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1

Mental health literacy: an impediment to the optimum treatment of major depression in the community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Mental health literacy refers to the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders which aid their recognition, management and prevention. This study examined the mental health literacy and experience of depression in a random and representative community population. Method: The experience of depression and mental health literacy of 3010 subjects from a random and representative population were determined on the

Robert D. Goldney; Laura J. Fisher; David H. Wilson

2001-01-01

2

Impact of mental health training on village health workers regarding clinical depression in rural India.  

PubMed

Village health worker (VHW) programs are known to be effective means of promoting health of communities. Comprehensive rural health project in India recently trained VHWs to identify, refer, and help people with mental health issues. This study evaluated knowledge, attitude, and behavior of VHWs regarding depression. Cluster sampling was used including all 36 VHWs trained in mental health. Among these, 24 were available and willing to participate in the study. Five FGDs were conducted among 24 VHWs, and the results were analyzed qualitatively. Four out of five groups were able to diagnose the presented case correctly as depression. VHWs were able to identify many symptoms and to suggest management options for depression. They showed supportive and empathetic attitudes towards depressed patients. VHWs are likely to be useful at identifying and assisting people with depression in the communities with lack of adequate resources provided they receive ongoing training and supervision. PMID:23756724

Paudel, Shreedhar; Gilles, Nadege; Hahn, Sigrid; Hexom, Braden; Premkumar, Ramaswamy; Arole, Shobha; Katz, Craig

2014-05-01

3

Improving engagement in mental health treatment for home meal recipients with depression  

PubMed Central

Background Staff who provide support services to older adults are in a unique position to detect depression and offer a referral for mental health treatment. Yet integrating mental health screening and recommendations into aging services requires staff learn new skills to integrate mental health and overcome client barriers to accepting mental health referrals. This paper describes client rates of depression and a novel engagement intervention (Open Door) for homebound older adults who are eligible for home delivered meals and screened for depression by in-home aging service programs. Methods Homebound older adults receiving meal service who endorsed depressive symptoms were interviewed to assess depression severity and rates of suicidal ideation. Open Door is a brief psychosocial intervention to improve engagement in mental health treatment by collaboratively addressing the individual level barriers to care. The intervention targets stigma, misconceptions about depression, and fears about treatment, and is designed to fit within the roles and responsibilities of aging service staff. Results Among 137 meal recipients who had symptoms when screened for depression as part of routine home meal service assessments, half (51%) had Major Depressive Disorder and 13% met criteria for minor depression on the SCID. Suicidal ideation was reported by 29% of the sample, with the highest rates of suicidal ideation (47%) among the subgroup of individuals with Major Depressive Disorder. Conclusion Individuals who endorse depressive symptoms during screening are likely to have clinically significant depression and need mental health treatment. The Open Door intervention offers a strategy to overcome barriers to mental health treatment engagement and to improve the odds of quality care for depression.

Sirey, Jo Anne; Greenfield, Alexandra; DePasquale, Alyssa; Weiss, Nathalie; Marino, Patricia; Alexopoulos, George S; Bruce, Martha L

2013-01-01

4

Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health Treatment in an Ethnoracially Diverse College Student Sample  

PubMed Central

Objectives To study (a) the prevalence of depressive symptoms and (b) the utilization of mental health treatment in an ethnoracially diverse sample consisting primarily of Asian Americans, European Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Participants 589 college students. Method A questionnaire packet that included the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (CES-D) was administered to students in introductory psychology courses. Results a) there were no differences among ethnoracial groups in levels of depressive symptoms as measured by the CES-D, b) 71% of participants with high levels of depressive symptoms had not received any mental health treatment in the previous 12 months, and c) European Americans were 3.7 times more likely to have received mental health treatment in the previous 12 months than other students. Conclusion Outreach efforts designed to improve utilization of mental health treatment services by depressed college students, especially by members of ethnoracial minority groups, should be increased.

Herman, Steve; Archambeau, Olga G.; Deliramich, Aimee N.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Chiu, Pearl H.; Frueh, B. Christopher

2011-01-01

5

Adolescent mental health literacy: Young people's knowledge of depression and help seeking  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the mental health literacy of a group of adolescents, with particular reference to their ability to recognize symptoms of depression in their peers. Respondents were 202 Australian adolescents (122 males, 80 females) aged 15–17 years. Their mental health literacy was examined through a questionnaire that presented them with five scenarios of young people. Respondents showed a mixed

John R. Burns; Ronald M. Rapee

2006-01-01

6

Adolescent Mental Health Literacy: Young People's Knowledge of Depression and Help Seeking  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined the mental health literacy of a group of adolescents, with particular reference to their ability to recognize symptoms of depression in their peers. Respondents were 202 Australian adolescents (122 males, 80 females) aged 15-17 years. Their mental health literacy was examined through a questionnaire that presented them with…

Burns, John R.; Rapee, Ronald M.

2006-01-01

7

Contextual Socioeconomic Status and Mental Health Counseling Use Among US Adolescents with Depression.  

PubMed

Most adolescents with depressive disorders do not receive any mental health services, even though effective treatments exist. Although research has examined numerous individual-level factors associated with mental health service use among depressed adolescents, less is known about the role of contextual factors. This study examines the relationship between contextual-level socioeconomic status (SES) and clinic-based mental health counseling use among US adolescents with high depressive symptoms in urban and suburban areas. Data from the first two waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 1,133; 59 % female) were analyzed using multilevel logistic models in which adolescents were nested within counties. After controlling for individual-level predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics, as well as county racial/ethnic composition, county SES was positively associated with clinic-based counseling use among depressed youth. A one standard deviation increase in the county affluence index was associated with 43 % greater odds of receiving any clinical counseling services. Furthermore, the positive relationship between county affluence and clinical counseling use was no longer significant after controlling for the county supply of mental health specialist physicians. The results indicate that county residential context is a key correlate of mental health service use among depressed adolescents, such that those who live in lower SES counties with fewer mental health specialists are less likely to receive treatment. PMID:24114588

Cummings, Janet R

2014-07-01

8

Depression and Chronic Diseases: It Is Time for a Synergistic Mental Health and Primary Care Approach  

PubMed Central

Objective: To identify the growing significance of depression as a global leading cause of years lost to disability and its role as a major independent risk factor in many chronic illnesses. The distinct effects of depression on morbidity and mortality in cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and stroke are investigated, including behavioral factors and plausible biological mechanisms (psychoneuroimmunology of depression). Data Sources: PubMed articles in English were searched from 1992 to 2012 (20-year span) using the following search criteria: psychoneuroimmunology of depression, immune-mediated inflammation, depression treatment recommendations, depression screening, years lost to disability, underserved populations and depression, chronic illnesses and depression, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and immune system. Data Synthesis: Evidence of the robust bidirectional relationship between depression and individual chronic diseases is presented and discussed. A brief overview of currently recommended psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment approaches in regard to depression in chronic diseases is provided. Results: Discordance between mental health and primary care within the US public health system is a systematic problem that must be addressed. This situation leads to a potentially high hidden prevalence of underdiagnosed and undertreated depression, especially in the underserved populations. Conclusion: Measures must be implemented across the communities of mental health and primary care practitioners in order to achieve a synergistic approach to depression.

Richie, William D.; Bailey, Rahn K.

2013-01-01

9

Improving early detection of childhood depression in mental health care: The Children?s Depression Screener (ChilD-S).  

PubMed

Diagnosing childhood depression can pose a challenge, even for mental health specialists. Screening tools can aid clinicians within the initial step of the diagnostic process. For the first time, the Children?s Depression Screener (ChilD-S) is validated in a mental health setting as a novel field of application beyond the previously examined pediatric setting. Based on a structured interview, DSM-IV-TR diagnoses of depression were made for 79 psychiatric patients aged 9-12, serving as the gold standard for validation. For assessing criterion validity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated. Point prevalence of major depression and dysthymia was 28%. Diagnostic accuracy in terms of the area under the ROC curve was high (0.97). At the optimal cut-off point ?12 according to the Youden?s index, sensitivity was 0.91 and specificity was 0.81. The findings suggest that the ChilD-S is not only a valid screening instrument for childhood depression in pediatric care but also in mental health settings. As a brief tool it can easily be implemented into daily clinical practice of mental health professionals facilitating the diagnostic process, especially in case of comorbid depression. PMID:24742687

Allgaier, Antje-Kathrin; Krick, Kathrin; Opitz, Ansgar; Saravo, Barbara; Romanos, Marcel; Schulte-Körne, Gerd

2014-07-30

10

Gender differences in general and specialty outpatient mental health service use for depression  

PubMed Central

Background This study ascertain gender-specific determinants of outpatient mental health (MH) service use for depression to highlight gender disparities in barriers to care and explain how depressed men and women in need of care might differ in their help-seeking behaviour. Methods Data used in this study came from the Canadian Community Health Survey on Mental Health and Well Being, cycle 1.2 (CCHS 1.2) conducted by Statistics Canada in 2002 (N =?36,984). The sample was limited to respondents filling the criteria for a probable major depression in the 12 months prior to the interview (n =?1743). Gender-specific multivariate logistic regression analyses were carried out. Results The results showed that 54.3% of respondents meeting criteria for major depression had consulted for mental health reasons in the year prior to interview. When looking at type of outpatient mental health service use, males were more likely to consult a general practitioner and a mental health specialist in the past year as opposed to females. However, females were more likely to consult a general practitioner only as opposed to no service use than males. Gender specific differences in determinants associated with outpatient service use included for males, lower adjusted household income, and for females, a younger age, the presence of social support, self-reported availability barriers, the presence of self-reported suicidal thoughts or attempt and a poorer self- perceived mental health. Conclusions It is concluded that continued efforts to promote access to mental health care are needed for men and women affected by depression, and this, to target specific vulnerable populations and increase utilization rates.

2014-01-01

11

Mental health literacy of those with major depression and suicidal ideation: an impediment to help seeking.  

PubMed

Mental health literacy is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid their recognition, management, or prevention, and is an important determinant of help seeking. This has relevance in suicide prevention, particularly for those with major depression, the clinical condition most frequently associated with suicidal behavior. In this study of a random and representative community sample, a vignette depicting classical features of major depression was presented to subjects along with questions related to mental health literacy. The responses of those with major depression, as delineated by the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders instrument, both with and without suicidal ideation, were compared to those of a third group of respondents. The results demonstrated that despite increased professional contact by those with major depression and suicidal ideation, there were few differences among the three groups on either open-ended or direct questions related to mental health literacy. This indicates that increased professional contact in itself was not related to increased mental health literacy, and suggests that more specific psychoeducational programs are required. PMID:12501964

Goldney, Robert D; Fisher, Laura J; Wilson, David H; Cheok, Frida

2002-01-01

12

The Role of an Early Head Start Mental Health Coordinator: Screening for Maternal Depression in a Comprehensive Approach to Mental Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Screening for maternal depression was a core component of the P.E.A.C.E., Inc., Early Head Start program's comprehensive approach to supporting the mental health needs of low-income pregnant women and families with infants and toddlers. The addition of a mental health coordinator as a full-time staff member created an opportunity to develop a…

Canuso, Regina

2007-01-01

13

Mental Health Literacy in Hmong and Cambodian Elderly Refugees: A Barrier to Understanding, Recognizing, and Responding to Depression  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study aims to explore mental health literacy, specifically focusing on depression, among Southeast Asian (SEA) elderly refugees residing in the Twin Cities of St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota. Three focus groups were held with nine mental health professionals who work with SEA elders. Jorm's mental health literacy framework guided the…

Lee, Hee Yun; Lytle, Kathy; Yang, Pa Nhia; Lum, Terry

2010-01-01

14

Mental health literacy and postpartum depression: a qualitative description of views of lower income women.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study is to understand mental health literacy (MHL) (Jorm, 2000) in lower income women postpartum and share participant experiences of recognizing and seeking help for depressive symptoms. Focus group textual data were received from 25 participants who completed a weight and psychosocial health longitudinal study. Iterative content data analysis using Jorm's framework provided thematic understandings descriptive of MHL. Women recognized behavioral changes indicating mental distress, but fears prevented them from seeking help, and some resorted to risky behaviors. This framework could guide providers to identify women who may benefit from early intervention for postpartum depressive symptoms. PMID:25017559

Guy, Sarah; Sterling, Bobbie Sue; Walker, Lorraine O; Harrison, Tracie C

2014-08-01

15

Does family history of depression predict major depression in midlife women? Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study (SWAN MHS).  

PubMed

This study aims to determine whether family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women independent of psychosocial and health profiles at midlife. Participants were 303 African American and Caucasian women (42-52 years at baseline) recruited into the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) and the Women's Mental Health Study (MHS) in Pittsburgh. Major depression was assessed annually with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Family mental health history was collected at the ninth or tenth follow-up. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether family history of depression predicted major depression in midlife, adjusting for covariates. The odds of experiencing major depression during the study were three times greater for those with a family history than for those without a family history (OR?=?3.22, 95 % CI?=?1.95-5.31). Family history predicted depression (OR?=?2.67, 95 % CI?=?1.50-4.78) after adjusting for lifetime history of depression, age, trait anxiety, chronic medical conditions, and stressful life events. In analyses stratified by lifetime history of depression, family history significantly predicted depression only among women with a lifetime history of depression. Family history of depression predicts major depression in midlife women generally, but particularly in those with a lifetime history of depression prior to midlife. PMID:24952069

Colvin, Alicia; Richardson, Gale A; Cyranowski, Jill M; Youk, Ada; Bromberger, Joyce T

2014-08-01

16

Managed Care, Access to Mental Health Specialists, and Outcomes Among Primary Care Patients with Depressive Symptoms  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To determine whether managed care is associated with reduced access to mental health specialists and worse outcomes among primary care patients with depressive symptoms. DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Offices of 261 primary physicians in private practice in Seattle. PATIENTS Patients (N = 17,187) were screened in waiting rooms, enrolling 1,336 adults with depressive symptoms. Patients (n = 942) completed follow-up surveys at 1, 3, and 6 months. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS For each patient, the intensity of managed care was measured by the managedness of the patient's health plan, plan benefit indexes, presence or absence of a mental health carve-out, intensity of managed care in the patient's primary care office, physician financial incentives, and whether the physician read or used depression guidelines. Access measures were referral and actually seeing a mental health specialist. Outcomes were the Symptom Checklist for Depression, restricted activity days, and patient rating of care from primary physician. Approximately 23% of patients were referred to mental health specialists, and 38% saw a mental health specialist with or without referral. Managed care generally was not associated with a reduced likelihood of referral or seeing a mental health specialist. Patients in more-managed plans were less likely to be referred to a psychiatrist. Among low-income patients, a physician financial withhold for referral was associated with fewer mental health referrals. A physician productivity bonus was associated with greater access to mental health specialists. Depressive symptom and restricted activity day outcomes in more-managed health plans and offices were similar to or better than less-managed settings. Patients in more-managed offices had lower ratings of care from their primary physicians. CONCLUSIONS The intensity of managed care was generally not associated with access to mental health specialists. The small number of managed care strategies associated with reduced access were offset by other strategies associated with increased access. Consequently, no adverse health outcomes were detected, but lower patient ratings of care provided by their primary physicians were found.

Grembowski, David E; Martin, Diane; Patrick, Donald L; Diehr, Paula; Katon, Wayne; Williams, Barbara; Engelberg, Ruth; Novak, Louise; Dickstein, Deborah; Deyo, Richard; Goldberg, Harold I

2002-01-01

17

Maternal Depressive Symptoms When Caring for a Child with Mental Health Problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

As primary caregivers of children with mental health problems, mothers face challenges that put them at risk for depression,\\u000a which is rarely identified or addressed. The aims of this paper were to (a) identify mean differences among demographic, stressor,\\u000a threat, and resource variables specified in a theoretical model and thought to be associated with maternal depressive symptoms\\u000a and (b) determine

Janis E. GerkensmeyerSusan; Susan M. Perkins; Jennifer Day; Joan K. Austin; Eric L. Scott; Jingwei Wu

18

Trauma, Depression, Coping, and Mental Health Service Seeking Among Impoverished Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined the relationship among trauma, coping, depression, and mental health service seeking in a probability sample of sheltered homeless and low-income housed women. Results highlight the diversity of trauma. In a longitudinal analysis, women who lived in shelters or experienced major violence had a twofold increase in their risk of…

Rayburn, Nadine Recker; Wenzel, Suzanne L.; Elliott, Marc N.; Hambarsoomians, Katrin; Marshall, Grant N.; Tucker, Joan S.

2005-01-01

19

Depressive Symptoms and Mental Health Treatment in an Ethnoracially Diverse College Student Sample  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objectives: To study (a) the prevalence of depressive symptoms and (b) the utilization of mental health treatment in an ethnoracially diverse sample consisting primarily of Asian Americans, European Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders. Participants: Five hundred eighty-nine college students. Method: A questionnaire packet that…

Herman, Steve; Archambeau, Olga G.; Deliramich, Aimee N.; Kim, Bryan S. K.; Chiu, Pearl H.; Frueh, B. Christopher

2011-01-01

20

Have Mental Health Education Programs Influenced the Mental Health Literacy of Those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation? A Comparison between 1998 and 2008 in South Australia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental health literacy is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid their recognition, management, or prevention and is considered to be an important determinant of help-seeking. This has relevance in suicide prevention, as depression, the clinical condition most frequently associated with suicidality, has been the target of…

Chamberlain, Peter N.; Goldney, Robert D.; Taylor, Anne W.; Eckert, Kerena A.

2012-01-01

21

Gender and Racial\\/Ethnic Differences in Use of Outpatient Mental Health and Substance Use Services by Depressed Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines depressed adults’ use of mental health services, focusing on Latinos and African Americans. Self-report data for adults meeting CIDI criteria for major depression or dysthymia from the 1997–98 HealthCare for Communities Survey were analyzed. Gender stratified logistic regression models examined the relationship between race\\/ethnicity and outpatient mental health service use, controlling for sociodemographic, health status, insurance, and

Victoria D. Ojeda; Thomas G. McGuire

2006-01-01

22

Mental Health and Heart Health  

MedlinePLUS

... problems.” Depression and Other Issues Many forms of mental health issues can affect heart disease. There’s the temporary state of depression or a more severe, clinical case. You can also have varying levels of anxiety ...

23

Mental health, depression, and anxiety in patients on maintenance dialysis.  

PubMed

Depression and anxiety are among the most common comorbid illnesses in people with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Patients with ESRD face many challenges which increase the likelihood that they will develop depression or anxiety or worsen these conditions. These include a general feeling of unwellness; specific symptoms caused by ESRD or the patient's treatment; major disruptions in lifestyle; the need to comply with treatment regimens, including dialysis schedules, diet prescription, and water restriction; ancillary treatments and hospitalizations; and the fear of disability, morbidity, and shortened lifespan. Depression has been studied extensively in patients on maintenance dialysis, and much effort has been done to validate the proper screening tools to diagnose depression and to define the treatment options for patients on maintenance dialysis with depression. Anxiety is less well studied in this population of patients. Evidence indicates that anxiety is also common in maintenance dialysis. More attention should be paid to measuring the incidence and prevalence and developing methods of diagnosis and treatment approaches for anxiety in patients with ESRD. In this review, we attempted to underscore those aspects of depression and anxiety that have not been investigated extensively, especially with regard to anxiety. The interaction between racial/ethnic characteristics of patients on maintenance dialysis with depression and anxiety needs to be studied more extensively, in order to assess better approaches to healthcare for these individuals. PMID:20622304

Feroze, Usama; Martin, David; Reina-Patton, Astrid; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kopple, Joel D

2010-07-01

24

Predicting the Impact of the 2011 Conflict in Libya on Population Mental Health: PTSD and Depression Prevalence and Mental Health Service Requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundMental disorders are likely to be elevated in the Libyan population during the post-conflict period. We estimated cases of severe PTSD and depression and related health service requirements using modelling from existing epidemiological data and current recommended mental health service targets in low and middle income countries (LMIC’s).MethodsPost-conflict prevalence estimates were derived from models based on a previously conducted systematic

Fiona J. Charlson; Zachary Steel; Louisa Degenhardt; Tien Chey; Derrick Silove; Claire Marnane; Harvey A. Whiteford

2012-01-01

25

Mental health symptoms in Iraqi refugees: posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety, and depression.  

PubMed

Refugees suffer from a higher rate of mental health symptoms than the general population since they have experienced extreme suffering and the accumulated effects of trauma. Because of the diversity of regions from which refugees originate, there is a need to understand some of the unique experiences that are specific to each sub-groups of immigrants. The purpose of the present study was to explore mental health symptoms in Iraqi refugee clients who immigrated to the United States after the Gulf War of the early 1990's. As part of a larger study, 116 adult Iraqi immigrants to the United States (46 male, 70 females) who were seeking mental health services completed measures of anxiety, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder. As expected, the majority of refugees reported intense anxiety and depression, and many met the DSM IV criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder. Like refugees from other countries-of-origin, Iraqi refugees are in need of culturally sensitive assessment and mental health treatment. The results are discussed in light of the treatment needs of Iraqi refugee clients, their resilience and motivation for a better life, and the ways that health professionals can assist in optimizing their adjustment. PMID:19172969

Jamil, Hikmet; Farrag, Mohamed; Hakim-Larson, Julie; Kafaji, Talib; Abdulkhaleq, Husam; Hammad, Adnan

2007-01-01

26

Associations between early exposure to intimate partner violence, parental depression and subsequent mental health outcomes  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine the association between parent reports of intimate partner violence (IPV) and depressive symptoms within the first 3 years of a child’s life with subsequent mental health conditions and psychotropic drug treatment. Design Prospective cohort study linking parental IPV and depression with subsequent billing and pharmacy data. Setting 4 pediatric clinics between November 2004 and June 2012 Patients/Participants 2,422 children Main Exposure Any report of IPV and/or parental depressive symptoms from birth to 3 years of age. Main Outcome Measures ICD-9 mental health diagnoses and any psychotropic drug treatment between 3 and 6 years of age. Results 2.4% of caregivers (n=58) reported both IPV and depressive symptoms before their children were 3 years of age, 3% (n=69) of caregivers reported IPV only, 29% (n=704) reported depressive symptoms only, and 65.7% (n=1,591) reported neither exposure. Children of parents reporting both IPV and depressive symptoms were more likely to have a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (AOR 4.0; 95% CI: 1.5–10.9), even after adjusting for child gender, race/ethnicity, and insurance type. Children whose parents reported depressive symptoms were more likely to have been prescribed psychotropic medication (AOR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.0–3.4). Conclusions Exposure to both IPV and depression before 3 years is associated with preschool-onset ADHD; and early exposure to parental depression is associated with being prescribed psychotropic medication.

Bauer, Nerissa S.; Gilbert, Amy L.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

2014-01-01

27

A Pilot Investigation of the Rates and Predictors of Mental Health Services Utilization Among Depressed African American Mothers and Their Children  

PubMed Central

Objective Depressed mothers, especially those who are African American, are likely to underutilize mental health services. Children of depressed mothers are an at-risk population with mental health needs that are often unmet. This prospective pilot study examined 3-month frequency rates and predictors of mental health utilization for a sample of African American depressed mothers and their children. Methods Mothers and 1 of their children completed assessment interviews. Three months later, mothers completed a telephone interview of maternal and child mental health utilization. Results Overall, 65.3% of depressed mothers and 36.7% of their children had utilized mental health services. Logistic regression analyses indicated that initial mental health treatment significantly predicted maternal mental health utilization. Maternal reports of child behavioral problems significantly predicted child mental health utilization. Conclusions The findings were consistent with other research and showed evidence of mental health use among African Americans who are in need of such services.

Boyd, Rhonda C.; Chen, Emmie; Benton, Tami

2010-01-01

28

Mental Health Nurses' Beliefs About Interventions for Schizophrenia and Depression: A Comparison with Psychiatrists and the Public  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The main objective of this paper was to investigate and compare mental health nurses' beliefs about interventions for schizophrenia and depression with those of psychiatrists and the public. Factors affecting nurses' beliefs were also investigated.Method: This research used methods employed in previous surveys of professional and public beliefs. A postal survey of 673 Australian mental health nurses was carried

Tanya M. Caldwell; Anthony F. Jorm

2000-01-01

29

Omega-3 fatty acids and major depression: A primer for the mental health professional  

PubMed Central

Omega-3 fatty acids play a critical role in the development and function of the central nervous system. Emerging research is establishing an association between omega-3 fatty acids (alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, docosahexaenoic) and major depressive disorder. Evidence from epidemiological, laboratory and clinical studies suggest that dietary lipids and other associated nutritional factors may influence vulnerability and outcome in depressive disorders. Research in this area is growing at a rapid pace. The goal of this report is to integrate various branches of research in order to update mental health professionals.

2004-01-01

30

Reconsidering the Role of Social Disadvantage in Physical and Mental Health: Stressful Life Events, Health Behaviors, Race, and Depression  

PubMed Central

Prevalence of depression is associated inversely with some indicators of socioeconomic position, and the stress of social disadvantage is hypothesized to mediate this relation. Relative to whites, blacks have a higher burden of most physical health conditions but, unexpectedly, a lower burden of depression. This study evaluated an etiologic model that integrates mental and physical health to account for this counterintuitive patterning. The Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Area Study (Maryland, 1993–2004) was used to evaluate the interaction between stress and poor health behaviors (smoking, alcohol use, poor diet, and obesity) and risk of depression 12 years later for 341 blacks and 601 whites. At baseline, blacks engaged in more poor health behaviors and had a lower prevalence of depression compared with whites (5.9% vs. 9.2%). The interaction between health behaviors and stress was nonsignificant for whites (odds ratio (OR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 0.98, 1.11); for blacks, the interaction term was significant and negative (?: ?0.18, P < 0.014). For blacks, the association between median stress and depression was stronger for those who engaged in zero (OR = 1.34) relative to 1 (OR = 1.12) and ?2 (OR = 0.94) poor health behaviors. Findings are consistent with the proposed model of mental and physical health disparities.

Mezuk, Briana; Rafferty, Jane A.; Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Hudson, Darrell; Abdou, Cleopatra M.; Lee, Hedwig; Eaton, William W.; Jackson, James S.

2010-01-01

31

Primary Care Patients with Depression Are Less Accepting of Treatment Than Those Seen by Mental Health Specialists  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE This study examined whether depressed patients treated exclusively in primary care report less need for care and less acceptability of treatment options than those depressed patients treated in the specialty mental health setting after up to 6 months of treatment. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Forty-five community primary care practices. PARTICIPANTS A total of 881 persons with major depression who had received mental health services in the previous 6 months and who enrolled in 3 of the 4 Quality Improvement for Depression Collaboration Studies. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS Patients were categorized into 1 of 2 groups: 1) having received mental health services exclusively from a primary care provider (45%), or 2) having received any services from a mental health specialist (55%) in the previous 6 months. Compared with patients who received care from mental health specialists, patients who received mental health services exclusively from primary care providers had 2.7-fold the odds (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6 to 4.4) of reporting that no treatment was definitely acceptable and had 2.4-fold the odds (95% CI, 1.5 to 3.9) of reporting that evidence-based treatment options (antidepressant medication) were definitely not acceptable. These results were adjusted for demographic, social/behavioral, depression severity, and economic factors using multiple logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS Patients with depression treated exclusively by primary care providers have attitudes and beliefs more averse to care than those seen by mental health specialists. These differences in attitudes and beliefs may contribute to lower quality depression care observed in comparisons of primary care and specialty mental health providers.

Van Voorhees, Benjamin W; Cooper, Lisa A; Rost, Kathryn M; Nutting, Paul; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Meredith, Lisa; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Ford, Daniel E

2003-01-01

32

Mental health literacy towards depression among non-medical students at a Malaysian university  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the knowledge and perception of depression among students of University Sains Malaysia (USM), in Penang, Peninsular Malaysia. Method Face?to?face interviews were conducted using a pre?validated 21?item questionnaire among students at USM. Results A total of 500 respondents participated in the survey comprising 24.6% (n=123) males and 75.4% (n=377) females. Half (50.0%, n=250) were Malays, followed by Chinese (44.0%, n=220) and Indians (6.0%, n=30). Whilst exploring the respondents' knowledge of the symptoms of depression, it was found that Chinese females had a comparatively better knowledge (P=0.058) of the symptoms of depression in comparison with Malays and Indians. Overall, social issues were attributed as the possible cause of depression. A cursory knowledge level was observed regarding medication for depression. Female students were more inclined towards the use of alternative and traditional medicines. However, with regard to seeking professional help, consultation with a psychiatrist was preferred by the majority. Conclusion Overall, a moderate level of knowledge about the symptoms of depression and a cursory knowledge of its therapy were observed. Those with personal experience of depression had better knowledge of the symptoms and therapy. Alternative treatments and traditional medicines were also favoured. There is a risk that this may affect the ability of Malaysian youths to seek evidence?based mental health care.

2010-01-01

33

Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social well-being. It affects how we think, feel and act as ... stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental health is important at every stage of life, from ...

34

Are depression, anxiety and poor mental health risk factors for knee pain? A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background While it is recognized that psychosocial factors are important in the development and progression of musculoskeletal pain and disability, no systematic review has specifically focused on examining the relationship between psychosocial factors and knee pain. We aimed to systematically review the evidence to determine whether psychosocial factors, specifically depression, anxiety and poor mental health, are risk factors for knee pain. Methods Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycINFO were performed to identify relevant studies published up to August 2012 using MESH terms and keywords. We included studies that met a set of predefined criteria and two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of the selected studies. Due to the heterogeneity of the studies, a best evidence synthesis was performed. Results Sixteen studies were included in the review, of which 9 were considered high quality. The study populations were heterogeneous in terms of diagnosis of knee pain. We found a strong level of evidence for a relationship between depression and knee pain, limited evidence for no relationship between anxiety and knee pain, and minimal evidence for no relationship between poor mental health and knee pain. Conclusions Despite the heterogeneity of the included studies, these data show that depression plays a significant role in knee pain, and that a biopsychosocial approach to the management of this condition is integral to optimising outcomes for knee pain.

2014-01-01

35

Identifying Mothers with Postpartum Depression Early: Integrating Perinatal Mental Health Care into the Obstetric Setting  

PubMed Central

With prevalence rates of postnatal depression (PND) as high as at least 7%, there was a need for early detection and intervention of postpartum mental illness amongst Singaporean mothers. This is a report on the first year results of our country's first PND Intervention Programme. The programme consists of two phases: (1) postpartum women were screened with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and provided appropriate care plans; (2) individualized clinical intervention using a case management multidisciplinary team model. Screening for PND was generally acceptable, as 64% eligible women participated voluntarily. Nine percent (126) were identified as probable cases from 1369 women. Forty-one women accepted intervention and achieved 78% reduction in the EPDS symptom scores to below the cutoff of 13, 76% had improvement in GAF functioning scores, and 68% had improved health quality scores. Preliminary results are promising, and this intervention model can be replicated.

Chen, Helen; Wang, Jemie; Ch'ng, Ying Chia; Mingoo, Roshayati; Lee, Theresa; Ong, Julia

2011-01-01

36

Nutrition and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... you eat affects your body. Cutting back on junk food and choosing healthier options helps you maintain a ... Adolescent Mental Health 14.3 (2009): 148-155 ) Junk Food Blues: Are Depression and Diet Related? by Zeratsky, ...

37

Adolescent Mental Health Facts  

MedlinePLUS

... Mental Health Adolescent Health Topics Mental Health States Adolescent Mental Health Facts Click a state below to ... Care Positive Mental Health: Resilience In the States Adolescent Health Topics Reproductive Health Mental Health Physical Health ...

38

Health beliefs and perceived need for mental health care of anxiety and depression--the patients' perspective explored.  

PubMed

Patients' illness representations and beliefs about treatment for depression and anxiety, as well as their perceived needs, are important for treatment. A systematic review was conducted of 71 studies describing the beliefs or perceived needs of patients and non-patients. Patients give multi-dimensional explanations for depression and see both psychological and medication treatment as helpful. People who suffer from depression have more positive beliefs about biological etiology and medication treatment than healthy people, or those with less severe depressive symptoms. Anxiety patients view psychological interventions as their best treatment option. Between 49% and 84% of the patients with depression or anxiety perceive a need for treatment, mostly for counseling and medication. All patients prefer psychological treatment forms to medication. A majority of patients view antidepressants as addictive and many perceive stigma and see practical and economic barriers to care. The most vulnerable groups in terms of seeking and receiving mental health care for depression and anxiety seem to be minority groups, as well as younger and older patients. More research is required into the specific needs of anxiety and depression patients. Open communication between patient and provider could lead to valuable improvements in treatment. PMID:18420323

Prins, Marijn A; Verhaak, Peter F M; Bensing, Jozien M; van der Meer, Klaas

2008-07-01

39

Graduate mental health worker case management of depression in UK primary care: a pilot study  

PubMed Central

Background Based on data from large multicentre US trials, the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is advocating a stepped-care model for the management of depression, with ‘case management’ or ‘collaborative care’ for selected patients in primary care. Aim To conduct a pilot study examining the use of graduate mental health workers case managing depressed primary care NHS patients. Design of study A randomised controlled trial comparing usual GP care with or without case management over 16 weeks of acute antidepressant drug treatment. Setting Three primary care practices in the North East of England. Method Patients with depression, aged 18–65 years, who had failed to adequately respond to antidepressant treatment, were randomised to the two treatments. Assessments were made at baseline, 12, and 24 weeks using a combination of observer and self ratings. Results Randomisation of 62 patients required screening of 1073 potential patients. There was little difference in outcome between the two treatment arms but a gradual improvement in symptoms over time was seen. Client satisfaction was assessed as high across both treatments. Conclusion While this pilot study confirmed the integrity of the study protocol and the suitability of the outcome measures and randomisation procedure, it raises questions regarding the practicality of recruitment and feasibility of the intervention. It would be crucial to address these issues prior to the implementation of a large multi-centre randomised controlled trial.

McMahon, Lindsay; Foran, Karin M; Forrest, Stephen D; Taylor, Michelle L; Ingram, Graham; Rajwal, Madhuri; Cornwall, Peter L; McAllister-Williams, R Hamish

2007-01-01

40

Family Matters: The Role of Mental Health Stigma and Social Support on Depressive Symptoms and Subsequent Help Seeking among African American Boys  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

African American adolescent boys underutilize mental health service due to stigma associated with depression. Gaining an increased understanding of how depressed, African American adolescent boys perceive their mental health needs and engage in help-seeking behaviors might play an essential role in efforts to improve their symptoms and access to…

Lindsey, Michael A.; Joe, Sean; Nebbitt, Von

2010-01-01

41

Validation of the Arab Youth Mental Health scale as a screening tool for depression/anxiety in Lebanese children  

PubMed Central

Background Early detection of common mental disorders, such as depression and anxiety, among children and adolescents requires the use of validated, culturally sensitive, and developmentally appropriate screening instruments. The Arab region has a high proportion of youth, yet Arabic-language screening instruments for mental disorders among this age group are virtually absent. Methods We carried out construct and clinical validation on the recently-developed Arab Youth Mental Health (AYMH) scale as a screening tool for depression/anxiety. The scale was administered with 10-14 year old children attending a social service center in Beirut, Lebanon (N = 153). The clinical assessment was conducted by a child and adolescent clinical psychiatrist employing the DSM IV criteria. We tested the scale's sensitivity, specificity, and internal consistency. Results Scale scores were generally significantly associated with how participants responded to standard questions on health, mental health, and happiness, indicating good construct validity. The results revealed that the scale exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.86) and specificity (79%). However, it exhibited moderate sensitivity for girls (71%) and poor sensitivity for boys (50%). Conclusions The AYMH scale is useful as a screening tool for general mental health states and a valid screening instrument for common mental disorders among girls. It is not a valid instrument for detecting depression and anxiety among boys in an Arab culture.

2011-01-01

42

Family Matters: The Role of Mental Health Stigma and Social Support on Depressive Symptoms and Subsequent Help Seeking Among African American Boys.  

PubMed

African American adolescent boys underutilize mental health service due to stigma associated with depression. Gaining an increased understanding of how depressed, African American adolescent boys perceive their mental health needs and engage in help-seeking behaviors might play an essential role in efforts to improve their symptoms and access to care. Using a mixed-methods design, this study examined the influence of mental health stigma and social support on depressive symptoms among African American adolescent boys. Findings indicated the protective effects of social support in decreasing depressive symptoms, especially when participants experienced mental health stigma. Results also revealed the pivotal role of family social support over both professional and peer support for participants who struggled with depressive symptoms. The primacy of family support among the sample, combined with the frequent distrust of professionals and peer networks, would indicate that working with families may improve initial identification of depression among African American adolescent boys and decrease their barriers to care. PMID:20953336

Lindsey, Michael A; Joe, Sean; Nebbitt, Von

2010-11-01

43

Family Matters: The Role of Mental Health Stigma and Social Support on Depressive Symptoms and Subsequent Help Seeking Among African American Boys  

PubMed Central

African American adolescent boys underutilize mental health service due to stigma associated with depression. Gaining an increased understanding of how depressed, African American adolescent boys perceive their mental health needs and engage in help-seeking behaviors might play an essential role in efforts to improve their symptoms and access to care. Using a mixed-methods design, this study examined the influence of mental health stigma and social support on depressive symptoms among African American adolescent boys. Findings indicated the protective effects of social support in decreasing depressive symptoms, especially when participants experienced mental health stigma. Results also revealed the pivotal role of family social support over both professional and peer support for participants who struggled with depressive symptoms. The primacy of family support among the sample, combined with the frequent distrust of professionals and peer networks, would indicate that working with families may improve initial identification of depression among African American adolescent boys and decrease their barriers to care.

Lindsey, Michael A.; Joe, Sean; Nebbitt, Von

2010-01-01

44

IRRITABLE MOOD IN ADULT MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE WORLD MENTAL HEALTH SURVEYS  

PubMed Central

Background Although irritability is a core symptom of DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) for youth but not adults, clinical studies find comparable rates of irritability between nonbipolar depressed adults and youth. Including irritability as a core symptom of adult MDD would allow detection of depression-equivalent syndromes with primary irritability hypothesized to be more common among males than females. We carried out a preliminary examination of this issue using cross-national community-based survey data from 21 countries in the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys (n = 110,729). Methods The assessment of MDD in the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview includes one question about persistent irritability. We examined two expansions of the definition of MDD involving this question: (1) cases with dysphoria and/or anhedonia and exactly four of nine Criterion A symptoms plus irritability; and (2) cases with two or more weeks of irritability plus four or more other Criterion A MDD symptoms in the absence of dysphoria or anhedonia. Results Adding irritability as a tenth Criterion A symptom increased lifetime prevalence by 0.4% (from 11.2 to 11.6%). Adding episodes of persistent irritability increased prevalence by an additional 0.2%. Proportional prevalence increases were significantly higher, but nonetheless small, among males compared to females. Rates of severe role impairment were significantly lower among respondents with this irritable depression who did not meet conventional DSM-IV criteria than those with DSM-IV MDD. Conclusion Although limited by the superficial assessment in this single question on irritability, results do not support expanding adult MDD criteria to include irritable mood.

Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Alonso, Jordi; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Karam, Elie G.; Jin, Robert; Lepine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Medina-Mora, Maria E.; O'Neill, Siobhan; Ono, Yutaka; Posada-Villa, Jose A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Scott, Kate M.; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria C.; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

2014-01-01

45

What Is Mental Health?  

MedlinePLUS

... Myths and Facts Recovery is Possible What Is Mental Health? Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social ... mental health problems and where to find help . Mental Health and Wellness Positive mental health allows people to: ...

46

The predictive value of mental health for long-term sickness absence: the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and the Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5) compared  

PubMed Central

Background Questionnaires are valuable for population surveys of mental health. Different survey instruments may however give different results. The present study compares two mental health instruments, the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and the Mental Health Inventory (MHI-5), in regard to their prediction of long-term sickness absence. Method Questionnaire data was collected from N?=?4153 Danish employees. The questionnaire included the MDI and the MHI-5. The information of long-term sickness absence was obtained from a register. We used Cox regression to calculate covariance adjusted hazard ratios for long-term sickness absence for both measures. Results Both the MDI and the MHI-5 had a highly significant prediction of long-term sickness absence. A one standard deviation change in score was associated with an increased risk of long-term sickness absence of 27% for the MDI and 37% for the MHI-5. When both measures were included in the same analysis, the MHI-5 performed best. Conclusion In general population surveys, the MHI-5 is a better predictor of long-term sickness absence than the MDI.

2013-01-01

47

Depressive Symptoms in a Sample of Social Work Students and Reasons Preventing Students from Using Mental Health Services: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Limited research exists on social work students' level of depression and help-seeking beliefs. This study empirically examined the rates of depression among 215 BSW students and explored students' reasons for not using mental health services. Approximately 50% scored at or above the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale cutoff;…

Ting, Laura

2011-01-01

48

No health without mental health.  

PubMed

About 14% of the global burden of disease has been attributed to neuropsychiatric disorders, mostly due to the chronically disabling nature of depression and other common mental disorders, alcohol-use and substance-use disorders, and psychoses. Such estimates have drawn attention to the importance of mental disorders for public health. However, because they stress the separate contributions of mental and physical disorders to disability and mortality, they might have entrenched the alienation of mental health from mainstream efforts to improve health and reduce poverty. The burden of mental disorders is likely to have been underestimated because of inadequate appreciation of the connectedness between mental illness and other health conditions. Because these interactions are protean, there can be no health without mental health. Mental disorders increase risk for communicable and non-communicable diseases, and contribute to unintentional and intentional injury. Conversely, many health conditions increase the risk for mental disorder, and comorbidity complicates help-seeking, diagnosis, and treatment, and influences prognosis. Health services are not provided equitably to people with mental disorders, and the quality of care for both mental and physical health conditions for these people could be improved. We need to develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions that can be integrated into management of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Health-care systems should be strengthened to improve delivery of mental health care, by focusing on existing programmes and activities, such as those which address the prevention and treatment of HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria; gender-based violence; antenatal care; integrated management of childhood illnesses and child nutrition; and innovative management of chronic disease. An explicit mental health budget might need to be allocated for such activities. Mental health affects progress towards the achievement of several Millennium Development Goals, such as promotion of gender equality and empowerment of women, reduction of child mortality, improvement of maternal health, and reversal of the spread of HIV/AIDS. Mental health awareness needs to be integrated into all aspects of health and social policy, health-system planning, and delivery of primary and secondary general health care. PMID:17804063

Prince, Martin; Patel, Vikram; Saxena, Shekhar; Maj, Mario; Maselko, Joanna; Phillips, Michael R; Rahman, Atif

2007-09-01

49

Dimensions of mental health: life satisfaction, anxiety and depression: a preventive mental health study in Ankara University students population  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this study is to investigate the interrelation between life satisfaction, anxiety, depression, and hopelessness among Ankara University students. 364 university students completed a test battery including the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Hopelessness Scale and the Satisfaction with Life Scale. Life satisfaction was negatively and significantly correlated with the scores from depression, anxiety

Sevgi Guney; Temel Kalafat; Murat Boysan

2010-01-01

50

The Efficacy of Group Metacognitive Therapy on Self-Esteem and Mental Health of Patients Suffering from Major Depressive Disorder  

PubMed Central

Objective: The present research aims to analyze the efficacy of group metacognitive therapy (MCT) on self-esteem and mental Health of those who suffer from major depressive disorder. Methods: The research was a randomized clinical controlled trial, using pretest and posttest with 2 months of follow-up. Twenty-two patients with major depressive disorder based on DSM-IV-TR criteria were selected through available sampling from patients of two psychiatric hospitals of Mashhad, Iran, in 2011. They were allocated randomly into two groups of trial (n = 11) and control (n = 11). Citalopram and sertraline were prescribed as antidepressant to both groups. The experimental group also attended nine 90-minute sessions of MCT (a 5-week program). Eysenck self-esteem scale (ESES) and Mental Health Checklist (MHC) were used in pretest, posttest, and follow-up as the study instrument. The data were analyzed by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) using SPSS. Results: ANCOVA revealed that the patients receiving group MCT had significantly increased (p < 0.001) self-esteem in posttest, which remained significant in the follow up (p < 0.001). Moreover, mental health scores had increased in the MCT group (posttest, p < 0.001; follow up, p < 0.001). Conclusion: Group MCT has beneficial therapeutic roles in improving the self-steam and recuperation of mental health in MDD patients.

Farahmand, Vahid; Hassanzadeh, Ramezan; Mirzaian, Bahram; Fayyazi Bordbar, Mohammad Reza; Feizi, Jaleh

2014-01-01

51

Good Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Health This information in Spanish ( en español ) Good mental health Nutrition and mental health Exercise and mental health ... work to keep your mind healthy. Nutrition and mental health Visit choosemyplate.gov to help find personalized eating ...

52

Women and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Women and Mental Health Mental illnesses affect women and men differently — some ... mail.nih.gov Share Science News About Women's Mental Health Bundling HIV Prevention with Prenatal Care Reduces Risky ...

53

Florida Mental Health Institute  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Florida Mental Health Institute, dedicated to research, training and program development for improving psychological wellbeing, has four main divisions: Aging and Mental Health, Child and Family Studies, Community Mental Health, and Mental Health Law and Policy.

54

An interprofessional nurse-led mental health promotion intervention for older home care clients with depressive symptoms  

PubMed Central

Background Depressive symptoms in older home care clients are common but poorly recognized and treated, resulting in adverse health outcomes, premature institutionalization, and costly use of health services. The objectives of this study were to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a new six-month interprofessional (IP) nurse-led mental health promotion intervention, and to explore its effects on reducing depressive symptoms in older home care clients (??70 years) using personal support services. Methods A prospective one-group pre-test/post-test study design was used. The intervention was a six-month evidence-based depression care management strategy led by a registered nurse that used an IP approach. Of 142 eligible consenting participants, 98 (69%) completed the six-month and 87 (61%) completed the one-year follow-up. Outcomes included depressive symptoms, anxiety, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and the costs of use of all types of health services at baseline and six-month and one-year follow-up. An interpretive descriptive design was used to explore clients’, nurses’, and personal support workers’ perceptions about the intervention’s appropriateness, benefits, and barriers and facilitators to implementation. Results Of the 142 participants, 56% had clinically significant depressive symptoms, with 38% having moderate to severe symptoms. The intervention was feasible and acceptable to older home care clients with depressive symptoms. It was effective in reducing depressive symptoms and improving HRQoL at six-month follow-up, with small additional improvements six months after the intervention. The intervention also reduced anxiety at one year follow-up. Significant reductions were observed in the use of hospitalization, ambulance services, and emergency room visits over the study period. Conclusions Our findings provide initial evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, and sustained effects of the nurse-led mental health promotion intervention in improving client outcomes, reducing use of expensive health services, and improving clinical practice behaviours of home care providers. Future research should evaluate its efficacy using a randomized clinical trial design, in different settings, with an adequate sample of older home care recipients with depressive symptoms. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01407926.

2014-01-01

55

Stress buffering effects of social support on depressive symptoms in middle age: reciprocity and community mental health.  

PubMed

Little is known about the association between depression and the buffering effects of social support in mid-life crisis. The aim of this study is to determine the buffering effects of social support on depression concerning middle-aged individuals, while also taking reciprocity and gender differences into careful consideration. A cross-sectional survey of all middle-aged individuals (40-69 years of age) using a large sample (n = 4558) from a community-living population, who resided in Rokunohe town, Aomori prefecture in northern Japan (response rate = 69.8%), was undertaken. This town recently had a lot of suicides. Two-way anova was used to analyze the effects of stressor and social support on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale scores. The authors found a stress buffering effect of social support on the depressive symptoms occurring in middle age, however, a significant difference in the stress buffer effect was only observed in male subjects. Moreover, when the authors take reciprocity into account, the effect of the buffer on depression was found not only in males receiving support but in males providing support as well. In conclusion, pertaining to males, social support reduces depressive symptoms under stressful circumstances in middle age, not only when they receive such support but also when they provide it. Therefore, these findings suggest that reciprocal social support is important for males in relation to community mental health. PMID:17109698

Takizawa, Tohru; Kondo, Tsuyoshi; Sakihara, Seizou; Ariizumi, Makoto; Watanabe, Naoki; Oyama, Hirofumi

2006-12-01

56

Self-harm in postpartum depression and referrals to a perinatal mental health team: an audit study.  

PubMed

There is a paucity of research on self-harm during pregnancy and the postpartum period despite suicide being a leading cause of death and high rates of mental disorder during this time. This audit describes a cohort of women referred to a new perinatal mental health team (PMHT) based in a large maternity hospital in the UK over a 12-month period. The audit was conducted in two stages. Stage one describes the clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of 225 pregnant women referred to the team after screening positive for a significant mental health history. Stage two determines the veracity of data on a subgroup of 73 pregnant women referred for previous postpartum depression (PPD), 58 % of whom disclosed an episode of self-harm with the 'intent to kill themselves' to the maternity staff when they first booked in for antenatal care. Previous PPD accounted for the largest majority of referrals (32 %) to the PMHT followed by depression (27 %) and self-harm (10 %). The majority of women (85 %) referred to the PMHT were engaged. Eight percent were so unwell at the point of referral they required an admission to the hospital. Attempted suicide in the subgroup of 73 women with previous PPD ranged from 24-49 %. The findings from this audit suggest that self-harm in PPD warrants further investigation. PMID:23462983

Healey, Christine; Morriss, Richard; Henshaw, Carol; Wadoo, Ovais; Sajjad, Aamer; Scholefield, Helen; Kinderman, Peter

2013-06-01

57

Are feelings of peace or depression the drivers of the relationship between neighbourhood social fragmentation and mental health in Aotearoa/New Zealand?  

PubMed

Exploration of the influence of neighbourhood social context on supportive relationships and social cohesion is on the rise. Positive social contexts may be less stressful for residents, resulting in mental wellbeing and calmness; whereas negative contexts may increase stress and deleterious mental health. To examine this, we measured the relationship between an Index of Neighbourhood Social Fragmentation and overall mental well-being in New Zealand. Then we examined the influence of fragmentation on two components of mental health: depression and calmness. Increased fragmentation was significantly associated with lower mental health scores for the entire population and for females, with similar but insignificant trends for males. Increased fragmentation was associated with increased depression in both sexes, but not calmness. Depression rather than calmness may contribute to the observed association between fragmentation and overall mental health. Groups vulnerable to stressful social contexts may be prone to depression in fragmented neighbourhoods. Further examination of the specific aspects of living in fragmented neighbourhoods which increase depressive feelings is warranted. PMID:24317391

Pearson, Amber L; Ivory, Vivienne; Breetzke, Gregory; Lovasi, Gina S

2014-03-01

58

Mental health in hypertension: assessing symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress on anti-hypertensive medication adherence  

PubMed Central

Background Patients with chronic conditions like hypertension may experience many negative emotions which increase their risk for the development of mental health disorders particularly anxiety and depression. For Ghanaian patients with hypertension, the interaction between hypertension and symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress remains largely unexplored. To fill this knowledge gap, the study sought to ascertain the prevalence and role of these negative emotions on anti-hypertensive medication adherence while taking into account patients’ belief systems. Methods The hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 400 hypertensive patients was conducted in two tertiary hospitals in Ghana. Data were gathered on patient’s socio-demographic characteristics, anxiety, depression and stress symptoms, spiritual beliefs, and medication adherence. Results Hypertensive patients experienced symptoms of anxiety (56%), stress (20%) and depression (4%). As a coping mechanism, a significant relation was observed between spiritual beliefs and anxiety (x2?=?13.352, p?=?0.010), depression (x2?=?6.205, p?=?0.045) and stress (x2?=?14.833, p?=?0.001). Stress among patients increased their likelihood of medication non-adherence [odds ratio (OR)?=?2.42 (95% CI 1.06 – 5.5), p?=?0.035]. Conclusion The study has demonstrated the need for clinicians to pay attention to negative emotions and their role in medication non-adherence. The recommendation is that attention should be directed toward the use of spirituality as a possible mechanism by which negative emotions could be managed among hypertensive patients.

2014-01-01

59

Children's Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... development, and these problems can continue into adulthood. Public health includes mental health A new report from the ... impact of childhood mental disorders and developing a public health approach to address children’s mental health. Research on ...

60

Have broad-based community and professional education programs influenced mental health literacy and treatment seeking of those with major depression and suicidal ideation?  

PubMed

Mental health literacy is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid in their recognition, management, or prevention; it is also a determinant of help seeking. As such, it is presumed to be important in community suicide prevention programs. In Australia there have been a number of government, professional, and charitable organizations as well as pharmaceutical company suicide prevention initiatives which have been designed to enhance public and professional knowledge about mental disorders, particularly depression. This naturalistic study conducted between 1998 and 2004 in a random and representative population sample examined the changes in mental health literacy and treatment seeking of those with major depression, both with and without suicidal ideation, and those who were neither depressed nor suicidal. Results indicated that there was marked improvement in mental health literacy for all three groups, although there was less change for those most in need of intervention (i.e., those with major depression and suicidal ideation). Furthermore, there were fewer changes in appropriate treatment seeking in those with major depression and suicidal ideation. These findings are consistent with literature reporting limited problem solving and decision making in those who are suicidal, and indicate that there are limits to broadbased community education programs. More focused suicide prevention initiatives are required, specifically for those who are depressed and suicidal. PMID:18444772

Goldney, Robert D; Fisher, Laura J

2008-04-01

61

Teen Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... worthless could be warning signs of a mental health problem. Mental health problems are real, painful, and sometimes severe. You ... things that could harm you or others Mental health problems can be treated. To find help, talk ...

62

Utilization of VA Mental Health and Primary Care Services Among Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans With Depression: The Influence of Gender and Ethnicity Status.  

PubMed

The objective of this study is to examine gender and ethnic differences in Veterans Affairs (VA) health services utilization among Iraq and Afghanistan military Veterans diagnosed with depression. With VA administrative data, sociodemographics, utilization of outpatient primary care, specialty mental health and mental health treatment modalities (psychotherapy and antidepressant prescriptions) were collected from electronic medical records of 1,556 depressed Veterans treated in one VA regional network from January 2008 to March 2009. Health care utilization patterns were examined 90 days following being diagnosed with depression. ?(2) and t-tests were used to evaluate unadjusted differences in VA service use by gender and ethnicity. Logistic regression was used to fit study models predicting VA service utilization. Study results indicate no ethnic or gender differences in the use of specialty mental health services or in the use of mental health treatments. However, women Veterans, especially those from ethnic minority groups, were less likely to use primary care than white and nonwhite male Veterans. Collectively, these findings signal a decrease in historically documented disparities within VA health care, especially in the use of mental health services. PMID:24806496

Davis, Teri D; Deen, Tisha L; Fortney, John C; Sullivan, Greer; Hudson, Teresa J

2014-05-01

63

Depression and psychological trauma: an overview integrating current research and specific evidence of studies in the treatment of depression in public mental health services in chile.  

PubMed

In the last two decades, different research has demonstrated the high prevalence of childhood trauma, including sexual abuse, among depressive women. These findings are associated with a complex, severe, and chronic psychopathology. This can be explained considering the neurobiological changes secondary to early trauma that can provoke a neuroendocrine failure to compensate in response to challenge. It suggests the existence of a distinguishable clinical-neurobiological subtype of depression as a function of childhood trauma that requires specific treatments. Among women with depression and early trauma receiving treatment in a public mental health service in Chile, it was demonstrated that a brief outpatient intervention (that screened for and focused on childhood trauma and helped patients to understand current psychosocial difficulties as a repetition of past trauma) was effective in reducing psychiatric symptoms and improving interpersonal relationships. However, in this population, this intervention did not prevent posttraumatic stress disorder secondary to the extreme earthquake that occurred in February 2010. Therefore in adults with depression and early trauma, it is necessary to evaluate prolonged multimodal treatments that integrate pharmacotherapy, social support, and interpersonal psychotherapies with trauma focused interventions (specific interventions for specific traumas). PMID:24695633

Vitriol, Verónica; Cancino, Alfredo; Weil, Kristina; Salgado, Carolina; Asenjo, Maria Andrea; Potthoff, Soledad

2014-01-01

64

Nutrition and Depression: Implications for Improving Mental Health Among Childbearing-Aged Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adequate nutrition is needed for countless aspects of brain functioning. Poor diet quality, ubiquitous in the United States, may be a modifiable risk factor for depression. The objective was to review and synthesize the current knowledge of the role of nutrition in depression, and address implications for childbearing-aged women. Poor omega-3 fatty acid status increases the risk of depression. Fish

Lisa M. Bodnar; Katherine L. Wisner

2005-01-01

65

MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAM.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

WEST VIRGINIA IS A RURAL STATE HAVING A LARGE POVERTY STRICKEN POPULATION. SINCE THIS GROUP HAD NO ACCESS TO MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES, THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH SPONSORED A VISTA PROGRAM IN MENTAL HEALTH AND MENTAL RETARDATION, AND ENCOURAGED THE VOLUNTEERS TO USE THEIR OWN CREATIVITY AND INGENUITY IN PROVIDING SUCH SERVICES AS--(1)…

CHAMBERLAIN, IDA

66

The effectiveness of a preferred intensity exercise programme on the mental health outcomes of young people with depression: a sequential mixed methods evaluation  

PubMed Central

Background People with mental illness are more likely to suffer physical health problems than comparable populations who do not have mental illness. There is evidence to suggest that exercise, as well has having obvious physical benefits, also has positive effects on mental health. There is a distinct paucity of research testing its effects on young people seeking help for mental health issues. Additionally, it is generally found that compliance with prescribed exercise programmes is low. As such, encouraging young people to exercise at levels recommended by national guidelines may be unrealistic considering their struggle with mental health difficulties. It is proposed that an exercise intervention tailored to young people's preferred intensity may improve mental health outcomes, overall quality of life, and reduce exercise attrition rates. Methods/Design A sequential mixed methods design will be utilised to assess the effectiveness of an individually tailored exercise programme on the mental health outcomes of young people with depression. The mixed methods design incorporates a Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT), focus groups and interviews and an economic evaluation. Participants: 158 young people (14-17 years) recruited from primary care and voluntary services randomly allocated to either the intervention group or control group. Intervention group: Participants will undertake a 12 week exercise programme of 12 × 60 minutes of preferred intensity aerobic exercise receiving motivational coaching and support throughout. Participants will also be invited to attend focus groups and 1-1 interviews following completion of the exercise programme to illicit potential barriers facilitators to participation. Control group: Participants will receive treatment as usual. Primary Outcome measure: Depression using the Children's Depression Inventory 2 (CDI-2). Secondary Outcome measures: Quality of Life (EQ-5D), physical fitness (Borg RPE scale, heart rate), incidents of self-harm, treatment received and compliance with treatment, and the cost effectiveness of the intervention. Outcome measures will be taken at baseline, post intervention and 6 month follow up. Discussion The results of this study will inform policy makers of the effectiveness of preferred intensity exercise on the mental health outcomes of young people with depression, the acceptability of such an intervention to this population and its cost effectiveness. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01474837

2012-01-01

67

Mental Health for Men  

MedlinePLUS

... If you are in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 800-273-TALK (8255). You can ... National Mental Health Consumers' Self-Help Clearinghouse National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration ...

68

Mental Health: Military  

MedlinePLUS

... service abroad can also play a role in mental health issues, including anxiety , posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and substance abuse . In addition to these mental health issues, many soldiers have experienced traumatic brain injury ...

69

Community Mental Health Journal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Community Psychiatric Practice is a special section within Community Mental Health Journal devoted to issues relating to psychiatrists who practice in community mental health centers and similar settings. The intent of the section is to stimulate interaction and involve community psychiatrists and other community mental health professionals in a dialogue analogous to the collaborative situation in the community men- tal

Robert E. Drake

2001-01-01

70

Post-conflict mental health needs: a cross-sectional survey of trauma, depression and associated factors in Juba, Southern Sudan  

PubMed Central

Background The signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in January 2005 marked the end of the civil conflict in Sudan lasting over 20 years. The conflict was characterised by widespread violence and large-scale forced migration. Mental health is recognised as a key public health issue for conflict-affected populations. Studies revealed high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) amongst populations from Southern Sudan during the conflict. However, no studies have been conducted on mental health in post-war Southern Sudan. The objective of this study was to measure PTSD and depression in the population in the town of Juba in Southern Sudan; and to investigate the association ofdemographic, displacement, and past and recent trauma exposure variables, on the outcomes of PTSD and depression. Methods A cross-sectional, random cluster survey with a sample of 1242 adults (aged over 18 years) was conducted in November 2007 in the town of Juba, the capital of Southern Sudan. Levels of exposure to traumatic events and PTSD were measured using the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (original version), and levels of depression measured using the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse the association ofdemographic, displacement and trauma exposure variables on the outcomes of PTSD and depression. Multivariate logistic regression was also conducted to investigate which demographic and displacement variables were associated with exposure to traumatic events. Results Over one third (36%) of respondents met symptom criteria for PTSD and half (50%) of respondents met symptom criteria for depression. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed strong associations of gender, marital status, forced displacement, and trauma exposure with outcomes of PTSD and depression. Men, IDPs, and refugees and persons displaced more than once were all significantly more likely to have experienced eight or more traumatic events. Conclusion This study provides evidence of high levels of mental distress in the population of Juba Town, and associated risk-factors. Comprehensive social and psychological assistance is urgently required in Juba.

Roberts, Bayard; Damundu, Eliaba Yona; Lomoro, Olivia; Sondorp, Egbert

2009-01-01

71

Depression or Endocrine Disorder?: What Mental Health Counselors Need to Know about Hypothyroidism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes hypothyroidism, an endocrine disorder characterized by symptoms that resemble those of depression. Discusses features of the disorder, types and grades of hypothyroidism, causes, valuative techniques for the disorder, and implications of hypothyroidism in counseling and in treating patients suffering from this disorder. (RJM)

Stanley, Paula Helen

1997-01-01

72

Career Thoughts, Indecision, and Depression: Implications for Mental Health Assessment in Career Counseling  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationships among dysfunctional career thoughts and career indecision with respect to symptoms of depression. Such information could be useful to counselors in identifying individuals at the outset of career counseling who may be experiencing emotional distress from life stressors in addition to career stress.…

Walker, Jerry V., III; Peterson, Gary W.

2012-01-01

73

Depressive Symptoms, Utilization of Mental Health Care, Substance Use and Sexual Risk Among Young Men Who have Sex with Men in EXPLORE: Implications for Age-Specific Interventions  

Microsoft Academic Search

The EXPLORE study evaluated a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV infection among MSM. We examined depressive symptoms,\\u000a utilization of mental health care, substance use and HIV risk taking behaviors in YMSM aged 16–25 years compared with their\\u000a older counterparts. YMSM were more likely to report depressive symptoms (OR = 1.55) and less likely to report use of counseling\\u000a (OR = 0.39) or medication (OR = 0.20) for

Elizabeth A. Salomon; Matthew J. Mimiaga; Marla J. Husnik; Seth L. Welles; Marc W. Manseau; Arnel B. Montenegro; Steven A. Safren; Beryl A. Koblin; Margaret A. Chesney; Kenneth H. Mayer

2009-01-01

74

Mental Health 3: Mental Health Through Literature  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, from Science NetLinks, examines how mental illness has been portrayed in the arts while highlighting for students a more insightful way to further develop their ideas about human behavior. This lesson is the third of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-27

75

Mental Health 2: Bedlam  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the second of three lessons from Science NetLinks on mental health and human behavior. This lesson gives students an up-close, personal look at Bedlam, the world's first mental health asylum, and the kind of life and treatment that mentally ill people received before the 20th century.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-28

76

Reducing depression in older home care clients: design of a prospective study of a nurse-led interprofessional mental health promotion intervention  

PubMed Central

Background Very little research has been conducted in the area of depression among older home care clients using personal support services. These older adults are particularly vulnerable to depression because of decreased cognition, comorbid chronic conditions, functional limitations, lack of social support, and reduced access to health services. To date, research has focused on collaborative, nurse-led depression care programs among older adults in primary care settings. Optimal management of depression among older home care clients is not currently known. The objective of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and effectiveness of a 6-month nurse-led, interprofessional mental health promotion intervention aimed at older home care clients with depressive symptoms using personal support services. Methods/Design This one-group pre-test post-test study aims to recruit a total of 250 long-stay (> 60 days) home care clients, 70 years or older, with depressive symptoms who are receiving personal support services through a home care program in Ontario, Canada. The nurse-led intervention is a multi-faceted 6-month program led by a Registered Nurse that involves regular home visits, monthly case conferences, and evidence-based assessment and management of depression using an interprofessional approach. The primary outcome is the change in severity of depressive symptoms from baseline to 6 months using the Centre for Epidemiological Studies in Depression Scale. Secondary outcomes include changes in the prevalence of depressive symptoms and anxiety, health-related quality of life, cognitive function, and the rate and appropriateness of depression treatment from baseline to 12 months. Changes in the costs of use of health services will be assessed from a societal perspective. Descriptive and qualitative data will be collected to examine the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention and identify barriers and facilitators to implementation. Discussion Data collection began in May 2010 and is expected to be completed by July 2012. A collaborative nurse-led strategy may provide a feasible, acceptable and effective means for improving the health of older home care clients by improving the prevention, recognition, and management of depression in this vulnerable population. The challenges involved in designing a practical, transferable and sustainable nurse-led intervention in home care are also discussed. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01407926

2011-01-01

77

Age differences in the prevalence and comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes: Results from the WHO World Mental Health Survey Initiative  

PubMed Central

Background Although depression appears to decrease in late life, this could be due to misattribution of depressive symptoms to physical disorders that increase in late life. Methods We investigated this issue by studying age differences in comorbidity of DSM-IV major depressive episodes (MDE) with chronic physical conditions in the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) surveys, a series of community epidemiological surveys carried out in 10 developed countries (n = 51,771) and 8 developing countries (n = 37,265). MDE and other mental disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Organic exclusion rules were not used to avoid inappropriate exclusion of cases with physical comorbidity. Physical conditions were assessed with a standard chronic conditions checklist. Results Twelve-month DSM-IV/CIDI MDE was significantly less prevalent among respondents ages 65+ than younger respondents in developed but not developing countries. Prevalence of comorbid mental disorders generally either decreased or remained stable with age, while comorbidity of MDE with mental disorders generally increased with age. Prevalence of physical conditions, in comparison, generally increased with age, while comorbidity of MDE with physical conditions generally decreased with age. Depression treatment was lowest among the elderly in developed and developing countries. Conclusions The weakening associations between MDE and physical conditions with increasing age argue against the suggestion that the low estimated prevalence of MDE among the elderly is due to increased confounding with physical disorders. Future study is needed to investigate processes that might lead to a decreasing impact of physical illness on depression among the elderly.

Kessler, Ronald C.; Birnbaum, Howard; Shahly, Victoria; Bromet, Evelyn; Hwang, Irving; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Sampson, Nancy; Andrade, Laura Helena; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Demyttenaere, Koen; Haro, Josep Maria; Karam, Aimee N.; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Kovess, Viviane; Lara, Carmen; Levinson, Daphna; Matschinger, Herbert; Nakane, Yoshibumi; Browne, Mark Oakley; Ormel, Johan; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Stein, Dan J.

2011-01-01

78

Age related differences in mental health scale scores and depression diagnosis: adult responses to the CIDI-SF and MHI-5.  

PubMed

Inconsistencies surrounding the prevalence levels of depression in later life suggest that the measurement of depression in older people may be problematic. The current study aimed to map responses to a depressive symptom scale, the Mental Health Index-5 (MHI-5) which is part of the Short form 36 (SF-36, Ware et al., 1993) against the diagnostic screening items of the Composite International Diagnostic Instrument-Short Form (CIDI-SF, Kessler et al., 1998) to examine disagreement rates across age groups. The study examined data from a national random sample of 10,641 participants living in Ireland, 58.8% were female and 19% were over 65 (SLÁN, 2007). CIDI-SF depression screening endorsement was lower in older groups, whereas mean MHI-5 depressive symptoms showed less change across age groups. Results showed that the odds of MHI-5 endorsers aged 18-44 endorsing CIDI-SF screening questions were 5 times and 4.5 times (dysphoria and anhedonia, respectively) greater than the odds of people aged 75 or more endorsing these items. Findings suggest that although the risk of depressive disorder may decrease with age, complex diagnostic screening questions may exaggerate lower rates of depression among older people. PMID:23993442

Trainor, Katie; Mallett, John; Rushe, Teresa

2013-11-01

79

Impact of Maternal Mental Health Status on Child Mental Health Treatment Outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effect of maternal depression and anxiety on child treatment outcome. Psychiatric assessments were conducted on 180 mother–child pairs when the child entered treatment in a community mental health center and six months later. Children whose mothers were depressed or anxious were significantly more impaired than children of mentally healthy mothers at both time points. Both groups

Carrie W. Rishel; Catherine G. Greeno; Steven C. Marcus; Esther Sales; M. Katherine. Shear; Holly A. Swartz; Carol Anderson

2006-01-01

80

Teens and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... the teen gets help: • The teen’s parents • A mental health professional at school or in the community • A health professional (doctor, ... old, approximately 4 million people, have a major mental health disorder that ... at home, school or with peers. (Surgeon General, 2000) Suicide is ...

81

Prison mental health services  

Microsoft Academic Search

This contribution describes current and future prison mental health service provision in England and Wales. There is a need for the development of multidisciplinary prison health care services, including greater coordination of care, continuity of care between the community and prison, improved information-sharing between agencies and developed care planning for prisoners with mental health problems. Recently, a formal partnership between

Jenny Shaw; Naomi Humber

2004-01-01

82

Mental Health in Schools  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States federal government has a vested interest in the mental health of children and adolescents. It considers\\u000a the current state of mental health care for children a public crisis (U.S. Public Health Service, 2000). Approximately 21%\\u000a of children and adolescents between the ages of 9 and 17 have a diagnosable mental or addictive disorder that causes at least

Trina Menden Anglin

83

Child and Adolescent Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... About Us Home > Health & Education > Mental Health Information Child and Adolescent Mental Health Publications Anxiety Disorders in Children and ... of development. More What Goes on in the Adolescent Brain? In recognition of National Children’s Mental Health ...

84

Mental Health of College Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

A random sample of college sophomores was studied regarding their mental health status, mental health service use, and attitudes toward mental health professionals. Data were collected through home interviews and a search of the students' service records at the university. Mental health status was measured by the 22-item Midtown Mental Health Scale.Religious affiliation and performance satisfaction were both found to

Jeffrey O. Whitley

1979-01-01

85

Does Interpersonal Psychotherapy improve clinical care for adolescents with depression attending a rural child and adolescent mental health service? Study protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility trial  

PubMed Central

Background Depression amongst adolescents is a costly societal problem. Little research documents the effectiveness of public mental health services in mapping this problem. Further, it is not clear whether usual care in such services can be improved via clinician training in a relevant evidence based intervention. One such intervention, found to be effective and easily learned amongst novice clinicians, is Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT). The study described in the current paper has two main objectives. First, it aims to investigate the impact on clinical care of implementing Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents for the treatment of adolescent depression within a rural mental health service compared with Treatment as Usual (TAU). The second objective is to record the process and challenges (i.e. feasibility, acceptability, sustainability) associated with implementing and evaluating an evidence-based intervention within a community service. This paper outlines the study rationale and design for this community based research trial. Methods/design The study involves a cluster randomisation trial to be conducted within a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service in rural Australia. All clinicians in the service will be invited to participate. Participating clinicians will be randomised via block design at each of four sites to (a) training and delivery of IPT, or (b) TAU. The primary measure of impact on care will be a clinically significant change in depressive symptomatology, with secondary outcomes involving treatment satisfaction and changes in other symptomatology. Participating adolescents with significant depressive symptomatology, aged 12 to 18 years, will complete assessment measures at Weeks 0, 12 and 24 of treatment. They will also complete a depression inventory once a month during that period. This study aims to recruit 60 adolescent participants and their parent/guardian/s. A power analysis is not indicated as an intra-class correlation coefficient will be calculated and used to inform sample size calculations for subsequent large-scale trials. Qualitative data regarding process implementation will be collected quarterly from focus groups with participating clinicians over 18 months, plus phone interviews with participating adolescents and parent/guardians at 12 weeks and 24 weeks of treatment. The focus group qualitative data will be analysed using a Fourth Generation Evaluation methodology that includes a constant comparative cyclic analysis method. Discussion This study protocol will be informative for researchers and clinicians interested in considering, designing and/or conducting cluster randomised trials within community practice such as mental health services. Trial Registration Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRNO12607000324415

Bearsley-Smith, Cate; Browne, Mark Oakley; Sellick, Ken; Villanueva, Elmer V; Chesters, Janice; Francis, Karen; Reddy, Prasuna

2007-01-01

86

Religion and mental health  

PubMed Central

In this chapter, the relation between religion and mental health and vice versa has been described. From primitive times different religions have different beliefs and systems of worshipping. Every religion with their belief system has implications on mental health and illness. We described how Hindu system of beliefs and rituals may have an effect in causation of various mental illnesses. It is also described how religion can help an individual to sustain one's life in various domains. The relationship between different religion and symptomatology is described. The impact and outcome of religion on mental health have been highlighted.

Behere, Prakash B.; Das, Anweshak; Yadav, Richa; Behere, Aniruddh P.

2013-01-01

87

A collaborative approach to identifying effective incentives for mental health clinicians to improve depression care in a large managed behavioral healthcare organization.  

PubMed

This descriptive study used stakeholder input to prioritize evidence-based strategies for improving depression care and to select incentives for mental health clinicians to adopt those strategies, and to conduct a feasibility test of an incentive-based program in a managed behavioral healthcare organization (MBHO). In two rounds of interviews and a stakeholder meeting, MBHO administrators and clinicians selected increasing combination treatment (antidepressant plus psychotherapy) rates as the program goal; and paying a bonus for case reviews, clinician feedback, and clinician education as incentives. We assessed program feasibility with case review and clinician surveys from a large independent practice association that contracts with the MBHO. Findings suggest that providing incentives for mental health clinicians is feasible and the incentive program did increase awareness. However, adoption may be challenging because of administrative barriers and limited clinical data available to MBHOs. PMID:20957427

Meredith, Lisa S; Branstrom, Robert B; Azocar, Francisca; Fikes, Ruth; Ettner, Susan L

2011-05-01

88

Social ties and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is generally agreed that social ties play a beneficial role in the maintenance of psychological well-being. In this targeted\\u000a review, we highlight four sets of insights that emerge from the literature on social ties and mental health outcomes (defined\\u000a as stress reactions, psychological well-being, and psychological distress, including depressive symptoms and anxiety). First,\\u000a the pathways by which social networks

Ichiro Kawachi; Lisa F. Berkman

2001-01-01

89

MENTAL HEALTH DIRECTORY, 1966.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE DIRECTORY IS INTENDED AS A REFERENCE GUIDE TO MENTAL HEALTH PROGRAMS AND SERVICES THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES. IT IS ORGANIZED INTO A FEDERAL SECTION AND A STATE AND COMMUNITY SECTION, EACH OF WHICH IS PRECEDED BY AN INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT CONCERNING THE LISTINGS IN THAT SECTION. ADDRESSES AND SHORT DESCRIPTIONS OF THE MAJOR MENTAL HEALTH

YOLLES, STANLEY F.; AND OTHERS

90

Transgender Clients: Identifying and Minimizing Barriers to Mental Health Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined mental healthcare use and barriers to mental healthcare utilization in a sample of 130 transgender volunteers. Roughly a third of participants sought treatment for mental health issues including depression, anxiety, and relationship problems. Sixty-eight participants (52% of sample) showed evidence of psychological distress but had not received mental health services in the past year. Results point to

Jillian C. Shipherd; Kelly E. Green; Sarah Abramovitz

2010-01-01

91

Myths & Facts about Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... ignity and S ocial Inclusion Associated with Mental Health (ADS Center) Home >> Publications Myths & Facts About Mental Health ... attention, and mental health services. By Post: SAMHSA ADS Center 4350 East West Highway, Suite 1100 Bethesda, ...

92

MentalHealth.net  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is an excellent resource for anyone seeking the latest issues surrounding mental health topics. It is designed and maintained by Clinical Psychologists and is "dedicated to educating the public about mental health, wellness, and family and relationship issues and concerns." In existence since 1995, the site provides featured topics, essays and articles, as well as latest news sections. In addition to these tools, weblogs, podcasts, and a questions and answers section are available. This site will be a valuable resource for any student, instructor or professional in the mental health field.

2007-08-23

93

Children's Mental Health Surveillance  

MedlinePLUS

... Act Early." Campaign CDC’s Mental Health CDC’s Positive Parenting Tips CDC’s Youth Tobacco Prevention CDC’s Suicide Prevention ... Disorders Tourette Syndrome Association The Triple P – Positive Parenting Program Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mental ...

94

Children's Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... development of more effective treatment and prevention of mental health disorders in children, youth, and families, including programs targeting expectant mothers, children in school settings, and youth transitioning into adulthood and programs ...

95

Depressive symptoms, utilization of mental health care, substance use and sexual risk among young men who have sex with men in EXPLORE: implications for age-specific interventions.  

PubMed

The EXPLORE study evaluated a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV infection among MSM. We examined depressive symptoms, utilization of mental health care, substance use and HIV risk taking behaviors in YMSM aged 16-25 years compared with their older counterparts. YMSM were more likely to report depressive symptoms (OR = 1.55) and less likely to report use of counseling (OR = 0.39) or medication (OR = 0.20) for psychiatric conditions. YMSM were more likely to report heavy alcohol and drug use. YMSM more often reported engaging in unprotected insertive (OR = 1.60) and receptive (OR = 2.07) anal intercourse with presumed HIV-uninfected partners, and unprotected receptive (OR = 1.72) anal intercourse with partners of unknown-HIV status. These findings suggest the need for more appropriate and accessible mental health care and substance use services for YMSM. Additionally, HIV prevention work with this population should provide comprehensive education about HIV testing and risk reduction counseling that focuses on communication about serostatus and safety in sexual situations. PMID:18709453

Salomon, Elizabeth A; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Husnik, Marla J; Welles, Seth L; Manseau, Marc W; Montenegro, Arnel B; Safren, Steven A; Koblin, Beryl A; Chesney, Margaret A; Mayer, Kenneth H

2009-08-01

96

Depressive Symptoms, Utilization of Mental Health Care, Substance Use and Sexual Risk Among Young Men Who have Sex with Men in EXPLORE: Implications for Age-Specific Interventions  

PubMed Central

The EXPLORE study evaluated a behavioral intervention to prevent HIV infection among MSM. We examined depressive symptoms, utilization of mental health care, substance use and HIV risk taking behaviors in YMSM aged 16–25 years compared with their older counterparts. YMSM were more likely to report depressive symptoms (OR = 1.55) and less likely to report use of counseling (OR = 0.39) or medication (OR = 0.20) for psychiatric conditions. YMSM were more likely to report heavy alcohol and drug use. YMSM more often reported engaging in unprotected insertive (OR = 1.60) and receptive (OR = 2.07) anal intercourse with presumed HIV-uninfected partners, and unprotected receptive (OR = 1.72) anal intercourse with partners of unknown-HIV status. These findings suggest the need for more appropriate and accessible mental health care and substance use services for YMSM. Additionally, HIV prevention work with this population should provide comprehensive education about HIV testing and risk reduction counseling that focuses on communication about serostatus and safety in sexual situations.

Mimiaga, Matthew J.; Husnik, Marla J.; Welles, Seth L.; Manseau, Marc W.; Montenegro, Arnel B.; Safren, Steven A.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Chesney, Margaret A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

2009-01-01

97

Mental health gets physical.  

PubMed

The physical health of people with severe mental illness is often neglected. Patients are more likely to smoke and have a poor diet, while psychiatric medication is known to affect physical health adversely. Yet these patients are less likely to be offered a physical health check. PMID:24802485

2014-05-13

98

Validation of cross-cultural child mental health and psychosocial research instruments: adapting the Depression Self-Rating Scale and Child PTSD Symptom Scale in Nepal  

PubMed Central

Background The lack of culturally adapted and validated instruments for child mental health and psychosocial support in low and middle-income countries is a barrier to assessing prevalence of mental health problems, evaluating interventions, and determining program cost-effectiveness. Alternative procedures are needed to validate instruments in these settings. Methods Six criteria are proposed to evaluate cross-cultural validity of child mental health instruments: (i) purpose of instrument, (ii) construct measured, (iii) contents of construct, (iv) local idioms employed, (v) structure of response sets, and (vi) comparison with other measurable phenomena. These criteria are applied to transcultural translation and alternative validation for the Depression Self-Rating Scale (DSRS) and Child PTSD Symptom Scale (CPSS) in Nepal, which recently suffered a decade of war including conscription of child soldiers and widespread displacement of youth. Transcultural translation was conducted with Nepali mental health professionals and six focus groups with children (n = 64) aged 11-15 years old. Because of the lack of child mental health professionals in Nepal, a psychosocial counselor performed an alternative validation procedure using psychosocial functioning as a criterion for intervention. The validation sample was 162 children (11-14 years old). The Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (K-SADS) and Global Assessment of Psychosocial Disability (GAPD) were used to derive indication for treatment as the external criterion. Results The instruments displayed moderate to good psychometric properties: DSRS (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.82, sensitivity = 0.71, specificity = 0.81, cutoff score ? 14); CPSS (AUC = 0.77, sensitivity = 0.68, specificity = 0.73, cutoff score ? 20). The DSRS items with significant discriminant validity were "having energy to complete daily activities" (DSRS.7), "feeling that life is not worth living" (DSRS.10), and "feeling lonely" (DSRS.15). The CPSS items with significant discriminant validity were nightmares (CPSS.2), flashbacks (CPSS.3), traumatic amnesia (CPSS.8), feelings of a foreshortened future (CPSS.12), and easily irritated at small matters (CPSS.14). Conclusions Transcultural translation and alternative validation feasibly can be performed in low clinical resource settings through task-shifting the validation process to trained mental health paraprofessionals using structured interviews. This process is helpful to evaluate cost-effectiveness of psychosocial interventions.

2011-01-01

99

Self versus Others' Perception of Youths' Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Data was analyzed in the National Longitudinal Survey Study from 1997 specifically relating to questions regarding depression in youth. In the analysis it was found that how the respondent defined their own depression and poor mental health was different than the perceptions about their mental health from those that live with them in the same…

Viviano, Thomas A.

2010-01-01

100

Mental Health Matters  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Mental Health Matters is a collection of various mental health articles which cover topics such as psychological disorders and treatments for mental illnesses. The site is easy to navigate and users can choose from disorders, symptoms, medications, and treatments. Once a visitor chooses a subfield from the homepage, they are provided with another set of choices which contain more specific information on the various main topics. The site is also designed so that users can search by disorder or category to find the appropriate information to answer their queries.

2007-08-13

101

Association of socioeconomic status in childhood with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder: results from the World Mental Health Japan survey 2002-2006  

PubMed Central

Background Low socioeconomic status (SES) in childhood is known to be a significant risk factor for mental disorders in Western societies. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a similar association exists in Japan. Methods We used data from the World Mental Health Japan Survey conducted from 2002–2006 (weighted N?=?1,682). Respondents completed diagnostic interviews that assessed lifetime prevalence of major depression (MD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Associations between parental education (a proxy of SES in childhood) and lifetime onset of both disorders were estimated and stratified by gender using discrete-time survival analysis. Results Among women, high parental education was positively associated with MD (odds ratio [OR]: 1.81, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.03-3.18) in comparison with low parental education, even after adjustment for age, childhood characteristics, and SES in adulthood. This same effect was not found for men. In contrast, higher parental education was associated with GAD (OR: 6.84, 95% CI: 1.62-28.94) in comparison with low parental education among men, but this association was not found among the women, in the fully adjusted model. Conclusions In Japan, childhood SES is likely to be positively associated with the lifetime onset of mental disorders, regardless of family history of mental disorders, childhood physical illness, or SES in adulthood. Further study is required to replicate the current findings and elucidate the mechanism of the positive association between mental disorders and childhood SES.

2014-01-01

102

The Sociology of Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This handbook describes the ways in which society shapes the mental health of its mem­ bers and further shapes the hves of those who have been identified as mentally ill. The terms mental health and mental illness encompass a broad collection of cognitive, emo­ tional, and behavioral phenomena. Mental illness includes, for example, the experiences of a person who speaks

Carol S. Aneshensel; Jo C. Phelan

103

The Mental Health of Agricultural Workers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The manifestation of stressors and associated coping strategies appears to vary according to whether individuals own or operate\\u000a farms or whether individuals are hired as farm workers. It is apparent that farmers are at risk for the development of stress\\u000a and other mental health difficulties such as anxiety, depression, and suicide.\\u000a \\u000a Almost all of the studies on the mental health

Joseph D. Hovey; Laura D. Seligman

104

Mental Health Economics and Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

As evidenced by the European Commission's recent Mental Health Pact, mental health has moved up the policy agenda in many countries. There is much more attention now on promoting general mental wellbeing in the population, and addressing the needs of people with mental health problems. Particular concerns are: human rights abuses; rebalancing community and institutional care; coordinating action across multiple

Martin Knapp; David McDaid; Jennifer Beecham; Derek King; Roshni Mangalore; A-La Park; Andres Roman; Monique Smith; Cicely Thomas; Fayaz Aziz

2009-01-01

105

Correlates of Child Mental Health and Mental Health Services Use.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This project was designed to present a method of identifying children (ages less than 21) with mental health conditions in the United States and to use those definitions to understand the utilization and expenditure patterns of children with mental health...

M. L. Ganz

2004-01-01

106

The mental health of prisoners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health problems are the most significant cause of morbidity in prisons. Over 90% of prisoners have a mental disorder. The prison environment and the rules and regimes governing daily life inside prison can be seriously detrimental to mental health. Prisoners have received very poor health care and, until recently, the National Health Service (NHS) had no obligations to service

Luke Birmingham

2003-01-01

107

Understanding the Usage of Content in a Mental Health Intervention for Depression: An Analysis of Log Data  

PubMed Central

Background Web-based interventions for the early treatment of depressive symptoms can be considered effective in reducing mental complaints. However, there is a limited understanding of which elements in an intervention contribute to effectiveness. For efficiency and effectiveness of interventions, insight is needed into the use of content and persuasive features. Objective The aims of this study were (1) to illustrate how log data can be used to understand the uptake of the content of a Web-based intervention that is based on the acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and (2) to discover how log data can be of value for improving the incorporation of content in Web-based interventions. Methods Data from 206 participants (out of the 239) who started the first nine lessons of the Web-based intervention, Living to the Full, were used for a secondary analysis of a subset of the log data of the parent study about adherence to the intervention. The log files used in this study were per lesson: login, start mindfulness, download mindfulness, view success story, view feedback message, start multimedia, turn on text-message coach, turn off text-message coach, and view text message. Differences in usage between lessons were explored with repeated measures ANOVAs (analysis of variance). Differences between groups were explored with one-way ANOVAs. To explore the possible predictive value of the login per lesson quartiles on the outcome measures, four linear regressions were used with login quartiles as predictor and with the outcome measures (Center for Epidemiologic Studies—Depression [CES-D] and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale—Anxiety [HADS-A] on post-intervention and follow-up) as dependent variables. Results A significant decrease in logins and in the use of content and persuasive features over time was observed. The usage of features varied significantly during the treatment process. The usage of persuasive features increased during the third part of the ACT (commitment to value-based living), which might indicate that at that stage motivational support was relevant. Higher logins over time (9 weeks) corresponded with a higher usage of features (in most cases significant); when predicting depressive symptoms at post-intervention, the linear regression yielded a significant model with login quartile as a significant predictor (explained variance is 2.7%). Conclusions A better integration of content and persuasive features in the design of the intervention and a better intra-usability of features within the system are needed to identify which combination of features works best for whom. Pattern recognition can be used to tailor the intervention based on usage patterns from the earlier lessons and to support the uptake of content essential for therapy. An adaptable interface for a modular composition of therapy features supposes a dynamic approach for Web-based treatment; not a predefined path for all, but a flexible way to go through all features that have to be used.

2014-01-01

108

Young people with depression and their experience accessing an enhanced primary care service for youth with emerging mental health problems: a qualitative study  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the emergence of mental health problems during adolescence and early adulthood, many young people encounter difficulties accessing appropriate services. In response to this gap, the Australian Government recently established new enhanced primary care services (headspace) that target young people with emerging mental health problems. In this study, we examine the experience of young people with depression accessing one of these services, with a focus on understanding how they access the service and the difficulties they encounter in the process. Method Individual, in-depth, audio-recorded interviews were used to collect data. Twenty-six young people with depression were recruited from a headspace site in Melbourne, Australia. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse the data. Results Four overlapping themes were identified in the data. First, school counsellors as access mediators, highlights the prominent role school counsellors have in facilitating student access to the service. Second, location as an access facilitator and inhibitor. Although the service is accessible by public transport, it is less so to those who do not live near public transport. Third, encountering barriers accessing the service initially. Two main service access barriers were experienced: unfamiliarity with the service, and delays in obtaining initial appointments for ongoing therapy. Finally, the service’s funding model acts as an access facilitator and barrier. While the model provides a low or no cost services initially, it limits the number of funded sessions, and this can be problematic. Conclusions Young people have contrasting experiences accessing the service. School counsellors have an influential role in facilitating access, and its close proximity to public transport enhances access. The service needs to become more prominent in young people’s consciousness, while the appointment system would benefit from providing more timely appointments with therapists. The service’s funding model is important in enabling access initially to young people from low socioeconomic backgrounds, but the government needs to reassess the model for those who require additional support.

2012-01-01

109

Prevalence and Risk Factors for Homelessness and Utilization of Mental Health Services Among 10,340 Patients With Serious Mental Illness in a Large Public Mental Health System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: The authors examined the prevalence of and risk factors for homeless- ness among all patients treated for serious mental illnesses in a large public mental health system in a 1-year period. The use of public mental health services among homeless persons was also examined. Method: The study included 10,340 per- sons treated for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression

David P. Folsom; William Hawthorne; Anne Bailey; Richard Hough; Dilip V. Jeste

2005-01-01

110

Latina Mothers' Perceptions of Mental Health and Mental Health Promotion  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latina mothers' perceptions of mental health and factors that promote/restore mental health were explored in this qualitative study. Participants discussed the importance of community, safety, and financial stability in addition to conventional factors that are related to mental health. Implications for working with urban Latinas and their…

Vera, Elizabeth M.; Conner, Wendy

2007-01-01

111

Cognitive Appraisals of Specialty Mental Health Services and Their Relation to Mental Health Service Utilization in the Rural Population  

PubMed Central

Purpose Rural individuals utilize specialty mental health services (eg, psychiatrists, psychologists, counselors, and social workers) at lower rates than their urban counterparts. This study explores whether cognitive appraisals (ie, individual perceptions of need for services, outcome expectancies, and value of a positive therapeutic outcome) of help-seeking for depression symptoms are related to the utilization of specialty mental health services in a rural sample. Methods Demographic and environmental characteristics, cultural barriers, cognitive appraisals, and depression symptoms were assessed in one model predicting specialty mental health service utilization (MHSU) in a rural sample. Three hypotheses were proposed: (1) a higher number of environmental barriers (eg, lack of insurance or transportation) would predict lower specialty mental health service utilization; (2) an increase in cultural barriers (stigma, stoicism, and lack of anonymity) would predict lower specialty mental health utilization; and (3) higher cognitive appraisals of mental health services would predict specialty mental health care utilization beyond the predictive capacities of psychiatric symptoms, demographic variables, environmental barriers, and cultural barriers. Findings Current depression symptoms significantly predicted lifetime specialty mental health service utilization. Hypotheses 1 and 2 were not supported: more environmental barriers predicted higher levels of specialty MHSU while cultural barriers did not predict specialty mental health service utilization. Hypothesis 3 was supported: cognitive appraisals significantly predicted specialty mental health service utilization. Conclusions It will be important to target perceptions and attitudes about mental health services to reduce disparities in specialty MHSU for the rural population.

Deen, Tisha L.; Bridges, Ana J.; McGahan, Tara C.; Andrews, Arthur R.

2014-01-01

112

Mental Health Frequently Asked Questions  

MedlinePLUS

... of the scarcity of mental health care providers, primary care doctors, who may not be adequately prepared in ... integration of mental, or rather, behavioral health and primary care services, for rural areas. It is assumed that ...

113

Dystonia: Emotional and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... Resources Frequently Asked Questions Faces of Dystonia Emotional & Mental Health Although dystonia is a movement disorder that impacts ... emotion as well as muscle movement. For years, mental health professionals have recognized that coping with a chronic ...

114

Media and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Outlines some of the main issues and areas of debate at the first international Congress on Audio-Visual Communication and Mental Health, which was held in Helsinki in June 1983. The issues discussed include the connection between violent actions and violence on television and censorship. The declared congress objectives are listed. (Author/MBR)

Bruce, David

1983-01-01

115

Mental Health Occupational Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article briefly reviews the history of ideas and practice in psychosocial occupational therapy. It then reports the results of two studies which examined present-day perspectives as reflected in occupational therapy literature and the actural practices of psychosocial therapists. The first study was based on a review of mental health-related articles in AJOT and OTMH; the second represented secondary analyses

Gary Kielhofner; Roann Barris

1984-01-01

116

Multidisciplinary Mental Health Teams  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study surveyed current practice amongst 91 Indian and Australian staff working within multidisciplinary mental health teams, looking at leadership skills, conflict resolution and therapeutic abilities. Length of training was asso ciated with management skills, though these skills were more developed by psychiatric nurses and occupational therapists working in community settings. Hospital settings involved less consensual decision-making than community teams.

Mike Slade; Alan Rosen; Radha Shankar

1995-01-01

117

Selected Mental Health Audiovisuals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented are approximately 2,300 abstracts on audio-visual Materials--films, filmstrips, audiotapes, and videotapes--related to mental health. Each citation includes material title; name, address, and phone number of film distributor; rental and purchase prices; technical information; and a description of the contents. Abstracts are listed in…

National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

118

Mental health characteristics of sexual minority veterans.  

PubMed

This study examines the mental health characteristics of sexual minority (lesbian, gay, and bisexual, or LGB) veterans, compared these characteristics to those of an existing Veterans Affairs (VA) sample, and examined the relationship between mental health and anxiety around concealment of LGB identity while in the military. Data regarding LGB veterans' (n = 409) military experiences and current mental health were collected via an online survey; comparison data (n = 15,000) were retrieved from a VA data warehouse. LGB veterans were more likely to screen positive for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and alcohol problems than the comparison sample. Anxiety around concealment of one's sexual orientation while in the service was related to current depression and PTSD symptoms. PMID:23414280

Cochran, Bryan N; Balsam, Kimberly; Flentje, Annesa; Malte, Carol A; Simpson, Tracy

2013-01-01

119

Correlates of Mental Health among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina  

PubMed Central

Latino farmworkers are a vulnerable population who confront multiple threats to their mental health. Informed by the stress-process model of psychiatric disorder, the goal of this paper is to determine personal and situational correlates of poor mental health among Latino farmworkers. Structured interview data were obtained from farmworkers (N=69) in six counties in eastern and western North Carolina. Results indicated that a substantial number of farmworkers have poor mental health, as indicated by elevated depressive symptoms (52.2%) and anxiety (16.4%). Results also indicated that each mental health outcome had different predictors. Addressing the mental health issues of farmworkers requires a comprehensive, multifaceted approach.

Crain, Rebecca; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Schwantes, Melody; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2013-01-01

120

School Mental Health Resources and Adolescent Mental Health Service Use  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Although schools are identified as critical for detecting youth mental disorders, little is known about whether the number of mental health providers and types of resources that they offer influence student mental health service use. Such information could inform the development and allocation of appropriate school-based resources to…

Green, Jennifer Greif; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Alegria, Margarita; Costello, E. Jane; Gruber, Michael J.; Hoagwood, Kimberly; Leaf, Philip J.; Olin, Serene; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kessler, Ronald C.

2013-01-01

121

Mental Health and Stress  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project collects resources for studying mental health and stress issues with middle schoolers. Teens and stress Science NetLinks: The Laughing Brain 2: A Good Laugh Dealing with anger Stress-o-meter Look at each of the above sites. Choose one and read the content. Write a one-paragraph summary. Play interactive games and take quizzes. Keep a log of what you do. Tell which site you liked best and why. ...

Falconer, Mrs.

2007-03-18

122

Mental health and functioning of children of low-income depressed mothers: Influences of parenting, family environment, and raters  

PubMed Central

Purpose To extend understanding of the effects of maternal depression on children to low-income and minority families; to apply advanced analytic methods to incorporate the reports of mothers, fathers, and teachers on the emotional and behavior problems and adaptive skills of 4–10 year old urban children; and to examine parenting quality and family environment as possible explanations of high rates of problems among children whose mothers have depression compared to those whose mothers are not depressed. Methods Mothers who participated either had major depressive disorder (n=84) or did not (n=49). They were predominantly African-American or Latino and lived in low-income, urban communities. Mothers, fathers, and teachers reported on children’s emotional, behavioral and adaptive functioning. Parenting behavior and family stress were examined as potential mediators and generalized estimating equations (GEE) were employed to test mediation and to account for discrepancies in reports by different raters. Results By mother, father and teacher reports, children of depressed mothers had significantly poorer adaptive skills than children of sociodemographically-similar non-depressed mothers; and they had more emotional/behavior problems according to mothers and fathers. The quality of mothers’ parenting mediated these associations, but quality of the family environment did not. Conclusions This study extends the literature on the effects of maternal depression to low-income, minority families, and demonstrates that mothers, fathers and teachers observe worse functioning in children of depressed mothers than those of non-depressed mothers, although their perspectives vary somewhat. The impact of maternal depression suggests the importance of developing and funding services to address the needs of affected families.

Riley, Anne W.; Coiro, Mary Jo; Broitman, Marina; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Hurley, Kristen; Colantuoni, Elizabeth; Miranda, Jeanne

2013-01-01

123

Mental Health, United States, 1987.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document presents timely statistical information on the nation's organized mental health service delivery system. Included are: (1) "Chronic Mental Disorder in the United States" (Howard H. Goldman and Ronald W. Manderscheid); (2) "Specialty Mental Health System Characteristics" (Michael J. Witkin, Joanne E. Atay, Adele S. Fell, and Ronald W.…

National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

124

The Need for Mental Health Promotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the concept and evidence for mental health promotion, within an understanding of mental health and mental illness and their determinants.Method: Aselective review of literature and opinion in the fields of public health and mental health.Results: Mental health and mental illness are often given a low priority, despite growing evidence of the burden of disease and costs to

Helen Herrman

2001-01-01

125

Mental Health Among Farmworkers in the Eastern United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Farmworker mental health research is sparse, particularly in the eastern United States. Nevertheless, available evidence suggests\\u000a that 20–50% of farmworkers have poor mental health as indicated by elevated symptoms of depression or anxiety, frequent heavy\\u000a alcohol consumption, or recent experiences of lay-defined illnesses like susto or nervios. Farmworkers’ poor mental health\\u000a likely results from a variety of structural and social

Joseph G. Grzywacz

126

[Epidemiology of mental health care].  

PubMed

Mental health care epidemiology seeks to investigate the practical situation of the health care system and services for individuals with mental disorders. In the past decades, mental health care structures in Germany were successively transformed from long-term inpatient treatment capacities to decentralized outpatient and day clinic services. Currently, the proportional relation between treatment facilities in different settings has been stabilized and the strategy of mental health care development focuses on innovative and integrative models of care provision. The aim is to integrate fragmented services by the introduction of network structures to overcome rigid sector boundaries. The need for health care services is associated with multiple factors such as population-based epidemiological data, usage behavior, and health politics. Due to scarce data and poor standards of care it is difficult to determine if current structures of mental health services cover the actual needs. Therefore, a substantial increase of mental health service research is needed. PMID:22371103

Jäger, M; Rössler, W

2012-03-01

127

Psychosocial Features Associated with Lifetime Comorbidity of Major Depression and Anxiety Disorders Among a Community Sample of Mid-Life Women: The SWAN Mental Health Study  

PubMed Central

Background In clinical samples, comorbidity between depressive and anxiety disorders is associated with greater symptom severity and elevated suicide risk. Less is known, however, regarding the long-term psychosocial impact that a lifetime history of both MDD and one or more anxiety disorders has in community samples. This report evaluates clinical, psychological, social, and stress-related characteristics associated with a lifetime history of MDD and anxiety. Methods Data from 915 women aged 42–52 who were recruited as part of the the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation Mental Health Study were used to examine clinical and psychosocial features across groups of women with a SCID-diagnosed lifetime history of MDD alone, anxiety alone, both MDD and anxiety, or neither MDD nor anxiety. Results As compared with women with a history of either MDD or anxiety alone, women with a comorbid history were more likely to report recurrent MDD, multiple and more severe lifetime anxiety disorders, greater depressive and anxiety symptoms, diminished social support, and more past-year distressing life events. Exploratory analyses indicated that women with a comorbid history also report more childhood abuse/neglect and diminished self-esteem, as compared with women with a history of either disorder alone. Conclusions Midlife women with a comorbid history that includes both MDD and anxiety disorders report diminished social support, more symptomatic distress, and a more severe and recurrent psychiatric history. Future research is needed to clarify the biological and psychosocial risk factors associated with this comorobid profile, and to develop targeted interventions for this at-risk group.

Cyranowski, Jill M.; Schott, Laura L.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Brown, Charlotte; Thurston, Rebecca C.; Joffe, Hadine; Matthews, Karen A.; Bromberger, Joyce T.

2013-01-01

128

Mental Health, United States, 1992.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Data presented in the fifth edition of 'Mental Health, United States' derive principally from national surveys. For the first time, the volume includes a chapter that highlights the characteristics of seriously mentally ill persons in the household popula...

R. W. Manderscheid M. A. Sonnenschein

1992-01-01

129

Disasters and Mental Health Research  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... or natural disasters such as hurricanes, are at risk of developing mental health issues. Dr. Sandro Galea : But we also know that people who are isolated- socially isolated- are at great risk of mental illness after these events. We know ...

130

The importance of functional impairment to mental health outcomes: A case for reassessing our goals in depression treatment research  

PubMed Central

Outcomes in depression treatment research include both changes in symptom severity and functional impairment. Symptom measures tend to be the standard outcome but we argue that there are benefits to considering functional outcomes. An exhaustive literature review shows that the relationship between symptoms and functioning remains unexpectedly weak and often bidirectional. Changes in functioning often lag symptom changes. As a result, functional outcomes might offer depression researchers more critical feedback and better guidance when studying depression treatment outcomes. The paper presents a case for the necessity of both functional and symptom outcomes in depression treatment research by addressing three aims–1) review the research relating symptoms and functioning, 2) provide a rationale for measuring both outcomes, and 3) discuss potential artifacts in measuring functional outcomes. The three aims are supported by an empirical review of the treatment outcome and epidemiological literatures.

McKnight, Patrick E.; Kashdan, Todd B.

2009-01-01

131

UCSD researchers study of E-cigarettes and mental health  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that people living with depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions are twice as likely to have tried e-cigarettes and three times as likely to be current users of the controversial battery-powered nicotine-delivery devices, as people without mental health disorders.

132

Mental Health and Education Decisions. CEE DP 136  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental health problems--and depression in particular--have been rising internationally. The link between poor mental health and poor educational outcomes is particularly interesting in the case of the UK which has a low international ranking both on measures of child wellbeing and the probability of early drop-out from the labour market and…

Cornaglia, Francesca; Crivellaro, Elena; McNally, Sandra

2012-01-01

133

Mental health of female survivors of human trafficking in Nepal  

Microsoft Academic Search

Little is known about the mental health status of trafficked women, even though international conventions require that it be considered. This study, therefore, aims at exploring the mental health status, including anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), of female survivors of human trafficking who are currently supported by local non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in Katmandu, the capital of Nepal, through

Atsuro Tsutsumi; Takashi Izutsu; Amod K. Poudyal; Seika Kato; Eiji Marui

2008-01-01

134

WAR & Military Mental Health  

PubMed Central

Involvement in warfare can have dramatic consequences for the mental health and well-being of military personnel. During the 20th century, US military psychiatrists tried to deal with these consequences while contributing to the military goal of preserving manpower and reducing the debilitating impact of psychiatric syndromes by implementing screening programs to detect factors that predispose individuals to mental disorders, providing early intervention strategies for acute war-related syndromes, and treating long-term psychiatric disability after deployment. The success of screening has proven disappointing, the effects of treatment near the front lines are unclear, and the results of treatment for chronic postwar syndromes are mixed. After the Persian Gulf War, a number of military physicians made innovative proposals for a population-based approach, anchored in primary care instead of specialty-based care. This approach appears to hold the most promise for the future.

Pols, Hans; Oak, Stephanie

2007-01-01

135

Have Broad-Based Community and Professional Education Programs Influenced Mental Health Literacy and Treatment Seeking of those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Mental health literacy" is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid in their recognition, management, or prevention; it is also a determinant of help seeking. As such, it is presumed to be important in community suicide prevention programs. In Australia there have been a number of government, professional, and charitable…

Goldney, Robert D.; Fisher, Laura J.

2008-01-01

136

Mental health literacy among residents in Shanghai  

PubMed Central

Background The recent adoption of China's new national mental health law provides a good opportunity to obtain baseline information about community mental health literacy in the country. Aim Assess knowledge and attitudes about mental disorders among residents in Shanghai. Methods A total of 1953 residents aged 15 or above selected from all 19 districts in Shanghai completed two self-report questionnaires – the Mental Health Knowledge Questionnaire (MHKQ) and the Case Assessment Questionnaire (CAQ). MHKQ total scores range from 0 to 20 (higher scores indicate better mental health literacy). The CAQ presents respondents with five case vignettes and possesses nine questions after each vignette measuring respondents' knowledge and attitudes towards these mental illnesses. Results Correct response rates for the 20 MHKQ items ranged from 26 to 98%, with a mean rate of 72%. The internal consistency (alpha) of the 20 items on the MHKQ was 0.69, but this decreased to 0.59 after removing four items about mental health promotion. A 5-factor model for the 20 items in the MHKQ was identified using exploratory factor analysis on one-half of the surveys, but the model was only partially validated in the confirmatory factor analysis using the second half of the surveys. On the CAQ, rates of correct recognition of mania, depression, schizophrenia with positive symptoms, schizophrenia with negative symptoms and anxiety were 42%, 35%, 30%, 19% and 21%, respectively. Work stress (37.3%), problems with thinking (30.0%) and negative life events (24.4%) were reported to be the three main causes of mental disorders. Seeing a counselor (34.2%) or a psychiatrist (33.3%) were the two most common suggestions for help-seeking. Higher education and younger age were related with better mental health literacy and higher rates of recognition of common mental disorders. Conclusions Mental health literacy in Shanghai appears to be increasing, but the reliability and validity of the instruments used to assess mental health literacy (MHKQ and CAQ) have not been adequately assessed so this result must be considered preliminary. Further work, preferably including both qualitative and quantitative components, is needed to revise these instruments before they can be used to assess the effectiveness of mental health promotion campaigns.

Wang, Jingyi; He, Yanling; Jiang, Qing; Cai, Jun; Wang, Weiling; Zeng, Qingzhi; Miao, Juming; Qi, Xuejun; Chen, Jianxin; Bian, Qian; Cai, Chun; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Ziqing; Zhang, Mingyuan

2013-01-01

137

Perspectives: A Mental Health Magazine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Perspectives, provided by Mental Health Net, is a quarterly online magazine devoted to mental health. It features short (usually less than 2,000 word) articles about all aspects of its topic. The Vol. 1, No. 4 issue contains articles on Prozac, loneliness, and managed care, among others. It also includes a regular column on "Being Human." Archives are available at the site, as are submission guidelines. Mental Health Net is a well known "comprehensive guide to mental health online," with pointers to resources in the field, arranged by topic and resource type.

1996-01-01

138

Mental Health of Indian Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Children constitute nearly 40% of India's population, a significant portion of whom suffer mental ailments. Ways to sensitize those who work with children to various aspects associated with child mental health are explored in this book. The focus is not on mental handicap but on the internal or external distress which warps the psychosocial…

Kapur, Malavika

139

Community perceptions of mental health needs in an underserved minority neighborhood.  

PubMed

Accurate information is needed to facilitate health equity in underserved communities. This community-based participatory study asked residents about the meaning of mental health, their perceptions of community mental health needs, barriers to accessing mental health care, and acceptability of mental health services that are integrated in primary health clinics. Forty-five primarily African-American residents from urban communities participated in focus groups. Findings revealed high prevalence of substance abuse, depression, crime, and stigma about mental illness, with multiple access barriers. Participants were receptive to mental health care integrated in primary care, if others did not know they were receiving mental health care. PMID:18979331

Roberts, Kay T; Robinson, Karen M; Topp, Robert; Newman, Jamie; Smith, Felicia; Stewart, Christopher

2008-01-01

140

Associations between maternal mental health and child emotional and behavioral problems: does prenatal mental health matter?  

PubMed

This study examined associations between elevated symptoms of prenatal depression or anxiety and offspring emotional and behavioral problems during mid to late childhood taking into account the impact of later maternal mental health symptoms. The sample consisted of 2,891 women and their children (49 % male) from a prospective, community-based study, the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Women completed measures of depressive (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) and anxious (Crown Crisp Experiential Index) symptoms at regular intervals beginning in pregnancy. Mothers and teachers assessed offspring emotional and behavioral problems using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire when children were 10-11 years old. Multivariable regression models were fit to address study hypotheses. Exposure to elevated symptoms of maternal depression during pregnancy was associated with increased total offspring emotional and behavioral problems, even after controlling for later maternal mental health problems and a range of sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics, according to mothers' but not teachers' reports. Similarly, children exposed to elevated symptoms of maternal anxiety during pregnancy were reported to have increased total emotional and behavioral problems by mothers but not by teachers. We found support for modest associations between elevated symptoms of maternal depression and anxiety during the prenatal period and certain domains of offspring emotional and behavioral problems in mid to late childhood above and beyond the impact of later maternal mental health problems. These findings highlight the need for additional clinical and research attention to the prenatal period and to both maternal depression and anxiety. PMID:23748337

Leis, Julie A; Heron, Jon; Stuart, Elizabeth A; Mendelson, Tamar

2014-01-01

141

The Mental Health of Young People in Australia: Key Findings from the Child and Adolescent Component of the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To identify the prevalence of three mental disorders (Depressive Disorder, Conduct Disorder and Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder), the prevalence of mental health problems, the health-related quality of life of those with problems, and patterns of service utilisation of those with and without mental health problems, among 4–17-year-olds in Australia. To identify rates of health-risk behaviours among adolescents with mental health problems.Method:

M. G Sawyer; F. M. Arney; P. A. Baghurst; J. J. Clark; B. W. Graetz; R. J. Kosky; B Nurcombe; G. C. Patton; M. R. Prior; B Raphael; J. M. Rey; L. C Whaites; S. R Zubrick

2001-01-01

142

Hospitalized mental health patients and oral health.  

PubMed

The purpose of this review of the literature is to present a contemporary perspective related to the nursing care of hospitalized mental health patients who have risk of developing oral health issues. Mental illness is a major health concern worldwide. Compounding this health issue, mental health patients/clients demonstrate avoidant behaviours related to oral health, and the symptoms of mental illness can be a compounding factor. Oral health and oral inflammatory disease are the result of lifestyle and behaviour and mental disorders affect both lifestyle and behaviour. The search used the search terms oral health AND nursing AND mental illness AND Published Date 2005 to 2010. For those who experience mental illness oral health assessment is not routinely practised by clinicians. The importance of special attention to dental problems for people with mental disorders has also been stressed by researchers since the lifespan of people with serious mental disorders is shortened compared to the general population. Oral health care is an important part of treatment. Routine oral care for hospitalized patients is imperative, and this is usually the responsibility of nurses without sufficient knowledge in oral care or comprehensive protocols to follow. PMID:22070464

Edward, K-L; Felstead, B; Mahoney, A-M

2012-06-01

143

Psychedelics and Mental Health: A Population Study  

PubMed Central

Background The classical serotonergic psychedelics LSD, psilocybin, mescaline are not known to cause brain damage and are regarded as non-addictive. Clinical studies do not suggest that psychedelics cause long-term mental health problems. Psychedelics have been used in the Americas for thousands of years. Over 30 million people currently living in the US have used LSD, psilocybin, or mescaline. Objective To evaluate the association between the lifetime use of psychedelics and current mental health in the adult population. Method Data drawn from years 2001 to 2004 of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health consisted of 130,152 respondents, randomly selected to be representative of the adult population in the United States. Standardized screening measures for past year mental health included serious psychological distress (K6 scale), mental health treatment (inpatient, outpatient, medication, needed but did not receive), symptoms of eight psychiatric disorders (panic disorder, major depressive episode, mania, social phobia, general anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, posttraumatic stress disorder, and non-affective psychosis), and seven specific symptoms of non-affective psychosis. We calculated weighted odds ratios by multivariate logistic regression controlling for a range of sociodemographic variables, use of illicit drugs, risk taking behavior, and exposure to traumatic events. Results 21,967 respondents (13.4% weighted) reported lifetime psychedelic use. There were no significant associations between lifetime use of any psychedelics, lifetime use of specific psychedelics (LSD, psilocybin, mescaline, peyote), or past year use of LSD and increased rate of any of the mental health outcomes. Rather, in several cases psychedelic use was associated with lower rate of mental health problems. Conclusion We did not find use of psychedelics to be an independent risk factor for mental health problems.

Krebs, Teri S.; Johansen, Pal-?rjan

2013-01-01

144

National Institute of Mental Health: Publications  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

For people who are living with a mental health condition, it can be most helpful to have access to high-quality and authoritative information. The National Institute of Mental Health provides such information on the publications area of their website, and visitors can make their way through fact sheets, booklets, and Spanish-language versions of these documents here. The topical fact sheets are quite good, and they include titles such as "Suicide in the U.S.: Statistics and Prevention" and "Depression: A Treatable Illness". Moving on, the "Booklets" area includes "Eating Disorders", "Depression", and ten other offerings. Finally, the right-hand side of the site includes news about recent research findings from the Institute.

145

Mental Health Problems and Symptoms among Male Adolescents Attending a Teen Health Clinic.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examined the frequency and nature of mental health problems and symptoms among a group of 51 inner city male adolescents attending a teen health clinic. Results indicated participants experienced significant mental health problems and symptoms, such as relationship problems, problems with time and money, and symptoms of anger, depression, and…

Smith, Peggy B.; Buzi, Ruth S.; Weinman, Maxine L.

2001-01-01

146

Tips for Mental Health Interpretation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper offers tips for working with interpreters in mental health settings. These tips include: (1) Using trained interpreters, not bilingual staff or community members; (2) Explaining "interpreting procedures" to the providers and clients; (3) Addressing the stigma associated with mental health that may influence interpreters; (4) Defining…

Whitsett, Margaret

2008-01-01

147

International Collaboration in Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented in five parts on research, services, training, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are 31 reports of mental health studies and programs supported by the U.S. and other countries. Explained in the introduction are reasons the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has supported international collaboration. The following are among subjects…

Brown, Bertram S., Ed.; Torrey, E. Fuller, Ed.

148

Mental Health Screening in Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: This article discusses the importance of screening students in schools for emotional/behavioral problems. Methods: Elements relevant to planning and implementing effective mental health screening in schools are considered. Screening in schools is linked to a broader national agenda to improve the mental health of children and…

Weist, Mark D.; Rubin, Marcia; Moore, Elizabeth; Adelsheim, Steven; Wrobel, Gordon

2007-01-01

149

Occupational Therapy in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have identified a low preference for mental health careers among students and practitioners in occupational therapy. Factors implicated include the social stigma of mental health in the community, fieldwork experience, academic preparation, and work setting factors such as role ambiguity and chronicity of clients. Of these factors, fieldwork may be the most important influence. A survey was administered

Anne Cusick; Tracey Demattia; Sharon Doyle

1993-01-01

150

Clinical Placement in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recruitment of students in health professions into the area of mental health has been shown to be influenced by their attitudes towards the area, with such attitudes possibly shaped in the same way as many of the attitudes towards mental illness are by the general community. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of occupational therapy

Jillian Gilbert; Jenny Strong

2000-01-01

151

Sensory Integration in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lorna Jean King is interviewed concerning the present status of sensory integration as a treatment modality in the area of mental health. Topics covered are: use of sensory integration techniques with adults and adolescents in both chronic and acute mental health settings; goals and expected outcomes of using sensory integration techniques; cost-effectiveness of these techniques; differences between occupational therapy and

Barbara W. Posthuma

1983-01-01

152

Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

... Teens > Mind > Mental Health > Finding Low-Cost Mental Health Care Print A A A Text Size What's in ... if you're concerned about paying for mental health care. Lots of people need help and worry that ...

153

Addressing the mental health needs of pregnant and parenting adolescents.  

PubMed

Adolescent parenthood is associated with a range of adverse outcomes for young mothers, including mental health problems such as depression, substance abuse, and posttraumatic stress disorder. Teen mothers are also more likely to be impoverished and reside in communities and families that are socially and economically disadvantaged. These circumstances can adversely affect maternal mental health, parenting, and behavior outcomes for their children. In this report, we provide an overview of the mental health challenges associated with teen parenthood, barriers that often prevent teen mothers from seeking mental health services, and interventions for this vulnerable population that can be integrated into primary care services. Pediatricians in the primary care setting are in a unique position to address the mental health needs of adolescent parents because teens often turn to them first for assistance with emotional and behavioral concerns. Consequently, pediatricians can play a pivotal role in facilitating and encouraging teen parents' engagement in mental health treatment. PMID:24298010

Hodgkinson, Stacy; Beers, Lee; Southammakosane, Cathy; Lewin, Amy

2014-01-01

154

Social and mental health needs of the aged  

Microsoft Academic Search

Argues that in the 1980s, an increase in life expectancy of older adults will have a significant impact on the cultural, social, economic, and political life of the country. As the 75+ yr old population increases, the need for comprehensive, community-based care for those persons will increase. Mental and physical health problems confronting the elderly include depression, mental disorder or

Lennie-Marie Tolliver

1983-01-01

155

Economic Stress and Mental Health  

PubMed Central

This paper correlates economic stress with minority status, resource allocations for mental health programs, and vulnerability to mental disability. Several hypotheses are advanced: 1. A major and recurring psychological pattern of the American national character is prowhite, antiblack paranoia. 2. Mental health fiscal allocations and programmatic determinations in ghetto, lower socioeconomic, minority-populated urban areas are predicated on political and racist considerations, the underlying motivation being to keep minorities at greater risk of mental disability. 3. Economic privation and stress increase vulnerability to mental illness, especially in a minority population for whom health, mental health, educational, and social services are grossly inadequate. 4. Poverty and economic stress combine with health systems that are unresponsive to the needs of blacks and other minorities, resulting in the perpetuation of disabilities and other conditions in blacks that are potentially preventable. 5. Health and mental health resources should be increased rather than diminished during periods of economic stress, especially in the public sector. 6. In order to provide each citizen with access to quality health and mental health care regardless of race and/or economic status, there must be enacted a national health insurance program based on tax-levy monies that will cover all aspects of health and mental health care. 7. Racism and social status will continue to be powerful determinants of the quality of service that white professionals render to black patients and to poor white patients, unless our training institutions mount a massive campaign to train appropriately and to include significant numbers of minority candidates and trainees in the effort. To date this effort is virtually nonexistent.

Butts, Hugh F.

1979-01-01

156

Mental Health Among Israeli Homosexual Adolescents and Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examines the mental health status of Israeli homosexuals in adolescence and early adulthood in comparison to heterosexual controls. We compared 219 homosexuals (136 gay men and 83 lesbian women) with 219 individually matched heterosexuals on indices of depression and subjective well being. In line with the study hypothesis, the results indicated that the homosexual participants reported more depressive

Geva Shenkman; Dov Shmotkin

2010-01-01

157

Exercise can seriously improve your mental health: Fact or fiction?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The World Health Organization predicts that depression will create the second greatest burden of disease by 2020, requiring cost-effective prevention and intervention strategies. The evidence to support the benefits of exercise in offering protection from depression and as an intervention in the treatment of mental illness is growing. The literature is reviewed with 11 prospective longitudinal studies that include measures

Marie E. Donaghy

2007-01-01

158

Metal music and mental health in France.  

PubMed

Although numerous authors have associated metal music with social problems such as suicide, self-destruction and Satanism, few studies have been undertaken to examine the mental health of fans of heavy metal music. This study attempts to determine if there is a link between mental health and the enjoyment of this type of music in France. The researchers surveyed 333 fans of metal music. Their mental health was evaluated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), a widely used instrument that measures anxiety and depression. The scores of the sample of metal music fans were then compared to the scores that reveal possible, probable, or severe mental disorders. Qualifying variables included age, gender, status, education, motivation and participation in metal music culture. The results indicated that fans of metal music are mainly young adults (median age = 22.67, SD = 5.29) and tend to be male (87.85 percent). As a whole, metal music fans have levels of anxiety and depression that are similar to and lower than levels in the general population. Specifically, <5 percent of metal music fans surveyed showed pathological symptoms. Subjects that scored higher levels of anxiety and depression were those that had literary and/or arts backgrounds rather than scientific backgrounds, that wrote metal music lyrics, that consumed alcohol and that engaged in the body modification practice of scarification. This study suggests that opponents of metal music should re-examine the basis for their criticism. More scholarly research is needed to better understand the effects of metal music on fans and on society. PMID:19521752

Recours, Robin; Aussaguel, François; Trujillo, Nick

2009-09-01

159

A review of domestic violence and women's mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  \\u000a Domestic violence is a major public health problem throughout the world. Domestic violence against women is perpetrated by\\u000a intimate male partners on family members, and may give rise to both physical and mental health sequelae. Mental health consequences\\u000a include depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, borderline personality disorder, dissociative disorder, somatization,\\u000a and self-harm behaviours. Psychiatrists may be called upon to

D. E. Stewart; G. Erlick Robinson

1998-01-01

160

Employer Attitudes Towards Accommodations in Mental Health Disability  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a It has been almost a decade since the World Health Organization brought to light the impact of mental health disorders worldwide\\u000a (WHO, 2001). The report states that mental health disorders are one of the ten leading causes of disability and account for\\u000a 10.5% of the global burden of all illness (Standing Senate committe, 2004). Moreover, depression alone constitutes the second

Izabela Z. Schultz; Ruth A. Milner; Douglas B. Hanson; Alanna Winter

161

The Mental Health of 13-17 Year-Olds in Australia: Findings from the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The prevalence of 3 mental disorders (Depressive Disorder, Conduct Disorder and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder), the prevalence of mental health problems, and rates of health-risk behaviours among those with problems, along with patterns of service utilisation, are reported for 1490 adolescents aged 13-17 years in Australia. Mental

Sawyer, M. G.; Miller-Lewis, L. R.; Clark, J. J.

2007-01-01

162

Global mental health: Global strengths and strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global mental health challenges sit at the frontiers of health care worldwide. The frequency of mental health disorders is increasing, and represents a large portion of the global burden of human disease (DALYs). There are many impeding forces in delivering mental health care globally. The knowledge of what mental health and its diseased states are limits the ability to seek

Melvin G. McInnis; Sofia D. Merajver

2011-01-01

163

Changing Roles of Mental Health Professionals.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The roles that mental health professionals must play to facilitate the prevention of mental illness and the introduction of mentally healthy attitudes in our society is discussed. Mental health professionals must re-examine the meaning of mental health in the context of the current world situation and ask themselves to what extent they are…

Garai, Josef E.

164

Developing Iraq's mental health policy.  

PubMed

As Iraq faces the challenge of securing a sustainable resolution to the current violence, the burden of mental illness is likely to increase dramatically. The impact of Saddam Hussein's dictatorship, the Iran-Iraq war, U.S.-led economic sanctions, the Persian Gulf wars, and the U.S. invasion and subsequent violent insurgency have devastated Iraq's governmental and social infrastructure. Health care delivery across sectors has suffered greatly. During the reconstruction phase, the United States and coalition forces allocated resources to restructure Iraq's health care system. Many multinational organizations, governments, and policy makers had the political will as well as the financial and human resources to greatly influence Iraq's mental health program. However, the lack of an existing mental health plan stifled these efforts. Applying Kingdon's model for policy development, which includes political analysis, problem defining, and proposal drafting, the authors describe the development of Iraq's current mental health policy. PMID:17914016

Hamid, Hamada I; Everett, Anita

2007-10-01

165

The National Mental Health Association  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As it approaches its 100th anniversary in 2009, the National Mental Health Association (NMHA) remains the countryâÂÂs oldest and largest nonprofit organization that deals with all aspects of mental health and mental illness. First-time users of their site will find that their homepage contains copious amounts of material related to their advocacy efforts, along with materials that deal with helping a loved one who may be suffering the effects of mental illness. The âÂÂNeed Info?â area is a good place to start for these types of materials, as it provides access to information on treatment resources, support groups, and fact sheets. Visitors can also elect to sign up for one (or several) of their helpful email updates, which include work on related legislation, and mental health news coverage.

2006-01-01

166

Screening Mental Health Problems in Schools. A Center Policy Issues Analysis Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Long-standing policy controversies have heated up as a result of increasing proposals for using schools to screen for mental health problems (e.g., depression screening). This brief highlights the following issues: (1) How appropriate is large-scale screening for mental health problems? (2) Will the costs of large-scale mental health screening…

Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2007

2007-01-01

167

Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. METHODS: The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional,

Kathleen M Griffiths; Helen Christensen; Anthony F Jorm

2009-01-01

168

Promoting mental health in small-medium enterprises: An evaluation of the \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Workplace mental health promotion (WMHP) aims to prevent and effectively manage the social and economic costs of common mental illnesses such as depression. The mental health of managers and employees within small-medium enterprises (SMEs) is a neglected sector in occupational health research and practice, despite the fact that this sector is the most common work setting in most economies.

Angela Martin; Kristy Sanderson; Jenn Scott; Paula Brough

2009-01-01

169

Alcohol Research and Health, Volume 26, Number 2, 2002. Alcohol and Comorbid Mental Health Disorders.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Alcohol use disorders frequently occur in tandem with mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety disorder, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, tobacco dependence, and even pathological gambling. Co-occurring disorders may be present in adolescence,...

2002-01-01

170

Quality assessment in mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discusses assessment studies related to quality of care in the mental health field. Quality assessment involves defining quality of care, choosing an appropriate focus of quality-of-care studies, identifying applicable and feasible methods, and guaranteeing the reliability and validity of the data used in the assessment. It is concluded that (a) dogmatic statements about methods to assess the quality of mental

Robert H. Brook; Caren J. Kamberg; Kathleen N. Lohr

1982-01-01

171

Facts About: College Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Facts about college mental health are presented in response to frequently asked questions. Areas of concern include common conditions interfering with student effectiveness, why students seek help and where they can get it, the frequency of severe mental illness in college students, the suicide problem, the limitations of nonprofessional help, the…

National Inst. of Mental Health (DHEW), Rockville, MD.

172

[Impact of disasters on the mental health].  

PubMed

The study on the impact of disasters on the mental health is a relatively recent research field. Despite this, there are a significant number of studies showing the epidemiological data of the psychiatric pathology present in survivors and those affected by disasters This review attempts to summarize current knowledge and give an integrated vision of the effects of the disasters on the mental health, either natural or manmade disasters, as well as identify the effects prevalence and differences in each type of disaster. Post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation or suicide attempts are some of the pathologies observed in people affected by disasters and with an ineffective adaptation, jointly with an increase in the consumption of toxic substances, generating an additional public health problem within another problem. The consequences will be different depending on the type of population and its cultural pattern, sex and gender of the affected people and type of disasters. PMID:24547635

Cernuda Martínez, José Antonio; Arcos González, Pedro; Castro Delgado, Rafael

2013-12-01

173

Review of mental-health-related stigma in Japan.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to understand the nature and characteristics of mental-health-related stigma among Japanese people. We searched relevant studies in English or Japanese published since 2001 using MEDLINE and PsycINFO, and found 19 studies that examined mental-health-related stigma in Japan. Regarding knowledge about mental illness, reviewed studies showed that in the Japanese general population, few people think that people can recover from mental disorders. Psychosocial factors, including weakness of personality, are often considered the cause of mental illness, rather than biological factors. In addition, the majority of the general public in Japan keep a greater social distance from individuals with mental illness, especially in close personal relationships. Schizophrenia is more stigmatized than depression, and its severity increases the stigmatizing attitude toward mental illness. The literature also showed an association between more direct social contact between health professionals and individuals with mental illness and less stigmatization by these professionals. Less stigmatization by mental health professionals may be associated with accumulation of clinical experience and daily contact with people who have mental illness. Stigmatizing attitudes in Japan are stronger than in Taiwan or Australia, possibly due to institutionalism, lack of national campaigns to tackle stigma, and/or society's valuing of conformity in Japan. Although educational programs appear to be effective in reducing mental-health-related stigma, future programs in Japan need to address problems regarding institutionalism and offer direct social contact with people with mental illness. PMID:24118217

Ando, Shuntaro; Yamaguchi, Sosei; Aoki, Yuta; Thornicroft, Graham

2013-11-01

174

Mental Health Task Force Report.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recommendations of a task force charged with examining conditions of mental health operatios in western Massachusetts are contained in this report. The greatest needs in the region were found to be crisis intervention, childrens' services, community-parti...

D. A. Allen

1974-01-01

175

Mental Health Treatment Program Locator  

MedlinePLUS

... Treatment Facility Locator Buprenorphine Physician Locator Find a Facility in Your State To locate the mental health ... Service . Privacy Policy . Home | About the Locator | Find Facilities Near You | Find Facilities by City, County, State ...

176

Children's and Adolescents' Mental Health. Factsheet.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This fact sheet addresses the mental health needs of children and adolescents. It emphasizes that children and adolescents can have mental health problems, that these mental health problems can be severe, and that these problems are common in young people. Some causes of mental health problems are identified, such as exposure to environmental…

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Mental Health Services.

177

Mental Health Counselor Preparation: Experts' Opinions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Explored mental health counselors' and counselor educators' perceptions of the training mental health counselors receive. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 mental health counselors or counselor educators. Key issues that emerged from interviews concerned licensure movement, what distinguishes mental health counseling, variability of…

Ginter, Earl J.

1991-01-01

178

Diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders: a survey of Singapore mental health professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: A series of surveys of mental health literacy have been undertaken in Australia, involving members of the general public\\u000a as well as general practitioners and mental health professionals, whereby respondents consider vignettes of depression and\\u000a of schizophrenia, offer a diagnosis and rate a series of possible interventions for their judged helpfulness. A similar survey\\u000a was undertaken in Singapore and

G. Parker; R. Mahendran; S. G. Yeo; M. I. Loh; A. F. Jorm

1999-01-01

179

Distributing Mental Health Care Resources: Strategic Implications from The National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This paper considers mental health services resource distribution under the Australian second national mental health plan, with its direction to mental health services to be more inclusive of people with higher prevalence psychiatric disorders. We consider inequalities in mental health in Australia, and describe the performance of the composite census variable employed in the Victorian mental health funding distribution

Graham Meadows; Philip Burgess; Irene Bobevski

2002-01-01

180

Indices of Community Mental Health. A Proposal.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of the major problems in measuring community mental health status is the lack of consensus among mental health workers in psychiatry, psychology, sociology, and epidemiology as to what constitutes mental illness. Additionally, changing social mores preclude a definition of mental illness in behavioral terms. An operational definition of mental

Chen, Martin K.

181

Mental Health Treatment and Criminal Justice Outcomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Are many prisoners in jail or prison because of their mental illness? And if so, is mental health treatment a cost-effective way to reduce crime and lower criminal justice costs? This paper reviews and evaluates the evidence assessing the potential of expansion of mental health services for reducing crime. Mental illness and symptoms of mental illness are highly prevalent among

Richard Frank; Thomas G. McGuire

2010-01-01

182

Malaysia mental health country profile.  

PubMed

Malaysia is a tropical country in the heart of south east Asia with a population of 24 million people of diverse ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds living in harmony in 330,000 km(2) of land on the Asian mainland and Borneo. Malaysia, which lies on the crossroads of trade between east and west Asia, has an ancient history as a centre of trading attracting commerce between Europe, west Asia, India and China. It has had influences from major powers that dominated the region throughout its history. Today the country, after independence in 1957, has embarked on an ambitious development project to make it a developed country by 2020. In this effort the economy has changed from one producing raw material to one manufacturing consumer goods and services and the colonial health system has been overhauled and social systems strengthened to provide better services for its people. The per capita income, which was under 1,000 US dollars at independence, has now passed 4,000 US dollars and continues to grow, with the economy largely based on strong exports that amount to over 100 billion US dollars. The mental health system that was based on institutional care in four mental hospitals at independence from British colonial rule in 1957 with no Malaysian psychiatrists is today largely based on over 30 general hospital psychiatric units spread throughout the country. With three local postgraduate training programmes in psychiatry and 12 undergraduate departments of psychiatry in the country--all started after independence--there is now a healthy development of mental health services. This is being supplemented by a newly established primary care mental health service that covers community mental health by integrating mental health into primary health care. Mental health care at the level of psychiatrists rests with about 140 psychiatrists most of whom had undertaken a four-year masters course in postgraduate psychiatry in Malaysia since 1973. However, there continues to be severe shortages of other professionals such as clinical psychologists and social workers in mental health services. There are a few specialists, and specialized services in child, adolescent, forensic, rehabilitative, liaison or research fields of mental health. In the area of services for women and children, as well as the disabled in the community, there are strong efforts to improve the care and provide services that are in keeping with a caring society. New legislation on these are being passed every year and the setting up of a Ministry for Women's Affairs is one such move in recent years. Mental health in Malaysia has been slow in developing but has in the past decade seen important strides to bring it on par with other branches of medicine. PMID:15276949

Parameshvara Deva, M

2004-01-01

183

Mental health aspects of disasters.  

PubMed

Disaster preparations and responses are incomplete without addressing the mental health aspects of disasters. Unpleasant mental states can be a natural and even adaptive human response following a disaster; however, disasters also can contribute to the development of mental illnesses and substance use disorders or exacerbate existing disorders for disaster survivors, response personnel, and even families and close contacts of survivors and responders. Disaster-related psychopathology can mimic or negatively affect other disaster-related illnesses and can impair health professionals and others who must respond to catastrophic events; however, disasters also can encourage tremendous human coping, perseverance, and resilience and can even enhance personal and collective feelings of purpose, connection, and meaning. Integrating mental health promotion and care into disaster planning and response has the potential to mitigate psychiatric and medical consequences of a disaster and may preserve the mission readiness of disaster response personnel and promote healing among communities traumatized by disaster. PMID:23263326

Oldham, Robert L

2013-01-01

184

Religious practices, beliefs, and mental health: Variations across Ethnicity  

PubMed Central

Objectives We examined whether Black Americans and Hispanic Americans experienced greater mental health benefits from religious involvement than White Americans, and whether these benefits would be mediated through three psychosocial factors—social support, meaning and forgiveness. Methods Utilizing data from a probability sample of Chicago-based adults (n=3103), ethnicity-stratified multivariate regression models estimated the association of religiosity with depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and major depressive disorder. Models controlled for potential confounders and psychosocial mediators. Results Contrary to our hypotheses, religiously involved Black Americans and Hispanic Americans did not experience greater mental health benefits than their White counterparts. For White Americans alone, service attendance was inversely related to depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and major depressive disorder. Religious saliency was consistently associated with worse mental health for Hispanic Americans only. However, both meaning and forgiveness conferred mental health benefits for all three groups. Conclusions The benefits of specific aspects of religious involvement vary across ethnicity. Caution is necessary in any effort to bring religion into the health domain. Our findings, if replicated, suggest that initiatives that facilitate a sense of purpose or forgiveness are likely to prove promising in improving mental health, regardless of race or ethnicity.

Sternthal, Michelle J.; Williams, David R.; Musick, Marc A.; Buck, Anna C.

2012-01-01

185

Differences in Physical and Mental Health Symptoms and Mental Health Utilization Associated With Intimate-Partner Violence Versus Childhood Abuse  

PubMed Central

Background There is ample evidence that both intimate-partner violence (IPV) and childhood abuse adversely affect the physical and mental health of adult women over the long term. Objective The authors assessed the associations between abuse, symptoms, and mental health utilization. Method The authors performed a cross-sectional survey of 380 adult female, internal-medicine patients. Results Although both IPV and childhood abuse were associated with depressive and physical symptoms, IPV was independently associated with physical symptoms, and childhood abuse was independently associated with depression. Women with a history of childhood abuse had higher odds, whereas women with IPV had lower odds, of receiving care from mental health providers. Conclusion IPV and childhood abuse may have different effects on women’s symptoms and mental health utilization.

Nicolaidis, Christina; McFarland, Bentson; Curry, MaryAnn; Gerrity, Martha

2009-01-01

186

Trajectories of poverty and children's mental health.  

PubMed

Using data from three waves of the Children of the National Longitudinal Surveys of Youth data set (1986, 1988, 1990), we examine the dynamic relationship between children's family histories of poverty and their developmental trajectories of mental health. Children who were poor in 1986 or who had prior histories of poverty had higher levels of depression and antisocial behavior in that year. Furthermore, subsequent poverty histories were also related to children's mental health trajectories. The number of years that children were poor between 1986 and 1990 correlates significantly with changes in children's antisocial behavior during those years. Finally, rates of increase in antisocial behavior were substantially higher for children with histories of persistent poverty during those years than for transiently poor or nonpoor children. These results demonstrate the accelerating behavioral disadvantages faced by persistently poor children. PMID:8898493

Mcleod, J D; Shanahan, M J

1996-09-01

187

Women's Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... at higher risk for depression, anxiety, or even suicide. Some teens develop eating disorders, too. Some of ... with problems. Recognize the warnings and prevent teen suicide. Many teenage girls feel sad, stressed, angry, or ...

188

Influencing factors of mental health of medical students in China.  

PubMed

This study investigated the mental health status of medical students in China, and analyzed the influencing factors in order to provide evidence for mental health education for medical students. A stratified cluster sampling method was used to recruit medical students from Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. The questionnaire survey on general information and Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) were used for investigation and analysis. The results showed among the 1137 valid questionnaires, 278 (24.45%) participants had SCL-90 score ? 160. The top three mental problems of medical students were obsessive-compulsive disorder, interpersonal sensitivity and depression in terms of the factor score ? 2.5 and the number of participants who reflected on the diseases. The third-year medical students had the worst mental health status, and fifth-year medical students had the best mental health status. Students from rural area had more psychological problems than those from urban area; furthermore, students with high professional satisfaction, those who were the single child of the family, non-poor students, and those whose parents had high education level had better mental health status. It was concluded that the mental health of medical students is not optimistic in China. Medical students have some mental health problems of different degrees. Factors that influence the mental health of medical students include academic pressure, professional satisfaction level and family environment. PMID:24939314

Yang, Fan; Meng, Heng; Chen, Hui; Xu, Xin-Hao; Liu, Zhuo; Luo, Ai; Feng, Zhan-Chun

2014-06-01

189

Mental Health Problems and Use of Services of Lesbians  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Boston Health Project II, replicating a national survey of lesbians completed in 1987, found few differences from previous data regarding mental health problems and service use among lesbians. Respondents expressed positive feelings about being lesbian but reported money and work to be major problems. Surveyed lesbians used therapy at high rates, with depression and relationship problems being common reasons

Susan Jo Roberts; Cecelia Gatson Grindel; Carol A. Patsdaughter; Kathleen Reardon; M. Suzanne Tarmina

2005-01-01

190

The relationship between cannabis use, depression and anxiety among Australian adults: findings from the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: This study aimed to examine the patterns of association between cannabis use, and anxiety and affective disorders, in the\\u000a general population. Method: Data from the Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being, a representative survey of Australians aged 18\\u000a years and over, were analysed to address the following questions: (1) is there an association between cannabis use, DSM-IV

L. Degenhardt; W. Hall; M. Lynskey

2001-01-01

191

Misdiagnosing the Problem: Mental Health Profiles of Incarcerated Juveniles  

PubMed Central

Aggression, antisocial and delinquent behavior frequently result in the incarceration of a large number of young people, but these problems pale in comparison to the mental health challenges faced by many of these youth. Recent studies show a high prevalence of mental disorders among adolescents within the justice system. These findings have led researchers, clinicians and policy-makers to re-evaluate the assessment and treatment options that are available for youth within correctional facilities. This article provides a concise review of the most recent research related to mental health disorders among incarcerated juveniles within Canada and the United States. Rates of some of the most common mental health disorders among juveniles, including depression, anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity and substance use are summarized. Throughout the review, issues related to co-morbidity and gender differences are highlighted. The implications of mental health disorders for juvenile justice policy and practice are discussed.

Odgers, Candice L.; Burnette, Mandi L.; Chauhan, Preeti; Moretti, Marlene M.; Reppucci, N. Dickon

2005-01-01

192

Mental health disorders and solid-organ transplant recipients.  

PubMed

Depression affects up to 60% of solid-organ recipients and is independently associated with both mortality (hazard ratio for death of ~2) and de novo malignancy after transplantation, although the mechanism is not clear. Both pretransplantation psychosis and depression occurring more than 2 years after transplantation are associated with increased noncompliance and graft loss. It remains to be shown that effective treatment of depression is associated with improved outcomes and quality of life. Immunosuppressive drugs (especially corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors) and physiologic challenges can precipitate deterioration in mental health. All potential transplant candidates should be assessed for mental health problems and preexisting medical conditions that can mimic mental health problems, such as uremic, hepatic, or hypoxic encephalopathy, should be identified and treated appropriately. Expert mental health review of those with identified risk factors (such as previous suicide attempts, history of mental illness or noncompliance with medications) is advisable early in the transplant assessment process to mitigate risk and support the patient. Patients with mental health disorders, when adequately controlled and socially supported, have outcomes similar to the general transplant population. Therefore, exclusion from transplantation based on the diagnosis alone is neither ethically nor medically justified. However, it is ethically and clinically justifiable to deny access to transplantation to those who, despite full support, would have a quality of life that is unacceptable to the candidate or are likely to be noncompliant with treatment or follow-up, which would lead to graft loss. PMID:23743726

Corbett, Chris; Armstrong, Matthew J; Parker, Richard; Webb, Kerry; Neuberger, James M

2013-10-15

193

Obesity in Bipolar Disorder and Major Depressive Disorder: Results from a National Community Health Survey on Mental Health and Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: We aimed to ascertain the prevalence of obesity in individuals with a mood disorder (MD) (that is, bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder), compared with the general population. We further aimed to examine the likelihood of an association between obesity and MD, while controlling for the influence of sociodemographic variables. Method: The analysis was based on data from Statistics

Roger S McIntyre; Jakub Z Konarski; Kathryn Wilkins; Joanna K Soczynska; Sidney H Kennedy

194

Promoting mental health as an essential aspect of health promotion  

Microsoft Academic Search

SUMMARY This paper advocates that mental health promotion receive appropriate attention within health promotion. It is of great concern that, in practice, mental health pro- motion is frequently overlooked in health promotion pro- grammes although the WHO definitions of health and the Ottawa Charter describe mental health as an integral part of health. It is suggested that more attention be

SHONA STURGEON

2007-01-01

195

Food policies for physical and mental health  

PubMed Central

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) account for the largest burden of early mortality and are predicted to cost the global community more than US $30 trillion over the next 20 years. Unhealthy dietary habits, in large part driven by substantial changes to global food systems, are recognised as major contributors to many of the common NCDs, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes. Recent evidence now indicates that unhealthy diets are also risk factors for mental disorders, particularly depression and dementia. This affords substantial scope to leverage on the established and developing approaches to the nutrition-related NCDs to address the large global burden of these mental disorders and reinforces the imperative for governments take substantial actions in regards to improving the food environment and consequent population health via policy initiatives.

2014-01-01

196

Mental Health Issues in Rural Nursing.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Five papers cover recent developments in rural mental health nursing. "Rural Mental Health Care: A Survey of the Research" (Karen Babich) chronicles recent interest in understanding the rural population's character and the nature of mental health services needed by and provided to rural America. Lauren Aaronson ("Using Health Beliefs in a Nursing…

Babich, Karen S., Comp.

197

Adolescent Mental Health, Behavior Problems, and Academic Achievement  

PubMed Central

Prior research on the association of mental health and behavior problems with academic achievement is limited because it does not consider multiple problems simultaneously, take co-occurring problems into account, and control for academic aptitude. We addressed these limitations using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N = 6,315). We estimated the associations of depression, attention problems, delinquency, and substance use with two indicators of academic achievement (high school GPA and highest degree received) with controls for academic aptitude. Attention problems, delinquency, and substance use were significantly associated with diminished achievement, but depression was not. Combinations of problems involving substance use were especially consequential. Our results demonstrate that the social consequences of mental health problems are not the inevitable result of diminished functional ability but, rather, reflect negative social responses. These results also encourage a broader perspective on mental health by demonstrating that behavior problems heighten the negative consequences of more traditional forms of distress.

McLeod, Jane D.; Uemura, Ryotaro; Rohrman, Shawna

2013-01-01

198

Mental health service delivery systems and perceived qualifications of mental health service providers in school settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of academic success (Adelman & Taylor, 2002).

Decia Nicole Dixon

2009-01-01

199

Mental Health Service Delivery Systems and Perceived Qualifications of Mental Health Service Providers in School Settings  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Latest research on the mental health status of children indicates that schools are key providers of mental health services (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2003). The push for school mental health services has only increased as stakeholders have begun to recognize the significance of sound mental health as an essential part of…

Dixon, Decia Nicole

2009-01-01

200

Ageism in Mental Health and Health Care: A Critical Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Discussions of aging and mental health widely assume that ageism among mental health providers is an important factor limiting access to mental health services for older adults. Given the widespread citation of ageism as a problem, we critically review the history of the ageism construct, and evidence for its existence in both mental health and medical professionals. There is surprisingly

Claire Robb; Hongbin Chen; William E. Haley

2002-01-01

201

Mental health and polygamy: The Syrian case  

PubMed Central

AIM: To examine the psychological, self-esteem (SE), family function, marital satisfaction, life satisfaction and degree of agreement with the practice of polygamy among polygamous women with a control group from monogamous women in Syria. METHODS: Convenience sample of 136 women, 64 of whom were wives in polygamous marriages and 72 were wives in monogamous marriages participated in this study. A snowball method of sampling was used, conducted by undergraduate local female students trained to collect data according to culturally competent methods. The following research instruments were deployed: the symptoms checklist-90, the Rosenberg SE, the Life Satisfaction, family function and marital satisfaction. RESULTS: Findings revealed that women in polygamous marriages experienced lower SE, less life satisfaction, less marital satisfaction and more mental health symptomatology than women in monogamous marriages. Many of the mental health symptoms were different; noteworthy were elevated somatization, depression, hostility and psychoticism and their general severity index was higher. Furthermore, “first wife syndrome” was examined in polygamous families, comparing first with second and third wives in polygamous marriages. Findings indicated that first wives reported on more family problems, less SE, more anxiety, more paranoid ideation, and more psychoticism than second and third wives. CONCLUSION: These results are best understood through consideration of the socio-cultural and economic realities facing these women. Implications for mental health practice, policy and further research are discussed.

Al-Krenawi, Alean

2013-01-01

202

Utilization of health services in relation to mental health problems in adolescents: A population based survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Only a minority of adolescents reporting symptoms above case-levels on screenings for mental health seeks and receives help from specialist health services. The objective of this study was to a) examine help-seeking for symptoms of anxiety and depression in relation to symptom load dimensionally, b) identify the level of specialization in mental health among service-providers, and c) identify associations

Henrik D Zachrisson; Kjetil Rödje; Arnstein Mykletun

2006-01-01

203

Guilt Feelings and Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After initially defining both mental health and guilt feelings, the author examined their relationship, primarily from the perspective of the crippling effects of unwarranted feelings of guilt. Admitting the varied pressures of modern society, he nevertheless believes it is the individual's fault when he fails to glean as much from lif e as he…

Moses, Harold A.

204

Women Veterans and Mental Health  

MedlinePLUS

... of relationship challenges can build on already existing mental health problems or lead to them. Are you thinking of suicide? If yes, please do the following – Dial: 911 Dial: 800-273-TALK (8255) Check yourself into the emergency room. Tell someone who can help you find help ...

205

Mental Health and Asian Americans  

MedlinePLUS

Mental Health and Asian Americans Suicide was the 10th leading cause of death for Asian Americans, and also was the 10th leading cause of death for White ... 1 Older Asian American women have the highest suicide rate of all women over age 65 in ...

206

Mental Health 1: Human Behavior  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lesson, from Science NetLinks, provides students with a sound introduction and historical overview of the important figures and discoveries that have greatly advanced the study of human behavior since the early 1900s. This lesson is the first of three lessons on mental health and human behavior.

Science Netlinks;

2002-07-29

207

Toward Explaining Mental Health Disparities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental health disparities refer to the disproportionate amount of psychopathology found among persons of disadvantageous social standing, such as persons of low socioeconomic status (SES). Although social and self selection cannot entirely be ruled out as explanations for these differences, the accumulation of evidence supports a social causation…

Aneshensel, Carol S.

2009-01-01

208

Children's Mental Health. Beginnings Workshop.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents four articles discussing mental health issues that pertain to early childhood education: "Granting Children Their Emotions" (Ilse Elisabeth Plattner); "Double Vision: Parent and Professional Perspectives on Our Family's Year in Crisis" (Kirsten Haugen); "Coping with Stress and Surviving Challenging Times" (Alan Cohen); and "When the World…

Plattner, Ilse Elisabeth; Haugen, Kirsten; Cohen, Alan; Levin, Diane E.

2003-01-01

209

The treatment gap in mental health care.  

PubMed Central

Mental disorders are highly prevalent and cause considerable suffering and disease burden. To compound this public health problem, many individuals with psychiatric disorders remain untreated although effective treatments exist. We examine the extent of this treatment gap. We reviewed community-based psychiatric epidemiology studies that used standardized diagnostic instruments and included data on the percentage of individuals receiving care for schizophrenia and other non-affective psychotic disorders, major depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and alcohol abuse or dependence. The median rates of untreated cases of these disorders were calculated across the studies. Examples of the estimation of the treatment gap for WHO regions are also presented. Thirty-seven studies had information on service utilization. The median treatment gap for schizophrenia, including other non-affective psychosis, was 32.2%. For other disorders the gap was: depression, 56.3%; dysthymia, 56.0%; bipolar disorder, 50.2%; panic disorder, 55.9%; GAD, 57.5%; and OCD, 57.3%. Alcohol abuse and dependence had the widest treatment gap at 78.1%. The treatment gap for mental disorders is universally large, though it varies across regions. It is likely that the gap reported here is an underestimate due to the unavailability of community-based data from developing countries where services are scarcer. To address this major public health challenge, WHO has adopted in 2002 a global action programme that has been endorsed by the Member States.

Kohn, Robert; Saxena, Shekhar; Levav, Itzhak; Saraceno, Benedetto

2004-01-01

210

Mental Health. Teacher Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This comprehensive course from the Practical Nursing series of competency-based curricula is designed to prepare students for employment by systematically guiding the students' learning activities from the simple to the complex. These materials prepare health care practitioners to function effectively in the rapidly changing health care industry.…

Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

211

Social Capital and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Social capital is a compound and complex construct, an umbrella term under which social cohesion, social support, social integration\\u000a and\\/or participation are often lumped together. Beyond its growing appeal to policy makers, practitioners and researchers\\u000a in public health in general and mental health in particular, social capital is now also an integral part of broad-based discussions\\u000a on social-ecological resilience, ecosystem

Astier M. Almedom; Douglas Glandon

212

The Role of Bilingual Workers without Professional Mental Health Training in Mental Health Services for Refugees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper discusses the use of bilingual workers who do not have formal mental health training as mediators and providers of mental health care for refugees. The introduction provides a background discussion of the need for refugee mental health services, the characteristics of bilingual mental health workers, and the work places and expectations…

Egli, Eric

213

Telepsychiatry and e-Mental Health Services: Potential for Improving Access to Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reforming mental health care is a focus of many ongoing initiatives in the United States, both at the national and state levels. Access to adequate mental health care services is one of the identified problems. Telepsychiatry and e-mental health services could improve access to mental health care in rural, remote and underserved areas. The authors discuss the required technology, common

Kaye L. McGinty; Sy Atezaz Saeed; Scott C. Simmons; Yilmaz Yildirim

2006-01-01

214

Ecological constraints on mental health services  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proposes 4 principles for community mental health programing that are consistent with an ecological thesis: (1) Assessment methods are focused on the total population rather than on those persons who presently receive a mental health service. (2) Mental health services are designed to reduce a high risk for community service. (3) Professional and research services are created as local community

James G. Kelly

1966-01-01

215

Handbook of Infant Mental Health. Second Edition.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This revised edition offers an interdisciplinary analysis of the developmental, clinical, and social aspects of mental health from birth to age 3. Chapters are organized into five areas, covering the context of mental health, risk and protective factors, assessment, psychopathology, intervention, and applications of infant mental health. The…

Zeanah, Charles H., Jr., Ed.

216

Leveraging Mental Health Dollars into Your District  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

By addressing common reasons that schools and mental health partners often cannot sustain sufficient school-based mental health services, Connecting With Care (CWC)--a mental health collaboration that places full-time clinicians in schools in Boston's most under-served urban neighborhood--is demonstrating how schools and districts can leverage…

Kilkenny, Robert; Katz, Nechama; Baron, Lisa

2009-01-01

217

Marital Rights, Mental Health, and Public Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author discusses a comprehensive literature review on the mental health effects of marriage denial on lesbians and gay men and the role of mental health arguments in advocacy for marriage equality. The review, by Gil Herdt and Robert Kertzner, studied more than 150 reports on how marriage is related to mental health and the psychological effects of discrimination as

Robert Kertzner

2009-01-01

218

Ethnic Issues in Adolescent Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The essays collected in this book examine the effects of ethnicity on the mental health of adolescents. A dual set of issues emerges throughout the volume: the importance of adolescent mental health in contributing to adult well-being, and the necessity of understanding ethnicity in studying and treating mental health problems. The book is divided…

Stiffman, Arlene Rubin, Ed.; Davis, Larry E., Ed.

219

Patient Records in the Mental Health Disciplines.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines reports written in mental health hospitals and community mental health centers. Analyzes a total of 150 randomly selected samples of 5 basic mental health records, and evaluates the rhetorical contexts for each with regard to author, purpose, audience and use. (KEH)

Reynolds, John Frederick; Mair, David

1989-01-01

220

Prestige and Occupational Therapy in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prestige of occupational therapy in mental health was studied in relationship to the prestige held by other mental health professions. One hundred fifty four mental health professionals, representing members of a psychiatric treatment team, were surveyed. Although all professionals agreed that occupational therapists held a moderate amount of prestige when considered apart from other disciplines, occupational therapists received the

Janet Falk-Kessler; Peter Ruopp

1993-01-01

221

Minority Administrators in Community Mental Health Centers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of the problems confronting minority administrators of mental health agencies. Twenty-five minority directors of Community Mental Health Centers were given questionnaires asking for information about their backgrounds and the design, structure, and operation of their respective mental health

Howard Univ., Washington, DC. Mental Health Research and Development Center.

222

Families, Managed Care, & Children's Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This theme issue of a bulletin on family support and children's mental health focuses on managed care and the impact on children who are in need of mental health services. Articles include: "Private Sector Managed Care and Children's Mental Health" (Ira S. Lourie and others); "Just What Is Managed Care?" (Chris Koyanagi); "Managed Behavioral…

McManus, Marilyn C., Ed.

1996-01-01

223

Committed Dating Relationships and Mental Health among College Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: To examine whether involvement in committed dating relationships is associated with university students’ mental health (depressive symptoms and problem alcohol use, including binge drinking), and whether these associations differ by gender. Participants: A sample of 889 undergraduate students aged 18 to 25. Methods: Self-report measures…

Whitton, Sarah W.; Weitbrecht, Eliza M.; Kuryluk, Amanda D.; Bruner, Michael R.

2013-01-01

224

Common mental health problems and antiretroviral therapy adherence  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the literature on various mental health problems and their impact on adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Depression, anxiety disorders, and disorders related to substance abuse were identified as key role-players influencing adherence. The severity of symptoms related to these disorders was found to be inversely related to ART adherence, with the possible exception of post-traumatic stress disorder

Adriaan Nel; Ashraf Kagee

2011-01-01

225

Nourishing Students' Mental Health in a Difficult Economy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent research on the mental health of college students conducted by Daniel Eisenberg, principal investigator in the multiyear Healthy Minds study, indicates that as many as one in five college students may suffer from depression, generalized anxiety disorder, or a panic disorder. Although it's too early to assess the effect of the economic…

Speer, Nicole; McFaul, Mimi; Mohatt, Dennis

2009-01-01

226

Mental Health Consequences Associated with Dropping out of High School.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the mental health consequences of dropping out of high school. It looks at levels of depression, anxiety, and self esteem reported by high school dropouts and graduates during the adolescent to young adult transition. It examines the extent to which family structure and family processes (parental support and transition specific…

Liem, Joan H.; Dillon, Colleen O'Neill; Gore, Susan

227

Obtaining Age-Related Mental Health Competency: What Is Needed?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Responses from 334 of 803 Department of Veterans Affairs mental health professionals indicated that they spend 30% of their time with older veterans; one-third had no geriatric training; and three-fourths would like more training in such areas as dementia, depression, grief, substance abuse, and legal and ethical issues. (Contains 19 references.)…

Molinari, Victor; Kier, Frederick J.; Kunik, Mark E.

2002-01-01

228

Social contagion of mental health: evidence from college roommates.  

PubMed

From a policy standpoint, the spread of health conditions in social networks is important to quantify, because it implies externalities and possible market failures in the consumption of health interventions. Recent studies conclude that happiness and depression may be highly contagious across social ties. The results may be biased, however, because of selection and common shocks. We provide unbiased estimates by using exogenous variation from college roommate assignments. Our findings are consistent with no significant overall contagion of mental health and no more than small contagion effects for specific mental health measures, with no evidence for happiness contagion and modest evidence for anxiety and depression contagion. The weakness of the contagion effects cannot be explained by avoidance of roommates with poor mental health or by generally low social contact among roommates. We also find that similarity of baseline mental health predicts the closeness of roommate relationships, which highlights the potential for selection biases in studies of peer effects that do not have a clearly exogenous source of variation. Overall, our results suggest that mental health contagion is lower, or at least more context specific, than implied by the recent studies in the medical literature. PMID:23055446

Eisenberg, Daniel; Golberstein, Ezra; Whitlock, Janis L; Downs, Marilyn F

2013-08-01

229

Barriers to Mental Health Care Utilization in Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Background Parkinson’s disease (PD) is frequently complicated by co-occurring psychiatric problems, such as depression and anxiety, that negatively affect the course and management of the illness. Yet, in the majority of cases, these psychiatric comorbidities are neither recognized nor treated to remission. The primary purpose of this study was to identify and describe barriers to mental health care utilization for people with PD. Secondary objectives included the assessment of attitudes and preferences regarding the need for mental health services in the PD community and the acceptability of tele-health interventions as a method for improving access and quality of care. Methods Seven hundred sixty-nine people with PD completed an anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire assessing barriers to mental health care utilization in this medical population. Respondents were drawn from a national sample. Results Commonly endorsed barriers to mental health care utilization in PD reflect the patients’ incomplete understanding of mental health problems, access issues, and illness-specific concerns, as well as the inadequate screening and detection of psychiatric complications by medical providers, and the need for more effective treatments in this medical population. Several demographic, medical, and psychiatric variables also influenced the likelihood of accessing mental health care. Interest in tele-health approaches to mental health treatment was high and, in several instances, correlated with perceived barriers to mental health care utilization. Conclusions People with PD may encounter a multitude of barriers that impede their pursuit of mental health care. Clinical implications are discussed and further research is needed to replicate and extend these findings.

Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Friedman, Jill; Allen, Lesley A.; Gara, Michael A.; Menza, Matthew

2013-01-01

230

Effects of patients with bipolar, schizophrenic, and major depressive disorders on the mental and other healthcare expenses of family members  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family members who live with patients with serious mental disorders incur increased healthcare expenses. A retrospective study measured these increased expenses using administrative data from a large Blue Cross Blue Shield health plan in the USA. Mental and other healthcare expenses of family members of patients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or major depression were compared to those of control family

Frank D. Gianfrancesco; Ruey-hua Wang; Elaine Yu

2005-01-01

231

General Practitioners' opinions on their practice in mental health and their collaboration with mental health professionals  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Common mental health problems are mainly treated in primary care settings and collaboration with mental health services is needed. Prior to re-organisation of the mental health care offer in a geographical area, a study was organized: 1) to evaluate GPs' opinions on their day-to-day practice with Patients with Mental Health Problems (PMHP) and on relationships with Mental Health Professionals

Nadia Younes; Isabelle Gasquet; Pierre Gaudebout; Marie-Pierre Chaillet; Viviane Kovess; Bruno Falissard; Marie-Christine Hardy Bayle

2005-01-01

232

Drug and Health Mediagraphy II: Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The second in a series of bibliographies lists approximately 350 instructional materials for use in mental health education. It is noted that all of the materials listed were suggested by teachers after careful screening, including evaluation with handicapped children. Materials are grouped according to the following media forms: books (the major…

Dykstra, Ralph R.; Dirr, Peter J.

233

Perinatal mental health: midwives and health visitors working together.  

PubMed

The Healthy Child Programme (HCP) focuses on the care offered to pregnant women and children in the first five years of life. It is delivered by a range of professionals, with the health visitor as lead. Effective delivery of the HCP depends on services for children and families being fully integrated, and partnership working between different agencies on a local level seems to be the key to success. This article focuses on how effective implementation of the HCP facilitates the recognition and care of women with anxiety, mild to moderate depression and other perinatal mental disorders during both the antenatal period and after the birth. PMID:24669519

Halnan, Bridget

2014-03-01

234

Mental Health Services in General Health Care. Volume 2. Coordinated Mental Health Care in Neighborhood Health Centers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Advantages of providing primary health and mental health services in the same location are argued from a standpoint of the author's experience and a review of the relevant literature. Alternatives to current national mental health policy are suggested to ...

J. F. Borus, B. J. Burns, A. M. Jacobson, L. B. Macht, R. G. Morrill

1979-01-01

235

Psychosocial work environment and mental health among construction workers.  

PubMed

We assessed psychosocial work environment, the prevalence of mental health complaints and the association between these two among bricklayers and construction supervisors. For this cross-sectional study a total of 1500 bricklayers and supervisors were selected. Psychosocial work characteristics were measured using the Dutch Questionnaire on the Experience and Evaluation of Work and compared to the general Dutch working population. Mental health effects were measured with scales to assess fatigue during work, need for recovery after work, symptoms of distress, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. The prevalence of self-reported mental health complaints was determined using the cut-off values. Associations between psychosocial work characteristics and self-reported mental health complaints were analysed using logistic regression. Total response rate was 43%. Compared to the general working population, bricklayers experienced statistically significant worse job control, learning opportunities and future perspectives; supervisors experienced statistically significant higher psychological demands and need for recovery. Prevalence of self-reported mental health effects among bricklayers and supervisors, respectively, were as follows: high need for recovery after work (14%; 25%), distress (5%, 7%), depression (18%, 20%) and post-traumatic stress disorder (11%, 7%). Among both occupations, high work speed and quantity were associated with symptoms of depression. Further, among construction supervisors, low participation in decision making and low social support of the direct supervisor was associated with symptoms of depression. The findings in the present study indicate psychosocial risk factors for bricklayers and supervisors. In each occupation a considerable proportion of workers was positively screened for symptoms of common mental disorders. PMID:23380530

Boschman, J S; van der Molen, H F; Sluiter, J K; Frings-Dresen, M H W

2013-09-01

236

The Mental Health of 13–17 Year-Olds in Australia: Findings from the National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being  

Microsoft Academic Search

The prevalence of 3 mental disorders (Depressive Disorder, Conduct Disorder and Attention-Deficit\\/Hyperactivity Disorder),\\u000a the prevalence of mental health problems, and rates of health-risk behaviours among those with problems, along with patterns\\u000a of service utilisation, are reported for 1490 adolescents aged 13–17 years in Australia. Mental disorders were assessed using\\u000a the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV completed by parents.

M. G. Sawyer; L. R. Miller-Lewis; J. J. Clark

2007-01-01

237

PHASE: a 'health technology' approach to psychological treatment in primary mental health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The PHASE research programme is an NHS-Executive funded, randomized controlled trial of assisted self-help for common mental disorders, delivered by practice nurses in primary care. The self-help guide - Managing anxiety and depression: a self-help guide published by the Mental Health Foundation - is conceptualized as a ' health technology' where the nurse' s role is to educate patients how

David Richards; Michael Barkham; Jane Cahill; Chris Williams; Chris Williams

2002-01-01

238

Defendants with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Diagnoses: Faring in a Mental Health Court  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Begun in the late 1990s, mental health courts are specialty criminal courts developed to address the needs of persons with mental illness. Methods: As many persons with intellectual disabilities (IDs) may overlap in the mental health court system, we used mental health court records to examine the phenomenology and outcomes of 224…

Burke, M. M.; Griggs, M.; Dykens, E. M.; Hodapp, R. M.

2012-01-01

239

Ethical issues in mental health  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review To describe community engaged research (CEnR) and how it may improve the quality of a research study while addressing ethical concerns that communities may have with mental health and substance abuse research. This article includes a review of the literature as well as recommendations from an expert panel convened with funding from the US National Institute of Mental Health. Recent findings CEnR represents a broad spectrum of practices including representation on institutional ethics committees, attitude research with individuals from the study population, engaging community advisory boards, forming research partnerships with community organizations, and including community members as co-investigators. Summary CEnR poses some challenges; for example, it requires funding and training for researchers and community members. However, it offers many benefits to researchers and communities and some form of CEnR is appropriate and feasible in nearly every study involving human participants.

DuBois, James; Bailey-Burch, Brendolyn; Bustillos, Dan; Campbell, Jean; Cottler, Linda; Fisher, Celia; Hadley, Whitney B.; Hoop, Jinger G.; Roberts, Laura; Salter, Erica K.; Sieber, Joan E.; Stevenson, Richard D.

2012-01-01

240

Mental Health Net: Professional Resources  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of a much larger meta-resource, this site contains annotated, rated resources in over 25 subject categories, as well as associations, academic departments, employment, mailing lists, and newsgroups, among other resources. MHN has a rating system (one to four stars), based on content, presentation, ease of use, and overall experience. Interestingly, users are also allowed to interactively vote thumbs up or down on annotated resources. Mental Health Net and CMHC Systems maintain this site.

1998-01-01

241

Caribbean Conference on Health/Mental Health Models.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A series of recommendations with respect to health and mental health priorities for the Caribbean are presented. The recommendations are the result of a Caribbean Conference on Health/Mental Health held in St. Ann, Jamaica in April 1983. Because mental he...

J. Szapocznik

1984-01-01

242

Mental health in prisons: A public health agenda  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental illness affects the majority of prisoners. Mental health issues are beginning to take a central position in the development of prison health services, reflecting this burden of disease. This change in focus is not before time. But prison mental health services cannot exist in isolation. Public health systems should lead provision of care for patients with acute and severe

A. Fraser

2009-01-01

243

Mental Health under National Health Care Reform: The Empirical Foundations.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews research pertinent to mental health services under health care reform proposals. Examines redistributional impact of inclusion of outpatient mental health benefits, optimal benefit packages, and findings that mental health services lower medical utilization costs. Argues that extending minimalist model of time-limited benefits to national…

Hudson, Christopher G.; DeVito, Jo Anne

1994-01-01

244

Issues in Children's Mental Health. Special Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Kids Count report examines issues related to children's mental health in Virginia. The report discusses the effects of children's mental illness, presents risk and protective factors, and describes the incidence of children's mental health problems. Information specific to Virginia is presented, including the prevalence of youth suicide,…

Nimmo, Margaret L.

245

Unemployment and Mental Health in French Canada.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews two articles contained in December 1987 issue of "Sante Mentale au Quebec" on the subject of mental health and unemployment. Articles reviewed present results of a qualitative study of the problems experienced and the mental health practices used by unemployed people. Claims articles reveal complexity of the issue while organizing it. (ABL)

King, Suzanne

1989-01-01

246

NIMH Support of Rural Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) aims to improve mental health services by funding research projects and research centers. NIMH also supports state planning, protection of and advocacy for the mentally ill, disaster relief, professional training, and public information programs. (DM)

Hutner, Michael; Windle, Charles

1991-01-01

247

Synergy, 2003. Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Each issue in the 2002 edition of the Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network (ATMHN) newsletter represents a theme critical to mental health practitioners. The Winter 2002 issue features articles on the psychological consequences of interpreters in relation to working with torture and trauma clients, addressing language issues on mental

Australian Transcultural Mental Health Network, Parramatta.

248

Partnership in Mental Health and Child Welfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental illness is an issue for a number of families reported to child protection agencies. Parents with mental health problems are more vulnerable, as are their children, to having parenting and child welfare concerns. A recent study undertaken in the Melbourne Children's Court (Victoria, Australia) found that the children of parents with mental health problems comprised just under thirty percent

Rosemary Sheehan

2005-01-01

249

The Mental Health First Aid Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary • Mental Health First Aid is a training program for members of the public in how to support someone in a mental health crisis situation or who is developing a mental disorder. • The program has solid evidence for its effectiveness from randomized controlled trials and qualitative studies. It increases knowledge, reduces stigma and, most importantly, increases supportive actions.

Tony Jorm; Betty Kitchener

250

Early Intervention Services in Youth Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental and substance use disorders are leading contributors to the burden of disease among young people in Australia, but young people experience a range of barriers to accessing appropriate treatment for their mental health concerns. The development of early intervention services that provide accessible and effective mental health care has the…

Wade, Darryl; Johnston, Amy; Campbell, Bronwyn; Littlefield, Lyn

2007-01-01

251

The effects of a brief CBT intervention, delivered by frontline mental health staff, to promote recovery in people with psychosis and comorbid anxiety or depression (the GOALS study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial  

PubMed Central

Background NICE guidance states that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) should be offered to all patients with psychosis. However, there is a need to improve access to therapeutic interventions. We aim to train frontline mental health staff to deliver brief, structured CBT-based therapies. We have developed and piloted a manualized intervention to support people with psychosis and anxious avoidance or depression to work towards a personal recovery goal. Methods/Design The ‘GOALS Study’ is a pilot randomized controlled trial comparing usual care plus an 8-week intervention with usual care alone. The key objective is to assess clinical feasibility (recruitment and randomization; compliance with the treatment manual; acceptability and satisfaction; progress towards goals). A secondary objective is a preliminary evaluation of efficacy. Sixty-six participants with a diagnosis of psychosis, plus symptoms of depression or anxiety will be recruited from adult mental health services. Those currently refusing medication, in receipt of CBT, or with a primary diagnosis of an organic mental health problem or substance dependency will be excluded. Following informed consent, randomization will be independent of the trial team, at a 50:50 ratio, at the level of the individual and stratified by main problem focus. Following randomization, participants allocated to the intervention group will begin the 8-week intervention with a local, trained member of staff, supervised by the study coordinator. Outcomes will be assessed blind to treatment condition at 0, 12 and 18 weeks post-randomization. The primary outcome measure for the efficacy analysis will be activity levels at 12 weeks. Secondary outcome measures include mood, psychotic symptoms, quality of life and clinical distress. A health economic analysis comparing service use in each condition will also be performed. Recruitment began in March, 2013 and is ongoing until December, 2014. Discussion This is the first trial of the GOALS intervention. The approach is brief and staff can be readily trained in its delivery: there is therefore potential to develop a cost-effective intervention that could be widely disseminated. If the trial proves clinically feasible and demonstrates preliminary evidence of efficacy, a large multi-site trial will be warranted. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN: 73188383. http://public.ukcrn.org.uk/search/StudyDetail.aspx?StudyID=13538

2014-01-01

252

Mental health utilization of new-to-care Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans following suicidal ideation assessment.  

PubMed

We evaluated the impact of brief structured suicidal ideation (SI) assessments on mental health care among new-to-care Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans. National datasets provided military, demographic, and clinical information. For all new-to-care OEF/OIF veterans administered depression screens (PHQ-2: Patient Health Questionnaire-2) and structured SI assessments in primary care or ambulatory mental health settings of three Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Centers between April 2008 and September 2009 (N=465), generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations between SI and number of subsequent-year specialty mental health visits and antidepressant prescriptions. Approximately one-third of the veterans reported SI. In multivariate models, PTSD and anxiety diagnoses, severe depression symptoms, being married, and SI assessment by a mental health clinician were associated with more mental health visits in the subsequent year. Depression, PTSD, and anxiety diagnoses, and SI assessment by a mental health clinician were associated with receiving antidepressants. Presence of SI did not significantly affect subsequent year mental health utilization when adjusting for diagnostic and clinician variables, but inaugural visits involving mental health clinicians were consistently associated with subsequent mental health care. PMID:24726814

Denneson, Lauren M; Corson, Kathryn; Helmer, Drew A; Bair, Matthew J; Dobscha, Steven K

2014-07-30

253

45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Child mental health. 1304.24...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...DELEGATE AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a...mental health interventions. (2)...

2010-10-01

254

45 CFR 1304.24 - Child mental health.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... Child mental health. 1304.24...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES...DELEGATE AGENCIES Early Childhood Development and Health Services § 1304.24 Child mental health. (a...mental health interventions. (2)...

2009-10-01

255

The effects of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on recurrence of depressive episodes, mental health and quality of life: A randomized controlled study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Depression is characterized by a large risk of relapse\\/recurrence. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) is a recent non-drug psychotherapeutic intervention to prevent future depressive relapse\\/recurrence in remitted\\/recovered depressed patients. In this randomized controlled trial, the authors investigated the effects of MBCT on the relapse in depression and the time to first relapse since study participation, as well as on several mood

K. A. Godfrin; C. van Heeringen

2010-01-01

256

Consumer-led Mental Health Education for Pharmacy Students  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate a consumer-led teaching intervention to reduce pharmacy students' stigma towards depression and schizophrenia, and improve attitudes toward providing pharmaceutical care for consumers with mental illness. Design Third-year bachelor of pharmacy degree students were given a series of mental health lectures, undertook supervised weekly placements in the community pharmacy setting, and attended a tutorial led by trained mental health consumer educators. Assessment A previously validated 26-item survey instrument was administered at baseline, 6 weeks postintervention, and 12 months postintervention, and 3 focus groups were conducted. Survey instruments were completed by 225 students at baseline, 230 students postintervention, and 228 students at 12 months. Students' stigma decreased (p < 0.05) and their attitudes toward the provision of pharmaceutical services to consumers with a mental illness showed significant improvements (p < 0.05). These improvements were maintained at the 12-month follow-up. Four themes emerged from the focus groups: knowledge and experience of mental illness, mental health stigma, impacts on attitudes and self-reported behavior, and the role of the pharmacist in mental healthcare. Conclusions Consumer-led education for pharmacy students may provide a sustainable reduction in stigma and improve attitudes towards providing pharmaceutical services to consumers with a mental illness.

Bell, J. Simon; Chen, Timothy F.

2010-01-01

257

[Gender differences in measures of mental health associated with a marital relationship].  

PubMed

This study examined gender differences for two measures of mental health as related to the quality of the marital relationship. Middle-aged respondents (221 female; 210 male) rated their marital satisfaction, affection, and communication. They also rated their psychological well-being and depression. The correlations between marital quality and mental health indicated that for males marital quality was more strongly associated with psychological well-being than with depression. Females showed no such difference, or their marital quality was associated with depression. This implies that for females, depression was a more sensitive measure of their mental health related to their husband-wife relationship. On the other hand, for males subjective well-being which was correlated with self-esteem was a more sensitive measure of their mental health. PMID:24669502

Ito, Yuko; Sagara, Junko

2014-02-01

258

The Mental Health of Canadians with Self-Reported Learning Disabilities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There has been growing concern as to the mental health status of persons with learning disabilities (PWLD). This study examined rates of mental health problems among PWLD aged 15 to 44 years using a large, nationally representative data set. PWLD were more than twice as likely to report high levels of distress, depression, anxiety disorders,…

Wilson, Alexander M.; Deri Armstrong, Catherine; Furrie, Adele; Walcot, Elizabeth

2009-01-01

259

Social Problem Solving Ability Predicts Mental Health Among Undergraduate Students  

PubMed Central

Background: The main objective of this study was predicting student's mental health using social problem solving- ability. Methods: In this correlational. descriptive study, 369 (208 female and 161 male) from, Mazandaran University of Medical Science were selected through stratified random sampling method. In order to collect the data, the social problem solving inventory-revised and general health questionnaire were used. Data were analyzed through SPSS-19, Pearson's correlation, t test, and stepwise regression analysis. Results: Data analysis showed significant relationship between social problem solving ability and mental health (P < 0.01). Social problem solving ability was significantly associated with the somatic symptoms, anxiety and insomnia, social dysfunction and severe depression (P < 0.01). Conclusions: The results of our study demonstrated that there is a significant correlation between social problem solving ability and mental health.

Ranjbar, Mansour; Bayani, Ali Asghar; Bayani, Ali

2013-01-01

260

Integrating mental health into primary care in Sverdlovsk  

PubMed Central

Introduction Mental disorders occur as frequently in Russia as elsewhere, but the common mental disorders, especially depression, have gone largely unrecognised and undiagnosed by policlinic staff and area doctors. Methods This paper describes the impact and sustainability of a multi-component programme to facilitate the integration of mental health into primary care, by situation appraisal, policy dialogue, development of educational materials, provision of a training programme and the publication of standards and good practice guidelines to improve the primary care of mental disorders in the Sverdlovsk region of the Russian Federation. Results The multi-component programme has resulted in sustainable training about common mental disorders, not only of family doctors but also of other cadres and levels of professionals, and it has been well integrated with Sverdlovsk's overall programme of health sector reforms. Conclusion It is possible to facilitate the sustainable integration of mental health into primary care within the Russian context. While careful adaptation will be needed, the approach adopted here may also hold useful lessons for policy makers seeking to integrate mental health within primary care in other contexts and settings.

2009-01-01

261

Public and Private Responsibility for Mental Health: Mental Health's Fourth Revolution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Three revolutions in the history of mental health were identified by Nicholas Hobbs: the humane revolution, the scientific and therapeutic revolution, and the public health revolution. The shift of responsibilities for mental health and substance abuse services from the public to the private sector may constitute a fourth mental health revolution.…

Dokecki, Paul R.

262

Promoting and Protecting Mental Health as Flourishing: A Complementary Strategy for Improving National Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article summarizes the conception and diagnosis of the mental health continuum, the findings supporting the two continua model of mental health and illness, and the benefits of flourishing to individuals and society. Completely mentally healthy adults--individuals free of a 12-month mental disorder and flourishing--reported the fewest missed…

Keyes, Corey L. M.

2007-01-01

263

Manic Depressive Disorder in Mental Handicap.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eight cases of early onset bipolar affective disorder in adolescents with mental impairment are described, focusing on age of onset; common characteristics such as rapid cycling, mixed affective states, and lithium resistance; and the likelihood that cerebral dysfunction might cause a secondary form of bipolar disorder. (JDD)

Berney, T. P.; Jones, P. M.

1988-01-01

264

Resilience in children of parents with mental illness: Relations between mental health literacy, social connectedness and coping, and both adjustment and caregiving  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the relationships between resilience factors (mental health literacy, social connectedness, coping strategies) frequently targeted in interventions, and both adjustment (depressive symptomatology, life satisfaction, prosocial behaviour, emotional\\/behavioural difficulties) and caregiving outcomes in children (12 – 17 years) of a parent with mental illness. Forty-four participants completed questionnaires. Correlations showed weak support for the predicted beneficial associations of mental

Eliza Fraser; Kenneth Ian Pakenham

2009-01-01

265

42 CFR 431.620 - Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 false Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions. 431.620 Section 431.620...Other Agencies § 431.620 Agreement with State mental health authority or mental institutions....

2013-10-01

266

The effect of social roles on mental health: a matter of quantity or quality?  

PubMed

The effect of social roles (partner, parent, worker) on mental health may depend on the total number or the quality of the individual occupied social roles. With longitudinal data from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS), the effect of the number and quality of occupied social roles on mental health over three years was examined among 2471 men and women aged 25-55 years without mental disorders at baseline. Mental health was assessed using 3-year change in the SF-36 mental health scale as well as using the 3-year incidence of anxiety and depressive disorders defined by DSM-III criteria. The quality of social roles was assessed by the GQSB (Groningen Questionnaire Social Behavior). The number of social roles had no significant effect on the risk of developing depressive and anxiety disorders, but particularly the partner-role had a significant positive effect on mental health (beta of mental health=1.19, p=0.01; HR of incident disorders=0.75, 95% CI:0.51-1.00, p=0.05). A good quality of each of the three social roles was associated with higher levels of mental health and lower risks of incident disorders over 3 years. More than the number of social roles, knowledge about social role quality might provide opportunities for prevention of depressive and anxiety disorders. PMID:18448169

Plaisier, I; Beekman, A T F; de Bruijn, J G M; de Graaf, R; Ten Have, M; Smit, J H; van Dyck, R; Penninx, B W J H

2008-12-01

267

Pilot mental health: expert working group recommendations.  

PubMed

Following a March 27, 2012, incident in which a pilot of a major commercial airline experienced a serious disturbance in his mental health, the Aerospace Medical Association formed an Ad Hoc Working Group on Pilot Mental Health. The working group met several times and analyzed current medical standards for evaluating pilot mental health. The result of the working group was a letter sent to the FAA and other organizations worldwide interested in medical standards. The Committee found that it is neither productive nor cost effective to perform extensive psychiatric evaluations as part of the routine pilot aeromedical assessment. However it did recommend greater attention be given to mental health issues by aeromedical examiners, especially to the more common and detectable mental health conditions and life stressors that can affect pilots and flight performance. They encouraged this through increased education and global recognition of the importance of mental health in aviation safety. PMID:23316549

2012-12-01

268

Childhood and Adolescence: Challenges in Mental Health  

PubMed Central

Mental health is an integral and essential component of health. The World Health Organization (WHO) constitution states: “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” More than 450 million people suffer from mental disorders worldwide. In India, mental health services, especially for children and adolescents, are limited both in terms of number of facilities as well as trained professionals. The majority of mental health services are restricted to urban areas, that is, medical colleges or regional mental health institutes. Mere presence of a treatment facility does not guarantee that all children/adolescents suffering from mental illness will utilize such services. In fact, most of the time there is a significant delay from the patient side in accessing mental health services either because of lack of awareness or associated stigma. It is high time to promote positive mental health in children, adolescents and their parents through health education. Parental counseling is of utmost importance in order to avoid the delay in treatment seeking.

Shrivastava, Saurabh RamBiharilal; Shrivastava, Prateek Saurabh; Ramasamy, Jegadeesh

2013-01-01

269

In-home mental health treatment for individuals with HIV.  

PubMed

Mental health problems are highly prevalent among individuals with HIV and are consistently associated with negative health outcomes. However, mental illness often remains untreated due to significant psychosocial and physical barriers to treatment participation. The Collaborative HIV/AIDS Mental Health Program (CHAMP) assessed the outcomes associated with providing 9 months of in-home mental health counseling for 40 individuals with HIV and a Major Axis I mental disorder. The evidence-based Illness Management and Recovery Model was adapted for use with HIV-positive individuals for the study using a community-based participatory research approach. Study participants were surveyed at baseline, 5 and 9 months to assess for changes in health outcomes. Thirty-five percent of study participants were female, 80% African American, 33% self-identified as MSM and the average participant age was 43. Forty percent of participants were on psychotropic medication at baseline. Participants had an average of 8 counseling visits (median 9). Statistically significant decreases in the global Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) score and a number of BSI symptoms dimensions including anxiety, depression, obsessive compulsive, phobic anxiety and hostility were detected, indicating a reduction of psychiatric symptoms. Statistically significant improvement was also identified for the SF-12 mental health scale, adaptive coping, overall social support and emotional support. No differences in psychiatric outcomes were identified by gender, race/ethnicity, or sexual preference. Findings from the CHAMP Study suggest that the use of in-home mental health treatment may be beneficial in engaging and treating HIV-positive individuals with comorbid mental health disorders. PMID:23050767

Reif, Susan S; Pence, Brian W; LeGrand, Sara; Wilson, Elena S; Swartz, Marvin; Ellington, Terry; Whetten, Kathryn

2012-11-01

270

The Clinical Neuroscience Course: Viewing Mental Health from Neurobiological Perspectives  

PubMed Central

Although the field of neuroscience is booming, a challenge for researchers in mental health disciplines is the integration of basic research findings into applied clinical approaches leading to effective therapies. Recently the National Institute of Mental Health called for translational research grants to encourage collaboration between neuroscientists and mental health professionals. In order for this “clinical neuroscience” to emerge and thrive, an important first step is the provision of appropriate course offerings so that future neuroscience researchers and mental health practitioners will have a common neurobiological base from which to make informed decisions about the most efficacious treatments for mental illnesses. Accordingly, an integrative course, Clinical Neuroscience, was developed to address these issues. After reviewing the historical origins of this emerging discipline, students are exposed to fundamental overviews of neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and neural development before approaching the neurobiological components of several disorders (e.g., schizophrenia, depression, Tourette’s syndrome, drug abuse, obsessive compulsive disorder). Finally, the maintenance of mental health is emphasized as topics such as psychoneuroimmunology, coping with stress, and eating regulation are discussed. Important themes emphasized in this course include (1) the consideration of only empirically based evidence, (2) the view that mental illness represents a disruption of neurobiological homeostasis, (3) the acknowledgement that, because the brain is a plastic organ, the clinical relevance of environmental and behavioral influences is difficult to overestimate, and (4) the recognition of the value of ecologically relevant animal models in the investigation of various aspects of mental illness. Because of the importance of stress maintenance in mental health, exercises have been developed to increase students’ awareness of their own coping strategies. Finally, several books and movies are incorporated to provide additional points of view of the topics discussed in the course.

Lambert, Kelly G.

2005-01-01

271

Nutrition health issues in self-reported postpartum depression  

PubMed Central

Aim In this retrospective survey women with and without self-reported postpartum depression (PPD) were compared in regards to consumption-frequency of foods and supplements rich in nutrients beneficial to nervous system (NS) health, in regards to consumption-frequency of compounds which may counteract the effect of the above and in regards to nutritional support provided to them during a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Background Postpartum depression (PPD) is defined as a major depressive episode that begins within 1 month of delivery and is experienced by roughly 13% of mothers. Patients and methods Four Hundred participants were recruited through the internet. Data gathered via multiple choice questionnaires was statistically analyzed using SPSS and Statistical software; statistical procedures included discriminant analysis, Pearson's product moment correlation, independent t-test and cross-tabulations. Results Out of 400 participants 83 (20.8%) were affected by self-reported depression after a pregnancy between 2003 and 2008. Depressed subjects consumed oily fish and offal significantly more often than non depressed subjects. Depression was more prevalent among women with vegetarian diets. No significant difference concerning food group intake or the ratios between foods rich in nutrients beneficial to NS health and foods rich in compounds antagonising their effect were found between depressed and non depressed subjects. Iron supplementation correlated positively with zinc supplementation in both groups. Roughly 70% of women reported to have received no information about n-3 fatty acid fish oils during pregnancy; informed subjects consumed fish oils more often. The majority of subjects with self-reported depression described nutritional support during pregnancy as inadequate. Conclusion Within this Austrian sample, the prevalence rate of postpartum depression was high; while the consumption of oily fish and vegetarian diets negatively correlated with depression, Patient information positively correlated with the consumption of fish oil supplements. These results indicate that further studies will be required in order to establish the exact relationship between nutrition and mental health during and after pregnancy.

Mortimore, Denise; Snow, Sarah

2011-01-01

272

Geographic Disparities in Children's Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. It is widely believed that only a minority of vulnerable children and adolescents receive any mental health services. Although health care dispar- ities associated with sociodemographic characteristics are well known, almost no information exists about another potentially important source of disparity for children: How does state of residence affect mental health service use? Methods. Observational analysis was conducted us-

Roland Sturm; Jeanne S. Ringel; Tatiana Andreyeva

2010-01-01

273

Mental health in schools and system restructuring  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because health is not the primary business of schools, a school’s response to mental health and psychosocial concerns usually is limited to targeted problems seen as direct barriers to learning. And because resources are sparse, priority is given to problems defined in legislative mandates. As a result, school-based mental health services are available only to a small proportion of the

Howard S Adelman; Linda Taylor

1999-01-01

274

Mental Health Promotion Education in Multicultural Settings.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A mental health promotion perspective provides a system-based understanding of relationships between culture and health. Educating nurses for multicultural practice should adopt an interdisciplinary approach that fosters critical awareness of diverse influences on mental health and their intersections. (Contains 38 references.) (SK)

Khanlou, Nazilla

2003-01-01

275

Humanistic Psychology and the Mental Health Worker  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article discusses the precarious relationship of humanistic psychology to the mental health worker in our current managed care, empirically based, behaviorally focused, excessively medication-oriented mental health system. Some of the challenges, frustrations, and potential successes of bringing real and nurturing human relationships in the context of humanistic psychology into the day-to-day involvements with clients for the mental health worker

Elliot Benjamin

2011-01-01

276

Maori Identification, Drinking Motivation and Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research examining the relationships among Maori cultural identification, drinking behaviour, drinking motivation and mental\\u000a health is almost non-existent. A review of literature suggests that stronger Maori identification could be associated with\\u000a lower alcohol consumption on a typical occasion, less frequent drinking, drinking to enhance mood or sociability (positive\\u000a reinforcement) and better mental health. Maori identification and mental health would be

Dave Clarke; Erin Ebbett

2010-01-01

277

Mental Health: An Interdisciplinary and International Perspective.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The World Federation for Mental Health was founded as an international apolitical organization concerned with quality of life rather than merely the absence or prevention of mental illness. An examination of the manner and extent to which mental problems arise in different cultural settings can provide data needed to understand the relationship…

Klineberg, Otto

278

Mental Health Services in Head Start  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This dialog suggests that mental health services in Head Start should be more broadly defined than they currently are in many programs. Specifically, these services should emphasize the important role prevention (e.g., prereferral/identification) plays in promoting mental wellness. Additionally, this dialog briefly addresses the role of the mental

Frey, Andy

2008-01-01

279

Mental capacity and mental health Acts part 1: advance decisions.  

PubMed

The Department of Health is undertaking a review of the Mental Health Act 1983 code of practice and as part of that review has opened a consultation on what changes should be made. One key area for change is a chapter that provides clearer information about the interface between the Mental Health Act 1983 and the Mental Capacity Act 2005. Both the House of Commons Health Select Committee and the House of Lords Mental Capacity Act Committee have argued that poor understanding of the interface has led to flawed decision making by doctors and nurses. In the first of a short series of articles, Richard Griffith considers the interface between these two important statutes, beginning with advance decisions to refuse treatment (ADRT). PMID:25062320

Griffith, Richard

2014-07-24

280

Holistic health: does it really include mental health?  

PubMed

Holistic health, incorporating mind and body as equally important and unified components of health, is a concept utilized in some health care arenas in the United States (U.S.) over the past 30 years. However, in the U.S., mental health is not seen as conceptually integral to physical health and, thus, holistic health cannot be realized until the historical concept of mind-body dualism, continuing stigma regarding mental illness, lack of mental health parity in insurance, and inaccurate public perceptions regarding mental illness are adequately addressed and resolved. Until then, mental and physical health will continue to be viewed as disparate entities rather than parts of a unified whole. We conclude that the U.S. currently does not generally incorporate the tenets of holistic health in its view of the mental and physical health of its citizens, and provide some suggestions for changing that viewpoint. PMID:17370005

McClanahan, Kimberly K; Huff, Marlene B; Omar, Hatim A

2006-01-01

281

A new paradigm for depression in new mothers: the central role of inflammation and how breastfeeding and anti-inflammatory treatments protect maternal mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Research in the field of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) has revealed that depression is associated with inflammation manifested by increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines. DISCUSSION: The old paradigm described inflammation as simply one of many risk factors for depression. The new paradigm is based on more recent research that has indicated that physical and psychological stressors increase inflammation. These recent studies

Kathleen Kendall-Tackett

2007-01-01

282

The role of the therapeutic alliance in psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy outcome: Findings in the National Institute of Mental Health Treatment of Depression Collaborative Research Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The relationship between therapeutic alliance and treatment outcome was examined for depressed outpa- tients who received interpersonal psychotherapy, cognitive-behavior therapy, imipramine with clinical management, or placebo with clinical management. Clinical raters scored videotapes of early, middle, and late therapy sessions for 225 cases (619 sessions). Outcome was assessed from patients' and clinical evaluators' perspectives and from depressive symptomatology. Therapeutic alliance

Janice L. Krupnick; Stuart M. Sotsky; Sam Simmens; Janet Moyer

1996-01-01

283

Mental health care use by soldiers conducting counterinsurgency operations.  

PubMed

Counterinsurgency (COIN) has become the cornerstone of the military's strategy to combat terrorist threats. COIN operations are complex and often expose soldiers to unfamiliar stressors as they fight the enemy while developing and maintaining rapport with the local populace. Utilizing a retrospective record review protocol, we examined 282 mental health files of soldiers assigned to a brigade combat team that operated from a large forward operating base in Iraq during the counterinsurgency campaign. Most reported sleep disturbance, depression, anxiety, irritability, and conflict with supervisors related to either operational stress, exposure to direct combat, or home front concerns. Most received brief individual supportive therapy or attended solution-focused group counseling emphasizing life skills training, post-traumatic stress treatment, women's support, or relationship skills. Psychopharmacologic treatment was an essential adjunct to the counseling program. Results indicate that supporting a COIN deployment requires a comprehensive mental health program that can respond to a wide range of mental health problems. PMID:22645874

Applewhite, Larry; Keller, Nathan; Borah, Adam

2012-05-01

284

Multiple trauma and mental health in former Ugandan child soldiers.  

PubMed

The present study examines the effect of war and domestic violence on the mental health of child soldiers in a sample consisting of 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age: 11-17 years, female: 49%). All children had experienced at least 1 war-related event and 78% were additionally exposed to at least 1 incident of domestic violence. Prevalences of posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder were 33%, and 36%, respectively. Behavioral and emotional problems above clinical cutoff were measured in 61%. No gender differences were found regarding mental health outcomes. War experience and domestic violence were significantly associated with all mental health outcomes. The authors' findings point to the detrimental effects of domestic violence in addition to traumatizing war experiences in child soldiers. PMID:21053376

Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Adam, Hubertus

2010-10-01

285

Labor migration and mental health in Cambodia: a qualitative study.  

PubMed

Labor migration is thought to have significant mental and physical health impacts, given the risks for exploitation and abuse of migrant workers, particularly among those in semiskilled and unskilled positions, although empirical data are limited. This qualitative study, conducted in July 2010 in Banteay Meanchey Province, Cambodia, focused on psychosocial and mental health signs and symptoms associated with labor migration among Cambodian migrant workers to Thailand. Two qualitative methods identified a number of mental health problems faced by Cambodian migrant workers in Thailand, including the presence of anxiety and depression-like problems among this population, described in local terminology as pibak chet (sadness), keut chreun (thinking too much), and khval khvay khnong chet (worry in heart). Key informants revealed the extent to which psychosocial well-being is associated with conditions of poverty, including debt and lack of access to basic services. PMID:24566505

Meyer, Sarah R; Robinson, W Courtland; Chhim, Sotheara; Bass, Judith K

2014-03-01

286

The role of primary mental health workers in child and adolescent mental health services in Scotland  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is estimated that approximately 10% of children and young people in Scotland have mental health problems (Scottish Government, 2008), resulting in a rapidly increasing need for child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS). Primary mental health workers (PMHW) have been identified as one of the key professional groups within a multidisciplinary CAMHS team to progress the agenda of early

Margaret Conlon

2009-01-01

287

Mental health services system research: the National Institute of Mental Health program.  

PubMed Central

There is a critical need for research to examine the changing mental health services system, to evaluate major innovations in the provision of mental health treatment, and to remove existing barriers to comprehensive and cost-effective care. To achieve these aims, collaboration is needed among government agencies, mental health services programs, academic institutions, and the private sector. The National Institute of Mental Health supports research and research training on the mental health services system primarily through the Division of Biometry and Applied Sciences. This article focuses on the division's three priority research areas of the mental health services system: the provision of mental health care in the primary care sector, the organization and delivery of care for the chronically mentally ill, and financing and reimbursement of care. The various mechanisms of research support are also highlighted.

Taube, C A; Burns, B J

1988-01-01

288

Modeling the mental health effects of victimization among homeless persons  

PubMed Central

Homeless persons are victims of violent and non-violent crime at higher rates than housed populations. While studies have suggested that victimization can induce or exacerbate mental health problems, there is very little known about factors that may buffer the effects of victimization. This cross-sectional study examined the influence of victimization on depressive symptoms in over 9600 homeless and mentally ill adults participating in the Access to Community Care and Effective Services and Supports study (ACCESS) conducted in multiple cities across the USA relationships between victimization, depressive symptoms, and perceived safety were tested within a structural equation modeling framework using data collected at the baseline interview. The overall model exhibited a good fit with the data. Non-physical victimization was associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms, and physical victimization was associated with lower levels of perceived safety. As hypothesized, perceived safety was a significant partial mediator of depressive symptoms. These results underscore the complexity of the relationships between victimization and depression in homeless adults and the importance of addressing different types of victimization in homeless and mentally ill adults.

Perron, Brian Edward; Alexander-Eitzman, Ben; Gillespie, David F.; Pollio, David

2014-01-01

289

Promoting mental health as an essential aspect of health promotion.  

PubMed

This paper advocates that mental health promotion receive appropriate attention within health promotion. It is of great concern that, in practice, mental health promotion is frequently overlooked in health promotion programmes although the WHO definitions of health and the Ottawa Charter describe mental health as an integral part of health. It is suggested that more attention be given to addressing the determinants of mental health in terms of protective and risk factors for both physical and mental conditions, particularly in developing countries. Examples of evidence-based mental health programmes operating in widely diverse settings are presented to demonstrate that well designed interventions can contribute to the well-being of populations. It is advocated that particular attention be given to the intersectorial cooperation needed for this work. PMID:17307955

Sturgeon, Shona

2006-12-01

290

Mental health first aid programme in Nepal.  

PubMed

Mental Health First Aid is a relatively new concept conceived in Australia about 10 years ago and by 2010 it has spread to 15 other countries including Nepal. It is designed to deal with mental health emergencies as well as to help people with developing mental health problems to get to appropriate help before a crisis occurs. This programme was launched in Kathmandu by SAF-Nepal in November 2010 when the Australian experts ran a workshop for over 22 delegates from various mental health organisations. The MHFA Nepal course is being evaluated and adapted to suit Nepalese context. New conditions including hysteria and epilepsy have been added in the Nepalese version. The programme is expected to raise mental health awareness and reduce stigmatising attitudes amongst the selected members of the general public and health professionals. PMID:23281463

Jha, A; Kitchener, B A; Pradhan, P K; Shyangwa, P; Nakarmi, B

2012-09-01

291

Mental health outcomes at the Jersey Shore after Hurricane Sandy.  

PubMed

On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall in the most densely populated region in the US. In New Jersey, thousands of families were made homeless and entire communities were destroyed in the worst disaster in the history of the state. The economic impact of Sandy was huge, comparable to Hurricane Katrina. The areas that sustained the most damage were the small- to medium-sized beach communities along New Jersey's Atlantic coastline. Six months following the hurricane, we conducted a random telephone survey of 200 adults residing in 18 beach communities located in Monmouth County. We found that 14.5% (95% CI = 9.9-20.2) of these residents screened positive for PTSD and 6.0% (95% CI = 3.1-10.2) met criteria for major depression. Altogether 13.5% (95% CI = 9.1-19.0) received mental health counseling and 20.5% (95% CI = 15.1-26.8) sought some type of mental health support in person or online, rates similar to those reported in New York after the World Trade Center disaster In multivariate analyses, the best predictors of mental health status and service use were having high hurricane exposure levels, having physical health limitations, and having environmental health concerns. Research is needed to assess the mental health status and service use of Jersey Shore residents over time, to evaluate environmental health concerns, and to better understand the storm's impact among those with physical health limitations. PMID:24558743

Boscarino, Joseph A; Hoffman, Stuart N; Kirchner, H Lester; Erlich, Porat M; Adams, Richard E; Figley, Charles R; Solhkhah, Ramon

2013-01-01

292

Review of community pharmacy staff educational needs for supporting mental health consumers and carers.  

PubMed

Development of a mental health education package for community pharmacy staff should be informed by mental health consumers/carers' needs, expectations and experiences, and staff knowledge, skills and attitudes. This review (1) explored research on community pharmacy practice and service provision for mental health consumers/carers, and (2) identified validated methods for assessing staff knowledge, skills and attitudes about mental illness to inform the development of a training questionnaire. A literature scan using key words knowledge, skills, attitudes, and beliefs combined with community pharmacy, pharmacist, and pharmacy support staff, and mental illness, depression, anxiety was conducted. A small number of studies were found that used reliable methods to assess pharmacists' training needs regarding mental illness and treatment options. There was little published specifically in relation to depression and anxiety in community pharmacy practice. No studies assessed the training needs of pharmacy support staff. A systematic analysis of pharmacy staff learning needs is warranted. PMID:23306675

Mey, Amary; Fowler, Jane L; Knox, Kathy; Shum, David H K; Fejzic, Jasmina; Hattingh, Laetitia; McConnell, Denise; Wheeler, Amanda

2014-01-01

293

Maternal postnatal depression and children's growth and behaviour during the early years of life: exploring the interaction between physical and mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectiveTo assess the association between maternal postnatal depression and child behaviour problems and child growth at age 2 yearsMethodsThis was a longitudinal birth cohort study in Johannesburg, South Africa. Primary analysis on the ‘Birth to Twenty’ cohort was performed for the association between maternal postnatal depression and child behaviour problems (n=1035) and growth (n=891) at age 2 and subgroup analyses

Bilal Avan; Linda M Richter; Paul G Ramchandani; Shane A Norris; Alan Stein

2010-01-01

294

Definition and Measurement of Mental Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Papers delivered during a symposium on the definition and measurement of mental health, organized by the National Center for Health Statistics, DHEW, are presented. The symposium was conducted as a series of lectures, each followed by group discussion and...

S. B. Sells

1968-01-01

295

The Crisis in Mental Health Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presented is a speech by Bertram Brown, director of the National Institute of Mental Health, on the effects of decreased federal funding of mental health research. Brown notes that there has been a 56% slash in the purchasing power of the research grant program when inflation is accounted for. It is suggested that causes of the dwindling support…

Brown, Bertram S.

296

Funding Early Childhood Mental Health Services & Supports.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper is the first of a two-part series on financing early childhood mental health services. It discusses the need for a systemic approach to financing early childhood mental health services and supports and presents a matrix to assist states and communities in the design of comprehensive financing systems. The vertical axis of the matrix…

Wishmann, Amy; Kates, Donald; Kaufmann, Roxane

297

Migrant Farmworker Stress: Mental Health Implications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Context: The number of Latinos in rural regions of the United States is increasing. Little is known about factors that undermine the mental health of this segment of the rural population. Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine which stressors inherent in farmwork and the farmworker lifestyle contribute to poor mental health. Methods: An…

Hiott, Ann E.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Davis, Stephen W.; Quandt, Sara A.; Arcury, Thomas A.

2008-01-01

298

Evaluation of Expanded School Mental Health Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Expanded school mental health programs provide a full range of mental health services (assessment, treatment, case management, prevention) to youth in regular and special education, and typically involve close collaboration between schools and community agencies. A major challenge for these programs is documenting that provided services are of high quality and leading to enhanced outcomes for the youth and schools

Mark D. Weist; Laura A. Nabors; C. Patrick Myers; Paula Armbruster

2000-01-01

299

Interpreting Results in Mental Health Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is often difficult to interpret the clinical or policy significance of findings from mental health research when results are presented only in terms of statistical significance. Results expressed in terms of p values or as a metric corresponding to a mental health status scale are seldom intuitively meaningful. To help interpret the significance of research results, we demonstrate a

Jeffrey S. Harman; Willard G. Manning; Nicole Lurie; Chuan-Fen Liu

2001-01-01

300

Student Mental Health: Reframing the "Problem"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author contends that to understand the concern over student mental health, one must first consider what students are reporting about themselves. Students with mental health issues are intellectually capable; rising numbers of accepted students with diagnosed psychological conditions confirm this. However, many conditions…

Bertram, Margaret

2010-01-01

301

College Mental Health at the Cutting Edge?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As someone who has been involved in college mental health in three different roles, the author would say those who work in this field inhabit a strange space. College mental health centers are generally seen as somewhat peripheral to the core mission of universities by upper administration. Counseling centers do not reside within academic…

Schwartz, Victor

2013-01-01

302

Mental health literacy among university students  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the mental health literacy of students. This study is part of the growing interest in mental health literacy among young people. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Over 400 university students indicated their knowledge of over 90 psychiatric illnesses labels derived from DSM:IV. They rated disorders on six questions concerning whether they had heard

Adrian Furnham; Richard Cook; Neil Martin; Mark Batey

2011-01-01

303

Neglecting the mental health of prisoners  

Microsoft Academic Search

From first contact with the police to release from prison, people with mental ill health who come into conflict with the law often find that their mental health needs are neglected while they are under the authority of the criminal justice system. In 2008, the Prison Reform Trust surveyed independent monitoring boards in England and Wales, asking them to comment

K. Edgar; D. Rickford

2009-01-01

304

Transformation at a community mental health centre  

Microsoft Academic Search

The community mental health centre affords an opportunity for psychodynamic practice that is both challenging and rewarding. The experience of psychoanalytic education and supervision at a suburban mental health centre is described in terms of its transformative effect on the participants and the clinical setting. A parallel clinical transformative process is illustrated through an extended vignette of one client's experience

David Kealy

2011-01-01

305

Advance Directives for Mental Health Treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Advance directives are designed to establish a person's preferences for treatment if the person becomes incompetent in the future or unable to communicate those preferences to treatment providers. Mental health advance directives are similar to the more commonly used directives for end-of-life medical decisions. A patient must be competent to execute a mental health advance directive, and the directive must

Debra S. Srebnik; John Q. La Fond

306

Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

2012-01-01

307

Family Involvement in Expanded School Mental Health.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Expanded school mental-health (ESMH) programs address the limitations of traditional mental-health agencies in meeting childrens' needs by offering a full range of services in school. Family involvement in ESMHs can enhance their effectiveness. This paper describes challenges of involving families, guidelines for determining program goals for…

Bickham, Nicole L.; Pizarro, L. Josefina; Warner, Beth S.; Rosenthal, Bernice; Weist, Mark D.

1998-01-01

308

Promoting School-Wide Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although schools are not traditionally designed to provide intensive mental health services to children, they are in a position to create systems that foster mental health. By creating school-wide systems in which students are academically, behaviorally and socially successful, schools can integrate those essential protective factors shown to…

Trussell, Robert P.

2008-01-01

309

The Internet and Mental Health Literacy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: This paper describes the informational and treatment opportunities offered by the Worldwide Web (WWW) and comments on the advantages, disadvantages and potential dangers of its role in mental health and mental health research.Method: Two perspectives are taken: (i) the impact of the Web from the point of view of the clinician (the practitioner view) and (ii) the impact of

Helen Christensen; Kathleen Griffiths

2000-01-01

310

Qualitative Research Methods in Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the evidence base for the study of mental health problems develops, there is a need for increasingly rigorous and systematic research methodologies. Complex questions require complex methodological approaches. Recognising this, the MRC guidelines for developing and testing complex interventions place qualitative methods as integral to each stage of intervention development and implementation. However, mental health research has lagged behind

Sarah Peters

2010-01-01

311

Mental Health and Work: Issues and Perspectives.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Australia, there is increasing attention being paid to the promotion of mental health and the prevention of serious mental disorder by policymakers, funders, academics and service providers. This has required a shift in thinking to focus on health and well being, not just on illness and treatment. The National Action Plan for Promotion,…

Morrow, Lou, Ed.; Verins, Irene, Ed.; Willis, Eileen, Ed.

312

Mental Health of Students. Position Statement. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that mental health is as critical to academic success as physical well-being. School nurses play a vital role in the school community by promoting positive mental health development in students through school/community-based programs and curricula. As members of…

National Association of School Nurses (NJ1), 2008

2008-01-01

313

Children's Mental Health and School Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An integrative review of literature was undertaken to examine the impact of children's mental health on their school success. The literature confirmed a confluence of problems associated with school performance and child and adolescent mental health. Poor academic functioning and inconsistent school attendance were identified as early signs of…

DeSocio, Janiece; Hootman, Janis

2004-01-01

314

Human Services Study. Report on Mental Health.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The mental health component of the countywide human services planning program of the Johnson County Regional Planning Commission in Iowa is described. The report on mental health is one in a series of eight reports outlining the program. The overall goal ...

1977-01-01

315

Political violence and mental health in Nepal: prospective study*†  

PubMed Central

Background Post-conflict mental health studies in low-income countries have lacked pre-conflict data to evaluate changes in psychiatric morbidity resulting from political violence. Aims This prospective study compares mental health before and after exposure to direct political violence during the People’s War in Nepal. Method An adult cohort completed the Beck Depression Inventory and Beck Anxiety Inventory in 2000 prior to conflict violence in their community and in 2007 after the war. Results Of the original 316 participants, 298 (94%) participated in the post-conflict assessment. Depression increased from 30.9 to 40.6%. Anxiety increased from 26.2 to 47.7%. Post-conflict post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was 14.1%. Controlling for ageing, the depression increase was not significant. The anxiety increase showed a dose–response association with conflict exposure when controlling for ageing and daily stressors. No demographic group displayed unique vulnerability or resilience to the effects of conflict exposure. Conclusions Conflict exposure should be considered in the context of other types of psychiatric risk factors. Conflict exposure predicted increases in anxiety whereas socioeconomic factors and non-conflict stressful life events were the major predictors of depression. Research and interventions in post-conflict settings therefore should consider differential trajectories for depression v. anxiety and the importance of addressing chronic social problems ranging from poverty to gender and ethnic/caste discrimination.

Kohrt, Brandon A.; Hruschka, Daniel J.; Worthman, Carol M.; Kunz, Richard D.; Baldwin, Jennifer L.; Upadhaya, Nawaraj; Acharya, Nanda Raj; Koirala, Suraj; Thapa, Suraj B.; Tol, Wietse A.; Jordans, Mark J. D.; Robkin, Navit; Sharma, Vidya Dev; Nepal, Mahendra K.

2012-01-01

316

76 FR 80741 - TRICARE: Certified Mental Health Counselors  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...RIN 0720-AB55] TRICARE: Certified Mental Health Counselors AGENCY: Office of the...that would allow licensed or certified mental health counselors to be able to independently...Under current TRICARE requirements, mental health counselors (MHCs) are...

2011-12-27

317

Indiana Department of Mental Health and Work Force Development.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The collaborative sharing of knowledge about training among Indiana mental health agencies to strengthen the individual efforts of each separate agency was defined. The mental health worker is referred to as a generalist mental health practitioner, demons...

1981-01-01

318

Parent Groups, Preventive Mental Health in the Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes an approach utilized by Margaret Dumas Mental Health Center to produce an effective preventive mental health program with the school incorporating the concept of clear communication and consultation between the school and mental health personnel. (Author)

Beck, Frances W.; Bornman, Kemper L.

1978-01-01

319

Transitions: A Mental Health Literacy Program for Postsecondary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Enhancement of mental health literacy is a mental health promotion strategy that may be effective at destigmatizing mental illness and increasing self-seeking behavior. Transitions is a mental health literacy program intended to heighten students' awareness and discussion of mental health problems and promote help-seeking behaviors. Transitions…

Potvin-Boucher, Jacqueline; Szumilas, Magdalena; Sheikh, Tabinda; Kutcher, Stan

2010-01-01

320

Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Released on December 13, the first Surgeon General's report on mental health reveals that nearly half of all Americans who have a severe mental illness fail to seek treatment. The 500-page publication was developed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) under the guidance of the Surgeon General. It notes that "disorders such as depression, schizophrenia and eating disorders are real illnesses that, if untreated, can be as disabling and serious as cancer and heart disease in terms of premature death and lost productivity." The report takes a life-span approach, considering vulnerability to distinct forms of mental and behavioral disorders at different stages of life as well as the impact of gender, culture, and age on the diagnosis, course, and treatment of mental illness. Users can read the full text of the report and the accompanying tables and figures in HTML or .pdf formats at the Virtual Office of the Surgeon General or one of three mirror sites. For more on the report, please see the In The News section from this week's Scout Report for Social Sciences.

321

Substance dependence and mental health in northern Iran.  

PubMed

Background: Today, substance dependence and illegal trading of narcotics is considered as a global issue. Since mental disorder has been reported in about 90% of the substance dependents, this study aimed at determining the rate of mental health in the substance dependents in Sari Township in 2011. Materials and Methods: In this study, 500 substance-dependent patients were selected using convenience sampling method. To collect data, SCL-90-R was used for the evaluation of their mental health and a demographic questionnaire was employed for identifying their personal information. The obtained data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics using the SPSS software. Results: It was found that 90.4% of the participants were susceptible to mental disorder. Most of them suffered from depression, psychoticism, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, and paranoia. Also, there was significant relationship between the mental health of single, divorced and married addicts (P < 0.21). Conclusion: Due to the presence of mental disorder in the substance-dependent patients, it is recommended to help treat them by providing them with education, psychotherapy, and psychiatric medication. PMID:24923370

Fard, Jabbar Heydari; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Jannati, Yadollah; Golikhatir, Iraj; Bozorgi, Farzad; Mohammadpour, Rezaali; Gorji, Ali Morad Heidari

2014-01-01

322

Migration and mental health in Europe (the state of the mental health in Europe working group: appendix 1)  

PubMed Central

Background This paper is a part of the work of the group that carried out the report "The state of the mental health in Europe" (European Commission, DG Health and Consumer Protection, 2004) and deals with the mental health issues related to the migration in Europe. Methods The paper tries to describe the social, demographical and political context of the emigration in Europe and tries to indicate the needs and (mental) health problems of immigrants. A review of the literature concerning mental health risk in immigrant is also carried out. The work also faces the problem of the health policy toward immigrants and the access to health care services in Europe. Results Migration during the 1990s has been high and characterised by new migrations. Some countries in Europe, that have been traditionally exporters of migrants have shifted to become importers. Migration has been a key force in the demographic changes of the European population. The policy of closed borders do not stop migration, but rather seems to set up a new underclass of so-called "illegals" who are suppressed and highly exploited. In 2000 there were also 392.200 asylum applications. The reviewed literature among mental health risk in some immigrant groups in Europe concerns: 1) highest rate of schizophrenia; suicide; alcohol and drug abuse; access of psychiatric facilities; risk of anxiety and depression; mental health of EU immigrants once they returned to their country; early EU immigrants in today disadvantaged countries; refugees and mental health Due to the different condition of migration concerning variables as: motivation to migrations (e.g. settler, refugees, gastarbeiters); distance for the host culture; ability to develop mediating structures; legal residential status it is impossible to consider "migrants" as a homogeneous group concerning the risk for mental illness. In this sense, psychosocial studies should be undertaken to identify those factors which may under given conditions, imply an increased risk of psychiatric disorders and influence seeking for psychiatric care. Comments and Remarks Despite in the migrants some vulnerable groups were identified with respect to health problems, in many European countries there are migrants who fall outside the existing health and social services, something which is particularly true for asylum seekers and undocumented immigrants. In order to address these deficiencies, it is necessary to provide with an adequate financing and a continuity of the grants for research into the multicultural health demand. Finally, there is to highlight the importance of adopting an integrated approach to mental health care that moves away from psychiatric care only.

2005-01-01

323

The association between criminal history and mental health service use among people with serious mental illness.  

PubMed

This study examined the extent to which a criminal history is associated with the use of various mental health services as well as related service use predictors among people with serious mental illness (SMI). Data were obtained from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. The sample consisted of 1,588 adults with SMI, including major depressive disorder (n = 1,398) and bipolar disorder (n = 190). Chi square tests were conducted to compare respondent characteristics based upon the presence/absence of a criminal history. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine various mental health services usage among respondents while controlling for predisposing, enabling, and need factors. Approximately 30 % of respondents reported a criminal history. Those with a criminal history were more likely to use specialty mental health services (OR = 1.42, p < 0.05). Findings suggest that the criminal justice system may be serving as a substantial referrer to mental health services or that there is higher morbidity among people with SMI who have been justice involved. PMID:23783440

Matejkowski, Jason; Lee, Sungkyu; Han, Woojae

2014-03-01

324

Women's mental health in Pakistan  

PubMed Central

In Pakistan, societal attitudes and norms, as well as cultural practices (Karo Kari, exchange marriages, dowry, etc.), play a vital role in women's mental health. The religious and ethnic conflicts, along with the dehumanizing attitudes towards women, the extended family system, role of in-laws in daily lives of women, represent major issues and stressors. Such practices in Pakistan have created the extreme marginalisation of women in numerous spheres of life, which has had an adverse psychological impact. Violence against women has become one of the acceptable means whereby men exercise their culturally constructed right to control women. Still, compared to other South Asian countries, Pakistani women are relatively better off than their counterparts.

Niaz, Unaiza

2004-01-01

325

Sexual orientation and mental health.  

PubMed

This article provides an overview of current psychological research on mental health and sexual orientation, as well as clinical practice with sexual minorities. The historical context for current research questions and controversies is described, and the findings of recent empirical research on psychological well-being and distress among nonheterosexuals are summarized. The minority stress model is used to frame a discussion of stressors unique to sexual minorities and to consider their possible effects on psychological well-being. The possible ameliorative effects of adopting a sexual orientation identity are examined, followed by a discussion of how these ideas translate into contemporary clinical work with sexual minority clients. The review concludes with a brief discussion of priority areas for empirical research and clinical practice. PMID:17716060

Herek, Gregory M; Garnets, Linda D

2007-01-01

326

Trucking organization and mental health disorders of truck drivers.  

PubMed

There are over 3 million truck drivers employed in the commercial transportation and material moving occupations, one of the largest occupational groups in the United States. Workers in this large and growing occupational segment are at risk for a range of occupational health-induced conditions, including mental health and psychiatric disorders due to high occupational stress, low access and use of health care, and limited social support. The purpose of this study was to explore male truck drivers' mental health risks and associated comorbidities, using a cross-sectional and quantitative design. Data were collected from a random sample of 316 male truckers between the ages of 23 and 76 at a large truck stop located within a 100-mile radius of Greensboro, North Carolina, USA, using a self-administered 82-item questionnaire. Surveyed truckers were found to have significant issues affecting their mental health, such as loneliness (27.9%), depression (26.9%), chronic sleep disturbances (20.6%), anxiety (14.5%), and other emotional problems (13%). Findings have potential to help researchers develop interventions to improve the emotional and occupational health of truck drivers, a highly underserved population. Mental health promotion, assessment, and treatment must become a priority to improve the overall trucking environment for truckers, the transportation industry, and safety on US highways. PMID:22757596

Shattell, Mona; Apostolopoulos, Yorghos; Collins, Chad; Sönmez, Sevil; Fehrenbacher, Caitlin

2012-07-01

327

The Public Health Impact of Major Depression: A Call for Interdisciplinary Prevention Efforts  

PubMed Central

Major depression is a consequential public health problem in the United States. Depression has long been recognized as an important target of intervention in psychology and psychiatry, but these fields have focused efforts primarily on treatment rather than prevention. Although effective preventive interventions targeting high-risk groups have been developed, they have thus far had poor reach and sustainability in the community. The development of sustainable preventive interventions that have the potential to impact population health represents a critical goal for the field. To this end, a research agenda incorporating the perspectives of both mental health disciplines and public health is proposed as a guide for future depression prevention research. Increased interdisciplinary collaboration between mental health disciplines and public health is recommended to develop, enact, and evaluate multi-level preventive interventions aimed at reducing the population health burden of major depression.

McLaughlin, Katie A.

2011-01-01

328

The public health impact of major depression: a call for interdisciplinary prevention efforts.  

PubMed

Major depression is a consequential public health problem in the United States. Depression has long been recognized as an important target of intervention in psychology and psychiatry, but these fields have focused efforts primarily on treatment rather than prevention. Although effective preventive interventions targeting high-risk groups have been developed, they have thus far had poor reach and sustainability in the community. The development of sustainable preventive interventions that have the potential to impact population health represents a critical goal for the field. To this end, a research agenda incorporating the perspectives of both mental health disciplines and public health is proposed as a guide for future depression prevention research. Increased interdisciplinary collaboration between mental health disciplines and public health is recommended to develop, enact, and evaluate multilevel preventive interventions aimed at reducing the population health burden of major depression. PMID:21732121

McLaughlin, Katie A

2011-12-01

329

Mental Health Service Delivery to Older People in New South Wales: Perceptions of Aged Care, Adult Mental Health and Mental Health Services for Older People  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To compare the perceptions of aged care services, adult mental health services and mental health services for older people regarding aspects of mental health service delivery for older people in New South Wales, Australia.Method: The NSW Branch of the Faculty of Psychiatry of Old Age in association with the NSW Centre for Mental Health, sent a postal survey to

Brian Draper; Tanya Jochelson; David Kitching; John Snowdon; Henry Brodaty; Bob Russell

2003-01-01

330

[Mental health support for nurses].  

PubMed

Burnout specific to human service workers has been reported in the U.S. in the 1970s. Since then, such burnout has become widely known and the mental health of nurses has attracted attention. Stressors in the work environment and complexity have increased with advancement in increasingly complicated medical care. One of the major roles of a psychiatric liaison nurse is to provide support to improve the mental health of nurses. In our hospital, a psychiatric liaison nurse has a staff position under the direct supervision of the director of the nursing department but operates outside the chain of command. A psychiatric liaison nurse is not involved in the performance review of nurses. Thus, the nursing staff and the nursing manager can discuss their problems with the psychiatric liaison nurse without risks. Psychiatric liaison nurses provide support as counselors through individual and group interviews so that nurses can become re-energized about their work. In addition, psychiatric liaison nurses provide consultations and education. They perform coordination function to organize an environment to promote consultations regarding nurse support to the staff nurses and the nursing manager and to promote support by supervisors. For support after reinstatement of a nurse following a medical leave, it is particularly important to work with not only the individual nurse but also the entire nursing team. In our hospital, newly graduated nurses are given the GHQ-28 after one month of employment to assess the support they might need. In our study, nurses with high risks were divided into a group with a score of at least 6 points but less than 10 points and a group with a score of at least 10 points. The group with at least 10 points had significantly higher rates of leave of absence and resignation. Thus, early intervention was thought to be necessary in newly graduated nurses with a score of at least 10 points in the GHQ. PMID:22712205

Fukushima, Yoshie

2012-01-01

331

A Suffering Generation: Six Factors Contributing to the Mental Health Crisis in North American Higher Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The number of students on university and college campuses that are struggling with depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts, and psychosis across North America is rising (Gallagher, 2008). This intensification of students' psychological needs has become a mental health crisis. The age at which many mental disorders manifest themselves is…

Kruisselbrink Flatt, Alicia

2013-01-01

332

Mental health literacy in an educational elite – an online survey among university students  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Mental health literacy is a prerequisite for early recognition and intervention in mental disorders. The aims of this paper are to determine whether a sample of university students recognise different symptoms of depression and schizophrenia and to reveal factors influencing correct recognition. METHODS: Bivariate and correspondence analyses of the results from an online survey among university students (n =

Christoph Lauber; Vladeta Ajdacic-Gross; Nadja Fritschi; Niklaus Stulz; Wulf Rössler

2005-01-01

333

Homeless Youths and Young Adults in Los Angeles: Prevalence of Mental Health Problems and the Relationship Between Mental Health and Substance Abuse Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although understanding of the subsistence patterns, service utilization, and HIV-risk behaviors of homeless youths and young adults is increasing, relatively little is known about the epidemiology of mental health problems in this group or the relationships between mental health problems and substance use. This study measured symptoms of depression, low self-esteem, ADHD, suicidality, self-injurious behavior (SIB), and drug and alcohol

Jennifer B. Unger; Michele D. Kipke; Thomas R. Simon; Susanne B. Montgomery; Christine J. Johnson

1997-01-01

334

The Relationship Between Outpatient Mental Health Treatment and Subsequent Mental Health Symptoms and Disorders in Young Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to evaluate community-based outpatient mental health services for young adults. Participants\\u000a were interviewed at ages 21, 24, 27, and 30. Outcomes included: (1) symptoms of depression, generalized anxiety, social phobia,\\u000a dysthymia and post traumatic stress individually and as a global scale; and (2) a dichotomous diagnosis variable inclusive\\u000a of all above disorders. Treatment was

Richard A. Van Dorn; Rick Kosterman; James Herbert Williams; Kristen Chandler; M. Scott Young; Richard F. Catalano; J. David Hawkins

2010-01-01

335

Managed Mental Health Care: Intentional Misdiagnosis of Mental Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the authors provide an overview of the effectiveness of managed health care systems and their impact on mental health counselors. They review ethical and legal dilemmas involving informed consent, confidentiality, client autonomy, competence, treatment plans, and termination that had not existed prior to the introduction of…

Braun, Sharon A.; Cox, Jane A.

2005-01-01

336

Validation of a Mental Health Assessment in an African Conflict Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the validity of the assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression within the context of an epidemiological mental health survey among war-affected adolescents and young adults in northern Uganda. Local language versions of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and the Depression section of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (DHSCL) were administered by trained local interviewers. Correlations with probable

Verena Ertl; Anett Pfeiffer; Regina Saile; Elisabeth Schauer; Thomas Elbert; Frank Neuner

2011-01-01

337

Validation of a Mental Health Assessment in an African Conflict Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the validity of the assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression within the context of an epidemiological mental health survey among war-affected adolescents and young adults in northern Uganda. Local language versions of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and the Depression section of the Hopkins Symptom Checklist (DHSCL) were administered by trained local interviewers. Correlations with probable

Verena Ertl; Anett Pfeiffer; Regina Saile; Elisabeth Schauer; Thomas Elbert; Frank Neuner

2010-01-01

338

Effects of Structural Family Therapy on Child and Maternal Mental Health Symptomatology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: This pilot study examined the effect of structural family therapy (SFT) on children's impairment and depressive symptomatology and mothers' depressive symptomatology and anxiety for 31 families served by a community mental health clinic. Method: A one group predesign/postdesign, with a baseline and two follow-up time points,…

Weaver, Addie; Greeno, Catherine G.; Marcus, Steven C.; Fusco, Rachel A.; Zimmerman, Tina; Anderson, Carol

2013-01-01

339

Validation of a Mental Health Assessment in an African Conflict Population  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We studied the validity of the assessment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression within the context of an epidemiological mental health survey among war-affected adolescents and young adults in northern Uganda. Local language versions of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS) and the Depression section of the Hopkins Symptom…

Ertl, Verena; Pfeiffer, Anett; Saile, Regina; Schauer, Elisabeth; Elbert, Thomas; Neuner, Frank

2010-01-01

340

Concepts of Mental Health-A Survey of Attendees at a Mental Health Promotion Conference.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reports on surveys of attendees (N=77) at Mental Health Promotion Conference in Yorkshire, England. There was agreement among respondents that a sense of self-worth is the most important attribute of being mentally healthy. Concludes there is a need to educate about enablement strategies to help develop concepts of positive mental health.…

Braidwood, Eve

2000-01-01

341

Stigma and Mental Illness: Investigating Attitudes of Mental Health and Non-Mental-Health Professionals and Trainees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors explored attitudes toward adults with mental illness. Results suggest that mental health trainees and professionals had less stigmatizing attitudes than did non-mental-health trainees and professionals. Professionals receiving supervision had higher mean scores on the Benevolence subscale than did professionals who were not receiving…

Smith, Allison L.; Cashwell, Craig S.

2010-01-01

342

Increasing mental health literacy via narrative advertising.  

PubMed

This research explored the effectiveness of narrative advertising and argument advertising in increasing mental illness (depression) literacy. Results showed that narrative advertising was more effective than argument advertising at engaging participants in experiential immersion, resulting in greater sympathy toward those suffering from depression. In addition, narrative advertising better involved participants in issue elaboration and increased willingness to seek professional help. Finally, in comparison with argument advertising, narrative advertisements were rated higher in providing vivid information, resulting in an increase in participants' perceived efficacy in recognizing friends or family suffering from depression. PMID:18307135

Chang, Chingching

2008-01-01

343

Building Bridges. Mental Health on Campus: Student Mental Health Leaders and College Administrators, Counselors, and Faculty in Dialogue.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Since 1997, the Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), within the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), has sponsored a series of participatory dialogues that offer mental health consumers and representatives from other gr...

2013-01-01

344

Prenatal health behaviors and postpartum depression: is there an association?  

PubMed

Postpartum depression is a prevalent mental disorder; however, scarce research has examined its association with prenatal health behaviors. This study investigated the associations of cigarette smoking, caffeine intake, and vitamin intake during pregnancy with postpartum depressive symptoms at 8 weeks after childbirth. Using a prospective cohort study design, participants were recruited from the postpartum floor at a hospital for women and newborns located in a northeastern city, from 2005 through 2008. Eligible women who were at least 18 years old and spoke English were interviewed in person while hospitalized for childbirth (N?=?662). A follow-up home interview was conducted at 8 weeks postpartum with a 79% response rate (N?=?526). Hierarchical regression analyses showed that smoking cigarettes anytime during pregnancy and not taking prenatal vitamins in the first trimester were significantly associated with worse depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale). Moreover, having a colicky infant, an infant that refuses feedings, being stressed out by parental responsibility, and having difficulty balancing responsibilities were stressors associated with worse depressive symptoms. Primary health care providers should consider evaluating women for risk of postpartum depression during their first prenatal visit, identifying prenatal health behaviors such as smoking and taking prenatal vitamins. PMID:22215286

Dagher, Rada K; Shenassa, Edmond D

2012-02-01

345

The Centre for International Mental Health approach to mental health system development.  

PubMed

Although mental disorders are a major public health problem, the development of mental health services has been a low priority everywhere, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Recent years have seen a growing understanding of the importance of population mental health and increased attention to the need to develop mental health systems for responding to population mental health service needs. In countries and regions where mental health services are all but nonexistent, and in postconflict and postdisaster settings, there are many impediments to establishing or scaling up mental health services. It is frequently necessary to act simultaneously on multiple fronts: generating local evidence that will inform decision makers; developing a policy framework; securing investment; determining the most appropriate service model for the context; training and supporting mental health workers; establishing or expanding existing services; putting in place systems for monitoring and evaluation; and strengthening leadership and governance capabilities. This article presents the approach of the Centre for International Mental Health in the Melbourne School of Population Health to mental health system development, and illustrates the way in which the elements of the program are integrated by giving a brief case example from Sri Lanka. PMID:22335181

Minas, Harry

2012-01-01

346

An effective exercise-based intervention for improving mental health and quality of life measures: a randomized controlled trial  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. This study investigates the effectiveness of 24-week aerobic and weight-training exercise plus behavior modification for mental health and quality of life (QOL) outcomes.Methods. Mental health and QOL data was collected using the Depression Anxiety and Stress Scales and SF-36 Health Status Survey, respectively. Employees from a single work-site were randomized into either treatment or wait-list control groups.Results: Mental Health

Evan Atlantis; Chin-Moi Chow; Adrienne Kirby; Maria Fiatarone Singh

2004-01-01

347

Multiple Roles and Women's Mental Health in Canada.  

PubMed

HEALTH ISSUE: Research on the relationship between women's social roles and mental health has been equivocal. Although a greater number of roles often protect mental health, certain combinations can lead to strain. Our study explored the moderating affects of different role combinations on women's mental health by examining associations with socioeconomic status and differences in women's distress (depressive symptoms, personal stress (role strain) and chronic stress (role strain plus environmental stressors). KEY FINDINGS: Women with children, whether single or partnered, had a higher risk of personal stress. Distress, stress and chronic stress levels of mothers, regardless of employment, or marital status, are staggeringly high. Single, unemployed mothers were significantly more likely than all other groups to experience financial stress and food insecurity. For partnered mothers, rates of personal stress and chronic stress were significantly lower among unemployed partnered mothers. Married and partnered mothers reported better mental health than their single counterparts. Lone, unemployed mothers were twice as likely to report a high level of distress compared with other groups. Lone mothers, regardless of employment status, were more likely to report high personal and chronic stress. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: National health surveys need to collect more data on the characteristics of women's work environment and their care giving responsibilities. Questions on household composition should include inter-generational households, same sex couples and multifamily arrangements. Data disaggregation by ethno-racial background would be helpful. Data should be collected on perceived quality of domestic and partnership roles and division of labours. PMID:15345066

Maclean, Heather; Glynn, Keva; Ansara, Donna

2004-08-25

348

Mental Health Patients in a Barrio Health Center  

Microsoft Academic Search

U TILIZATION by Mexican Americans of Mental Facilities of a Barrio area neighborhood health center, and demographic and symptom characteristicts of this population were investigated. The findings suggest that contrary to other studies this program was able to reach a high risk Mexican American population frequently missed by mental health programs. The barrio location, the relationship to a neighborhood health

Elliott M. Heiman; Martin W. Kahn

1975-01-01

349

Diabetes and Depressive Symptoms among Korean American Older Adults: The Mediating Role of Subjective Health Perceptions  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE In recognition of the impact of chronic diseases on mental health and the lack of research on Asian American subgroups, the present study examined subjective perceptions of health as a potential mediator in the association between diabetes and depressive symptoms in Korean American older adults. METHODS Multivariate analysis with data from 672 Korean American older adults in Florida explored the mediation model of health perceptions. RESULTS The presence of diabetes was associated with negative perceptions of health and elevated symptoms of depression. The proposed mediation model was also supported: negative perceptions of health served as an intervening step between diabetes and depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS The intervening role of health perceptions yields implications for developing health promotion interventions targeting older individuals with diabetes. Results suggest that even in the presence of chronic health conditions, mental well-being of older adults can be maintained by having optimistic beliefs and positive attitudes towards their own health.

Jang, Yuri; Park, Nan Sook; Cho, Soyeon; Roh, Soonhee; Chiriboga, David A.

2012-01-01

350

Examining disaster mental health workforce capacity.  

PubMed

Objective: We examined the capacity of the disaster mental health workforce in Victoria, Australia, to provide the three evidence-supported intervention types of psychological first aid, skills for psychological recovery, and intensive mental health treatments. Method: Utilizing data from a cross-professional, state-level disaster mental health workforce survey (n = 791), we developed composite capacity indicators (CCI) for each intervention and performed logistic regression analyses to examine key predictors of disaster mental health workforce capacity. Results: CCI profiles highlighted significant gaps in the disaster mental health capacity of Victorian providers, with only 32-42% able to deliver current best practice interventions. Key predictors of workforce capacity common and unique to interventions were highlighted. Conclusions: Key strategies to raise Victoria's disaster mental health workforce capacity should focus on targeted multilevel training in best practice interventions, creation of practice opportunities, and structural provider support/engagement. CCIs focused on best practice interventions provide a methodology for rapid workforce capacity assessment that can facilitate disaster preparedness planning, capacity building, and delivery of quality disaster mental health services. PMID:24865201

Reifels, Lennart; Naccarella, Lucio; Blashki, Grant; Pirkis, Jane

2014-01-01

351

Promoting and Protecting Mental Health as Flourishing: A Complementary Strategy for Improving National Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article summarizes the conception and diagnosis of the mental health continuum, the findings supporting the two continua model of mental health and illness, and the benefits of flourishing to individuals and society. Completely mentally healthy adults—individuals free of a 12-month mental disorder and flourishing—reported the fewest missed days of work, the fewest half-day or greater work cutbacks, the healthiest

Corey L. M. Keyes

2007-01-01

352

Integrating Mental Health Promotion and Substance Abuse Prevention on College Campuses. Prevention Update  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the American Psychiatric Association, college can be an exciting time, though for some it can be overwhelming and stressful. Depression, anxiety, substance use, and eating disorders are common mental health issues on college campuses. The 2010 American College Health Association National College Health Assessment found that 28 percent…

Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2011

2011-01-01

353

Predictors of using mental health services after sexual assault.  

PubMed

Sexual assault increases the risk for psychopathology. Despite the availability of effective interventions, relatively few victims who need treatment receive care in the months following an assault. Prior work identified several factors associated with utilizing care, including ethnicity, insurance, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Few studies, however, have examined predictors of treatment utilization prospectively from the time of assault. The present study hypothesized that White racial status, younger age, being partnered, having health insurance, having previously received mental health treatment, and having more PTSD and depression symptoms would predict utilization of care in the 6 months postassault. This was examined in a sample of 266 female sexual assault victims with an average age of 26.2 years, of whom 62.0% were White and 38.0% were African American assessed at 1.5 and 6 months postassault. Available information on utilizing care varied across assessments (1.5 months, n = 214; 3 months, n = 126; 6 months, n = 204). Significant predictors included having previously received mental health treatment (OR = 4.09), 1 day depressive symptoms (OR = 1.06), and having private insurance (OR = 2.24) or Medicaid (OR = 2.19). Alcohol abuse and prior mental health care were associated with a substantial increase in treatment utilization (OR = 4.07). The findings highlight the need to help victims at risk obtain treatment after sexual assault. PMID:24852357

Price, Matthew; Davidson, Tatiana M; Ruggiero, Kenneth J; Acierno, Ron; Resnick, Heidi S

2014-06-01

354

Proximity to Urban Parks and Mental Health  

PubMed Central

Background Urban parks have received attention in recent years as a possible environmental factor that could encourage physical activity, prevent obesity, and reduce the incidence of chronic conditions. Despite long hypothesized benefits of parks for mental health, few park studies incorporate mental health measures. Aims of the Study To test the association between proximity to urban parks and psychological distress. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of individual health survey responses. Data were collected for a study of capital improvements of neighborhood parks in Los Angeles. A survey was fielded on a sample of residential addresses, stratified by distance from the park (within 400m, 800m, 1.6 km, and 3.2km; N=1070). We used multiple regression to estimate the relationship between the psychological distress as measured by the MHI-5 (outcome variable) and distance to parks (main explanatory variable), controlling for observed individual characteristics. Results Mental health is significantly related to residential distance from parks, with the highest MHI-5 scores among residents within short walking distance from the park (400m) and decreasing significantly over the next distances. The number of visits and physical activity minutes are significantly and independently related to distance, although controlling for them does not reduce the association between distance and mental health. Discussion and Limitations This paper provides a new data point for an arguably very old question, but for which empirical data are sparse for the US. A nearby urban park is associated with the same mental health benefits as decreasing local unemployment rates by 2 percentage points, suggesting at least the potential of environmental interventions to improve mental health. The analysis is cross-sectional, making it impossible to control for important confounders, including residential selection. Implications for Health Policy Mental health policy has traditionally focused on individual-centered interventions. Just as health policy for preventable chronic illnesses has shifted attention to modifiable environmental determinants, population mental health may benefit substantially from environmental interventions. Implications for Future Research Policy evaluations should incorporate mental health measures when assessing neighborhood improvement programs and physical environments. Many recent and ongoing studies have excluded mental health measure in the belief that they are too burdensome for respondents or irrelevant. If a causal relationship is confirmed, then ameliorating neighborhood conditions and physical environments could represent a scalable way to improve mental health issues for large populations.

Sturm, Roland; Cohen, Deborah

2014-01-01

355

Acid Monoamine Metabolites of Cerebrospinal Fluid in Mental Depression and Mania.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Twenty male inpatients with mental depression or mania were studied in respect of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and homovanillic acid in the CSF. The results obtained suggest a decrease of CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in the acute phase of depression, with...

S. J. Dencker U. Malm D. E. Roos B. Werdinius

1966-01-01

356

How Stigma Interferes with Mental Health Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many people who would benefit from mental health services opt not to pursue them or fail to fully participate once they have begun. One of the reasons for this disconnect is stigma; namely, to avoid the label of mental illness and the harm it brings, people decide not to seek or fully participate in care. Stigma yields 2 kinds of harm that may…

Corrigan, Patrick

2004-01-01

357

Culturally Sensitive Refugee Mental Health Training Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report, based on a survey conducted during the summer and fall of 1986, identifies culturally sensitive training programs for professionals, paraprofessionals, and others who provide mental health services to refugees. An introductory section discusses the language, cultural, racial, experiential, and socioeconomic factors of refugee mental

Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Refugees Assistance Program - Mental Health Technical Assistance Center.

358

Mental health literacy as a function of remoteness of residence: an Australian national study  

PubMed Central

Background Although there have been many population studies of mental health literacy, little is known about the mental health literacy of people who reside in rural areas. This study sought to determine the impact of remoteness on public knowledge of depression and schizophrenia. Methods The mental health literacy of residents of major cities, inner regional, and outer-remote (including outer regional, remote, and very remote) regions were compared using data from a 2003–04 Australian national survey of the mental health literacy of 3998 adults. Measures included the perceived helpfulness of a range of professionals, non-professionals and interventions, and the causes, prognosis, and outcomes after treatment for four case vignettes describing depression, depression with suicidal ideation, early schizophrenia and chronic schizophrenia. Participant awareness of Australia's national depression initiative and depression in the media, their symptoms of depression and exposure to the conditions depicted in the vignettes were also compared. Results Mental health literacy was similar across remoteness categories. However, inner regional residents showed superior identification of the disorders depicted in the suicidal ideation and chronic schizophrenia vignettes. They were also more likely to report having heard of Australia's national depression health promotion campaign. Conversely, they were less likely than major city residents to rate the evidence-based treatment of psychotherapy helpful for depression. Both inner regional and outer-remote residents were less likely to rate psychologists as helpful for depression alone. The rural groups were more likely to rate the non-evidence based interventions of drinking and painkillers as helpful for a depression vignette. In addition, outer-remote residents were more likely to identify the evidence based treatment of antipsychotics as harmful for early schizophrenia and less likely to endorse psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers and general practitioners as helpful for the condition. Conclusion Mental health awareness campaigns in rural and remote regions may be most appropriately focused on communicating which interventions are effective for depression and schizophrenia and which mental health and other professionals are trained in the best-practice delivery and management of these. There is also a need to communicate to rural residents that alcohol and pain relievers are not an effective solution for depression.

Griffiths, Kathleen M; Christensen, Helen; Jorm, Anthony F

2009-01-01

359

Scope of Community Mental Health Consultation and Education.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The role of community consultation and education in the prevention of mental illness and the promotion of mental health is discussed. Mental health consultation is defined as the provision of technical assistance by an expert to individual and agency care...

B. W. MacLennan R. D. Quinn D. Schroeder

1971-01-01

360

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441...Individuals Age 65 or Over in Institutions for Mental Diseases § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...

2013-10-01

361

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441...Individuals Age 65 or Over in Institutions for Mental Diseases § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...

2010-10-01

362

42 CFR 441.106 - Comprehensive mental health program.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2009-10-01 2009-10-01 false Comprehensive mental health program. 441.106 Section 441...Individuals Age 65 or Over in Institutions for Mental Diseases § 441.106 Comprehensive mental health program. (a) If the plan...

2009-10-01

363

Development and implementation of depression care along the health care continuum.  

PubMed

Depression is a common cause of illness with significant social, vocational, and economic consequences. As one of the most treatable forms of mental illness, depression often is underrecognized and undertreated. The annual cost of depression to the United States economy is approximately $43.7 billion, with 55 percent (or $23.8 billion) accounting for missed work and lowered productivity. The prevalence rate of depression is estimated at 12-20 percent. The depressed patient utilizes two to three times more health services. There is little in the literature to demonstrate the care of the depressed person across the continuum in an integrated health care system. This article reviews the development and implementation of the treatment of depression care across multiple sites along the continuum. The care management depression team utilized the principles of performance improvement; Plan, Do, Check, Act framework for the initiative. PMID:9926675

Lock, J; Walsh, M

1999-02-01

364

Indicators of Mental Health in Various Iranian Populations  

PubMed Central

Background: Promoting mental health and preventing mental disorders are of the main concerns for every country. Achieving these goals requires effective indexes for evaluating mental health. Therefore, to develop mental health enhancement programs in Iran, there is a need to measure the state of mental health in Iran. Objectives: This study aimed to select a set of mental health indicators that can be used to monitor the status of mental health in Iran. Materials and Methods: This research work used Q-methodology which combines both quantitative and qualitative research methods for establishment of mental health indicators in Iran. In this study, 30 participants were chosen by purposive sampling from different types of professionals in the field of mental health. Results: Twenty seven mental health indicators were obtained from the Q-methodology. The most important indicators obtained in this study are as follows: annual prevalence of mental disorders, suicide rates, number of mental health professionals, mental health expenditures and suicide related deaths. Conclusions: This study provides mental health indices for measuring mental health status in Iran. These mental health indices can be used to measure progress in the reform policies and community mental health services.

Mohamadi, Khosro; Ahmadi, Khodabakhsh; Fathi Ashtiani, Ali; Azad Fallah, Parviz; Ebadi, Abbas; Yahaghi, Emad

2014-01-01

365

Australian mental health consumers' priorities for research: Qualitative findings from the SCOPE for Research project.  

PubMed

Background? There is growing acceptance of the importance of the consumer viewpoint in mental health research. Previous studies have identified differences in research priorities between researchers and mental health consumers in Australia defined broadly. However, little is known about the research priorities of consumers with specific mental health conditions. Objective? The aim of this study was to explore Australian mental health consumers' priorities for depression and bipolar disorder research. Design? Focus groups with consumers and individual telephone interviews with consumer advocates. Participants were asked to discuss the topics they believed were priorities for depression or bipolar disorder research. Transcripts were thematically analysed using NVivo 7. Setting and Participants? Ten people with depression and 19 with bipolar disorder participated in face-to-face focus groups held in three Australian capital cities. Five participants with each disorder participated in online focus groups. Five Australian consumer advocates with experience of depression and six with experience of bipolar disorder were individually interviewed by telephone. Results? Participants raised a broad variety of topics for research. The most salient themes included the need for research on medication, and lifestyle and psychosocial influences on depression and bipolar disorder. Conclusions? Participants' priorities reflect an interest in a holistic approach to mental health research that examines the influences of everyday life and psychosocial influences both on the development and on the management of these disorders. Their focus was on research that explores individualized care and the active role that consumers can play in their own care and recovery. PMID:22221624

Banfield, Michelle A; Barney, Lisa J; Griffiths, Kathleen M; Christensen, Helen M

2014-06-01

366

The Latino Mental Health Project: A Local Mental Health Needs Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article, we present the results of a local needs assessment of the mental health experiences, service needs, and barriers\\u000a to treatment-seeking of the Latino population in Worcester, Massachusetts. Overall, participants reported relatively high\\u000a rates of experiences with symptoms of mental health problems, they indicated using a range of both formal and alternative\\u000a mental health services, and they noted

Esteban V. Cardemil; Sara T. Adams; Joanne L. Calista; Joy Connell; José Encarnación; Nancy K. Esparza; Jeanne Frohock; Ellen Hicks; Saeromi Kim; Gerald Kokernak; Michael McGrenra; Ray Mestre; Maria Pérez; Tatiana M. Pinedo; Rosemary Quagan; Christina Rivera; Patsy Taucer; Ed Wang

2007-01-01

367

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care  

MedlinePLUS

Religion, Spirituality and Your Mental Health Care Quick Links Facts for Families - Numerical List Facts for Families - ... and print a PDF version of this document . Religion and spirituality can be important in the lives ...

368

Outpatient Mental Health Benefits in Rhode Island.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

During the last several years considerable attention has been devoted to the need for public policies to influence the availability of outpatient mental health insurance coverage in Rhode Island. A number of experts have expressed opinions on this issue a...

1983-01-01

369

Criminal Justice/Mental Health Consensus Project.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The goal of this project has been to elicit ideas from some of the most respected criminal justice and mental health practitioners in the United States, to develop recommendations that reflect a consensus among seemingly opposing viewpoints, and to dissem...

2002-01-01

370

Child Mental Health and Brain Development  

MedlinePLUS

... Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Cool Tools NLM Director’s Comments Transcript Child Mental Health and Brain Development: 06/ ... information is available in 43 other languages. Your comments about this or any of our podcasts are ...

371

Some Mental Health Concerns of School Psychologists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Focuses on the implications that children's excessive attention-seeking behavior, loneliness, and low self-esteem have for counselors. Early intervention is essential. Provision of counseling services in all elementary schools is recommended to insure children's mental health. (BEF)

Dawson, Don

1980-01-01

372

Applying State Mental Health Standards: Management Uses.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Guidelines are presented to assist State mental health agencies in developing, monitoring, and using standards. The guidelines are directed to State agency directors, to members of their management teams and support systems, and to persons charged with de...

1976-01-01

373

Mental health conference first of its kind  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nursing students in their final semester of study have participated in “Stepping Out”, a student-led mental health conference that’s the first of its kind at The University of Notre Dame Australia’s Sydney School of Nursing.\\u000aAssociate Professor Bill Goodin and Associate Professor Bethne Hart decided to incorporate the conference into the assessment schedule for nursing students undertaking the Mental Health

Elizabeth Fenech

2011-01-01

374

Juvenile Probation Officers’ Mental Health Decision Making  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed case records for 583 juvenile delinquency intakes in four county juvenile probation offices; 14.4% were receiving\\u000a mental health or substance use services at case opening, and 24.9% were newly identified during probation contact. Youths\\u000a were significantly more likely to be newly identified if they were repeat offenders, if their probation officer knew more\\u000a about mental health and if

Gail A. Wasserman; Larkin S. McReynolds; Andria L. Whited; Joseph M. Keating; Hana Musabegovic; Yanling Huo

2008-01-01

375

Sahaja: an Indian ideal of mental health.  

PubMed

Sahaja is an Indian ideal of mental and spiritual health that has received special emphasis in the Sikh scriptures--especially, the Adi Granth. Since the concept of sahaja has long been associated with mystical thought and practice, its description has become shrouded in peculiar esoteric terminologies. It is the purpose of this communication to divest sahaja of its esoteric, mystic connotations and to redefine it as a mental health ideal in the context of contemporary conditions. PMID:1114187

Neki, J S

1975-02-01

376

Strategic market positions for mental health services.  

PubMed

Faced with a rapidly changing market, increased legislation and intense competition, mental health service providers must be sophisticated planners and position themselves advantageously in the marketplace. They can effectively position themselves to be profitable and sustaining through market segmentation and sensitivity. The following article will address one concept of marketing that has received less attention but is of critical importance: positioning. As the market environment becomes increasingly competitive, positioning will be the key to success for mental health programs and institutions. PMID:10302552

Ambrose, D M; Lennox, L

1988-01-01

377

Coping with perceived discrimination: does ethnic identity protect mental health?  

PubMed

Using data (N = 2,109) from a large-scale epidemiological study of Filipino Americans, this study examines whether ethnic identity is linked to mental health and reduces the stress of discrimination. The strength of identification with an ethnic group is found to be directly associated with fewer depressive symptoms. In other words, having a sense of ethnic pride, involvement in ethinic practices, and cultural commitment to one's racial/ethnic group may protect mental health. Self-reports of racial/ethnic discrimination over a lifetime and everyday discrimination in the past month not due to race/ethnicity are associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms. Yet ethnic identity buffers the stress of racial/ethnic discrimination. This suggests that ethnic identity is a coping resource for racial/ethnic minorities that should not be overlooked. The strong link between ethnic identity and better mental health has implications for social-psychological theories on race/ethnicity and assimilation in the United States. PMID:14582311

Mossakowski, Krysia N

2003-09-01

378

Children's mental health service use across service sectors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This DataWatch explores the roles of human service sectors (mental health, education, health, child welfare, and juvenile justice) in providing mental health services for children. The data are from the first wave of the Great Smoky Mountains Study of Youth, a population-based study of psychopathology and mental health service use among children. The results show somewhat higher rates of mental

Barbara J. Burns; E. Jane Costello; Adrian Angold; Dan Tweed; Dalene Stangl; Elizabeth M. Z. Farmer; Al Erkanli

1995-01-01

379

Mental Health Treatment in a State Prison: Managing Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health services exist in prisons. Participants often abuse psychoactive substances. Substance abuse treatment programs in prison manifest a custodial culture of safety and control. Substance abuse among inmate participants in mental health programming must be dealt with in the context of mental health treatment. Mental health treatment, which is less coercive than substance abuse programming in prisons, shows a

Eric Oxelson

2009-01-01

380

Child psychiatry in Bombay: the school mental health clinic.  

PubMed

The school mental health clinic is an unusual amalgamation of the mental health and education sectors in Bombay. It aims to detect emotional problems in schoolchildren, increase mental health awareness in teachers and other professionals and determine any risk or causal factors in schoolchildren suffering from mental health problems. It also offers cross-cultural research opportunities. PMID:10962654

Vaidya, G; Dhavale, H S

2000-06-01

381

Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General. Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This first Report of the Surgeon General on Mental Health represents the initial step in advancing the notion that mental health is fundamental to general health. It states that a review of research on mental health revealed two findings. First, the efficacy of treatment is well documented, and second, a range of treatment exists for most mental

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Mental Health Services.

382

Mental Health Programs for American Indians: Their Logic, Structure & Function.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chapters included are (1) introduction; (2) mental health problems affecting Indian people; (3) impact of mental health problems on Indian communities; (4) the service delivery system; (5) treatment modalities; (6) mental health providers; (7) holding the system together; and (7) a model Indian mental health system. (KS)

Neligh, Gordon

1990-01-01

383

A Historical Perspective on National Child Mental Health Policy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This country has never had a formalized child mental health policy, if one uses the definition of child mental health policy as the existence of governmental commitment to ensure the availability of appropriate mental health services to children (birth-21 years) and their families. Over the past century, the field of children's mental health has borrowed policy from child welfare, juvenile

Ira S. Lourie; Mario Hernandez

2003-01-01

384

Mental health stigma and primary health care decisions.  

PubMed

People with serious mental illness have higher rates of mortality and morbidity due to physical illness. In part, this occurs because primary care and other health providers sometimes make decisions contrary to typical care standards. This might occur because providers endorse mental illness stigma, which seems inversely related to prior personal experience with mental illness and mental health care. In this study, 166 health care providers (42.2% primary care, 57.8% mental health practice) from the Veteran?s Affairs (VA) medical system completed measures of stigma characteristics, expected adherence, and subsequent health decisions (referral to a specialist and refill pain prescription) about a male patient with schizophrenia who was seeking help for low back pain due to arthritis. Research participants reported comfort with previous mental health interventions. Path analyses showed participants who endorsed stigmatizing characteristics of the patient were more likely to believe he would not adhere to treatment and hence, less likely to refer to a specialist or refill his prescription. Endorsement of stigmatizing characteristics was inversely related to comfort with one?s previous mental health care. Implications of these findings will inform a program meant to enhance VA provider attitudes about people with mental illness, as well as their health decisions. PMID:24774076

Corrigan, Patrick W; Mittal, Dinesh; Reaves, Christina M; Haynes, Tiffany F; Han, Xiaotong; Morris, Scott; Sullivan, Greer

2014-08-15

385

Declaration on mental health in Africa: moving to implementation.  

PubMed

Urgent action is needed to address mental health issues globally. In Africa, where mental health disorders account for a huge burden of disease and disability, and where in general less than 1% of the already small health budgets are spent on these disorders, the need for action is acute and urgent. Members of the World Health Organization, including African countries, have adopted a Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan. Africa now has an historic opportunity to improve the mental health and wellbeing of its citizens, beginning with provision of basic mental health services and development of national mental health strategic plans (roadmaps). There is need to integrate mental health into primary health care and address stigma and violations of human rights. We advocate for inclusion of mental health into the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, and for the convening of a special UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on Mental Health within three years. PMID:24931476

Daar, Abdallah S; Jacobs, Marian; Wall, Stig; Groenewald, Johann; Eaton, Julian; Patel, Vikram; Dos Santos, Palmira; Kagee, Ashraf; Gevers, Anik; Sunkel, Charlene; Andrews, Gail; Daniels, Ingrid; Ndetei, David

2014-01-01

386

Declaration on mental health in Africa: moving to implementation  

PubMed Central

Urgent action is needed to address mental health issues globally. In Africa, where mental health disorders account for a huge burden of disease and disability, and where in general less than 1% of the already small health budgets are spent on these disorders, the need for action is acute and urgent. Members of the World Health Organization, including African countries, have adopted a Comprehensive Mental Health Action Plan. Africa now has an historic opportunity to improve the mental health and wellbeing of its citizens, beginning with provision of basic mental health services and development of national mental health strategic plans (roadmaps). There is need to integrate mental health into primary health care and address stigma and violations of human rights. We advocate for inclusion of mental health into the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, and for the convening of a special UN General Assembly High Level Meeting on Mental Health within three years.

Daar, Abdallah S.; Jacobs, Marian; Wall, Stig; Groenewald, Johann; Eaton, Julian; Patel, Vikram; dos Santos, Palmira; Kagee, Ashraf; Gevers, Anik; Sunkel, Charlene; Andrews, Gail; Daniels, Ingrid; Ndetei, David

2014-01-01

387

[The development of psychiatric and mental health nursing in Taiwan].  

PubMed

Psychiatric mental health is critical to ensuring the health and wellbeing of individuals, families, and communities. While psychiatric mental health work continues to become increasingly complex and challenging, the demand for psychiatric nurses with evidence-based skills continues to grow. Psychiatric mental health nurses (PMHNs) are the primary providers of professional psychiatric mental health care services. PMFNs emphasize humanistic values and focus on servicing patient and family needs. In Taiwan, the Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Association constructs the competence-credentialing model for psychiatric mental health nursing that underpins the values, attitudes, and beliefs of PMHNs and ensures that the mental health nursing practice promotes public health and wellbeing. In addition, this association promotes advanced psychiatric nursing education, research, and practice, influences the national health agenda, and discusses and disseminates information on psychiatric mental health care issues in order to influence the direction, nature, and quality of psychiatric and mental health care. PMID:24519338

Rong, Jiin-Ru; Shiau, Shu-Jen; Su, Shu-Fang

2014-02-01

388

Gender Differences In The Relationships Between Alcohol, Tobacco And Mental Health In Patients Attending An Emergency Department  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aims: There is evidence of a non-linear relationship between alcohol consumption and mental health status, and of an association between tobacco use and poor mental health. This paper examines the nature of the association between usual alcohol consumption, tobacco use and symptoms of anxiety and depression in Emergency Department patients in Queensland, Australia. Methods: A cross sectional survey of patients

Rosa Alati; Stuart Kinner; Jake M. Najman; Greg Fowler; KERRIANNE WATT; DAVID GREEN

389

Trauma, poverty and mental health among Somali and Rwandese refugees living in an African refugee settlement – an epidemiological study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among Rwandese and Somali refugees resident in a Ugandan refugee settlement, as a measure of the mental health consequences of armed conflict, as well as to inform a subsequent mental health outreach program. The study population comprised a sample from 14400 (n

Lamaro P Onyut; Frank Neuner; Verena Ertl; Elisabeth Schauer; Michael Odenwald; Thomas Elbert

2009-01-01

390

Paternal Postnatal and Subsequent Mental Health Symptoms and Child Socio-Emotional and Behavioural Problems at School Entry  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research on the effect of paternal mental health problems, particularly on young children, is based predominantly on clinical levels of depression. Furthermore, potential mediators such as marital discord have often been overlooked. This longitudinal community study assessed the association between paternal mental health symptoms in a community…

Smith, Hannah R.; Eryigit-Madzwamuse, Suna; Barnes, Jacqueline

2013-01-01

391

Former system youth with mental health needs: Routes to adult mental health care, insight, emotions, and mistrust  

Microsoft Academic Search

ObjectivePublic health concern surrounding the mental health needs of former system youth is escalating. We know very little about mental health service utilization on the other side of the developmental transition to adulthood. The purpose of this study was to explore the mental health service use experiences among former system youth with childhood histories which included mental disorder, use of

Michelle R. Munson; Lionel D. Scott; Susan E. Smalling; HyunSoo Kim; Jerry E. Floersch

2011-01-01

392

Evaluting the WHO Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems by comparing mental health policies in four countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mental health is a low priority in most countries around the world. Minimal research and resources have been invested in mental health at the national level. As a result, WHO has developed the Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems (WHO- AIMS) to encourage countries to gather data and to re-evaluate their national mental health policy. This paper demonstrates the utility

Hamada Hamid; Karen Abanilla; Besa Bauta; Keng-Yen Huang

2008-01-01

393

Mixed methods research in mental health nursing.  

PubMed

Mixed methods research is becoming more widely used in order to answer research questions and to investigate research problems in mental health and psychiatric nursing. However, two separate literature searches, one in Scotland and one in the USA, revealed that few mental health nursing studies identified mixed methods research in their titles. Many studies used the term 'embedded' but few studies identified in the literature were mixed methods embedded studies. The history, philosophical underpinnings, definition, types of mixed methods research and associated pragmatism are discussed, as well as the need for mixed methods research. Examples of mental health nursing mixed methods research are used to illustrate the different types of mixed methods: convergent parallel, embedded, explanatory and exploratory in their sequential and concurrent combinations. Implementing mixed methods research is also discussed briefly and the problem of identifying mixed methods research in mental and psychiatric nursing are discussed with some possible solutions to the problem proposed. PMID:21749560

Kettles, A M; Creswell, J W; Zhang, W

2011-08-01

394

Mental Health Correlates of the Victim-Perpetrator Relationship Among Interpersonally Victimized Adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research examines mental health correlates of different victim-perpetrator relationships among adolescent victims of interpersonal violence. A large and nationally representative sample of adolescents (N = 4,023) responded to structured telephone interviews concerning mental health functioning (posttraumatic stress disorder—PTSD, major depressive disorder, substance abuse\\/dependence, and delinquency). Those reporting histories of sexual (n = 321) and\\/or physical (n = 688) assault

Steven R. Lawyer; Kenneth J. Ruggiero; Heidi S. Resnick; Dean G. Kilpatrick; Benjamin E. Saunders

2006-01-01

395

The Relationship Between Maternal and Child Symptom Change in Community Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mental health of mothers and children are closely linked. This study examined the relationship between child and maternal\\u000a symptom change during a period in which children participated in community mental health treatment. Symptom change was measured\\u000a using the Child Behavior Checklist for children and the Beck Depression Inventory for Mothers. Results indicate that mothers\\u000a whose children improve in community

Carrie W. Rishel; Catherine G. Greeno; Carol Anderson

2008-01-01

396

Racial Differences in Depression Trajectories among Older Women Socioeconomic, Family, and Health Influences  

PubMed Central

Despite recent increases in life course research on mental illness, important questions remain about the social patterning of, and explanations for, depression trajectories among women in later life. The authors investigate competing theoretical frameworks for the age patterning of depressive symptoms and the physical health, socioeconomic, and family mechanisms differentiating black and white women. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Mature Women, the authors use linear mixed (growth curve) models to estimate trajectories of distress for women aged 52 to 81 years (N = 3,182). The results demonstrate that: (1) there are persistently higher levels of depressive symptoms among black women relative to white women throughout later life; (2) physical health and socioeconomic status account for much of the racial gap in depressive symptoms; and (3) marital status moderates race differences in distress. The findings highlight the importance of physical health, family, and socioeconomic status in racial disparities in mental health.

Spence, Naomi J.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Dupre, Matthew E.

2014-01-01

397

Benefiting from online mental status examination system and mental health diagnostic system  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this really hectic world, quite a number of people are exposed to situations where mental stress Is unavoidable. This leads to people having all kinds of mental health problems that eventually may turn to chronic mental disorders. People with mental health problems normally have the tendency of not admitting their health problems because of the stigma attached to these

Hajar Mat Jani; Jalan Kajang-Puchong; Selangor Darul Ehsan

2010-01-01

398

Deinstitutionalization and Mental Health Services  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The resident population of large mental hospitals has been reduced by two-thirds in 20 years, but chronic patients are being discharged to a lonely existence in hostile communities without adequate care. (Author/BB)

Bassuk, Ellen L.; Gerson, Samuel

1978-01-01

399

Gender, Traumatic Events, and Mental Health Disorders in a Rural Asian Setting*  

PubMed Central

Research shows a strong association between traumatic life experience and mental health and important gender differences in that relationship in the Western European Diaspora, but much less is known about these relationships in other settings. We investigate these relationships in a poor rural Asian setting that recently experienced a decade-long armed conflict. We use data from 400 adult interviews in rural Nepal. The measures come from World Mental Health survey instruments clinically validated for this study population to measure Depression, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED). Our results demonstrate that traumatic life experience significantly increases the likelihood of mental health disorders in this setting and that these traumatic experiences have a larger effect on the mental health of women than men. These findings offer important clues regarding the potential mechanisms producing gender differences in mental health in many settings.

Axinn, William G.; Ghimire, Dirgha J.; Williams, Nathalie E.; Scott, Kate M.

2014-01-01

400

Latina Self-Reported Mental Health and Delay in Health Care in a New Latino Destination  

PubMed Central

Understanding how depression and/or anxiety affect use of health care among Latinas in rapidly growing new Latino destinations, population where the growth rate of the Latino population exceeds the national average, may enhance community engagement efforts. Using community-based participatory research, a questionnaire assessing health care use was administered to 289 Latinas. Most (70%) reported delaying healthcare, and self-reported depression/anxiety was associated with a 3.1 fold (95% CI: 1.6 - 5.9) increase in delay, after adjusting for current health status, acculturation, age, education and place of birth. Mental health disparities exist among Latinas, which are related to delays in use of health care. A gap exists regarding health education interventions for Latinas. More research is needed to identify successful models, especially in new Latino destinations as they may be particularly vulnerable to delay care.

Westin, Emily Leckman; Rossy-Millan, Jose

2010-01-01

401

THE ASSOCIATION OF RESILIENCE WITH MENTAL AND PHYSICAL HEALTH AMONG OLDER AMERICAN INDIANS: THE NATIVE ELDER CARE STUDY  

PubMed Central

We examined the association of resilience with measures of mental and physical health in a sample of older American Indians (AIs). A validated scale measuring resilience was administered to 185 noninstitutionalized AIs aged ?55 years. Unadjusted analyses revealed that higher levels of resilience were associated with lower levels of depressive symptomatology and chronic pain, and with higher levels of mental and physical health. Resilience remained significantly associated with depressive symptomatology after controlling for demographic and other health measures. Our findings suggest that resilience among older AIs has important implications for some aspects of mental and physical health.

Schure, Marc B.; Odden, Michelle; Goins, R. Turner

2013-01-01

402

The WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys  

PubMed Central

The paper presents an overview of the WHO World Mental Health (WMH) Survey Initiative and summarizes recent WMH results regarding the prevalence and societal costs of mental disorders. The WMH surveys are representative community surveys that were carried out in 28 countries throughout the world aimed at providing information to mental health policy makers about the prevalence, burden, and unmet need for treatment of common mental disorders. Results show that mental disorders are commonly occurring in all participating countries. The inter-quartile range (IQR: 25th–75th percentiles) of lifetime DSM-IV disorder prevalence estimates (combining anxiety, mood, disruptive behavior, and substance disorders) is 18.1–36.1%. The IQR of 12-month prevalence estimates is 9.8–19.1%. Analysis of age-of-onset reports shows that many mental disorders begin in childhood-adolescence and have significant adverse effects on subsequent role transitions. Adult mental disorders are found in the WMH data to be associated with high levels of role impairment. Despite this burden, the majority of mental disorders go untreated. Although these results suggest that expansion of treatment could be cost-effective from both the employer perspective and the societal perspective, treatment effectiveness trials are needed to confirm this suspicion. The WMH results regarding impairments are being used to target several such interventions.

Kessler, Ronald C.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, Sergio; Alonso, Jordi; Chatterji, Somnath; Lee, Sing; Ustun, T. Bedirhan

2009-01-01

403

Japanese Americans' health concerns and depressive symptoms: implications for disaster counseling.  

PubMed

This study examined factors contributing to depressive symptoms among Japanese Americans. Data were collected in Houston, Texas, in 2008, before the March 2011 Japan earthquake, through a community survey including demographic and mental health questions and the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist. Among 43 Japanese American respondents in this convenience sample, the depression prevalence was 11.6 percent. Chi-square results found that having anxiety symptoms and holding a master's degree had statistically significant relationships with depressive symptoms. An independent sample t test found that those having depressive symptoms experienced significantly more health issues than those without depressive symptoms. When these statistically significant variables were entered into a logistic regression model, the overall effect of having health issues, anxiety symptoms, and a master's degree collectively predicted depressive symptoms. It was also found that Japanese Americans rarely consult mental health professionals; in particular, female Japanese American respondents tend to seek help from religious leaders. As implied by these findings, the reluctance of Japanese Americans to seek formal help can be explained by social stigma, a health-oriented approach to treatment, and other cultural considerations. Practice implications focus on disaster counseling with a connection between mental health needs and health care support. PMID:24032301

Cheung, Monit; Leung, Patrick; Tsui, Venus

2013-07-01

404

Mental health literacy and attitudes in a Swedish community sample – Investigating the role of personal experience of mental health care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Mental ill health is a common condition in the general population, yet only about half of those with a mental disorder have treatment contact. Personal experience may affect attitudes, which in turn influence the help-seeking process. This study investigated differences in mental health literacy and attitudes among mentally healthy persons and in persons with symptoms of mental illness with

Karin M Dahlberg; Margda Waern; Bo Runeson

2008-01-01

405

Substance Use and Mental Health Risk Factors for Servicemembers: Findings from U.S. Department of Defense Health Related Behavior Surveys.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This paper examines trends in use and risk factors for six substance use and mental health indicators among United States active duty military personnel: cigarette smoking, heavy drinking, illicit drug use, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)...

J. Williams L. L. Hourani R. M. Bray

2011-01-01

406

Neuroscience of exercise: from neurobiology mechanisms to mental health.  

PubMed

The neuroscience of exercise is a growing research area that is dedicated to furthering our understanding of the effects that exercise has on mental health and athletic performance. The present study examined three specific topics: (1) the relationship between exercise and mental disorders (e.g. major depressive disorder, dementia and Parkinson's disease), (2) the effects of exercise on the mood and mental health of athletes, and (3) the possible neurobiological mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise. Positive responses to regular physical exercise, such as enhanced functional capacity, increased autonomy and improved self-esteem, are frequently described in the recent literature, and these responses are all good reasons for recommending regular exercise. In addition, physical exercise may improve both mood and adherence to an exercise program in healthy individuals and might modulate both the performance and mental health of athletes. Exercise is associated with the increased synthesis and release of both neurotransmitters and neurotrophic factors, and these increases may be associated with neurogenesis, angiogenesis and neuroplasticity. This review is a call-to-action that urges researchers to consider the importance of understanding the neuroscience of physical exercise and its contributions to sports science. PMID:23774826

Matta Mello Portugal, Eduardo; Cevada, Thais; Sobral Monteiro-Junior, Renato; Teixeira Guimarães, Thiago; da Cruz Rubini, Ercole; Lattari, Eduardo; Blois, Charlene; Camaz Deslandes, Andrea

2013-01-01

407

Sociodemographic Factors Contribute to Mental Health Disparities and Access to Services Among Young Men Who Have Sex with Men in New York City  

PubMed Central

Young men who have sex with men (YMSM) may be at increased risk for mental health problems including depression, post-traumatic stress (PTSD), and suicidality. The overriding goal of the current investigation was to examine mental health and mental health services in a diverse sample of YMSM. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a cohort study of 598 YMSM, including sociodemographics, mental health, and mental health care. We then tested for bivariate associations, and used multivariable modeling to predict depression, PTSD, suicidality and mental health care utilization. Lower socioeconomic status, unstable housing, and school non-enrollment predicted depression and PTSD scores, while unstable housing and school non-enrollment predicted recent suicide attempt(s). These recent suicide attempt(s) also predicted current utilization of counseling or treatment, any history of psychiatric hospitalization, and any history of psychiatric diagnosis. Black and API men were less likely to have ever accessed mental health counseling or treatment. There were significant class-based differences with regard to mental health outcomes, but not mental health services. Further, recent crises (i.e., suicide attempt, hospitalization) were strong predictors of accessing mental health services. Improving the mental health of YMSM requires addressing the underlying structural factors that influence mental health outcomes and service access.

Storholm, Erik David; Siconolfi, Daniel E.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Moeller, Robert W.; Eddy, Jessica A.; Bare, Michael G.

2013-01-01

408

Duration of major depressive episodes in the Duration of major depressive episodes in the general population: results fromThe Netherlands general population: results fromThe Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS) (NEMESIS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

may be explained by different definitions of may be explained by different definitions of recovery. Moreover, the previous studies recovery. Moreover, the previous studies were subject to two kinds of bias. Lead- were subject to two kinds of bias. Lead- time bias arises because participants with time bias arises because participants with depression were not recruited at a similar depression

JAN SPIJKER; RON JAN SPIJKER; RON DE DE GRAA; ROB V. BIJL; T. F. BEEKMAN; GR AAF; JOHAN ORMEL; WILLEM A. NOLEN

409

Screening and Referral for Postpartum Depression among Low-Income Women: A Qualitative Perspective from Community Health Workers  

PubMed Central

Postpartum depression is a serious and common psychiatric illness. Mothers living in poverty are more likely to be depressed and have greater barriers to accessing treatment than the general population. Mental health utilization is particularly limited for women with postpartum depression and low-income, minority women. As part of an academic-community partnership, focus groups were utilized to examine staff practices, barriers, and facilitators in mental health referrals for women with depression within a community nonprofit agency serving low-income pregnant and postpartum women. The focus groups were analyzed through content analyses and NVIVO-8. Three focus groups with 16 community health workers were conducted. Six themes were identified: (1) screening and referral, (2) facilitators to referral, (3) barriers to referral, (4) culture and language, (5) life events, and (6) support. The study identified several barriers and facilitators for referring postpartum women with depression to mental health services.

Boyd, Rhonda C.; Mogul, Marjie; Newman, Deena; Coyne, James C.

2011-01-01

410

Longitudinal follow-up of the mental health of unaccompanied refugee minors.  

PubMed

Despite growing numbers of unaccompanied refugee minors (UMs) in Europe, and evidence that this group is at risk of developing mental health problems, there still remain important knowledge gaps regarding the development of UMs' mental health during their trajectories in the host country and, in particular, the possible influencing role of traumatic experiences and daily stressors therein. This study therefore followed 103 UMs from the moment they arrived in Belgium until 18 months later. Traumatic experiences (SLE), mental health symptoms (HSCL-37A, RATS) and daily stressors (DSSYR) were measured at arrival in Belgium, after 6 and 18 months. UMs reported generally high scores on anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Linear mixed model analysis showed no significant differences in mental health scores over time, pointing towards the possible long-term persistence of mental health problems in this population. The number of traumatic experiences and the number of daily stressors leaded to a significant higher symptom level of depression (daily stressors), anxiety and PTSD (traumatic experiences and daily stressors). European migration policies need to reduce the impact of daily stressors on UMs' mental health by ameliorating the reception and care facilities for this group. Moreover, regular mental health screenings are needed, in combination with, if needed, adapted psychosocial and therapeutic care. PMID:23979476

Vervliet, Marianne; Lammertyn, Jan; Broekaert, Eric; Derluyn, Ilse

2014-05-01

411

Service network analysis for agricultural mental health  

PubMed Central

Background Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as a baseline to inform service network improvements. Methods A network survey of mental health related links between agricultural support, health and other human services in four drought declared shires in comparable districts in rural New South Wales, Australia. Mental health links covered information exchange, referral recommendations and program development. Results 87 agencies from 111 (78%) completed a survey. 79% indicated that two thirds of their clients needed assistance for mental health related problems. The highest mean number of interagency links concerned information exchange and the frequency of these links between sectors was monthly to three monthly. The effectiveness of agricultural support and health sector links were rated as less effective by the agricultural support sector than by the health sector (p < .05). The most highly linked across all areas of activity were Rural Financial Counsellors, the Department of Primary Industry Drought Support Workers and Community Health Centres. Hence for a mental health service network targeting farming families these are three key agencies across the spectrum of case work to program development. The study limitations in describing service networks relate to the accuracy of network bounding, self report bias and missing data from non participants. Conclusion Aligning with agricultural agencies is important to build effective mental health service pathways to address the needs of farming populations. Work is required to ensure that these agricultural support agencies have operational and effective links to primary mental health care services. Network analysis provides a baseline to inform this work. With interventions such as local mental health training and joint service planning to promote network development we would expect to see over time an increase in the mean number of links, the frequency in which these links are used and the rated effectiveness of these links.

Fuller, Jeffrey D; Kelly, Brian; Law, Susan; Pollard, Georgia; Fragar, Lyn

2009-01-01

412

Caregiver Mental Health, Neighborhood, and Social Network Influences on Mental Health Needs among African American Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this study, the authors examined the combined effects of caregiver mental health, alcohol use, and social network support/satisfaction on child mental health needs among African American caregiver-child dyads at risk of maltreatment. The sample included 514 eight-year-old African American children and their caregivers who participated in the…

Lindsey, Michael A.; Browne, Dorothy C.; Thompson, Richard; Hawley, Kristin M.; Graham, Christopher J.; Weisbart, Cindy; Harrington, Donna; Kotch, Jonathan B.

2008-01-01

413

Advancing Mental Health Research: Washington University's Center for Mental Health Services Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research centers have become a key component of the research infrastructure in schools of social work, including the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University. In 1993, that school's Center for Mental Health Services Research (CMHSR) received funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) as a Social Work…

Proctor, Enola K.; McMillen, Curtis; Haywood, Sally; Dore, Peter

2008-01-01

414

School-Based Mental Health: A De Facto Mental Health System for Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the nation's schools seek to fulfill the academic imperatives of the federal No Child Left Behind Act and associated state imperatives, they may be forgetting an important missing element in boosting academic achievement: directly confronting the mental health and psychosocial needs that impede a significant percentage of children and adolescents. This article explores the available research on mental health

Steve Jacob; Alberto Coustasse

2008-01-01

415

The Primary Mental Health Worker within Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes the development of the primary mental health worker (PMHW) role within Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) within the UK, and focuses on services in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland, an area with a general population of 900,000. The concept behind the PMHW role is described and the application of this to practice is outlined. The role

Fiona Gale; Panos Vostanis

2003-01-01

416

Psychosocial Functioning of Youth Receiving Mental Health Services in the Schools Versus Community Mental Health Centers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evaluated psychosocial differences between youthreceiving mental health services in Community MentalHealth Centers (CMHCs; n = 79) as compared to youthreceiving services from a program operating in 10 Baltimore schools (n = 186). Racial and genderdifferences were shown, with more African American youthand females in the School than CMHC sample. Multivariateanalyses that controlled for these racial and gender differences failed to

Mark D. Weist; C. Patrick Myers; Eileen Hastings; Hari Ghuman; Yu Ling Han

1999-01-01

417

Do State Mental Health Plans Address the New Freedom Commission's Goals for Children's Mental Health?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The latest initiative to address mental health needs of the nation, including those of children and youth, is the President's New Freedom Commission on Mental Health (NFC). The NFC formulated a benchmark of six goals and related recommendations toward which the U.S. should strive, including the recommendation that each state develop a…

Gould, Sara R.; Roberts, Michael C.; Beals, Sarah E.

2009-01-01

418

Measuring Child Mental Health Status for Services Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiological studies of the prevalence of mental health disorders typically contain multiple measures of mental health, using different instruments and different informants (child, parent, and interviewer). We used the Methods for the Epidemiology of Child and Adolescents Mental Disorder (MECA) study of U.S. youth to assess the effects of employing a range of these measures in mental health services research.

Sherry Glied; Christina W. Hoven; A. Bowen Garrett; Robert E. Moore; Philip Leaf; Hector R. Bird; Sherryl Goodman; Darrel Regier; Margarita Alegria

1997-01-01

419

Mental Health Awareness Month & Speak Up for Kids  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

May is National Mental Health Awareness Month. This is a great time to highlight the importance of mental wellness and school-based mental health services to children's positive learning and development. There is heightened urgency to the imperative to advance school-based mental health and school psychologists' expertise as essential to the…

Cowan, Katherine C.

2012-01-01

420

Connecting Social and Emotional Learning with Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As knowledge of effective treatments for mental disorders has grown, so too has the field of mental health promotion and positive development. Studies completed during the last two decades have synthesized the state of mental health promotion and documented that universal mental health supports positively affect child and adolescent developmental…

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (NJ1), 2008

2008-01-01

421

Depression  

MedlinePLUS

... Yellow Pages under mental health, health, social services, suicide prevention, crisis intervention services, hotlines, hospitals, or physicians for ... Mental Health, NIH Phone: 866-615-6464 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline Phone: 800-273-TALK (8255) Substance Abuse ...

422

Attitudes toward community mental health care: the contact paradox revisited.  

PubMed

Contact with people with mental illness is considered to be a promising strategy to change stigmatizing attitudes. This study examines the underlying mechanisms of the association between contact and attitudes toward community mental health care. Data are derived from the 2009 survey "Stigma in a Global Context-Belgian Mental Health Study", using the Community Mental Health Ideology-scale. Results show that people who received mental health treatment themselves or have a family member who has been treated for mental health problems report more tolerant attitudes toward community mental health care than people with public contact with people with mental illness. Besides, the perception of the effectiveness of the treatment seems to matter too. Furthermore, emotions arising from public contact are associated with attitudes toward community mental health care. The degree of intimacy and the characteristics of the contact relationship clarify the association between contact and attitudes toward community mental health care. PMID:23179045

Pattyn, E; Verhaeghe, M; Bracke, P

2013-06-01

423

Are mental health problems associated with use of Accident and Emergency and health-related harm?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Previous findings indicate that mental health problems are common in Emergency departments; however, there are few studies of the extent of health-related problems and emergency service use in mental health populations as a whole. Methods: Record linkage methods were used to map the association between mental health, age, gender, and health-related harm across total health and mental health care

J. Keene; J. Rodriguez

2007-01-01

424

Women's childhood and adult adverse experiences, mental health, and binge drinking: The California Women's Health Survey  

PubMed Central

Background This study examined sociodemographic, physical and mental health, and adult and childhood adverse experiences associated with binge drinking in a representative sample of women in the State of California. Materials and methods Data were from the 2003 to 2004 (response rates of 72% and 74%, respectively) California Women's Health Survey (CWHS), a population-based, random-digit-dial annual probability survey sponsored by the California Department of Health Services. The sample was 6,942 women aged 18 years or older. Results The prevalence of binge drinking was 9.3%. Poor physical health, and poorer mental health (i.e., symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression, feeling overwhelmed by stress), were associated with binge drinking when demographics were controlled, as were adverse experiences in adulthood (intimate partner violence, having been physically or sexually assaulted, or having experienced the death of someone close) and in childhood (living with someone abusing substances or mentally ill, or with a mother vicimized by violence, or having been physically or sexually assaulted). When adult mental health and adverse experiences were also controlled, having lived as a child with someone who abused substances or was mentally ill was associated with binge drinking. Associations between childhood adverse experiences and binge drinking could not be explained by women's poorer mental health status in adulthood. Conclusion Identifying characteristics of women who engage in binge drinking is a key step in prevention and intervention efforts. Binge drinking programs should consider comprehensive approaches that address women's mental health symptoms as well as circumstances in the childhood home.

Timko, Christine; Sutkowi, Anne; Pavao, Joanne; Kimerling, Rachel

2008-01-01

425

Screening Offenders for Health and Mental Health Problems at Court  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of arrestees and court defendants have demonstrated that health and mental health problems are apparent in these groups at higher rates than in the general population. This study examined self-reported physical and mental well-being of 200 participants in a pre-trial support program (Court Integrated Services Program), using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v2). On entry to the program, clients

Stuart Ross; Jedda Graham

2012-01-01

426

Screening Offenders for Health and Mental Health Problems at Court  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of arrestees and court defendants have demonstrated that health and mental health problems are apparent in these groups at higher rates than in the general population. This study examined self-reported physical and mental well-being of 200 participants in a pre-trial support program (Court Integrated Services Program), using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12 v2). On entry to the program, clients

Stuart Ross; Jedda Graham

2011-01-01

427

The Public Health Impact of Socioeconomic Status on Adolescent Depression and Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. We examined the public health impact of the socioeconomic status (SES) gradient on adolescents' physical and mental health. Methods. Population attributable risk (PAR) for household income and parental edu- cation were calculated relative to depression and obesity among a nationally repre- sentative sample of 15 112 adolescents. Results. PARs for income and education were large. Across each gender and

Elizabeth Goodman; Gail B. Slap; Bin Huang

428

Development of mental health quality indicators (MHQIs) for inpatient psychiatry based on the interRAI mental health assessment  

PubMed Central

Background Outcome quality indicators are rarely used to evaluate mental health services because most jurisdictions lack clinical data systems to construct indicators in a meaningful way across mental health providers. As a result, important information about the effectiveness of health services remains unknown. This study examined the feasibility of developing mental health quality indicators (MHQIs) using the Resident Assessment Instrument - Mental Health (RAI-MH), a clinical assessment system mandated for use in Ontario, Canada as well as many other jurisdictions internationally. Methods Retrospective analyses were performed on two datasets containing RAI-MH assessments for 1,056 patients from 7 facilities and 34,788 patients from 70 facilities in Ontario, Canada. The RAI-MH was completed by clinical staff of each facility at admission and follow-up, typically at discharge. The RAI-MH includes a breadth of information on symptoms, functioning, socio-demographics, and service utilization. Potential MHQIs were derived by examining the empirical patterns of improvement and incidence in depressive symptoms and cognitive performance across facilities in both sets of data. A prevalence indicator was also constructed to compare restraint use. Logistic regression was used to evaluate risk adjustment of MHQIs using patient case-mix index scores derived from the RAI-MH System for Classification of Inpatient Psychiatry. Results Subscales from the RAI-MH, the Depression Severity Index (DSI) and Cognitive Performance Scale (CPS), were found to have good reliability and strong convergent validity. Unadjusted rates of five MHQIs based on the DSI, CPS, and restraints showed substantial variation among facilities in both sets of data. For instance, there was a 29.3% difference between the first and third quartile facility rates of improvement in cognitive performance. The case-mix index score was significantly related to MHQIs for cognitive performance and restraints but had a relatively small impact on adjusted rates/prevalence. Conclusions The RAI-MH is a feasible assessment system for deriving MHQIs. Given the breadth of clinical content on the RAI-MH there is an opportunity to expand the number of MHQIs beyond indicators of depression, cognitive performance, and restraints. Further research is needed to improve risk adjustment of the MHQIs for their use in mental health services report card and benchmarking activities.

2013-01-01

429

One Hundred Years of College Mental Health  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Although the first student health service is credited to Amherst College in 1861, almost 50 years passed before Princeton University established the first mental health service in 1910. At that time, a psychiatrist was hired to help with student personality development. Although other schools subsequently established such services, the first 50…

Kraft, David P.

2011-01-01

430

PMHT: Positive Mental Health for Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

After some of the work hazards unique to teaching are noted and the identifiable characteristics of the maladjusted teacher discussed, a three-state teacher mental health plan is proposed to prevent children from being exposed to teachers who suffer from poor emotional health: prevention, assistance, dismissal. (Author/SJL)

Mackiel, John

1979-01-01

431

Service network analysis for agricultural mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Farmers represent a subgroup of rural and remote communities at higher risk of suicide attributed to insecure economic futures, self-reliant cultures and poor access to health services. Early intervention models are required that tap into existing farming networks. This study describes service networks in rural shires that relate to the mental health needs of farming families. This serves as

Jeffrey D Fuller; Brian Kelly; Susan Law; Georgia Pollard; Lyn Fragar

2009-01-01

432

Mental Health Practice Guidelines for Child Welfare  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The guidelines and supporting rationale presented in this paper were developed from the October 2007 "Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference" sponsored by Casey Family Programs, the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the REACH Institute (REsource for Advancing Children's Health). The purpose of the conference was to…

Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2009

2009-01-01

433

Employment propensity: The roles of mental and physical health  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an investigation into the impacts of mental and physical health on the propensity to be employed. Health status is parameterised using three physical and three mental health indicators. After controlling for various socioeconomic factors, the application of limited dependent variable regression techniques generates results which indicate that activity-limiting physical health and accomplishment-limiting mental health issues significantly affect

Gail Pacheco; Don J. Webber

2011-01-01

434

Identity Theft in Community Mental Health Patients  

PubMed Central

Identity theft is a serious problem in the United States, and persons with enduring mental illnesses may be particularly vulnerable to becoming victims of this crime. Victims of identity theft experience a variety of consequences that include financial loss and serious emotional distress. Little is known about the impact of identity theft on individuals with mental illnesses. The two cases from a community mental health center presented in this article demonstrate many of the facets that may be associated with an increased risk for becoming the victim of identity theft. A summary of preventive steps as well as steps involved in resolving the crime once one has become a victim are presented.

Klopp, Jonathon; Konrad, Shane; Yanofski, Jason

2007-01-01

435

Correspondence of perceptions about centenarians’ mental health  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The goals of this study were to uncover the criteria by which centenarians, proxy\\/caregivers, and interviewers rated centenarians’ mental health. Often proxy and interviewer reports are obtained in studies of the oldest-old and become a primary source of information.Methods: Data were from a population-based sample of mentally competent US centenarians in northern Georgia. The dependent variables were based on

Maurice MacDonald; Peter Martin; Jennifer Margrett; Leonard W. Poon

2009-01-01

436

School Mental Health in Systems of Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Center for Mental Health Services (1997) estimates that from 9 to 13% of all children aged 9–17 have a serious emotional\\u000a disturbance that either impairs or substantially interferes with their ability to function effectively at home, school, or\\u000a within the community. More than 20 years ago, Knitzer (1982) found that two-thirds of children in need did not receive mental

Philip J. Leaf; David Schultz; Laurel J. Riser; David B. Pruitt

437

Road traffic noise, sleep and mental health.  

PubMed

This study examines the relationship between road traffic noise, self-reported sleep quality and mental health. The study is cross-sectional and based on data from a survey conducted in Oslo, Norway, in 2000. Psychological distress (Hopkins Symptom Checklist, HSCL-25) was measured along with self-reported somatic health, sleep quality, noise sensitivity and socioeconomic variables. Questionnaire data were combined with modeled estimates of noise exposure. The total study sample consisted of 2898 respondents. After adjustment for potential confounders and stratifying for sleep quality, we found a positive, but not statistically significant association between noise exposure and symptoms of psychological distress among participants with poor sleep quality (slope=0.06, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.13, per 10dB increase in noise exposure). In the same sleep quality group, we found a borderline statistically significant association between noise exposure and a symptom level indicating a probable mental disorder (HSCL?1.55) (odds ratio=1.47, 95% CI: 0.99-1.98, per 10dB increase in noise exposure). We found no association between road traffic noise and mental health among subjects reporting good and medium sleep quality. The results suggest that road traffic noise may be associated with poorer mental health among subjects with poor sleep. Individuals with poor sleep quality may be more vulnerable to effects of road traffic noise on mental health than individuals with better sleep quality. PMID:24637180

Sygna, Karin; Aasvang, Gunn Marit; Aamodt, Geir; Oftedal, Bente; Krog, Norun Hjertager

2014-05-01

438

Unmet mental health and substance abuse treatment needs of sexual minority elders.  

PubMed

In a survey exploring the reliability and validity of a screening tool, we explored the substance abuse and mental health issues among 371 elders; 74 were sexual minorities. Analyses by age group indicated that elders 55-64 years had significantly more problems with substance abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts compared to those 65 and older. Bisexuals reported significantly greater problems with depression, anxiety, and suicidality than either heterosexual or lesbian or gay elders. Mental health and substance abuse treatment utilization was low among all elders with problems. Implications for assessment, access to care, and group-specific services delivery are discussed. PMID:22587357

Jessup, Martha A; Dibble, Suzanne L

2012-01-01

439

[Mental health support for disaster relief personnel].  

PubMed

The Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake, which occurred on March 11, 2011, caused serious damage and resulted in numerous fatalities and almost 20,000 missing persons. Furthermore, a major accident accompanied by exudation of radioactive material occurred in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A statement regarding the victims' mental health was issued by the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology on May 21, 2011, which established the Department of Disaster Psychiatry for the provision and assurance of long-term mental care support for the victims. The Department of Disaster Psychiatry was consequently reformed in April 2012, focusing on the following objectives: to verify the validity of current mental support methods; to ensure disaster psychiatry and medical care in Japan; and to promote human resource development that can respond to future large-scale disasters. Mental health support for disaster victims is of highest priority. However, the mental health of relief personnel, who act as front liners during disasters (i. e., police officers, fire fighters, Self-Defense Forces, and health care workers), has often been neglected. Therefore, countermeasures for the problems faced by relief personnel are indispensable for a more effective reconstruction. Volunteers are also important members of the disaster relief team and they have witnessed the actual tragedy, and some have experienced burnout. Thus, they require sufficient mental health support, as do relief personnel. We thought that the mental health of disaster relief personnel is an important issue; thus, we report their mental health needs, the systematic correspondence to disaster stress, and our works for relief assistance. As first responders, relief personnel even without prior disaster education proceed to the area of disaster and may get injured. We therefore suggest that prior to the occurrence of any disaster, networking, education, and disaster awareness should be advocated among relief personnel and volunteers to safeguard their mental health. However, programs on these subjects remain insufficient. We extend our utmost respect and appreciation to the disaster relief workforce for doing their best to save lives. We hope that this aids in the reconstruction process of such affected areas. PMID:24783446

Takahashi, Sho

2014-01-01

440

Mental state decoding in past major depression: Effect of sad versus happy mood induction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with mild depression show an enhanced ability to read or “decode” others' mental states. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether this pattern of performance is related specifically to the pathology of depression or whether it is simply a feature of the transient dysphoric state. Forty-one undergraduates with a previous episode of major depression and 52

Kate L. Harkness; Jill A. Jacobson; David Duong; Mark A. Sabbagh

2010-01-01

441

Mental Health Check-up  

MedlinePLUS

... any thoughts of suicide could indicate clinical depression . Energy — Do you feel that you have the energy to do the things you need and want ... high sugar and fatty foods ultimately zap your energy and leave you feeling lower. Not to mention ...

442

Social support and mental health among college students.  

PubMed

This study is the first, to our knowledge, to evaluate the relationship between mental health and social support in a large, random sample of college students. A Web-based survey was administered at a large, public university, with 1,378 students completing the measures in this analysis (response rate = 57%). The results support our hypothesis that students with characteristics differing from most other students, such as minority race or ethnicity, international status, and low socioeconomic status, are at greater risk of social isolation. In addition, the authors found that students with lower quality social support, as measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, were more likely to experience mental health problems, including a sixfold risk of depressive symptoms relative to students with high quality social support. These results may help administrators and health providers to identify more effectively the population of students at high risk for mental illness and develop effective interventions to address this significant and growing public health issue. PMID:20099940

Hefner, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Daniel

2009-10-01

443

Mental Health Disorders. Adolescent Health Highlight. Publication #2013-1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mental disorders are diagnosable conditions characterized by changes in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination of these) that can cause a person to feel stressed out and impair his or her ability to function. These disorders are common in adolescence. This "Adolescent Health Highlight" presents the warning signs of mental disorders;…

Murphey, David; Barry, Megan; Vaughn, Brigitte