, despite efforts to promote occupational mental health activities. The adoption of such activities is lagging behind in medium and small-sized enterprises. Priorities to improve occupational mental health include motivating business operators to address mental health issues, focusing more on prevention, and promoting mental health initiatives in medium and small-sized enterprises. Mental-Rosai, a web-based mental health check system, is a useful tool for the prevention of mental health problems and can provide support for medium and small-sized enterprises. PMID:24605529

Momotani, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Haruyoshi

2014-02-01

66

Intimate Partner Violence, Depression, PTSD and Use of Mental Health Resources among Ethnically Diverse Black Women  

PubMed Central

Background This study examined exposure to violence and risk for lethality in intimate partner relationships as factors related to co-occurring MH problems and use of mental health (MH) resources among women of African descent. Methods Black women with intimate partner violence (IPV) experiences (n=431) were recruited from primary care, prenatal or family planning clinics in the US and the US Virgin Islands. Results Severity of IPV was significantly associated with co-occurring MH problems, but was not associated with the use of MH resources among African American women. Risk for lethality and co-occurring problems were also not significantly related to the use of resources. African Caribbean women with severe physical abuse experiences were significantly less likely to use resources. In contrast, severity of physical abuse was positively associated with the use of resources among Black women with mixed ethnicity. Conclusions Severe IPV experiences are risk factors for co-occurring MH problems, which in turn, increases the need for MH services. However, Black women may not seek help for MH problems. Thus, social work practitioners in health care settings must thoroughly assess women for their IPV experiences and develop tailored treatment plans that address their abuse histories and MH needs. PMID:23581838

SABRI, BUSHRA; BOLYARD, RICHELLE; MCFADGION, AKOSOA L.; STOCKMAN, JAMILA K.; LUCEA, MARGUERITE B.; CALLWOOD, GLORIA B.; COVERSTON, CATHERINE R.; CAMPBELL, JACQUELYN C.

2013-01-01

67

The Efficacy of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy as a Public Mental Health Intervention for Adults with Mild to Moderate Depressive Symptomatology: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Objective Although there has been growing evidence for the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for different clinical populations, its effectiveness as a public mental health intervention has not been studied. The present study evaluates a community-based MBCT intervention for adults with mild to moderate depressive symptomatology in a large multi-site, pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Method The participants with mild to moderate depressive symptomatology were recruited from the general population and randomized to the MBCT intervention (n?=?76) or to a waiting list control group (n?=?75). Participants completed measures before and after the intervention. Participants in the experimental condition also completed these measures at a 3-month follow-up. Results In the experimental condition significant reductions in depression, anxiety, and experiential avoidance, and improvements in mindfulness and emotional- and psychological mental health were found, compared to the waiting list (effect sizes Cohen's d?=?0.31–0.56). These effects were sustained at the 3-month follow-up. The likelihood of a clinically significant change in depressive symptoms was significantly higher for the MBCT group [odds ratio (OR) 3.026, p<0.01 at post-treatment; NNT?=?5.10]. Discussion MBCT as a public mental health intervention for adults with mild to moderate depressive symptoms seems effective and applicable in a natural setting. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR2096 PMID:25333885

Pots, Wendy T. M.; Meulenbeek, Peter A. M.; Veehof, Martine M.; Klungers, Jorinde; Bohlmeijer, Ernst T.

2014-01-01

68

Women At Work and At Home: Implications for Depression and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers in the area of depression, aware that women are more likely than men to be depressed, have examined women's marital and employment status to explain this phenomenon. However, the meanings, perceptions, and situations encountered within marital and work roles also contribute to emotional distress. The traditional sex role explanation of…

Kanefield, Linda

69

National Institute of Mental Health: Child and Adolescent Mental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Developed as a public service by the National Institute of Mental Health, this Web site contains a wealth of materials that will be very useful to mental health practitioners, parents, and those who work with young people in any capacity. First-time visitors will want to read the brief notes on the mental health of children and adolescents, as well as the section dealing with the treatment of children with mental disorders, which answers some basic questions about various disorders and psychotropic medicines commonly prescribed to treat these conditions. The Educational Materials section provides a number of booklets, fact sheets, and additional Web sites on such conditions as autism, depression, learning disabilities, and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Researchers and health care professionals will want to examine the sections devoted to current research reports and multi-center collaborations, including the Child and Adolescent Research Consortium and the Child Abuse and Neglect Working Group.

70

Mental Health in American Indians and Alaska Natives  

MedlinePLUS

... One Sky Center - a National Resource Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Education and Research. Healthy Minds TV - Depression Mental Health Disparities Fact Sheet: American Indians ...

71

Career Thoughts, Indecision, and Depression: Implications for Mental Health Assessment in Career Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationships among dysfunctional career thoughts and career indecision with respect to symptoms of depression. Such information could be useful to counselors in identifying individuals at the outset of career counseling who may be experiencing emotional distress from life stressors in addition to career stress.…

Walker, Jerry V., III; Peterson, Gary W.

2012-01-01

72

Depression or Endocrine Disorder?: What Mental Health Counselors Need to Know about Hypothyroidism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes hypothyroidism, an endocrine disorder characterized by symptoms that resemble those of depression. Discusses features of the disorder, types and grades of hypothyroidism, causes, valuative techniques for the disorder, and implications of hypothyroidism in counseling and in treating patients suffering from this disorder. (RJM)

Stanley, Paula Helen

1997-01-01

73

Post-conflict mental health needs: a cross-sectional survey of trauma, depression and associated factors in Juba, Southern Sudan  

PubMed Central

Background The signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in January 2005 marked the end of the civil conflict in Sudan lasting over 20 years. The conflict was characterised by widespread violence and large-scale forced migration. Mental health is recognised as a key public health issue for conflict-affected populations. Studies revealed high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) amongst populations from Southern Sudan during the conflict. However, no studies have been conducted on mental health in post-war Southern Sudan. The objective of this study was to measure PTSD and depression in the population in the town of Juba in Southern Sudan; and to investigate the association ofdemographic, displacement, and past and recent trauma exposure variables, on the outcomes of PTSD and depression. Methods A cross-sectional, random cluster survey with a sample of 1242 adults (aged over 18 years) was conducted in November 2007 in the town of Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan. Levels of exposure to traumatic events and PTSD were measured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (original version), and levels of depression measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse the association ofdemographic, displacement and trauma exposure variables on the outcomes of PTSD and depression. Multivariate logistic regression was also conducted to investigate which demographic and displacement variables were associated with exposure to traumatic events. Results Over one third (36%) of respondents met symptom criteria for PTSD and half (50%) of respondents met symptom criteria for depression. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed strong associations of gender, marital status, forced displacement, and trauma exposure with outcomes of PTSD and depression. Men, IDPs, and refugees and persons displaced more than once were all significantly more likely to have experienced eight or more traumatic events. Conclusion This study provides evidence of high levels of mental distress in the population of Juba Town, and associated risk-factors. Comprehensive social and psychological assistance is urgently required in Juba. PMID:19261192

Roberts, Bayard; Damundu, Eliaba Yona; Lomoro, Olivia; Sondorp, Egbert

2009-01-01

74

Mental Health 3: Mental Health Through Literature  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, from Science NetLinks, examines how mental illness has been portrayed in the arts while highlighting for students a more insightful way to further develop their ideas about human behavior. This lesson is the third of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-27

75

Depression in Europe: does migrant integration have mental health payoffs? A cross-national comparison of 20 European countries.  

PubMed

Objectives. Depression is a leading cause of ill health and disability. As migrants form an increasing group in Europe, already making up about 8.7% of the population in 2010, knowledge on migrant-related inequalities in depression is of main public health interest. In this study, we first assess whether migrants in Europe are at higher risk for depression compared to the native population. Second, we assess whether the association between migration and depression is dependent on different forms of migrant integration. Migrant integration is looked at both from the individual and from the national level. Design. Hierarchical linear regression analyses based on data for 20 countries in the European Social Survey 2006/2007 (N = 37,076 individuals aged 15 or more). Depression is measured using the center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale. We consider migrant integration over time (first- and second-generation migrants, differentiated according to European Union (EU) or non-EU origin), barriers to integration (low educational level, financial difficulties, being out of the labor market, ethnic minority status, discrimination), and the host country environment (national migrant integration policy). Controls are gender, age, partner relationship, social support, and welfare state regime. Results. Natives and second-generation migrants do not differ significantly in their risk profile for depression. First-generation migrants show higher levels of depression, with those born outside of Europe to be the worst off. This higher risk for depression is not attributable to ethnic minority status but is mainly due to experienced barriers to socioeconomic integration and processes of discrimination. A country's national policy on migrant integration shows not to soften the depressing effect of being a first-generation migrant nor does it have indirect beneficial health effects by reducing barriers to integration. Conclusion. In Europe, first-generation EU and non-EU migrants experience higher levels of depression. Second-generation migrants and natives show similar risk profiles. PMID:24517205

Levecque, Katia; Van Rossem, Ronan

2015-02-01

76

Mental Health 2: Bedlam  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the second of three lessons from Science NetLinks on mental health and human behavior. This lesson gives students an up-close, personal look at Bedlam, the world's first mental health asylum, and the kind of life and treatment that mentally ill people received before the 20th century.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-28

77

HUMAN SERVICES Mental Health Services  

E-print Network

procedures. Federal government, Departments of Health and Human Services Justice Veterans AdministrationPSYCHOLOGY HUMAN SERVICES Counseling Advocacy Mental Health Services STRATEGIESAREAS EMPLOYERS State government, Departments of Human Services Mental Health & Mental Retardation Community mental

Escher, Christine

78

Brazil's mental health adventure.  

PubMed

This is an account of my trips to Brazil in 2001 where I worked on a series of mental health projects with Brazilian colleagues. I first got interested in Brazil after I graduated from college when I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Northeast Brazil (Bahia state). After I got out of the Peace Corps I moved to Rio de Janeiro and went to work for United Press International (UPI) in their Rio bureau. I was UPI foreign news correspondent for a year and a half. Those years in Brazil were probably the happiest years of my life. Later on, after I became ill in the U.S., my Brazilian connection played an important role in my recovery. Raised in a Victorian family in a small town in the Midwest, and schooled in a traditional boarding school for boys and then at an all men's college, Brazil's lively Latino culture served as a healthy antidote for my tendency to be reserved and often depressed. My contact with Brazilians and Brazilian culture always beckoned me on. I maintained contact with my friends in Brazil and they stuck by me through my illness years. What seemed like my emotional and intellectual "excess" to me, was easily accepted by my Brazilian friends. I felt much more myself interacting with Brazilians and connected to a larger sense of self I developed in Brazil. I traveled to Brazil at every opportunity and made friends with Brazilians I met in the States. I initiated Portuguese classes at John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio in the early 1990s and then was invited to teach Brazilian culture to undergraduates. These appointments and my own resilience moved me past one depression and a dysthymia condition and into the wider community. I regained my confidence as a teacher, a role I had before and during the years of my illness. From this position, I organized a club for Brazilian students studying in the Cleveland area. After this teaching stint, I felt ready to pursue full time employment and began a job search that would eventually land me in New Haven at the Connecticut Mental Health Center. Since 1997, I've spent my vacations traveling and working in Brazil as an Outside Consultant on mental health projects with colleagues in Rio and Sao Paulo. In my travels I've been befriended and supported by adherents of a social movement, not unlike the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, that has struggled for many years to close Brazil's long-term psychiatric hospitals, create community-based services and expand the rights of mental patients. Now I see my Brazilian connection as part of my ongoing recovery. I see myself as having the opportunity to be a link between the mental health worlds of the U.S. and Brazil. I believe the two countries have much to offer each other when it comes to mental health. PMID:12653451

Weingarten, Richard

2003-01-01

79

Age differences in the prevalence and comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Survey Initiative  

PubMed Central

Background Although depression appears to decrease in late life, this could be due to misattribution of depressive symptoms to physical disorders that increase in late life. Methods We investigated this issue by studying age differences in comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes (MDE) with chronic physical conditions in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) surveys, a series of community epidemiological surveys carried out in 10 developed countries (n = 51,771) and 8 developing countries (n = 37,265). MDE and other mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Organic exclusion rules were not used to avoid inappropriate exclusion of cases with physical comorbidity. Physical conditions were assessed with a standard chronic conditions checklist. Results Twelve-month DSM-IV/CIDI MDE was significantly less prevalent among respondents ages 65+ than younger respondents in developed but not developing countries. Prevalence of comorbid mental disorders generally either decreased or remained stable with age, while comorbidity of MDE with mental disorders generally increased with age. Prevalence of physical conditions, in comparison, generally increased with age, while comorbidity of MDE with physical conditions generally decreased with age. Depression treatment was lowest among the elderly in developed and developing countries. Conclusions The weakening associations between MDE and physical conditions with increasing age argue against the suggestion that the low estimated prevalence of MDE among the elderly is due to increased confounding with physical disorders. Future study is needed to investigate processes that might lead to a decreasing impact of physical illness on depression among the elderly. PMID:20037917

Kessler, Ronald C.; Birnbaum, Howard; Shahly, Victoria; Bromet, Evelyn; Hwang, Irving; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sampson, Nancy; Andrade, Laura Helena; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Demyttenaere, Koen; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Aimee N.; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Kovess, Viviane; Lara, Carmen; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Browne, Mark Oakley; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Stein, Dan J.

2011-01-01

80

Subjective Versus Objective: An Exploratory Analysis of Latino Primary Care Patients With Self-Perceived Depression Who Do Not Fulfill Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders Patient Health Questionnaire Criteria for Depression  

PubMed Central

Objective: Identification and treatment of depression may be difficult for primary care providers when there is a mismatch between the patient's subjective experiences of illness and objective criteria. Cultural differences in presentation of symptoms among Latino immigrants may hinder access to care for treatment of depression. This article seeks to describe the self-perceptions and symptoms of Latino primary care patients who identify themselves as depressed but do not meet screening criteria for depression. Method: A convenience sample of Latino immigrants (N = 177) in Corona, Queens, New York, was obtained from a primary care practice from August 2008 to December 2008. The sample was divided into 3 groups according to whether participants met Patient Health Questionnaire diagnostic criteria for depression and whether or not participants had a self-perceived mental health problem and self-identified their problem as “depression” from a checklist of cultural idioms of distress. Psychosocial, demographic, and treatment variables were compared between the 3 groups. Results: Participants’ descriptions of symptoms had a predominantly somatic component. The most common complaints were ánimo bajo (low energy) and decaimiento (weakness). Participants with “subjective” depression had mean scores of somatic symptoms and depression severity that were significantly lower than the participants with “objective” depression and significantly higher than the group with no depression (P < .0001). Conclusions: Latino immigrants who perceive that they need help with depression, but do not meet screening criteria for depression, still have significant distress and impairment. To avoid having these patients “fall through the cracks,” it is important to take into account culturally accepted expressions of distress and the meaning of illness for the individual. PMID:21274360

Alvidrez, Jennifer; Paris, Manuel; Escobar, Javier I.; Dixon, Jane K.; Desai, Mayur M.; Whittemore, Robin; Scahill, Lawrence D.

2010-01-01

81

Mental Health and Minorities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This newsletter includes 12 brief articles or news items concerning mental health among minority groups. These address: (1) cultural considerations in treating Asians (reasons why Asians tend not to use mental health services); (2) coping with racial stress (responses to a questionnaire on dealing with racial stress); (3) minority health

Meadows, Michelle, Ed.

1997-01-01

82

What Is Mental Health?  

MedlinePLUS

... positive Getting physically active Helping others Getting enough sleep Developing coping skills Learn More About Mental Health The importance of prevention and wellness What communities can do ...

83

Women Veterans and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Health > Women veterans and mental health Mental Health Women veterans and mental health Post-traumatic stress disorder ( ... hurt you. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and women veterans PTSD can occur after you have been ...

84

Social ties and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is generally agreed that social ties play a beneficial role in the maintenance of psychological well-being. In this targeted\\u000a review, we highlight four sets of insights that emerge from the literature on social ties and mental health outcomes (defined\\u000a as stress reactions, psychological well-being, and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms and anxiety). First,\\u000a the pathways by which social networks

Ichiro Kawachi; Lisa F. Berkman

2001-01-01

85

The Real World Mental Health Needs of Heart Failure Patients Are Not Reflected by the Depression Randomized Controlled Trial Evidence  

PubMed Central

Introduction International depression screening guidelines in heart failure (HF) are partly based on depression treatment efficacy from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Our aim was to test the external validity of depression RCT criteria in a sample of real-world HF patients. Methods HF patients admitted to 3 hospitals in South Australia were referred to a HF psychologist if not already receiving current psychiatric management by psychologist or psychiatrist elsewhere. Screening and referral protocol consisted of the following; (a). Patient Health Questionnaire ?10; (b). Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ?7); (c). positive response to 1 item panic attack screener; (d). evidence of suicidality. Patients were evaluated against the most common RCT exclusion criteria personality disorder, high suicide risk, cognitive impairment, psychosis, alcohol or substance abuse or dependency, bi-polar depression. Results Total 81 HF patients were referred from 404 HF admissions, and 73 were assessed (age 60.6±13.4, 47.9% female). Nearly half (47%) met at least 1 RCT exclusion criterion, most commonly personality disorder (28.5%), alcohol/substance abuse (17.8%) and high suicide risk (11.0%). RCT ineligibility criteria was more frequent among patients with major depression (76.5% vs. 46.2%, p<.01) and dysthymia (26.5% vs. 7.7%, p?=?.03) but not significantly associated with anxiety disorders. RCT ineligible patients reported greater severity of depression (M?=?16.6±5.0 vs. M?=?12.9±7.2, p?=?.02) and were higher consumers of HF psychotherapy services (M?=?11.5±4.7 vs. M?=?8.5±4.8, p?=?.01). Conclusion In this real-world sample comparable in size to recent RCT intervention arms, patients with depression disorders presented with complex psychiatric needs including comorbid personality disorders, alcohol/substance use and suicide risk. These findings suggest external validity of depression screening and RCTs could serve as a basis for level A guideline recommendations in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24475060

Tully, Phillip J.; Wittert, Gary; Selkow, Terina; Baumeister, Harald

2014-01-01

86

Predictors of Depressive Symptomatology Among Lower Social Class Caregivers of Persons with Chronic Mental Illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the predictors of depressive symptomatology among caregivers of persons with chronic mental illness. Data were collected through in-person interviews with family caregivers of 103 adults with chronic mental illness who were served by mental health case management agencies. The results indicated that insufficiency of overall social support was the most powerful predictor of caregiver depressive symptomatology. In

Li-Yu Song; David E. Biegel; Sharon E. Milligan

1997-01-01

87

Defining mental health and mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Key featuresDiscussion of the terminological confusion that exists in relation to issues associated with mental health.  The scale of individual suffering from mental health problems and illness among young people.  The worldwide phenomenon of the stigmatization of mental illness, originating during childhood.

Sharon Leighton; Nisha Dogra

88

MentalHealth.net  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is an excellent resource for anyone seeking the latest issues surrounding mental health topics. It is designed and maintained by Clinical Psychologists and is "dedicated to educating the public about mental health, wellness, and family and relationship issues and concerns." In existence since 1995, the site provides featured topics, essays and articles, as well as latest news sections. In addition to these tools, weblogs, podcasts, and a questions and answers section are available. This site will be a valuable resource for any student, instructor or professional in the mental health field.

2007-08-23

89

Ramapo CollegeRamapo College Mental Health AwarenessMental Health Awareness  

E-print Network

Challenges Facing Students Stress is the most common problem amongStress is the most common problem among college of college studentsA large national survey of college students identified rates of depression (44Ramapo CollegeRamapo College Mental Health AwarenessMental Health Awareness TrainingTraining #12

Rainforth, Emma C.

90

Vulnerability and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The vulnerability of children has long been recognized in terms of their development needs and the importance of protecting their physical health. The extent, severity and impact of their mental health problems, including the particular vulnerabilities associated with such problems in both childhood and through to adult life, have been less of a public health priority. Vulnerabilities come in many

Beverley Raphael; Garry Stevens; Keirsten Pedersen

2006-01-01

91

Depressive Symptoms, Utilization of Mental Health Care, Substance Use and Sexual Risk Among Young Men Who have Sex with Men in EXPLORE: Implications for Age-Specific Interventions  

PubMed Central

The EXPLORE study evaluated a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV infection among MSM. We examined depressive symptoms, utilization of mental health care, substance use and HIV risk taking behaviors in YMSM aged 16–25 years compared with their older counterparts. YMSM were more likely to report depressive symptoms (OR = 1.55) and less likely to report use of counseling (OR = 0.39) or medication (OR = 0.20) for psychiatric conditions. YMSM were more likely to report heavy alcohol and drug use. YMSM more often reported engaging in unprotected insertive (OR = 1.60) and receptive (OR = 2.07) anal intercourse with presumed HIV-uninfected partners, and unprotected receptive (OR = 1.72) anal intercourse with partners of unknown-HIV status. These findings suggest the need for more appropriate and accessible mental health care and substance use services for YMSM. Additionally, HIV prevention work with this population should provide comprehensive education about HIV testing and risk reduction counseling that focuses on communication about serostatus and safety in sexual situations. PMID:18709453

Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Husnik, Marla J.; Welles, Seth L.; Manseau, Marc W.; Montenegro, Arnel B.; Safren, Steven A.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

2009-01-01

92

Mental Health Matters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mental Health Matters is a collection of various mental health articles which cover topics such as psychological disorders and treatments for mental illnesses. The site is easy to navigate and users can choose from disorders, symptoms, medications, and treatments. Once a visitor chooses a subfield from the homepage, they are provided with another set of choices which contain more specific information on the various main topics. The site is also designed so that users can search by disorder or category to find the appropriate information to answer their queries.

2007-08-13

93

Health policy and mental health.  

PubMed

Health policy can be described as policy directed at the determinants of health, i.e. biological and environmental factors, lifestyle and the health care system. This type of policy now has become a policy objective in an increasing number of countries. In this article mental health is placed in the broad context of this policy. The central question is: can the mental health field grasp the opportunity of a growing interest in prevention and health promotion in general, as major objectives of health policy? Or will it stay more or less isolated from the mainstream of current developments? Answering this question means looking at the conditions of health policy. For health policy it is required that a definition be given of health problems and "causing" conditions. There should further be available intervention possibilities of a preventive and intersectoral character and also preventive strategies. It is stated that there is enough standardized information on mental health problems and experience with community-based research to let mental health participate in drawing up a community diagnosis. It also appears possible to construct an ecological health status model for mental health. Research on the factors in this model shows a shift in focus from risk populations to risk situations, e.g. unemployment, industrial disability, divorce and isolation. Further it is recognized that the search for causal factors is substituted by that for precipitating factors. Social-demographic factors, taken alone, are not precipitating factors. What matters is the combination of an underdeveloped coping mechanism, little social support, and prolonged stressful conditions or sudden stressful events.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10287174

Dekker, E

1987-01-01

94

Mental Health and Mass Violence  

E-print Network

Mental Health and Mass Violence Evidence-Based Early Psychological Intervention for Victims Institute of Mental Health (2002). Mental Health and Mass Violence: Evidence-Based Early Psychological are available through: The National Institute of Mental Health Office of Communications and Public Liaison 6001

Baker, Chris I.

95

Cannabis Use and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors aecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dy- namics of cannabis use. Our main finding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger eect than

Carol Propper; Tue Gørgens; Chikako Yamauchi

96

Benchmarking Adult Mental Health Organizations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This paper describes the adult mental health forums that were conducted as part of the National Mental Health Benchmarking Project (NMHBP).Method: Eight adult mental health forums were attended by staff from eight adult mental health services from around the country. The forums provided an avenue for these participants to document their organizations’ performances against previously agreed key performance indicators

Tim Coombs; Tania Geyer; Jane Pirkis

2011-01-01

97

Inequality, privacy, and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The state's mental health power is standardly understood in terms of the state's power to intervene with persons or populations to address mental health problems. This article advances a more expansive view of the state's mental health power, one which seeks to capture those exercises of state power that do not directly concern mental health but that nevertheless can have

Andrew W. Siegel

2008-01-01

98

Association of socioeconomic status in childhood with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder: results from the World Mental Health Japan survey 2002-2006  

PubMed Central

Background Low socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood is known to be a significant risk factor for mental disorders in Western societies. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a similar association exists in Japan. Methods We used data from the World Mental Health Japan Survey conducted from 2002–2006 (weighted N?=?1,682). Respondents completed diagnostic interviews that assessed lifetime prevalence of major depression (MD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Associations between parental education (a proxy of SES in childhood) and lifetime onset of both disorders were estimated and stratified by gender using discrete-time survival analysis. Results Among women, high parental education was positively associated with MD (odds ratio [OR]: 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-3.18) in comparison with low parental education, even after adjustment for age, childhood characteristics, and SES in adulthood. This same effect was not found for men. In contrast, higher parental education was associated with GAD (OR: 6.84, 95% CI: 1.62-28.94) in comparison with low parental education among men, but this association was not found among the women, in the fully adjusted model. Conclusions In Japan, childhood SES is likely to be positively associated with the lifetime onset of mental disorders, regardless of family history of mental disorders, childhood physical illness, or SES in adulthood. Further study is required to replicate the current findings and elucidate the mechanism of the positive association between mental disorders and childhood SES. PMID:24735450

2014-01-01

99

Self versus Others' Perception of Youths' Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data was analyzed in the National Longitudinal Survey Study from 1997 specifically relating to questions regarding depression in youth. In the analysis it was found that how the respondent defined their own depression and poor mental health was different than the perceptions about their mental health from those that live with them in the same…

Viviano, Thomas A.

2010-01-01

100

Mental Health Economics and Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

As evidenced by the European Commission's recent Mental Health Pact, mental health has moved up the policy agenda in many countries. There is much more attention now on promoting general mental wellbeing in the population, and addressing the needs of people with mental health problems. Particular concerns are: human rights abuses; rebalancing community and institutional care; coordinating action across multiple

Martin Knapp; David McDaid; Jennifer Beecham; Derek King; Roshni Mangalore; A-La Park; Andres Roman; Monique Smith; Cicely Thomas; Fayaz Aziz

2009-01-01

101

Student Mental Health Final Report  

E-print Network

1 Student Mental Health Committee Final Report University of California Office of the President: Report of the University of California Student Mental Health Committee On behalf of the Student Mental in December 2005, and was given a charge to assess 1) trends in student mental health, 2) how these trends

O'Toole, Alice J.

102

Mental Health, Racism, and Sexism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume, successor to the 1973 volume "Racism and Mental Health," presents a range of perspectives on mental health, prejudice, and discrimination. Contributors are of multiracial, multiethnic, and gender-diverse backgrounds. They use their existential experiences to analyze pressing mental health and mental illness issues. Contributions…

Willie, Charles V., Ed.; And Others

103

Atheism and mental health.  

PubMed

The exploration of the impact of religiosity on mental health is an enduring, if somewhat quiet, tradition. There has been virtually no exploration, however, of the influence of atheism on mental health. Though not a "religion," atheism can be an orienting worldview that is often consciously chosen by its adherents, who firmly believe in the "truth" of atheism-a phenomenon known as "positive atheism." Atheism, especially positive atheism, is currently enjoying something of a renaissance in the Western liberal democracies-a trend often referred to as the "new atheism." I argue that atheism, especially positive atheism, should be treated as a meaningful sociocultural variable in the study of mental health. I argue that atheism (just like theism) is an appropriate domain of study for social and cultural psychiatrists (and allied social scientists) interested in exploring socio-environmental stressors and buffers relating to mental health. Specifically, I argue that (1) atheism needs to be accurately measured as an individual-level exposure variable, with the aim of relating that variable to psychiatric outcomes, (2) there needs to be greater systematic investigation into the influence of atheism on psychiatry as an institution, and (3) the relation of atheism to mental health needs to be explored by examining atheistic theory and its practical application, especially as it relates to the human condition, suffering, and concepts of personhood. PMID:20415634

Whitley, Rob

2010-01-01

104

National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located at the National Institutes of Health, NIMH is focused on mental health: Depression, Anxiety Disorders, Alzheimer's Disease, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Schizophrenia, etc. The site contains items of interest to the researcher (news & events, grants, contracts, & committees, and research activities) as well as the lay person (the public information section provides specifics on "mental disorders, diagnosis and treatment," as well as links to other NIMH programs such as D/ART, the Depression Awareness Recognition Treatment Program). Additionally, NIMH organizational and directory information is available. The site can be searched, through either a simple or an advanced search interface.

1997-01-01

105

Australian Indigenous mental health.  

PubMed

Understanding the complexity of another culture's health concerns is fraught with difficulty, yet 'ways forward' abound. Many researchers, including Indigenous people, have recorded cultural understandings of health, and made recommendations that have influenced the planning of Indigenous peoples' mental health care. Indeed, there is anticipation with vision for the future. Australian Indigenous people have suffered many losses, which have resulted in much social unrest, and mental and spiritual sorrow. The difficulty of belonging and adjusting to two different cultural contexts has led to particular physical health and mental health concerns for some. Health for Indigenous people is viewed within a holistic and community lifestyle framework, which is related to both past and present issues, and it is not necessarily individualized or compartmentalized. A closer liaison between the health traditions of both cultures, working together with education, good will and understanding of each other's health business, and working together within mainstream health services may assist with healing, reconciliation and improved Aboriginal holistic health. PMID:11421971

Brown, R

2001-03-01

106

where transformation happens health + mental health  

E-print Network

where transformation happens health + mental health BOSTON COLLEGE G R A D U A T E S C H O O L O F SOCIAL WOR K #12;program overview The Health & Mental Health Concentration prepares students for clinical or macro practice in health or mental health settings by providing specialized knowl- edge in assessment

Huang, Jianyu

107

Perceived helpfulness of websites for mental health information  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Despite the high risk of developing a mental disorder during adolescence, many young people fail to receive appropriate treatment\\u000a from mental health professionals. Recent studies have found certain mental health information websites have improved mental\\u000a health literacy and reduced symptoms of depression. However, studies exploring young people’s perceptions of such resources\\u000a still remain scarce. The current paper compared young people’s

Elizabeth Oh; Anthony F. Jorm; Annemarie Wright

2009-01-01

108

Mental Health: Keeping Your Emotional Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotional health can sometimes have emotional problems or mental illness. Mental illness often has a physical cause, such as a ... with family, work or school can sometimes trigger mental illness or make it worse. However, people who are ...

109

Community Mental Health Model for Campus Mental Health Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

University and college mental health services have historically modeled themselves after a traditional clinic model. Few delivery systems have been influenced by the community mental health model. The major reason for this lack of influence appears to be the "in loco parentis" stance of colleges and universities. A campus mental health service…

Banning, James H.

110

Pennsylvania Women's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Women have undergone a revolution in their self-perception and their traditional relationships to work, money, marriage, and family. These social changes have implications for every aspect of women's lives, including their mental health. Because of the special problems and conflicts confronting women today, data need to be analyzed on policies,…

Towns, Kathryn; And Others

111

Lifestyle and Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized…

Walsh, Roger

2011-01-01

112

Lifestyle and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health professionals have significantly underestimated the importance of lifestyle factors (a) as contributors to and treatments for multiple psychopathologies, (b) for fostering individual and social well-being, and (c) for preserving and optimizing cognitive function. Consequently, therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLCs) are underutilized despite considerable evidence of their effectiveness in both clinical and normal populations. TLCs are sometimes as effective as

Roger Walsh

2011-01-01

113

Mental Health Treatment Program Locator  

MedlinePLUS

... County or Zip By Name Other Links State Mental Health Agencies Frequently Asked Questions Links Comments or Questions ... a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health treatment programs nearest you, find your State on ...

114

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... 1 Item) Populations Children and Adolescents (18 Items) Military Service Members (2 Items) Women’s Mental Health (1 ... 1 Item) Populations Children and Adolescents (18 Items) Military Service Members (2 Items) Women’s Mental Health (1 ...

115

Mental health and housing.  

PubMed

With the present trend away from the designing of individual buildings and towards the systematic planning of whole residential communities, it should be possible to take mental health requirements into account at the planning stage. At present, sociologists are all too seldom consulted on matters of residential planning. When discussing the relationship between housing and mental health one cannot restrict oneself only to the external aspects of the house, but rather one must also consider the opportunities available for the members of the family to satisfy their own needs, both within the home and in its immediate surroundings. Factors which may affect residential requirements include geographical location, type and standard of dwelling and time and continuity of occupation. A move between two districts or groups representing different housing norms and values may lead to withdrawal symptoms in the individual. This may arise equally well from the remoteness of the country districts as from the conflicting pressures brought on by the abundance of contacts available in the large towns. Town life tends to heighten susceptibility to neuroses and personality conflicts. The character of a residential area may affect the mental health of its occupants. Faris & Dunham (4), in studying the incidence of various types of mental illness with an urban population, observed that schizophrenia was most common among people who were in some way isolated from social involvement. The striving for spaciousness in residential areas and the creation of a "summer city" or "garden city" image or a "family-centred way of life" may lead to unexpected problems and have a variety of social consequences. Mental health difficulties have been noted, for example, among housewives in "dormitory" towns or suburbs (11). The institutions required by a community may be grouped into four categories, representing the basic needs of its members. These are (1) economic institutions, (2) social and political organizations, (3) leisure-time clubs and (4) societies and institutions for promoting social integration, including educational, advisory and assistance bodies. The study of satiation processes offers an interesting approach to the relationship between housing and mental health. Man requires new stimuli to motivate him. Boredom and satiation serve to induce passivity and may provoke destructive behaviour and escapism. Finland has the highest percentage of dwellings constructed in the immediate post-war period of any country in Europe, and in respect of the functions of housing many aspects are still apparent which are detrimental to mental health. PMID:1273551

Kari-Koskinen, O; Karvonen, P

1976-01-01

116

Mental Illness and Mental Health: The Two Continua Model Across the Lifespan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health has long been defined as the absence of psychopathologies, such as depression and anxiety. The absence of mental\\u000a illness, however, is a minimal outcome from a psychological perspective on lifespan development. This article therefore focuses\\u000a on mental illness as well as on three core components of positive mental health: feelings of happiness and satisfaction with\\u000a life (emotional well-being),

Gerben J. Westerhof; Corey L. M. Keyes

2010-01-01

117

Mental Health and the Media.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduces special issue on the topic of mental health and the media. States that there is no single answer about the impact of the media. Suggests that articles attempt to encourage counselors to think critically about the role of the media in influencing individual mental health and in shaping public perceptions of mental health issues.…

Wilson, Nona L.

1999-01-01

118

Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation  

E-print Network

Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation in Florida Final Summary of Survey, with the Program Office of Substance Abuse and Mental Health in Florida's Department of Children and Families (DCF). Background Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation (ECMHC) is an effective prevention and early

McQuade, D. Tyler

119

The HIV mental health spectrum  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growing mental health needs that are related to HIV are immense and diverse. The HIV mental health spectrum is a model that identifies and characterizes populations in need of HIV-related services which can be offered by Community Mental Health Centers. The spectrum describes the specialized service requirements for each of these populations, the challenges in providing these services, and

Michael D. Knox; Maryann Davis; Martha A. Friedrich

1994-01-01

120

Mental health consequences of the Lockerbie Disaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines mental health consequences of the Lockerbie Disaster in 66 adults claiming compensation from the insurers of the airline. Claimants were examined 10 to 14 months after the disaster by clinical interview and questionnaires. The most frequent diagnoses were post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, followed by other anxiety disorders. Many were above “caseness” levels on questionnaires, and had

Neil Brooks; William McKinlay

1992-01-01

121

Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure

Evelyn J Bromet

2012-01-01

122

Mental Health Needs of Arab Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Researchers indicate that the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in the Arab region is similar to that found in other parts of the world. Women, in particular, are more likely to suffer various disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, somatization, and eating disorders. In this article, the author highlights some of the research on the mental health needs of Arab women. Consideration

Aisha Hamdan

2009-01-01

123

Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina  

PubMed Central

Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine personal and situational correlates of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N=69) in six counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach. PMID:22757952

Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

124

School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

2013-01-01

125

Contemporary mental health rehabilitation.  

PubMed

In the United Kingdom, contemporary mental health rehabilitation services evolved during the period of deinstitutionalisation. They focus on people with complex psychosis, a "low volume, high needs" group which is at risk of social exclusion. Without these specialist services, this group is at risk of becoming stuck in a hospital or in other facilities that do not enable them to achieve their optimal level of autonomy. When a "whole system" of rehabilitative care is provided, including specialist inpatient facilities and supported accommodation, the majority are able to progress in their recovery and live successfully in the community. Rehabilitation is a complex intervention; current and further research is needed to identify the specific aspects of treatment and support it delivers that are most effective in enabling recovery and social inclusion for those with the most complex and long-term mental health needs. PMID:25316799

Killaspy, H

2014-09-01

126

Problem-solving therapy for depression and common mental disorders in Zimbabwe: piloting a task-shifting primary mental health care intervention in a population with a high prevalence of people living with HIV  

PubMed Central

Background There is limited evidence that interventions for depression and other common mental disorders (CMD) can be integrated sustainably into primary health care in Africa. We aimed to pilot a low-cost multi-component 'Friendship Bench Intervention' for CMD, locally adapted from problem-solving therapy and delivered by trained and supervised female lay workers to learn if was feasible and possibly effective as well as how best to implement it on a larger scale. Method We trained lay workers for 8 days in screening and monitoring CMD and in delivering the intervention. Ten lay workers screened consecutive adult attenders who either were referred or self-referred to the Friendship Bench between July and December 2007. Those scoring above the validated cut-point of the Shona Symptom Questionnaire (SSQ) for CMD were potentially eligible. Exclusions were suicide risk or very severe depression. All others were offered 6 sessions of problem-solving therapy (PST) enhanced with a component of activity scheduling. Weekly nurse-led group supervision and monthly supervision from a mental health specialist were provided. Data on SSQ scores at 6 weeks after entering the study were collected by an independent research nurse. Lay workers completed a brief evaluation on their experiences of delivering the intervention. Results Of 395 potentially eligible, 33 (8%) were excluded due to high risk. Of the 362 left, 2% (7) declined and 10% (35) were lost to follow-up leaving an 88% response rate (n = 320). Over half (n = 166, 52%) had presented with an HIV-related problem. Mean SSQ score fell from 11.3 (sd 1.4) before treatment to 6.5 (sd 2.4) after 3-6 sessions. The drop in SSQ scores was proportional to the number of sessions attended. Nine of the ten lay workers rated themselves as very able to deliver the PST intervention. Conclusion We have found preliminary evidence of a clinically meaningful improvement in CMD associated with locally adapted problem-solving therapy delivered by lay health workers through routine primary health care in an African setting. There is a need to test the effectiveness of this task-shifting mental health intervention in an appropriately powered randomised controlled trial. Trial registration ISRCTN: ISRCTN25476759 PMID:22029430

2011-01-01

127

Mental health promotion system.  

PubMed

Mental activity promotion system is presented that analyzes, quantifies, trains and prescribes based on analysis of logical, memorizing, concentrative, decisive, in conditions where time and space is involved, possibility of dementia, and on evaluation of lifestyle of subjects. Special consideration has been made to make the system motivational, persuasive, attractive and fun to use. The system has been successfully deployed in Bitgeoul Senior health town, Gwangju, South Korea. PMID:22255530

Farooq, Umar; Jang, Dae-Geun; Jang, Jae-Keun; Park, Seung-Hun

2011-01-01

128

Mental Health and Stress  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project collects resources for studying mental health and stress issues with middle schoolers. Teens and stress Science NetLinks: The Laughing Brain 2: A Good Laugh Dealing with anger Stress-o-meter Look at each of the above sites. Choose one and read the content. Write a one-paragraph summary. Play interactive games and take quizzes. Keep a log of what you do. Tell which site you liked best and why. ...

Falconer, Mrs.

2007-03-18

129

What Is Infant Mental Health?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Unfortunately, the term "infant mental health" can be confusing for some people because it may be understood as translating into "mental illness." Others may not appreciate that babies and toddlers have the capacity to experience complex emotions. The Guest Editors of this issue of the Journal explore the meaning of infant mental health.

Osofsky, Joy D.; Thomas, Kandace

2012-01-01

130

Chicano Aging and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focusing on the direction future research on the Chicano elderly should take, the 10 papers address theory development, methodological approach, social policy and problems, mental health service delivery, and issues of mental illness. The first seven papers discuss: the theoretical perspectives of research pertaining to mental health and the…

Miranda, Manuel, Ed.; Ruiz, Rene A., Ed.

131

The importance of functional impairment to mental health outcomes: A case for reassessing our goals in depression treatment research  

PubMed Central

Outcomes in depression treatment research include both changes in symptom severity and functional impairment. Symptom measures tend to be the standard outcome but we argue that there are benefits to considering functional outcomes. An exhaustive literature review shows that the relationship between symptoms and functioning remains unexpectedly weak and often bidirectional. Changes in functioning often lag symptom changes. As a result, functional outcomes might offer depression researchers more critical feedback and better guidance when studying depression treatment outcomes. The paper presents a case for the necessity of both functional and symptom outcomes in depression treatment research by addressing three aims–1) review the research relating symptoms and functioning, 2) provide a rationale for measuring both outcomes, and 3) discuss potential artifacts in measuring functional outcomes. The three aims are supported by an empirical review of the treatment outcome and epidemiological literatures. PMID:19269076

McKnight, Patrick E.; Kashdan, Todd B.

2009-01-01

132

Psychosocial Features Associated with Lifetime Comorbidity of Major Depression and Anxiety Disorders Among a Community Sample of Mid-Life Women: The SWAN Mental Health Study  

PubMed Central

Background In clinical samples, comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders is associated with greater symptom severity and elevated suicide risk. Less is known, however, regarding the long-term psychosocial impact that a lifetime history of both MDD and one or more anxiety disorders has in community samples. This report evaluates clinical, psychological, social, and stress-related characteristics associated with a lifetime history of MDD and anxiety. Methods Data from 915 women aged 42–52 who were recruited as part of the the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study were used to examine clinical and psychosocial features across groups of women with a SCID-diagnosed lifetime history of MDD alone, anxiety alone, both MDD and anxiety, or neither MDD nor anxiety. Results As compared with women with a history of either MDD or anxiety alone, women with a comorbid history were more likely to report recurrent MDD, multiple and more severe lifetime anxiety disorders, greater depressive and anxiety symptoms, diminished social support, and more past-year distressing life events. Exploratory analyses indicated that women with a comorbid history also report more childhood abuse/neglect and diminished self-esteem, as compared with women with a history of either disorder alone. Conclusions Midlife women with a comorbid history that includes both MDD and anxiety disorders report diminished social support, more symptomatic distress, and a more severe and recurrent psychiatric history. Future research is needed to clarify the biological and psychosocial risk factors associated with this comorobid profile, and to develop targeted interventions for this at-risk group. PMID:22930404

Cyranowski, Jill M.; Schott, Laura L.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Brown, Charlotte; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Joffe, Hadine; Matthews, Karen A.; Bromberger, Joyce T.

2013-01-01

133

Use and quality of mental health services for Haitian youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. To describe the mental health service use of Haitian, African-American, and non-Latino White youth in a community mental health setting. Groups are compared on adherence to treatment guidelines for attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and depressive disorders.Design. Retrospective review of outpatient mental health charts (n=252) from five community sites in an urban area of the Northeastern United States. We recorded the

Nicholas J. Carson; Mark Stewart; Julia Y. Lin; Margarita Alegria

2011-01-01

134

WAR & Military Mental Health  

PubMed Central

Involvement in warfare can have dramatic consequences for the mental health and well-being of military personnel. During the 20th century, US military psychiatrists tried to deal with these consequences while contributing to the military goal of preserving manpower and reducing the debilitating impact of psychiatric syndromes by implementing screening programs to detect factors that predispose individuals to mental disorders, providing early intervention strategies for acute war-related syndromes, and treating long-term psychiatric disability after deployment. The success of screening has proven disappointing, the effects of treatment near the front lines are unclear, and the results of treatment for chronic postwar syndromes are mixed. After the Persian Gulf War, a number of military physicians made innovative proposals for a population-based approach, anchored in primary care instead of specialty-based care. This approach appears to hold the most promise for the future. PMID:17971561

Pols, Hans; Oak, Stephanie

2007-01-01

135

Marital transitions and mental health.  

PubMed

Most research identifies marital disruption as a precursor for poor mental health but is generally unable to discount the potential selection effect of poor mental health leading to marital disruption. We use data from nine annual waves of the British Household Panel Survey to examine social selection and social causation as competing explanations. Mental health is measured using the general health questionnaire. We examine mental health at multiple time points prior to and after a marital transition through separation or divorce and compare this process to those who experience widowhood. All groups transitioning out of marriage have a higher prevalence of poor mental health afterwards but for those separated or divorced, poor mental health also precedes marital disruption, lending support to both social-causation and social-selection processes. The processes both preceding and after the transition to widowhood differ, with increased prevalence of disorder centering around the time surrounding the death itself PMID:15305757

Wade, Terrance J; Pevalin, David J

2004-06-01

136

Perceived Discrimination and Children's Mental Health Symptoms.  

PubMed

Perceived discrimination has been shown to be strongly associated with mental health outcomes, such as depression, anxiety, chronic stress, post traumatic stress disorder, and low self-esteem. This study (N = 88) examined the effects of perceived discrimination and its association with child mental health symptoms. African American children had a significantly stronger association between social stress and a sense of exclusion/rejection than Multiracial or European American children. Nurses need to assess and counsel families of color about their experiences with perceived discriminatory acts. PMID:25365283

Cooke, Cheryl L; Bowie, Bonnie H; Carrère, Sybil

2014-01-01

137

Mental health of female survivors of human trafficking in Nepal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the mental health status of trafficked women, even though international conventions require that it be considered. This study, therefore, aims at exploring the mental health status, including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), of female survivors of human trafficking who are currently supported by local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Katmandu, the capital of Nepal, through

Atsuro Tsutsumi; Takashi Izutsu; Amod K. Poudyal; Seika Kato; Eiji Marui

2008-01-01

138

Mental Health and Service Delivery Systems for Black Women.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines mental health issues, especially alcoholism, suicide, and social depression, related to the counseling of Black women. Recommends improved mental health services, counselor/clinical training programs, and additional research focusing on the causes of stress among Black women. (Author/MW)

Smith, Elsie H.

1981-01-01

139

Synergy: Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network Newsletter, 2001.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each issue in the 2001 edition of the Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network (ATMHN) newsletter represents a theme critical to mental health practitioners. The Spring/Summer 2001 issue features articles on building communities of support for refugees, providing support to these families in cultural transitions, and studying depression

Baldwin, Sandee, Ed.

2001-01-01

140

The importance of functional impairment to mental health outcomes: A case for reassessing our goals in depression treatment research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Outcomes in depression treatment research include both changes in symptom severity and functional impairment. Symptom measures tend to be the standard outcome but we argue that there are benefits to considering functional outcomes. An exhaustive literature review shows that the relationship between symptoms and functioning remains unexpectedly weak and often bidirectional. Changes in functioning often lag symptom changes. As a

Patrick E. McKnight; Todd B. Kashdan

2009-01-01

141

Latino Adolescents' Mental Health: Exploring the Interrelations among Discrimination, Ethnic Identity, Cultural Orientation, Self-Esteem, and Depressive Symptoms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Guided by a risk and resilience framework, the current study used cross-sectional data to examine the degree to which Latino adolescents' (N=274; M age=16.3; 47.1% female) self-esteem, ethnic identity, and cultural orientations mediated or moderated the relation between perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms. Utilizing a multiple group…

Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.; Updegraff, Kimberly A.

2007-01-01

142

Mental health and disorders. Editorial.  

PubMed

Mental health and mental disorders pose a tremendous challenge to the societal, health, and research policies in Europe, and sound advice is needed on a potential strategy for mental health research investment. Toward this goal, the ROAMER initiative ("Roadmap for Mental Health Research in Europe") was launched to map the current state of the art, to identify gaps and to delineate advances needed in various areas and domains of mental health research in Europe. To further stimulate discussions among the scientific community and stakeholders on how to improve mental health research and to promote an improved research agenda for the next decade, this IJMPR topic issue presents the overall ROAMER methodology as well as a series of selected papers highlighting critical issues of psychological approaches and interventions as outcomes of the ROAMER work package 5 "Psychological research and treatments". PMID:24375538

Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

2014-01-01

143

Have Broad-Based Community and Professional Education Programs Influenced Mental Health Literacy and Treatment Seeking of those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Mental health literacy" is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid in their recognition, management, or prevention; it is also a determinant of help seeking. As such, it is presumed to be important in community suicide prevention programs. In Australia there have been a number of government, professional, and charitable…

Goldney, Robert D.; Fisher, Laura J.

2008-01-01

144

Mental Health of Indian Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children constitute nearly 40% of India's population, a significant portion of whom suffer mental ailments. Ways to sensitize those who work with children to various aspects associated with child mental health are explored in this book. The focus is not on mental handicap but on the internal or external distress which warps the psychosocial…

Kapur, Malavika

145

Health care reform and rural mental health: Severe mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Service needs of rural severely mentally ill and strengths of rural communities are addressed. Health care reform policy development at present appears to neglect the seriously mentally ill in general and rural services specifically. Examples of strategies to meet the needs for health care, psychiatric treatment, psychosocial rehabilitation and appropriate housing are described. The advantages and drawbacks of such efforts

Catherine F. Kane; Jacqueline M. Ennis

1996-01-01

146

Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster.  

PubMed

The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental health problems like depression in Fukushima patients. PMID:22394694

Bromet, Evelyn J

2012-03-01

147

The Mental Health of Young People in Australia: Key Findings from the Child and Adolescent Component of the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To identify the prevalence of three mental disorders (Depressive Disorder, Conduct Disorder and Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder), the prevalence of mental health problems, the health-related quality of life of those with problems, and patterns of service utilisation of those with and without mental health problems, among 4–17-year-olds in Australia. To identify rates of health-risk behaviours among adolescents with mental health problems.Method:

M. G Sawyer; F. M. Arney; P. A. Baghurst; J. J. Clark; B. W. Graetz; R. J. Kosky; B Nurcombe; G. C. Patton; M. R. Prior; B Raphael; J. M. Rey; L. C Whaites; S. R Zubrick

2001-01-01

148

National Institute of Mental Health: Publications  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For people who are living with a mental health condition, it can be most helpful to have access to high-quality and authoritative information. The National Institute of Mental Health provides such information on the publications area of their website, and visitors can make their way through fact sheets, booklets, and Spanish-language versions of these documents here. The topical fact sheets are quite good, and they include titles such as "Suicide in the U.S.: Statistics and Prevention" and "Depression: A Treatable Illness". Moving on, the "Booklets" area includes "Eating Disorders", "Depression", and ten other offerings. Finally, the right-hand side of the site includes news about recent research findings from the Institute.

149

Psychedelics and Mental Health: A Population Study  

PubMed Central

Background The classical serotonergic psychedelics LSD, psilocybin, mescaline are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive. Clinical studies do not suggest that psychedelics cause long-term mental health problems. Psychedelics have been used in the Americas for thousands of years. Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline. Objective To evaluate the association between the lifetime use of psychedelics and current mental health in the adult population. Method Data drawn from years 2001 to 2004 of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health consisted of 130,152 respondents, randomly selected to be representative of the adult population in the United States. Standardized screening measures for past year mental health included serious psychological distress (K6 scale), mental health treatment (inpatient, outpatient, medication, needed but did not receive), symptoms of eight psychiatric disorders (panic disorder, major depressive episode, mania, social phobia, general anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and non-affective psychosis), and seven specific symptoms of non-affective psychosis. We calculated weighted odds ratios by multivariate logistic regression controlling for a range of sociodemographic variables, use of illicit drugs, risk taking behavior, and exposure to traumatic events. Results 21,967 respondents (13.4% weighted) reported lifetime psychedelic use. There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, lifetime use of specific psychedelics (LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote), or past year use of LSD and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes. Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with lower rate of mental health problems. Conclusion We did not find use of psychedelics to be an independent risk factor for mental health problems. PMID:23976938

Krebs, Teri S.; Johansen, Pal-?rjan

2013-01-01

150

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A description is provided of a course, "Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing," designed to teach students at Level 3 of a two-year college nursing program about the role of the nurse in a psychiatric setting and about concepts of mental health and psychiatric disorders, using both classroom and clinical instruction. The first section of the course…

Reighley, Joan

151

Mental Health, United States, 2000.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, the mental health community has made great strides in understanding more about the delivery of mental health services, improving efficiency and quality in services, and also about how to build strengths and resilience in the face of lifes stresses. This volume adds to the knowledge base so that the important task of system change…

Manderscheid, Ronald W., Ed.; Henderson, Marilyn J., Ed.

152

Tips for Mental Health Interpretation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper offers tips for working with interpreters in mental health settings. These tips include: (1) Using trained interpreters, not bilingual staff or community members; (2) Explaining "interpreting procedures" to the providers and clients; (3) Addressing the stigma associated with mental health that may influence interpreters; (4) Defining…

Whitsett, Margaret

2008-01-01

153

Zambia mental health country profile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary This country profile for Zambia was compiled between 1998 and 2002. The objectives of the exercise were to first of all avail policymakers, other key decision makers and leaders in Zambia, information about mental health in Zambia in order to assist policy and services development. Secondly, to facilitate comparative analyses of mental health services between countries. The work involved

John Mayeya; Roy Chazulwa; Petronella Ntambo Mayeya; Edward Mbewe; Lonia Mwape Magolo; Friday Kasisi; Annel Chishimba Bowa

2004-01-01

154

Urban Politics and Mental Health: An Agenda for Health Geographic Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Siting of mental health service facilities has often been subject to public opposition and political struggles. These processes have produced a landscape of mental health provision that is powerfully uneven and concentrated in economically and socially depressed areas. We argue that understanding this landscape requires an examination of the political processes that shape such siting decisions. Although health geographers (most

Joseph Pierce; Deborah G. Martin; Alexander W. Scherr; Amelia Greiner

2012-01-01

155

AHRQ Healthcare Horizon Scanning System Potential High Impact Interventions: Priority Area 05: Depression and Other Mental Health Disorders.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Horizon scanning is an activity undertaken to identify technological and system innovations that could have important impacts or bring about paradigm shifts. In the health care sector, horizon scanning pertains to identification of new (and new uses of ex...

2012-01-01

156

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program  

E-print Network

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program One in an agency program providing mental health services in contract with the Bureau of Mental Health. Individuals mental health services to adults that is in contract with the Bureau of Mental Health in the NYC DOHMH

Qiu, Weigang

157

Neuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health  

E-print Network

Neuroscience and Mental Health Page 1 New program proposal: Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. Honours in Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. Major in Neuroscience and Mental Health · B.Sc. General in Neuroscience and Mental Health · Minor in Neuroscience and Mental Health 1: Objectives 1.1: Mission

158

India mental health country profile.  

PubMed

India, the second most populated country of the world with a population of 1.027 billion, is a country of contrasts. It is characterized as one of the world's largest industrial nations, yet most of the negative characteristics of poor and developing countries define India too. The population is predominantly rural, and 36% of people still live below poverty line. There is a continuous migration of rural people into urban slums creating major health and economic problems. India is one of the pioneer countries in health services planning with a focus on primary health care. Improvement in the health status of the population has been one of the major thrust areas for social development programmes in the country. However, only a small percentage of the total annual budget is spent on health. Mental health is part of the general health services, and carries no separate budget. The National Mental Health Programme serves practically as the mental health policy. Recently, there was an eight-fold increase in budget allocation for the National Mental Health Programme for the Tenth Five-Year Plan (2002-2007). India is a multicultural traditional society where people visit religious and traditional healers for general and mental health related problems. However, wherever modern health services are available, people do come forward. India has a number of public policy and judicial enactments, which may impact on mental health. These have tried to address the issues of stigma attached to the mental illnesses and the rights of mentally ill people in society. A large number of epidemiological surveys done in India on mental disorders have demonstrated the prevalence of mental morbidity in rural and urban areas of the country; these rates are comparable to global rates. Although India is well placed as far as trained manpower in general health services is concerned, the mental health trained personnel are quite limited, and these are mostly based in urban areas. Considering this, development of mental health services has been linked with general health services and primary health care. Training opportunities for various kinds of mental health personnel are gradually increasing in various academic institutions in the country and recently, there has been a major initiative in the growth of private psychiatric services to fill a vacuum that the public mental health services have been slow to address. A number of non-governmental organizations have also initiated activities related to rehabilitation programmes, human rights of mentally ill people, and school mental health programmes. Despite all these efforts and progress, a lot has still to be done towards all aspects of mental health care in India in respect of training, research, and provision of clinical services to promote mental health in all sections of society. PMID:15276945

Khandelwal, Sudhir K; Jhingan, Harsh P; Ramesh, S; Gupta, Rajesh K; Srivastava, Vinay K

2004-01-01

159

Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care Print A A A Text Size What's in ... if you're concerned about paying for mental health care. Lots of people need help and worry that ...

160

Economic Stress and Mental Health  

PubMed Central

This paper correlates economic stress with minority status, resource allocations for mental health programs, and vulnerability to mental disability. Several hypotheses are advanced: 1. A major and recurring psychological pattern of the American national character is prowhite, antiblack paranoia. 2. Mental health fiscal allocations and programmatic determinations in ghetto, lower socioeconomic, minority-populated urban areas are predicated on political and racist considerations, the underlying motivation being to keep minorities at greater risk of mental disability. 3. Economic privation and stress increase vulnerability to mental illness, especially in a minority population for whom health, mental health, educational, and social services are grossly inadequate. 4. Poverty and economic stress combine with health systems that are unresponsive to the needs of blacks and other minorities, resulting in the perpetuation of disabilities and other conditions in blacks that are potentially preventable. 5. Health and mental health resources should be increased rather than diminished during periods of economic stress, especially in the public sector. 6. In order to provide each citizen with access to quality health and mental health care regardless of race and/or economic status, there must be enacted a national health insurance program based on tax-levy monies that will cover all aspects of health and mental health care. 7. Racism and social status will continue to be powerful determinants of the quality of service that white professionals render to black patients and to poor white patients, unless our training institutions mount a massive campaign to train appropriately and to include significant numbers of minority candidates and trainees in the effort. To date this effort is virtually nonexistent. PMID:439171

Butts, Hugh F.

1979-01-01

161

Impediments to mental health treatment as predictors of mental health symptoms following combat.  

PubMed

This longitudinal study examined whether impediments to mental health treatment would predict changes in mental health symptoms (posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD] and depression) in the months following soldiers returning from combat. Three-hundred ten combat veterans completed measures of impediments to treatment and measures of PTSD and depression symptoms at 2, 3, and 4 months following a 15-month combat deployment. Structural equation modeling revealed that greater impediments (a latent variable indexed by stigma, practical barriers, and negative treatment attitudes) at 2 months predicted increased PTSD and depression symptoms from 2-3 months (? = .14) and greater impediments at 3 months predicted increased symptoms from 3-4 months (? = .26). In contrast, evidence was not obtained for the opposite causal direction of symptoms predicting higher levels of impediments at the different periods. Possible mechanisms for the predictive effects of impediments are discussed. PMID:25322883

Wright, Kathleen M; Britt, Thomas W; Moore, DeWayne

2014-10-01

162

Mental Health Among Israeli Homosexual Adolescents and Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the mental health status of Israeli homosexuals in adolescence and early adulthood in comparison to heterosexual controls. We compared 219 homosexuals (136 gay men and 83 lesbian women) with 219 individually matched heterosexuals on indices of depression and subjective well being. In line with the study hypothesis, the results indicated that the homosexual participants reported more depressive

Geva Shenkman; Dov Shmotkin

2010-01-01

163

UPDATES IN HIV: Mental health  

E-print Network

Illness in southern Africa In Botswana, depression is highly prevalent among people living with HIV . Evidence suggests that mental illness is a significant problem in similar settings across southern Africa transmissions. However, alcohol abuse is significant risk factor for HIV acquisition in southern Africa21

Sharp, Kim

164

Why mental health matters to global health.  

PubMed

Global health has been defined as an area of study, research, and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide. This article provides an overview of some central issues in global mental health in three parts. The first part demonstrates why mental health is relevant to global health by examining three key principles of global health: priority setting based on the burden of health problems, health inequalities and its global scope in particular in relation to the determinants and solutions for health problems. The second part considers and addresses the key critiques of global mental health: (a) that the "diagnoses" of mental disorders are not valid because there are no biological markers for these conditions; (b) that the strong association of social determinants undermines the use of biomedical interventions; (c) that the field is a proxy for the expansion of the pharmaceutical industry; and (d) that the actions of global mental health are equivalent to "medical imperialism" and it is a "psychiatric export." The final part discusses the opportunities for the field, piggybacking on the surge of interest in global health more broadly and on the growing acknowledgment of mental disorders as a key target for global health action. PMID:24595266

Patel, Vikram

2014-12-01

165

Telepsychiatry and school mental health.  

PubMed

The provision of mental health services in schools has been one effective strategy for reaching out to a greater number of youth to identify and provide treatment for mental health issues. With the increasing challenges related to shortages in child and adolescent psychiatrists, it is critical to develop models of care that can maximize a full range of mental health services for all children and adolescents who need them. Telehealth offers an innovative distance technology strategy to effectively and efficiently provide access to psychiatric services in schools. Telepsychiatry has the potential to better link and enhance the provision of health services, and can be particularly beneficial in addressing geographic distance and/or capacity issues. This article describes the clinical, educational, and administrative uses of telemental health in the school environment with mental health professionals and staff. PMID:21092914

Grady, Brian J; Lever, Nancy; Cunningham, Dana; Stephan, Sharon

2011-01-01

166

Online social networking and mental health.  

PubMed

During the past decade, online social networking has caused profound changes in the way people communicate and interact. It is unclear, however, whether some of these changes may affect certain normal aspects of human behavior and cause psychiatric disorders. Several studies have indicated that the prolonged use of social networking sites (SNS), such as Facebook, may be related to signs and symptoms of depression. In addition, some authors have indicated that certain SNS activities might be associated with low self-esteem, especially in children and adolescents. Other studies have presented opposite results in terms of positive impact of social networking on self-esteem. The relationship between SNS use and mental problems to this day remains controversial, and research on this issue is faced with numerous challenges. This concise review focuses on the recent findings regarding the suggested connection between SNS and mental health issues such as depressive symptoms, changes in self-esteem, and Internet addiction. PMID:25192305

Pantic, Igor

2014-10-01

167

Employer Attitudes Towards Accommodations in Mental Health Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a It has been almost a decade since the World Health Organization brought to light the impact of mental health disorders worldwide\\u000a (WHO, 2001). The report states that mental health disorders are one of the ten leading causes of disability and account for\\u000a 10.5% of the global burden of all illness (Standing Senate committe, 2004). Moreover, depression alone constitutes the second

Izabela Z. Schultz; Ruth A. Milner; Douglas B. Hanson; Alanna Winter

168

WHO: Global Health Observatory: Mental Health  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

While more than 800,000 people die from suicide globally each year, the median amount of the health budget allocated to mental health in 2011 was 2.8%. In Afghanistan, six out of every 100,000 men committed suicide. In the United States, that number was 19. These and other data can be gleaned from the age-standardized suicide rates interactive graph on the World Health OrganizationâÂÂs Global Health Observatory website dedicated to issues of Mental Health. Additionally, the page provides links to reports on Policy and financing of mental health, Human resources (in terms of the number of psychiatrists available per 100,000 people in a given country), and Mental health care delivery.

169

School Mental Health: A Federal Perspective  

E-print Network

School Mental Health: A Federal Perspective David Esquith Director for the Office of Safe Ingrid Donato Branch Chief, Mental Health Promotion, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) #12;Health Resources and Services Administration Maternal

Weber, David J.

170

Islamic Values and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental well-being is as important as physical well-being for sound life of man, and perhaps even more important, since physical illnesses are related in varying degrees to psychological problems. Modern psychology emphasizes essential criteria for mental health and well-being. These include positive relationships with others, productivity and…

Nassir, Balkis

171

[Impact of disasters on the mental health].  

PubMed

The study on the impact of disasters on the mental health is a relatively recent research field. Despite this, there are a significant number of studies showing the epidemiological data of the psychiatric pathology present in survivors and those affected by disasters This review attempts to summarize current knowledge and give an integrated vision of the effects of the disasters on the mental health, either natural or manmade disasters, as well as identify the effects prevalence and differences in each type of disaster. Post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation or suicide attempts are some of the pathologies observed in people affected by disasters and with an ineffective adaptation, jointly with an increase in the consumption of toxic substances, generating an additional public health problem within another problem. The consequences will be different depending on the type of population and its cultural pattern, sex and gender of the affected people and type of disasters. PMID:24547635

Cernuda Martínez, José Antonio; Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael

2013-12-01

172

Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. METHODS: The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional,

Kathleen M Griffiths; Helen Christensen; Anthony F Jorm

2009-01-01

173

Results from the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Mental Health Findings  

MedlinePLUS

... Figure 2.4 ). Figure 2.4 Receipt of Treatment for Major Depressive Episode in the Past Year among ... 5.11 Past Year Mental Health Care and Treatment for Substance Use Problems among Adults Aged 18 or ...

174

Mental Health Consequences of Intimate Partner Abuse  

PubMed Central

Battered women are exposed to multiple forms of intimate partner abuse. This article explores the independent contributions of physical violence, sexual coercion, psychological abuse, and stalking on symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among a sample of 413 severely battered, help-seeking women. The authors test the unique effects of psychological abuse and stalking on mental health outcomes, after controlling for physical violence, injuries, and sexual coercion. Mean scores for the sample fall into the moderate to severe range for PTSD and within the moderate category for depression scores. Hierarchical regressions test the unique effects of stalking and psychological abuse, after controlling for physical violence, injuries, and sexual coercion. Psychological abuse and stalking contribute uniquely to the prediction of PTSD and depression symptoms, even after controlling for the effects of physical violence, injuries, and sexual coercion. Results highlight the importance of examining multiple dimensions of intimate partner abuse. PMID:18535306

Mechanic, Mindy B.; Weaver, Terri L.; Resick, Patricia A.

2010-01-01

175

Mental Health Care: Who's Who  

MedlinePLUS

... with a master’s degree or doctoral degree in psychology (Psy.D.), philosophy (Ph.D.) or education (Ed. ... work experience. Licensed Professional Counselor: Master’s degree in psychology, counseling or a related field. Mental Health Counselor: ...

176

The functional neuroanatomy of mental pain in depression.  

PubMed

This study aimed at determining the functional neuroanatomy of mental pain, a hitherto neglected symptom in the study of depression, which according to DSM-IV is stronglylinked with suicide. Mental pain (measured with the Orbach & Mikulincer Mental Pain Scale), suicidal ideation (measured using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression), hopelessness (measured using Beck's Hopelessness Scale), and regional cerebral blood flow as measured with single photon emission computed tomography were assessed in 39 depressed individuals. Levels of mental pain were significantly and positively associated with suicidal ideation and levels of hopelessness. When compared with patients with low levels of mental pain, those with high levels of mental pain showed relatively increased perfusion in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, occipital cortex and inferior frontal gyrus and in the left inferior temporal gyrus, and relatively decreased perfusion at the medulla. The findings indicate that mental pain in depressed patients is associated with an increased risk of suicide and that high levels of mental pain are associated with changes in perfusion in brain areas that are involved in the regulation of emotions. Further study is warranted to understand whether this association reflects increased emotional processing or decreased cognitive control over mental pain in depressed individuals. PMID:20074915

van Heeringen, Kees; Van den Abbeele, Dirk; Vervaet, Myriam; Soenen, Lieslot; Audenaert, Kurt

2010-02-28

177

Rurality and Mental Health Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diversity within rural areas renders rural–urban comparisons difficult. The association of mental health treatment rates with\\u000a levels of rurality is investigated here using Rural–Urban Continuum Codes. Data from the 1996–1999 panels of the Medical Expenditure\\u000a Panel Survey are aggregated to provide annual treatment rates for respondents reporting mental health problems. Data show\\u000a that residents of the most rural areas receive

Emily J. Hauenstein; Stephen Petterson; Virginia Rovnyak; Elizabeth Merwin; Barbara Heise; Douglas Wagner

2007-01-01

178

Pediatric mental health emergencies in the emergency medical services system.  

PubMed

Emergency departments are vital in the management of pediatric patients with mental health emergencies. Pediatric mental health emergencies are an increasing part of emergency medical practice because emergency departments have become the safety net for a fragmented mental health infrastructure that is experiencing critical shortages in services in all sectors. Emergency departments must safely, humanely, and in a culturally and developmentally appropriate manner manage pediatric patients with undiagnosed and known mental illnesses, including those with mental retardation, autistic spectrum disorders, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and those experiencing a behavioral crisis. Emergency departments also manage patients with suicidal ideation, depression, escalating aggression, substance abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder, and maltreatment and those exposed to violence and unexpected deaths. Emergency departments must address not only the physical but also the mental health needs of patients during and after mass-casualty incidents and disasters. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Emergency Physicians support advocacy for increased mental health resources, including improved pediatric mental health tools for the emergency department, increased mental health insurance coverage, and adequate reimbursement at all levels; acknowledgment of the importance of the child's medical home; and promotion of education and research for mental health emergencies. PMID:17015573

Dolan, Margaret A; Mace, Sharon E

2006-10-01

179

Exercise: a neglected intervention in mental health care?  

PubMed

This paper reports the results of a literature review examining the effects of exercise on mental health and well-being. Throughout history many societies, ancient and modern, have used exercise as a means of preventing disease, and promoting health and well-being. There is evidence that exercise is beneficial for mental health; it reduces anxiety, depression, and negative mood, and improves self-esteem and cognitive functioning. Exercise is also associated with improvements in the quality of life of those living with schizophrenia. However, exercise is seldom recognized by mainstream mental health services as an effective intervention in the care and treatment of mental health problems. There is evidence to suggest that exercise may be a neglected intervention in mental health care. PMID:15255923

Callaghan, P

2004-08-01

180

Use of technology to enhance mental health for older adults.  

PubMed

Recent research suggests that older adults may gain significant mental health benefits from health resources made available through emerging modern technologies, especially because this population is becoming more Internet savvy. Technology-enhanced interventions for older adults have been shown to be helpful not only for general wellness activities (i.e., exercise), but also to specifically enhance mental health. This article focuses on two types of interventions for mental health: (a) cognitive-behavioral therapy for depression and anxiety and (b) assistive technology for individuals with dementia. Nurses should reevaluate their assumptions that older adults fear technology and explore whether different types of modern technology might be effective in enhancing mental health for these clients. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 52(9), 17-20.]. PMID:25062353

Cangelosi, Pamela R; Sorrell, Jeanne M

2014-08-01

181

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health  

E-print Network

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health Revised September 2013 Mental Health Reference of emergency. #12;Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health September 2013 Resource Contact Information and are trained to counsel and support freshmen on a wide variety of issues. Residential College Mental Health

182

Cannabis Use and Mental Health Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper investigates whether cannabis use leads to worse mental health. To do so, we account for common unobserved factors affecting mental health and cannabis consumption by modeling mental health jointly with the dynamics of cannabis use. Our main finding is that using cannabis increases the likelihood of mental health problems, with current use having a larger effect than past

Jenny Williams

2009-01-01

183

Mental Health Medications  

MedlinePLUS

... New England Journal of Medicine . 2006 Mar 23; 354(12):1231-1242. 3. Trivedi MH, Fava M, ... New England Journal of Medicine . 2006 Mar 23; 354(12): 1243-1252. 4. Hypericum Depression Trial Study ...

184

Malaysia mental health country profile.  

PubMed

Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be severe shortages of other professionals such as clinical psychologists and social workers in mental health services. There are a few specialists, and specialized services in child, adolescent, forensic, rehabilitative, liaison or research fields of mental health. In the area of services for women and children, as well as the disabled in the community, there are strong efforts to improve the care and provide services that are in keeping with a caring society. New legislation on these are being passed every year and the setting up of a Ministry for Women's Affairs is one such move in recent years. Mental health in Malaysia has been slow in developing but has in the past decade seen important strides to bring it on par with other branches of medicine. PMID:15276949

Parameshvara Deva, M

2004-01-01

185

Mental Health, Are We at Risk?  

PubMed Central

Background: Mental health is an important component of the total positive health and is interwoven closely with the physical and physiological dynamics of the human body. Worldwide, about 500 million people are believed to be suffering from neurotic, stress related and psychological problems. In India, surveys on mental morbidity in various parts of the country suggest a prevalence rate of 18-20 per 1000. Materials and Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out amongst married women in the age group 18-45 years in an urban community of South Mumbai. Self-reporting questionnaire of 20 items (SRQ 20) developed by the WHO was administered. Statistical analysis was carried out to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disturbance. Result: The prevalence of psychiatric disturbance was found to be 27.27% for the total sample. The study results indicate that somatic symptoms were reported more commonly which could be a manifestation of underlying/burgeoning mental disorders. Conclusions: The results imply a high prevalence of 27.27% of psychiatric disturbance in our community. However, defining mental disorder from a clinical standpoint necessitates identification of the dividing line between despair and depression. It is recommended that women be encouraged to approach counsellors and thus enable further diagnosis and management of Common Mental Disorders in the community. PMID:24695680

Tawar, Shabeena; Bhatia, Sanjana Seth; Ilankumaran, Mookkiah

2014-01-01

186

Perceived Discrimination and Mental Health Symptoms Among Black Men With HIV  

Microsoft Academic Search

People living with HIV (PLWH) exhibit more severe mental health symptoms, including depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, than do members of the general public. We examined whether perceived discrimination, which has been associated with poor mental health in prior research, contributes to greater depression and PTSD symptoms among HIV-positive Black men who have sex with men (MSM), who

Laura M. Bogart; Glenn J. Wagner; Frank H. Galvan; Hope Landrine; David J. Klein; Laurel A. Sticklor

2011-01-01

187

Workaholism and mental health among Polish academic workers.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between workaholism and mental health among 126 Polish academic workers. The participants' mean age was 45.9 years, 51.6% of them were women. The participants completed 2 questionnaires: the work addiction risk test and the general health questionnaire. Even though 66% of the subjects were classified in the group of moderate-to-high risk of workaholism, the overall state of mental health was categorized as average. The results revealed that workaholism was associated with poorer mental health. Employees with higher levels of workaholism had worse state of health, i.e., more somatic symptoms, higher levels of anxiety, insomnia, social dysfunction and symptoms of depression. Emotional arousal/perfectionism was the strongest predictor of the state of general health and was mostly responsible for harmful effects on mental health. However, the general effect of workaholism on health was not as strong as expected. PMID:22429525

Bartczak, Monika; Ogi?ska-Bulik, Nina

2012-01-01

188

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program  

E-print Network

New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) Mental Health Scholarship Program One in an agency program providing mental health services in contract with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Bureau of Mental Health (BMH) or Bureau of Children, Youth and Families (CYF). Individuals

Qiu, Weigang

189

Immigrant and refugee health: mental health conditions.  

PubMed

Immigrants leave their homes for unfamiliar destinations in search of better lives for themselves and their families. Many immigrants experience profound loss and emotional distress as they adjust to life in different societies. Despite these challenges, the prevalence of mental health conditions among immigrants is low, whereas children of immigrants have rates equal to those of native populations. The prevalence of mental health conditions is high among refugees, who comprise a specific subgroup of immigrants who have been displaced forcibly and often have experienced severe trauma. Cultural factors, such as stigma and somatization of emotional symptoms, make it less likely that immigrants and refugees from certain groups will ever present to mental health subspecialists. Strong therapeutic relationships, cultural sensitivity, involvement of family members, judicious use of medications, and knowledge of available community resources are important tools that can aid clinicians who treat immigrants and refugees with mental health conditions. PMID:25127536

Rew, Karl T; Clarke, S Lindsey; Gossa, Weyinshet; Savin, Daniel

2014-08-01

190

Influencing factors of mental health of medical students in China.  

PubMed

This study investigated the mental health status of medical students in China, and analyzed the influencing factors in order to provide evidence for mental health education for medical students. A stratified cluster sampling method was used to recruit medical students from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. The questionnaire survey on general information and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) were used for investigation and analysis. The results showed among the 1137 valid questionnaires, 278 (24.45%) participants had SCL-90 score ? 160. The top three mental problems of medical students were obsessive-compulsive disorder, interpersonal sensitivity and depression in terms of the factor score ? 2.5 and the number of participants who reflected on the diseases. The third-year medical students had the worst mental health status, and fifth-year medical students had the best mental health status. Students from rural area had more psychological problems than those from urban area; furthermore, students with high professional satisfaction, those who were the single child of the family, non-poor students, and those whose parents had high education level had better mental health status. It was concluded that the mental health of medical students is not optimistic in China. Medical students have some mental health problems of different degrees. Factors that influence the mental health of medical students include academic pressure, professional satisfaction level and family environment. PMID:24939314

Yang, Fan; Meng, Heng; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xin-hao; Liu, Zhuo; Luo, Ai; Feng, Zhan-chun

2014-06-01

191

Dating violence: mental health consequences based on type of abuse.  

PubMed

This study aims to determine the relationship between psychological, physical, and sexual abuse, and mental health symptoms. Female college students (N = 499) completed anonymous online surveys to report experiences of abuse, as well as symptoms of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and physical injuries. Five groups of participants were found: no abuse; psychological abuse; physical abuse; psychological and physical abuse; and psychological, physical, and sexual abuse. The multiple abuse groups showed the highest rate of mental health symptoms. In addition, increased frequency of abuse was related to more mental health symptoms and more physical injuries. PMID:22594217

Eshelman, Lee; Levendosky, Alytia A

2012-01-01

192

Predictors of Healthcare Service Utilization for Mental Health Reasons  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to identify: (1) predictors of 12-month healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons, framed by the Andersen model, among a population cohort in an epidemiological catchment area; and (2) correlates associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons among individuals with and without mental disorders respectively. Analyses comprised univariate, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses. Being male, having poor quality of life, possessing better self-perception of physical health, and suffering from major depressive episodes, panic disorder, social phobia, and emotional problems predicted healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals with mental disorders, needs factors (psychological distress, impulsiveness, emotional problems, victim of violence, and aggressive behavior) and visits to healthcare professionals were associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals without mental disorders, healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons is strongly associated with enabling factors such as social support, income, environmental variables, and self-perception of the neighborhood. Interventions facilitating social cohesion and social solidarity in neighborhood settings may reduce the need to seek help among individuals without mental disorders. Furthermore, in their capacity as frontline professionals, general practitioners should be more sensitive in preventing, detecting, and treating mental disorders in routine primary care. PMID:25321874

Fleury, Marie-Josee; Ngamini Ngui, Andre; Bamvita, Jean-Marie; Grenier, Guy; Caron, Jean

2014-01-01

193

Predictors of healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons.  

PubMed

This study was designed to identify: (1) predictors of 12-month healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons, framed by the Andersen model, among a population cohort in an epidemiological catchment area; and (2) correlates associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons among individuals with and without mental disorders respectively. Analyses comprised univariate, bivariate, and multiple regression analyses. Being male, having poor quality of life, possessing better self-perception of physical health, and suffering from major depressive episodes, panic disorder, social phobia, and emotional problems predicted healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals with mental disorders, needs factors (psychological distress, impulsiveness, emotional problems, victim of violence, and aggressive behavior) and visits to healthcare professionals were associated with healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons. Among individuals without mental disorders, healthcare service utilization for mental health reasons is strongly associated with enabling factors such as social support, income, environmental variables, and self-perception of the neighborhood. Interventions facilitating social cohesion and social solidarity in neighborhood settings may reduce the need to seek help among individuals without mental disorders. Furthermore, in their capacity as frontline professionals, general practitioners should be more sensitive in preventing, detecting, and treating mental disorders in routine primary care. PMID:25321874

Fleury, Marie-Josée; Ngui, André Ngamini; Bamvita, Jean-Marie; Grenier, Guy; Caron, Jean

2014-01-01

194

Counseling and Mental Health Services OUR MISSION  

E-print Network

Counseling and Mental Health Services Page 1 OUR MISSION The mission of Counseling and Mental Disclosure and Confidentiality The privacy of your mental health information, including all written of all disciplines involved in your treatment. Uses and Disclosures of Your Mental Health Information

Alpay, S. Pamir

195

Depression  

MedlinePLUS

... care provider will find out how severe your depression is (mild, moderate, or severe) and look for the cause by doing a: Health history Mental health interview Physical examination If there is a risk of suicide, you may need to stay in the hospital ...

196

Women's Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... alcohol or drug abuse u have a close family member who has attempted or committed suicide u are already coping with depression or alcohol/ ... influence how you act with your friends and family. It may shape how you raise your ... suicide. If trauma, violence, or abuse has happened to ...

197

Intimate partner violence and mental health in Bolivia  

PubMed Central

Background Latin America has among the highest rates of intimate partner violence. While there is increasing evidence that intimate partner violence is associated with mental health problems, there is little such research for developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between Bolivian women’s experiences with physical, psychological, and sexual intimate partner violence and mental health outcomes. Methods This study analyzes data from the 2008 Bolivia Demographic and Health Survey. 10,119 married or cohabiting women ages 15–49 are included in the analysis. Probit regression models are used to assess the association between intimate partner violence and mental health, after controlling for other demographic factors and partner characteristics. The questionnaire uses selected questions from the SRQ-20 to measure symptoms of mental health problems. Results Intimate partner violence is common in Bolivia, with 47% of women experiencing some type of spousal abuse in the 12 months before the survey. Women exposed to physical spousal violence in the past year are more likely to experience symptoms of depression, anxiety, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and psychotic disorders, after controlling for other demographic and partner characteristics. Women who experienced sexual abuse by a partner are most likely to suffer from all mental health issues. Psychological abuse is also associated with an increased risk of experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and psychogenic seizures. Women who experienced only psychological abuse report mental health problems similar to those who were physically abused. Conclusion This study demonstrates an urgent need for research on the prevalence and health consequences of psychological abuse in developing countries. Our findings highlight the need for mental health services for victims of intimate partner violence. Because physical and psychological violence are often experienced concurrently, it is recommended that health providers who are treating victims of physical intimate partner violence also screen them for symptoms of potential mental health problems and refer them to appropriate mental health services. PMID:23799992

2013-01-01

198

Health-related quality of life in postpartum depressed women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  The objectives of this study were a) to evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among women with postpartum depression,\\u000a b) examine the association between severity of depressive symptoms and level of impairment in physical and mental HRQoL and\\u000a c) to identify contributors to physical and mental HRQoL. Seventy-eight women scoring ?10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression\\u000a Scale completed the questionnaires

D. Da Costa; M. Dritsa; N. Rippen; I. Lowensteyn; S. Khalifé

2006-01-01

199

The relationship between cannabis use, depression and anxiety among Australian adults: findings from the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study aimed to examine the patterns of association between cannabis use, and anxiety and affective disorders, in the\\u000a general population. Method: Data from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being, a representative survey of Australians aged 18\\u000a years and over, were analysed to address the following questions: (1) is there an association between cannabis use, DSM-IV

L. Degenhardt; W. Hall; M. Lynskey

2001-01-01

200

Health care professionals attitudes towards individuals diagnosed with severe mental illness  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this dissertation is to critically examine the attitudes of health care professionals' attitudes towards individuals with severe mental illness. Severe mental illnesses (SMI) are major social and public health issues in the United States and Canada. Severe mental illness may include individuals with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, major depression, bipolar disorder, mood disorders, and some of the

Sonja Grbevski

2009-01-01

201

Violent oppression: implications for mental health priorities in South Africa.  

PubMed

This study explores the complex nature of mental health challenges and priorities in a post-apartheid South Africa. Special reference is made to indigenous people's experiences of poverty, racism, sexism and the machinery of political repression as critical bases for determining the priorities in mental health services. Whilst the provision of mental health services for all is sought by mental health professionals and legal systems in Western countries and other African states, South Africa has not developed a coherent sociolegal policy which aims at preventing, alleviating and healing mental health problems for all its citizens. Research gathered through a phenomenological approach amongst the oppressed seeks to define the terrain of people's psychological problems. Although data used are deduced mainly from the 'oppressed' on one white owned farm, questions raised and conclusions drawn address national as opposed to regional solutions, and also facilitate thinking about mental health priorities for all South Africans living under similar conditions. Commonly experienced problems are the effects of organized violence, child and adolescent problems, the prevalence of alcohol and drug use, depression, lack of facilities for the disabled and psychological care for homeless children, families and the youth. Participants were ignorant about mental health services, they experienced them as inaccessible and they were generally suspicious of an lacked faith in mental health workers. The author proposes broad future mental health options, like the restoration of family life in oppressed communities, the training of lay counsellors and the introduction of community mental health programmes. A suggestion is made that health workers in community mental health centres should adopt an advocacy position against all forms of unfair practices and violence and lobby for the protection of human rights. PMID:8065247

Mkhize, H

1994-01-01

202

IINational Institute of Mental Health  

E-print Network

IINational Institute of Mental Health U. S. D E P A R T M E N T O F H E A L T H A N D H U M A N S E R V I C E S N A T I O N A L I N S T I T U T E S O F H E A L T H of the National Institute of Mental Health Breaking Ground, Breaking Through: The Strategic Plan for Mood Disorders Research #12;PREFACE

Bandettini, Peter A.

203

Mental Health Issues in Rural Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five papers cover recent developments in rural mental health nursing. "Rural Mental Health Care: A Survey of the Research" (Karen Babich) chronicles recent interest in understanding the rural population's character and the nature of mental health services needed by and provided to rural America. Lauren Aaronson ("Using Health Beliefs in a Nursing…

Babich, Karen S., Comp.

204

The Relationship Between Gratitude and Burnout in Mental Health Professionals.  

E-print Network

??This study investigated the relationship between gratitude and burnout in mental health professionals. Participants consisted of 65 mental health treatment providers from community mental health… (more)

Lanham, Michelle E.

2011-01-01

205

The neighborhood context of adolescent mental health.  

PubMed

Mental health disorders in adolescence are pervasive, often carry into adulthood, and appear to be inversely associated with social status. We examine how structural aspects of neighborhood context, specifically, socioeconomic stratification and racial/ethnic segregation, affect adolescent emotional well-being by shaping subjective perceptions of their neighborhoods. Using a community-based sample of 877 adolescents in Los Angeles County, we find that youth in low socioeconomic status (SES) neighborhoods perceive greater ambient hazards such as crime, violence, drug use, and graffiti than those in high SES neighborhoods. The perception of the neighborhood as dangerous, in turn, influences the mental health of adolescents: the more threatening the neighborhood, the more common the symptoms of depression, anxiety, oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder. Social stability and, to a lesser extent, social cohesion, also emerge as contributors to adolescent disorder. This investigation demonstrates that research into the mental health of young people should consider the socioeconomic and demographic environments in which they live. PMID:8997886

Aneshensel, C S; Sucoff, C A

1996-12-01

206

Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

Dixon, Decia Nicole

2009-01-01

207

Mental Health Resources on UAA Campus Student Health and  

E-print Network

Mental Health Resources on UAA Campus Student Health and Counseling Center Psychological Services Health Education YES YES YES Mental Health Screening Events YES NO YES Situational Crisis Management YES Nurse Practitioners, Licensed Counselors, Graduate Interns Graduate Psychology Interns Supervised

Duddleston, Khrys

208

Mental health of prisoners: identifying barriers to mental health treatment and medication continuity.  

PubMed

Objectives. We assessed mental health screening and medication continuity in a nationally representative sample of US prisoners. Methods. We obtained data from 18?185 prisoners interviewed in the 2004 Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities. We conducted survey logistic regressions with Stata version 13. Results. About 26% of the inmates were diagnosed with a mental health condition at some point during their lifetime, and a very small proportion (18%) were taking medication for their condition(s) on admission to prison. In prison, more than 50% of those who were medicated for mental health conditions at admission did not receive pharmacotherapy in prison. Inmates with schizophrenia were most likely to receive pharmacotherapy compared with those presenting with less overt conditions (e.g., depression). This lack of treatment continuity is partially attributable to screening procedures that do not result in treatment by a medical professional in prison. Conclusions. A substantial portion of the prison population is not receiving treatment for mental health conditions. This treatment discontinuity has the potential to affect both recidivism and health care costs on release from prison. PMID:25322306

Reingle Gonzalez, Jennifer M; Connell, Nadine M

2014-12-01

209

Mental Health Clinic Intake Assessment  

E-print Network

-624-8182. · Eating Disorders: We provide an Eating Disorder Therapy program in coordination with medical and nutrition services. We do not offer intensive Eating Disorder Treatment (including treatment for anorexia-624-8182. Psychiatric Hospitalizations/Past Treatment: Mental Health Professional/Clinic: Situation/condition treated

Weiblen, George D

210

Career development and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusion While the extent of linkages and the patterning of the relationships between career development and mental health is yet to be fully studied and articulated, this paper has argued that such connections do exist. Given such a premise, it has been contended that career counseling does serve as a therapeutic modality as it provides dislocated, unhappy, maladjusted or underemployed

Edwin L. Herr

1989-01-01

211

Psychologists in Mental Health: 1966.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes major characteristics of 11,638 psychologists in the 1966 National Science Foundation's Register of Scientific and Technical Personnel who identified their positions as being related to the field of mental health. They make up 61.2 percent of all psychologists in the Register. Findings include: (1) The median age is 41, (2)…

Jones, Donald R.

212

Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic disorder like dystonia is similar to grieving a loss, such as a death or divorce. Common phases of dealing with dystonia include denial, ...

213

Learning, Mental Health, and Testing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Achievement and intelligence tests have been criticized for their adverse effects on the mental health and intellectual development of children. The fault is not with the testing, but with the instructional program. Reforms in testing must be accomplished as part of a revolution in the total instructional program encompassing: (1) a shift from a…

Heathers, Glen

214

Poverty and Women's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the prevalence and rise of poverty in the United States, which is found particularly among women, children, and those from minority groups. Discusses the positive association between poverty and mental health problems. Describes the impact of poverty on women, and the need for research to discover the psychological impact of poverty. (JS)

Belle, Deborah

1990-01-01

215

Students & Mental Health Resource Pack  

E-print Network

this care? 4.4 What services should be available? 4.5 What support can be provided by the college? Support to the worrying levels of students' dropping-out of their studies and the rise in suicide and attempted suicide to students with experience of mental health problems and those who became ill for the first time at college

Stevenson, Mark

216

The treatment gap in mental health care.  

PubMed Central

Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States. PMID:15640922

Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

2004-01-01

217

Social Capital and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social capital is a compound and complex construct, an umbrella term under which social cohesion, social support, social integration\\u000a and\\/or participation are often lumped together. Beyond its growing appeal to policy makers, practitioners and researchers\\u000a in public health in general and mental health in particular, social capital is now also an integral part of broad-based discussions\\u000a on social-ecological resilience, ecosystem

Astier M. Almedom; Douglas Glandon

218

December, 2013 Addiction & Mental Health Learning Events  

E-print Network

Cognition December, 2013 Addiction & Mental Health Learning Events Information & Evaluation Services, Addiction and Mental Health, Edmonton Zone http://www.intranet2.capitalhealth.ca/regional%2, Addictions and Related Disorders conference in Richmond, BC. http://conference2013.jackhirose

MacMillan, Andrew

219

Attitudes Toward Mental Illness Among Mental Health Volunteers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many research efforts have demonstrated relationships between the experience of mental health volunteers and their attitudes toward mental illness. Questionnaire surveys were completed by adult volunteers in psychiatric and nonpsychiatric programs in order to assess general attitudes toward mental patients and to control for the potential effects…

Wahl, Otto F.; And Others

220

Associations between DSM-IV mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset: beyond depression  

PubMed Central

Background Prior studies on the depression-heart disease association have not usually used diagnostic measures of depression, nor taken other mental disorders into consideration. As a result, it is not clear whether the association between depression and heart disease onset reflects a specific association, or the comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders. Additionally, the relative magnitude of associations of a range of mental disorders with heart disease onset is unknown. Methods Face-to-face household surveys were conducted in 19 countries (n=52,095; person years=2,141,194). The Composite International Diagnostic Interview retrospectively assessed lifetime prevalence and age at onset of 16 DSM-IV mental disorders. Heart disease was indicated by self-report of physician’s diagnosis, or self-report of heart attack, together with their timing (year). Survival analyses estimated associations between first onset of mental disorders and subsequent heart disease onset. Results After comorbidity adjustment, depression, panic disorder, specific phobia, post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders were associated with heart disease onset (ORs 1.3–1.6). Increasing number of mental disorders was associated with heart disease in a dose-response fashion. Mood disorders and alcohol abuse were more strongly associated with earlier onset than later onset heart disease. Associations did not vary by gender. Conclusions Depression, anxiety and alcohol use disorders were significantly associated with heart disease onset; depression was the weakest predictor. If confirmed in future prospective studies, the breadth of psychopathology’s links with heart disease onset has substantial clinical and public health implications. PMID:23993321

Scott, Kate M.; de Jonge, Peter; Alonso, Jordi; Viana, Maria Carmen; Liu, Zhaorui; O'Neill, Siobhan; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Caldas-de-Almeida, Jose Miguel; Stein, Dan J.; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Florescu, Silvia E.; Hu, Chiyi; Taib, Nezar Ismet; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Piazza, Marina; Posada-Villa, Jose A.; Uda, Hidenori; Wojtyniak, Bogdan J.; Lim, Carmen C. W.; Kessler, Ronald C.

2013-01-01

221

STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH POLICY  

E-print Network

, safety and welfare at work of all those "lawfully on the premises" Protect against discrimination, gender reassignment and pregnancy and maternity. Make reasonable adjustments to support students do not cause harm Duty to act reasonably to protect the health, safety and welfare of students

Martin, Ralph R.

222

Johnson & Johnson Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program  

E-print Network

the mental health authority and state vocational rehabilitation and provides IPS trainer training the collaboration between the state mental health authority and the state #12;vocational rehabilitation of implementing evidence-based supported employment with close collaboration between mental health and vocational

Myers, Lawrence C.

223

Marital Rights, Mental Health, and Public Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses a comprehensive literature review on the mental health effects of marriage denial on lesbians and gay men and the role of mental health arguments in advocacy for marriage equality. The review, by Gil Herdt and Robert Kertzner, studied more than 150 reports on how marriage is related to mental health and the psychological effects of discrimination as

Robert Kertzner

2009-01-01

224

The ABCs of Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Surgeon General's 2000 Report on Children's Mental Health estimates that one in five children and adolescents will experience a significant mental-health problem during their school years. While the family is the primary source of support for a child's mental health, the increased stress and fracturing of today's life make it imperative…

Whelley, Pete; Cash, Gene; Bryson, Dixie

2002-01-01

225

Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

1996-01-01

226

Young People's Experiences of Mental Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Fifteen in-depth interviews were conducted to explore young people's experiences of mental health care in Australia with the aim of informing the headspace National Youth Mental Health Foundation. The interviews revealed that significant numbers of respondents had been aware of their mental health problems for several years before seeking help and…

Cohen, Anjalee; Medlow, Sharon; Kelk, Norm; Hickie, Ian; Whitwell, Bradley

2009-01-01

227

Becoming Indispensable through Mental Health Promotion.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Both educational attainment and mental health are part of the whole development of the child. School psychologists are indispensable in the schools because they alone bridge the gap between learning and mental health. They become even more in demand when they demonstrate that they can leverage mental health through educational interventions, and…

Sandoval, Jonathan

228

A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

A PROFILE OF KENTUCKY MEDICAID MENTAL HEALTH DIAGNOSES, 2000-2010 #12; #12; i A Profile of Kentucky Medicaid Mental Health Diagnoses, 20002010 BY Michael T. Childress have received a mental or behavioral health diagnosis from 2000 to 2010. A Profile of Kentucky

Hayes, Jane E.

229

Postdoctoral Fellowships National Institute of Mental Health  

E-print Network

Postdoctoral Fellowships National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program Bethesda, Maryland, USA The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), Section on Neuroadaptation and Protein; National Institute of Mental Health; 10 Center Drive, Room 2D54; Bethesda, MD 20892-1298, USA or via e

Bandettini, Peter A.

230

STAFF GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH  

E-print Network

STAFF GUIDELINES FOR HANDLING STUDENT MENTAL HEALTH DIFFICULTIES MARCH 2007 #12;1 1. INTRODUCTION This document seeks to give basic advice to staff who may encounter students with mental health difficulties and guidance mechanisms in respect of mental health. These guidelines do not give detailed medical advice

Guo, Zaoyang

231

Promoting Student Interest in Mental Health Nursing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Factors related to undergraduate nursing education are among the issues inhibiting interest in mental health nursing as a field of practice. To gain more understanding about views about mental health nursing, a survey was conducted with undergraduate nursing students at a major university in Australia after implementation of a mental health nursing course. The data provide information about student beliefs,

Cynthia M. Stuhlmiller

2005-01-01

232

Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and  

E-print Network

Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and Early Childhood Settings Opportunities to Expand-922-1300 · www.cpeip.fsu.edu #12;Mental Health Consultation in Child Care and Early Childhood Settings ....................................... 27 Strategies for Implementing Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation in Child Care

McQuade, D. Tyler

233

The Role of Bilingual Workers without Professional Mental Health Training in Mental Health Services for Refugees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the use of bilingual workers who do not have formal mental health training as mediators and providers of mental health care for refugees. The introduction provides a background discussion of the need for refugee mental health services, the characteristics of bilingual mental health workers, and the work places and expectations…

Egli, Eric

234

Committed Dating Relationships and Mental Health among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine whether involvement in committed dating relationships is associated with university students’ mental health (depressive symptoms and problem alcohol use, including binge drinking), and whether these associations differ by gender. Participants: A sample of 889 undergraduate students aged 18 to 25. Methods: Self-report measures…

Whitton, Sarah W.; Weitbrecht, Eliza M.; Kuryluk, Amanda D.; Bruner, Michael R.

2013-01-01

235

Nourishing Students' Mental Health in a Difficult Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research on the mental health of college students conducted by Daniel Eisenberg, principal investigator in the multiyear Healthy Minds study, indicates that as many as one in five college students may suffer from depression, generalized anxiety disorder, or a panic disorder. Although it's too early to assess the effect of the economic…

Speer, Nicole; McFaul, Mimi; Mohatt, Dennis

2009-01-01

236

Chronic Family Economic Hardship, Family Processes and Progression of Mental and Physical Health Symptoms in Adolescence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research has documented the relationship between family stressors such as family economic hardship and marital conflict and adolescents' mental health symptoms, especially depressive symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined the processes whereby supportive parenting lessens this effect and the progression of mental health and physical health

Lee, Tae Kyoung; Wickrama, K. A. S.; Simons, Leslie Gordon

2013-01-01

237

Mental health promotion and the prevention of mental disorders in South Africa.  

PubMed

The need for greater attention to mental health promotion and the prevention of mental disorders in South Africa is highlighted by the cycle of poverty and mental ill-health, the potential for social gains, the question of affordability of treatment in the face of the increasing burden of mental disorders, and the limitations of existing treatment methods. This article, which provides a desk review of the current status of mental health promotion and prevention of mental disorders in South Africa, suggests that South Africa has a number of policies that bode well for promoting mental health from infancy through to old age. There is, however, a need for programmatic interventions to promote resilience in vulnerable populations. Of note, is the need for programmes to address maternal depression and strengthen attachment and psychosocial stimulation during infancy, strengthen families, promote health enhancing school environments, and address intimate partner violence and build health enhancing social capital. Given the multifaceted nature of risk and protective influences, the need for a multi-sectoral plan of action is highlighted. PMID:23340522

Petersen, I; Bhana, A; Swartz, L

2012-11-01

238

Men's mental health: Connection to urologic health.  

PubMed

Historically, the specialty of urology has focused on single-system diseases. In recent years, however, there has been increasing recognition of the interconnectivity between the various systems, such as cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, erectile dysfunction and prostate cancer. This constellation of disease/syndrome and dysfunction may place urologists at the centre of men's overall health concerns. As urologists considering taking on a leadership role in men's health, they should also consider their potential in helping men suffering from the significant burden of a mental health disorder. Urologists may have a unique opportunity to identify mental health issues in their male patients, influence healthy behaviour change, and successfully refer men, who might otherwise not seek help, to appropriate medical/psychological care. PMID:25243041

Matthew, Andrew; Elterman, Dean

2014-07-01

239

Integrating mental health into public health: The community mental health development project in India  

PubMed Central

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare and its public health institutes are collaborating with Asia Australia Mental Health on an innovative community mental health development project designed to enhance initiatives under the District Mental Health Program and increase accessibility of essential community mental health services. The project is an exciting opportunity to create positive change in meeting the challenges of community mental health care in India. It recognizes that no one single model of care can be applied to all the community in the country and that locally appropriate models working in close partnership with local communities is required. Targeted and skill-based training programs are useful to build local leadership capacity in implementing quality and culturally appropriate community mental health services.

Ng, Chee; Chauhan, Ajay P.; Chavan, Bir Singh; Ramasubramanian, Chellamuthu; Singh, Amool R.; Sagar, Rajesh; Fraser, Julia; Ryan, Brigid; Prasad, Jagdish; Singh, Sujeet; Das, Jayanta; Isaac, Mohan

2014-01-01

240

Seminar in Health and Mental Health Economics Spring 2012  

E-print Network

and mental health measurement; (3) prescription drugs and medical devices; (4 21 Health and Mental Health Measurement (2) February 28 Prescription Drugs. Justin Sydnor (UW Business) March 13 Prescription Drugs and Medical Devices (2

Sheridan, Jennifer

241

Barriers to Mental Health Care Utilization in Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is frequently complicated by co-occurring psychiatric problems, such as depression and anxiety, that negatively affect the course and management of the illness. Yet, in the majority of cases, these psychiatric comorbidities are neither recognized nor treated to remission. The primary purpose of this study was to identify and describe barriers to mental health care utilization for people with PD. Secondary objectives included the assessment of attitudes and preferences regarding the need for mental health services in the PD community and the acceptability of tele-health interventions as a method for improving access and quality of care. Methods Seven hundred sixty-nine people with PD completed an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire assessing barriers to mental health care utilization in this medical population. Respondents were drawn from a national sample. Results Commonly endorsed barriers to mental health care utilization in PD reflect the patients’ incomplete understanding of mental health problems, access issues, and illness-specific concerns, as well as the inadequate screening and detection of psychiatric complications by medical providers, and the need for more effective treatments in this medical population. Several demographic, medical, and psychiatric variables also influenced the likelihood of accessing mental health care. Interest in tele-health approaches to mental health treatment was high and, in several instances, correlated with perceived barriers to mental health care utilization. Conclusions People with PD may encounter a multitude of barriers that impede their pursuit of mental health care. Clinical implications are discussed and further research is needed to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:23589410

Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Friedman, Jill; Allen, Lesley A.; Gara, Michael A.; Menza, Matthew

2013-01-01

242

Investing in the Mental Health of the Labor Force: Epidemiological and Economic Impact of Mental Health Disabilities in the Workplace  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a By the year 2020, depression will emerge as one of the leading causes of disability globally, second only to ischemic heart\\u000a disease (World Health Organization 2001). Thus, governments are taking notice of the mental health of workers. For example,\\u000a the European Ministers of Health have endorsed a detailed action plan calling for employers to “create healthy workplaces\\u000a by introducing ­measures

Carolyn S. Dewa; David McDaid

243

Obesity among those with mental disorders: a National Institute of Mental Health meeting report.  

PubMed

The National Institute of Mental Health convened a meeting in October 2005 to review the literature on obesity, nutrition, and physical activity among those with mental disorders. The findings of this meeting and subsequent update of the literature review are summarized here. Levels of obesity are higher in those with schizophrenia and depression, as is mortality from obesity-related conditions such as coronary heart disease. Medication side effects, particularly the metabolic side effects of antipsychotic medications, contribute to the high levels of obesity in those with schizophrenia, but increased obesity and visceral adiposity have been found in some but not all samples of drug-naïve patients as well. Many of the weight-management strategies used in the general population may be applicable to those with mental disorders, but little is known about the effects of these strategies on this patient population or how these strategies may need to be adapted for the unique needs of those with mental disorders. The minimal research on weight-management programs for those with mental disorders indicates that meaningful changes in dietary intake and physical activity are possible. Physical activity is an important component of any weight-management program, particularly for those with depression, for which a substantial body of research indicates both mental and physical health benefits. Obesity among those with mental disorders has not received adequate research attention, and empirically-based interventions to address the increasing prevalence of obesity and risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in this population are lacking. PMID:19285199

Allison, David B; Newcomer, John W; Dunn, Andrea L; Blumenthal, James A; Fabricatore, Anthony N; Daumit, Gail L; Cope, Mark B; Riley, William T; Vreeland, Betty; Hibbeln, Joseph R; Alpert, Jonathan E

2009-04-01

244

Psychosocial work environment and mental health among construction workers.  

PubMed

We assessed psychosocial work environment, the prevalence of mental health complaints and the association between these two among bricklayers and construction supervisors. For this cross-sectional study a total of 1500 bricklayers and supervisors were selected. Psychosocial work characteristics were measured using the Dutch Questionnaire on the Experience and Evaluation of Work and compared to the general Dutch working population. Mental health effects were measured with scales to assess fatigue during work, need for recovery after work, symptoms of distress, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. The prevalence of self-reported mental health complaints was determined using the cut-off values. Associations between psychosocial work characteristics and self-reported mental health complaints were analysed using logistic regression. Total response rate was 43%. Compared to the general working population, bricklayers experienced statistically significant worse job control, learning opportunities and future perspectives; supervisors experienced statistically significant higher psychological demands and need for recovery. Prevalence of self-reported mental health effects among bricklayers and supervisors, respectively, were as follows: high need for recovery after work (14%; 25%), distress (5%, 7%), depression (18%, 20%) and post-traumatic stress disorder (11%, 7%). Among both occupations, high work speed and quantity were associated with symptoms of depression. Further, among construction supervisors, low participation in decision making and low social support of the direct supervisor was associated with symptoms of depression. The findings in the present study indicate psychosocial risk factors for bricklayers and supervisors. In each occupation a considerable proportion of workers was positively screened for symptoms of common mental disorders. PMID:23380530

Boschman, J S; van der Molen, H F; Sluiter, J K; Frings-Dresen, M H W

2013-09-01

245

Creativity, mental health, and alcoholism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Findings from a research project on the creative process spanning a 25?year period are applied to considerations regarding mental health and creativity. Two specific creative functions are described: (a) homospatial process?actively conceiving two or more discrete entities occupying the same space, a conception leading to the articulation of new identities; and (b) janusian process?actively conceiving multiple opposites or antitheses simultaneously.

Albert Rothenberg

1990-01-01

246

Mental Health Net: Professional Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of a much larger meta-resource, this site contains annotated, rated resources in over 25 subject categories, as well as associations, academic departments, employment, mailing lists, and newsgroups, among other resources. MHN has a rating system (one to four stars), based on content, presentation, ease of use, and overall experience. Interestingly, users are also allowed to interactively vote thumbs up or down on annotated resources. Mental Health Net and CMHC Systems maintain this site.

1998-01-01

247

Demands of Immigration, Health Literacy, and Depression in Recent Latino Immigrants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Latino immigrants have unique stressors that can influence mental health. The challenges of adapting to a new society include language barriers, separation from family, and feelings of loss, which can lead to depression. Low health literacy may make it difficult to obtain health care services, and depression may then go untreated. This secondary data analysis examined the relationships of immigration

Maren J. Coffman; Cynthia K. Norton

2010-01-01

248

Depression in Older Adults  

MedlinePLUS

... You are here Home » Depression In Older Adults Depression In Older Adults Depression affects more than 19 ... combination of both. [8] Older Adult Attitudes Toward Depression: According to a Mental Health America survey [9] ...

249

Climate change: the next challenge for public mental health?  

PubMed

Climate change is increasingly recognized as one of the greatest threats to human health of the 21st century, with consequences that mental health professionals are also likely to face. While physical health impacts have been increasingly emphasized in literature and practice, recent scholarly literature indicates that climate change and related weather events and environmental changes can profoundly impact psychological well-being and mental health through both direct and indirect pathways, particularly among those with pre-existing vulnerabilities or those living in ecologically sensitive areas. Although knowledge is still limited about the connections between climate change and mental health, evidence is indicating that impacts may be felt at both the individual and community levels, with mental health outcomes ranging from psychological distress, depression and anxiety, to increased addictions and suicide rates. Drawing on examples from diverse geographical areas, this article highlights some climate-sensitive impacts that may be encountered by mental health professionals. We then suggest potential avenues for public mental health in light of current and projected changes, in order to stimulate thought, debate, and action. PMID:25137107

Bourque, François; Willox, Ashlee Cunsolo

2014-08-01

250

Making connections: Greek and Sri Lankan Tamil perceptions of mental health, ways of coping, and help-seeking  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis explores the perceptions of mental health, mental health problems, depression, and the coping and help-seeking behaviour of Greeks and Sri Lankan Tamils in Toronto. The study was undertaken in collaboration with a community mental health agency located in the Toronto community council area of East York. The information from this study will be used to help the agency,

Margaret Douglin

1998-01-01

251

PHASE: a 'health technology' approach to psychological treatment in primary mental health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHASE research programme is an NHS-Executive funded, randomized controlled trial of assisted self-help for common mental disorders, delivered by practice nurses in primary care. The self-help guide - Managing anxiety and depression: a self-help guide published by the Mental Health Foundation - is conceptualized as a ' health technology' where the nurse' s role is to educate patients how

David Richards; Michael Barkham; Jane Cahill; Chris Williams; Chris Williams

2002-01-01

252

Increasing Mental Health Literacy via Narrative Advertising  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research explored the effectiveness of narrative advertising and argument advertising in increasing mental illness (depression) literacy. Results showed that narrative advertising was more effective than argument advertising at engaging participants in experiential immersion, resulting in greater sympathy toward those suffering from depression. In addition, narrative advertising better involved participants in issue elaboration and increased willingness to seek professional help.

Chingching Chang

2008-01-01

253

Sleep Characteristics, Mental Health, and Diabetes Risk  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE Research has suggested that a higher risk of type 2 diabetes associated with sleep characteristics exists. However, studies have not thoroughly assessed the potential confounding effects of mental health conditions associated with alterations in sleep. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We prospectively assessed the association between sleep characteristics and self-reported incident diabetes among Millennium Cohort Study participants prospectively followed over a 6-year time period. Surveys are administered approximately every 3 years and collect self-reported data on demographics, height, weight, lifestyle, features of military service, sleep, clinician-diagnosed diabetes, and mental health conditions assessed by the PRIME-MD Patient Health Questionnaire and the PTSD Checklist–Civilian Version. Statistical methods for longitudinal data were used for data analysis. RESULTS We studied 47,093 participants (mean 34.9 years of age; mean BMI 26.0 kg/m2; 25.6% female). During 6 years of follow-up, 871 incident diabetes cases occurred (annual incidence 3.6/1,000 person-years). In univariate analyses, incident diabetes was significantly more likely among participants with self-reported trouble sleeping, sleep duration <6 h, and sleep apnea. Participants reporting incident diabetes were also significantly older, of nonwhite race, of higher BMI, less likely to have been deployed, and more likely to have reported baseline symptoms of panic, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression. After adjusting for covariates, trouble sleeping (odds ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.03–1.42]) and sleep apnea (1.78 [1.39–2.28]) were significantly and independently related to incident diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Trouble sleeping and sleep apnea predict diabetes risk independent of mental health conditions and other diabetes risk factors. PMID:23835691

Boyko, Edward J.; Seelig, Amber D.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Hooper, Tomoko I.; Smith, Besa; Smith, Tyler C.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.

2013-01-01

254

Issues in Children's Mental Health. Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report examines issues related to children's mental health in Virginia. The report discusses the effects of children's mental illness, presents risk and protective factors, and describes the incidence of children's mental health problems. Information specific to Virginia is presented, including the prevalence of youth suicide,…

Nimmo, Margaret L.

255

Synergy, 2003. Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each issue in the 2002 edition of the Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network (ATMHN) newsletter represents a theme critical to mental health practitioners. The Winter 2002 issue features articles on the psychological consequences of interpreters in relation to working with torture and trauma clients, addressing language issues on mental

Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network, Parramatta.

256

Mental Health Counseling: A Stakeholder's Manifesto.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the original dreams of the founders of the American Mental Health Counselors Association; looks at history and comments on the state of mental health counseling as it has struggled to evolve as a profession. Urges those in the counseling profession to consider an acquisitions and mergers corporate mentality to ensure and enhance the…

Beck, Edward S.

1999-01-01

257

Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

1994-01-01

258

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration  

MedlinePLUS

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Home Newsroom Site Map Contact Us SAMHSA Search Search Data Visit ... SAMHSA's mission is to reduce the impact of substance abuse and mental illness on America's communities. The ...

259

Obesity Is More Strongly Associated With Inappropriate Eating Behaviors Than With Mental Health in Older Adults Receiving Congregate Meals  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explored the relationships of inappropriate eating behaviors and mental health with obesity in congregate meal participants in Georgia (N = 120, mean age = 75 years, 75% female, 43% African American). Inappropriate eating behaviors were evaluated with the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (18 questions); mental health was assessed with the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (21 questions); history of depression was assessed with the

Kathryn N. Porter; Mary Ann Johnson

2011-01-01

260

Manic Depressive Disorder in Mental Handicap.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight cases of early onset bipolar affective disorder in adolescents with mental impairment are described, focusing on age of onset; common characteristics such as rapid cycling, mixed affective states, and lithium resistance; and the likelihood that cerebral dysfunction might cause a secondary form of bipolar disorder. (JDD)

Berney, T. P.; Jones, P. M.

1988-01-01

261

Developing specialist perinatal mental health services.  

PubMed

Perinatal mental illness (PMI) represents a significant public health concern affecting considerable numbers of pregnant women and mothers of infants. Depression and anxiety are key issues; however accurate identification of PMI, suitable intervention and provision of adequate services are salient contemporary challenges. Coherence in the commissioning of PMI services, appropriate and contextually sensitive to the needs of the locality, remains a critical factor in the provision of high quality, integrated and seamless care. However, such coherence has had difficulty in finding traction, largely as a consequence of complex service and organisational structures and commissioning pathways. This paper discusses many of the issues that must be considered in the provision of high quality PMI services that are sensitive and appropriate for the needs of women and their families in the community. An exemplar of the development of a local service is discussed in detail. PMID:24669517

Jomeen, Julie; Martin, Colin

2014-03-01

262

Mental Health and Business Professionals’ Employment-Related Perceptions of Individuals with Psychological Disorders.  

E-print Network

??Mental health and business professionals’ employment-related perceptions of 6 psychological disorders (i.e. alcoholism, insomnia, major depression, social phobia, post- traumatic stress disorder, obesity) were examined.… (more)

Mock, Kevan

2008-01-01

263

[Gender differences in measures of mental health associated with a marital relationship].  

PubMed

This study examined gender differences for two measures of mental health as related to the quality of the marital relationship. Middle-aged respondents (221 female; 210 male) rated their marital satisfaction, affection, and communication. They also rated their psychological well-being and depression. The correlations between marital quality and mental health indicated that for males marital quality was more strongly associated with psychological well-being than with depression. Females showed no such difference, or their marital quality was associated with depression. This implies that for females, depression was a more sensitive measure of their mental health related to their husband-wife relationship. On the other hand, for males subjective well-being which was correlated with self-esteem was a more sensitive measure of their mental health. PMID:24669502

Ito, Yuko; Sagara, Junko

2014-02-01

264

77 FR 9672 - National Institute of Mental Health; Notice of Closed Meetings  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Committee: National Institute of Mental Health Special Emphasis Panel; Mechanisms Explaining Differences in Depressive & Anxiety Disorders Across Racial/Ethnic Groups. Date: March 6, 2012. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and...

2012-02-17

265

Gender differences in the knowledge, attitude and practice towards mental health illness in a rapidly developing Arab society  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Mental disorders are common in all countries and cause immense suffering. Both gender and low socioeconomic status have been related to depression and other common mental disorders, but their possible relationship to mental health literacy remains uncertain.Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the gender differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices towards mental illness in a sample

Abdulbari Bener; Suhaila Ghuloum

2011-01-01

266

The gap that makes us desperate: Paths from language to mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although past research provided some clues about the relation of language use with mental health, the mediatory functions of personality variables in this relationship have been ignored. This research examined the mediatory role of self?concept clarity in the relationship between language use perceived by individuals and mental health indicators including anxiety, depression, and alexithymia. Based on the theoretical framework suggested

Ömer Faruk ?im?ek; Yasar Kuzucu

2012-01-01

267

Occupational Mental Health: A Study of Work-Related Mental Health among Clinical Nurses  

PubMed Central

Objective: This paper reports a study performed to investigate and assess the mental health as well as the demographic characteristics of nurses to examine their mental health status based on four physical, anxiety, social-function and depression items. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was accomplished on 86 nurses working at three hospitals, affiliated to Iranian health ministry, in Ilam city(western Iran) all the cases were selected by purposeful sampling method. Data was collected by a two-part questionnaire containing individual data and GHQ -28 Standardized Questionnaire. The GHO-28 was developed by Goldberg, in 1978, as a screening tool to detect those likely to have or be at risk of developing psychiatric disorders. The GHQ-28 is a 28-item measure of emotional distress in medical settings. Analysis was done by SPSS 18 software. Results: The majority of participants were females(50.6 vs.49.4) of 35-40 years old(27.2% ), 84 percent were married(vs.16%), 35.8 percent with 10-15 years of record(vs.33.3% less than 5), 22.2% with 5-10, and 8.6% with more than 15-years of work record. The majority of participants have worked in surgical wards of hospitals. The analysis of GHQ results showed that 43.2%(n=35) of participants were suspected to suffer from mental disorders(vs.56.8% n=46 healthy participants); of all the suspected cases, 12.3% were supposed to have physical symptoms, 16% anxiety symptoms, 42% social dysfunction, and 6.2% symptoms of depression. In general, the participants demonstrated a Mean±SD of mental health score equal to 23.65±9.43. Conclusion: Research results showed that the high prevalence of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms among nurses is alarming. It was concluded that providing efficient adequate and appropriate support services for this group can result in more healthy nurses as well as promotion of public health. PMID:25386506

Taghinejad, Hamid; Kikhavani, Sattar; Jaafarpour, Molouk; Azadi, Arman

2014-01-01

268

Social Problem Solving Ability Predicts Mental Health Among Undergraduate Students  

PubMed Central

Background: The main objective of this study was predicting student's mental health using social problem solving- ability. Methods: In this correlational. descriptive study, 369 (208 female and 161 male) from, Mazandaran University of Medical Science were selected through stratified random sampling method. In order to collect the data, the social problem solving inventory-revised and general health questionnaire were used. Data were analyzed through SPSS-19, Pearson's correlation, t test, and stepwise regression analysis. Results: Data analysis showed significant relationship between social problem solving ability and mental health (P < 0.01). Social problem solving ability was significantly associated with the somatic symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction and severe depression (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results of our study demonstrated that there is a significant correlation between social problem solving ability and mental health. PMID:24404372

Ranjbar, Mansour; Bayani, Ali Asghar; Bayani, Ali

2013-01-01

269

Reducing the silent burden of impaired mental health.  

PubMed

Mental and behavioural disorders account for about one-third of the world's disability due to all ill health amongst adults, with unipolar depressive disorders set to be the world's number one cause of ill health and premature death in 2030, affecting high- and low-income countries alike. There is a range of evidence-based cost-effective interventions that can be implemented in parenting, at schools, at the workplace and in older age that can promote health and well-being, reduce mental disorders, lead to improved productivity and increase resilience to cope with many of the stressors that are facing the world. These facts need to be better communicated to policy makers to ensure that the silent burden of impaired mental health is adequately heard and reduced. PMID:22079936

Anderson, Peter; Jané-Llopis, Eva; Hosman, Clemens

2011-12-01

270

Crisis as opportunity: international health work during the economic depression.  

PubMed

The economic depression of the 1930s represented the most important economic and social crisis of its time. Surprisingly, its effect on health did not show in available morbidity and mortality rates. In 1932, the League of Nations Health Organisation embarked on a six-point program addressing statistical methods of measuring the effect and its influence on mental health and nutrition and establishing ways to safeguard public health through more efficient health systems. Some of these studies resulted in considerations of general relevance beyond crisis management. Unexpectedly, the crisis offered an opportunity to reconsider key concepts of individual and public health. PMID:19230333

Borowy, Iris

2008-01-01

271

AIMHI NT 'Mental Health Story Teller Mob': Developing stories in mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Australian Integrated Mental Health Initiative in the Northern Territory is one of a number of sites funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council. The project has been working with Aboriginal Mental Health Workers (AMHWs), and the Top End Division of General Practice (TEDGP) to adapt mental health information to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context through

Tricia Nagel; Carolyn Thompson

2007-01-01

272

Mental health service use among trauma-exposed adults: a mixed-methods study.  

PubMed

Research findings indicate that many urban trauma-exposed individuals do not access needed mental health care; therefore, it is critical to identify factors associated with the use of mental health services for this group. This study used a mixed-methods approach to examine predictors of mental health service use and barriers to care. Quantitative findings showed that significantly more adults who were male and black with a lower education and income did not report current mental health service use. After controlling for covariates, individuals with lower trauma exposure (odds ratio [OR], 0.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.5-0.9) and higher depression symptom scores (OR, 1.0; 95% CI, 1.0-1.1) were significantly more likely to report current mental health service use. Qualitative findings indicated that fear, low mental health literacy, helplessness, and psychosocial issues were identified as barriers to mental health treatment. Implications for treatment and future research are discussed. PMID:24566510

Ghafoori, Bita; Barragan, Belen; Palinkas, Lawrence

2014-03-01

273

Tibetan Psychiatry and Mental Health  

E-print Network

book on Tibetan medicine. That book was a major breakthrough and has been very important. So, thank you very much, Miss Winder. Now the top:: for my talk this morning is Tibetan psychiatry and mental health. I must teU you that when I first started... fortune to meet was Mr. Gene Smith, whom many of you may know as one of the greatest scholars of Tibetan literature. He immediately told me that there were actu­ ally three whole chapters of the rGyud-bii exclusively devoted to the subject of psychiatry...

Clifford, Terry

1993-01-01

274

Mental health implications of migration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction  Since late 1980s, 1,001,726 immigrants arrived in Israel from the former Soviet Union (FSU). A review of community studies\\u000a on the mental health of these immigrants is presented.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Method  Israeli studies from the past two decades were reviewed. Presented are findings on the prevalence of psychological distress\\u000a and psychiatric disorders as well as on a number of risk factors among FSU

Julia Mirsky

2009-01-01

275

Feminism, eating, and mental health.  

PubMed

Eating disorders are prevalent health problems for women today. The traditional biomedical or psychiatric approaches offer a narrow perspective of the problem, its courses, and its treatment. Analyzing disordered eating from a feminist perspective, this article discusses cultural, political, and social phenomena that have had a significant impact on the development of these disorders. Parallels of eating disorders and other women's mental illnesses and the medicalization of their symptoms is explored. A "new view" of disordered eating in women is proposed that can be advanced only through feminist research. PMID:1707250

White, J H

1991-03-01

276

The effect of social roles on mental health: a matter of quantity or quality?  

PubMed

The effect of social roles (partner, parent, worker) on mental health may depend on the total number or the quality of the individual occupied social roles. With longitudinal data from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS), the effect of the number and quality of occupied social roles on mental health over three years was examined among 2471 men and women aged 25-55 years without mental disorders at baseline. Mental health was assessed using 3-year change in the SF-36 mental health scale as well as using the 3-year incidence of anxiety and depressive disorders defined by DSM-III criteria. The quality of social roles was assessed by the GQSB (Groningen Questionnaire Social Behavior). The number of social roles had no significant effect on the risk of developing depressive and anxiety disorders, but particularly the partner-role had a significant positive effect on mental health (beta of mental health=1.19, p=0.01; HR of incident disorders=0.75, 95% CI:0.51-1.00, p=0.05). A good quality of each of the three social roles was associated with higher levels of mental health and lower risks of incident disorders over 3 years. More than the number of social roles, knowledge about social role quality might provide opportunities for prevention of depressive and anxiety disorders. PMID:18448169

Plaisier, I; Beekman, A T F; de Bruijn, J G M; de Graaf, R; Ten Have, M; Smit, J H; van Dyck, R; Penninx, B W J H

2008-12-01

277

Mental health, gender, and drug court completion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drug-involved offenders report high rates of mental health problems that can negatively impact criminal justice outcomes.\\u000a Yet, relatively little attention has been given to the mental health issues of drug court offenders. Therefore, this study\\u000a examined 449 participants in a Delaware drug court and investigated relationships between mental health, gender, and program\\u000a completion. Bivariate results indicated that gender was related

Alison R. Gray; Christine A. Saum

2005-01-01

278

The challenge of auditing mental health.  

PubMed

A changing environment which includes increased competition and changing philosophies of providing mental health services reflect an increased need for an information gathering instrument to provide the foundation for developing strategic plans in mental health organizations. The initial step in the planning process is collecting and systematizing the data necessary to the organization's functioning. A marketing audit specifically designed to encompass the special problems encountered in the mental health organization is presented in this paper. PMID:10303626

Hill, C J

1989-01-01

279

Marriage and Mental Health among Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Marriage is widely thought to confer mental health benefits, but little is known about how this apparent benefit may vary across the life course. Early marriage, which is nonnormative, could have no, or even negative, mental health consequences for young adults. Using survey data from waves 1 and 3 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 11,695),

Jeremy E. Uecker

2012-01-01

280

Mental Health Care in Primary Care Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE To assess family physicians' interactions with mental health professionals (MHPs), their satisfaction with the delivery of mental health care in primary health care settings, and their perceptions of areas for improvement. DESIGN Mailed survey. SETTING Province of Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS All FPs in Saskatchewan (N = 816) were invited to participate in the study; 31 were later determined to be

C. C. Doebbeling; Syed M. Shah

2004-01-01

281

The Clinical Neuroscience Course: Viewing Mental Health from Neurobiological Perspectives  

PubMed Central

Although the field of neuroscience is booming, a challenge for researchers in mental health disciplines is the integration of basic research findings into applied clinical approaches leading to effective therapies. Recently the National Institute of Mental Health called for translational research grants to encourage collaboration between neuroscientists and mental health professionals. In order for this “clinical neuroscience” to emerge and thrive, an important first step is the provision of appropriate course offerings so that future neuroscience researchers and mental health practitioners will have a common neurobiological base from which to make informed decisions about the most efficacious treatments for mental illnesses. Accordingly, an integrative course, Clinical Neuroscience, was developed to address these issues. After reviewing the historical origins of this emerging discipline, students are exposed to fundamental overviews of neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neural development before approaching the neurobiological components of several disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, Tourette’s syndrome, drug abuse, obsessive compulsive disorder). Finally, the maintenance of mental health is emphasized as topics such as psychoneuroimmunology, coping with stress, and eating regulation are discussed. Important themes emphasized in this course include (1) the consideration of only empirically based evidence, (2) the view that mental illness represents a disruption of neurobiological homeostasis, (3) the acknowledgement that, because the brain is a plastic organ, the clinical relevance of environmental and behavioral influences is difficult to overestimate, and (4) the recognition of the value of ecologically relevant animal models in the investigation of various aspects of mental illness. Because of the importance of stress maintenance in mental health, exercises have been developed to increase students’ awareness of their own coping strategies. Finally, several books and movies are incorporated to provide additional points of view of the topics discussed in the course. PMID:23494100

Lambert, Kelly G.

2005-01-01

282

Mental health in the Middle East: an Egyptian perspective.  

PubMed

This article introduces the reader to mental health in the Middle East with an Egyptian perspective, from the Pharaonic era through the Islamic Renaissance, up until the current state. During Pharaonic times, mental illness was not known as such, as there was no separator between Soma and Psyche. Actually, mental disorders were described as symptoms of the heart and uterine diseases, as stated in Eber's and Kahoun's papyri. In spite of the mystical culture, mental disorders were attributed and treated on a somatic basis. In the Islamic era, mental patients were never subjected to any torture or maltreatment because of the inherited belief that they may be possessed by a good Moslem genie. The first mental hospital in Europe was located in Spain, following the Arab invasion, and from then on it propagated to other European countries. The 14th century Kalawoon Hospital in Cairo had four departments, including medicine, surgery, ophthalmology, and mental disorders. Six centuries earlier, psychiatry in general hospitals was recognized in Europe. The influence of Avicenna and Elrazi and their contributions to European medicine is well-known. This article discusses further the current state of the mental health services in Egypt and the transcultural studies of the prevalence and phenomenology of anxiety, schizophrenia, depression, suicide, conversion, and obsessive compulsive disorders. An outline of psychiatric disorders in children is discussed. The problem of drug abuse is also addressed, especially that in Egypt after 1983, where drugs like heroine replaced the common habit of hashish. PMID:10547710

Okasha, A

1999-12-01

283

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care Quick Links Facts for Families - Numerical List Facts for Families - Keyword (Alphabetical) Facts for Families No. 107; Updated December 2012 Click ...

284

Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary and International Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The World Federation for Mental Health was founded as an international apolitical organization concerned with quality of life rather than merely the absence or prevention of mental illness. An examination of the manner and extent to which mental problems arise in different cultural settings can provide data needed to understand the relationship…

Klineberg, Otto

285

Student Mental Health Services in Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Facts about mental and emotional illness and implications for student mental health services in higher education are reviewed. Psychoses, which are types of mental illness that are usually quite severe, are discussed in terms of symptoms, as are neuroses, which cause severe distress and impair coping with living conditions but are not as…

Blai, Boris, Jr.

286

Rural Schools' Mental Health Needs  

E-print Network

d b y t h e A m er ic an P sy ch o lo g ic al A ss o ci at io n o r o n e o f it s al li ed p u b li sh er s. T h is a rt ic le i s in te n d ed s o le ly f o r th e p er so n al u se o f th e in d iv id u al u se r an d i... health services (Harowski, Turner, LeVine, Schank & Leichter, 2006}.The available research indicates the mental health needs of rural populations are heterogeneous and shift on the basis of an array of changing socioeconomic factors, including...

Lee, Steven W.; Lohmeier, Jill H.; Niileksela, Christopher Robert; Oeth, Jessica

2009-01-01

287

Nutrition health issues in self-reported postpartum depression  

PubMed Central

Aim In this retrospective survey women with and without self-reported postpartum depression (PPD) were compared in regards to consumption-frequency of foods and supplements rich in nutrients beneficial to nervous system (NS) health, in regards to consumption-frequency of compounds which may counteract the effect of the above and in regards to nutritional support provided to them during a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Background Postpartum depression (PPD) is defined as a major depressive episode that begins within 1 month of delivery and is experienced by roughly 13% of mothers. Patients and methods Four Hundred participants were recruited through the internet. Data gathered via multiple choice questionnaires was statistically analyzed using SPSS and Statistical software; statistical procedures included discriminant analysis, Pearson's product moment correlation, independent t-test and cross-tabulations. Results Out of 400 participants 83 (20.8%) were affected by self-reported depression after a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Depressed subjects consumed oily fish and offal significantly more often than non depressed subjects. Depression was more prevalent among women with vegetarian diets. No significant difference concerning food group intake or the ratios between foods rich in nutrients beneficial to NS health and foods rich in compounds antagonising their effect were found between depressed and non depressed subjects. Iron supplementation correlated positively with zinc supplementation in both groups. Roughly 70% of women reported to have received no information about n-3 fatty acid fish oils during pregnancy; informed subjects consumed fish oils more often. The majority of subjects with self-reported depression described nutritional support during pregnancy as inadequate. Conclusion Within this Austrian sample, the prevalence rate of postpartum depression was high; while the consumption of oily fish and vegetarian diets negatively correlated with depression, Patient information positively correlated with the consumption of fish oil supplements. These results indicate that further studies will be required in order to establish the exact relationship between nutrition and mental health during and after pregnancy. PMID:24834169

Mortimore, Denise; Snow, Sarah

2011-01-01

288

Holistic health: does it really include mental health?  

PubMed

Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S.) over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate public perceptions regarding mental illness are adequately addressed and resolved. Until then, mental and physical health will continue to be viewed as disparate entities rather than parts of a unified whole. We conclude that the U.S. currently does not generally incorporate the tenets of holistic health in its view of the mental and physical health of its citizens, and provide some suggestions for changing that viewpoint. PMID:17370005

McClanahan, Kimberly K; Huff, Marlene B; Omar, Hatim A

2006-01-01

289

Multiple trauma and mental health in former Ugandan child soldiers.  

PubMed

The present study examines the effect of war and domestic violence on the mental health of child soldiers in a sample consisting of 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age: 11-17 years, female: 49%). All children had experienced at least 1 war-related event and 78% were additionally exposed to at least 1 incident of domestic violence. Prevalences of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder were 33%, and 36%, respectively. Behavioral and emotional problems above clinical cutoff were measured in 61%. No gender differences were found regarding mental health outcomes. War experience and domestic violence were significantly associated with all mental health outcomes. The authors' findings point to the detrimental effects of domestic violence in addition to traumatizing war experiences in child soldiers. PMID:21053376

Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Adam, Hubertus

2010-10-01

290

Beyond workers' compensation: men's mental health in and out of work.  

PubMed

The mental health of men is an important issue with significant direct and indirect costs emerging from work-related depression and suicide. Although the merits of men's community-based and workplace mental health promotion initiatives have been endorsed, few programs are mandated or formally evaluated and reported on. Conspicuously absent also are gender analyses detailing connections between masculinities and men's work-related depression and suicide on which to build men-centered mental health promotion programs. This article provides an overview of four interconnected issues, (a) masculinities and men's health, (b) men and work, (c) men's work-related depression and suicide, and (d) men's mental health promotion, in the context of men's diverse relationships to work (including job insecurity and unemployment). Based on the review, recommendations are made for advancing the well-being of men who are in as well as of those out of work. PMID:23727792

Oliffe, John L; Han, Christina S E

2014-01-01

291

Increasing lifestyle physical activity in patients with depression or other serious mental illness.  

PubMed

People with severe and persistent mental illness are more likely to be overweight and to suffer from obesity-related illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease than healthy individuals. Lifestyle change interventions that emphasize integrating physical activity into daily life have not been studied extensively in people with mental illness. The authors present the results of an initial feasibility study of a lifestyle modification program for individuals with serious mental illness. Thirty-nine individuals with depression or other serious mental illness were recruited from three different mental health facilities to attend an 18-week lifestyle intervention program promoting physical activity and healthy eating. At each session, participants discussed topics related to healthy lifestyle changes and participated in group walks. Data were collected at baseline, 6 weeks, and 18 weeks. The results demonstrated that individuals who have depression and other serious mental illnesses can participate in a lifestyle intervention program. Participants who attended the final follow-up session had lost weight over the course of the intervention. Study retention was a problem. However, the cost of this type of group-based lifestyle intervention was relatively low, so that such an intervention for this high-risk group may still be cost-effective. PMID:16304506

Richardson, Caroline R; Avripas, Sabrina A; Neal, David L; Marcus, Sheila M

2005-11-01

292

Mental health priorities in Vietnam: a mixed-methods analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The Mental Health Country Profile is a tool that was generated by the International Mental Health Policy and Services Project to inform policy makers, professionals and other key stakeholders about important issues which need to be considered in mental health policy development. The Mental Health Country Profile contains four domains, which include the mental health context, resources, provision and

Maria Niemi; Huong T Thanh; Tran Tuan; Torkel Falkenberg

2010-01-01

293

Global mental health: from science to action.  

PubMed

This article charts the historical development of the discipline of global mental health, whose goal is to improve access to mental health care and reduce inequalities in mental health outcomes between and within nations. The article begins with an overview of the contribution of four scientific foundations toward the discipline's core agenda: to scale up services for people with mental disorders and to promote their human rights. Next, the article highlights four recent, key events that are indicative of the actions shaping the discipline: the Mental Health Gap Action Programme to synthesize evidence on what treatments are effective for a range of mental disorders; the evidence on task shifting to nonspecialist health workers to deliver these treatments; the Movement for Global Mental Health's efforts to build a common platform for professionals and civil society to advocate for their shared goal; and the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health, which has identified the research priorities that, within the next decade, can lead to substantial improvements in the lives of people living with mental disorders. The article ends by examining the major challenges for the field, and the opportunities for addressing them in the future. PMID:22335178

Patel, Vikram

2012-01-01

294

Maternal postnatal depression and children's growth and behaviour during the early years of life: exploring the interaction between physical and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo assess the association between maternal postnatal depression and child behaviour problems and child growth at age 2 yearsMethodsThis was a longitudinal birth cohort study in Johannesburg, South Africa. Primary analysis on the ‘Birth to Twenty’ cohort was performed for the association between maternal postnatal depression and child behaviour problems (n=1035) and growth (n=891) at age 2 and subgroup analyses

Bilal Avan; Linda M Richter; Paul G Ramchandani; Shane A Norris; Alan Stein

2010-01-01

295

Mental Health: The Search for a Definition  

PubMed Central

Various attempts to define the concept of “mental health” are examined. Value judgments permeate much mental health literature. Their use militates against obtaining an objective definition, capable of universal application. The acceptance of a definition including a value judgment implies taking an attitude toward a particular society and its social ideals. Present limits of competence only allow us to describe “mental health” conceptually. Such “untechnical” proposals are liable to be confused with “technical” (“scientific”) propositions. Multiple criteria are likely to be helpful in improving our concept of “mental health”. The intrusion of morals into the world of health is discussed as part of the contemporary intellectual dilemma of determined human behaviour versus human responsibility and the reality of moral values. It is suggested that “mental health” might consist simply of an individual's possession of insight into his own personality, combined with an honest recognition and acceptance of his condition. PMID:14145470

Tucker, D. K.; le Riche, W. Harding

1964-01-01

296

Insights on unemployment, unemployment insurance, and mental health.  

PubMed

This paper contributes to the growing literature on the relationship between business cycles and mental health. It is one of the first applications in the economics literature to incorporate data on web searches from Google Insights for Search, and these unique data allow the opportunity to estimate the association between weekly unemployment insurance (UI) claims, in addition to monthly unemployment rates, and search indexes for "depression" and "anxiety". Results from state fixed effects models yield (1) a positive relationship between the unemployment rate and the depression search index and (2) a negative relationship between initial UI claims on the one hand and the depression and anxiety search indexes on the other. A lag analysis also shows that an extended period of higher levels of continued UI claims is associated with a higher depression search index. PMID:21349596

Tefft, Nathan

2011-03-01

297

Depression care management: impact of implementation on health system costs.  

PubMed

This study examined the mental health care costs associated with implementation of a collaborative care management (CCM) of treatment for depression in primary care. A retrospective review of all costs was performed over a 2-year period associated with providing care to adult patients at clinical sites with CCM versus those with usual care, comparing total and mental health per member per month (PMPM) costs for 2008 and 2009 (patient population = 103,000). The mental health-PMPM costs as a percentage of total health care costs at the clinic without CCM were 4.65% in 2008 and 4.5% in 2009 (p = .085). In the clinics with CCM, there was a significant difference between the 2 years with a decrease noted in 2009 of 4.91% compared with 4.36% in 2008 (p < .0001). This study demonstrated that, on a population basis with the implementation of CCM, the metric of mental health-PMPM (using the actual costs of delivering care) suggested that an increased short-term cost of care is not always realized. Collaborative care management treatment for depression may be a more cost-efficient method of care for the population as a whole, even in the short term. PMID:21537138

Angstman, Kurt B; Rasmussen, Norman H; Herman, David C; Sobolik, Jerry J

2011-01-01

298

Mental health outcomes at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy.  

PubMed

On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the most densely populated region in the US. In New Jersey, thousands of families were made homeless and entire communities were destroyed in the worst disaster in the history of the state. The economic impact of Sandy was huge, comparable to Hurricane Katrina. The areas that sustained the most damage were the small- to medium-sized beach communities along New Jersey's Atlantic coastline. Six months following the hurricane, we conducted a random telephone survey of 200 adults residing in 18 beach communities located in Monmouth County. We found that 14.5% (95% CI = 9.9-20.2) of these residents screened positive for PTSD and 6.0% (95% CI = 3.1-10.2) met criteria for major depression. Altogether 13.5% (95% CI = 9.1-19.0) received mental health counseling and 20.5% (95% CI = 15.1-26.8) sought some type of mental health support in person or online, rates similar to those reported in New York after the World Trade Center disaster In multivariate analyses, the best predictors of mental health status and service use were having high hurricane exposure levels, having physical health limitations, and having environmental health concerns. Research is needed to assess the mental health status and service use of Jersey Shore residents over time, to evaluate environmental health concerns, and to better understand the storm's impact among those with physical health limitations. PMID:24558743

Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Kirchner, H Lester; Erlich, Porat M; Adams, Richard E; Figley, Charles R; Solhkhah, Ramon

2013-01-01

299

Mental health of female survivors of human trafficking in Nepal.  

PubMed

Little is known about the mental health status of trafficked women, even though international conventions require that it be considered. This study, therefore, aims at exploring the mental health status, including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), of female survivors of human trafficking who are currently supported by local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Katmandu, the capital of Nepal, through comparison between those who were forced to work as sex workers and those who worked in other areas such as domestic and circus work (non-sex workers group). The Hopkins Symptoms Checklist-25 (HSCL-25) was administered to assess anxiety and depression, and the PTSD Checklist Civilian Version (PCL-C) was used to evaluate PTSD. Both the sex workers' and the non-sex workers' groups had a high proportion of cases with anxiety, depression, and PTSD. The sex workers group tended to have more anxiety symptoms (97.7%) than the non-sex workers group (87.5%). Regarding depression, all the constituents of the sex workers group scored over the cut-off point (100%), and the group showed a significantly higher prevalence than the non-sex workers (80.8%). The proportion of those who are above the cut-off for PTSD was higher in the sex workers group (29.6%) than in the non-sex workers group (7.5%). There was a higher rate of HIV infection in the sex workers group (29.6%) than in the non-sex workers group (0%). The findings suggest that programs to address human trafficking should include interventions (such as psychosocial support) to improve survivors' mental health status, paying attention to the category of work performed during the trafficking period. In particular, the current efforts of the United Nations and various NGOs that help survivors of human trafficking need to more explicitly focus on mental health and psychosocial support. PMID:18276050

Tsutsumi, Atsuro; Izutsu, Takashi; Poudyal, Amod K; Kato, Seika; Marui, Eiji

2008-04-01

300

Reducing the Silent Burden of Impaired Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental and behavioral disorders account for about one third of the world's disability caused by all ill health among adults, with unipolar depressive disorders set to be the world's number one cause of illhealth and premature death in 2030, affecting high- and low-income countries. There is a range of evidence-based cost-effective interventions that can be implemented in parenting, at schools,

Eva Jané-Llopis; Peter Anderson; Sarah Stewart-Brown; Katherine Weare; Kristian Wahlbeck; David McDaid; Cary Cooper; Paul Litchfield

2011-01-01

301

Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

302

Segmenting the mental health care market.  

PubMed

The authors report the results of a segmentation study of the mental health care market. A random sample of 387 residents of a western city were interviewed by telephone. Cluster analysis of the data identified six market segments. Each is described according to the mental health care services to which it is most sensitive. Implications for targeting the segments are discussed. PMID:10104017

Stone, T R; Warren, W E; Stevens, R E

1990-03-01

303

The Elementary Mental Health Operations Evaluation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the results of a study that investigated the effectiveness of four Elementary Mental Health Operations (ELMHO) programs in Pinellas County, Florida. ELMHO programs were designed to provide school-based mental health services to children and their families to help elementary students with emotional disabilities learn to cope…

Struchen, Wendy L.; Hall, Judy

304

Mental health in the aftermath of conflict  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors survey the recent literature on the mental health effects of conflict. They highlight the methodological challenges faced in this literature, which include the lack of validated mental health scales in a survey context, the difficulties in measuring individual exposure to conflict, and the issues related to making causal inferences from observed correlations. They illustrate how some of these

Lakshmi Iyer

2009-01-01

305

College Mental Health at the Cutting Edge?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As someone who has been involved in college mental health in three different roles, the author would say those who work in this field inhabit a strange space. College mental health centers are generally seen as somewhat peripheral to the core mission of universities by upper administration. Counseling centers do not reside within academic…

Schwartz, Victor

2013-01-01

306

Minority Status, Aging, and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews findings on mental health and life satisfaction among aged blacks, Mexican Americans, and Native Americans. Mental health and life satisfaction of these groups was no lower than might be anticipated based on their relative socioeconomic standing. Little is known about how ethnicity and minority group status influence psychopathology and…

Markides, Kyriakos S.

1986-01-01

307

Migrant Farmworker Stress: Mental Health Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The number of Latinos in rural regions of the United States is increasing. Little is known about factors that undermine the mental health of this segment of the rural population. Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine which stressors inherent in farmwork and the farmworker lifestyle contribute to poor mental health. Methods: An…

Hiott, Ann E.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Davis, Stephen W.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2008-01-01

308

Children's Mental Health and School Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An integrative review of literature was undertaken to examine the impact of children's mental health on their school success. The literature confirmed a confluence of problems associated with school performance and child and adolescent mental health. Poor academic functioning and inconsistent school attendance were identified as early signs of…

DeSocio, Janiece; Hootman, Janis

2004-01-01

309

Student Mental Health: Reframing the "Problem"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author contends that to understand the concern over student mental health, one must first consider what students are reporting about themselves. Students with mental health issues are intellectually capable; rising numbers of accepted students with diagnosed psychological conditions confirm this. However, many conditions…

Bertram, Margaret

2010-01-01

310

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health  

E-print Network

Yale College Council Committee on Mental Health Revised January 2014 Mental Health Reference Sheet therapies conducted by supervised Yale clinical psychology graduate students. Call for a 20 minute phone screen, before a longer intake appointment and assignment to a therapist. Yale Stress Center (Click Here

311

Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Clinical Courses  

E-print Network

0 Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Clinical Courses Student Preceptor Guide Revised 1..............................................................................................................................................28 #12;2 TO: Psychiatric Mental Nurse Practitioner (PMH) Students, Preceptors, and Clinical Faculty Concentration Coordinator, Department of Advanced Practice & Doctoral Studies The University of Tennessee Health

Cui, Yan

312

Qualitative Research Methods in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the evidence base for the study of mental health problems develops, there is a need for increasingly rigorous and systematic research methodologies. Complex questions require complex methodological approaches. Recognising this, the MRC guidelines for developing and testing complex interventions place qualitative methods as integral to each stage of intervention development and implementation. However, mental health research has lagged behind

Sarah Peters

2010-01-01

313

Funding Early Childhood Mental Health Services & Supports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is the first of a two-part series on financing early childhood mental health services. It discusses the need for a systemic approach to financing early childhood mental health services and supports and presents a matrix to assist states and communities in the design of comprehensive financing systems. The vertical axis of the matrix…

Wishmann, Amy; Kates, Donald; Kaufmann, Roxane

314

Advance Directives for Mental Health Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advance directives are designed to establish a person's preferences for treatment if the person becomes incompetent in the future or unable to communicate those preferences to treatment providers. Mental health advance directives are similar to the more commonly used directives for end-of-life medical decisions. A patient must be competent to execute a mental health advance directive, and the directive must

Debra S. Srebnik; John Q. La Fond

315

Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

2012-01-01

316

School Mental Health: Politics, Power and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Progress has been made in the implementation of school mental health promotion, but there are some underlying issues that need to be recognised and addressed to ensure that the outcomes of current endeavours are maximised. These issues are politics, power and practice, and they reflect the different concerns and perspectives of some of the stakeholders, politicians, the media, mental health

Louise Rowling

2008-01-01

317

Unemployment Impairs Mental Health: Meta-Analyses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The effect of unemployment on mental health was examined with meta-analytic methods across 237 cross-sectional and 87 longitudinal studies. The average overall effect size was d = 0.51 with unemployed persons showing more distress than employed persons. A significant difference was found for several indicator variables of mental health (mixed…

Paul, Karsten I.; Moser, Klaus

2009-01-01

318

Women's mental health in Pakistan  

PubMed Central

In Pakistan, societal attitudes and norms, as well as cultural practices (Karo Kari, exchange marriages, dowry, etc.), play a vital role in women's mental health. The religious and ethnic conflicts, along with the dehumanizing attitudes towards women, the extended family system, role of in-laws in daily lives of women, represent major issues and stressors. Such practices in Pakistan have created the extreme marginalisation of women in numerous spheres of life, which has had an adverse psychological impact. Violence against women has become one of the acceptable means whereby men exercise their culturally constructed right to control women. Still, compared to other South Asian countries, Pakistani women are relatively better off than their counterparts. PMID:16633458

Niaz, Unaiza

2004-01-01

319

Mental Health of Muslim Nursing Students in Thailand  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this research was to explore the mental health and well-being of Muslim nursing students in Thailand. Specifically, the study investigated the factors that impact anxiety and depression among Muslim nursing students. This cross-sectional research was conducted with a half sampling method of Muslim undergraduate students who were studying at a public nursing college in Thailand. From the 220 self-identified Muslim nursing students, 110 were sampled for this study, representing 14% of the total nursing students at this college. Results indicated a moderate prevalence of anxiety and high prevalence of depression among Muslim nursing students. Stress (? = .42) was positively associated with anxiety, while self-esteem (? = -.42) was negatively associated with anxiety; together this model accounted for 46% of the variance in anxiety. Self-esteem (? = -.41) and social support (? = -.17) were negatively associated with depression, while stress (? = .37) was positively correlated with depression; together this model accounted for 57% of the variance in depression. Recommendations were given to help train Muslim nursing students to be competent nurses with good mental health and well-being who will succeed and contribute to the nursing profession. PMID:22792481

Ratanasiripong, Paul

2012-01-01

320

Depression Awareness Day Health Screenings on Campus  

E-print Network

This Issue Depression Awareness Day Health Screenings on Campus Food Day Open Enrollment Plan Name Changes Depression Awareness Day Newsletter Fall 2012 Upcoming Events Oct 9 ­ New Employee Benefits Orientation Oct 9 ­ UC Focus on Your Future* Oct 11 ­ EAP Webinar: UC Depression Awareness Day Oct 11

Stanford, Kyle

321

Review of community pharmacy staff educational needs for supporting mental health consumers and carers.  

PubMed

Development of a mental health education package for community pharmacy staff should be informed by mental health consumers/carers' needs, expectations and experiences, and staff knowledge, skills and attitudes. This review (1) explored research on community pharmacy practice and service provision for mental health consumers/carers, and (2) identified validated methods for assessing staff knowledge, skills and attitudes about mental illness to inform the development of a training questionnaire. A literature scan using key words knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs combined with community pharmacy, pharmacist, and pharmacy support staff, and mental illness, depression, anxiety was conducted. A small number of studies were found that used reliable methods to assess pharmacists' training needs regarding mental illness and treatment options. There was little published specifically in relation to depression and anxiety in community pharmacy practice. No studies assessed the training needs of pharmacy support staff. A systematic analysis of pharmacy staff learning needs is warranted. PMID:23306675

Mey, Amary; Fowler, Jane L; Knox, Kathy; Shum, David H K; Fejzic, Jasmina; Hattingh, Laetitia; McConnell, Denise; Wheeler, Amanda

2014-01-01

322

Issues in mental health care benefits: the costs of mental health parity.  

PubMed

This Issue Brief discusses issues in mental health care benefits. It describes the current state of employment-based mental health benefits and discusses studies and issues regarding full mental health parity. It also includes an analysis of the effect of full mental parity on the uninsured population and the effects of the limited mental health parity provision contained in the VA-HUD appropriations bill. The final section discusses the implications of mental health parity for health plans and health insurers. When employers began to provide health insurance benefits to their employees and their families, they extended coverage to include mental health benefits under the same terms as other health care services. Many employers continued to add mental health benefits through the 1970s and early 1980s until cost pressures required employers to re-examine all health care benefits that were offered. They quickly found that, while only a small proportion of the beneficiaries used mental health care services, the costs associated with this care were very high. As a result, employers placed limits on mental health benefits in an attempt to make the insurance risk more manageable. The general strategies employers have used to manage their health care costs are cost sharing, utilization review, managed care, and the packaging of provider services. Employers' cost management strategies may be restricted, however. Five states have mental health parity laws, but three of the states--Rhode Island, Maine, and New Hampshire--apply these laws only to the seriously mentally ill. In addition, 31 states mandate that mental health benefits be provided. However, state mandates apply only to insured plans, not to self-insured employer plans, which are exempt from state regulation of health plans under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). A number of recent studies have examined the effect of mental health parity on health insurance premiums in a "typical" preferred provider organization and on the uninsured. In general, the studies concluded that mental health parity could increase health insurance premiums, decrease health insurance coverage for non-mental health related illnesses, and increase the number of uninsured individuals. All studies of mental health parity, and mandated benefits in general, assume that there is a strong likelihood that increased health benefit costs would be passed along to workers in the form of higher cost sharing for health insurance, lower wage growth, or lower growth in other employee benefits. PMID:10164993

Fronstin, P

1997-02-01

323

Comorbid Mental Health Symptoms and Heart Diseases: Can Health Care and Mental Health Care Professionals Collaboratively Improve the Assessment and Management?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On the basis of current epidemiological and clinical research, this article describes how mental health symptoms are associated with heart disease, a major chronic condition that occurs primarily in middle and late life. The article describes the culturally and historically important link between heart and mind. It then describes depression and…

Ai, Amy L.; Rollman, Bruce L.; Berger, Candyce S.

2010-01-01

324

Addressing disparities in mental health agencies: Strategies to implement the national clas standards in mental health.  

PubMed

Historically, the mental health system has not effectively addressed the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse individuals (President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health, 2003), which has contributed to significant racial and ethnic disparities in mental health care (USDHHS, 2001). This paper focuses on exploring how a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Minority Health policy initiative, the National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care (or the National CLAS Standards), may be used by mental health agencies to reduce mental health care disparities. The National CLAS Standards are a set of action steps that inform and facilitate the implementation of culturally and linguistically appropriate services. We first discuss the role of cultural and linguistic competency in mental health care disparities reduction efforts, and then describe specific strategies to facilitate the organizational implementation of the National CLAS Standards. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25383992

Barksdale, Crystal L; Kenyon, Jennifer; Graves, Darci L; Jacobs, C Godfrey

2014-11-01

325

Latino Adults’ Access to Mental Health Care  

PubMed Central

Since the early 1980s, epidemiological studies using state-of-the-art methodologies have documented the unmet mental health needs of Latinos adults in the U.S. and Puerto Rico. This paper reviews 16 articles based on seven epidemiological studies, examines studies methodologies, and summarizes findings about how Latino adults access mental health services. Studies consistently report that, compared to non-Latino Whites, Latinos underutilize mental health services, are less likely to receive guideline congruent care, and rely more often on primary care for services. Structural, economic, psychiatric, and cultural factors influence Latinos’ service access. In spite of the valuable information these studies provide, methodological limitations (e.g., reliance on cross-sectional designs, scarcity of mixed Latino group samples) constrict knowledge about Latinos access to mental health services. Areas for future research and development needed to improve Latinos’ access and quality of mental health care are discussed. PMID:16598658

Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Zayas, Luis H.; Hansen, Marissa C.

2008-01-01

326

Portrayal of Depression and Other Mental Illnesses in Australian Nonfiction Media  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study describes Australian media portrayal of mental illnesses, focusing on depression. A random sample of 1,123 items was selected for analysis from a pool of 13,389 nonfictional media items about mental illness collected between March 2000 and February 2001. Depression was portrayed more frequently than other mental illnesses. Items about…

Francis, Catherine; Pirkis, Jane; Blood, R. Warwick; Dunt, David; Burgess, Philip; Morley, Belinda; Stewart, Andrew

2005-01-01

327

Development of a Brief Mental Health Screen for Intimate Partner Violence Victims in the Emergency Department  

PubMed Central

Background Emergency physicians routinely treat victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) and patients with mental health symptoms, although these issues may be missed without routine screening. In addition, research has demonstrated a strong association between IPV victimization and mental health symptoms. Objectives To develop a brief mental health screen that could be used feasibly in an emergency department to screen IPV victims for depressive symptoms, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and suicidal ideation. Methods The authors conducted a pretest/posttest validation study of female IPV victims to determine what questions from the Beck Depression Inventory II, Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, and Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation would predict moderate to severe levels of depressive symptoms, PTSD symptoms, and suicidal ideation. A principal components factor analysis was conducted to determine which questions would be used in the brief mental health screen. Scatter plots were then created to determine a cut point. Results Scores on the brief mental health screen ranged from 0 to 8. A cutoff score of 4 was used, which resulted in positive predictive values of 96% for the brief mental health screen for depression, 84% for PTSD symptoms, and 54% for suicidal ideation. In particular, four questions about sadness, experiencing a traumatic event, the desire to live, and the desire to commit suicide were associated with moderate to severe mental health symptoms in IPV victims. Conclusions The brief mental health screen provides a tool that could be used in an emergency department setting and predicted those IPV victims with moderate to severe mental health symptoms. Using this tool can assist emergency physicians in recognizing at-risk patients and referring these IPV victims to mental health services. PMID:17242384

Houry, Debra; Kemball, Robin S.; Click, Lorie A.; Kaslow, Nadine J.

2008-01-01

328

Managed Mental Health Care: Intentional Misdiagnosis of Mental Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors provide an overview of the effectiveness of managed health care systems and their impact on mental health counselors. They review ethical and legal dilemmas involving informed consent, confidentiality, client autonomy, competence, treatment plans, and termination that had not existed prior to the introduction of…

Braun, Sharon A.; Cox, Jane A.

2005-01-01

329

Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released on December 13, the first Surgeon General's report on mental health reveals that nearly half of all Americans who have a severe mental illness fail to seek treatment. The 500-page publication was developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) under the guidance of the Surgeon General. It notes that "disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders are real illnesses that, if untreated, can be as disabling and serious as cancer and heart disease in terms of premature death and lost productivity." The report takes a life-span approach, considering vulnerability to distinct forms of mental and behavioral disorders at different stages of life as well as the impact of gender, culture, and age on the diagnosis, course, and treatment of mental illness. Users can read the full text of the report and the accompanying tables and figures in HTML or .pdf formats at the Virtual Office of the Surgeon General or one of three mirror sites. For more on the report, please see the In The News section from this week's Scout Report for Social Sciences.

330

Mental health policy in Eastern Europe: a comparative analysis of seven mental health systems  

PubMed Central

Background The objective of this international comparative study is to describe and compare the mental health policies in seven countries of Eastern Europe that share their common communist history: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Moldova, Poland, Romania, and Slovakia. Methods The health policy questionnaire was developed and the country-specific information was gathered by local experts. The questionnaire includes both qualitative and quantitative information on various aspects of mental health policy: (1) basic country information (demography, health, and economic indicators), (2) health care financing, (3) mental health services (capacities and utilisation, ownership), (4) health service purchasing (purchasing organisations, contracting, reimbursement of services), and (5) mental health policy (policy documents, legislation, civic society). Results The social and economic transition in the 1990s initiated the process of new mental health policy formulation, adoption of mental health legislation stressing human rights of patients, and a strong call for a pragmatic balance of community and hospital services. In contrast to the development in the Western Europe, the civic society was suppressed and NGOs and similar organizations were practically non-existent or under governmental control. Mental health services are financed from the public health insurance as any other health services. There is no separate budget for mental health. We can observe that the know-how about modern mental health care and about direction of needed reforms is available in documents, policies and programmes. However, this does not mean real implementation. Conclusions The burden of totalitarian history still influences many areas of social and economic life, which also has to be taken into account in mental health policy. We may observe that after twenty years of health reforms and reforms of health reforms, the transition of the mental health systems still continues. In spite of many reform efforts in the past, a balance of community and hospital mental health services has not been achieved in this part of the world yet. PMID:24467832

2014-01-01

331

Page 1 of 2 Mental Health Services Provider Information  

E-print Network

medicine, psychologist offering psychological services and nurses who provide mental health services to patients." · Mental Health Services are defined as "assessment, diagnosis, treatment or counseling, conditions or disorders." · Positions that may qualify as Mental Health Service Providers include

Lichtarge, Olivier

332

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

2013-10-01

333

Master of Education Degree Program Clinical Mental Health Counseling  

E-print Network

Master of Education Degree Program Clinical Mental Health Counseling information about field experiences in the clinical mental health counseling program students develop requisite counseling skills and direct knowledge of mental health

Duchowski, Andrew T.

334

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

2012-10-01

335

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section... § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...and implementing a comprehensive mental health program. (b) The program...

2011-10-01

336

Trucking organization and mental health disorders of truck drivers.  

PubMed

There are over 3 million truck drivers employed in the commercial transportation and material moving occupations, one of the largest occupational groups in the United States. Workers in this large and growing occupational segment are at risk for a range of occupational health-induced conditions, including mental health and psychiatric disorders due to high occupational stress, low access and use of health care, and limited social support. The purpose of this study was to explore male truck drivers' mental health risks and associated comorbidities, using a cross-sectional and quantitative design. Data were collected from a random sample of 316 male truckers between the ages of 23 and 76 at a large truck stop located within a 100-mile radius of Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, using a self-administered 82-item questionnaire. Surveyed truckers were found to have significant issues affecting their mental health, such as loneliness (27.9%), depression (26.9%), chronic sleep disturbances (20.6%), anxiety (14.5%), and other emotional problems (13%). Findings have potential to help researchers develop interventions to improve the emotional and occupational health of truck drivers, a highly underserved population. Mental health promotion, assessment, and treatment must become a priority to improve the overall trucking environment for truckers, the transportation industry, and safety on US highways. PMID:22757596

Shattell, Mona; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Collins, Chad; Sönmez, Sevil; Fehrenbacher, Caitlin

2012-07-01

337

The Relationship Between Outpatient Mental Health Treatment and Subsequent Mental Health Symptoms and Disorders in Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to evaluate community-based outpatient mental health services for young adults. Participants\\u000a were interviewed at ages 21, 24, 27, and 30. Outcomes included: (1) symptoms of depression, generalized anxiety, social phobia,\\u000a dysthymia and post traumatic stress individually and as a global scale; and (2) a dichotomous diagnosis variable inclusive\\u000a of all above disorders. Treatment was

Richard A. Van Dorn; Rick Kosterman; James Herbert Williams; Kristen Chandler; M. Scott Young; Richard F. Catalano; J. David Hawkins

2010-01-01

338

Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)  

PubMed Central

Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only. PMID:16135246

2005-01-01

339

Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

2010-01-01

340

Associations Between Caregiving and Health Outcomes Among Parents of Children with Mental Illness: An Attachment Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the associations between attachment, caregiving, and health outcomes (perceptions of somatic and depressive symptoms) in a sample of 194 parents who have a child with mental illness. Securely attached parents reported using more comforting behavior and tactile communication with their children with mental illness. Parents with a fearful attachment reported using more overinvolved and egocentric caregiving, as

Lisa Farinelli; Laura K. Guerrero

2011-01-01

341

A Suffering Generation: Six Factors Contributing to the Mental Health Crisis in North American Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of students on university and college campuses that are struggling with depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, and psychosis across North America is rising (Gallagher, 2008). This intensification of students' psychological needs has become a mental health crisis. The age at which many mental disorders manifest themselves is…

Kruisselbrink Flatt, Alicia

2013-01-01

342

Mental health literacy in an educational elite – an online survey among university students  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Mental health literacy is a prerequisite for early recognition and intervention in mental disorders. The aims of this paper are to determine whether a sample of university students recognise different symptoms of depression and schizophrenia and to reveal factors influencing correct recognition. METHODS: Bivariate and correspondence analyses of the results from an online survey among university students (n =

Christoph Lauber; Vladeta Ajdacic-Gross; Nadja Fritschi; Niklaus Stulz; Wulf Rössler

2005-01-01

343

Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

2010-01-01

344

Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points,…

Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

2013-01-01

345

Validation of a Mental Health Assessment in an African Conflict Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the validity of the assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression within the context of an epidemiological mental health survey among war-affected adolescents and young adults in northern Uganda. Local language versions of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and the Depression section of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (DHSCL) were administered by trained local interviewers. Correlations with probable

Verena Ertl; Anett Pfeiffer; Regina Saile; Elisabeth Schauer; Thomas Elbert; Frank Neuner

2011-01-01

346

Validation of a Mental Health Assessment in an African Conflict Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the validity of the assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression within the context of an epidemiological mental health survey among war-affected adolescents and young adults in northern Uganda. Local language versions of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and the Depression section of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (DHSCL) were administered by trained local interviewers. Correlations with probable

Verena Ertl; Anett Pfeiffer; Regina Saile; Elisabeth Schauer; Thomas Elbert; Frank Neuner

2010-01-01

347

Mental Health Impact of the World Trade Center Attacks on Displaced Chinese Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

To identify psychological sequelae of the World Trade Center attacks in immigrant Chinese displaced workers, we interviewed 77 displaced workers in May 2002. One third of the sample was classified as at least moderately depressed, and 21% met diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder; however, few had utilized mental health services. Depression and PTSD scores were positively correlated with age,

Heike Thiel de Bocanegra; Ellen Brickman

2004-01-01

348

Reliability and Validity of Five Mental Health Scales in Older Persons.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Assessed five scales as mental health measures for older persons (N=318). The internal consistency reliabilities for the anxiety, depression, and well-being scales were moderately high to high, but the reliabilities for the affect balance scale suggest some caution. Cutting points for the well-being and depression scales are suggested. (Author/JAC)

Himmelfarb, Samuel; Murrell, Stanley A.

1983-01-01

349

New directions for community mental health centers.  

PubMed

Community Mental Health Centers and other quasi-public authorities are operating within a larger health market characterized by the rapid unfolding of a number of key trends in consumer behavior, provider supply, and financing. Each of these trends, though not readily apparent, is strongly reflected in the specialty mental health sector. Mental health managers are faced with fundamental choices about the direction of their respective organizations and the adequacy of their resources to proceed. Mr. Kipp outlines the market dynamics at issue, describes three basic alternatives, and offers some guidelines for management in charting a course. PMID:10287206

Kipp, M F

1987-01-01

350

Homeless Youths and Young Adults in Los Angeles: Prevalence of Mental Health Problems and the Relationship Between Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although understanding of the subsistence patterns, service utilization, and HIV-risk behaviors of homeless youths and young adults is increasing, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of mental health problems in this group or the relationships between mental health problems and substance use. This study measured symptoms of depression, low self-esteem, ADHD, suicidality, self-injurious behavior (SIB), and drug and alcohol

Jennifer B. Unger; Michele D. Kipke; Thomas R. Simon; Susanne B. Montgomery; Christine J. Johnson

1997-01-01

351

Mental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service Utilization and Recidivism  

E-print Network

Mental Health Screenings in Juvenile Detention Centers: Predictors of Mental Health Service Utilization and Recidivism Laura M. White1 , Matthew C. Aalsma1 1 Department of Pediatrics, Section meet criteria for mental illness. Unfortunately, the juvenile justice system does not consistently

Zhou, Yaoqi

352

Arab culture and mental health care.  

PubMed

This selective review describes recent literature and the author's experience with mental illness and mental health care, and the impact of cultural transformation on mental health in some Arab Islamic cultures, particularly in Egypt, Qatar and Kuwait. Traditional extended Arab families provide a structure for their members that may sometimes prevent and or compensate for the effects of parental loss and mental disability. The role of traditional families in the care of members and in medical decision-making is discussed. The impact of cultural change on Arab culture is also examined, as is the effect of intergenerational conflict in traditional families. PMID:19091731

Fakhr El-Islam, M

2008-12-01

353

Mental health services in the Arab world.  

PubMed

This paper summarizes the current situation of mental health services in the Arab world. Out of 20 countries for which information is available, six do not have a mental health legislation and two do not have a mental health policy. Three countries (Lebanon, Kuwait and Bahrain) had in 2007 more than 30 psychiatric beds per 100,000 population, while two (Sudan and Somalia) had less than 5 per 100,000. The highest number of psychiatrists is found in Qatar, Bahrain and Kuwait, while seven countries (Iraq, Libya, Morocco, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) have less than 0.5 psychiatrists for 100,000 population. The budget allowed for mental health as a percentage from the total health budget, in the few countries where information is available, is far below the range to promote mental health services. Some improvement has occurred in the last decade, but the mental health human resources and the attention devoted to mental health issues are still insufficient. PMID:22295010

Okasha, Ahmed; Karam, Elie; Okasha, Tarek

2012-02-01

354

Feasibility of dissemination of cognitive behavioral therapy to Texas community mental health centers.  

PubMed

State mental health systems are actively seeking to disseminate empirically supported treatment approaches to improve the outcomes of adults with serious mental illnesses. However, many of these interventions have not been studied within public mental health settings. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective for major depression in well-controlled trials, but its effectiveness in public mental health settings is less known. The present study examines the feasibility of dissemination of CBT in the Texas public mental health system. Seven clinicians were trained by a CBT expert and supervised for 5 months, during which time their skills approached competency levels of therapists in randomized controlled trials. Forty clients were treated during the therapists' training phase, attending an average of ten sessions and experiencing a significant reduction in depressive symptoms. Study results are compared with previously published studies of CBT. PMID:20162373

Lopez, Molly A; Basco, Monica Ramirez

2011-01-01

355

The Cuban immigration of 1980: a special mental health challenge.  

PubMed Central

The 124,769 Cubans who entered the United States from Cuba in a boatlift in 1980 included a small minority of people who needed mental health care. Some had been taken involuntarily from psychiatric hospitals, mental retardation facilities, jails, and prisons. The National Institute of Mental Health, Public Health Service (PHS), was responsible for mental health screening, evaluation, and treatment of the Cuban Entrants. Bilingual psychiatrists and psychologists found that many Entrants given preliminary evaluations showed evidence of transient situational stress reactions, not psychiatric illnesses. Entrants who had not yet been sponsored were consolidated into one facility in October 1980, and about 100 of those with severe problems were transferred to an Immigration and Naturalization Service-PHS evaluation facility in Washington, DC. Between March 1, 1981, and March 1, 1982, a total of 3,035 Entrants were evaluated at both facilities. Among the 1,307 persons who presented symptoms, there was a primary diagnosis of personality disorders for 26 percent, schizophrenic disorders for 15 percent, adjustment disorders for 14.5 percent, mental retardation for 8.6 percent, chronic alcohol abuse for 8.6 percent, and major depression for 7.2 percent. Only 459 Cubans with symptoms were found to be in need of further psychiatric care. As of October 1984, many Entrants with psychiatric illnesses remained under inpatient or community-based halfway house psychiatric care as a direct Federal responsibility. A PHS program for further placement in community-based facilities is underway. PMID:3918322

Silver, L B; Silver, B J; Silverman, M M; Prescott, W; del Pollard, L

1985-01-01

356

Multiple Roles and Women's Mental Health in Canada  

PubMed Central

Health Issue Research on the relationship between women's social roles and mental health has been equivocal. Although a greater number of roles often protect mental health, certain combinations can lead to strain. Our study explored the moderating affects of different role combinations on women's mental health by examining associations with socioeconomic status and differences in women's distress (depressive symptoms, personal stress (role strain) and chronic stress (role strain plus environmental stressors). Key Findings Women with children, whether single or partnered, had a higher risk of personal stress. Distress, stress and chronic stress levels of mothers, regardless of employment, or marital status, are staggeringly high. Single, unemployed mothers were significantly more likely than all other groups to experience financial stress and food insecurity. For partnered mothers, rates of personal stress and chronic stress were significantly lower among unemployed partnered mothers. Married and partnered mothers reported better mental health than their single counterparts. Lone, unemployed mothers were twice as likely to report a high level of distress compared with other groups. Lone mothers, regardless of employment status, were more likely to report high personal and chronic stress. Data Gaps and Recommendations National health surveys need to collect more data on the characteristics of women's work environment and their care giving responsibilities. Questions on household composition should include inter-generational households, same sex couples and multifamily arrangements. Data disaggregation by ethno-racial background would be helpful. Data should be collected on perceived quality of domestic and partnership roles and division of labours. PMID:15345066

Maclean, Heather; Glynn, Keva; Ansara, Donna

2004-01-01

357

Multiple Roles and Women's Mental Health in Canada.  

PubMed

HEALTH ISSUE: Research on the relationship between women's social roles and mental health has been equivocal. Although a greater number of roles often protect mental health, certain combinations can lead to strain. Our study explored the moderating affects of different role combinations on women's mental health by examining associations with socioeconomic status and differences in women's distress (depressive symptoms, personal stress (role strain) and chronic stress (role strain plus environmental stressors). KEY FINDINGS: Women with children, whether single or partnered, had a higher risk of personal stress. Distress, stress and chronic stress levels of mothers, regardless of employment, or marital status, are staggeringly high. Single, unemployed mothers were significantly more likely than all other groups to experience financial stress and food insecurity. For partnered mothers, rates of personal stress and chronic stress were significantly lower among unemployed partnered mothers. Married and partnered mothers reported better mental health than their single counterparts. Lone, unemployed mothers were twice as likely to report a high level of distress compared with other groups. Lone mothers, regardless of employment status, were more likely to report high personal and chronic stress. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: National health surveys need to collect more data on the characteristics of women's work environment and their care giving responsibilities. Questions on household composition should include inter-generational households, same sex couples and multifamily arrangements. Data disaggregation by ethno-racial background would be helpful. Data should be collected on perceived quality of domestic and partnership roles and division of labours. PMID:15345066

Maclean, Heather; Glynn, Keva; Ansara, Donna

2004-08-25

358

Australian rural football club leaders as mental health advocates: an investigation of the impact of the Coach the Coach project  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Mental ill health, especially depression, is recognised as an important health concern, potentially with greater impact in rural communities. This paper reports on a project, Coach the Coach, in which Australian rural football clubs were the setting and football coaches the leaders in providing greater mental health awareness and capacity to support early help seeking behaviour among young males

David Pierce; Siaw-Teng Liaw; Jennifer Dobell; Rosemary Anderson

2010-01-01

359

Workplace culture and mental health are interwoven.  

PubMed

Workplace health is a serious issue. Illness and injury take a significant toll on employers, employees and the bottom line. Research has focused primarily on the physical health and injury side of the workplace health equation, with much less attention being paid to the mental health factors that affect employers, employees, families, productivity, efficiency, quality, creativity and innovation. PMID:15829767

Service, John

2004-01-01

360

Promoting and Protecting Mental Health as Flourishing: A Complementary Strategy for Improving National Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes the conception and diagnosis of the mental health continuum, the findings supporting the two continua model of mental health and illness, and the benefits of flourishing to individuals and society. Completely mentally healthy adults—individuals free of a 12-month mental disorder and flourishing—reported the fewest missed days of work, the fewest half-day or greater work cutbacks, the healthiest

Corey L. M. Keyes

2007-01-01

361

An effective exercise-based intervention for improving mental health and quality of life measures: a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. This study investigates the effectiveness of 24-week aerobic and weight-training exercise plus behavior modification for mental health and quality of life (QOL) outcomes.Methods. Mental health and QOL data was collected using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales and SF-36 Health Status Survey, respectively. Employees from a single work-site were randomized into either treatment or wait-list control groups.Results: Mental Health

Evan Atlantis; Chin-Moi Chow; Adrienne Kirby; Maria Fiatarone Singh

2004-01-01

362

Biobehavioral Correlates of Depression in Reaction to Mental and Physical Challenge.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Depression is the most common mental disorder in the United States. Individuals with depression are at an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, little is known regarding the possible mechanisms to explain this relationship. On...

A. A. Weinstein

2007-01-01

363

Mental health symptoms associated with morbidity, not mortality, in an elderly community sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Six previous reviews have found a relationship between depression and mortality. However, many past studies have failed to\\u000a adequately control for the role of physical health. A proposed mechanism of the depression–mortality relationship suggests\\u000a that physical health may mediate the relationship. The present study used new methods to examine relationships between mental\\u000a health symptoms and mortality in an elderly community

Philip J. Batterham; Helen Christensen; Andrew J. Mackinnon

364

Medical Family Therapy: A Model for Addressing Mental Health Disparities Among Latinos  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Latino population in the United States is growing at an exponential rate. As a medically underserved population, Latinos experience many health disparities, including those related to mental health. Current research suggests that Latinos in the United States are at high risk for problems such as anxiety, depression, somatization disorders, and substance abuse, yet, often these health needs go unmet.

Elaine Willerton; Mary E. Dankoski; Javier F. Sevilla Martir

2008-01-01

365

Organization and financing of mental health care in Poland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Organization of care: Health care is provided to patients with mental disorders by the state health care facilities as well as by social help agencies. Mental health care services are provided mostly by mental health facilities and partly by primary care units. Outpatient clinics, separate for psychiatric patients and substance abusers, are the most numerous mental health care units, amounting

Wanda Langiewicz; Elzbieta Slupczynska-Kossobudzka

2000-01-01

366

How Stigma Interferes with Mental Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many people who would benefit from mental health services opt not to pursue them or fail to fully participate once they have begun. One of the reasons for this disconnect is stigma; namely, to avoid the label of mental illness and the harm it brings, people decide not to seek or fully participate in care. Stigma yields 2 kinds of harm that may…

Corrigan, Patrick

2004-01-01

367

Culturally Sensitive Refugee Mental Health Training Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, based on a survey conducted during the summer and fall of 1986, identifies culturally sensitive training programs for professionals, paraprofessionals, and others who provide mental health services to refugees. An introductory section discusses the language, cultural, racial, experiential, and socioeconomic factors of refugee mental

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Refugees Assistance Program - Mental Health Technical Assistance Center.

368

The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is the nation's leading legal advocate for the rights of adults and children with mental disabilities. The Center uses a coordinated strategy of federal policy advocacy, legal support for a nationwide network of advocates, and creation of educational materials to help families, professionals,…

Carty, Lee; Burley, Christopher

2004-01-01

369

The influence of social factors and health on depressive symptoms and worry: A study of older Vietnamese adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Vietnam has a growing older population, many of whom experienced war and social upheavals in their lives. Prior research has described the health of the older population, but little work has explored mental health. The current study examines the frequency and correlates of two mental health indicators: depressive symptoms and worry.Method: A representative sample of 600 adults 55 and

Amanda Leggett; Steven H. Zarit; Ngoc H. Nguyen; Chuong N. Hoang; Ha T. Nguyen

2012-01-01

370

Caregiving spouses. Physical and mental health in perspective.  

PubMed

The self-reported physical and mental health of 315 persons caring for a spouse who had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease or a related disorder was compared with general population norms for existing data bases controlling for age and gender. Results suggest that across all indicators of mental health, spouse caregivers are more depressed, express higher levels of negative affect, are more likely to use psychotropic drugs, and have more symptoms of psychological distress than the general population. In terms of physical health, caregivers report higher than expected rates of diabetes, arthritis, ulcers, and anemia, yet they use medical services at rates which are similar or lower than those reported by the general population. Since no simultaneous control group was studied, these results suggest, but do not prove, the presence of differences between caregivers and non-caregivers. PMID:2754154

Pruchno, R A; Potashnik, S L

1989-08-01

371

Gender differences in factors associated with perceived need and use of korean adolescents mental health services.  

PubMed

This study investigated the socio-demographic characteristics and emotional and behavioral factors associated with the perceived need and actual use of adolescent mental health services according to genders in Korea. We assessed 1,857 middle school students aged 14-16 years. We administered a self-reported questionnaire including questions on their socio-demographic data, Korean Youth Self Report, and self perceived need and actual use of mental health services. Overall, 11.6 % of the adolescents demonstrated a self perceived need for mental health services regarding their emotional or behavioral problems, while 2.1 % had sought mental health services. There were discrepancies between the perceived need and actual use. Most adolescents (81.6 %) used mental health services without self-perceived need, and only 3.3 % of adolescents with self-perceived need utilized mental health services. The perceived need of mental health services is positively influenced by the adolescent's anxious/depressed problems in both genders. The use of them is negatively influenced by the withdrawn problem in adolescent boys, while positively influenced by the aggressive behavior in adolescent girls. To increase the actual use of mental health services more attention needs to be focused on their internalizing problems, such as anxious/depressed and withdrawn problems, in addition to externalizing problems in both genders. PMID:24526458

Kim, Nam Hee; Lim, Ki Young; Chung, Young Ki; Noh, Jae Sung; Shin, Yun Mi

2014-12-01

372

Computer aids to mental health care.  

PubMed

Computer systems are being used increasingly to aid the assessment and self-treatment of mental health problems in adults. Systems vary hugely in the extent to which they meet all patients' assessment and therapy needs and save clinicians' time. Hardly any single system 1) performs every task required from initial screening to the end of follow-up, 2) works 100% independently of contact with a clinician or technician, and 3) is widely available and supported. Most systems use desk- or laptop computers. Some now use palmtop (hand-held) computers. A few employ computerized phone interviews (interactive voice response), usually from home. Virtual reality as a tool is embryonic. Computer aids save time in screening and outcome-tracking in a wide variety of problems. Computer aids to treatment have had promising outcomes in phobic, anxiety, panic, and obsessive-compulsive disorders, nonsuicidal depression, obesity, and smoking cessation. Some systems are installed in a few places as part of everyday clinical care. A growing number should soon be robust enough to ease the lives of many patients, practitioners, and researchers if use of the systems is carefully integrated into normal clinical practice. PMID:10497696

Marks, I

1999-08-01

373

Visualizations for mental health topic models  

E-print Network

Crisis Text Line supports people with mental health issues through texting. Unfortunately, support is limited by the number of counselors and the time each counselor has for clients, as well as the cognitive load on ...

Chen, Ge (Ge Jackie)

2014-01-01

374

Existentially Oriented Training for Mental Health Practitioners  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The author presents an overview of the role of existentialism in the training of counselors and mental health practitioners. Exercises and skill development techniques are also presented for existentially oriented training of psychotherapists, using a workshop format. (HLM)

Goldberg, Carl

1976-01-01

375

Relationship between anxiety, depression, and health satisfaction among veterans with PTSD  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivesDepression and anxiety are associated with significantly increased healthcare costs that include costs of non-psychiatric medical care. PTSD has been found to be related to many negative health perceptions and outcomes (e.g., [Resnick, H.S., Acierno, R., Kilpatrick, D.G., 1997. Health impact of interpersonal violence: II. Medical and mental health outcomes. Behavioral Medicine 23, 65–78]). The presence of comorbid depression and

Sheila A. M. Rauch; Todd Favorite; Nicholas Giardino; Carole Porcari; Erin Defever; Israel Liberzon

2010-01-01

376

The Latino Mental Health Project: A Local Mental Health Needs Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we present the results of a local needs assessment of the mental health experiences, service needs, and barriers\\u000a to treatment-seeking of the Latino population in Worcester, Massachusetts. Overall, participants reported relatively high\\u000a rates of experiences with symptoms of mental health problems, they indicated using a range of both formal and alternative\\u000a mental health services, and they noted

Esteban V. Cardemil; Sara T. Adams; Joanne L. Calista; Joy Connell; José Encarnación; Nancy K. Esparza; Jeanne Frohock; Ellen Hicks; Saeromi Kim; Gerald Kokernak; Michael McGrenra; Ray Mestre; Maria Pérez; Tatiana M. Pinedo; Rosemary Quagan; Christina Rivera; Patsy Taucer; Ed Wang

2007-01-01

377

Why Is It Important? What Is Infant Mental Health?2 What Is Infant Mental Health?  

E-print Network

provide the basis for children's mental health and social-emotional development. Social development Health? 5 How can adults nurture children's emotional development and mental health? · Surround children both the social-emotional capacities and the primary relationships in children birth through age five

McQuade, D. Tyler

378

Strategic market positions for mental health services.  

PubMed

Faced with a rapidly changing market, increased legislation and intense competition, mental health service providers must be sophisticated planners and position themselves advantageously in the marketplace. They can effectively position themselves to be profitable and sustaining through market segmentation and sensitivity. The following article will address one concept of marketing that has received less attention but is of critical importance: positioning. As the market environment becomes increasingly competitive, positioning will be the key to success for mental health programs and institutions. PMID:10302552

Ambrose, D M; Lennox, L

1988-01-01

379

Juvenile Probation Officers’ Mental Health Decision Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed case records for 583 juvenile delinquency intakes in four county juvenile probation offices; 14.4% were receiving\\u000a mental health or substance use services at case opening, and 24.9% were newly identified during probation contact. Youths\\u000a were significantly more likely to be newly identified if they were repeat offenders, if their probation officer knew more\\u000a about mental health and if

Gail A. Wasserman; Larkin S. McReynolds; Andria L. Whited; Joseph M. Keating; Hana Musabegovic; Yanling Huo

2008-01-01

380

Mental health conference first of its kind  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing students in their final semester of study have participated in “Stepping Out”, a student-led mental health conference that’s the first of its kind at The University of Notre Dame Australia’s Sydney School of Nursing.\\u000aAssociate Professor Bill Goodin and Associate Professor Bethne Hart decided to incorporate the conference into the assessment schedule for nursing students undertaking the Mental Health

Elizabeth Fenech

2011-01-01

381

Indicators of Mental Health in Various Iranian Populations  

PubMed Central

Background: Promoting mental health and preventing mental disorders are of the main concerns for every country. Achieving these goals requires effective indexes for evaluating mental health. Therefore, to develop mental health enhancement programs in Iran, there is a need to measure the state of mental health in Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to select a set of mental health indicators that can be used to monitor the status of mental health in Iran. Materials and Methods: This research work used Q-methodology which combines both quantitative and qualitative research methods for establishment of mental health indicators in Iran. In this study, 30 participants were chosen by purposive sampling from different types of professionals in the field of mental health. Results: Twenty seven mental health indicators were obtained from the Q-methodology. The most important indicators obtained in this study are as follows: annual prevalence of mental disorders, suicide rates, number of mental health professionals, mental health expenditures and suicide related deaths. Conclusions: This study provides mental health indices for measuring mental health status in Iran. These mental health indices can be used to measure progress in the reform policies and community mental health services. PMID:24719740

Mohamadi, Khosro; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Fathi Ashtiani, Ali; Azad Fallah, Parviz; Ebadi, Abbas; Yahaghi, Emad

2014-01-01

382

Unusual but sound minds: mental health indicators in spiritual individuals.  

PubMed

Previous research has linked certain types of modern spirituality, including New Age and Pagan, with either benign schizotypy or insecure attachment. While the first view emphasizes a positive aspect of spiritual believers' mental health (benign schizotypy), the second view emphasizes a negative aspect, namely the unhealthy emotional compensation associated with an insecure attachment style. This study addresses these two conflicting views by comparing a sample of modern spiritual individuals (N = 114) with a contrast group of traditional religious believers (N = 86). Measures of schizotypy and attachment style were combined with mental health scales of anxiety and depression. We further assessed death anxiety to determine whether modern spiritual beliefs fulfilled a similar function as traditional religious beliefs in the reduction of existential threat. Our results support a psychological contiguity between traditional and modern spiritual believers and reinforce the need to de-stigmatize spiritual ideas and experiences. Using hierarchical regression, we showed that unusual experiences and ideas are the major predictor of engagement in modern spiritual practices. Anxiety, depression variables, and insecure attachment were not significant predictors of spirituality or correlated with them; on the other hand, the results show that spiritual believers report high social support satisfaction and this variable predicts involvement in modern spirituality. Further, spiritual practices were negatively correlated with and negatively predicted by death anxiety scores. Overall, the results strengthen the association between modern spirituality, good mental health, and general well-being. PMID:23848387

Farias, Miguel; Underwood, Raphael; Claridge, Gordon

2013-08-01

383

Mental health assessment in rehabilitation research.  

PubMed

Assessment in mental health research has evolved from focusing on symptoms and diagnosis to addressing a broad range of change, including psychosocial functioning. This is consistent with developments in the areas of psychosocial rehabilitation and the increase in recovery-oriented intervention models for mental disorders. We reviewed the status of assessment in mental health research, providing an overview of symptom and diagnostic assessment that is the cornerstone of most mental health research assessment. We then focused on measurement that can be applied across diagnostic groups and on functioning as a key mental health outcome. We reviewed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health and its implications for improvements in assessment. We provided an example of a new assessment, the Inventory of Psychosocial Functioning, which highlights key issues in the measurement of functioning. We then addressed improving research assessment, including issues of assessment in diverse populations and the need to capitalize on new data sources and new assessment technologies to advance assessment in mental health research. Finally, we reviewed and discussed areas for research and quality improvement, drawing on examples from the Department of Veterans Affairs to illustrate potential opportunities. PMID:22492343

McQuaid, John R; Marx, Brian P; Rosen, Marc I; Bufka, Lynn F; Tenhula, Wendy; Cook, Helene; Keane, Terence M

2012-01-01

384

Mental health and group tensions  

PubMed Central

The author points out that, with the development of technology in industry and the resultant more-technical roles demanded of workers, communication between them and between all persons in an industrial organization becomes of primary importance. This is particularly so because of the constant demands for change within an industrial organization. Any change, however minor, will inevitably involve a wide area of the organization, and special attention will therefore have to be paid to communication between persons. The author goes on to describe some of the investigations which have been made by the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Leyden, and indicates the extreme difficulty of obtaining accurate information. He shows also how the different attitudes of persons within a factory can lead to completely different perceptions of the field and of the attitudes of others within the same organization. He concludes that the main task of the mental health workers in industry lies in the prevention of tensions within it. One of the means of preventing tensions is to aim at a concept of “productive collaboration” within a factory. This task is seen as a special kind of therapy which must concern all levels of the factory. The author describes a procedure of investigation—diagnostic and therapeutic—within a factory, commencing with a phase of introduction, a pilot study, extensive individual interviewing, group interviewing, and a more specifically therapeutic phase, in which groups or specific individuals are enabled to talk their problems out. Finally, the investigating team must take steps to prevent situations of tension recurring, and, before leaving, must be certain that the plant is capable of maintaining a healthy equilibrium by itself. PMID:13276808

Koekebakker, J.

1955-01-01

385

Mental health and group tensions.  

PubMed

The author points out that, with the development of technology in industry and the resultant more-technical roles demanded of workers, communication between them and between all persons in an industrial organization becomes of primary importance. This is particularly so because of the constant demands for change within an industrial organization. Any change, however minor, will inevitably involve a wide area of the organization, and special attention will therefore have to be paid to communication between persons.The author goes on to describe some of the investigations which have been made by the Institute of Preventive Medicine, Leyden, and indicates the extreme difficulty of obtaining accurate information. He shows also how the different attitudes of persons within a factory can lead to completely different perceptions of the field and of the attitudes of others within the same organization. He concludes that the main task of the mental health workers in industry lies in the prevention of tensions within it.One of the means of preventing tensions is to aim at a concept of "productive collaboration" within a factory. This task is seen as a special kind of therapy which must concern all levels of the factory. The author describes a procedure of investigation-diagnostic and therapeutic-within a factory, commencing with a phase of introduction, a pilot study, extensive individual interviewing, group interviewing, and a more specifically therapeutic phase, in which groups or specific individuals are enabled to talk their problems out. Finally, the investigating team must take steps to prevent situations of tension recurring, and, before leaving, must be certain that the plant is capable of maintaining a healthy equilibrium by itself. PMID:13276808

KOEKEBAKKER, J

1955-01-01

386

Advanced Graduate Clinical Mental Health Counseling Certificate The Department admits applicants to an Advanced Graduate Community Mental Health Counseling  

E-print Network

the top of these rankings are manic-depressive illness, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorders are mental disorders. In the United States, major depression is the leading cause of disability. Also near

Hemmers, Oliver

387

Program evaluation of Texas mental health and mental retardation centers.  

PubMed

The diversity of programs offered by the 24 mental health and mental retardation centers in Texas required that program evaluation take a management-by-objectives approach, with each center examined as a unique system with its own goals, techniques, and activities. The approach required the centers to develop statements of management objectives, which they did with varying degrees of success. The evaluations were carried out by site-visit teams. The authors describe the evaluation process, the difficulties encountered, and some of the beneficial effects. PMID:162779

Winn, R J; Rich, C C; Dolby, J R; King, J A; Pinder, S

1975-01-01

388

Mental health stigma and primary health care decisions.  

PubMed

People with serious mental illness have higher rates of mortality and morbidity due to physical illness. In part, this occurs because primary care and other health providers sometimes make decisions contrary to typical care standards. This might occur because providers endorse mental illness stigma, which seems inversely related to prior personal experience with mental illness and mental health care. In this study, 166 health care providers (42.2% primary care, 57.8% mental health practice) from the Veteran?s Affairs (VA) medical system completed measures of stigma characteristics, expected adherence, and subsequent health decisions (referral to a specialist and refill pain prescription) about a male patient with schizophrenia who was seeking help for low back pain due to arthritis. Research participants reported comfort with previous mental health interventions. Path analyses showed participants who endorsed stigmatizing characteristics of the patient were more likely to believe he would not adhere to treatment and hence, less likely to refer to a specialist or refill his prescription. Endorsement of stigmatizing characteristics was inversely related to comfort with one?s previous mental health care. Implications of these findings will inform a program meant to enhance VA provider attitudes about people with mental illness, as well as their health decisions. PMID:24774076

Corrigan, Patrick W; Mittal, Dinesh; Reaves, Christina M; Haynes, Tiffany F; Han, Xiaotong; Morris, Scott; Sullivan, Greer

2014-08-15

389

Pediatric Mental Health Emergencies and Special Health Care Needs  

PubMed Central

SYNOPSIS Children with mental health problems are increasingly being evaluated and treated by both pediatric primary care and pediatric emergency physicians. This article focuses on the epidemiology, evaluation, and management of the two most common pediatric mental health emergencies, suicidal and homicidal/aggressive patients, as well as the equally challenging population of children with autism or other developmental disabilities. PMID:24093903

Chun, Thomas H.; Katz, Emily R.; Duffy, Susan J.

2013-01-01

390

Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This first Report of the Surgeon General on Mental Health represents the initial step in advancing the notion that mental health is fundamental to general health. It states that a review of research on mental health revealed two findings. First, the efficacy of treatment is well documented, and second, a range of treatment exists for most mental

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Mental Health Services.

391

Internship Handbook For Mental Health and College Counseling  

E-print Network

Internship Handbook For Mental Health and College Counseling Internship in Mental Health Counseling January 2014 #12;Mental Health & College Counselor Internship Handbook January 2014 2 CONTENTS I://www.cacrep.org/doc/2009%20Standards%20with%20cover.pdf. #12;Mental Health & College Counselor Internship Handbook January

392

NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND MENTAL HYGIENE  

E-print Network

NEW YORK CITY DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND MENTAL HYGIENE Thomas Farley, MD, MPH Commissioner New York City Department of Health & Mental Hygiene (DOHMH) 2014 Mental Health Scholarship Program One Year MENTAL HEALTH SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM: Letter of Intent due February 14, 2014 DEADLINE FOR SSSW AT HUNTER

Qiu, Weigang

393

Designing Consumer Health Technologies for the Treatment of Patients With Depression: A Health Practitioner's Perspective  

PubMed Central

Background The consumer health technologies used by patients on a daily basis can be effectively leveraged to assist them in the treatment of depression. However, because treatment for depression is a collaborative endeavor, it is important to understand health practitioners’ perspectives on the benefits, drawbacks, and design of such technologies. Objective The objective of this research was to understand how patients and health practitioners can effectively and successfully influence the design of consumer health treatment technologies for treating patients with depression. Methods A group of 10 health practitioners participated in individual semistructured contextual interviews at their offices. Health practitioners rated an a priori identified list of depression indicators using a 7-point Likert scale and generated a list of depression indicators. Finally, health practitioners were asked to rate the perceived usefulness of an a priori identified list of depression treatment technologies using a 7-point Likert scale. Results Of the 10 health practitioners interviewed, 5 (50%) were mental health practitioners, 3 (30%) nurses, and 2 (20%) general practitioners. A total of 29 unique depression indicators were generated by the health practitioners. These indicators were grouped into 5 high-level categories that were identified by the research team and 2 clinical experts: (1) daily and social functioning, (2) medication, (3) nutrition and physical activity, (4) demographics and environment, and (5) suicidal thoughts. These indicators represent opportunities for designing technologies to support health practitioners who treat patients with depression. The interviews revealed nuances of the different health practitioners’ clinical practices and also barriers to using technology to guide the treatment of depression. These barriers included (1) technology that did not fit within the current practice or work infrastructure, (2) technology that would not benefit the current treatment process, (3) patients forgetting to use the technology, and (4) patients not being able to afford the technology. Conclusions In order to be successful in the treatment of depression, consumer health treatment technologies must address health practitioners’ technology concerns early on in the design phase, account for the various types of health practitioners, treatment methods, and clinical practices, and also strive to seamlessly integrate traditional and nontraditional depression indicators within various health practitioners’ clinical practices. PMID:24413087

White, Ginger; Caine, Kelly; Selove, Rebecca; Doub, Tom

2014-01-01

394

Associations between physical activity and mental health among bariatric surgical candidates  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed to examine associations between physical activity (PA) and mental health among adults undergoing bariatric surgery. Methods Cross sectional analysis was conducted on pre-operative data of 850 adults with ? class 2 obesity. PA was measured with a step activity monitor; mean daily steps, active minutes, and high-cadence minutes (proxy for moderate-vigorous intensity PA) were determined. Mental health functioning, depressive symptoms and treatment for depression or anxiety were measured with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form, Beck Depression Inventory, and a study-specific questionnaire, respectively. Logistic regression analyses tested associations between PA and mental health indicators, controlling for potential confounders. Receiver operative characteristic analysis determined PA thresholds that best differentiated odds of each mental health indicator. Results Each PA parameter was significantly (P<.05) associated with a decreased odds of depressive symptoms and/or treatment for depression or anxiety, but not with impaired mental health functioning. After controlling for sociodemographics and physical health, only associations with treatment for depression and anxiety remained statistically significant. PA thresholds that best differentiated those who had vs. had not recently received treatment for depression or anxiety were <191 active minutes/day, <4750 steps/day, and <8 high-cadence minutes/day. Utilizing high-cadence minutes, compared to active minutes or steps, yielded the highest classification accuracy. Conclusion Adults undergoing bariatric surgery who meet relatively low thresholds of PA (e.g., ? 8 high-cadence minutes/day, representative of approximately one hour/week of moderate-vigorous intensity PA) are less likely to have recently received treatment for depression or anxiety compared to less active counterparts. PMID:23332532

King, Wendy C.; Kalarchian, Melissa A.; Steffen, Kristine J.; Wolfe, Bruce M.; Elder, Katherine A.; Mitchell, James E.

2013-01-01

395

Mental health aspects of HIV infection.  

PubMed Central

Of the multiple causes of mental disturbance in HIV infection, it is generally safest to consider organic causes first, including opportunistic infections, tumours, medications, and HIV encephalopathy. The psychological stress of the illness will cause different or overlapping presentations that include anxiety and depression. When managing these situations, one should also pay attention to the effects of stress on the social network of the infected person. PMID:8324410

Hunter, J.

1993-01-01

396

Physical Activity and Public Health: Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the effects of physical activity on depression and anxiety, discussing the scientific strength of studies on physical activity, depression, and anxiety against the standards of science accepted in epidemiology with a focus on the independence, consistency, dose-response gradient, and biological plausibility of the evidence. (Author/SM)

Dishman, Rod K.

1995-01-01

397

Declaration on mental health in Africa: moving to implementation  

PubMed Central

Urgent action is needed to address mental health issues globally. In Africa, where mental health disorders account for a huge burden of disease and disability, and where in general less than 1% of the already small health budgets are spent on these disorders, the need for action is acute and urgent. Members of the World Health Organization, including African countries, have adopted a Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan. Africa now has an historic opportunity to improve the mental health and wellbeing of its citizens, beginning with provision of basic mental health services and development of national mental health strategic plans (roadmaps). There is need to integrate mental health into primary health care and address stigma and violations of human rights. We advocate for inclusion of mental health into the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, and for the convening of a special UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on Mental Health within three years. PMID:24931476

Daar, Abdallah S.; Jacobs, Marian; Wall, Stig; Groenewald, Johann; Eaton, Julian; Patel, Vikram; dos Santos, Palmira; Kagee, Ashraf; Gevers, Anik; Sunkel, Charlene; Andrews, Gail; Daniels, Ingrid; Ndetei, David

2014-01-01

398

Benefiting from online mental status examination system and mental health diagnostic system  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this really hectic world, quite a number of people are exposed to situations where mental stress Is unavoidable. This leads to people having all kinds of mental health problems that eventually may turn to chronic mental disorders. People with mental health problems normally have the tendency of not admitting their health problems because of the stigma attached to these

Hajar Mat Jani; Jalan Kajang-Puchong; Selangor Darul Ehsan

2010-01-01

399

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out"  

E-print Network

Annual Conference on Advancing School Mental Health Theme: "What Works in School Mental Health: Collaboration from the Inside Out" Early Bird Pre-Conference Training Opportunity--Youth Mental Health First Aid USA Want to become a Youth Mental Health First Aider? This Early Bird Pre-Conference opportunity

Weber, David J.

400

Mental Health Correlates of the Victim-Perpetrator Relationship Among Interpersonally Victimized Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines mental health correlates of different victim-perpetrator relationships among adolescent victims of interpersonal violence. A large and nationally representative sample of adolescents (N = 4,023) responded to structured telephone interviews concerning mental health functioning (posttraumatic stress disorder—PTSD, major depressive disorder, substance abuse\\/dependence, and delinquency). Those reporting histories of sexual (n = 321) and\\/or physical (n = 688) assault

Steven R. Lawyer; Kenneth J. Ruggiero; Heidi S. Resnick; Dean G. Kilpatrick; Benjamin E. Saunders

2006-01-01

401

“Being black and feeling blue”: the mental health consequences of racial discrimination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between racial discrimination and mental health was examined using Wave 2 (1987–1988) and Wave 3 (1988–1989) panel data from the National Survey of Black Americans (NSBA). Mental health status was assessed by psychological distress and depression. In cross-sectional analyses, the perception of racial discrimination was related to high levels of psychological distress at Waves 2 and 3. Experiencing

Tony N Brown; David R Williams; James S Jackson; Harold W Neighbors; Myriam Torres; Sherrill L Sellers; Kendrick T Brown

2000-01-01

402

Was there unmet mental health need after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  This study examined the use of professionals for mental health problems among New York City residents who were directly affected\\u000a by the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) or had a probable diagnosis of post-traumatic\\u000a stress disorder (PTSD) or depression in its aftermath. Correlates of help seeking from professionals for mental health problems\\u000a after the

Jennifer Stuber; Sandro Galea; Joseph A. Boscarino; Mark Schlesinger

2006-01-01

403

Managing Mental Health Problems in Everyday Life: Drug Treatment Clients’ Self-Care Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is understood about the self-care activities undertaken by drug treatment clients. Using data from a qualitative study\\u000a of drug treatment and mental health we identify the self-care practices of drug treatment clients diagnosed with anxiety and\\u000a depression. Seventy-seven participants were interviewed in four sites across Australia. Participants described a range of\\u000a self-care practices for mental health including: self-medication, seeking

Martin Holt; Carla Treloar

2008-01-01

404

Community-based mental health care in Africa: mental health workers' views  

PubMed Central

The World Health Organization (WHO) has for long proposed the development of community-based mental health services worldwide. However, the progress toward community mental health care in most African countries is still hampered by a lack of resources, with specialist psychiatric care essentially based in large, centrally located mental hospitals. It is again time to reconsider the direction of mental health care in Africa. Based on a small inquiry to a number of experienced mental health professionals in sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss what a community concept of mental health care might mean in Africa. There is a general agreement that mental health services should be integrated in primary health care. A critical issue for success of this model is perceived to be provision of appropriate supervision and continuing education for primary care workers. The importance of collaboration between modern medicine and traditional healers is stressed and the paper ends in a plea for WHO to take the initiative and develop mental health services according to the special needs and the socio-cultural conditions prevailing in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:18458779

ALEM, ATALAY; JACOBSSON, LARS; HANLON, CHARLOTTE

2008-01-01

405

Trauma, poverty and mental health among Somali and Rwandese refugees living in an African refugee settlement – an epidemiological study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among Rwandese and Somali refugees resident in a Ugandan refugee settlement, as a measure of the mental health consequences of armed conflict, as well as to inform a subsequent mental health outreach program. The study population comprised a sample from 14400 (n

Lamaro P Onyut; Frank Neuner; Verena Ertl; Elisabeth Schauer; Michael Odenwald; Thomas Elbert

2009-01-01

406

Paternal Postnatal and Subsequent Mental Health Symptoms and Child Socio-Emotional and Behavioural Problems at School Entry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the effect of paternal mental health problems, particularly on young children, is based predominantly on clinical levels of depression. Furthermore, potential mediators such as marital discord have often been overlooked. This longitudinal community study assessed the association between paternal mental health symptoms in a community…

Smith, Hannah R.; Eryigit-Madzwamuse, Suna; Barnes, Jacqueline

2013-01-01

407

Beliefs About Outcomes for Mental Disorders: A Comparative Study of Primary Health Practitioners and Psychiatrists in Singapore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To compare responses to a mental health literacy survey assessing the likely outcome of three major mental disorders by primary health practitioners (OPD doctors and GPs) and by psychiatrists in Singapore. Methods: We used two vignettes of Major Depression and Schizophrenia developed in an Australian study. In addition, a third vignette of Mania was developed locally and included. The

J H K Kua; G Parker; C Lee; A F Jorm

408

Custody and Access Evaluations: Issues for Mental Health Professionals Conducting Assessments withMentally Disordered or Mentally Retarded Parents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health professionals are increasingly beingcalled upon by the courts to offer their expertise inchild custody and access disputes. This paperaddresses the specialized role mental healthprofessionals have in custody and access hearings,particularly in cases wherein one or both parents havereceived a mental diagnosis (i.e., of mental disorderor mental retardation). The focus upon thispopulation of parents is warranted, as there is

Joti Samra-Grewal

1999-01-01

409

Predisposing, enabling and need correlates of mental health treatment utilization among homeless men.  

PubMed

There is significant unmet need for mental health treatment among homeless men, but little is known about the correlates of treatment utilization in this population. Within the framework of the Behavioral Model for Vulnerable Populations, this study examines predisposing, enabling and need factors that may be associated with mental health care utilization. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men utilizing meal programs in the Skid Row region of LA. Logistic regression examined the association between predisposing, enabling and need factors and past 30 day mental health service utilization on Skid Row. Results indicated that while need, operationalized as positive screens for posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, was associated with recent mental health care utilization, predisposing and enabling factors were also related to utilization. African-American homeless men, and those men who also reported substance abuse treatment and drop-in center use, had increased odds of reporting mental health care utilization. PMID:24595594

Rhoades, Harmony; Wenzel, Suzanne L; Golinelli, Daniela; Tucker, Joan S; Kennedy, David P; Ewing, Brett

2014-11-01

410

Neuroscience of exercise: from neurobiology mechanisms to mental health.  

PubMed

The neuroscience of exercise is a growing research area that is dedicated to furthering our understanding of the effects that exercise has on mental health and athletic performance. The present study examined three specific topics: (1) the relationship between exercise and mental disorders (e.g. major depressive disorder, dementia and Parkinson's disease), (2) the effects of exercise on the mood and mental health of athletes, and (3) the possible neurobiological mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise. Positive responses to regular physical exercise, such as enhanced functional capacity, increased autonomy and improved self-esteem, are frequently described in the recent literature, and these responses are all good reasons for recommending regular exercise. In addition, physical exercise may improve both mood and adherence to an exercise program in healthy individuals and might modulate both the performance and mental health of athletes. Exercise is associated with the increased synthesis and release of both neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors, and these increases may be associated with neurogenesis, angiogenesis and neuroplasticity. This review is a call-to-action that urges researchers to consider the importance of understanding the neuroscience of physical exercise and its contributions to sports science. PMID:23774826

Matta Mello Portugal, Eduardo; Cevada, Thais; Sobral Monteiro-Junior, Renato; Teixeira Guimarães, Thiago; da Cruz Rubini, Ercole; Lattari, Eduardo; Blois, Charlene; Camaz Deslandes, Andrea

2013-01-01

411

42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.  

42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT...

2014-10-01

412

Mental health concepts of evangelical Protestants.  

PubMed

There has been an upsurge of interest in the problems encountered when attempting counseling and psychotherapy across cultural and ethnic barriers. Differences between therapist and client in nationality, race, and socioeconomic background have been widely discussed. Protestant evangelicals have not received much attention in this literature, yet this group has a world view not likely to be shared by the majority of mental health professionals. To fill this gap, 152 members of liberal and traditional (evangelical, fundamentalist) Protestant churches were investigated. Measures of religious orthodoxy and of modernity served as independent variables. Dependent variables were attitudes toward seeking mental health services, opinions about mental illness, and tendencies to view mental health problems as spiritual. The results indicate that evangelicals are prepared to use professional help, although they are concerned about the beliefs and values of the mental health practitioner and express fears that secular therapists might try to alter their beliefs and values: They prefer to go to religious advisers. They also appear to have certain characteristic ideas about mental illness that need to be addressed in any attempt to counsel such clients. PMID:6530680

McLatchie, L R; Draguns, J G

1984-11-01

413

Mental health on the campus revisited.  

PubMed

The author briefly reviews Mental Health on the Campus: A Field Study, published in 1973, noting areas of consensus and points of tension or disagreement that were reported in that study. He then assesses the extent to which the current state of mental health on the campus is an echo of that report. These comparisons form the basis for anticipating the probable direction of future developments in campus mental health. The areas and issues considered include the increased diversity of the student body, the stable incidence of psychotic disorders, the increased prevalence of gender-related diagnoses such as sexual abuse and eating disorders, the continuing financial pressures bearing on campus mental health programs, and the forms of care and treatment that fiscal and other circumstances are imposing. The author concludes that although the resources available and the particular challenges that are faced may have changed, the traditional goals of a campus mental health program, as articulated 75 years ago when the American College Health Association was founded, remain valid, even if they are difficult to attain. PMID:7608413

Arnstein, R L

1995-05-01

414

Loneliness, health and depression in older males  

Microsoft Academic Search

Loneliness and social isolation, particularly in the older adult, have been shown to influence psychosocial well-being. Loneliness has been related to chronic illness and self-rated health in older adults, and researchers suggest there is an important relationship between loneliness and psychological well-being in older adults particularly in the area of depression. This study investigated relationships between loneliness, health, and depression

F. M. Alpass; S. Neville

2003-01-01

415

Health habits and depression in adolescence  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study of the relationship between health habits and depression, 80 high school students, selected on an availability basis, were administered a Health Behaviors Questionnaire (HBQ) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The HBQ and the BDI significantly correlated (r=0.43pX2=10.5pX2=9.2p<0.01). Mildly overweight boys (overweight by more than 5% of their ideal weight) and mildly under-weight boys (underweight by more

Stuart L. Kaplan; Michael Nussbaum; Phyllis Skomorowsky; I. Ronald Shenker; Patricia Ramsey

1980-01-01

416

[Mental health and utilization of mental health services among victims of crime in Japan].  

PubMed

Since the Crime Victims Act became enforced in 2005, the mental health recovery of crime victims has become an important issue among national government and local authorities. A high prevalence of psychiatric disorders, such as PTSD, among crime victims has been reported in domestic and foreign studies. However, little is known about the percentage of victims of crime who actually attend mental health services. The prevalence of mental health service usage varied from one study to another and is thought to be higher among victims of severe crimes, such as sexual assault. Several factors associated with seeking mental health care, including the presence of psychopathology, appear to be common among the studies. To offer suitable mental health services for crime victims, various organizations or agencies must cooperate with each other, including the police and prosecution, private victim support groups, and medical departments like emergency medical care centers and gynecology clinics. This report summarizes mental health problems and the use of mental health services among crime victims, and discusses how crime victims who require medical treatment may actually receive adequate mental health care. PMID:17447467

Nakajima, Satomi; Shirai, Akemi

2007-02-01

417

Racial Differences in Depression Trajectories among Older Women Socioeconomic, Family, and Health Influences  

PubMed Central

Despite recent increases in life course research on mental illness, important questions remain about the social patterning of, and explanations for, depression trajectories among women in later life. The authors investigate competing theoretical frameworks for the age patterning of depressive symptoms and the physical health, socioeconomic, and family mechanisms differentiating black and white women. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, the authors use linear mixed (growth curve) models to estimate trajectories of distress for women aged 52 to 81 years (N = 3,182). The results demonstrate that: (1) there are persistently higher levels of depressive symptoms among black women relative to white women throughout later life; (2) physical health and socioeconomic status account for much of the racial gap in depressive symptoms; and (3) marital status moderates race differences in distress. The findings highlight the importance of physical health, family, and socioeconomic status in racial disparities in mental health. PMID:22021654

Spence, Naomi J.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Dupre, Matthew E.

2014-01-01

418

Coaching May Help Diabetics Battle Depression, Disease Better  

MedlinePLUS

... please enable JavaScript. Coaching May Help Diabetics Battle Depression, Disease Better Study found mental health sessions allowed ... Preidt Wednesday, August 6, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Depression Diabetes Mental Health WEDNESDAY, Aug. 6, 2014 (HealthDay ...

419

Screening soldiers in outpatient care for mental health concerns.  

PubMed

Significant recent effort has been directed toward screening and describing military populations in relation to deployment. Missing from these recent efforts is information describing screened mental health symptoms for the population of active duty military that are seen for mental health services. This article presents mental health screening data for 2,882 soldiers seeking services at a military facility outpatient behavioral health clinic. Screening positive for multiple symptom domains was common, with >60% of the sample screening positive for more than one clinical symptom domain. Post-traumatic stress disorder and depression were among the most commonly identified disorders, followed by alcohol abuse. This screening data, gathered using measures similar to those used in published deployment-related screening efforts, suggest differences that exist between the clinical population and the overall military population, providing some insights into the rates of clinical symptomatology within the military health system and providing a point of comparison for population- screening efforts. Clinical implications include the importance of provider awareness to the high rates of comorbidity across symptom domains. PMID:18251327

Gahm, Gregory A; Lucenko, Barbara A

2008-01-01

420

Mental health, behaviour and intellectual abilities of people with Down syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mental health, adaptive behaviour and intellectual abilities of people with Down syndrome (n=129) were evaluated in a population-based survey of social and health care records. Females had better cognitive abilities and speech production compared with males. Males had more behavioural problems than females. Behaviour suggestive of attention deficit hyperactiv- ity disorder was often seen in childhood. Depression was diagnosed

Tuomo Määttä; Tuula Tervo-Määttä; Anja Taanila; Markus Kaski; Matti Iivanainen

2006-01-01

421

Childhood cognitive ability and adult mental health in the British 1946 birth cohort  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined whether childhood cognitive ability was associated with two mental health outcomes at age 53 years: the 28 item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) as a measure of internalising symptoms of anxiety and depression, and the CAGE screen for potential alcohol abuse as an externalising disorder. A total of 1875 participants were included from the Medical Research Council National Survey

Stephani L. Hatch; Peter B. Jones; Diana Kuh; Rebecca Hardy; Michael E. J. Wadsworth; Marcus Richards

2007-01-01

422

Toward full mental health parity and beyond.  

PubMed

The 1996 Mental Health Parity Act (MHPA), which became effective in January 1998, is scheduled to expire in September 2001. This paper examines what the MHPA accomplished and steps toward more comprehensive parity. We explain the strategic and self-reinforcing link of parity with managed behavioral health care and conclude that the current path will be difficult to reverse. The paper ends with a discussion of what might be behind the claims that full parity in mental health benefits is insufficient to achieve true equity and whether additional steps beyond full parity appear realistic or even desirable. PMID:11463091

Gitterman, D P; Sturm, R; Scheffler, R M

2001-01-01

423

Mental health research and philanthropy: possible partnerships?  

PubMed

Mental health research has received relatively little philanthropic support in Australia compared with other areas of health research. Philanthropic trusts do not generally provide recurrent funding or make grants for that perceived to be the responsibility of the state or the market. The emergence of 'strategic philanthropy' however, provides potential for mental health researchers to form partnerships with philanthropic foundations, particularly on initiatives that are focused on prevention and innovative and sustainable models with the capacity to 'go to scale' across the service system. PMID:15660703

Scott, Dorothy

2005-01-01

424

Mental health services at selected private schools.  

PubMed

Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism for addressing their students' mental health needs. Understanding that need requires data to guide the services and programs a school may put in place. Having data helps inform those services, and comparative data from other schools provides feedback and perspective. This project surveyed type and frequency of mental health problems experienced by students who received a formal evaluation at 11 private schools in Connecticut during academic year 2001-2002. PMID:15193002

Van Hoof, Thomas J; Sherwin, Tierney E; Baggish, Rosemary C; Tacy, Peter B; Meehan, Thomas P

2004-04-01

425

Asthma and mental disorders in Canada: Impact on functional impairment and mental health service use  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveThe goal of this study is to examine the association between asthma and mental disorders and the impact of asthma and mental disorder comorbidity on functional impairment and mental health care service use among adults in the community.

Renee D. Goodwin; Jina Pagura; Brian Cox; Jitender Sareen

2010-01-01

426

Report of the National Action Commission on the Mental Health of Rural Americans. Rural Mental Health: The Time for Action is Now.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the early 1980s, local affiliates of the National Mental Health Association in states with large rural populations began to notice sharp increases in incidences of suicide, family violence, alcohol abuse, depression, and other psychological and emotional problems. These problems may link to negative economic conditions in rural America. In…

National Mental Health Association, Alexandria, VA.

427

Ethics and Culture in Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines the complex relationship between culture, values, and ethics in mental health care. Cultural competence is a practical, concrete demonstration of the ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence (doing good), nonmaleficence (not doing harm), and justice (treating people fairly)—the cornerstones of modern ethical codes for the health professions. Five clinical cases are presented to illustrate the range

Jinger G. Hoop; Tony DiPasquale; Juan M. Hernandez; Laura Weiss Roberts

2008-01-01

428

Career Guidance and Public Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Career guidance may have the potential to promote public health by contributing positively to both the prevention of mental health conditions and to population level well-being. The policy implications of this possibility have received little attention. Career guidance agencies are well placed to reach key target groups. Producing persuasive…

Robertson, Peter J.

2013-01-01

429

Mental Health Services at Selected Private Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Private schools educate a significant percentage of US children and adolescents. Private schools, particularly where students reside during the academic year, assume responsibility for the health and well-being of their students. Children and adolescents experience mental health problems at a predictable rate, and private schools need a mechanism…

Van Hoof, Thomas J.; Sherwin, Tierney E.; Baggish, Rosemary C.; Tacy, Peter B.; Meehan, Thomas P.

2004-01-01

430

Service network analysis for agricultural mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as

Jeffrey D Fuller; Brian Kelly; Susan Law; Georgia Pollard; Lyn Fragar

2009-01-01

431

Longitudinal follow-up of the mental health of unaccompanied refugee minors.  

PubMed

Despite growing numbers of unaccompanied refugee minors (UMs) in Europe, and evidence that this group is at risk of developing mental health problems, there still remain important knowledge gaps regarding the development of UMs' mental health during their trajectories in the host country and, in particular, the possible influencing role of traumatic experiences and daily stressors therein. This study therefore followed 103 UMs from the moment they arrived in Belgium until 18 months later. Traumatic experiences (SLE), mental health symptoms (HSCL-37A, RATS) and daily stressors (DSSYR) were measured at arrival in Belgium, after 6 and 18 months. UMs reported generally high scores on anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Linear mixed model analysis showed no significant differences in mental health scores over time, pointing towards the possible long-term persistence of mental health problems in this population. The number of traumatic experiences and the number of daily stressors leaded to a significant higher symptom level of depression (daily stressors), anxiety and PTSD (traumatic experiences and daily stressors). European migration policies need to reduce the impact of daily stressors on UMs' mental health by ameliorating the reception and care facilities for this group. Moreover, regular mental health screenings are needed, in combination with, if needed, adapted psychosocial and therapeutic care. PMID:23979476

Vervliet, Marianne; Lammertyn, Jan; Broekaert, Eric; Derluyn, Ilse

2014-05-01

432

Connecting the Dots of Heart Disease, Poor Mental Health, and Abuse to Understand Gender Disparities and Promote Women's Health: A Prospective Cohort Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Heart disease, poor mental health, and abuse are epidemic among women worldwide. Our purpose was to identify a group of women with heart disease and explore the relationship between a history of abuse and existing symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and analyze the relationships over time. A prospective cohort analysis design with mental health measures repeated at

Judith McFarlane; Lene Symes; Lorraine Frazier; Gayle McGlory; Maria C. Henderson-Everhardus; Kathy Watson; Yan Liu

2010-01-01

433

Connecting Social and Emotional Learning with Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As knowledge of effective treatments for mental disorders has grown, so too has the field of mental health promotion and positive development. Studies completed during the last two decades have synthesized the state of mental health promotion and documented that universal mental health supports positively affect child and adolescent developmental…

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (NJ1), 2008

2008-01-01

434

Mental Health Awareness Month & Speak Up for Kids  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. This is a great time to highlight the importance of mental wellness and school-based mental health services to children's positive learning and development. There is heightened urgency to the imperative to advance school-based mental health and school psychologists' expertise as essential to the…

Cowan, Katherine C.

2012-01-01

435

Law and Aging: Mental Health Theory Approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The purpose of this chapter is to offer a mental health theory approach to law and aging. Key issues regarding legal capacity,\\u000a mental competence, guardianship, and substitute decision making for older persons are presented as a core around which elder\\u000a law is established. A critical perspective describes how legal concepts of capacity are used to conceal legal bias and ageism

W. C. Schmidt

436

Sociodemographic Factors Contribute to Mental Health Disparities and Access to Services Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City  

PubMed Central

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) may be at increased risk for mental health problems including depression, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), and suicidality. The overriding goal of the current investigation was to examine mental health and mental health services in a diverse sample of YMSM. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a cohort study of 598 YMSM, including sociodemographics, mental health, and mental health care. We then tested for bivariate associations, and used multivariable modeling to predict depression, PTSD, suicidality and mental health care utilization. Lower socioeconomic status, unstable housing, and school non-enrollment predicted depression and PTSD scores, while unstable housing and school non-enrollment predicted recent suicide attempt(s). These recent suicide attempt(s) also predicted current utilization of counseling or treatment, any history of psychiatric hospitalization, and any history of psychiatric diagnosis. Black and API men were less likely to have ever accessed mental health counseling or treatment. There were significant class-based differences with regard to mental health outcomes, but not mental health services. Further, recent crises (i.e., suicide attempt, hospitalization) were strong predictors of accessing mental health services. Improving the mental health of YMSM requires addressing the underlying structural factors that influence mental health outcomes and service access. PMID:24224066

Storholm, Erik David; Siconolfi, Daniel E.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Moeller, Robert W.; Eddy, Jessica A.; Bare, Michael G.

2013-01-01

437

Road traffic noise, sleep and mental health.  

PubMed

This study examines the relationship between road traffic noise, self-reported sleep quality and mental health. The study is cross-sectional and based on data from a survey conducted in Oslo, Norway, in 2000. Psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Checklist, HSCL-25) was measured along with self-reported somatic health, sleep quality, noise sensitivity and socioeconomic variables. Questionnaire data were combined with modeled estimates of noise exposure. The total study sample consisted of 2898 respondents. After adjustment for potential confounders and stratifying for sleep quality, we found a positive, but not statistically significant association between noise exposure and symptoms of psychological distress among participants with poor sleep quality (slope=0.06, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.13, per 10 dB increase in noise exposure). In the same sleep quality group, we found a borderline statistically significant association between noise exposure and a symptom level indicating a probable mental disorder (HSCL?1.55) (odds ratio=1.47, 95% CI: 0.99-1.98, per 10 dB increase in noise exposure). We found no association between road traffic noise and mental health among subjects reporting good and medium sleep quality. The results suggest that road traffic noise may be associated with poorer mental health among subjects with poor sleep. Individuals with poor sleep quality may be more vulnerable to effects of road traffic noise on mental health than individuals with better sleep quality. PMID:24637180

Sygna, Karin; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Aamodt, Geir; Oftedal, Bente; Krog, Norun Hjertager

2014-05-01

438

Health promotion behaviors in adolescents: prevalence and association with mental health status in a statewide sample.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to estimate the proportion of adolescents meeting Healthy People 2020 health behavior recommendations for the prevention of chronic disease and to determine the association between mental health status (depression and/or conduct problems) and the likelihood of meeting these recommendations. The data used for this study are from the 2010 Washington State Healthy Youth Survey. Descriptive statistics and linear regression were utilized to estimate the proportion of adolescents meeting recommendations and associations between youth mental health status indicators and health-promoting behaviors. A small minority (5.8 %) of youth met all six recommendations in domains of tobacco abstinence, substance use abstinence, daily physical activity, breakfast consumption, weight below obese levels, and adequate sleep, though most (84.3 %) met at least three. At the aggregate level, the proportion of Washington State youth who met Healthy People 2020 guidelines exceeded targets, with the exception of substance use abstinence. A minority of youth reported guideline levels of daily physical activity (23.3 %) and sleep (39.8 %). Mental health status was strongly associated with the number of health-promoting behaviors adolescents endorsed. Interventions to increase the adoption of sleep hygiene and exercise habits should be added to an integrative positive youth development framework within school-, community-, and primary care-based adolescent health initiatives. Attention to adolescent mental health and shared risk factors may be critical for reducing barriers to healthy behavior. PMID:24114409

Adrian, Molly; Charlesworth-Attie, Sarah; Vander Stoep, Ann; McCauley, Elizabeth; Becker, Linda

2014-04-01

439

Pediatric mental health emergencies in the emergency medical services system. American College of Emergency Physicians.  

PubMed

Emergency departments (EDs) are vital in the management of pediatric patients with mental health emergencies (MHE). Pediatric MHE are an increasing part of emergency medical practice because EDs have become the safety net for a fragmented mental health infrastructure which is experiencing critical shortages in services in all sectors. EDs must safely, humanely, and in a culturally and developmentally appropriate manner manage pediatric patients with undiagnosed and known mental illnesses including those with mental retardation, autistic spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and those experiencing a behavioral crisis. EDs also manage patients with suicidal ideation, depression, escalating aggression, substance abuse, post traumatic stress disorder, maltreatment, and those exposed to violence and unexpected deaths. EDs must address not only the physical but also the mental health needs of patients during and after mass casualty incidents and disasters. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Emergency Physicians support the following actions: advocacy for increased mental health resources, including improved pediatric mental health tools for the ED, increased mental health insurance coverage, adequate reimbursement at all levels; acknowledgment of the importance of the child's medical home, and promotion of education and research for mental health emergencies. PMID:16997698

Dolan, Margaret A; Mace, Sharon E

2006-10-01

440

Screening and diagnosing depression in women visiting GPs' drop in clinic in Primary Health Care  

PubMed Central

Background Only half of all depressions are diagnosed in Primary Health Care (PHC). Depression can remain undetected for a long time and entail high costs for care and low quality of life for the individuals. Drop in clinic is a common form of organizing health care; however the visits are short and focus on solving the most urgent problems. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and severity of depression among women visiting the GPs' drop in clinic and to identify possible clues for depression among women. Methods The two-stage screening method with "high risk feedback" was used. Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to screen 155 women visiting two GPs' drop in clinic. Women who screened positive (BDI score ?10) were invited by the GP to a repeat visit. Major depression (MDD) was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria and the severity was assessed with Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Women with BDI score <10 constituted a control group. Demographic characteristics were obtained by questionnaire. Chart notations were examined with regard to symptoms mentioned at the index visit and were categorized as somatic or mental. Results The two-stage method worked well with a low rate of withdrawals in the second step, when the GP invited the women to a repeat visit. The prevalence of depression was 22.4% (95% CI 15.6–29.2). The severity was mild in 43%, moderate in 53% and severe in 3%. The depressed women mentioned mental symptoms significantly more often (69%) than the controls (15%) and were to a higher extent sick-listed for a longer period than 14 days. Nearly one third of the depressed women did not mention mental symptoms. The majority of the women who screened as false positive for depression had crisis reactions and needed further care from health professionals in PHC. Referrals to a psychiatrist were few and revealed often psychiatric co-morbidity. Conclusion The prevalence of previously undiagnosed depression among women visiting GPs' drop in clinic was high. Clues for depression were identified in the depressed women's symptom presentation; they often mention mental symptoms when they visit the GP for somatic reasons e.g. respiratory infections. We suggest that GPs do selective screening for depression when women mention mental symptoms and offer to schedule a repeat visit for follow-up rather than just recommending that the patient return if the mental symptoms do not disappear. PMID:18554388

Stromberg, Ranja; Wernering, Estera; Aberg-Wistedt, Anna; Furhoff, Anna-Karin; Johansson, Sven-Erik; Backlund, Lars G

2008-01-01

441

Mental Health Promotion and Illness Prevention: A Challenge for Psychiatrists  

PubMed Central

Mental health is essential for individual and public health. To improve mental health, promotion, prevention, and the treatment of disease are required. These three kinds of interventions are interrelated but independent from one another. Although separate efforts for mental health promotion and prevention are needed as well as the public need of mental health promotion and well-being, psychiatrists usually are not accustomed to mental health promotion and prevention. This review introduces an overview of the concept, subjects according to target populations, and various intervention strategies for mental health promotion and prevention of mental illnesses. Based on literatures to date, understanding of developmental psychology, lifestyle medicine, and biopsychosocial contributors of mental health with a macroscopic perspective might help to practice mental health promotion and illness prevention. PMID:24474978

Min, Jung-Ah; Lee, Chang-Uk

2013-01-01

442

The nearest relative in mental health law.  

PubMed

This article considers the concept of the 'nearest relative' in mental health law in England and Wales and argues, inter alia, for its retention in a way that avoids violation of the European Convention on Human Rights and the Human Rights Act 1998. It looks, first, at the meaning of nearest relative and then focuses on his/her role today, including its link with advance directives for mental health care, and on the tension between nearest relatives and approved social workers and the law. The problem exposed by JT v. United Kingdom in relation to the Human Rights Act 1998 and its implications for the future are considered. The impact of the Mental Health Bill (2002) on the nearest relative is discussed and recommendations to improve the present law are then suggested. PMID:15176627

Andoh, Benjamin; Gogo, Emmanuel

2004-04-01

443

Mental Health Policy and Psychotropic Drugs  

PubMed Central

The pace of innovation in psychotropic drugs has been rapid over the past 15 years. There also have been unprecedented increases in spending on prescription drugs generally and psychotropic medications specifically. Psychotropic medications are playing a more central role in treatment. They also are receiving close scrutiny from health insurers, state budget makers, and ordinary citizens. Public policy actions regarding prescription drugs have the potential to significantly affect clinical care for mental disorders, the costs of this care to individuals and society at large, and the prospects for future scientific advances. This article outlines the policy issues related to psychotropic drugs with respect to their role in determining access to mental health treatment and the cost and quality of mental health care. PMID:15960772

Frank, Richard G; Conti, Rena M; Goldman, Howard H

2005-01-01

444

Mental health policy and psychotropic drugs.  

PubMed

The pace of innovation in psychotropic drugs has been rapid over the past 15 years. There also have been unprecedented increases in spending on prescription drugs generally and psychotropic medications specifically. Psychotropic medications are playing a more central role in treatment. They also are receiving close scrutiny from health insurers, state budget makers, and ordinary citizens. Public policy actions regarding prescription drugs have the potential to significantly affect clinical care for mental disorders, the costs of this care to individuals and society at large, and the prospects for future scientific advances. This article outlines the policy issues related to psychotropic drugs with respect to their role in determining access to mental health treatment and the cost and quality of mental health care. PMID:15960772

Frank, Richard G; Conti, Rena M; Goldman, Howard H

2005-01-01

445

Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte

2013-01-01

446

WPA guidance on mental health and mental health care in migrants.  

PubMed

The purpose of this guidance is to review currently available evidence on mental health problems in migrants and to present advice to clinicians and policy makers on how to provide migrants with appropriate and accessible mental health services. The three phases of the process of migration and the relevant implications for mental health are outlined, as well as the specific problems of groups such as women, children and adolescents, the elderly, refugees and asylum seekers, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. The concepts of cultural bereavement, cultural identity and cultural congruity are discussed. The epidemiology of mental disorders in migrants is described. A series of recommendations to policy makers, service providers and clinicians aimed to improve mental health care in migrants are provided, covering the special needs of migrants concerning pharmacotherapies and psychotherapies. PMID:21379345

Bhugra, Dinesh; Gupta, Susham; Bhui, Kamaldeep; Craig, Tom; Dogra, Nisha; Ingleby, J David; Kirkbride, James; Moussaoui, Driss; Nazroo, James; Qureshi, Adil; Stompe, Thomas; Tribe, Rachel

2011-02-01

447

Predictors of recovery-oriented competencies among mental health professionals in one community mental health system.  

PubMed

A survey of 813 mental health professionals serving adults with severe mental illness clustered in 25 community mental health centers assessed the extent to which mental health professionals possess clinical competencies that support recovery and the predictors of these competencies. The results suggest there is room for improvement in recovery-oriented competencies. In-depth professional training in recovery, greater job variety, more years practicing in mental health, participation on an intensive case management team, and perceptions of workplace recovery culture were predictors of recovery-oriented competencies. Prioritization of on-going professional, worker retention, and management strategies that incorporate a team approach to treatment and improvements in workplace recovery culture may potentially increase recovery-oriented clinical practice. PMID: