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Sample records for mercuric ion reductase

  1. Expression of bacterial mercuric ion reductase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rensing, C; Kües, U; Stahl, U; Nies, D H; Friedrich, B

    1992-01-01

    The gene merA coding for bacterial mercuric ion reductase was cloned under the control of the yeast promoter for alcohol dehydrogenase I in the yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle plasmid pADH040-2 and transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae AH22. The resulting transformant harbored stable copies of the merA-containing hybrid plasmid, displayed a fivefold increase in the MIC of mercuric chloride, and synthesized mercuric ion reductase activity. Images PMID:1735719

  2. Biochemical and Structural Properties of a Thermostable Mercuric Ion Reductase from Metallosphaera sedula

    PubMed Central

    Artz, Jacob H.; White, Spencer N.; Zadvornyy, Oleg A.; Fugate, Corey J.; Hicks, Danny; Gauss, George H.; Posewitz, Matthew C.; Boyd, Eric S.; Peters, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Mercuric ion reductase (MerA), a mercury detoxification enzyme, has been tuned by evolution to have high specificity for mercuric ions (Hg2+) and to catalyze their reduction to a more volatile, less toxic elemental form. Here, we present a biochemical and structural characterization of MerA from the thermophilic crenarchaeon Metallosphaera sedula. MerA from M. sedula is a thermostable enzyme, and remains active after extended incubation at 97°C. At 37°C, the NADPH oxidation-linked Hg2+ reduction specific activity was found to be 1.9 μmol/min⋅mg, increasing to 3.1 μmol/min⋅mg at 70°C. M. sedula MerA crystals were obtained and the structure was solved to 1.6 Å, representing the first solved crystal structure of a thermophilic MerA. Comparison of both the crystal structure and amino acid sequence of MerA from M. sedula to mesophillic counterparts provides new insights into the structural determinants that underpin the thermal stability of the enzyme. PMID:26217660

  3. Structure of the detoxification catalyst mercuric ion reductase from Bacillus sp. strain RC607

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiering, N.; Kabsch, W.; Moore, M. J.; Distefano, M. D.; Walsh, C. T.; Pai, E. F.

    1991-07-01

    SEVERAL hundred million tons of toxic mercurials are dispersed in the biosphere1. Microbes can detoxify organo-mercurials and mercury salts through sequential action of two enzymes, organomercury lyase2 and mercuric ion reductase (MerA) 3-5. The latter, a homodimer with homology to the FAD-dependent disulphide oxidoreductases6, catalyses the reaction NADPH + Hg(II) --> NADP+ + H+Hg(0), one of the very rare enzymic reactions with metal substrates. Human glutathione reductase7,8 serves as a reference molecule for FAD-dependent disulphide reductases and between its primary structure9 and that of MerA from Tn501 (Pseudomonas), Tn21 (Shigella), pI258 (Staphylococcus) and Bacillus, 25-30% of the residues have been conserved10,11. All MerAs have a C-terminal extension about 15 residues long but have very varied N termini. Although the enzyme from Streptomyces lividans has no addition, from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tn5Ol and Bacillus sp. strain RC607 it has one and two copies respectively of a domain of 80-85 residues, highly homologous to MerP, the periplasmic component of proteins encoded by the mer operon11. These domains can be proteolytically cleaved off without changing the catalytic efficiency3. We report here the crystal structure of MerA from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus sp. strain RC607. Analysis of its complexes with nicotinamide dinucleotide substrates and the inhibitor Cd(II) reveals how limited structural changes enable an enzyme to accept as substrate what used to be a dangerous inhibitor. Knowledge of the mode of mercury ligation is a prerequisite for understanding this unique detoxification mechanism.

  4. Structure and dynamics of a compact state of a multidomain protein, the mercuric ion reductase.

    PubMed

    Hong, Liang; Sharp, Melissa A; Poblete, Simón; Biehl, Ralf; Zamponi, Michaela; Szekely, Noemi; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Winkler, Roland G; Nauss, Rachel E; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M; Yi, Zheng; Cheng, Xiaolin; Liang, Liyuan; Ohl, Michael; Miller, Susan M; Richter, Dieter; Gompper, Gerhard; Smith, Jeremy C

    2014-07-15

    The functional efficacy of colocalized, linked protein domains is dependent on linker flexibility and system compaction. However, the detailed characterization of these properties in aqueous solution presents an enduring challenge. Here, we employ a novel, to our knowledge, combination of complementary techniques, including small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, and all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained simulation, to identify and characterize in detail the structure and dynamics of a compact form of mercuric ion reductase (MerA), an enzyme central to bacterial mercury resistance. MerA possesses metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) tethered to its catalytic core domain by linkers. The NmerA domains are found to interact principally through electrostatic interactions with the core, leashed by the linkers so as to subdiffuse on the surface over an area close to the core C-terminal Hg(II)-binding cysteines. How this compact, dynamical arrangement may facilitate delivery of Hg(II) from NmerA to the core domain is discussed. PMID:25028881

  5. Structure and Dynamics of a Compact State of a Multidomain Protein, the Mercuric Ion Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Liang; Sharp, Melissa A.; Poblete, Simón; Biehl, Ralf; Zamponi, Michaela; Szekely, Noemi; Appavou, Marie-Sousai; Winkler, Roland G.; Nauss, Rachel E.; Johs, Alexander; Parks, Jerry M.; Yi, Zheng; Cheng, Xiaolin; Liang, Liyuan; Ohl, Michael; Miller, Susan M.; Richter, Dieter; Gompper, Gerhard; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-01-01

    The functional efficacy of colocalized, linked protein domains is dependent on linker flexibility and system compaction. However, the detailed characterization of these properties in aqueous solution presents an enduring challenge. Here, we employ a novel, to our knowledge, combination of complementary techniques, including small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin-echo spectroscopy, and all-atom molecular dynamics and coarse-grained simulation, to identify and characterize in detail the structure and dynamics of a compact form of mercuric ion reductase (MerA), an enzyme central to bacterial mercury resistance. MerA possesses metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) tethered to its catalytic core domain by linkers. The NmerA domains are found to interact principally through electrostatic interactions with the core, leashed by the linkers so as to subdiffuse on the surface over an area close to the core C-terminal Hg(II)-binding cysteines. How this compact, dynamical arrangement may facilitate delivery of Hg(II) from NmerA to the core domain is discussed. PMID:25028881

  6. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg2+ transfer between flexibly-linked domains of mercuric ion reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase, MerA, is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess a metallochaperone-like N-terminal domain, NmerA, that can transfer Hg2+ to the catalytic core (Core) for reduction to Hg0. These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are subject to proteolysis, which has limited structural and functional characterization of the interactions of these domains. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structure of constructs that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg2+ from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations resulting from flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg2+ from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg2+ handoff. The small buried surface area at the site of interaction suggests molecular recognition may be of less importance for the integrity of metal ion transfers between tethered domains than for transfers between separate proteins in metal trafficking pathways.

  7. Structural characterization of intramolecular Hg(2+) transfer between flexibly linked domains of mercuric ion reductase.

    PubMed

    Johs, Alexander; Harwood, Ian M; Parks, Jerry M; Nauss, Rachel E; Smith, Jeremy C; Liang, Liyuan; Miller, Susan M

    2011-10-28

    The enzyme mercuric ion reductase MerA is the central component of bacterial mercury resistance encoded by the mer operon. Many MerA proteins possess metallochaperone-like N-terminal domains (NmerA) that can transfer Hg(2+) to the catalytic core domain (Core) for reduction to Hg(0). These domains are tethered to the homodimeric Core by ~30-residue linkers that are susceptible to proteolysis, the latter of which has prevented characterization of the interactions of NmerA and the Core in the full-length protein. Here, we report purification of homogeneous full-length MerA from the Tn21 mer operon using a fusion protein construct and combine small-angle X-ray scattering and small-angle neutron scattering with molecular dynamics simulation to characterize the structures of full-length wild-type and mutant MerA proteins that mimic the system before and during handoff of Hg(2+) from NmerA to the Core. The radii of gyration, distance distribution functions, and Kratky plots derived from the small-angle X-ray scattering data are consistent with full-length MerA adopting elongated conformations as a result of flexibility in the linkers to the NmerA domains. The scattering profiles are best reproduced using an ensemble of linker conformations. This flexible attachment of NmerA may facilitate fast and efficient removal of Hg(2+) from diverse protein substrates. Using a specific mutant of MerA allowed the formation of a metal-mediated interaction between NmerA and the Core and the determination of the position and relative orientation of NmerA to the Core during Hg(2+) handoff. PMID:21893070

  8. Structure/Function Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Role of Dynamic Motions in Mercuric Ion Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Susan M.

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the activities and findings of our structure/function studies of the bacterial detoxification enzyme mercuric ion reductase. The objectives of the work were to obtain crystal structure information for the catalytic core of this enzyme, use the information to investigate the importance of specific parts of the enzyme to its function, and investigate the role of one domain of the enzyme in its function within cells. We describe the accomplishments towards these goals including many structures of the wild type and mutant forms of the enzyme that highlight its interactions with its Hg(II) substrate, elucidation of the role of the N-terminal domain in vitro and in vivo, and elucidation of the roles of at two conserved residues in the core in the mechanism of catalysis.

  9. Immobilization of mercuric reductase from a pseudomonas putida strain on different activated carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Anspach, F.B.; Hueckel, M.; Brunke, M.

    1994-02-01

    Mercuric reductase was isolated from Pseudomonas putida KT2442::mer-73 and immobilized on chromatographic carriers activated by various methods. The immobilization methods for covalent coupling were compared with regard to preservation of enzymatic activity and coupling yields. Highest yields were obtained with carriers bearing the most reactive functional groups. Best results were achieved with tresyl chloride-activated carriers. The optimum binding conditions were found at pH 8. Application of the immobilized mercuric reductase for continuous treatment of Hg(II)-containing water was examined in a fixed bed reactor. Space-time yields up to 510 nmol/min{center_dot}mL were attained. The kinetics of immobilized enzyme systems were not diffusion-controlled. 22 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Picomolar detection of mercuric ions by means of gold-silver core-shell nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shouhui; Liu, Dingbin; Wang, Zhihua; Sun, Xiaolian; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-07-01

    We report an ultrasensitive and selective probe for detection of mercuric ions using gold-silver core-shell nanorods as the substrate of surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The detection limit of this probe for mercuric ions can be as low as 1 pM. The efficiency of this probe in complex samples was evaluated by allowing detection of spiked mercuric ions in river water and fish samples.We report an ultrasensitive and selective probe for detection of mercuric ions using gold-silver core-shell nanorods as the substrate of surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The detection limit of this probe for mercuric ions can be as low as 1 pM. The efficiency of this probe in complex samples was evaluated by allowing detection of spiked mercuric ions in river water and fish samples. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01603j

  11. Mercury Resistance and Mercuric Reductase Activities and Expression among Chemotrophic Thermophilic Aquificae

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Zachary; Zhu, Chengsheng

    2012-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) resistance (mer) by the reduction of mercuric to elemental Hg is broadly distributed among the Bacteria and Archaea and plays an important role in Hg detoxification and biogeochemical cycling. MerA is the protein subunit of the homodimeric mercuric reductase (MR) enzyme, the central function of the mer system. MerA sequences in the phylum Aquificae form the deepest-branching lineage in Bayesian phylogenetic reconstructions of all known MerA homologs. We therefore hypothesized that the merA homologs in two thermophilic Aquificae, Hydrogenobaculum sp. strain Y04AAS1 (AAS1) and Hydrogenivirga sp. strain 128-5-R1-1 (R1-1), specified Hg resistance. Results supported this hypothesis, because strains AAS1 and R1-1 (i) were resistant to >10 μM Hg(II), (ii) transformed Hg(II) to Hg(0) during cellular growth, and (iii) possessed Hg-dependent NAD(P)H oxidation activities in crude cell extracts that were optimal at temperatures corresponding with the strains' optimal growth temperatures, 55°C for AAS1 and 70°C for R1-1. While these characteristics all conformed with the mer system paradigm, expression of the Aquificae mer operons was not induced by exposure to Hg(II) as indicated by unity ratios of merA transcripts, normalized to gyrA transcripts for hydrogen-grown AAS1 cultures, and by similar MR specific activities in thiosulfate-grown cultures with and without Hg(II). The Hg(II)-independent expression of mer in the deepest-branching lineage of MerA from bacteria whose natural habitats are Hg-rich geothermal environments suggests that regulated expression of mer was a later innovation likely in environments where microorganisms were intermittently exposed to toxic concentrations of Hg. PMID:22773655

  12. Mercury (II) removal by resistant bacterial isolates and mercuric (II) reductase activity in a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A.

    PubMed

    Giovanella, Patricia; Cabral, Lucélia; Bento, Fátima Menezes; Gianello, Clesio; Camargo, Flávio Anastácio Oliveira

    2016-01-25

    This study aimed to isolate mercury resistant bacteria, determine the minimum inhibitory concentration for Hg, estimate mercury removal by selected isolates, explore the mer genes, and detect and characterize the activity of the enzyme mercuric (II) reductase produced by a new strain of Pseudomonas sp. B50A. The Hg removal capacity of the isolates was determined by incubating the isolates in Luria Bertani broth and the remaining mercury quantified by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. A PCR reaction was carried out to detect the merA gene and the mercury (II) reductase activity was determined in a spectrophotometer at 340 nm. Eight Gram-negative bacterial isolates were resistant to high mercury concentrations and capable of removing mercury, and of these, five were positive for the gene merA. The isolate Pseudomonas sp. B50A removed 86% of the mercury present in the culture medium and was chosen for further analysis of its enzyme activity. Mercuric (II) reductase activity was detected in the crude extract of this strain. This enzyme showed optimal activity at pH 8 and at temperatures between 37 °C and 45 °C. The ions NH4(+), Ba(2+), Sn(2+), Ni(2+) and Cd(2+) neither inhibited nor stimulated the enzyme activity but it decreased in the presence of the ions Ca(2+), Cu(+) and K(+). The isolate and the enzyme detected were effective in reducing Hg(II) to Hg(0), showing the potential to develop bioremediation technologies and processes to clean-up the environment and waste contaminated with mercury. PMID:26051077

  13. A Novel Mercuric Reductase from the Unique Deep Brine Environment of Atlantis II in the Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Ahmed; Ghazy, Mohamed A.; Ferreira, Ari J. S.; Setubal, João C.; Chambergo, Felipe S.; Ouf, Amged; Adel, Mustafa; Dawe, Adam S.; Archer, John A. C.; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Siam, Rania; El-Dorry, Hamza

    2014-01-01

    A unique combination of physicochemical conditions prevails in the lower convective layer (LCL) of the brine pool at Atlantis II (ATII) Deep in the Red Sea. With a maximum depth of over 2000 m, the pool is characterized by acidic pH (5.3), high temperature (68 °C), salinity (26%), low light levels, anoxia, and high concentrations of heavy metals. We have established a metagenomic dataset derived from the microbial community in the LCL, and here we describe a gene for a novel mercuric reductase, a key component of the bacterial detoxification system for mercuric and organomercurial species. The metagenome-derived gene and an ortholog from an uncultured soil bacterium were synthesized and expressed in Escherichia coli. The properties of their products show that, in contrast to the soil enzyme, the ATII-LCL mercuric reductase is functional in high salt, stable at high temperatures, resistant to high concentrations of Hg2+, and efficiently detoxifies Hg2+ in vivo. Interestingly, despite the marked functional differences between the orthologs, their amino acid sequences differ by less than 10%. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis of the mutant enzymes, in conjunction with three-dimensional modeling, have identified distinct structural features that contribute to extreme halophilicity, thermostability, and high detoxification capacity, suggesting that these were acquired independently during the evolution of this enzyme. Thus, our work provides fundamental structural insights into a novel protein that has undergone multiple biochemical and biophysical adaptations to promote the survival of microorganisms that reside in the extremely demanding environment of the ATII-LCL. PMID:24280218

  14. Direct Measurement of Hg(II) Removal from Organomercurial Lyase (MerB) by Tryptophan Fluorescence: NmerA Domain of Co-evolved γ -Proteobacterial Mercuric Ion Reductase (MerA) Is More Efficient than MerA Catalytic Core or Glutathione†

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Baoyu; Nauss, Rachel; Harwood, Ian; Miller, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea harboring mer loci exhibit resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)]. In broad spectrum resistance, RHg(I) is converted to less toxic Hg(0) in the cytosol by the sequential action of organomercurial lyase (MerB: RHg(I) --> RH + Hg(II)) and mercuric ion reductase (MerA: Hg(II) --> Hg(0)) enzymes, requiring transfer of Hg(II) from MerB to MerA. Although previous studies with γ-proteobacterial versions of MerA and a non-physiological Hg(II)-DTT-MerB complex qualitatively support a pathway for direct transfer between proteins, assessment of the relative efficiencies of Hg(II) transfer to the two different di-cysteine motifs in γ-proteobacterial MerA and to competing cellular thiol is lacking. Here we show the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of γ-proteobacterial MerB is sensitive to Hg(II) binding and use this to probe the kinetics of Hg(II) removal from MerB by the N-terminal domain (NmerA) and catalytic core C-terminal cysteine pairs of its co-evolved MerA, and by glutathione (GSH), the major competing cellular thiol in γ-proteobacteria. At physiologically relevant concentrations, reaction with a 10-fold excess NmerA over HgMerB removes ≥ 92% Hg(II), while similar extents of reaction require more than 1000-fold excess of GSH. Kinetically, the apparent second order rate constant for Hg(II) transfer from MerB to NmerA, at 2.3 ± 0.1 × 104 M−1 s−1 is ~ 100-fold greater than that for GSH (1.2 ± 0.2 × 102 M−1 s−1) or the MerA catalytic core (1.2 × 102 M−1 s−1), establishing transfer to the metallochaperone-like NmerA domain as the kinetically favored pathway in this co-evolved system. PMID:20722420

  15. Direct measurement of mercury(II) removal from organomercurial lyase (MerB) by tryptophan fluorescence: NmerA domain of coevolved γ-proteobacterial mercuric ion reductase (MerA) is more efficient than MerA catalytic core or glutathione .

    PubMed

    Hong, Baoyu; Nauss, Rachel; Harwood, Ian M; Miller, Susan M

    2010-09-21

    Aerobic and facultative bacteria and archaea harboring mer loci exhibit resistance to the toxic effects of Hg(II) and organomercurials [RHg(I)]. In broad spectrum resistance, RHg(I) is converted to less toxic Hg(0) in the cytosol by the sequential action of organomercurial lyase (MerB: RHg(I) → RH + Hg(II)) and mercuric ion reductase (MerA: Hg(II) → Hg(0)) enzymes, requiring transfer of Hg(II) from MerB to MerA. Although previous studies with γ-proteobacterial versions of MerA and a nonphysiological Hg(II)-DTT-MerB complex qualitatively support a pathway for direct transfer between proteins, assessment of the relative efficiencies of Hg(II) transfer to the two different dicysteine motifs in γ-proteobacterial MerA and to competing cellular thiol is lacking. Here we show the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of γ-proteobacterial MerB is sensitive to Hg(II) binding and use this to probe the kinetics of Hg(II) removal from MerB by the N-terminal domain (NmerA) and catalytic core C-terminal cysteine pairs of its coevolved MerA and by glutathione (GSH), the major competing cellular thiol in γ-proteobacteria. At physiologically relevant concentrations, reaction with a 10-fold excess of NmerA over HgMerB removes ≥92% Hg(II), while similar extents of reaction require more than 1000-fold excess of GSH. Kinetically, the apparent second-order rate constant for Hg(II) transfer from MerB to NmerA, at (2.3 ± 0.1) × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), is ∼100-fold greater than that for GSH ((1.2 ± 0.2) × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)) or the MerA catalytic core (1.2 × 10(2) M(-1) s(-1)), establishing transfer to the metallochaperone-like NmerA domain as the kinetically favored pathway in this coevolved system. PMID:20722420

  16. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Steingrube, V.A.; Wallace, R.J. Jr.; Steele, L.C.; Pang, Y.J. )

    1991-05-01

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria.

  17. Highly photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals for rapid, label-free and recyclable detection of mercuric ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the thiol group, the fluorescence can be fully recovered by biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione, therefore, a regenerative strategy has been proposed and successfully applied to detect Hg2+ by the same sensor for at least five cycles. Endowed with relatively high sensitivity and selectivity, the present sensor holds the potential to be applied for mercuric assay in water.Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg2+) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg2+ over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg2+ with the

  18. Highly photoluminescent silicon nanocrystals for rapid, label-free and recyclable detection of mercuric ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2014-04-21

    Hydrothermal treatment of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) in the presence of sodium citrate generates a suspension of highly fluorescent silicon nanocrystals that fluoresces blue under UV irradiation. The photoluminescent quantum yield of the as-prepared silicon nanocrystals was calculated to be 21.6%, with quinine sulfate as the standard reference. Only mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) can readily prevent the fluorescence of the silicon nanocrystals, indicating a remarkably high selectivity towards Hg(2+) over other metal ions. The optimized sensor system shows a sensitive detection range from 50 nM to 1 μM and a detection limit of 50 nM. The quenching mechanism was explained in terms of optical absorption spectra and time-resolved fluorescence decay spectra. Due to the strong interaction of Hg(2+) with the thiol group, the fluorescence can be fully recovered by biothiols such as cysteine and glutathione, therefore, a regenerative strategy has been proposed and successfully applied to detect Hg(2+) by the same sensor for at least five cycles. Endowed with relatively high sensitivity and selectivity, the present sensor holds the potential to be applied for mercuric assay in water. PMID:24604008

  19. Expressing a bacterial mercuric ion binding protein in plant for phytoremediation of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ju-Liang; Chen, Ching-Yi; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chein, Mei-Fang; Chang, Jo-Shu; Endo, Ginro; Huang, Chieh-Chen

    2009-01-30

    A specific mercuric ion binding protein (MerP) originating from transposon TnMERI1 of Bacillus megaterium strain MB1 isolated from Minamata Bay displayed good adsorption capability for a variety of heavy metals. In this study, the Gram-positive MerP protein was expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis to create a model system for phytoremediation of heavy metals. Under control of an actin promoter, the transgenic Arabidpsis showed higher tolerance and accumulation capacity for mercury, cadium and lead when compared with the control plant. Results from confocal microscopy analysis also indicate that MerP was localized at the cell membrane and vesicles of plant cells. The developed transgenic plants possessing excellent metal-accumulative ability could have potential applications in decontamination of heavy metals. PMID:18538925

  20. Magnetic detection of mercuric ion using giant magnetoresistance-based biosensing system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yi; Tu, Liang; Klein, Todd; Feng, Yinglong; Li, Qin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2014-04-15

    We have demonstrated a novel sensing strategy employing a giant magnetoresistance (GMR) biosensor and DNA chemistry for the detection of mercuric ion (Hg(2+)). This assay takes advantages of high sensitivity and real-time signal readout of GMR biosensor and high selectivity of thymine-thymine (T-T) pair for Hg(2+). The assay has a detection limit of 10 nM in both buffer and natural water, which is the maximum mercury level in drinking water regulated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The magnitude of the dynamic range for Hg(2+) detection is up to three orders (10 nM to 10 μM). Herein, GMR sensing technology is first introduced into a pollutant monitoring area. It can be foreseen that the GMR biosensor could become a robust contender in the areas of environmental monitoring and food safety testing. PMID:24654958

  1. A dual-channel detection of mercuric ions using a label free G-quadruplex-based DNAzyme molecule.

    PubMed

    Ma, Long; Liu, Haiyan; Wu, Guanrong; Sun, Nana; Meng, Lingpei; Li, Yuyin; Liu, Zhenxing; Diao, Aipo

    2016-06-20

    We have constructed a 'turn-off' and label free bio-sensor using a DNAzyme molecule. This facile bio-sensor is capable of selective detection of mercuric ions with a high sensitivity and satisfactory dynamic range. More importantly, it is able to generate both fluorescent and colourimetric signals for detection. This dual-channel bio-sensor is expected to afford high detection confidence and overcome false-positive readout especially when assaying complex biological samples. PMID:27197879

  2. Highly Sensitive and Selective Label-Free Optical Detection of Mercuric Ions Using Photon Upconverting Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Zhang, Peng

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a fluorescence-based, label-free detection scheme that reports the presence of Hg(II) ion using photon upconverting nanoparticles. A single-stranded DNA containing a number of thymine bases to be used as the Hg2+-capturing element is covalently attached to the photon upconverting NaYF4:Yb3+,Tm3+ nanoparticles. Under the illumination of 980 nm laser, energy transfer takes place between the NaYF4:Yb3+,Tm3+ nanoparticles as the donor and SYBR green I, a DNA intercalating dye, as the acceptor. By monitoring the ratio of the acceptor emission to the donor emission, we can quantitatively detect the presence of the mercuric ions with a directly observed detection limit of 0.06 nM. The remarkably high signal-to-noise ratio of photon upconverting particles leads to very high sensitivity and specificity without the need of fluorophore labeling. The sensor also does not suffer from photobleaching. PMID:20456935

  3. Femtomolar detection of mercuric ions using polypyrrole, pectin and graphene nanocomposites modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Arulraj, Abraham Daniel; Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Chen, Shen-Ming; Vasantha, Vairathevar Sivasamy; Wang, Sea-Fue

    2016-12-01

    Several nanomaterials and techniques for the detection of mercuric ions (Hg(2+)) have been developed in the past decade. However, simple, low-cost and rapid sensor for the detection of heavy metal ions yet remains an important task. Herein, we present a highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the femtomolar detection of Hg(2+) based on polypyrrole, pectin, and graphene (PPy/Pct/GR) which was prepared by one step electrochemical potentiodyanamic method. The effect of concentration of pectin, polypyrrole and graphene were studied for the detection of Hg(2+). The influence of experimental parameters including effect of pH, accumulation time and accumulation potential were also studied. Different pulse anodic stripping voltammetry was chosen to detect Hg(2+) at PPy/Pct/GR/GCE modified electrode. The fabricated sensor achieved an excellent performance towards Hg(2+) detection such as higher sensitivity of 28.64μAμM(-1) and very low detection limit (LOD) of 4 fM at the signal to noise ratio of 3. The LOD of our sensor offered nearly 6 orders of magnitude lower than that of recommended concentration of Hg(2+) in drinking water by United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Compared to all previously reported electrochemical sensors towards Hg(2+) detection, our newly fabricated sensor attained a very LOD in the detection of Hg(2+). The practicality of our proposed sensor for the detection of Hg(2+) was successfully demonstrated in untreated tap water. PMID:27565958

  4. MRP2 and the handling of mercuric ions in rats exposed acutely to inorganic and organic species of mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, Christy C. Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2011-02-15

    Mercuric ions accumulate preferentially in renal tubular epithelial cells and bond with intracellular thiols. Certain metal-complexing agents have been shown to promote extraction of mercuric ions via the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2). Following exposure to a non-toxic dose of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}), in the absence of complexing agents, tubular cells are capable of exporting a small fraction of intracellular Hg{sup 2+} through one or more undetermined mechanisms. We hypothesize that MRP2 plays a role in this export. To test this hypothesis, Wistar (control) and TR{sup -} rats were injected intravenously with a non-nephrotoxic dose of HgCl{sub 2} (0.5 {mu}mol/kg) or CH{sub 3}HgCl (5 mg/kg), containing [{sup 203}Hg], in the presence or absence of cysteine (Cys; 1.25 {mu}mol/kg or 12.5 mg/kg, respectively). Animals were sacrificed 24 h after exposure to mercury and the content of [{sup 203}Hg] in blood, kidneys, liver, urine and feces was determined. In addition, uptake of Cys-S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+} and methylmercury (CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +}) was measured in inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from either control Sf9 cells or Sf9 cells transfected with human MRP2. The amount of mercury in the total renal mass and liver was significantly greater in TR{sup -} rats than in controls. In contrast, the amount of mercury in urine and feces was significantly lower in TR{sup -} rats than in controls. Data from membrane vesicles indicate that Cys-S-conjugates of Hg{sup 2+} and CH{sub 3}Hg{sup +} are transportable substrates of MRP2. Collectively, these data indicate that MRP2 plays a role in the physiological handling and elimination of mercuric ions from the kidney.

  5. Biophysical characterization of the MerP-like amino-terminal extension of the mercuric reductase from Ralstonia metallidurans CH34.

    PubMed

    Rossy, Emmanuel; Champier, Ludovic; Bersch, Beate; Brutscher, Bernhard; Blackledge, Martin; Covès, Jacques

    2004-01-01

    The purified native mercuric reductase (MerA) from Ralstonia metallidurans CH34 contains an N-terminal sequence of 68 amino acids predicted to be homologous to MerP, the periplasmic mercury-binding protein. This MerP-like protein has now been expressed independently. The protein was named MerAa by homology with Ccc2a, the first soluble domain of the copper-transporting ATPase from yeast. Deltaa has been characterized using a set of biophysical techniques. The binding of mercury was followed using circular dichroism spectroscopy and electrospray mass spectrometry. The two cysteine residues contained in the consensus sequence GMTC XXC are involved in the binding of one mercury atom, with an apparent affinity comparable to that of MerP for the same metal. The metal-binding site is confirmed by NMR chemical shift changes observed between apo- and metal-bound MerAa in solution. NMR shift and NOE data also indicate that only minor structural changes occur upon metal binding. Further NMR investigation of the fold of MerAa using long-range methyl-methyl NOE and backbone residual dipolar coupling data confirm the expected close structural homology with MerP. (15)N relaxation data show that MerAa is a globally rigid molecule. An increased backbone mobility was observed for the loop region connecting the first beta-strand and the first alpha-helix and comprising the metal-binding domain. Although significantly reduced, this loop region keeps some conformational flexibility upon metal binding. Altogether, our data suggest a role of MerAa in mercury trafficking. PMID:14624351

  6. Toxicological significance of renal Bcrp: Another potential transporter in the elimination of mercuric ions from proximal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bridges, Christy C. Zalups, Rudolfs K.; Joshee, Lucy

    2015-06-01

    Secretion of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) from proximal tubular cells into the tubular lumen has been shown to involve the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2). Considering similarities in localization and substrate specificity between Mrp2 and the breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp), we hypothesize that Bcrp may also play a role in the proximal tubular secretion of mercuric species. In order to test this hypothesis, the uptake of Hg{sup 2+} was examined initially using inside-out membrane vesicles containing Bcrp. The results of these studies suggest that Bcrp may be capable of transporting certain conjugates of Hg{sup 2+}. To further characterize the role of Bcrp in the handling of mercuric ions and in the induction of Hg{sup 2+}-induced nephropathy, Sprague–Dawley and Bcrp knockout (bcrp{sup −/−}) rats were exposed intravenously to a non-nephrotoxic (0.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}), a moderately nephrotoxic (1.5 μmol·kg{sup −1}) or a significantly nephrotoxic (2.0 μmol·kg{sup −1}) dose of HgCl{sub 2}. In general, the accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} was greater in organs of bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in Sprague–Dawley rats, suggesting that Bcrp may play a role in the export of Hg{sup 2+} from target cells. Within the kidney, cellular injury and necrosis was more severe in bcrp{sup −/−} rats than in controls. The pattern of necrosis, which was localized in the inner cortex and the outer stripe of the outer medulla, was significantly different from that observed in Mrp2-deficient animals. These findings suggest that Bcrp may be involved in the cellular export of select mercuric species and that its role in this export may differ from that of Mrp2. - Highlights: • Bcrp may mediate transport of mercury out of proximal tubular cells. • Hg-induced nephropathy was more severe in Bcrp knockout rats. • Bcrp and Mrp2 may differ in their ability to transport Hg.

  7. Mercuric chloride poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mercuric chloride is a very poisonous form of mercury. It is a type of mercury salt. There are different types of mercury poisonings . This article discusses poisoning from swallowing mercuric ...

  8. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg(2+) ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn(2+)); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg(2+) causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn(2+) release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn(2+) or Hg(2+). Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg(2+)-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg(2+) that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system. PMID:20951154

  9. Mercuric ions inhibit mitogen-activated protein kinase dephosphorylation by inducing reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Hajo; Engelhardt, Gabriela; Hebel, Silke; Rink, Lothar

    2011-01-01

    Mercury intoxication profoundly affects the immune system, in particular, signal transduction of immune cells. However, the mechanism of the interaction of mercury with cellular signaling pathways, such as mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPK), remains elusive. Therefore, the objective of this study is to investigate three potential ways in which Hg{sup 2+} ions could inhibit MAPK dephosphorylation in the human T-cell line Jurkat: (1) by direct binding to phosphatases; (2) by releasing cellular zinc (Zn{sup 2+}); and (3) by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hg{sup 2+} causes production of ROS, measured by dihydrorhodamine 123, and triggers ROS-mediated Zn{sup 2+} release, detected with FluoZin-3. Yet, phosphatase-inhibition is not mediated by binding of Zn{sup 2+} or Hg{sup 2+}. Rather, phosphatases are inactivated by at least two forms of thiol oxidation; initial inhibition is reversible with reducing agents such as Tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Prolonged inhibition leads to non-reversible phosphatase oxidation, presumably oxidizing the cysteine thiol to sulfinic- or sulfonic acid. Notably, phosphatases are a particularly sensitive target for Hg{sup 2+}-induced oxidation, because phosphatase activity is inhibited at concentrations of Hg{sup 2+} that have only minor impact on over all thiol oxidation. This phosphatase inhibition results in augmented, ROS-dependent MAPK phosphorylation. MAPK are important regulators of T-cell function, and MAPK-activation by inhibition of phosphatases seems to be one of the molecular mechanisms by which mercury affects the immune system.

  10. X-ray Structure of a Hg2+ Complex of Mercuric Reductase (MerA) and Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical Study of Hg2+ Transfer between the C-Terminal and Buried Catalytic Site Cysteine Pairs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mercuric reductase, MerA, is a key enzyme in bacterial mercury resistance. This homodimeric enzyme captures and reduces toxic Hg2+ to Hg0, which is relatively unreactive and can exit the cell passively. Prior to reduction, the Hg2+ is transferred from a pair of cysteines (C558′ and C559′ using Tn501 numbering) at the C-terminus of one monomer to another pair of cysteines (C136 and C141) in the catalytic site of the other monomer. Here, we present the X-ray structure of the C-terminal Hg2+ complex of the C136A/C141A double mutant of the Tn501 MerA catalytic core and explore the molecular mechanism of this Hg transfer with quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations. The transfer is found to be nearly thermoneutral and to pass through a stable tricoordinated intermediate that is marginally less stable than the two end states. For the overall process, Hg2+ is always paired with at least two thiolates and thus is present at both the C-terminal and catalytic binding sites as a neutral complex. Prior to Hg2+ transfer, C141 is negatively charged. As Hg2+ is transferred into the catalytic site, a proton is transferred from C136 to C559′ while C558′ becomes negatively charged, resulting in the net transfer of a negative charge over a distance of ∼7.5 Å. Thus, the transport of this soft divalent cation is made energetically feasible by pairing a competition between multiple Cys thiols and/or thiolates for Hg2+ with a competition between the Hg2+ and protons for the thiolates. PMID:25343681

  11. Mercuric oxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mercuric oxide may be found in some: Button batteries (batteries containing mercury are no longer sold in the ... long-term injury Any person who swallowed a battery will need immediate x-rays to make sure ...

  12. Comparative biosorption of mercuric ions from aquatic systems by immobilized live and heat-inactivated Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus sajur-caju.

    PubMed

    Arica, M Y; Arpa, C; Kaya, B; Bektaş, S; Denizli, A; Genç, O

    2003-09-01

    Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus sajur-caju mycelia immobilized in Ca-alginate beads were used for the removal of mercuric ions from aqueous solutions. The sorption of Hg(II) ions by alginate beads and both immobilized live and heat-killed fungal mycelia of T. versicolor and P. sajur-caju was studied in the concentration range of 0.150-3.00 mmol dm(-3). The biosorption of Hg(II) increased as the initial concentration of Hg(II) ions increased in the medium. Maximum biosorption capacities for plain alginate beads were 0.144+/-0.005 mmol Hg(II)/g; for immobilized live and heat-killed fungal mycelia of T. versicolor were 0.171+/-0.007 mmol Hg(II)/g and 0.383+/-0.012 mmol Hg(II)/g respectively; whereas for live and heat-killed P. sajur-caju, the values were 0.450+/-0.014 mmol Hg(II)/g and 0.660+/-0.019 mmol Hg(II)/g respectively. Biosorption equilibrium was established in about 1 h and the equilibrium adsorption was well described by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms. Between 15 and 45 degrees C the biosorption capacity was not affected and maximum adsorption was observed between pH 4.0 and 6.0. The alginate-fungus beads could be regenerated using 10 mmol dm(-3) HCl solution, with up to 97% recovery. The biosorbents were reused in five biosorption-desorption cycles without a significant loss in biosorption capacity. Heat-killed T. versicolor and P. sajur-caju removed 73% and 81% of the Hg(II) ions, respectively, from synthetic wastewater samples. PMID:12699933

  13. Modified purification of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, N. L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M. M.; Vandenberg, L.

    The standard procedure used in our laboratory to purify commercially available mercuric iodide consists of a sequence of steps: (1) repeated sublimation under continous evacuation, followed by (2) melting and recrystallization, and (3) a sublimation process in a closed tube. This paper describes a modification of the standard purification sequence by adding recrystallization of the mercuric iodide in hydrochloric acid. Leaching cation impurities out of mercuric iodide powder with hydrochloric acid has been practiced before by Zaletin, (V.M. Zaletin, I.H. Nozhiua, I.N. Fomin, V.T. Shystov, and N.V. Protasov, Atomic Energy 48, 169 (1980)). Our objective for the hydrochloric acid treatment was to remove nitrates and hydrocarbons which were interfering with the vapor transport during crystal growth. Results of the procedure are presented in terms of total carbon and selected ion content of the treated and untreated material.

  14. Neutron Detection with Mercuric Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.A.

    2003-06-17

    Mercuric iodide is a high-density, high-Z semiconducting material useful for gamma ray detection. This makes it convertible to a thermal neutron detector by covering it with a boron rich material and detecting the 478 keV gamma rays resulting from the {sup 10}B(n, {alpha}){sup 7}Li* reaction. However, the 374 barn thermal capture cross section of {sup nat}Hg, makes the detector itself an attractive absorber, and this has been exploited previously. Since previous work indicates that there are no low-energy gamma rays emitted in coincidence with the 368 keV capture gamma from the dominant {sup 199}Hg(n, {gamma}){sup 200}Hg reaction, only the 368 keV capture gamma is seen with any efficiency a relatively thin (few mm) detector. In this paper we report preliminary measurements of neutrons via capture reactions in a bare mercuric iodide crystal and a crystal covered in {sup 10}B-loaded epoxy. The covered detector is an improvement over the bare detector because the presence of both the 478 and 368 keV gamma rays removes the ambiguity associated with the observation of only one of them. Pulse height spectra, obtained with and without lead and cadmium absorbers, showed the expected gamma rays and demonstrated that they were caused by neutrons.

  15. Mercuric iodide light detector and related method

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Barton, J.B.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1986-09-23

    Apparatus and method for detecting light involve applying a substantially uniform electrical potential difference between first and second spaced surfaces of a body of mercuric iodide, exposing the first surface to light and measuring an electrical current passed through the body in response to the light. The mercuric iodide may be substantially monocrystalline and the potential may be applied between a substantially transparent conductive layer at the first surface and a second conductive layer at the second surface. In a preferred embodiment, the detector is coupled to a scintillator for passage of light to the mercuric iodide in response to ionizing radiation incident on the scintillator. 7 figs.

  16. Mercuric iodide light detector and related method

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barton, Jeff B.; Dabrowski, Andrzej J.; Schnepple, Wayne F.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting light involve applying a substantially uniform electrical potential difference between first and second spaced surfaces of a body of mercuric iodide, exposing the first surface to light and measuring an electrical current passed through the body in response to the light. The mercuric iodide may be substantially monocrystalline and the potential may be applied between a substantially transparent conductive layer at the first surface and a second conductive layer at the second surface. In a preferred embodiment, the detector is coupled to a scintillator for passage of light to the mercuric iodide in response to ionizing radiation incident on the scintillator.

  17. Three spinach leaf nitrate reductase-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase kinases that are required by reversible phosphorylation and/or Ca2+ ions.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, P; Pigaglio, E; Ferrer, A; Halfords, N G; MacKintosh, C

    1997-01-01

    In spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf extracts, three protein kinases (PKI, PKII and PKIII) were identified each of which phosphorylated spinach nitrate reductase on serine-543, and inactivated the enzyme in the presence of nitrate reductase inhibitor, 14-3-3. PKIII was also very active in phosphorylating and inactivating Arabidopsis (Landsberg erecta) 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase 1 (HMGR1). PKI and PKII phosphorylated HMGR1 more slowly than PKIII, compared with their relative rates of phosphorylation of nitrate reductase. HMGR1 identical with those that are seen after phosphorylation of serine-577 by the sucrose non-fermenting (SNF1)-like PK, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Co A reductase kinase A (HRK-A), from cauliflower [Dale, Arró, Becerra, Morrice, Boronat, Hardie and Ferrer (1995) Eur. J. Biochem. 233, 506-513]. PKI was Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the absence of protein phosphatase (PP) inhibitors, and largely Ca2+-dependent when prepared in the presence of PP inhibitors (NaF and EGTA). The Ca2+-independent portion of PKI was inactivated by either PP2A or PP2C, while the Ca2+-dependent portion of PKI became increasingly activated during storage, which we presume was mimicking the effect of an unidentified PP. These findings indicate that PK1 is regulated by two functionally distinct phosphorylations. PKI had a molecular mass of 45 kDa on gel filtration and was active towards substrate peptides that terminated at the +2 residue from the phosphorylation site, whereas PKIII was inactive towards these peptides. PKII was Ca2+-stimulated under all conditions tested. PKIII was Ca2+-indepdented, inactivated by PP2A or PP2C, had a requirement for a hydrophobic residue in the +4 position of peptide substrates, had a molecular mass by gel filtration of approximately 140 kDa, and an antibody against the rye SNF1-related PK (RKIN1) recognized a 58 kDa subunit in fractions containing PKIII. These properties of PKIII are identical with those reported

  18. Roles of glutamates and metal ions in a rationally designed nitric oxide reductase based on myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.W.; Robinson, H.; Yeung, N.; Gao, Y.-G.; Miner, K. D.; Tian, S.; Lu, Y.

    2010-05-11

    A structural and functional model of bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) has been designed by introducing two glutamates (Glu) and three histidines (His) in sperm whale myoglobin. X-ray structural data indicate that the three His and one Glu (V68E) residues bind iron, mimicking the putative FeB site in NOR, while the second Glu (I107E) interacts with a water molecule and forms a hydrogen bonding network in the designed protein. Unlike the first Glu (V68E), which lowered the heme reduction potential by {approx}110 mV, the second Glu has little effect on the heme potential, suggesting that the negatively charged Glu has a different role in redox tuning. More importantly, introducing the second Glu resulted in a {approx}100% increase in NOR activity, suggesting the importance of a hydrogen bonding network in facilitating proton delivery during NOR reactivity. In addition, EPR and X-ray structural studies indicate that the designed protein binds iron, copper, or zinc in the FeB site, each with different effects on the structures and NOR activities, suggesting that both redox activity and an intermediate five-coordinate heme-NO species are important for high NOR activity. The designed protein offers an excellent model for NOR and demonstrates the power of using designed proteins as a simpler and more well-defined system to address important chemical and biological issues.

  19. Roles of Glutamates and Metal ions in a Rationally Designed Nitric Oxide Reductase Based on Myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Y Lin; N Yeung; Y Gao; K Miner; S Tian; H Robinson; Y Lu

    2011-12-31

    A structural and functional model of bacterial nitric oxide reductase (NOR) has been designed by introducing two glutamates (Glu) and three histidines (His) in sperm whale myoglobin. X-ray structural data indicate that the three His and one Glu (V68E) residues bind iron, mimicking the putative FeB site in NOR, while the second Glu (I107E) interacts with a water molecule and forms a hydrogen bonding network in the designed protein. Unlike the first Glu (V68E), which lowered the heme reduction potential by {approx}110 mV, the second Glu has little effect on the heme potential, suggesting that the negatively charged Glu has a different role in redox tuning. More importantly, introducing the second Glu resulted in a {approx}100% increase in NOR activity, suggesting the importance of a hydrogen bonding network in facilitating proton delivery during NOR reactivity. In addition, EPR and X-ray structural studies indicate that the designed protein binds iron, copper, or zinc in the FeB site, each with different effects on the structures and NOR activities, suggesting that both redox activity and an intermediate five-coordinate heme-NO species are important for high NOR activity. The designed protein offers an excellent model for NOR and demonstrates the power of using designed proteins as a simpler and more well-defined system to address important chemical and biological issues.

  20. An assay for ribonucleotide reductase based on ion-exchange chromatography of the reaction product.

    PubMed

    Narine, D R; Bacchetti, S; Chan, W W

    1985-03-01

    A rapid and convenient assay for ribonucleotide reductase has been developed in which the reaction product, deoxycytidine diphosphate (dCDP), is isolated without further conversion. The enzymatic reaction is terminated by the addition of ethanol and the sample is chromatographed on a single, small, and disposable column of polyethylenimine cellulose. A two-step elution is conducted with buffers containing 25% ethanol. First, contaminants and byproducts such as cytidine and its monophosphate are removed at low ionic strength while the diphosphates are retained. Then dCDP is selectively eluted as a sharp peak with a strong borate buffer. Under these conditions, the excess substrate, cytidine diphosphate, remains on the column, presumably as the borate complex. The assay is linear with time for 15 min at 25 degrees C and linear with the amount of enzyme even at very low concentrations. With slight modifications, the assay seems applicable to the use of UDP or ADP as substrates. The method is not suitable for samples which contain nucleotide kinase or other interfering enzymes which convert a significant amount of dCDP into byproducts. However, another chromatographic system based on similar principles has been found which could be used to measure any dCTP produced in this way. PMID:2990252

  1. Energy resolution enhancement of mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, M.; Prince, T. A.; Padgett, L.; Prickett, B.; Schnepple, W.

    1984-01-01

    A pulse processing technique has been developed which improves the gamma-ray energy resolution of mercuric iodide detectors. The technique employs a fast (100 ns) and a slow (6.4 microsec) pulse height analysis to correct for signal variations due to variations in charge trapping. The capabilities of the technique for energy resolution enhancement are discussed as well as the utility of the technique for examining the trapping characteristics of individual detectors. An energy resolution of 2.6 percent FWHM at 662 keV was achieved with an acceptance efficiency of 100 percent from a mercuric iodide detector which gives 8.3 percent FWHM using standard techniques.

  2. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of mercuric halides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templet, P.; Mcdonald, J. R.; Mcglynn, S. P.; Kendrow, C. H.; Roebber, J. L.; Weiss, K.

    1972-01-01

    The gas phase transitions of the mercuric halides were observed in the UV region by operating at temperatures above 400 K and at vapor pressures on the order of 0.5 mm. Spectral features exhibited by the chloride, bromide, and iodide of mercury correlate energetically with bands previously designated as intermolecular charge transfer transitions. The solution spectra of mercuric iodide and deep color of the crystals (if not due to some solid state interactions) indicate that this molecule may also have longer wavelength transitions.

  3. Mercuric chloride (HgCl2)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercuric chloride ( HgCl2 ) ; CASRN 7487 - 94 - 7 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  4. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; Beyerle, A. G.; Dolin, R. C.; Ortale, C.

    A mercuric iodide gamma-ray imaging array and camera system previously described has been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on this data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criterion for the new camera will be presented.

  5. Developments in mercuric iodide gamma ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; Beyerle, A. G.; Dolin, R. C.; Ortale, C.

    1989-11-01

    A mercuric iodide (HgI2) gamma ray imaging array and camera system previously described have been characterized for spatial and energy resolution. Based on these data a new camera is being developed to more fully exploit the potential of the array. Characterization results and design criteria for the new camera will be presented.

  6. MERCURIC CHLORIDE CAPTURE BY ALKALINE SORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of bench-scale mechanistic studies of mercury/sorbent reactions that showed that mercuric chloride (HgC12) is readily adsorbed by alkaline sorbents, which may offers a less expensive alternative to the use of activated carbons. A laboratory-scale, fixed-b...

  7. Response to mercury (II) ions in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Boden, Rich; Murrell, J Colin

    2011-11-01

    The mercury (II) ion is toxic and is usually detoxified in Bacteria by reduction to elemental mercury, which is less toxic. This is catalysed by an NAD(P)H-dependent mercuric reductase (EC 1.16.1.1). Here, we present strong evidence that Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) - a methanotrophic member of the Gammaproteobacteria - uses this enzyme to detoxify mercury. In radiorespirometry studies, it was found that cells exposed to mercury dissimilated 100% of [(14) C]-methane provided to generate reducing equivalents to fuel mercury (II) reduction, rather than the mix of assimilation and dissimilation found in control incubations. The detoxification system is constitutively expressed with a specific activity of 352 (±18) nmol NADH oxidized min(-1) (mg protein)(-1) . Putative mercuric reductase genes were predicted in the M. capsulatus (Bath) genome and found in mRNA microarray studies. The MerA-derived polypeptide showed high identity (> 80%) with MerA sequences from the Betaproteobacteria. PMID:22092810

  8. Modified purification of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, N. L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M. M.; Van Den Berg, L.

    1988-06-01

    The standard procedure used in our laboratory to purify commercially available mercuric iodide (HgI 2) consists of a sequence of steps: (1) repeated sublimation under continuous evacuation, followed by (2) melting and recrystallization, and (3) a sublimation process in a closed tube. This paper describes a modification of the standard purification sequence by adding recrystallization of the HgI 2 in hydrochloric acid. Leaching cation impurities out of HgI 2 powder with hydrochloric acid has been practised before by Zaletin et al. Our objective for the hydrochloric acid treatment was to remove nitrates and hydrocarbons which were interfering with the vapor transport during crystal growth. Results of the procedure are presented in terms of total carbon and selected ion content of the treated and untreated material.

  9. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  10. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; Delduca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1 to 2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5 to 6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  11. 27 CFR 21.121 - Phenyl mercuric benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phenyl mercuric benzoate. 21.121 Section 21.121 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.121 Phenyl mercuric benzoate....

  12. Determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury in mercury ores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fahey, J.J.

    1937-01-01

    A method for the determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury on the same sample is described. The mercury minerals are volatilized in a glass tube and brought into intimate contact with granulated sodium carbonate. The chlorine is fixed as sodium chloride, determined with silver nitrate, and computed to mercurous chloride. The mercury is collected on a previously weighed gold coil and weighed.

  13. 27 CFR 21.121 - Phenyl mercuric benzoate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phenyl mercuric benzoate. 21.121 Section 21.121 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.121 Phenyl mercuric benzoate....

  14. 34. August, 1971. PHOTOCOPY: GENERAL VIEW OF CITY OF MERCUR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. August, 1971. PHOTOCOPY: GENERAL VIEW OF CITY OF MERCUR CA. 1910 (THIS HISTORIC VIEW IS TAKEN FROM A PUBLICATION BY UTAH POWER & LIGHT CO. CREDIT REQUESTED TO COMPANY.). (SEE UT-10-2 FOR PRESENT DAY VIEW). - DeLamar Mercur Mines Company, Golden Gate Mill, Ophir, Tooele County, UT

  15. Large-area mercuric iodide photodectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Iwanczyk, J.; Dabrowski, A.

    1983-07-01

    The limits of the active area of mercuric iodide photodetectors imposed by the size of available crystals, electronic noise, and the uniformity of charge carrier collection are discussed. Theoretical calculations of the photodetector electronic noise are compared with the experimental results. Different entrance contacts were studied including semitransparent palladium films and conductive liquids. HgI2 photodetectors with active area up to 4 sq cm are matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and are evaluated as gamma radiation spectrometers.

  16. Recent developments in thick mercuric iodide spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, K.; Beyerle, A.; Lopez, B.; Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Vandenberg, L.

    Thick (approx. 1 cm) mercuric iodide gamma-ray detectors have been produced which show spectroscopic qualities at moderate detector biases (approx. 5 kV) comparable to those of thin spectrometers. Efficiency measurements indicate that the entire volume of the detectors is active. Spectra resolutions of less than 10% have been obtained for gamma-ray energies above 1 MeV. Short charge collection times have produced the best results. Measurement of crystal charge transport properties is discussed. A small amount of bias conditioning is necessary for best performance. Operating parameters of the detectors have been investigated.

  17. Etching of mercuric iodide in cation iodide solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponpon, J. P.; Amann, M.

    2006-07-01

    The surface properties of mercuric iodide after etching in various cation iodide solutions have been investigated in terms of dissolution rate, morphology, electrical properties and reaction with water vapour. No significant differences have been observed in the etching rates. However, dissolution of HgI 2 in NH 4I, NaI, KI or RbI leaves the surface more or less covered with a residual iodo mercurate compound whose electrical properties and stability with regard to humidity may noticeably influence the behaviour of mercuric iodide devices. The smallest effect has been observed for etching in NaI.

  18. Thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed

    Mustacich, D; Powis, G

    2000-02-15

    The mammalian thioredoxin reductases (TrxRs) are a family of selenium-containing pyridine nucleotide-disulphide oxidoreductases with mechanistic and sequence identity, including a conserved -Cys-Val-Asn-Val-Gly-Cys- redox catalytic site, to glutathione reductases. TrxRs catalyse the NADPH-dependent reduction of the redox protein thioredoxin (Trx), as well as of other endogenous and exogenous compounds. The broad substrate specificity of mammalian TrxRs is due to a second redox-active site, a C-terminal -Cys-SeCys- (where SeCys is selenocysteine), that is not found in glutathione reductase or Escherichia coli TrxR. There are currently two confirmed forms of mammalian TrxRs, TrxR1 and TrxR2, and it is possible that other forms will be identified. The availability of Se is a key factor determining TrxR activity both in cell culture and in vivo, and the mechanism(s) for the incorporation of Se into TrxRs, as well as the regulation of TrxR activity, have only recently begun to be investigated. The importance of Trx to many aspects of cell function make it likely that TrxRs also play a role in protection against oxidant injury, cell growth and transformation, and the recycling of ascorbate from its oxidized form. Since TrxRs are able to reduce a number of substrates other than Trx, it is likely that additional biological effects will be discovered for TrxR. Furthermore, inhibiting TrxR with drugs may lead to new treatments for human diseases such as cancer, AIDS and autoimmune diseases. PMID:10657232

  19. Nitrate reductase mutation alters potassium nutrition as well as nitric oxide-mediated control of guard cell ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-Hua; Wang, Yizhou; Wang, Jian-Wen; Babla, Mohammad; Zhao, Chenchen; García-Mata, Carlos; Sani, Emanuela; Differ, Christopher; Mak, Michelle; Hills, Adrian; Amtmann, Anna; Blatt, Michael R

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining potassium (K(+) ) nutrition and a robust guard cell K(+) inward channel activity is considered critical for plants' adaptation to fluctuating and challenging growth environment. ABA induces stomatal closure through hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide (NO) along with subsequent ion channel-mediated loss of K(+) and anions. However, the interactions of NO synthesis and signalling with K(+) nutrition and guard cell K(+) channel activities have not been fully explored in Arabidopsis. Physiological and molecular techniques were employed to dissect the interaction of nitrogen and potassium nutrition in regulating stomatal opening, CO2 assimilation and ion channel activity. These data, gene expression and ABA signalling transduction were compared in wild-type Columbia-0 (Col-0) and the nitrate reductase mutant nia1nia2. Growth and K(+) nutrition were impaired along with stomatal behaviour, membrane transport, and expression of genes associated with ABA signalling in the nia1nia2 mutant. ABA-inhibited K(+) in current and ABA-enhanced slow anion current were absent in nia1nia2. Exogenous NO restored regulation of these channels for complete stomatal closure in nia1nia2. While NO is an important signalling component in ABA-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis, our findings demonstrate a more complex interaction associating potassium nutrition and nitrogen metabolism in the nia1nia2 mutant that affects stomatal function. PMID:26508536

  20. Preparation and evaluation of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, N. L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M. M.; Vandenberg, L.

    Large quantities, on the order of several hundred, of consistent, high quality mercuric iodide for crystal growth have not been commercially available. The hydrocarbon, anion, and cation impurity levels varied considerably, occasionally preventing crystal growth. This occurred even though the starting materials was from the same vendor and was subjected to the same purification treatment. This paper will describe an aqueous precipitation process of mercuric iodide preparation in batches of 3 kg using Hg(NO sub 3) sub 2, or HgCl and KI. Since these salts are produced in much larger quantities than mercuric iodide, more consistent quality is available. The impurity content of these batched and single crystals are compared. Some of the single crystals grown using the in-house prepared mercuric iodide have yielded a large number of spectroscopy grade nuclear radiation detectors. The influence of the major impurities are discussed.

  1. Mercuric iodine room temperature gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patt, Bradley E.; Markakis, Jeffrey M.; Gerrish, Vernon M.; Haymes, Robert C.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1990-01-01

    high resolution mercuric iodide room temperature gamma-ray detectors have excellent potential as an essential component of space instruments to be used for high energy astrophysics. Mercuric iodide detectors are being developed both as photodetectors used in combination with scintillation crystals to detect gamma-rays, and as direct gamma-ray detectors. These detectors are highly radiation damage resistant. The list of applications includes gamma-ray burst detection, gamma-ray line astronomy, solar flare studies, and elemental analysis.

  2. Carrier traps and transport in mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlesinger, T. E.; Bao, X. J.; James, R. B.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1992-11-01

    Thermally stimulated current spectroscopy (TSC) was performed on a variety of mercuric iodide samples and detectors to determine the nature and origin of deep traps in this material. It is shown that the trap type and concentration is a function of the metal overlayer employed as a contact material. The energy barrier height as well as the type (electron or hole) of barrier at the metal/semiconductor interface has also been determined by internal photoemission measurements. When polarization effects are not present, as is the case in most Pd contacted samples, the barrier height can be accurately determined by this technique. A value of 1.05 eV was measured for a hole barrier at the Pd/Hgl 2 interface.

  3. Nucleotide sequence of a chromosomal mercury resistance determinant from a Bacillus sp. with broad-spectrum mercury resistance. [Mercury reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Levinson, H.S.; Mahler, I. ); Moore, M.; Walsh, C. ); Silver, S. )

    1989-01-01

    A 13.5-kilobase HindIII fragment, bearing an intact mercury resistance (mer) operon, was isolated from chromosomal DNA of broad-spectrum mercury-resistant Bacillus sp. strain RC607 by using as a probe a clone containing the mercury reductase (merA) gene. The new clone, pYW33, expressed broad-spectrum mercury resistance both in Escherichia coli and in Bacillus subtilis, but only in B. subtilis was the mercuric reductase activity inducible. Sequencing of a 1.8-kilobase mercury hypersensitivity-producing fragment revealed four open reading frames (ORFs). ORF1 may code for a regulatory protein (MerR). ORF2 and ORF4 were associated with cellular transport function and the hypersensitivity phenotype. DNA fragments encompassing the merA and the merB genes were sequenced. The predicted Bacillus sp. strain RC607 MerA (mercuric reductase) and MerB (organomercurial lyase) were similar to those predicted from Staphylococcus aureus plasmid pI258 (67 and 73% amino acid identities, respectively); however, only 40% of the amino acid residues of RC607 MerA were identical to those of the mercuric reductase from gram-negative bacteria. A 69-kilodalton polypeptide was isolated and identified as the merA gene product by examination of its amino-terminal sequence.

  4. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin

    2014-10-02

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  5. Development of a mercuric iodide solid state spectrometer for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.

    1983-01-01

    Mercuric iodide detectors, experimental development for astronomical use, X ray observations of the 1980 Cygnus X-1 High State, astronomical had X ray detectors in current use, detector development, balloon flight of large area (1500 sq cm) Phoswich detectors, had X ray telescope design, shielded mercuric iodide background measurement, Monte Carlo analysis, measurements with a shielded mercuric iodide detector are discussed.

  6. Processing of mercurous chloride in reduced gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.; Thomas, A.

    1996-12-31

    In a joint experiment between the Northrop-Grumman Science and Technology Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville, Consortium for Materials Development in Space (UAH/CMDS), single crystals of mercurous chloride (Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) were grown in the Space Experiment Facility (SEF) transparent furnace that was flown on Spacelab 4 (STS-77) in May 1996. Single crystals of this material can be readily grown in normal gravity by closed-tube physical vapor transport, but the crystals generally contain structural inhomogeneities which degrade the optical performance. The nature and cause of these defects are not completely understood, but their degree appears to correlate with the Rayleigh number that characterizes the convective transport during their growth; hence, it is suspected that uncontrolled convection may play a role in the defect structure. The objective of the flight experiment was to reduce the convective flows by several orders of magnitude to see if the structural inhomogeneities can be reduced or eliminated. This paper will describe the physical and thermal properties of the SEF furnace, the ampoule design and loading procedure, and the ground testing, and will also present the preliminary flight results.

  7. Introduction of extrinsic defects into mercuric iodide during processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, C.-Y.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1993-05-01

    Low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) measurements were performed on mercuric iodide (HgI2) crystals which were intentionally doped with copper or silver during KI etching. PL spectra obtained after these doping experiments show specific Cu and Ag features similar to those previously observed after deposition of Cu or Ag contacts on mercuric iodide crystals. The in-diffusion of Cu or Ag into bulk HgI2 has also been confirmed a few days after doping. This diffusion introduces new recombination centers in the material. This work suggests that the processing steps used to fabricate mercuric iodide nuclear detectors can lead to the introduction of new defects which are detrimental to detector performance.

  8. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartsough, Neal; Iwanczyk, Jan

    2009-01-01

    A film-growth process was developed for polycrystalline mercuric iodide that creates cost-effective, large-area detectors for high-energy charged-particle detection. A material, called a barrier film, is introduced onto the substrate before the normal mercuric iodide film growth process. The barrier film improves the quality of the normal film grown and enhances the adhesion between the film and the substrate. The films grown using this improved technique were found to have adequate signal-to-noise properties so that individual high-energy charged -particle interactions could be distinguished from noise, and thus, could be used to provide an anticoincidence veto function as desired.

  9. Thermodynamic reactivity, growth and characterization of mercurous halide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mazelsky, R.; Singh, M.; Glicksman, M. E.; Paradies, C.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations were carried out for the Hg-X-O system (X = Cl, Br, I) to identify the potential sources of contamination and relative stability of oxides and oxy-halide phases. The effect of excess mercury vapor pressure on the optical quality of mercurous halide crystal was studied by growing several mercurous chloride crystals from mercury-rich composition. The optical quality of crystals was examined by birefringence interferometry and laser scattering studies. Crystals grown in slightly mercury-rich composition showed improved optical quality relative to stoichiometric crystals.

  10. Chronic effects of mercuric chloride ingestion on rat adrenocortical function

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, R.; Chansouria, J.P.N. )

    1989-09-01

    Mercurial contamination of environment has increased. Mercury accumulates in various organs and adversely affects their functions. Some of the most prominent toxic effects of inorganic mercury compounds include neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. Besides this, mercury has also been reported to affect various endocrine glands like pituitary, thyroid, gonadal and adrenal glands. There have been no reports on the toxic effects of chronic oral administration of varying doses of mercuric chloride on adrenocortical function in albino rats. The present work was undertaken to study the adrenocortical response to chronic oral administration of mercuric chloride of varying dose and duration in albino rats.

  11. Direct vapor/solid synthesis of mercuric iodide using compounds of mercury and iodine

    DOEpatents

    Skinner, Nathan L.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing high purity mercuric iodide by passing a gaseous source of a mercuric compound through a particulate bed of a low vapor pressure iodide compound which is maintained at an elevated temperature which is the lower of either: (a) just below the melting or volatilization temperature of the iodide compound (which ever is lower); or (b) just below the volatilization point of the other reaction product formed during the reaction; to cause the mercuric compound to react with the iodide compound to form mercuric iodide which then passes as a vapor out of the bed into a cooler condensation region.

  12. Translocatable resistance to mercuric and phenylmercuric ions in soil bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, A.J.; Oliver, J.; Kelly, W.J.; Reaney, D.C.

    1981-08-01

    Of a sample of 42 grams-negative Hg-resistant bacteria, three (a Pseudomonas fluorescens, a Klebsiella sp. and a Citrobacter sp.) contained translocatable elements conferring resistance to Hgbj (all three) and to Hgbj and phenylmercuric acetate (P. fluorescens). The discovery of transposable phenylmercuric acetate resistance extends the range of known resistance ''transposons'' from heavy metals and antibiotics to organometallic compounds.

  13. Mercuric iodide (HgI2) growth for nuclear detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnepple, W.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to grow more-perfect mercuric iodide crystals in a low-gravity environment by taking advantage of diffusion-controlled growth conditions and by avoiding the problem of strain dislocations produced by the crystal's weight. This crystal has considerable practical importance as a sensitive gamma-ray detector and energy spectrometer that can operate at ambient temperature, as compared to presently available detectors that must be cooled to near liquid nitrogen temperatures. However, the performance of mercuric iodide crystals only rarely approaches the expected performance, presumably because some of the free electrical charges produced within the crystal are not collected at the electrodes, but instead remain trapped or immobilized at crystal defects. An efficient high atomic number semiconductor detector capable of operating at room temperature utilizing single HgI2 crystals offers a greater potential than existing detector technology.

  14. Growth of mercuric iodide single crystals from dimethylsulfoxide

    DOEpatents

    Carlston, Richard C.

    1976-07-13

    Dimethylsulfoxide is used as a solvent for the growth of red mercuric iodide (HgI.sub.2) crystals for use in radiation detectors. The hygroscopic property of the solvent allows controlled amounts of water to enter into the solvent phase and diminish the large solubility of HgI.sub.2 so that the precipitating solid collects as well-defined euhedral crystals which grow into a volume of several cc.

  15. Stress-dependent regulation of the gene encoding thioredoxin reductase from the fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung-Min; Lim, Hye-Won; Kim, Il-Han; Kim, Kanghwa; Park, Eun-Hee; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2004-05-15

    The unique putative gene for thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) was isolated from the chromosomal DNA of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The determined DNA sequence carries 3125 bp, and encodes the plausible 322 amino acid sequence of TrxR with a molecular mass of 34,618 Da. The S. pombe cells harboring the cloned TrxR gene contain increased TrxR activity, and shows higher survivals on solid media with mercuric chloride or aluminum chloride. The 1526 bp upstream region was fused into promoterless beta-galactosidase gene of the shuttle vector YEp367R to generate the fusion plasmid. The synthesis of beta-galactosidase from the fusion plasmid pYUTR10 was enhanced by menadione, mercuric chloride, hydrogen peroxide, aluminium chloride and sodium selenite. Menadione significantly enhanced the TrxR mRNA level in the S. pombe cells, which was detected by RT-PCR. Induction of the S. pombe TrxR gene by menadione and mercuric chloride occurs through the mediation of the transcription factor Pap1. These results suggest that the S. pombe TrxR gene is one of the stress response-related genes. PMID:15135546

  16. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Ariesanti, Elsa; Corcoran, Bridget

    2004-04-30

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers.

  17. Mercuric iodate precipitation from radioiodine-containing off-gas scrubber solution

    DOEpatents

    Partridge, Jerry A.; Bosuego, Gail P.

    1982-01-01

    Mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrub solutions containing radioiodine may be reduced in volume without excessive loss of volatile iodine. The use of concentrated nitric acid during an evaporation process oxidizes the mercury-iodide complex to a less volatile mercuric iodate precipitate.

  18. Phonon dispersion in red mercuric iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Sim, H.; Chang, Y. ); James, R.B. )

    1994-02-15

    We present theoretical studies of phonon modes of undoped HgI[sub 2] in its red tetragonal form. A rigid-ion model including the Coulomb interaction is used which gives the best fit to the neutron scattering, infrared reflectivity, and Raman scattering data. The calculated sound velocities are also in accord with experiment.

  19. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  20. Rutherford backscattering and Auger spectroscopy of mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felter, T. E.; Stulen, R. H.; Schnepple, W. F.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Palladium contacts on mercuric iodide have been studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Results on actual detector contacts show some intermixing of both mercury and iodine with the palladium. To investigate the role of processing variables as a possible cause of this effect we have fabricated model contacts at low temperatures (T ≈ 100 K) and analyzed in situ. The results demonstrated that significant interdiffusion occurs at temperatures as low as 225 K. We conclude that excessive heating during contact deposition could prove to be detrimental to device performance and that the use of cooled substrates during processing should be explored.

  1. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies of mercuric-iodide photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Markakis, J. M.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.

    1989-09-01

    Mercuric-iodide (HgI2 ) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photocurrent-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse.

  2. Development of mercuric iodide uncooled x ray detectors and spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained in the development of miniature, lowpower, light weight mercuric iodide, HgI2, x ray spectrometers for future space missions are summarized. It was demonstrated that HgI2 detectors can be employed in a high resolution x ray spectrometer, operating in a scanning electron microscope. Also, the development of HgI2 x ray detectors to augment alpha backscattering spectrometers is discussed. These combination instruments allow for the identification of all chemical elements, with the possible exception of hydrogen, and their respective concentrations. Additionally, further investigations of questions regarding radiation damage effects in the HgI2 x ray detectors are reported.

  3. The effect of elemental and hydrocarbon impurities on mercuric iodide gamma ray detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Eilene S.; Buffleben, George; Soria, Ed; James, Ralph; Schieber, Michael; Natarajan, Raj; Gerrish, Vern

    Mercuric iodide is a room temperature semiconductor material that is used for gamma ray and x-ray radiation detection. Mercuric iodide is synthesized from mercuric chloride and potassium iodide and is then purified by a series of melts and sublimation steps and by zone refining. The mercuric iodide is grown into crystals and platelets and then fabricated into detectors. Elemental contamination may be a determining factor in the performance of these detectors. These contaminates may be present in the starting material or may be introduced during, or be unaffected by, the purification, growth or fabrication steps. Methods have been developed for the analysis of trace levels of elemental contamination. Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS), Inductively Coupled Plasma/Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP/OES) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) are used to determine sub ppm levels of many trace elemental impurities. Trace levels of many elemental impurities in the raw mercuric iodide are significantly reduced during the purification and zone refining processes. Though the levels of impurities are reduced, poor performing mercuric iodide detectors have contamination levels remaining or reintroduced which are higher for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Mg, Mn, Na, Pb and Zn than detectors with good gamma ray response. This paper will discuss the analytical methodology, the effects of purification on impurity levels, and the correlation between detector performance and impurity levels.

  4. Investigation of copper electrodes for mercuric iodide detector applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Stulen, R. H.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1990-06-01

    Copper diffusion in mercuric iodide was studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. A broad radiative emission band at a wavelength of about 6720 Å in the PL spectra was found to be related to Cu incorporation in the crystal. PL spectra obtained from surface doping experiments indicate that Cu is a rapid diffuser in HgI2 bulk material. Auger electron spectroscopy performed as a function of depth from the crystal surface confirms the rapid bulk diffusion process of Cu in HgI2. Fabrication of HgI2 nuclear detectors with Cu electrodes indicates that Cu is not acceptable as an electrode material, which is consistent with the fact that it diffuses easily into the bulk crystal and introduces new radiative recombination centers.

  5. Incorporation of defects during processing of mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Stulen, R. H.; Ortale, C.; Cheng, A. Y.

    1990-07-01

    The effects of chemical etching in KI solution, heating, and vacuum exposures of HgI2 were individually studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Each of these processing steps is important in the manufacturing of mercuric iodide detectors and may be responsible for the incorporation of carrier traps both in the near-surface region and in the bulk. The results of etching experiments showed that the near-surface region has a different defect structure than the bulk, which appears to result from iodine deficiency. Bulk heating at 100 °C also modifies the defect structure of the crystal. Vacuum exposure has an effect similar to chemical etching, but it does not cause significant degradation of the stoichiometry for recently KI-etched specimens. These studies suggest that some features in the PL spectra of HgI2 are associated with stoichiometry of the specimens.

  6. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S.; Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper discusses the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI{sub 2}, as well as preliminary correlations between HgI{sub 2} detector performance and elemental contamination levels. The purified HgI{sub 2} is grown into a single crystal by physical vapor transport. The crystal are cut into slices and they are fabricated into room temperature radiation detectors and photocells. Crystals that produce good resolution gamma detector do not necessarily make good resolution photocells or x-ray detectors. Many factors other than elemental impurities may contribute to these differences in performance.

  7. Mercuric Iodide Photocell Technology for Room Temperature Readout of Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Warnick Kernan et al.

    2007-08-31

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by thickness of the detector, which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We are reporting here preliminary results in using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of various scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Preliminary nuclear response from a HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a Ce3+ :LaBr3 scintillator will also be presented and discussed. Further improvements will be sought by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  8. Preparation and evaluation of mercuric iodide for crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, N. L.; Ortale, C.; Schieber, M. M.; van den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    Large quantities (on the order of several hundred kilograms) of consistent, high-quality mercuric iodide (HgI2) for crystal growth have not been commercially available. The hydrocarbon, anion and cation impurity levels varied considerably, occasionally preventing crystal growth. This occurred even though the starting material was from the same vendor and was subjected to the same purification treatment. This paper will describe an aqueous precipitation process of HgI2 preparation in batches of 3 kg using Hg(NO3)2, or HgCl2 and KI. Since these salts are produced in much larger quantities than HgI2, more consistent quality is available. The impurity content of these batches and single crystals grown from them have been evaluated. These results and those from several commercially available starting materials and their grown single crystals are compared. Some of the single crystals grown using the in-house prepared HgI2 have yielded a large number of spectroscopy-grade nuclear detectors. The influence of the major impurities will be discussed.

  9. Correlation between mercuric iodide detector performance and crystalline perfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schieber, M.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.; Schnepple, W.; Keller, L.; Wagner, C. N. J.; Yelon, W.; Ross, F.; Georgeson, G.; Milstein, F.

    1989-11-01

    X-ray, neutron and gamma ray diffraction rocking curves; X-ray topography; microhardness; and optical microscopic measurements have been performed directly on several mercuric iodide (Hgl2) nuclear radiation detectors fabricated from single crystals grown from the vapor phase. Two types of detectors were measured: spectrometer types (grades A and B), which had resolutions of 5-10% for the 662 keV photopeak of 137Cs, or radiation counters (grades C and D), where the spectral resolution ranged from 11% to no resolution. A good correlation has been found between the detector grade and the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of both the X- and gamma ray rocking curves (i.e., the higher the detector grade (A or B), the narrower the FWHM of the diffraction peak). X-ray topography also correlated with well both the FWHM of the diffraction X-ray rocking curve and the detector grade. The uniformity of the microhardness of the HgI2 detectors was found to be proportional to the nuclear performance of the detector. The better spectrometer-grade detectors were softer and much more uniform in microhardness than the most inferior detectors. The better detectors were also found to have much smoother surfaces than the poorer detectors, as observed by optical microscopy studies.

  10. Polycrystalline Mercuric Iodide Films on CMOS Readout Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hartsough, Neal E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygard, Einar; Malakhov, Nail; Barber, William C.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan

    2009-01-01

    We have created high-resolution x-ray imaging devices using polycrystalline mercuric iodide (HgI2) films grown directly onto CMOS readout chips using a thermal vapor transport process. Images from prototype 400×400 pixel HgI2-coated CMOS readout chips are presented, where the pixel grid is 30 μm × 30 μm. The devices exhibited sensitivity of 6.2 μC/Rcm2 with corresponding dark current of ∼2.7 nA/cm2, and a 80 μm FWHM planar image response to a 50 μm slit aperture. X-ray CT images demonstrate a point spread function sufficient to obtain a 50 μm spatial resolution in reconstructed CT images at a substantially reduced dose compared to phosphor-coated readouts. The use of CMOS technology allows for small pixels (30 μm), fast readout speeds (8 fps for a 3200×3200 pixel array), and future design flexibility due to the use of well-developed fabrication processes. PMID:20161098

  11. Characterization of thyroidal glutathione reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Raasch, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    Glutathione levels were determined in bovine and rat thyroid tissue by enzymatic conjugation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene using glutathione S-transferase. Bovine thyroid tissue contained 1.31 {+-} 0.04 mM reduced glutathione (GSH) and 0.14 {+-} 0.02 mM oxidized glutathione (GSSG). In the rat, the concentration of GSH was 2.50 {+-} 0.05 mM while GSSG was 0.21 {+-} 0.03 mM. Glutathione reductase (GR) was purified from bovine thyroid to electrophoretic homogeneity by ion exchange, affinity and molecular exclusion chromatography. A molecular weight range of 102-109 kDa and subunit size of 55 kDa were determined for GR. Thyroidal GR was shown to be a favoprotein with one FAD per subunit. The Michaelis constants of bovine thyroidal GR were determined to be 21.8 {mu}M for NADPH and 58.8 {mu}M for GSSG. The effect of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) on in vivo levels of GR and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase were determined in rat thyroid homogenates. Both enzymes were stimulated by TSH treatment and markedly reduced following T{sub 4} treatment. Lysosomal hydrolysis of ({sup 125}I)-labeled and unlabeled thyroglobulin was examined using size exclusion HPLC.

  12. Intracellular inducer Hg2+ concentration is rate determining for the expression of the mercury-resistance operon in cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, H; Chu, L; Misra, T K

    1996-05-01

    Experiments involving mercury resistance mer operon-lacZ fusions, point mutations in the mercuric ion reductase merA gene, and transcomplementation have revealed that in Hg2+-resistant cells, the inducer Hg2+ concentration is rate determining for activation of transcription. mer operon expression is activated by the presence of nanomolar concentrations of Hg2+ in liquid media only when the mercuric ion reductase function is artificially inactivated in cells, whereas cells with active mercuric ion reductase require micromolar concentrations of Hg2+ for effective induction of the operon. PMID:8626343

  13. Human brain aldehyde reductases: relationship to succinic semialdehyde reductase and aldose reductase.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-08-01

    Human brain contains multiple forms of aldehyde-reducing enzymes. One major form (AR3), as previously shown, has properties that indicate its identity with NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase isolated from brain and other organs of various species; i.e., low molecular weight, use of NADPH as the preferred cofactor, and sensitivity to inhibition by barbiturates. A second form of aldehyde reductase ("SSA reductase") specifically reduces succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to produce gamma-hydroxybutyrate. This enzyme form has a higher molecular weight than AR3, and uses NADH as well as NADPH as cofactor. SSA reductase was not inhibited by pyrazole, oxalate, or barbiturates, and the only effective inhibitor found was the flavonoid quercetine. Although AR3 can also reduce SSA, the relative specificity of SSA reductase may enhance its in vivo role. A third form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, appears to be comparable to aldose reductases characterized in several species, on the basis of its activity pattern with various sugar aldehydes and its response to characteristic inhibitors and activators, as well as kinetic parameters. This enzyme is also the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of biogenic amines. These studies suggest that the various forms of human brain aldehyde reductases may have specific physiological functions. PMID:6778961

  14. Study of semitransparent palladium contacts on mercuric iodide by photoluminescence spectroscopy and thermally stimulated current measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Gentry, G. L.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, C.

    1991-04-01

    Semitransparent palladium contacts on mercuric iodide were studied by low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy and thermally stimulated conductivity. These contacts were deposited either by thermal evaporation or by plasma sputtering. Changes due to palladium deposition were found in the photoluminescence spectra and were attributed to modifications in the stoichiometry within the palladium/mercuric iodide interfacial region. Thermally stimulated conductivity measurements revealed two dominant traps with activation energies of 0.010 and 0.54 eV. The importance of these traps in the application of nuclear detection is discussed.

  15. Mesozoic hydrothermal alteration associated with gold mineralization in the Mercur district, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.N.; Parry, W.T. )

    1990-09-01

    K/Ar dates and chemical data show that a Mesozoic gold-bearing hydrothermal system altered black shales of the Mississippian Great Blue Limestone throughout an area encompassing the Mercur gold district, Utah. K/Ar dates of illite veins and illite-rich, clay-sized separates of altered shales that are enriched in Au, As, Hg, Sc, and other heavy metals indicate that hydrothermal activity occurred from 193 to 122 Ma. Several ages from within the Mercur district cluster near 160 Ma and may date the minimum age of gold mineralization.

  16. Nitrate and periplasmic nitrate reductases

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney; Stolz, John F.; Basu, Partha

    2014-01-01

    The nitrate anion is a simple, abundant and relatively stable species, yet plays a significant role in global cycling of nitrogen, global climate change, and human health. Although it has been known for quite some time that nitrate is an important species environmentally, recent studies have identified potential medical applications. In this respect the nitrate anion remains an enigmatic species that promises to offer exciting science in years to come. Many bacteria readily reduce nitrate to nitrite via nitrate reductases. Classified into three distinct types – periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), respiratory nitrate reductase (Nar) and assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas), they are defined by their cellular location, operon organization and active site structure. Of these, Nap proteins are the focus of this review. Despite similarities in the catalytic and spectroscopic properties Nap from different Proteobacteria are phylogenetically distinct. This review has two major sections: in the first section, nitrate in the nitrogen cycle and human health, taxonomy of nitrate reductases, assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reduction, cellular locations of nitrate reductases, structural and redox chemistry are discussed. The second section focuses on the features of periplasmic nitrate reductase where the catalytic subunit of the Nap and its kinetic properties, auxiliary Nap proteins, operon structure and phylogenetic relationships are discussed. PMID:24141308

  17. Acute cardiorespiratory effects of intracisternal injections of mercuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Futuro Neto, Henrique de Azevedo; Stefanon, Ivanita; Vassallo, Dalton Valentin

    2011-06-01

    The present studies were conducted to changes arising from mercury poisoning in the central nervous system (CNS), with a focus on determining the receptors and neurotransmitters involved. Currently, little is known regarding the neurological basis of the cardiopulmonary effects of mercury poisoning. We evaluated changes in systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP), respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate (HR) following a 5 μl intracisternal (i.c) injection of mercuric chloride (HgCl(2)) and the participation of the autonomic nervous system in these responses. 58 animals were utilized and distributed randomly into 10 groups and administered a 5 μL intracisternal injection of 0.68 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 1.2 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 2.4 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 60 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=7), 120 μg/kg HgCl(2) (n=3), saline (control) (n=7), 60 μg/kg HgCl(2) plus prazosin (n=6), saline plus prazosin (n=6), 60 μg/kg HgCl(2) plus metilatropina (n=4) or saline plus metilatropina (n=4)HgCl(2). Anesthesia was induced with halothane and maintained as needed with urethane (1.2 g/kg) administered intravenously (i.v.) through a cannula placed in the left femoral vein. The left femoral artery was also cannulated to record systolic arterial pressure (SAP), diastolic arterial pressure (DAP) and heart rate (HR). A tracheotomy was performed to record respiratory rate. Animals were placed in a stereotaxic frame, and the cisterna magna was exposed. After a stabilization period, solutions (saline or HgCl(2)) were injected i.c., and cardiopulmonary responses were recorded for 50 min. Involvement of the autonomic nervous system was assessed through the i.v. injection of hexamethonium (20 mg/kg), prazosin (1 mg/kg) and methylatropine (1 mg/kg) 10 min before the i.c. injection of HgCl(2) or saline. Treatment with 0.68, 1.2, 2.4 μg/kg HgCl(2) or saline did not modify basal cardiorespiratory parameters, whereas the 120 μg/kg dose induced acute toxicity, provoking respiratory

  18. Novel semiconductor radiation detector based on mercurous halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Henry; Kim, Joo-Soo; Amarasinghe, Proyanthi; Palosz, Withold; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir; Burger, Arnold; Marsh, Jarrod C.; Litz, Marc S.; Wiejewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.; Gupta, Neelam; Jensen, Janet; Jensen, James

    2015-08-01

    The three most important desirable features in the search for room temperature semiconductor detector (RTSD) candidate as an alternative material to current commercially off-the-shelf (COTS) material for gamma and/or thermal neutron detection are: low cost, high performance and long term stability. This is especially important for pager form application in homeland security. Despite years of research, no RTSD candidate so far can satisfy the above 3 features simultaneously. In this work, we show that mercurous halide materials Hg2X2 (X= I, Cl, Br) is a new class of innovative compound semiconductors that is capable of delivering breakthrough advances to COTS radiation detector materials. These materials are much easier to grow thicker and larger volume crystals. They can detect gamma and potentially neutron radiation making it possible to detect two types of radiation with just one crystal material. The materials have wider bandgaps (compared to COTS) meaning higher resistivity and lower leakage current, making this new technology more compatible with available microelectronics. The materials also have higher atomic number and density leading to higher stopping power and better detector sensitivity/efficiency. They are not hazardous so there are no environmental and health concerns during manufacturing and are more stable making them more practical for commercial deployment. Focus will be on Hg2I2. Material characterization and detector performance will be presented and discussed. Initial results show that an energy resolution better than 2% @ 59.6 keV gamma from Am-241 and near 1% @ 662 keV from Cs-137 source can be achieved at room temperature.

  19. Comparative toxicogenomic responses of mercuric and methyl-mercury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mercury is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant that exists in multiple chemical forms. A paucity of information exists regarding the differences or similarities by which different mercurials act at the molecular level. Results Transcriptomes of mixed-stage C. elegans following equitoxic sub-, low- and high-toxicity exposures to inorganic mercuric chloride (HgCl2) and organic methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) were analyzed. In C. elegans, the mercurials had highly different effects on transcription, with MeHgCl affecting the expression of significantly more genes than HgCl2. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that inorganic and organic mercurials affected different biological processes. RNAi identified 18 genes that were important in C. elegans response to mercurial exposure, although only two of these genes responded to both mercurials. To determine if the responses observed in C. elegans were evolutionarily conserved, the two mercurials were investigated in human neuroblastoma (SK-N-SH), hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) and embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells. The human homologs of the affected C. elegans genes were then used to test the effects on gene expression and cell viability after using siRNA during HgCl2 and MeHgCl exposure. As was observed with C. elegans, exposure to the HgCl2 and MeHgCl had different effects on gene expression, and different genes were important in the cellular response to the two mercurials. Conclusions These results suggest that, contrary to previous reports, inorganic and organic mercurials have different mechanisms of toxicity. The two mercurials induced disparate effects on gene expression, and different genes were important in protecting the organism from mercurial toxicity. PMID:24118919

  20. Electrical properties of solid iodo mercurates resulting from the reaction of HgI2 with alcaline iodides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponpon, J. P.; Amann, M.

    2005-01-01

    Potassium iodide solutions are currently used during the fabrication process of mercuric iodide based nuclear radiation detectors. However, KI treatment leaves the HgI2 surface covered with a residual compound (namely the potassium tri-iodo mercurate) which has a significant influence on the surface properties and stability of mercuric iodide devices and therefore on the detectors characteristics. Looking for other solutions to etch mercuric iodide, we found it interesting to investigate the electrical properties of the compounds which may form when etching HgI2 in NH4I, NaI, and RbI. For this purpose, solid iodo mercurates with the cations ammonium, sodium, and rubidium, have been prepared by reacting HgI2 with the solutions of interest. Study of the electrical properties of these samples and comparison with those of potassium tri-iodo mercurate ones, especially with respect to humidity, indicates noticeable stability differences in presence of water vapour. This could have interesting consequences on the surface cleaning of mercuric iodide.

  1. Scrubbing of iodine from gas streams with mercuric nitrate-conversion of mercuric iodate product to barium iodate for fixation in concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, G.C.; Moore, J.G.; Morgan, M.T.

    1980-06-01

    A bench-scale model of a mercuric nitrate scrubber for removal of iodine from off-gas streams was constructed and operated in conjunction with a mercuric iodate-to-barium iodate conversion system to determine the feasibility of total recycle of all processing solutions. The two main aspects of the system examined were (1) the extent of contamination of the barium iodate product, and (2) the effect of cross-contamination of various process solutions on the efficiency of the process. The experimental evidence obtained indicates that, with appropriate control, all solutions can be recycled without significant contamination of the product that would be harmful to the host concrete or to the environment. Mercury contamination was found to be less than or equal to 0.5 wt % of the barium iodate product. The most significant effect on system efficiency was determined to be barium hydroxide contamination of the sodium hydroxide solution used to convert mercuric iodate to sodium iodate. A mole ratio of barium hydroxide to sodium hydroxide of about 1:225 caused a decrease in conversion efficiency of about 45%.

  2. Apoptogenic and necrogenic effects of mercuric acetate on the chromatin structure of K562 human erythroleukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Erzsebet; Ujvarosi, Kinga; Nagy, Gabor; Posta, Jozsef; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2010-02-01

    Time lapse video photography was used to follow the movement of individual cells after in vitro treatment with Hg(II) acetate. Cellular changes of mercuric ions were characterized by their properties of causing reduced cellular mobility (10-50microM), and complete lack of cellular movement at higher concentrations (100-1000microM). Results show that after mercury treatment at subtoxic levels (1microM): (a) chromatin changes were the earliest signs of cytotoxicity, (b) two major parts in nuclear material of K562 erythroleukemia cells could be distinguished, highly condensed supercoiled and decondensed veil-like chromatin, (c) decondensed chromosomes were rejected as clustered puffs and (d) often the nuclear material was broken down to apoptotic bodies. Nuclear changes caused by Hg(II) acetate in the concentration range between 10 and 50microM were characterized by apoptosis seen as broken nuclei and apoptotic bodies. High concentration of Hg(2+) ions (100microM) initiated necrotic nuclear changes, with enlarged leaky or opened nuclei. PMID:19723577

  3. The use of a mercuric iodide detector for X-ray fluorescence analysis in archaeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesareo, R.; Gigante, G. E.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A.

    1992-11-01

    For about two decades, energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) has been employed in Rome for the analysis of works of art. A short history of the applications of EDXRF to paintings and alloys is presented. Finally, the usefulness of mercuric iodide room-temperature semiconductor detectors in this field is shown.

  4. Sexual maturation and productivity of Japanese quail fed graded concentrations of mercuric chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) were fed 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, and 32 p.p.m. Hg as mercuric chloride (HgCl2) from the time of hatching up to the age of 1 year. None of the birds manifested any gross signs of mercury poisioning. Food consumption, growth rate, and weight maintenance were unaffected. Initial oviposition tended to occur at a younger age as dietary mercuric chloride increased, e.g., the median age at which egg laying began among hens fed 32 p.p.m. Hg was 6 days younger than for controls. The average rate of egg production was positively related to the concentration of mercuric chloride with the most pronounced differences between treatments occurring among young (less than 9-week-old) hens. Beyond 9 weeks of age production was more uniform among the treatments, but even after 1 year hens on 32 p.p.m. Hg were laying an average of 13.5% more eggs than controls. Rate of egg fertilization was generally depressed for all Hg-treatments above 4 p.p.m. Hatchability of fertilized eggs and eggshell thickness appeared unaffected by mercuric chloride.

  5. ASSESSMENT OF FUNCTIONAL, MORPHOLOGICAL AND ENZYMATIC TEST FOR ACUTE NEPHROTOXICITY INDUCED BY MERCURIC CHLORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The relative merits of a comprehensive series of contemporary methods for detection of acute nephrotoxicity were evaluated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, or 30.0 mg mercuric chloride (HgCl2)/kg body weight by ip injection. Indices of nephrotoxicity were e...

  6. Mercuric iodide medical imagers for low-exposure radiography and fluoroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, George; Partain, Larry; Pavlyuchkova, Raisa; Proano, Cesar; Breen, Barry N.; Taieb, A.; Dagan, Ofer; Schieber, Michael; Gilboa, Haim; Thomas, Jerry

    2004-05-01

    Photoconductive polycrystalline mercuric iodide deposited on flat panel thin film transistor (TFT) arrays is being developed for direct digital X-ray detectors that can perform both radiographic and fluoroscopic medical imaging. The mercuric iodide is either vacuum deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) or coated onto the array by a wet Particle-In-Binder (PIB) process. The PVD deposition technology has been scaled up to the 20 cm x 25 cm size required in common medical imaging applications. A TFT array with a pixel pitch of 127 microns is used for these imagers. Arrays of 10 cm x 10 cm size have been used to evaluate performance of mercuric iodide imagers. Radiographic and fluoroscopic images of diagnostic quality at up to 15 pulses per second were demonstrated. As we previously reported, the resolution is limited to the TFT array Nyquist frequency of ~3.9 lp/mm (127 micron pixel pitch). Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) has been measured as a function of spatial frequency for these imagers. The DQE is lower than the theoretically calculated value due to some additional noise sources of the electronics and the array. We will retest the DQE after eliminating these noise sources. Reliability and stress testing was also began for polycrystalline mercuric iodide PVD and PIB detectors. These are simplified detectors based upon a stripe electrode or circular electrode structure. The detectors were stressed under various voltage bias, temperature and time conditions. The effects of the stress tests on the detector dark current and sensitivity were determined.

  7. SUMMARY REVIEW OF HEALTH EFFECTS ASSOCIATED WITH MERCURIC CHLORIDE: HEALTH ISSUE ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) is a white crystalline substance that is currently used as a catalyst or reagent in various chemical reactions, and to a lesser extent as a disinfectant or pesticide. ercury exists in various valence states and forms (e.g., He, Hgo, Hg2 2+, and organic m...

  8. Metal oxide and mercuric sulfide nanoparticles synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin

    Commercially available and laboratory-synthesized metal based nanoparticles (NPs), iron oxide (Fe2O3), copper oxide (CuO), titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and mercuric sulfide (HgS) were studied by comprehensive characterizations methods. The general synthesis process was modified sol-gel method. The size and morphology of NPs could be influenced by temperature, sonication, calcination, precursor concentration, pH and types of reaction media. All types of the laboratory-synthesized or commercially available NPs were characterized by physical and chemical processes. One characteristic of NP that can lead to ambiguous toxicity test results was the effect of agglomeration of primary nano-sized particles. Laser light scattering was used to measure the aggregated and particle size distribution. Aggregation effects were apparent and often extensive in some synthesis approaches. Electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) gave the images of those laboratory-synthesized particles and aggregation. The average single particle was about 5-20 nm of ZnO; 20-40 nm of CuO; 10-20 nm of TiO2; 20-35 nm of Fe2O3; 10-15 nm of HgS, while the aggregate size was in the range of a hundred nanometers or more. These five types of NPs were obtained with spherical and oblong formation and the agglomeration of ZnO, CuO, HgS and TiO2 was random, but Fe2O3 has web-like aggregation. Other measurements performed on the particles and aggregates include bandgap energies, surface composition, surface area, hydrodynamic radius, and particle surface charge. In aqueous environment, NPs are subject to processes such as solubilization and aggregation. These processes can be controlling factors in the fate of nanomaterials in environmental settings, including bioavailability to organisms. This study has focused primarily on measurement of the solubility in aqueous media of varying composition (pH, ionic strength, and organic carbon), sedimentation and stability. The aggregate size distribution was

  9. Construction and evaluation of a metal ion biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tescione, Lia; Belfort, Georges

    1993-01-01

    E. coli, genetically engineered with a mercury(II)-sensitive promoter and the lux genes from Vibrio fischeri, were used as microbial sensors for the detection of mercury. Evaluation of this genetic construction was carried out by determining the effects of various parameters on cell suspensions maintained at constant conditions in a small vessel. The strongest light intensities and quickest induction times occurred with cells in the mid-exponential growth phase maintained at 280 C, concentrated to 1 x 10(exp 9) cells/mL, mixed at very fast speeds, and aerated at 2 vvm (volume of air per volume of culture per minute) during light measurement in the small vessel. The sensitivity of these cells to the mercuric ion lied in the range of 0.02-4 micrometer (4-800 ppb) and the total response time was on the order of one hour, depending on the above parameters. The cells exhibited great specificity for mercury. The cells have almost equal specificity for organic and inorganic form of the mercuric ion and responded more weakly to the mercurous ion. A simple, inexpensive, durable miniature probe was constructed and operated using the optimum parameters found in the small vessel as a guide. The range of sensitivity to the mercuric ion detected in the probe was 0.01-4 micrometer when aeration was provided.

  10. Purification, properties, and sequence of glycerol trinitrate reductase from Agrobacterium radiobacter.

    PubMed Central

    Snape, J R; Walkley, N A; Morby, A P; Nicklin, S; White, G F

    1997-01-01

    Glycerol trinitrate (GTN) reductase, which enables Agrobacterium radiobacter to utilize GTN and related explosives as sources of nitrogen for growth, was purified and characterized, and its gene was cloned and sequenced. The enzyme was a 39-kDa monomeric protein which catalyzed the NADH-dependent reductive scission of GTN (Km = 23 microM) to glycerol dinitrates (mainly the 1,3-isomer) with a pH optimum of 6.5, a temperature optimum of 35 degrees C, and no dependence on metal ions for activity. It was also active on pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), on isosorbide dinitrate, and, very weakly, on ethyleneglycol dinitrate, but it was inactive on isopropyl nitrate, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, ammonium ions, nitrate, or nitrite. The amino acid sequence deduced from the DNA sequence was homologous (42 to 51% identity and 61 to 69% similarity) to those of PETN reductase from Enterobacter cloacae, N-ethylmaleimide reductase from Escherichia coli, morphinone reductase from Pseudomonas putida, and old yellow enzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, placing the GTN reductase in the alpha/beta barrel flavoprotein group of proteins. GTN reductase and PETN reductase were very similar in many respects except in their distinct preferences for NADH and NADPH cofactors, respectively. PMID:9401040

  11. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  12. Zeatin reductase in Phaseolus embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Mok, David, W.S.; Mok, M.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Zeatin was converted to O-xylosylzeatin in embryos of Phaseolus vulgaris . O-xylosyldihydrozeatin was also identified as a zeatin metabolite. Incubation of embryo extracts with {sup 14}C-zeatin and {sup 14}C-O-xylosylzeatin revealed that reduction preceeds the O-xylosylation of zeatin. An enzyme responsible for reducing the N{sup 6}-side chain was isolated and partially purified using ammonium sulfate fractionation and affinity, gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. The NADPH dependent reductase was zeatin specific and did not recognize cis-zeatin, ribosylzeatin, i{sup 6}Ade or i{sup 6}Ado. Two forms of the reductase could be separated by either gel filtration or anion exchange HPLC. The HMW isozyme (Mr. 55,000) eluted from the anion exchange column later than the LMW isozyme (Mr. 25,000). Interspecific differences in zeatin reductase activity were also detected.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: 5-alpha reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... gene provides instructions for making an enzyme called steroid 5-alpha reductase 2. This enzyme is involved ... external genitalia. Mutations in the SRD5A2 gene prevent steroid 5-alpha reductase 2 from effectively converting testosterone ...

  14. Growth of mercuric iodide (HgI2) for nuclear radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, L.; Schnepple, W. F.

    1988-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a material used for the fabrication of the sensing element in solid state X-ray and gamma ray detecting instruments. The operation of the devices is determined to a large degree by the density of structural defects in the single crystalline material used in the sensing element. Since there were strong indications that the quality of the material was degraded by the effects of gravity during the growth process, a research and engineering program was initiated to grow one or more crystals of mercuric iodide in the reduced gravity environment of space. A special furnace assembly was designed which could be accommodated in a Spacelab rack, and at the same time made it possible to use the same growth procedures and controls used when growing a crystal on the ground. The space crystal, after the flight, was subjected to the same evaluation methods used for earth-grown crystals, so that comparisons could be made.

  15. Effects of indium and tin overlayers on the photoluminescence spectrum of mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Ortale, C.; Cheng, A. Y.

    1990-03-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2 ) crystals with semitransparent metal overlayers of indium and tin were characterized using low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL spectra were found to differ for points beneath the thin metal overlayers and points that were masked off during each deposition. The photoluminescence data were compared with PL measurements taken on HgI2 photodetectors with indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes. The similarities of the spectra for the HgI2 samples with In, Sn, and ITO conducting overlayers indicate that the regions in the ITO-contacted photodetectors with relatively poor photoresponses are associated with the interaction of indium or tin with the mercuric iodide substrate.

  16. A study of the homogeneity and deviations from stoichiometry in mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, A.; Morgan, S.; He, C.; Silberman, E.; van den Berg, L.; Ortale, C.; Franks, L.; Schieber, M.

    1990-01-01

    We have been able to determine the deviations from stoichiometry of mercuric iodide (HgI 2) by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Mercury excess or iodine deficiency in mercuric iodide can be evaluated from the eutectic melting of α-Hgl 2-Hg 2I 2 at 235 °C, which appears as an additional peak in DSC thermograms. I 2 excess can be found from the existence of the I 2-α-HgI 2 eutectic melting at 103°C. An additional DSC peak appears in some samples around 112°C, that could be explained by the presence of iodine inclusions. Using resonance fluorescence spectroscopy (RFS) we have been able to determine the presence of free I 2 that is released by samples during the heating at 120 °C (crystal growth temperature), thus giving additional support to the above DSC results.

  17. Dose and sex dependent distribution of mercury in rats exposed to mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, A.T.; Graham, T.C.; Webster, J.E.; Ferguson, J.A.

    1994-12-31

    A 14-day study was conducted in young male and female rats (Sprague-Dawley SDTM) with mercuric chloride at daily oral doses of 0, 1.25, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg mercuric chloride to determine the maximum tolerated dose and the distribution of mercury in the target organs. The brains, hearts, kidneys, livers, lungs and spleens of both male and female rats (survived or died during the experiment) were analyzed for mercury content. At all treatments (1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg) groups, mercury level was higher in the kidneys of both sexes, and followed by the livers, spleen, lungs, hearts, and brains, respectively. The mercury level in target organs of females was higher than those of males. All mercury treated rats also showed a reduction in cumulative body weight gained beginning on the third day of treatment.

  18. Acute effects of mercuric chloride on glycogen and protein content of zebra fish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Vutukuru, S S; Basani, Kalpana

    2013-03-01

    Presence of mercury and other heavy metals above permissible levels in water bodies across the globe is posing a serious threat to aquatic biota and public health. Occurrence of mercury above the permissible limits in the aquatic ecosystem of Hyderabad city is well established. In this context, we carried out static- renewal bioassays on the zebra fish, Danio rerio exposed to different concentrations of mercuric chloride, and the 96-h median lethal concentration (LC50) was found to be 0.077 mgl(-1). Behavioral manifestations like loss of scales, hyper secretion of mucus, surfacing and darting movements, loss of balance, irregular swimming patterns were noticed in the fish exposed to 0.077 mgl(-1). The present study also examined the toxic effects of mercuric chloride on vital biochemical constituent's total glycogen and total protein. Significant decrease (p < 0.001) in glycogen and protein content of fish exposed to 0.077 mgl(-1). PMID:24620592

  19. A radiotelemetry pill for the measurement of ionising radiation using a mercuric iodide detector.

    PubMed

    Hassan, M A; Pearce, G; Edwards, J P

    1978-03-01

    A small radiation measuring pill is briefly described which utilises the principles of radiotelemetry and the properties of a room temperature semiconductor radiation detector such as mercuric iodide. By transmitting a radio signal to a remote receiver the pill could be an effective tool in localising bleeding sites along the gastrointestinal tract and also possibly in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal carcinoma. Other uses of the radiopill are suggested. The size of the pill is 27 mm x 10 mm diameter and consists of a mercuric iodide crystal, an amplifier, a frequency modulated transmitter and one battery. The radiotransmitter operates at about 106 MHz and has a range of about 10m, and the sensitivity of the pill has been found for 99Tcm, 131I and 32P. PMID:306112

  20. Conversion of covalently mercurated nucleic acids to tritiated and halogenated derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Dale, R M; Ward, D C; Livingston, D C; Martin, E

    1975-01-01

    Mercurated nucleic acids are converted to the corresponding tritiated, brominated, and iodinated derivatives by treatment with sodium borotritiide, N-bromosuccinimide, and elemental iodine, respectively. All three reactions occur under mild conditions in neutral aqueous solutions. Mercury-halogen conversions are essentially quantitative at both the mono- and polynucleotide levels. Tritiation reactions also proceed efficiently with mononucleotides, although polymers undergo incomplete demercuration. In spite of the latter limitation , these reactions provide novel and efficient synthetic routes to radiolabeled nucleic acid derivatives. PMID:1144066

  1. Effect of temperature gradient on the optical quality of mercurous chloride crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Davies, D. K.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Mazelsky, R.

    1989-01-01

    Single crystals of mercurous chloride were grown at temperature gradients of 8, 11 and 17 K/cm by the physical vapor transport method. The optical quality of these crystals was evaluated by measuring bulk scattering and inhomogeneity of refractive index by birefringence interferometry. It was observed that a high temperature gradient at the solid-vapor interface induced thermal stresses and crystals showed higher scattering and irregular fringes.

  2. Transformation of mercuric chloride and methylmercury by the rumen microflora.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S; Forsberg, C W

    1979-01-01

    The microflora in strained rumen fluid did not methylate or volatilize 203Hg2+ at detectable rates. However, there was an exponential decay in the concentration of added CH3Hg+, which was attributed to demethylation. The major product of demethylation was metallic mercury (Hg0), and it was released as a volatile product from the reaction mixture. Demethylation occurred under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. The rate of demethylation was proportional to the concentration of added CH3Hg+-Hg from 0.02 to 100 microgram of Hg per ml. The presence of HgCl2 had almost no inhibitory effect on the rate of cleavage of the carbon-mercury bond of CH2HgCl, but it completely inhibited volatilization of the Hg formed, when the concentration of HgCl2-Hg reached 100 micrograms/ml. Three of 11 species of anaerobic rumen bacteria catalyzed demethylation. These were Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Selenomonas ruminantium, and Megasphaera elsdenii. None of the 11 species caused detectable methylation, and only two caused limited volatilization of Hg2+. Three species of bacteria out of 90 fresh aerobic isolates from rumen contents were demethylators: two were identified as Pseudomonas sp., and the third was a Micrococcus sp. Demethylation by the rumen microflora appeared to be carried out by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and, on the basis of Hg2+ sensitivity, probably resulted from the activity of two enzymes, a CH3-Hg+ hydrolase and a Hg2+ reductase. PMID:539820

  3. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases. PMID:12626517

  4. Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductase in Chlorella autotrophica and Chlorella saccharophila in Relation to Osmoregulation 1

    PubMed Central

    Laliberté, Gilles; Hellebust, Johan A.

    1989-01-01

    Pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (EC 1.5.1.2), which catalyzes the reduction of P5C to proline, was partially purified from two Chlorella species; Chlorella autotrophica, a euryhaline marine alga that responds to increases in salinity by accumulating proline and ions, and Chlorella saccharophila, which does not accumulate proline for osmoregulation. From the elution profile of this enzyme from an anion exchange column in Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.6), containing sorbitol and glycine betaine, it was shown that P5C reductase from C. autotrophica was a neutral protein whereas the enzyme from C. saccharophila was negatively charged. The kinetic mechanisms of the reductase was characteristic of a ping-pong mechanism with double competitive substrate inhibition. Both enzymes showed high specificity for NADH as cofactor. The affinities of the reductases for their substrates did not change when the cells were grown at different salinities. In both algae, the apparent Km values of the reductase for P5C and NADH were 0.17 and 0.10 millimolar, respectively. A fourfold increase in maximal velocity of the reductase was observed when C. autotrophica was transferred from 50 to 150% artificial sea water. Even though the reductase was inhibited by NaCl, KCl, and proline, it still showed appreciable activity in the presence of these compounds at molar concentrations. A possible role for the regulation of proline synthesis at the step catalyzed by P5C reductase is discussed in relation to the specificity of P5C reductase for NADH and its responses to salt treatments. PMID:16667157

  5. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  6. Tectonic and climatic control on geomorphological and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure basin, southern Apennines, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robustelli, Gaetano; Ermolli, Elda Russo; Petrosino, Paola; Jicha, Brian; Sardella, Raffaele; Donato, Paola

    2014-06-01

    The morpho-tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Mercure intramontane basin (Calabria-Lucania boundary, southern Apennines) has been assessed through facies analysis, morphostratigraphy and geomorphological correlation with adjacent areas. The Mercure basin, one of the most active seismogenic zones of the southern Apennines, is a favorable area for reconstructing the main stages of landscape evolution of the axial zone because of its capability to record changes in base level during the Quaternary. In addition, the presence of both erosional and depositional Palaeosurfaces is a useful marker for reconstructing tectonic and morphogenetic events, and hence to detect the role played by tectonics and climate in its genesis, evolution and extinction. The present study identifies the key role of tectonics and denudation, combined with high-frequency floods, as mechanisms controlling alluvial sedimentation in the study area. During endorheic conditions, denudational processes driven by pulses of extensional deformation of the basin margin caused strong alluvial inputs that resulted in the development of alluvial fans. Alluvial facies are mainly characterized by turbulent, subaerial, hyperconcentrated flood flows deposited during the glacial, semi-arid conditions of MIS 14. The retrogradational stacking pattern of the alluvial system indicates decreasing rates of tectonic activity along with declining river gradients. The Mercure coalescing alluvial fans were inundated by lake transgression during MIS 13 in response to (i) abrupt tectonic subsidence at the basin margins and (ii) large decrease of coarse sediment supply due to the interplay among climate, tectonics and catchment size changes. In this regard, it is suggested that tectonic control on the drainage network along with climate and long-term slope evolution may have caused marked pulses in sediment supply, thus influencing the arrangement of facies associations in the sedimentary succession. In addition, the

  7. Introduction to fifth international workshop on mercuric iodide nuclear radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Schieber, M.

    1982-01-01

    Mercuric iodide is a wide bandgap semiconductor, with Eg approx. = 2.14 eV at room temperature. Therefore, HgI/sub 2/ is totally different from the well-studied, narrower gap, elemental semiconductors such as Si and Ge, and also different in its physical and chemical properties from the known semiconductor binary zinc-blend compounds such as GaAs or InP. The purpose of studies in the last decade was to further our understanding of HgI/sub 2/; recent progress is reported. (WHK)

  8. Vapor crystal growth studies of single crystals of mercuric iodide (3-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenberg, Lodewijk

    1992-01-01

    A single crystal of mercuric iodide (HgI2) will be grown during the International Microgravity Lab. (IML-1) mission. The crystal growth process takes place by sublimation of HgI2 from an aggregate of purified material, transport of the molecules in the vapor from the source to the crystal, and condensation on the crystal surface. The objectives of the experiment are as follow: to grow a high quality crystal of HgI2 of sufficient size so that its properties can be extensively analyzed; and to study the vapor transport process, specifically the rate of diffusion transport at greatly reduced gravity where convection is minimized.

  9. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning.

    PubMed

    Dhanapriya, J; Gopalakrishnan, N; Arun, V; Dineshkumar, T; Sakthirajan, R; Balasubramaniyan, T; Haris, M

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months. PMID:27194836

  10. Acute kidney injury and disseminated intravascular coagulation due to mercuric chloride poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Dhanapriya, J.; Gopalakrishnan, N.; Arun, V.; Dineshkumar, T.; Sakthirajan, R.; Balasubramaniyan, T.; Haris, M.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury is a toxic heavy metal and occurs in organic and inorganic forms. Inorganic mercury includes elemental mercury and mercury salts. Mercury salts are usually white powder or crystals, and widely used in indigenous medicines and folk remedies in Asia. Inorganic mercury poisoning causes acute kidney injury (AKI) and gastrointestinal manifestations and can be life-threatening. We describe a case with unknown substance poisoning who developed AKI and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Renal biopsy showed acute tubular necrosis. Later, the consumed substance was proven to be mercuric chloride. His renal failure improved over time, and his creatinine normalized after 2 months. PMID:27194836

  11. X-ray fluorescence analysis of alloy and stainless steels using a mercuric iodide detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelliher, Warren C.; Maddox, W. Gene

    1988-01-01

    A mercuric iodide detector was used for the XRF analysis of a number of NBS standard steels, applying a specially developed correction method for interelemental effects. It is shown that, using this method and a good peak-deconvolution technique, the HgI2 detector is capable of achieving resolutions and count rates needed in the XRF anlysis of multielement samples. The freedom from cryogenic cooling and from power supplies necessary for an electrically cooled device makes this detector a very good candidate for a portable instrument.

  12. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    PubMed

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  13. A Highly Robust, Recyclable Displacement Assay for Mercuric Ions in Aqueous Solutions and Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dingbin; Wang, Shouju; Swierczewska, Magdalena; Huang, Xinglu; Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A.; Sun, Jiashu; Wang, Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    We designed a recyclable Hg2+ probe based on Rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC) - poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG)-co-modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with excellent robustness, selectivity and sensitivity. Based on a rational design, only Hg2+ can displace RBITC from the AuNP surfaces, resulting in a remarkable enhancement of RBITC fluorescence initially quenched by AuNPs. To maintain stability and monodispersity of AuNPs in real samples, thiol-terminated PEG was employed to bind with the remaining active sites of AuNPs. Besides, this displacement assay can be regenerated by resupplying free RBITC into the AuNPs solutions that were already used for detecting Hg2+. Importantly, the detection limit of this assay for Hg2+ (2.3 nM) was lower than the maximum limits guided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency as well as that permitted by the World Health Organization. The efficiency of this probe was demonstrated in monitoring Hg2+ in complex samples such as river water and living cells. PMID:23121626

  14. Antioxidant effect of Arabic gum against mercuric chloride-induced nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gado, Ali M; Aldahmash, Badr A

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Arabic gum (AG) against nephrotoxicity of mercury (Hg), an oxidative-stress inducing substance, in rats were investigated. A single dose of mercuric chloride (5 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection) induced renal toxicity, manifested biochemically by a significant increase in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite production in kidney tissues. In addition, reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase enzymes in renal tissues were significantly decreased. Pretreatment of rats with AG (7.5 g/kg/day per oral administration), starting 5 days before mercuric chloride injection and continuing through the experimental period, resulted in a complete reversal of Hg-induced increase in creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and total nitrate/nitrite to control values. Histopathologic examination of kidney tissues confirmed the biochemical data; pretreatment of AG prevented Hg-induced degenerative changes of kidney tissues. These results indicate that AG is an efficient cytoprotective agent against Hg-induced nephrotoxicity by a mechanism related at least in part to its ability to decrease oxidative and nitrosative stress and preserve the activity of antioxidant enzymes in kidney tissues. PMID:24174869

  15. Dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, S G; Shaw, D C; Armarego, W L

    1988-01-01

    A dihydropteridine reductase from Escherichia coli was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a dimeric enzyme with identical subunits (Mr 27000) and a free N-terminal group. It can use NADH (Vmax./Km 3.36 s-1) and NADPH (Vmax./Km 1.07 s-1) when 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin is the second substrate, as well as quinonoid dihydro-(6H)-biopterin (Vmax./Km 0.69 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-neopterin (Vmax./Km 0.58 s-1), dihydro-(6H)-monapterin 0.66 s-1), 6-methyldihydro-(6H)-pterin and cis-6,7-dimethyldihydro-(6H)-pterin (Vmax./Km 0.66 s-1) when NADH is the second substrate. The pure reductase has a yellow colour and contains bound FAD. The enzyme also has pterin-independent NADH and NADPH oxidoreductase activities when potassium ferricyanide is the electron acceptor. Images Fig. 2. PMID:3060113

  16. Δ1-Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase from Arabidopsis thaliana: stimulation or inhibition by chloride ions and feedback regulation by proline depend on whether NADPH or NADH acts as co-substrate.

    PubMed

    Giberti, Samuele; Funck, Dietmar; Forlani, Giuseppe

    2014-05-01

    Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) reductase (P5CR) catalyses the final step of proline synthesis in plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, protein levels are correlated neither to the corresponding mRNA copy numbers, nor to intracellular proline concentrations. The occurrence of post-translational regulatory mechanisms has therefore been hypothesized, but never assessed. The purification of A. thaliana P5CR was achieved through either a six-step protocol from cultured cells, or heterologous expression of AtP5CR in Escherichia coli. The protein was characterized with respect to structural, kinetic, and biochemical properties. P5CR was able to use either NADPH or NADH as the electron donor, with contrasting affinities and maximum reaction rates. The presence of equimolar concentrations of NADP(+) completely suppressed the NADH-dependent activity, whereas the NADPH-dependent reaction was mildly affected. Proline inhibited only the NADH-dependent reaction. At physiological values, increasing concentrations of salt progressively inhibited the NADH-dependent activity, but were stimulatory of the NADPH-dependent reaction. The biochemical properties of A. thaliana P5CR suggest a complex regulation of enzyme activity by the redox status of the pyridine nucleotide pools, and the concentrations of proline and chloride in the cytosol. Data support a to date underestimated role of P5CR in controlling stress-induced proline accumulation. PMID:24467670

  17. COMPARISON OF IN VITRO AND IN VIVO METHODS FOR EVALUATING ALTERATIONS IN HEPATIC DRUG METABOLISM FOLLOWING MERCURIC CHLORIDE ADMINISTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercuric chloride was administered once ip to female Fischer 344 rats at doses of 0, 0.2, 0.6, and 1.8 mg/kg. Although there were no alterations in the urinary excretion of lactate dehydrogenase, significant elevations in the activities of urinary alkaline phosphatase, glutamicpy...

  18. TOXICITY OF MERCURIC CHLORIDE TO THE DEVELOPING RAT KIDNEY. 3. DISTRIBUTION AND ELIMINATION OF MERCURY DURING POSTNATAL MATURATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mercuric chloride is a potent nephrotoxin in the adult rat, but has little effect on newborns. Nephrotoxicity increases with postnatal maturation. The study assesses the changes in tissue distribution and excretion of Hg during postnatal development. Sprague Dawley rats were inje...

  19. Growth of high quality mercurous halide single crystals by physical vapor transport method for AOM and radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amarasinghe, Priyanthi M.; Kim, Joo-Soo; Chen, Henry; Trivedi, Sudhir; Qadri, Syed B.; Soos, Jolanta; Diestler, Mark; Zhang, Dajie; Gupta, Neelam; Jensen, Janet L.; Jensen, James

    2016-09-01

    Single crystals of mercurous halide were grown by physical vapor transport method (PVT). The orientation and the crystalline quality of the grown crystals were determined using high resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) technique. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the grown mercurous bromide crystals was measured to be 0.13 degrees for (004) reflection, which is the best that has been achieved so far for PVT grown mercurous halide single crystals. The extended defects of the crystals were also analyzed using high resolution x-ray diffraction topography. Preliminary studies were carried out to evaluate the performance of the crystals on acousto-optic modulator (AOM) and gamma-ray detector applications. The results indicate the grown mercurous halide crystals are excellent materials for acousto-optic modulator device fabrication. The diffraction efficiencies of the fabricated AOM device with 1152 and 1523 nm wavelength lasers polarizing parallel to the acoustic wave were found to be 35% and 28%, respectively. The results also indicate the grown crystals are a promising material for gamma-ray detector application with a very high energy resolution of 1.86% FWHM.

  20. ROLE OF SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS IN THE CAPTURE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY AND MERCURIC CHLORIDE BY ACTIVATED CARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses using a laboratory-scale, fixed bed apparatus to study the role of surface functional groups (SFGs) in the capture of mercuric chloride (HgC12) and elemental mercury (Hgo) in nitrogen (N2) prior to flue gas atmosphere studies. The study focused on two activat...

  1. An electrogenic nitric oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Al-Attar, Sinan; de Vries, Simon

    2015-07-22

    Nitric oxide reductases (Nors) are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily that reduce nitric oxide (NO) to nitrous oxide (N₂O). In contrast to the proton-pumping cytochrome oxidases, Nors studied so far have neither been implicated in proton pumping nor have they been experimentally established as electrogenic. The copper-A-dependent Nor from Bacillus azotoformans uses cytochrome c₅₅₁ as electron donor but lacks menaquinol activity, in contrast to our earlier report (Suharti et al., 2001). Employing reduced phenazine ethosulfate (PESH) as electron donor, the main NO reduction pathway catalyzed by Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes involves transmembrane cycling of the PES radical. We show that Cu(A)Nor reconstituted in liposomes generates a proton electrochemical gradient across the membrane similar in magnitude to cytochrome aa₃, highlighting that bacilli using Cu(A)Nor can exploit NO reduction for increased cellular ATP production compared to organisms using cNor. PMID:26149211

  2. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-04-29

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities.

  3. Use of mercuric iodide X-ray detectors with alpha backscattering spectrometers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Wang, Y. J.; Dorri, N.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Economou, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectra of different extraterrestrial samples taken with a mercuric iodide (HgI2) spectrometer inserted into an alpha backscattering instrument identical to that used in the Soviet Phobos mission. The results obtained with the HgI2 ambient temperature detector are compared with those obtained using an Si(Li) cryogenically cooled detector. Efforts to design an optimized instrument for space application are also described. The results presented indicate that the energy resolution and sensitivity of HgI2 detectors are adequate to meet the performance needs of a number of proposed space applications, particularly those in which cooled silicon X-ray detectors are impractical or even not usable, such as for the target science programs on geoscience opportunities for lunar surface, Mars surface, and other comet and planetary missions being planned by NASA and ESA.

  4. Reproductivity of Japanese quail fed mercuric chloride in the absence of vitamin D

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Soares, J.H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Mercuric chloride (HgCl2) was tested at 16 p.p.m. Hg for vitamin D sparing activity by presenting it dietarily in the presence and absence of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-HCC) to Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) for 25 days. No gross signs characteristic of mercury poisoning were observed, but some predictable effects of vitamin D deficiency on avian reproduction were manifested within 10 days. Rate of lay, egg shell thickness, and hatchability of fertile eggs decreased markedly for birds on vitamin D-deficient diets. Shell-less eggs were laid by these birds after 20 days and laying stopped entirely on the 23rd day. Laying resumed within 5 days after diets were refortified with 25-HCC. There was no detectable interaction between HgCl2 and vitamin D.

  5. Toxic exposure to ethylene dibromide and mercuric chloride: effects on laboratory-reared octopuses.

    PubMed

    Adams, P M; Hanlon, R T; Forsythe, J W

    1988-01-01

    The effects of acute and chronic exposure to either ethylene dibromide (EDB) or mercuric chloride (MC) were studied in laboratory-reared Octopus joubini, O. maya and O. bimaculoides. The advantages of using octopuses were that the responses were immediate, highly visible and sensitive. All species demonstrated signs of toxicity to acute and chronic exposure to EDB and to MC. A dosage-sensitive relationship for the loss and subsequent recovery of locomotor response and of chromatophore expansion was found for each species after acute exposure. For each species the LC50 for chronic exposure occurred within 12 hr at 100 mg/l for EDB and within 3 hr at 1,000 mg/l for MC. This study demonstrated the potential usefulness of laboratory-reared octopuses in evaluating the toxicity of marine environmental pollutants. PMID:3072470

  6. Optical detection of impurities and defects in detector-grade mercuric iodide vandenBerg, L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Ottesen, D. K.; Wong, D.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Schnepple, W. F.; Ortale, C.; Vandenberg, L.

    Fourier tranform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and low-temperature photoluminescence were used to study impurities and defects in mercuric iodide crystals. FTIR spectra of the transmittance and reflectance were obtained in the 400 to 4000 cm sup minus 1 range, and the results were found to vary for different samples due to the presence of impurities and stoichiometry deviations. The photoluminescence data were found to consist primarily of three distinct emission bands. The lowest energy band at about 680 nm (at 4.2 K) was shown to be related to the performance of nuclear radiation detectors fabricated from these samples. Further correlations between the spectral features obtained from FTIR and photoluminescence techniques and the detector response are also noted.

  7. Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Of Thin Indium-Tin-Oxide Contacts On Mercuric Iodide Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, Ralph B.; Bao, Xue J.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.; Markakis, Jeff; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, Carol

    1989-05-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminesence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI2 interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photo-current-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse. Specimens of HgI2 with evaporated semi-transparent tin and indium films were also investigated. The spectra obtained from points beneath the Sn and In films suggest that the regions having poor photoresponse in the ITO-contacted photodetector contain either free tin or indium metal.

  8. Photoluminescence variations associated with the deposition of palladium electrical contacts on detector-grade mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, D.; Bao, X. J.; Schlesinger, T. E.; James, R. B.; Cheng, A.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L.

    1988-10-01

    Specimens of mercuric iodide with evaporated semitransparent palladium contacts have been studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. Distinct differences were found between spectra taken from beneath the Pd contacts and those taken from regions on the HgI2 sample that were masked during the Pd deposition, indicating that contact fabrication can change the defect structure near the contact/substrate interface. Comparison of the spectra from spots beneath the contacts with spectra from bulk material specimens and HgI2 detectors graded in terms of their nuclear detection performance suggests that the processing steps used to deposit electrical contacts and the choice of contact material may have a significant influence on detector performance.

  9. Growth of single crystals of mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) in spacelab III

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Berg, L.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1981-01-01

    Continued development of a system designed to grow crystals by physical vapor transport in the environment of Spacelab III will be described, with special emphasis on simulation of expected space conditions, adjustment of crystal growth parameters, and on board observation and control of the experiment by crew members and ground personnel. A critical factor in the use of mercuric iodide for semiconductor detectors of x-rays and gamma-rays is the crystalline quality of the material. The twofold purpose of the Spacelab III experiment is therefore to grow single crystals with superior electronic properties as an indirect result of the greatly reduced gravity field during the growth, and to obtain data which will lead to improved understanding of the vapor transport mechanism. The experiments planned to evaluate the space crystals, including gamma-ray diffractometry and measurements of stoichiometry, lattice dimensions, mechanical strength, luminescense, and detector performance are discussed.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... reductase enzyme. This enzyme is involved in the production of a molecule called tetrahydrobiopterin (also known as ... is responsible for the last step in the production of tetrahydrobiopterin. Tetrahydrobiopterin helps process several building blocks ...

  11. Geology and geochemistry of the Mercur mining district, Tooele County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Tafuri, W.J.

    1987-01-01

    The Mercur mining district is located in the southern end of the Oquirrh Mountains approximately 35 miles southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah. The gold deposits occur in the east dipping limb of the Ophir anticline and are confined to favorable beds in the Mercur Member of the Mississippian Great Blue Formation. Host rocks are thin bedded bioelastic limestones and calcareous siltstones. The mineralized zones are cut by extensive small displacement high angle normal faults. Gold mineralization forms stratiform and strata-bound disseminated ore bodies within the favorable beds. The apparent control of the mineralization is the porosity and permeability of the host rocks combined with strong fracturing caused by the faulting. Mineralization occurs in zones of hydrothermal alteration consisting of partial decalcification followed by the introduction of varying amounts of silica and organic carbon and slight amounts of kaolinite and sericite. Gold has been observed, in the sulfide zone, in three forms: as one to two micron sized inclusions in marcasite; as gold bonded with complex organic molecules; and, rarely, in the native state as grains less than 5 microns in size. Commonly occurring minerals associated with the gold mineralizations are; pyrite, marcasite, orpiment, realgar and barite. The introduced organic matter occurs as extractable hydrocarbons and as insoluble activated carbon. Gold is found in the asphaltene phase of the extractable hydrocarbons and in the activated carbon. Both the asphaltene and the activated carbon are thought to be degradation products of a more mobile petroleum precursor that circulated in the hydrothermal system. The degradation to asphaltene and activated carbon could have been due to the increase in temperature, increase in Eh and water washing as the hydrothermal system matured.

  12. Study on growth of large area mercuric iodide polycrystalline film and its x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Guo, Yanfei; Xi, Zengzhe; Gu, Zhi; Zhang, Lan; Yu, Wentao; Ma, Xuming; Li, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Tetragonal mercuric iodide, as a group of wide band gap semiconductors, has been widely investigation during most of the last half-century, applied on room-temperature X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers. Up to the present, Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is still thought to be one of the most outstanding vitality semiconductor materials because of its wide band gap, for which the device was required to be high resistivity, high atomic number, adequate mechanical strength, long carrier lifetimes and high mobility-lifetime produces. Now, HgI2 polycrystalline films are being developed as a new detector technology for digital x-ray imaging. In this research, HgI2 polycrystalline films with different surface areas of 1 and 36 cm2 were grown by vapor sublimation method within a self-design growth furnace. XRD, SEM and J-V analysis were used to characterize the properties of these as-grown films. The results of XRD show that the ratio of (001) / (hkl) on all as-grown films is amount to be 90% for the area of 1 cm2 films. Grain size of 1 cm2 films was measured to be 120-150 μm. Their electrical resistivity were also determined to be about 1011 Ω·cm operated at the bias voltage of ~100 V by I-V characteristic measurement. Utilizing the polycrystalline film with the area of 36 cm2 deposited on TFT, we then prepared the direct image detector after capsulation for non-corrosive steel screw imaging. The results indicated that profile of screw was distinctly exhibited in digital x-ray imaging systems.

  13. Net methylation of mercury in estuarine sediment microcosms amended with dissolved, nanoparticulate, and microparticulate mercuric sulfides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Kucharzyk, Katarzyna H; Kim, Bojeong; Deshusses, Marc A; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2014-08-19

    The production of methylmercury (MeHg) by anaerobic microorganisms depends in part on the speciation and bioavailability of inorganic mercury to these organisms. Our previous work with pure cultures of methylating bacteria has demonstrated that the methylation potential of mercury decreased during the aging of mercuric sulfides (from dissolved to nanoparticulate and microcrystalline HgS). The objective of this study was to understand the relationship between mercury sulfide speciation and methylation potential in experiments that more closely simulate the complexity of sediment settings. The study involved sediment slurry microcosms that represented a spectrum of salinities in an estuary and were each amended with different forms of mercuric sulfides: dissolved Hg and sulfide, nanoparticulate HgS (3-4 nm in diameter), and microparticulate HgS (>500 nm). The results indicated that net MeHg production was influenced by both the activity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (roughly represented by the rate of sulfate loss) and the bioavailability of mercury. In the presence of abundant sulfate and carbon sources (supporting relatively high microbial activity), net MeHg production in the slurries amended with dissolved Hg was greater than in slurries amended with nano-HgS, similar to previous experiments with pure bacterial cultures. In microcosms with minimal microbial activity (indicated by low rates of sulfate loss), the addition of either dissolved Hg or nano-HgS resulted in similar amounts of net MeHg production. For all slurries receiving micro-HgS, MeHg production did not exceed abiotic controls. In slurries amended with dissolved and nano-HgS, mercury was mainly partitioned to bulk-scale mineral particles and colloids, indicating that Hg bioavailability was not simply related to dissolved Hg concentration or speciation. Overall, the results suggest that models for mercury methylation potential in the environment will need to balance the relative contributions of

  14. A dissimilatory nitrite reductase in Paracoccus halodenitrificans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1984-01-01

    Paracoccus halodenitrificans produced a membrane-associated nitrite reductase. Spectrophotometric analysis showed it to be associated with a cd-cytochrome and located on the inner side of the cytoplasmic membrane. When supplied with nitrite, membrane preparations produced nitrous oxide and nitric oxide in different ratios depending on the electron donor employed. The nitrite reductase was maximally active at relatively low concentrations of sodium chloride and remained attached to the membranes at 100 mM sodium chloride.

  15. Multiple aldehyde reductases of human brain.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-01-01

    Human brain contains four forms of aldehyde reducing enzymes. One major activity, designated AR3, has properties indicating its identity with the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase, EC 1.1.1.2. The other major form of human brain enzyme, AR1, which is also NADPH-dependent, reduces both aldehyde and ketone-containing substrates, including vitamin K3 (menadione) and daunorubicin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This enzyme is very sensitive to inhibition by the flavonoids quercitrin and quercetine, and may be analogous to a daunorubicin reductase previously described in liver of other species. One minor form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, demonstrates substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity which suggest its similarity to aldose reductases found in lens and other tissues of many species. This enzyme, which can also use NADH as cofactor to some extent, is the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of the biogenic amines. The fourth human brain enzyme ("SSA reductase") differs from the other forms in its ability to use NADH as well as or better than NADPH as cofactor, and in its molecular weight, which is nearly twice that of the other forms. It is quite specific for succinic semialdehyde (SSA) as substrate, and was found to be significantly inhibited only by quercetine and quercitrin. AR3 can also reduce SSA, and both enzymes may contribute to the production of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in vivo. These results indicate that the human brain aldehyde reductases can play relatively specific physiologic roles. PMID:7424738

  16. Thioredoxin Reductase and its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Saccoccia, Fulvio; Angelucci, Francesco; Boumis, Giovanna; Carotti, Daniela; Desiato, Gianni; Miele, Adriana E; Bellelli, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Thioredoxin plays a crucial role in a wide number of physiological processes, which span from reduction of nucleotides to deoxyriboucleotides to the detoxification from xenobiotics, oxidants and radicals. The redox function of Thioredoxin is critically dependent on the enzyme Thioredoxin NADPH Reductase (TrxR). In view of its indirect involvement in the above mentioned physio/pathological processes, inhibition of TrxR is an important clinical goal. As a general rule, the affinities and mechanisms of binding of TrxR inhibitors to the target enzyme are known with scarce precision and conflicting results abound in the literature. A relevant analysis of published results as well as the experimental procedures is therefore needed, also in view of the critical interest of TrxR inhibitors. We review the inhibitors of TrxR and related flavoreductases and the classical treatment of reversible, competitive, non competitive and uncompetitive inhibition with respect to TrxR, and in some cases we are able to reconcile contradictory results generated by oversimplified data analysis. PMID:24875642

  17. New measurement of the Fano factor of mercuric iodide. [astronomical x-ray detector charge collection efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Vallerga, J. V.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Entine, G.

    1982-01-01

    It is pointed out that mercuric iodide (HgI2) shows great promise as a high-resolution X-ray detector for use in X-ray astronomy. Development of mercuric iodide for astronomical work has required investigation of the temperature dependence of the HgI2 crystal parameters such as leakage current, resolution, and mobility of the charge carriers. The first studies in connection with these investigations have led to a new value of the Fano factor of 0.19 + or - 0.03. The best value previously reported was 0.27 measured at room temperature. The new upper limit of 0.19 for the HgI2 Fano factor was determined by cooling the HgI2 crystal and preamp to -20 C. It is concluded that room-temperature energy resolution of HgI2 is not limited by charge generation statistics but rather by collection efficiency.

  18. Chemical analysis of metal impurity distribution of zone-refined mercuric iodide by ICP-AES and DSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, K.-T.; Salary, L.; Burger, A.; Soria, E.; Antolak, A.; James, R. B.

    A mercuric iodide single crystal is being developed for X-ray and gamma-ray detector applications where high-purity starting material is required. Zone-refining processing has been proven to be an effective step in the purification of large amounts of mercuric iodide for crystal growth. In this study we used the Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) to identify and determine the distribution of impurity concentrations along the ampoule after zone-refining mercuric iodide. The results show that for Ag, Cu, Fe, Mg, Ca, Zn, Cr and Al, the zone-refining process does sweep the impurities to the last-to-freeze zone, due to an effective distribution coefficient, keff < 1. For Na, Ni, Cd, Mn and Pb the concentration gradient seems to be fairly independent of the position along the ingot. Differential Scanning Calorimetry was also employed to investigate the deviation from stoichiometry caused by the zone-refining process, and the results indicated that the first-to-freeze section is Hg-rich, and the middle section tends to become slightly Hg-rich, while the last-to-freeze section becomes I-rich.

  19. GENES ENCODING MERCURIC REDUCTASES FROM SELECTED GRAM NEGATIVE AQUATIC BACTERIA HAVE A LOW DEGREE OF HOMOLOGY WITH MWEA OF TRANSPOSON 501

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Hg2+ resistance mechanism was studied in four freshwater and four coastal marine bacteria that did not hybridize with a mer operonic probe (T. Barkay, C. Liebert, and M. Gillman, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 55, 1196, 1989). nducible Hg2+-volatilization was demonstrated for all ...

  20. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  1. Human monomethylarsonic acid (MMA(V)) reductase is a member of the glutathione-S-transferase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Zakharyan, R A; Sampayo-Reyes, A; Healy, S M; Tsaprailis, G; Board, P G; Liebler, D C; Aposhian, H V

    2001-08-01

    The drinking of water containing large amounts of inorganic arsenic is a worldwide major public health problem because of arsenic carcinogenicity. Yet an understanding of the specific mechanism(s) of inorganic arsenic toxicity has been elusive. We have now partially purified the rate-limiting enzyme of inorganic arsenic metabolism, human liver MMA(V) reductase, using ion exchange, molecular exclusion, and hydroxyapatite chromatography. When SDS-beta-mercaptoethanol-PAGE was performed on the most purified fraction, seven protein bands were obtained. Each band was excised from the gel, sequenced by LC-MS/MS and identified according to the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL Protein Sequence databases. Human liver MMA(V) reductase is 100% identical, over 92% of sequence that we analyzed, with the recently discovered human glutathione-S-transferase Omega class hGSTO 1-1. Recombinant human GSTO1-1 had MMA(V) reductase activity with K(m) and V(max) values comparable to those of human liver MMA(V) reductase. The partially purified human liver MMA(V) reductase had glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. MMA(V) reductase activity was competitively inhibited by the GST substrate, 1-chloro 2,4-dinitrobenzene and also by the GST inhibitor, deoxycholate. Western blot analysis of the most purified human liver MMA(V) reductase showed one band when probed with hGSTO1-1 antiserum. We propose that MMA(V) reductase and hGSTO 1-1 are identical proteins. PMID:11511179

  2. The effects of mercuric chloride on calmodulin-mediated Ca sup 2+ transport in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, G.G.; Oelsner, D.; Anderson, C.R.; Pearce, C.J.; Wallin, J.D. )

    1990-01-01

    We have shown previously that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) inhibits in vitro vasopressin release from the isolated rat neurohypophysis with maximum inhibition occurring with 0.5 mM HgCl2. Associated with the inhibition of hormone release is an increase in 45Ca+2 uptake, an increase in cytosolic 45Ca+2, and a reduction of 45Ca+2 accumulation by mitochondria in the intact gland. In the present series of studies, the effect of HgCl2 on calmodulin (CM) function in neural tissue preparations is reported. Mercuric chloride (0.5 mM) reduced 45Ca+2 binding to CM purified from bovine neurohypophyses by 20% and inhibited endogenous CM-stimulated Ca,Mg-ATPase activity from rat brain mitochondria in a dose-dependent fashion. Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by 50 and 80% with 0.5 and 5.0 mM HgCl2, respectively. CM-stimulation of Ca,Mg-ATPase activity was inhibited by calmidazolium (CMZ) with maximal inhibition seen with 0.1 mM CMZ. Reversibility of the HgCl2 interaction with CM was demonstrated using CM-stimulated phosphodiesterase (PDEase) activity from rat brain. HgCl2 inhibited both basal and CM-stimulated PDEase activity in a dose-dependent manner with maximum inhibition occurring with 1.0 mM HgCl2. Preexposure of CM to an inhibitory concentration (1.0 mM) of HgCl2 resulted in no loss of stimulatory PDEase enzyme activity. From these results, we conclude that HgCl2 reversibly interferes with 45Ca+2 binding to CM and also inhibits CM-regulated Ca+2 pumping enzyme systems in the neurohypophysis. The inhibition of vasopressin release from the intact gland in the presence of HgCl2 thus, may be associated with a disruption of calcium in the neurohypophysis.

  3. Phylogenomics of Mycobacterium Nitrate Reductase Operon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-07-01

    NarGHJI operon encodes a nitrate reductase that can reduce nitrate to nitrite. This process enhances bacterial survival by nitrate respiration under anaerobic conditions. NarGHJI operon exists in many bacteria, especially saprophytic bacteria living in soil which play a key role in the nitrogen cycle. Most actinomycetes, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, possess NarGHJI operons. M. tuberculosis is a facultative intracellular pathogen that expands in macrophages and has the ability to persist in a non-replicative form in granuloma lifelong. Nitrogen and nitrogen compounds play crucial roles in the struggle between M. tuberculosis and host. M. tuberculosis can use nitrate as a final electron acceptor under anaerobic conditions to enhance its survival. In this article, we reviewed the mechanisms regulating nitrate reductase expression and affecting its activity. Potential genes involved in regulating the nitrate reductase expression in M. tuberculosis were identified. The conserved NarG might be an alternative mycobacterium taxonomic marker. PMID:25980349

  4. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  5. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Richey, Christine; Chovanec, Peter; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA 15282 ; Hoeft, Shelley E.; Oremland, Ronald S.; Basu, Partha; Stolz, John F.

    2009-05-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  6. Mineral supplementation increases erythrose reductase activity in erythritol biosynthesis from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of divalent copper, iron, manganese, and zinc ions on the production of erythritol from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica and their effect on the activity of erythrose reductase. No inhibitory effect of the examined minerals on yeast growth was observed in the study. Supplementation with MnSO4 · 7H2O (25 mg l(-1)) increased erythritol production by Y. lipolytica by 14.5%. In the bioreactor culture with manganese ion addition, 47.1 g l(-1) of erythritol was produced from 100.0 g l(-1) of glycerol, which corresponded to volumetric productivity of 0.87 g l(-1) h(-1). The addition of Mn(2+) enhanced the intracellular activity of erythrose reductase up to 24.9 U g(-1) of dry weight of biomass (DW), hence, about 1.3 times more than in the control. PMID:24488778

  7. IN VITRO INHIBITION OF GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE BY ARSENOTRI-GLUTATHIONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenotriglutathione, a product of the reduction of arsenate and the complexation of arsenite by glutathione, is a mixed type inhibitor of the reduction of glutathione disulfide by purified yeast glutathione reductase or the glutathione reductase activity in rabbit erythrocyte ly...

  8. Evaluation of nitrate reductase activity in Rhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, J.G.; DeVine, P.J.

    1983-08-01

    Nitrate reductase activity was evaluated by four approaches, using four strains of Rhizobium japonicum and 11 chlorate-resistant mutants of the four strains. It was concluded that in vitro assays with bacteria or bacteroids provide the most simple and reliable assessment of the presence or absence of nitrate reductase. Nitrite reductase activity with methyl viologen and dithionite was found, but the enzyme activity does not confound the assay of nitrate reductase. 18 references

  9. Physical vapor transport of mercurous chloride under a nonlinear thermal profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennetrier, Christophe; Duval, Walter M. B.; Singh, Narsingh B.

    1992-01-01

    Our study investigates numerically the flow field characteristics during the growth of mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2) crystals in a rectangular ampoule under terrestrial and microgravity conditions for a nonlinear thermal gradient. With a residual gas lighter than the nutrient, the solutal Grashof number is dominant. We observe that in tilted configurations, when solutal convection is dominant, the maximum transport rate occurs at approximately 40 percent. For the vertical configurations, we were able to obtain solutions only for the cases either below the critical Rayleigh numbers or the stabilized configurations. The total mass flux decreases exponentially with an increase of pressure of residual gas, but it increases following a power law with the temperature difference driving the transport. The nonlinear thermal gradient appears to destabilize the flow field when thermal convection is dominant for both vertical top-heated and bottom-heated configurations. However, when the solutal Grashof number is dominant, the density gradient resulting from the solutal gradient appears to stabilize the flow for the bottom-heated configuration. The flow field for the top-heated configuration is destabilized for high Grashof numbers. The microgravity environment provides a means for lowering convection. For gravity levels of 10(exp -3) g(0) or less, the Stefan wind drives the flow, and no recirculating cell is predicted.

  10. Effect of mercuric chloride on some biochemical and physiological parameters of the freshwater murrel, Channa punctatus

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.V.; Rao, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The freshwater murrel, Channa punctatus, was exposed to a sublethal concentration of mercuric chloride (3 ..mu..g/liter) for 120 days and the following effects were examined: changes in the levels of glucose and lactic acid in blood and of glycogen and lactic acid in liver and muscles; rate of absorption of glucose from the intestine; and changes in the activities of glucose-6-phosphatase (G-6-Pase), hexokinase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), malate dehydrogenase (MDH), glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), L-amino acid oxidase (AO), and xanthine oxidase (XO) in brain, gills, intestine, kidney, liver, and muscles. Mercury-treated fish were hypoglycemic and hypolactemic. The glycogen content of liver and muscles remained unaltered but the muscle lactic acid level decreased significantly. The rate of intestinal absorption of glucose was reduced significantly by exposure to mercury. G-6-Pase activity was decreased in all the tissues. Hexokinase activity also decreased in mercury-exposed fish but it was significant only in intestine, kidney, and liver. The activities of LDH, PDH, SDH, and MDH also were decreased significantly except LDH in brain and MDH in kidney where an insignificant decrease and an insignificant increase, respectively, were recorded. GDH and AO activities were elevated in most of the tissues except GDH in gills, and AO in gills and muscles where a decrease was observed. XO activity in brain, gills, and kidneys was significantly elevated, but no marked alteration was noted in other tissues.

  11. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patt, B.

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  12. Chronic exposure to mercuric chloride during gestation affects sensorimotor development and later behaviour in rats.

    PubMed

    Chehimi, Latifa; Roy, Vincent; Jeljeli, Mustapha; Sakly, Mohsen

    2012-09-01

    The current study was performed to assess the effects of inorganic mercury (mercuric chloride - HgCl(2)) on the development of offsprings from intoxicated-mother during pregnancy. In this respect, pregnant rats were chronically treated with HgCl(2) at 50 ppm (Hg50) and 100 ppm (Hg100) in drinking water. After parturition, maternal behaviour was recorded during 30 min at 1st to 6th postnatal day (Pnd). The development of their offspring was studied during the first 17 days after birth. Sensorimotor development of pups was measured by different tests: rooting reflex, vibrissae placing response, righting reflex, negative geotaxis, suspension test and rotating grid. Two month after birth, the anxiety of offspring was tested using the elevated plus maze test. Our results indicate that mercury treatment significantly reduced the nursing and increased the time out the nest or drinking and eating. We also showed that prenatal exposure to HgCl(2) decreased weight gain. Importantly, the rooting reflex, the development of the vibrissae placing response, the righting reflex, the grip strength and the negative geotaxis behaviour were delayed in the offspring of dams treated with Hg50, the delay being more severe with Hg100. We also found a decrease in anxiety in adulthood. Cross-fostering test support the direct toxic effects of mercury. PMID:22705860

  13. A study of mercuric oxide and zinc-air battery life in hearing aids.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, C; Lacey, N K

    1997-09-01

    The requirement to phase out mercuric oxide (mercury) batteries on environmental grounds has led to the widespread introduction of zinc-air technology. The possibility arises that high drain hearing aids may not be adequately catered for by zinc-air cells, leading to poor performance. This study investigated the hearing aid user's ability to perceive differences between zinc-air and mercury cells in normal everyday usage. The data was collected for 100 experienced hearing aid users in field trials. Users report 50 per cent greater life for zinc-air cells in high power aids and 28 per cent in low power aids. The average life of the zinc-air cells range from 15 days in high power to 34 days in low power aids. Users are able to perceive a difference in sound quality in favour of zinc-air cells for low and medium power aids. The hearing aid population is not disadvantaged by phasing out mercury cells. PMID:9373545

  14. Volatilization of fluorescein mercuric acetate by marine bacterial from Minamata Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kunihiko )

    1989-05-01

    Some bacteria that live in a mercury-polluted environment are resistant to mercury compounds. A majority of these mercury-resistant bacterial have been found to volatilize organic as well as inorganic mercury compounds into elemental mercury vapor by means of their enzymes. One compound, fluorescein mercuric acetate (FMA) has long been in use as a disinfectant in hospitals; yet, there has been little definitive information on bacterial resistance to this compound. Minamata Bay has been heavily polluted by mercury, which has caused methylmercury poisoning in humans, called Minamata disease. Sediments from the Bay still contain high concentrations of mercury. The percentage of mercury-resistant bacteria in the total bacterial count is higher in these sediments than in those of other marine environments. FMA-pollution, however, has not been reported. Research into the mechanism of bacterial resistance to FMA will not only add to our general understanding of the ability of certain bacteria to resist mercury, but will also help in defining the role bacteria play in the mercury cycle of a mercury-polluted environment. The purpose of the present study is to determine the mechanism of resistance to FMA of the FMA-resistant bacteria living in the Bay.

  15. Effect of mercuric chloride feeding on sexual maturity, egg production and fertility in Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.; Shaffner, C.S.

    1973-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix c. japonica) were fed 0, 8, 16 or 32 p.p.m. of mercury as mercuric chloride from 3 days of age through 20 weeks of age. The onset of egg production generally occurred earlier for hens fed HgCl2. Average age in days at first oviposition for the control, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m. and 32 p.p.m. was 48.4, 50.9, 46.9 and 44.0 respectively. The average rate of egg productivity from first oviposition to attainment of full growth (9 weeks of age) correlated positively with in increased dietary mercury (controls, 8 p.p.m., 16 p.p.m., 32 p.p.m. ? 75.2, 69.3, 86.1 and 93.3% respectively). By 20 weeks of age productivity was 81.0, 80.6, 87.5 and 92.9% for control, 8, 16 and 32 p.p.m. groups respectively. Fertility was depressed when hens were fed HgCl2. At 9 weeks of age average control fertility was 59% contrasted with 25% for the 32 p.p.m. group. At 12 weeks fertility increased to 89% and 57% for these groups. From this study it is apparent. that the onset and rate of egg production was stimulated by HgCl2, but fertility was adversely affected.

  16. Investigation of a mercurous chloride acousto-optic cell based on longitudinal acoustic mode.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neelam

    2009-03-01

    A number of spectral imagers using acousto-optic tunable filters (AOTFs) operating from the UV to the longwave infrared (LWIR) using KDP, MgF(2), TeO(2), and Tl(3)AsSe(3) crystals to cover different spectral regions have been developed. In the LWIR there is a lack of high quality acousto-optic (AO) materials. Mercurous halide (Hg(2)Cl(2) and Hg(2)Br(2)) crystals are highly anisotropic with a high AO figure of merit due to slow acoustic velocities and high photoelastic constants and are transparent over a wide spectral region from 0.35 to 20 mum for Hg(2)Cl(2) and from 0.4 to 30 mum for Hg(2)Br(2). AO modulators, deflectors, and AOTFs based on these crystals can operate over a wide spectral range. Single crystals of these materials are being grown and some prototype devices have been fabricated. Results are presented from device characterization for an AO cell fabricated in Hg(2)Cl(2) based on longitudinal acoustic mode propagation. This device was very useful in demonstrating the AO interaction as well as soundness of the transducer bonding technique. Acoustic phase velocity is calculated and measured, diffraction efficiency is obtained from experiments, and the AO figure of merit of the sample is evaluated. PMID:19252608

  17. Optical detection of impurities and defects in detector-grade mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Ottesen, D. K.; Wong, D.; Schlesinger, T. E.; Schnepple, W. F.; Ortale, C.; Van Den Berg, L.

    1989-11-01

    We report the results of two different optical techniques, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and low-temperature photoluminescence, used to study impurities and native defects in mercuric iodide crystals and nuclear detectors. Several absorption bands associated with the presence of impurities are observed in transmission infrared spectra. Our measurements indicate that significant amounts of water are likely contained in the HgI2 crystals, and that the concentration of the water can be reduced by appropriate storage of the material. The FTIR spectra also show the existence of hydrocarbons in the bulk material. Several other weak absorption bands due to contaminants are detected in the transmission measurements. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies were also conducted on fully processed nuclear detectors to elucidate the relation between the measured luminescence and the detector response. At 78 K we observe a spectral line that appears to be correlated with the detector quality. In general, the photoluminescence results suggest that detector fabrication steps cause significant modifications to the stoichiometry in the near-surface region of the HgI2 crystals.

  18. Study of stoichiometry in mercuric iodide by low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xue J.; James, Ralph B.; Hung, C.-Y.; Schlesinger, Tuviah E.; Cheng, A. Y.; Ortale, Carol; van den Berg, Lodewijk

    1993-02-01

    Low temperature (4.2 K) photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) measurements were performed on mercuric iodide (HgI(subscript 2)) crystals that were surface-doped with either iodine or mercury. Two methods of treatment were used to achieve the surface doping. The first is the direct immersion of HgI(subscript 2) samples into potassium iodide (KI) aqueous solution saturated with iodine or immersion into elemental mercury liquid. The second is the storage of HgI(subscript 2) crystals under either iodine or mercury vapor. Certain features in the PL spectra were correlated with the stoichiometry of the HgI(subscript 2/ crystals modified by the surface doping. It was also found that if HgI(subscript 2) was exposed to air, an iodine deficient surface layer would form within a one-day period due to the preferential loss of iodine. Finally, the behavior of a broad emission band in the PL spectra and its implication in the fabrication of high quality HgI(subscript 2) nuclear detector is discussed.

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide in solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, M.A.; Rafiuddin

    1987-05-01

    The kinetics and the mechanism of the reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide were studied in the solid state by X-ray, chemical analysis, and electrical conductivity measurements. This is a multistep reaction where Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ is formed as an intermediate. In an equimolar mixture of Ag/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ and HgI/sub 2/, AgI an HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed, whereas in a 1:2 molar mixture Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ and HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed. The data for lateral diffusion best fit the equation X/sup n/ = kt, where X is the product thickness, t is time, and k and n are constants. This is a multistep solid state ionic reaction initiated by the diffusion of HgI/sub 2/ molecules as such and not through counterdiffusion of cations.

  20. Mercuric chloride-induced protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) in brown Norway (BN) rats

    SciTech Connect

    Knoflach, P.; Weiser, M.M.; Albini, B.

    1986-03-05

    Prolonged exposure to low doses of mercuric chloride (MC) may induce immunologically mediated kidney disease in man and animals. Mercury compounds are of growing importance as environmental pollutants. Twenty female BN rats were gavaged with 150 microgram MC/100 gm body weight 3x/wk for up to 39 wks. Starting with wk 2, rat intestines demonstrated linear IgG and IgA deposits along the vascular and intestinal basement membranes (VBM and IBM). Serum antibodies to IBM were observed during the first 4 wks of gavage. At wk 11, first granular deposits of IgG and C3 were observed along VBM. Only after wk 35 were granular deposits also seen along the IBM. Using radioactive chromium chloride, 50% of rats with granular deposits along BM showed significantly increased protein loss into the intestines. Thus, granular deposits of IgG and C3 along the IBM, probably representing immune complexes, may lead to PLE. This animal model may contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of PLE in man described in graft-vrs-host reactions following bone marrow grafts, allergic enteritides, inflammatory bowel disease, and arsenic intoxication, as well as the assessment of biological effects of environmental pollutants.

  1. Detection of malformations in sea urchin plutei exposed to mercuric chloride using different fluorescent techniques.

    PubMed

    Buttino, Isabella; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Romano, Giovanna; Sun, Chi-Kuang; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Pellegrini, David; Gaion, Andrea; Sartori, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and subtropical Echinometra mathaei were exposed to 5,10, 15 and 20µgL(-1), and to 1, 2, 3 and 4µgL(-1) mercuric chloride (HgCl2), respectively. The effective concentration (EC50) inducing malformation in 50% of 4-arm pluteus stage (P4) was 16.14µgL(-1) for P. lividus and 2.41µgL(-1) for E. mathaei. Two-photon (TP), second (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) microscopy techniques, TUNEL staining, propidium iodide (PI) and Hoechst 33342 probes were used to detect light signals or to stain apoptotic and necrotic cells in fixed and alive plutei. Signals were detected differently in the two species: TP fluorescence, commonly associated with apoptotic cells, did not increase with increasing HgCl2 concentrations in P. lividus and in fact, the TUNEL did not reveal induction of apoptosis. PI fluorescence increased in P. lividus in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a loss of cell permeability. In E. mathaei plutei TP fluorescence increased at increasing HgCl2 concentrations. THG microscopy revealed skeletal rods in both species. Different fluorescent techniques, used in this study, are proposed as early-warning systems to visualize malformations and physiological responses in sea urchin plutei. PMID:26254716

  2. Structures of complexes of octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens with sulfite and cyanide.

    PubMed

    Trofimov, Anton A; Polyakov, Konstantin M; Boyko, Konstantin M; Tikhonova, Tamara V; Safonova, Tatyana N; Tikhonov, Alexey V; Popov, Alexandre N; Popov, Vladimir O

    2010-10-01

    The structures of complexes of octahaem cytochrome c nitrite reductase from the bacterium Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) with the substrate sulfite (1.4 Å resolution; R(cryst) = 0.126) and the inhibitor cyanide (1.55 Å resolution; R(cryst) = 0.148) have been established. The complex with sulfite was prepared by the reduction of the protein crystal with sodium dithionite. The sulfite ion is bound to the iron ion of the catalytic haem through the S atom. The Fe-S distance is 2.24 Å. The structure of the cyanide complex with full occupancy of the ligand site was established for the first time for cytochrome c nitrite reductases. The cyanide ion is bound to the catalytic haem iron through the C atom. The Fe-C distance is 1.91 Å and the Fe-C-N angle is 171°. The sulfite reductase activity of TvNiR was measured at different pH values. The activity is 0.02 µmol of HS(-) per minute per milligram at pH 7.0; it decreases with increasing pH and is absent at pH 9.0. PMID:20944237

  3. Structure of Physarum polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase at 1.56 Å resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sangwoo; Suga, Michihiro; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Ikegami, Terumi; Minami, Yoshiko; Yubisui, Toshitsugu; Tsukihara, Tomitake

    2007-04-01

    The structure of P. polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase, an enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of cytochrome b{sub 5} by NADH, was determined at a resolution of 1.56 Å. Physarum polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase catalyzes the reduction of cytochrome b{sub 5} by NADH. The structure of P. polycephalum cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase was determined at a resolution of 1.56 Å. The molecular structure was compared with that of human cytochrome b{sub 5} reductase, which had previously been determined at 1.75 Å resolution [Bando et al. (2004 ▶), Acta Cryst. D60, 1929–1934]. The high-resolution structure revealed conformational differences between the two enzymes in the adenosine moiety of the FAD, the lid region and the linker region. The structural properties of both proteins were inspected in terms of hydrogen bonding, ion pairs, accessible surface area and cavity volume. The differences in these structural properties between the two proteins were consistent with estimates of their thermostabilities obtained from differential scanning calorimetry data.

  4. The anaerobic ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase from Escherichia coli requires S-adenosylmethionine as a cofactor.

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, R; Fontecave, M; Jörnvall, H; Krook, M; Pontis, E; Reichard, P

    1990-01-01

    Extracts from anaerobically grown Escherichia coli contain an oxygen-sensitive activity that reduces CTP to dCTP in the presence of NADPH, dithiothreitol, Mg2+ ions, and ATP, different from the aerobic ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase (2'-deoxyribonucleoside-diphosphate: oxidized-thioredoxin 2'-oxidoreductase, EC 1.17.4.1) present in aerobically grown E. coli. After fractionation, the activity required at least five components, two heat-labile protein fractions and several low molecular weight fractions. One protein fraction, suggested to represent the actual ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase was purified extensively and on denaturing gel electrophoresis gave rise to several defined protein bands, all of which were stained by a polyclonal antibody against one of the two subunits (protein B1) of the aerobic reductase but not by monoclonal anti-B1 antibodies. Peptide mapping and sequence analyses revealed partly common structures between two types of protein bands but also suggested the presence of an additional component. Obviously, the preparations are heterogeneous and the structure of the reductase is not yet established. The second, crude protein fraction is believed to contain several ancillary enzymes required for the reaction. One of the low molecular weight components is S-adenosylmethionine; a second component is a loosely bound metal. We propose that S-adenosylmethionine together with a metal participates in the generation of the radical required for the reduction of carbon 2' of the ribosyl moiety of CTP. Images PMID:2185465

  5. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  6. Ferrisiderophore reductase activity in Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, J S; Gaines, C G; Arceneaux, J E; Byers, B R

    1982-01-01

    Reduction of the iron in ferriagrobactin by the cytoplasmic fraction of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strictly required NaDH as the reductant. Addition of flavin mononucleotide and anaerobic conditions were necessary for the reaction; when added with flavin mononucleotide, magnesium was stimulatory. This ferrisiderophore reductase activity may be a part of the iron assimilation process in A. tumefaciens. PMID:7056702

  7. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases

    PubMed Central

    Penning, Trevor M.; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ4-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1–AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1–AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled ‘Steroid/Sterol signaling’. PMID:25500069

  8. Promiscuity and diversity in 3-ketosteroid reductases.

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M; Chen, Mo; Jin, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Many steroid hormones contain a Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid functionality that undergoes sequential reduction by 5α- or 5β- steroid reductases to produce 5α- or 5β-dihydrosteroids; and a subsequent 3-keto-reduction to produce a series of isomeric tetrahydrosteroids. Apart from steroid 5α-reductase all the remaining enzymes involved in the two step reduction process in humans belong to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. The enzymes involved in 3-ketosteroid reduction are AKR1C1-AKR1C4. These enzymes are promiscuous and also catalyze 20-keto- and 17-keto-steroid reduction. Interest in these reactions exist since they regulate steroid hormone metabolism in the liver, and in steroid target tissues, they may regulate steroid hormone receptor occupancy. In addition many of the dihydrosteroids are not biologically inert. The same enzymes are also involved in the metabolism of synthetic steroids e.g., hormone replacement therapeutics, contraceptive agents and inhaled glucocorticoids, and may regulate drug efficacy at their cognate receptors. This article reviews these reactions and the structural basis for substrate diversity in AKR1C1-AKR1C4, ketosteroid reductases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Steroid/Sterol signaling'. PMID:25500069

  9. Functional studies of aldo-keto reductases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Qing; Griest, Terry A.; Harter, Theresa M.; Petrash, J. Mark

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY We utilized the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model to systematically explore physiological roles for yeast and mammalian aldo-keto reductases. Six open reading frames encoding putative aldo-keto reductases were identified when the yeast genome was queried against the sequence for human aldose reductase, the prototypical mammalian aldo-keto reductase. Recombinant proteins produced from five of these yeast open reading frames demonstrated NADPH-dependent reductase activity with a variety of aldehyde and ketone substrates. A triple aldo-keto reductase null mutant strain demonstrated a glucose-dependent heat shock phenotype which could be rescued by ectopic expression of human aldose reductase. Catalytically-inactive mutants of human or yeast aldo-keto reductases failed to effect a rescue of the heat shock phenotype, suggesting that the phenotype results from either an accumulation of one or more unmetabolized aldo-keto reductase substrates or a synthetic deficiency of aldo-keto reductase products generated in response to heat shock stress. These results suggest that multiple aldo-keto reductases fulfill functionally redundant roles in the stress response in yeast. PMID:17140678

  10. Multigram-scale synthesis of l,d-heptoside using a Fleming-Tamao oxidation promoted by mercuric trifluoroacetate.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianlei; Tikad, Abdellatif; Durka, Maxime; Pan, Weidong; Vincent, Stéphane P

    2016-09-01

    An efficient multigram-scale synthesis of methyl 2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-l-glycero-α-d-manno-heptopyranoside from methyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-α-d-mannopyranoside is reported. It involves a sequence of Swern oxidation, Grignard addition and Fleming-Tamao reactions. The resulting scaffold was used as a precursor to design a small library of clickable l-heptosides. This study shows that the use of mercuric bistrifluoroacetate is required both to accelerate and to cleanly perform the Fleming-Tamao oxidation, without side-reactions. PMID:27450667

  11. Mechanism of inhibition of rat brain adenosine triphosphatase by mercuric chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Chetty, C.S.; Rajanna, B.; Rajanna, S. )

    1989-02-09

    Mercuric Chloride (Hg), a neurotoxic compound inhibited ATPase system of rat brain microsomes. Membrane bound enzymes, Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase (IC{sub 50} = 2.35 {times} 10{sup {minus}7M}) and K-paranitrophenyl phosphatase (K-PNPPase) (IC{sub 50} = 2.7 {times} 10{sup {minus}7M}) and {sup 3}H-Ouabain binding (IC{sub 50} = 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7M}) were inhibited by Hg at micromolar concentrations in a dose dependent manner. Hydrolysis of ATP was linear with time with or without Hg in the reaction mixtures. Altered pH or temperature versus enzyme activity showed higher inhibition by Hg at basic pH (8.0-9.0) and at lower temperatures (17-32{degree}C). Activation energy ({Delta}E) values were increased at 27-37{degree}C in the presence of Hg. Kinetic studies of cationic-substrate activation of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase and K-PNPPase in the presence of Hg showed significant changes in kinetic constant (K{sub m} and V{sub max}). Inhibition of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase was partially restored by repeated washings of microsomes. Preincubation with sulfhydryl agents protected Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase from Hg inhibition. Cumulative inhibition studies with Hg and ouabain indicated possible interaction between the two inhibitors of Na{sup +}-K{sup +} ATPase by interacting at Na{sup +} and K{sup +} sites.

  12. The metabolism of nitrosothiols in the Mycobacteria: identification and characterization of S-nitrosomycothiol reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Ryan N; Steenkamp, Daniel J; Zheng, Renjian; Blanchard, John S

    2003-01-01

    When grown in culture Mycobacterium smegmatis metabolized S-nitrosoglutathione to oxidized glutathione and nitrate, which suggested a possible involvement of an S-nitrosothiol reductase and mycobacterial haemoglobin. The mycothiol-dependent formaldehyde dehydrogenase from M. smegmatis was purified by a combination of Ni2+-IMAC (immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography), hydrophobic interaction, anion-exchange and affinity chromatography. The enzyme had a subunit molecular mass of 38263 kDa. Steady-state kinetic studies indicated that the enzyme catalyses the NAD+-dependent conversion of S-hydroxymethylmycothiol into formic acid and mycothiol by a rapid-equilibrium ordered mechanism. The enzyme also catalysed an NADH-dependent decomposition of S-nitrosomycothiol (MSNO) by a sequential mechanism and with an equimolar stoichiometry of NADH:MSNO, which indicated that the enzyme reduces the nitroso group to the oxidation level of nitroxyl. Vmax for the MSNO reductase reaction indicated a turnover per subunit of approx. 116700 min(-1), which was 76-fold faster than the formaldehyde dehydrogenase activity. A gene, Rv2259, annotated as a class III alcohol dehydrogenase in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome was cloned and expressed in M. smegmatis as the C-terminally His6-tagged product. The purified recombinant enzyme from M. tuberculosis also catalysed both activities. M. smegmatis S-nitrosomycothiol reductase converted MSNO into the N -hydroxysulphenamide, which readily rearranged to mycothiolsulphinamide. In the presence of MSNO reductase, M. tuberculosis HbN (haemoglobin N) was converted with low efficiency into metHbN [HbN(Fe3+)] and this conversion was dependent on turnover of MSNO reductase. These observations suggest a possible route in vivo for the dissimilation of S-nitrosoglutathione. PMID:12809551

  13. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    PubMed

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species. PMID:26031293

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: importance of early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Fattal-Valevski, A; Bassan, H; Korman, S H; Lerman-Sagie, T; Gutman, A; Harel, S

    2000-08-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency is the most common inborn error of folate metabolism and should be suspected when homocystinuria is combined with hypomethioninemia. The main clinical findings are neurologic signs such as severe developmental delay, marked hypotonia, seizures, microcephaly, apnea, and coma. Most patients present in early life. The infantile form is severe, with rapid deterioration leading to death usually within 1 year. Treatment with betaine has been shown to be efficient in lowering homocysteine concentrations and returning methionine to normal, but the clinical response is variable. We report two brothers with methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency: the first was undiagnosed and died at 8 months of age from neurologic deterioration and apnea, while his brother, who was treated with betaine from the age of 4 months, is now 3 years old and has developmental delay. PMID:10961793

  15. Structure of aldose reductase from Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, M.; Abendroth, J.; Zhang, Y.; Sankaran, B.; Edwards, T. E.; Staker, B. L.; Van Voorhis, W. C.; Stewart, L. J.; Myler, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an anaerobic aerotolerant eukaryotic parasite of the intestines. It is believed to have diverged early from eukarya during evolution and is thus lacking in many of the typical eukaryotic organelles and biochemical pathways. Most conspicuously, mitochondria and the associated machinery of oxidative phosphorylation are absent; instead, energy is derived from substrate-level phosphorylation. Here, the 1.75 Å resolution crystal structure of G. lamblia aldose reductase heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli is reported. As in other oxidoreductases, G. lamblia aldose reductase adopts a TIM-barrel conformation with the NADP+-binding site located within the eight β-strands of the interior. PMID:21904059

  16. Characterization of erythrose reductases from filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Birgit; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2013-01-01

    Proteins with putative erythrose reductase activity have been identified in the filamentous fungi Trichoderma reesei, Aspergillus niger, and Fusarium graminearum by in silico analysis. The proteins found in T. reesei and A. niger had earlier been characterized as glycerol dehydrogenase and aldehyde reductase, respectively. Corresponding genes from all three fungi were cloned, heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified. Subsequently, they were used to establish optimal enzyme assay conditions. All three enzymes strictly require NADPH as cofactor, whereas with NADH no activity could be observed. The enzymatic characterization of the three enzymes using ten substrates revealed high substrate specificity and activity with D-erythrose and D-threose. The enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger herein showed comparable activities, whereas the one from F. graminearum reached only about a tenth of it for all tested substrates. In order to proof in vivo the proposed enzyme function, we overexpressed the erythrose reductase-encoding gene in T. reesei. An increased production of erythritol by the recombinant strain compared to the parental strain could be detected. PMID:23924507

  17. A mercuric iodide detector system for X-ray astronomy. II - Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, described by Ricker et al., an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, TX. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 + or - 0.7 x 10 to the -5th counts/s sq cm keV over the energy range of 40-80 keV. This measurement was within 50 percent of the predicted value. The measured rate is about 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range.

  18. Plasma enzyme activities in coturnix quail fed graded doses of DDE, polychlorinated biphenyl, malathion, and mercuric chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dieter, M.P.

    1974-01-01

    Male Coturnix quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed diets for 12 weeks containing graded levels of DDE, polychlorinated biphenyl (Aroclor 1254), malathion, and mercuric chloride. Birds were bled prior to exposure and at 2, 4 and 12 weeks, and the plasma used to measure the activities of creatine kinase, aspartate aminotransferase, cholinesterase, fructose-diphosphate aldolase, and lactate dehydrogenase. Abnormal activity of certain plasma enzymes was noted in birds after 2 and 4 weeks, but these changes were not proportional to dose or exposure time. At 12 weeks increases in each of the activities of plasma enzymes of birds fed organochlorines, and decreases in cholinesterase activity of birds fed malathion or mercuric chloride, were proportional to the log dose of the respective agents. In addition, the pattern of enzyme responses in the 4 experimental groups had changed, and was illustrative of the specific type of substance that had been fed. The data suggest that qualitative and quantitative identification of environmental contaminants in birds, and perhaps a variety of wild animals, may be possible by utilization of multiple plasma enzyme assays. Residue analyses after 12 weeks of feeding showed that DDE accumulated in carcasses and livers at concentrations up to 4-fold higher than those in the diets. In contrast residues of Aroclor 1254 attained in carcasses were identical to, and in livers one-half of, the concentration in the feed. Mercury did not accumulate as much in the tissues; residues attained were one-twentieth or less of those in the feed.

  19. A mercuric detector system for X-ray astronomy. 2. Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, Texas. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 O.7 x 10-5 counts/sec cm keV over the energy range of 40 to 80 keV. This measurement was within 50% of the predicted value. The measured rate is approx 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range. The prediction was based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the detector assembly in the radiation environment at float altitude.

  20. Role of the Dinitrogenase Reductase Arginine 101 Residue in Dinitrogenase Reductase ADP-Ribosyltransferase Binding, NAD Binding, and Cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Ludden, Paul W.

    2001-01-01

    Dinitrogenase reductase is posttranslationally regulated by dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT) via ADP-ribosylation of the arginine 101 residue in some bacteria. Rhodospirillum rubrum strains in which the arginine 101 of dinitrogenase reductase was replaced by tyrosine, phenylalanine, or leucine were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis of the nifH gene. The strain containing the R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase retains 91%, the strain containing the R101Y form retains 72%, and the strain containing the R101L form retains only 28% of in vivo nitrogenase activity of the strain containing the dinitrogenase reductase with arginine at position 101. In vivo acetylene reduction assays, immunoblotting with anti-dinitrogenase reductase antibody, and [adenylate-32P]NAD labeling experiments showed that no switch-off of nitrogenase activity occurred in any of the three mutants and no ADP-ribosylation of altered dinitrogenase reductases occurred either in vivo or in vitro. Altered dinitrogenase reductases from strains UR629 (R101Y) and UR630 (R101F) were purified to homogeneity. The R101F and R101Y forms of dinitrogenase reductase were able to form a complex with DRAT that could be chemically cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide. The R101F form of dinitrogenase reductase and DRAT together were not able to cleave NAD. This suggests that arginine 101 is not critical for the binding of DRAT to dinitrogenase reductase but that the availability of arginine 101 is important for NAD cleavage. Both DRAT and dinitrogenase reductase can be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD individually upon UV irradiation, but most 14C label is incorporated into DRAT when both proteins are present. The ability of R101F dinitrogenase reductase to be labeled by [carbonyl-14C]NAD suggested that Arg 101 is not absolutely required for NAD binding. PMID:11114923

  1. N-acetylcysteine pretreatment ameliorates mercuric chloride-induced oxidative renal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ekor, M; Adesanoye, O A; Farombi, E O

    2010-12-01

    The effectiveness of the antioxidant thiol, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), in enhancing methylmercury (CH3HgCl) excretion and its utility as a possible antidote in CH3HgCl poisoning has been reported. NAC, however, has been reported to be ineffective in accelerating excretion of divalent toxic metals, including inorganic mercury, Hg2+. In this study, we evaluated the possible protective effect of short-term pretreatment with NAC against mercuric chloride (HgCl2) toxicity in rat model. This is aimed at determining its chemopreventive or prophylactic benefit in situations of high risk exposure (occupational/industrial) to mercury. Rats were divided into three treatment groups. Group I received saline (10 ml/kg) and served as control. Group II received HgCl2 (5mg/kg) and group III received NAC (10mg/kg) plus (5mg/kg). All administration was via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. Saline and NAC were administered for 5days and HgCl2 was administered to rats in groups II and III on the 5th day. Animals were sacrificed 24 hours after HgCl2 injection and samples obtained for biochemical evaluation. Results revealed that single i.p. injection of HgCl2 induced significant renal oxidative damage resulting in significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), depletion of reduced glutathione (GSH) and increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in these rats. The activities of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and 5'-nucleotidase (5'-NTD) (markers of microsomal damage) also decreased in these HgCl2 treated rats. The oxidative damage induced by HgCl2 led to significant alterations in renal histology and caused functional impairment (indicated by elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine) in these rats. NAC was effective in attenuating the oxidative damage, functional impairments and histopathological changes that characterized HgCl2 intoxication in this study. Renal antioxidant defense system was re-enforced by

  2. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Iyanagi, Takashi . E-mail: iyanagi@spring8.or.jp

    2005-12-09

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH {sup {center_dot}}/FMNH{sub 2} couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed.

  3. Reduction of tetrathionate by mammalian thioredoxin reductase

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Vivek; Kudva, Avinash K.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Tetrathionate, a polythionate oxidation product of microbial hydrogen sulfide and reactive oxygen species from immune cells in the gut, serves as a terminal electron acceptor to confer growth advantage for Salmonella and other enterobacteria. Here we show that the rat liver selenoen-zyme thioredoxin reductase (Txnrd1; TR1) efficiently reduces tetrathionate in vitro. Furthermore, lysates of selenium-supplemented murine macrophages also displayed activity towards tetrathionate, while cells lacking TR1 were unable to reduce tetrathionate. These studies suggest that upregulation of TR1 expression, via selenium supplementation, may modulate the gut microbiome, particularly during inflammation, by regulating the levels of tetrathionate. PMID:26252619

  4. Molecular dissection of a putative iron reductase from Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Kim, David D; Nelson, Ornella D; Otwell, Anne E; Richardson, Ruth E; Callister, Stephen J; Lin, Hening

    2015-11-20

    Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 is a Firmicute strain capable of reducing a variety of heavy metal ions and has a great potential in heavy metal bioremediation. We recently identified Dred_2421 as a potential iron reductase through proteomic study of D. reducens. The current study examines its iron-reduction mechanism. Dred_2421, like its close homolog from Escherichia coli (2, 4-dienoyl-CoA reductase), has an FMN-binding N-terminal domain (NTD), an FAD-binding C-terminal domain (CTD), and a 4Fe-4S cluster between the two domains. To understand the mechanism of the iron-reduction activity and the role of each domain, we generated a series of variants for each domain and investigated their iron-reduction activity. Our results suggest that CTD is the main contributor of the iron-reduction activity, and that NTD and the 4Fe-4S cluster are not directly involved in such activity. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the iron-reductase activity of Dred_2421 and may also help to elucidate other physiological activities this enzyme may have. PMID:26454174

  5. Evolution of the Ferric Reductase Domain (FRD) Superfamily: Modularity, Functional Diversification, and Signature Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Xenarios, Ioannis; Soldati, Thierry; Boeckmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    A heme-containing transmembrane ferric reductase domain (FRD) is found in bacterial and eukaryotic protein families, including ferric reductases (FRE), and NADPH oxidases (NOX). The aim of this study was to understand the phylogeny of the FRD superfamily. Bacteria contain FRD proteins consisting only of the ferric reductase domain, such as YedZ and short bFRE proteins. Full length FRE and NOX enzymes are mostly found in eukaryotic cells and all possess a dehydrogenase domain, allowing them to catalyze electron transfer from cytosolic NADPH to extracellular metal ions (FRE) or oxygen (NOX). Metazoa possess YedZ-related STEAP proteins, possibly derived from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses suggests that FRE enzymes appeared early in evolution, followed by a transition towards EF-hand containing NOX enzymes (NOX5- and DUOX-like). An ancestral gene of the NOX(1-4) family probably lost the EF-hands and new regulatory mechanisms of increasing complexity evolved in this clade. Two signature motifs were identified: NOX enzymes are distinguished from FRE enzymes through a four amino acid motif spanning from transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) to TM4, and YedZ/STEAP proteins are identified by the replacement of the first canonical heme-spanning histidine by a highly conserved arginine. The FRD superfamily most likely originated in bacteria. PMID:23505460

  6. Structure of octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens in a complex with phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Trofimov, A. A.; Polyakov, K. M.; Boiko, K. M.; Filimonenkov, A. A.; Dorovatovskii, P. V.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Popov, V. O.; Koval'chuk, M. V.

    2010-01-15

    Octaheme cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Thioalkalivibrio nitratireducens (TvNiR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrite and hydroxylamine to ammonia. The structures of the free enzyme and of the enzyme in complexes with the substrate (nitrite ion) and the inhibitor (azide ion) have been solved previously. In this study we report the structures of the oxidized complex of TvNiR with phosphate and of this complex reduced by europium(II) chloride (1.8- and 2.0-A resolution, the R factors are 15.9 and 16.7%, respectively) and the structure of the enzyme in the complex with cyanide (1.76-A resolution, the R factor is 16.5%), which was prepared by soaking a crystal of the oxidized phosphate complex of TvNiR. In the active site of the enzyme, the phosphate ion binds to the iron ion of the catalytic heme and to the side chains of the catalytic residues Arg131, Tyr303, and His361. The cyanide ion is coordinated to the heme-iron ion and is hydrogen bonded to the residue His361. In the structure of reduced TvNiR, the phosphate ion is bound in the same manner as in the structure of oxidized TvNiR, and the nine{sub c}oordinated europium ion is located on the surface of one of the crystallographically independent monomers of the enzyme.

  7. Effect of mercury-silver alloy composition on the open-circuit voltage of cadmium/mercuric oxide cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kronenberg, M.L.; Stein, B.J.; Codd, B.P. )

    1994-10-01

    To minimize the migration of mercury droplets when discharging cadmium/mercuric oxide (Cd/HgO) cells, silver powder is often blended with HgO powder in the cathode to promote formation of a solid Hg-Ag alloy. Even though only high purity materials are used, open-circuit cell voltages are much higher than what is normally observed when Ag powder is not present. There is also a significant variation in the open-circuit voltage (OCV) of a given lot of Cd/HgO cells. The authors hypothesized that this high OCV and cell voltage variation is at least partially attributed to uncontrolled very small quantities of mercury present in the HgO. The potential variations arise from the reduced activity of mercury in the Hg-Ag alloy. The experiments that were carried out and reported here support this hypothesis.

  8. A mercuric iodide detector system for X-ray astronomy. I - Design considerations and predictions of background and sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricker, G. R.; Vallerga, J. V.; Wood, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Since the discovery of Sco X-1 initiated X-ray astronomy in 1962, this science has progressed in connection with the placement of X-ray photon detectors above the atmosphere by means of rockets, balloons, and satellites. In the last few years, studies have been conducted regarding the use of mercuric iodide (HgI2) as room temperature X-ray detector for applications in hard X-ray astronomy. These detectors combine a high quantum efficiency with good energy resolution. The sensitivity of an astronomical X-ray telescope is discussed, and a description is presented of a specific design accepted for the HDXT to be flown on Spacelab. Attention is given to predictions of the background counting rate of the detector assembly in this design, taking into account the results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the detector assembly in the radiation environment at balloon altitudes (40 km).

  9. Low energy x-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Huth, G.C.; Bradley, J.G.; Conley, J.M.; Albee, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K/sub ..cap alpha../ at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  10. Histopathological changes in the epidermis of the air breathing catfish Heteropneustes fossilis exposed to sublethal concentration of mercuric chloride.

    PubMed

    Rajan, M T; Banerjee, T K

    1993-12-01

    Histopathological alterations induced by the sublethal concentration of (0.03 ppm) mercuric chloride solution on the epidermis of the fresh-water catfish Heteropneustes fossilis have been studied. It induces slow but significant histopathological changes in the various cellular components of the epidermis. It induces vacuolization, necrosis and pycnosis of the nuclei of the epithelial cells which subsequently shed. Loosening of epithelial cells of the outermost and middle layers following degeneration of the intercellular material and widened intercellular spaces is another important alteration. Prolonged mercury treatment also causes a gradual decrease in staining intensity for sulphated glycosaminoglycans in the outer border of the most superficial layer epithelial cells. The glandular elements (club cells and mucocytes) also get affected, showing cyclic degeneration followed by regeneration. PMID:8198757

  11. A mercuric ensemble based on a cycloruthenated complex as a visual probe for iodide in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xianlong; Guo, Lieping; Ma, Yajuan; Li, Xianghong

    2016-01-01

    A new water-soluble cycloruthenated complex Ru(bthiq)(dcbpy)2+ (1, Hbthiq = 1-(2-benzo[b]thiophenyl)isoquinoline, dcbpy = 4,4‧-dicarboxylate-2,2‧-bipyridine) was designed and synthesized to form its mercuric ensemble (1-Hg2+) to achieve visual detection of iodide anions. The binding constant of 1-Hg2+ is calculated to be 2.40 × 104 M-1, which is lower than that of HgI2. Therefore, the addition of I- to the aqueous solution of 1-Hg2+lead to significant color changes from yellow to deep-red by the release of 1. The results showed that iodide anions could be easily detected by the naked eyes. The detection limit of iodide anion is calculated as 0.77 μM. In addition, an easily-prepared test strip of 1-Hg2+ was obtained successfully to detect iodide anions.

  12. Whole-body retention, and urinary and fecal excretion of mercury after subchronic oral exposure to mercuric chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, M A; Santamaria, J

    1995-10-01

    The effects of long-term daily intake of mercury on its urinary and fecal excretion, whole-body retention, and blood concentration in male rats were observed. The animals were exposed to mercuric, chloride labeled with 203Hg via drinking water for 8 weeks (5, 50 and 500 microM Hg). 203Hg in urine, feces and blood was quantified. The blood mercury concentration did not keep a linear relationship with the increasing dose. The percentage of the total amount of mercury intake which is excreted by the fecal route in rats exposed to 500 microM Hg was significantly lower than in those exposed to 5 and 50 microM. The daily dose percentage of mercury excreted in urine increased with dose size. The results show that the absorption fraction of mercury through the gastrointestinal tract (30-40%) was higher than values previously reported. PMID:7580050

  13. Low energy X-ray spectra measured with a mercuric iodide energy dispersive spectrometer in a scanning electron microscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Bradley, J. G.; Conley, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    A mercuric iodide energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer, with Peltier cooling provided for the detector and input field effect transistor, has been developed and tested in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray spectra were obtained with the 15 keV electron beam. An energy resolution of 225 eV (FWHM) for Mn-K(alpha) at 5.9 keV and 195 eV (FWHM) for the Mg-K line at 1.25 keV has been measured. Overall system noise level was 175 eV (FWHM). The detector system characterization with a carbon target demonstrated good energy sensitivity at low energies and lack of significant spectral artifacts at higher energies.

  14. A reusable thioether-rich crown-based fluorescent sensor for the detection and removal of mercuric ions.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yao; Liu, Yu; Qin, Yiqiao; Xu, Yufang; Qian, Xuhong; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-10-01

    Based on the thioether-rich crown receptor, we describe a naphthalimide based bifunctional fluorescent sensor (FS-G) for simultaneous detection and separation of trace Hg(2+) in water. FS-G exhibited excellent selectivity toward Hg(2+) in aqueous environment and showed 5-fold increase in fluorescence emission intensity upon the addition of Hg(2+). A good linearity was observed between the fluorescence enhancement and the dose of Hg(2+) with a lower detection limit of 33.4ppb. Additionally, adsorption capacity of FS-G is 7.4mgg(-1). FS-G can be easily regenerated when treated with dimercaptosuccinic acid. These results indicate that FS-G has potential applications for detection and removal of trace Hg(2+) in water. PMID:27343764

  15. A novel type of catalytic copper cluster in nitrous oxide reductase.

    PubMed

    Brown, K; Tegoni, M; Prudêncio, M; Pereira, A S; Besson, S; Moura, J J; Moura, I; Cambillau, C

    2000-03-01

    Nitrous oxide (N20) is a greenhouse gas, the third most significant contributor to global warming. As a key process for N20 elimination from the biosphere, N20 reductases catalyze the two-electron reduction of N20 to N2. These 2 x 65 kDa copper enzymes are thought to contain a CuA electron entry site, similar to that of cytochrome c oxidase, and a CuZ catalytic center. The copper anomalous signal was used to solve the crystal structure of N20 reductase from Pseudomonas nautica by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion, to a resolution of 2.4 A. The structure reveals that the CuZ center belongs to a new type of metal cluster, in which four copper ions are liganded by seven histidine residues. N20 binds to this center via a single copper ion. The remaining copper ions might act as an electron reservoir, assuring a fast electron transfer and avoiding the formation of dead-end products. PMID:10700275

  16. Biliverdin reductase: a target for cancer therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Peter E. M.; Miralem, Tihomir; Maines, Mahin D.

    2015-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase (BVR) is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s) of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1, and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ, and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26089799

  17. Flavodiiron Oxygen Reductase from Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Vera L.; Vicente, João B.; Pinto, Liliana; Romão, Célia V.; Frazão, Carlos; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro; Teixeira, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) are a family of enzymes endowed with bona fide oxygen- and/or nitric-oxide reductase activity, although their substrate specificity determinants remain elusive. After a comprehensive comparison of available three-dimensional structures, particularly of FDPs with a clear preference toward either O2 or NO, two main differences were identified near the diiron active site, which led to the construction of site-directed mutants of Tyr271 and Lys53 in the oxygen reducing Entamoeba histolytica EhFdp1. The biochemical and biophysical properties of these mutants were studied by UV-visible and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopies coupled to potentiometry. Their reactivity with O2 and NO was analyzed by stopped-flow absorption spectroscopy and amperometric methods. These mutations, whereas keeping the overall properties of the redox cofactors, resulted in increased NO reductase activity and faster inactivation of the enzyme in the reaction with O2, pointing to a role of the mutated residues in substrate selectivity. PMID:25151360

  18. A high-throughput assay format for determination of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase enzyme activities

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, N.; Liu, Xiang Yang; Choudary, P.V.

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe a microplate-based high-throughput procedure for rapid assay of the enzyme activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase, using extremely small volumes of reagents. The new procedure offers the advantages of rapidity, small sample size-nanoliter volumes, low cost, and a dramatic increase in the throughput sample number that can be analyzed simultaneously. Additional advantages can be accessed by using microplate reader application software packages that permit assigning a group type to the wells, recording of the data on exportable data files and exercising the option of using the kinetic or endpoint reading modes. The assay can also be used independently for detecting nitrite residues/contamination in environmental/food samples. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Transcripts of anthocyanidin reductase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase and measurement of catechin and epicatechin in tartary buckwheat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, Yeji; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  20. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Bok; Thwe, Aye Aye; Kim, YeJi; Li, Xiaohua; Cho, Jin Woong; Park, Phun Bum; Valan Arasu, Mariadhas; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Kim, Sun-Ju; Suzuki, Tastsuro; Hyun Jho, Kwang; Park, Sang Un

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR) play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs) such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions. PMID:24605062

  1. Chaperone properties of Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Renée; Malki, Abderrahim; Holmgren, Arne; Richarme, Gilbert

    2003-01-01

    Thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase and NADPH form the thioredoxin system and are the major cellular protein disulphide reductase. We report here that Escherichia coli thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase interact with unfolded and denatured proteins, in a manner similar to that of molecular chaperones that are involved in protein folding and protein renaturation after stress. Thioredoxin and/or thioredoxin reductase promote the functional folding of citrate synthase and alpha-glucosidase after urea denaturation. They also promote the functional folding of the bacterial galactose receptor, a protein without any cysteines. Furthermore, redox cycling of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase in the presence of NADPH and cystine stimulates the renaturation of the galactose receptor, suggesting that the thioredoxin system functions like a redox-powered chaperone machine. Thioredoxin reductase prevents the aggregation of citrate synthase under heat-shock conditions. It forms complexes that are more stable than those formed by thioredoxin with several unfolded proteins such as reduced carboxymethyl alpha-lactalbumin and unfolded bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor. These results suggest that the thioredoxin system, in addition to its protein disulphide isomerase activity possesses chaperone-like properties, and that its thioredoxin reductase component plays a major role in this function. PMID:12549977

  2. Ribonucleotide reductase metallocofactor: assembly, maintenance and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Caiguo; LIU, Guoqi; HUANG, Mingxia

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) supplies cellular deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates (dNTP) pools by converting ribonucleotides to the corresponding deoxy forms using radical-based chemistry. Eukaryotic RNR comprises α and β subunits: α contains the catalytic and allosteric sites; β houses a diferric-tyrosyl radical cofactor (FeIII2-Y•) that is required to initiates nucleotide reduction in α. Cells have evolved multi-layered mechanisms to regulate RNR level and activity in order to maintain the adequate sizes and ratios of their dNTP pools to ensure high-fidelity DNA replication and repair. The central role of RNR in nucleotide metabolism also makes it a proven target of chemotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the function and regulation of eukaryotic RNRs, with a focus on studies revealing the cellular machineries involved in RNR metallocofactor biosynthesis and its implication in RNR-targeting therapeutics. PMID:24899886

  3. Dynamics of trimethoprim bound to dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Searle, M.S.; Forster, M.J.; Birdsall, B.; Roberts, G.C.K.; Feeney, J.; Cheung, H.T.A.; Kompis, I.; Geddes, A.J. )

    1988-06-01

    The conformation of a small molecule in its binding site on a protein is a major factor in the specificity of the interaction between them. In this paper, the authors report the use of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy to study the fluctuations in conformation of the anti-bacterial drug trimethoprim when it is bound to its target, dihydrofolate reductase. {sup 13}C relaxation measurements reveal dihedral angle changes of {plus minus}25{degree} to {plus minus}35{degree} on the subnanosecond time scale, while {sup 13}C line-shape analysis demonstrates dihedral angle changes of at least {plus minus}65{degree} on the millisecond time scale. {sup 1}H NMR shows that a specific hydrogen bond between the inhibitor and enzyme, which is believed to make an important contribution to binding, makes and breaks rapidly at room temperature.

  4. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    PubMed

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  5. The cytochrome bd respiratory oxygen reductases

    PubMed Central

    Borisov, Vitaliy B.; Gennis, Robert B.; Hemp, James; Verkhovsky, Michael I.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cytochrome bd is a respiratory quinol:O2 oxidoreductase found in many prokaryotes, including a number of pathogens. The main bioenergetic function of the enzyme is the production of a proton motive force by the vectorial charge transfer of protons. The sequences of cytochromes bd are not homologous to those of the other respiratory oxygen reductases, i.e., the heme-copper oxygen reductases or alternative oxidases (AOX). Generally, cytochromes bd are noteworthy for their high affinity for O2 and resistance to inhibition by cyanide. In E. coli, for example, cytochrome bd (specifically, cytochrome bd-I) is expressed under O2-limited conditions. Among the members of the bd-family are the so-called cyanide-insensitive quinol oxidases (CIO) which often have a low content of the eponymous heme d but, instead, have heme b in place of heme d in at least a majority of the enzyme population. However, at this point, no sequence motif has been identified to distinguish cytochrome bd (with a stoichiometric complement of heme d) from an enzyme designated as CIO. Members of the bd-family can be subdivided into those which contain either a long or a short hydrophilic connection between transmembrane helices 6 and 7 in subunit I, designated as the Q-loop. However, it is not clear whether there is a functional consequence of this difference. This review summarizes current knowledge on the physiological functions, genetics, structural and catalytic properties of cytochromes bd. Included in this review are descriptions of the intermediates of the catalytic cycle, the proposed site for the reduction of O2, evidence for a proton channel connecting this active site to the bacterial cytoplasm, and the molecular mechanism by which a membrane potential is generated. PMID:21756872

  6. Molecular evolution of nitrate reductase genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Kleinhofs, A

    1996-04-01

    To understand the evolutionary mechanisms and relationships of nitrate reductases (NRs), the nucleotide sequences encoding 19 nitrate reductase (NR) genes from 16 species of fungi, algae, and higher plants were analyzed. The NR genes examined show substantial sequence similarity, particularly within functional domains, and large variations in GC content at the third codon position and intron number. The intron positions were different between the fungi and plants, but conserved within these groups. The overall and nonsynonymous substitution rates among fungi, algae, and higher plants were estimated to be 4.33 x 10(-10) and 3.29 x 10(-10) substitutions per site per year. The three functional domains of NR genes evolved at about one-third of the rate of the N-terminal and the two hinge regions connecting the functional domains. Relative rate tests suggested that the nonsynonymous substitution rates were constant among different lineages, while the overall nucleotide substitution rates varied between some lineages. The phylogenetic trees based on NR genes correspond well with the phylogeny of the organisms determined from systematics and other molecular studies. Based on the nonsynonymous substitution rate, the divergence time of monocots and dicots was estimated to be about 340 Myr when the fungi-plant or algae-higher plant divergence times were used as reference points and 191 Myr when the rice-barley divergence time was used as a reference point. These two estimates are consistent with other estimates of divergence times based on these reference points. The lack of consistency between these two values appears to be due to the uncertainty of the reference times. PMID:8642612

  7. Partial purification and some properties of a latent CO2 reductase from green potato tuber chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Ramaswamy, N K; Nair, P M

    1985-12-16

    We have partially purified the CO2 reductase, present in green potato tuber chloroplasts, as a latent form. Illumination of the chloroplasts in the absence of substrate, bicarbonate, activated the enzyme, which could then be obtained in soluble forms. Purification of the enzyme was achieved by (NH4)2SO4 fractionation (0-30%) and adsorption and elution from a DEAE-Sephadex A-50 column. The final preparation showed 15-fold purification and 50% recovery of the activity. The pH optimum for CO2 reductase was 8.0. Hepes and Tricine buffers showed maximum activity whereas Tris/phosphate or borate failed to show any activity. The enzyme reaction was sensitive to the presence of metal ions like Fe3+, Hg2+, Cu2+, Mo6+ and Zn2+, however, a threefold activation was observed with Fe2+. The metal requirement for CO2 reductase was evident from the observed inhibition by metal chelators like o-phenanthroline, alpha, alpha'-dipyridyl, bathocuproine, 8-hydroxyquinoline etc. Out of these o-phenanthroline was the strongest inhibitor and its concentration for 50% inhibition was 40 microM. The presence of Fe2+ ions in the reaction mixture protected the enzyme from heat denaturation upto 50 degrees C. Maximum enzyme activity was observed at 15 degrees C. The enzyme activity showed a 30-s lag period and the maximum was reached in 90 s. Supplementation of sodium dithionite in the reaction activated enzyme activity threefold, suggesting involvement of dithiol groups in the catalytic activity. There was strong inhibition by -SH inhibitors like 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) and N-ethylmaleimide and -SH reagents like dithiothreitol, 2-mercaptoethanol and cysteine. Various nucleotide coenzyme tried inhibited the enzyme strongly. PMID:3841062

  8. Carboxylation mechanism and stereochemistry of crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, a carboxylating enoyl-thioester reductase

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Tobias J.; Brecht, Volker; Fuchs, Georg; Müller, Michael; Alber, Birgit E.

    2009-01-01

    Chemo- and stereoselective reductions are important reactions in chemistry and biology, and reductases from biological sources are increasingly applied in organic synthesis. In contrast, carboxylases are used only sporadically. We recently described crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase, which catalyzes the reduction of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA but also the reductive carboxylation of (E)-crotonyl-CoA to ethylmalonyl-CoA. In this study, the complete stereochemical course of both reactions was investigated in detail. The pro-(4R) hydrogen of NADPH is transferred in both reactions to the re face of the C3 position of crotonyl-CoA. In the course of the carboxylation reaction, carbon dioxide is incorporated in anti fashion at the C2 atom of crotonyl-CoA. For the reduction reaction that yields butyryl-CoA, a solvent proton is added in anti fashion instead of the CO2. Amino acid sequence analysis showed that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase is a member of the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and shares the same phylogenetic origin. The stereospecificity of the hydride transfer from NAD(P)H within this superfamily is highly conserved, although the substrates and reduction reactions catalyzed by its individual representatives differ quite considerably. Our findings led to a reassessment of the stereospecificity of enoyl(-thioester) reductases and related enzymes with respect to their amino acid sequence, revealing a general pattern of stereospecificity that allows the prediction of the stereochemistry of the hydride transfer for enoyl reductases of unknown specificity. Further considerations on the reaction mechanism indicated that crotonyl-CoA carboxylase/reductase may have evolved from enoyl-CoA reductases. This may be useful for protein engineering of enoyl reductases and their application in biocatalysis. PMID:19458256

  9. Solubilization and Resolution of the Membrane-Bound Nitrite Reductase from Paracoccus Halodenitrificans into Nitrite and Nitric Oxide Reductases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Michael A.; Cronin, Sonja E.; Hochstein, Lawrence I.

    1984-01-01

    Membranes prepared from Paracoccus halodenitrificans reduced nitrite or nitric oxide to nitrous oxide. Extraction of these membranes with the detergent CHAPSO [3-(3-Chlolamidoporopyldimethylammonio)-1-(2- hydroxy-1-propanesulfonate)], followed by ammonium sulfate fractionation of the solubilized proteins, resulted in the separation of nitrite and nitric oxide reductase activities. The fraction containing nitrite reductase activity spectrally resembled a cd-type cytochrome. Several cytochromes were detected in the nitric oxide reductase fraction. Which, if any, of these cytochromes is associated with the reduction of nitric oxide is not clear at this time.

  10. FAD binding, cobinamide binding and active site communication in the corrin reductase (CobR)

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Taylor, Samantha L.; Scott, Alan; Rowe, Michelle L.; Johnson, Christopher M.; Rigby, Stephen E. J.; Geeves, Michael A.; Pickersgill, Richard W.; Howard, Mark J.; Warren, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Adenosylcobalamin, the coenzyme form of vitamin B12, is one Nature's most complex coenzyme whose de novo biogenesis proceeds along either an anaerobic or aerobic metabolic pathway. The aerobic synthesis involves reduction of the centrally chelated cobalt metal ion of the corrin ring from Co(II) to Co(I) before adenosylation can take place. A corrin reductase (CobR) enzyme has been identified as the likely agent to catalyse this reduction of the metal ion. Herein, we reveal how Brucella melitensis CobR binds its coenzyme FAD (flavin dinucleotide) and we also show that the enzyme can bind a corrin substrate consistent with its role in reduction of the cobalt of the corrin ring. Stopped-flow kinetics and EPR reveal a mechanistic asymmetry in CobR dimer that provides a potential link between the two electron reduction by NADH to the single electron reduction of Co(II) to Co(I). PMID:24909839

  11. COMPARISON OF THE METHYL REDUCTASE GENES AND GENE PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The DNA sequences encoding component C of methyl coenzyme M reductase (mcr genes) in Methanothermus fervidus, Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, Methanococcus vannielii, and Methanosarcina barkeri have been published. omparisons of transcription initiation and termination site...

  12. Structural features of the ribonucleotide reductase of Aujeszky's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, A V; Boldogköi, Z; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    A gene construct of the Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) genome was prepared and the DNA fragment encoding the ribonucleotide reductase was structurally characterized. We determined the entire DNA sequence of two adjacent open reading frames of the ribonucleotide reductase genes with the intergenic sequence of nine base pairs. From the sequence analysis we predict that Aujeszky's disease virus encodes a ribonucleotide reductase which comprises two polypeptides--large and small subunits, with sizes of 835 and 303 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the large and small subunits of the Aujeszky's disease virus ribonucleotide reductase have been compared with that of other herpesviruses, and structural features of both proteins have been characterized. PMID:7810419

  13. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  14. Anti-HMG-CoA Reductase, Antioxidant, and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Amaranthus viridis Leaf Extract as a Potential Treatment for Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Salvamani, Shamala; Gunasekaran, Baskaran; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Sabullah, Mohd Khalizan

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress are believed to contribute to the pathology of several chronic diseases including hypercholesterolemia (elevated levels of cholesterol in blood) and atherosclerosis. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed as synthetic drugs, such as statins, which are known to cause adverse effects on the liver and muscles. Amaranthus viridis (A. viridis) has been used from ancient times for its supposedly medically beneficial properties. In the current study, different parts of A. viridis (leaf, stem, and seed) were evaluated for potential anti-HMG-CoA reductase, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. The putative HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity of A. viridis extracts at different concentrations was determined spectrophotometrically by NADPH oxidation, using HMG-CoA as substrate. A. viridis leaf extract revealed the highest HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory effect at about 71%, with noncompetitive inhibition in Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis. The leaf extract showed good inhibition of hydroperoxides, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO), and ferric ion radicals in various concentrations. A. viridis leaf extract was proven to be an effective inhibitor of hyaluronidase, lipoxygenase, and xanthine oxidase enzymes. The experimental data suggest that A. viridis leaf extract is a source of potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent and may modulate cholesterol metabolism by inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. PMID:27051453

  15. 1,8-Dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-Melanin Biosynthesis Inhibitors Increase Erythritol Production in Torula corallina, and DHN-Melanin Inhibits Erythrose Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Kul; Jung, Hyung-Moo; Kim, Sang-Yong

    2003-01-01

    The yeast Torula corallina is a strong erythritol producer that is used in the industrial production of erythritol. However, melanin accumulation during culture represents a serious problem for the purification of erythritol from the fermentation broth. Melanin biosynthesis inhibitors such as 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 1,8-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin inhibitors were added to the T. corallina cultures. Only the DHN-melanin inhibitors showed an effect on melanin production, which suggests that the melanin formed during the culturing of T. corallina is derived from DHN. This finding was confirmed by the detection of a shunt product of the pentaketide pathway, flaviolin, and elemental analysis. Among the DHN-melanin inhibitors, tricyclazole was the most effective. Supplementation with tricyclazole enhanced the production of erythritol while significantly inhibiting the production of DHN-melanin and DHN-melanin biosynthetic enzymes, such as trihydroxynaphthalene reductase. The erythrose reductase from T. corallina was purified to homogeneity by ion-exchange and affinity chromatography. Purified erythrose reductase was significantly inhibited in vitro in a noncompetitive manner by elevated levels of DHN-melanin. In contrast, the level of erythrose reductase activity was unaffected by increasing concentrations of tricyclazole. These results suggest that supplemental tricyclazole reduces the production of DHN-melanin, which may lead to a reduction in the inhibition of erythrose reductase and a higher yield of erythritol. This is the first report to demonstrate that melanin biosynthesis inhibitors increase the production of a sugar alcohol in T. corallina. PMID:12788746

  16. Low doses of mercuric chloride cause the main features of anti-nucleolar autoimmunity in female outbred CFW mice.

    PubMed

    Arefieva, Alla S; Kamaeva, Alfia G; Krasilshchikova, Marina S

    2016-09-01

    The growth of the influence of anthropogenic factors aimed on the improvement of human life has its side effect, for example, living organisms receive increasing exposure to toxic mercuric compounds. Experimental data show that mercury (Hg) salts are able to induce systemic autoimmunity in rodents. This Hg-induced autoimmune process (HgIA) is characterized by T cell-dependent polyclonal activation of B lymphocytes, increased level of serum immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and immunoglobulin E (IgE), production of antinucleolar autoantibodies (ANoA), and immune complex deposition in multiple organs. HgIA in mice is used as a model of human systemic autoimmune disorders. However, the dose of mercuric chloride (HgCl2) usually used in laboratory mice to induce HgIA is above the allowable limit for everyday levels of Hg exposure in humans. So, we decided to determine the lowest dose of HgCl2 that is able to trigger autoimmunity in outbred Carworth Farms Swiss Webster (CFW) mice not genetically prone to HgIA development. The lowest dose (50 µg/kg body weight (b.w.)/week) was chosen to match the World Health Organization provisional weekly tolerable intake of total Hg for humans. We also tested HgCl2 at 500 and 1500 µg/kg b.w./week (6.5- and 2-fold less than usually used for induction of HgIA in mice). We found that even the lowest dose of Hg resulted in a statistically significant increase in serum level of IgG1 after 8 weeks of treatment. HgCl2 in doses 500 and 1500 µg/kg b.w./week resulted in a significant increase in serum level of IgG1 after 4 weeks of treatment, followed by ANoA production. Sera of HgCl2-treated mice stained the regions in which the major autoantigen in HgIA, fibrillarin, was revealed. These results suggest that low doses of Hg are able to induce the main features of HgIA in genetically heterozygous mice, and that humans chronically exposed to low doses of Hg may be at risk of autoimmunity induction regardless of their genetic background. PMID:25765285

  17. Comparative anatomy of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Jez, J M; Bennett, M J; Schlegel, B P; Lewis, M; Penning, T M

    1997-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductases metabolize a wide range of substrates and are potential drug targets. This protein superfamily includes aldose reductases, aldehyde reductases, hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and dihydrodiol dehydrogenases. By combining multiple sequence alignments with known three-dimensional structures and the results of site-directed mutagenesis studies, we have developed a structure/function analysis of this superfamily. Our studies suggest that the (alpha/beta)8-barrel fold provides a common scaffold for an NAD(P)(H)-dependent catalytic activity, with substrate specificity determined by variation of loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel. All the aldo-keto reductases are dependent on nicotinamide cofactors for catalysis and retain a similar cofactor binding site, even among proteins with less than 30% amino acid sequence identity. Likewise, the aldo-keto reductase active site is highly conserved. However, our alignments indicate that variation ofa single residue in the active site may alter the reaction mechanism from carbonyl oxidoreduction to carbon-carbon double-bond reduction, as in the 3-oxo-5beta-steroid 4-dehydrogenases (Delta4-3-ketosteroid 5beta-reductases) of the superfamily. Comparison of the proposed substrate binding pocket suggests residues 54 and 118, near the active site, as possible discriminators between sugar and steroid substrates. In addition, sequence alignment and subsequent homology modelling of mouse liver 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and rat ovary 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase indicate that three loops on the C-terminal side of the barrel play potential roles in determining the positional and stereo-specificity of the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases. Finally, we propose that the aldo-keto reductase superfamily may represent an example of divergent evolution from an ancestral multifunctional oxidoreductase and an example of convergent evolution to the same active-site constellation as the short

  18. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems. PMID:8694757

  19. Low apparent aldose reductase activity produced by monosaccharide autoxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, S P; Crabbe, M J

    1985-01-01

    Low apparent aldose reductase activity, as measured by NADPH oxidation, can be produced by the spontaneous autoxidation of monosaccharides. NADPH is oxidized to metabolically active NADP+ in a solution of autoxidizing DL-glyceraldehyde at rates of up to 15 X 10(-4) A340/min. The close parallelism between the effects of buffer salt type and concentration, monosaccharide structure and temperature activation on autoxidation and NADPH oxidation imply that autoxidation is a prerequisite for the NADPH oxidation, probably via the hydroperoxy radical. Nucleotide-binding proteins enhanced NADPH oxidation induced by DL-glyceraldehyde, up to 10.6-fold with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. Glutathione reductase-catalysed NADPH oxidation in the presence of autoxidizing monosaccharide showed many characteristics of the aldose reductase reaction. Aldose reductase inhibitors acted as antioxidants in inhibiting this NADPH oxidation. These results indicate that low apparent aldose reductase activities may be due to artifacts of monosaccharide autoxidation, and could provide an explanation for the non-linear steady-state kinetics observed with DL-glyceraldehyde and aldose reductase. PMID:2985042

  20. Reaction mechanism and regulation of mammalian thioredoxin/glutathione reductase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qi-An; Su, Dan; Novoselov, Sergey V; Carlson, Bradley A; Hatfield, Dolph L; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2005-11-01

    Thioredoxin/glutathione reductase (TGR) is a recently discovered member of the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase family in mammals. In contrast to two other mammalian thioredoxin reductases, it contains an N-terminal glutaredoxin domain and exhibits a wide spectrum of enzyme activities. To elucidate the reaction mechanism and regulation of TGR, we prepared a recombinant mouse TGR in the selenoprotein form as well as various mutants and individual domains of this enzyme. Using these proteins, we showed that the glutaredoxin and thioredoxin reductase domains of TGR could independently catalyze reactions normally associated with each domain. The glutaredoxin domain is a monothiol glutaredoxin containing a CxxS motif at the active site, which could receive electrons from either the thioredoxin reductase domain of TGR or thioredoxin reductase 1. We also found that the C-terminal penultimate selenocysteine was required for transfer of reducing equivalents from the thiol/disulfide active site of TGR to the glutaredoxin domain. Thus, the physiologically relevant NADPH-dependent activities of TGR were dependent on this residue. In addition, we examined the effects of selenium levels in the diet and perturbations in selenocysteine tRNA function on TGR biosynthesis and found that expression of this protein was regulated by both selenium and tRNA status in liver, but was more resistant to this regulation in testes. PMID:16262253

  1. Effects of thioredoxin reductase-1 deletion on embryogenesis and transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Bondareva, Alla A.; Capecchi, Mario R.; Iverson, Sonya V.; Li, Yan; Lopez, Nathan I.; Lucas, Olivier; Merrill, Gary F.; Prigge, Justin R.; Siders, Ashley M.; Wakamiya, Maki; Wallin, Stephanie L.; Schmidt, Edward E.

    2007-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductases (Txnrd)1 maintain intracellular redox homeostasis in most organisms. Metazoans Txnrds also participate in signal transduction. Mouse embryos homozygous for a targeted null mutation of the txnrd1 gene, encoding the cytosolic thioredoxin reductase, were viable at embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) but not at E9.5. Histology revealed that txnrd1−/− cells were capable of proliferation and differentiation; however, mutant embryos were smaller than wild-type littermates and failed to gastrulate. In situ marker gene analyses indicated primitive streak mesoderm did not form. Microarray analyses on E7.5 txnrd−/− and txnrd+/+ littermates showed similar mRNA levels for peroxiredoxins, glutathione reductases, mitochondrial Txnrd2, and most markers of cell proliferation. Conversely, mRNAs encoding sulfiredoxin, IGF-binding protein 1, carbonyl reductase 3, glutamate cysteine ligase, glutathione S-transferases, and metallothioneins were more abundant in mutants. Many gene expression responses mirrored those in thioredoxin reductase 1-null yeast; however mice exhibited a novel response within the peroxiredoxin catalytic cycle. Thus, whereas yeast induce peroxiredoxin mRNAs in response to thioredoxin reductase disruption, mice induced sulfiredoxin mRNA. In summary, Txnrd1 was required for correct patterning of the early embryo and progression to later development. Conserved responses to Txnrd1 disruption likely allowed proliferation and limited differentiation of the mutant embryo cells. PMID:17697936

  2. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  3. Regulation of the Neurospora crassa assimilatory nitrate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ketchum, P A; Zeeb, D D; Owens, M S

    1977-01-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-nitrate reductase from Neurospora crassa was purified and found to be stimulated by certain amino acids, citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). Stimulation by citrate and the amino acids was dependent upon the prior removal of EDTA from the enzyme preparations, since low quantities of EDTA resulted in maximal stimulation. Removal of EDTA from enzyme preparations by dialysis against Chelex-containing buffer resulted in a loss of nitrate reductase activity. Addition of alanine, arginine, glycine, glutamine, glutamate, histidine, tryptophan, and citrate restored and stimulated nitrate reductase activity from 29- to 46-fold. The amino acids tested altered the Km of NADPH-nitrate reductase for NADPH but did not significantly change that for nitrate. The Km of nitrate reductase for NADPH increased with increasing concentrations of histidine but decreased with increasing concentrations of glutamine. Amino acid modulation of NADPH-nitrate reductase activity is discussed in relation to the conservation of energy (NADPH) by Neurospora when nitrate is the nitrogen source. PMID:19423

  4. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  5. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and diabetic mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  6. Aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Xanthium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ha Na; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-09-01

    As part of our ongoing search for natural sources of therapeutic and preventive agents for diabetic complications, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of components of the fruit of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) on aldose reductase (AR) and galactitol formation in rat lenses with high levels of glucose. To identify the bioactive components of X. strumarium, 7 caffeoylquinic acids and 3 phenolic compounds were isolated and their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with published data. The abilities of 10 X. strumarium-derived components to counteract diabetic complications were investigated by means of inhibitory assays with rat lens AR (rAR) and recombinant human AR (rhAR). From the 10 isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed the most potent inhibition, with IC₅₀ values of 0.30 and 0.67 μM for rAR and rhAR, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed competitive inhibition of rhAR. Furthermore, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate inhibited galactitol formation in the rat lens and in erythrocytes incubated with a high concentration of glucose, indicating that this compound may be effective in preventing diabetic complications. PMID:23604720

  7. Measurement of the characteristic X ray of oxygen and other ultrasoft X rays using mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, J. S.; Dabrowski, A. J.; Huth, G. C.; Economou, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    This letter reports the detection and resolution of the characteristic X-ray of oxygen at 523 eV and other ultrasoft X-rays (photons energy less than 1 keV) using radiation detectors fabricated from the compound semi-insulator mercuric iodide (HgI2). These detectors are capable of operation at room ambient but in these experiments were slightly cooled using a Peltier element to 0 C. A pulsed light feedback preamplifier with a Peltier element cooled (to -30 deg) first stage field-effect transistor was used to amplify signals from the detector. Overall system noise level was 185 eV (full width at half-maximum) limited by the temperature of the first stage field-effect transistor. With optimal cooling of this element the characteristic X-ray of carbon at 282 eV should be measurable. These results would seem to be important in measurement of biological samples in electron column instruments.

  8. Performance of room temperature mercuric iodide /HgI2/ detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabrowski, A. J.; Barton, J. B.; Huth, G. C.; Whited, R.; Ortale, C.; Economou, T. E.; Turkevich, A. L.; Iwanczyk, J. S.

    1981-02-01

    Experiments have been done to study the performance of mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors in the ultralow-energy X-ray region. Energy resolution values of 245 eV (FWHM) for the Mg K-alpha X-ray line at 1.25 keV and 225 eV (FWHM) for the electronic noise linewidth have been obtained for an HgI2 detector with painted carbon contacts using a pulsed-light feedback preamplifier; the whole system was operated at room temperature. The resolution values in the ultralow-energy region are still limited by electronic noise of the system. In an attempt to minimize X-ray attenuation in the front contact, detectors were prepared with thin evaporated Pd contacts. These detectors show a pronounced low-energy tailing of the photopeak below a few keV, in contrast to the spectra obtained by detectors with carbon contact. An attempt has been made to explain the tailing effect starting with models wich have been proposed to describe similar effects in Ge detectors.

  9. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel).

    PubMed

    Copan, Lori; Fowles, Jeff; Barreau, Tracy; McGee, Nancy

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users' homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m³ of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m³. Mercury contamination of cream users' homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment. PMID:26364641

  10. Mercury Toxicity and Contamination of Households from the Use of Skin Creams Adulterated with Mercurous Chloride (Calomel)

    PubMed Central

    Copan, Lori; Fowles, Jeff; Barreau, Tracy; McGee, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic mercury, in the form of mercurous chloride, or calomel, is intentionally added to some cosmetic products sold through informal channels in Mexico and the US for skin lightening and acne treatment. These products have led to multiple cases of mercury poisoning but few investigations have addressed the contamination of cream users’ homes. We report on several cases of mercury poisoning among three Mexican-American families in California from use of mercury-containing skin creams. Each case resulted in widespread household contamination and secondary contamination of family members. Urine mercury levels in cream users ranged from 37 to 482 µg/g creatinine and in non-users from non-detectable to 107 µg/g creatinine. Air concentrations of up to 8 µg/m3 of mercury within homes exceeded the USEPA/ATSDR health-based guidance and action level of <1.0 μg/m3. Mercury contamination of cream users’ homes presented a multi-pathway exposure environment to residents. Homes required extensive decontamination, including disposal of most household items, to achieve acceptable air levels. The acceptable air levels used were not designed to consider multi-pathway exposure scenarios. These findings support that the calomel is able to change valence form to elemental mercury and volatilize once exposed to the skin or surfaces in the indoor environment. PMID:26364641