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1

Mercury  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury.

Vilas, F.; Chapman, C.R.; Matthews, M.S.

1988-01-01

2

Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site offers information on the planet Mercury. Some topics include: the atmosphere, surface, and interior of Mercury, missions to Mercury, recent discoveries, and myths and culture related to Mercury. There are also numerous pictures and additional websites to find more information.

2005-06-07

3

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

Mercury is an element that is found in air, water and soil. It has several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If ... with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic mercury is used ...

4

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... Releases and Spills Fish Consumption Advice Consumer Products Mercury News September 2014 – EPA has proposed effluent limitation ... 2014 press release News Archive Minimata Convention on Mercury EPA web page on the Minimata Convention United ...

5

Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lithograph shows mosaic images of Mercury, captured by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. The images are accompanied by a brief description and history, some statistical facts, and a list of significant dates in the exploration of Mercury.

6

[Determination of arsenic, mercury and selenium in Gynostemma pentaphyllum and rhizospheric soil samples collected from different regions by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry].  

PubMed

The contents of arsenic (As), mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) in Gynostemma pentaphyllum and rhizospheric soil samples collected from seven provinces were determined, through the optimization of the hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry working conditions. The results show that: the contents of As, Hg and Se in Gynostemma pentaphyllum from seven provinces revealed large differences, but compared with the limits of the two kinds of heavy metal element: As and Hg set by the Green Trade Standards of Importing & Exporting Medicinal Plants & Preparations (As < or = 2.0 mg x kg(-1), Hg < or = 0.2 mg kg(-1)), the As and Hg contents in Gynostemma pentaphyllum samples are both lower than them. The Se content in Gynostemma pentaphyllum samples and in rhizospheric soil samples revealed significant correlation, and as a result, the Gynostemma pentaphyllum from the Fu Xi area Enshi in Hu Bei province had obviously higher Se content than others in the 6 provinces. From this study, a preliminary conclusion can be drawn that Se in Gynostemma pentaphyllum is mainly from the soil, moreover, the As and Hg show the difference from Se, possibly they are still affected by the dry and wet deposition of atmospheric aerosols. PMID:22582659

Wang, Jing; Xiao, Ya-ping; Liang, Xiao-qing; Shao, Xian-hui; Zhang, Ke

2012-03-01

7

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... enters the air from mining ore deposits, burning coal and waste, and from manufacturing plants. It enters ... to cause cancer? There are inadequate human cancer data available for all forms of mercury. Mercuric chloride ...

8

Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) planet profile provides data and images of the planet Mercury. These data include planet size, distance from the Sun, rotation and revolution times, temperature, atmospheric composition, density, and albedo. Images of the planet include general surface features such as crater basins, the Caloris Basin, and other images taken by the Mariner 10 spacecraft.

9

Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

New findings on the environmental fate of Hg indicate that lakes can be contaminated by long distance transport on mercury vapor in the atmosphere and that higher levels of Me Hg in fish are associated with acidification of lakes and with the creation of hydroelectric reservoirs. Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the disposition and metabolism of

Thomes W. Clarkson

1989-01-01

10

Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is the least-explored planet except for Pluto. The Mariner 10 mission yielded much information about the planet, but raised new questions. Groundbased observations of the polar craters and atmosphere have also raised new questions. The Messenger mission will address many of these, but in order to maximize the return from this mission, a program of laboratory, observational, and theoretic

A. E. Potter; R. M. Killen; B. Hapke

2002-01-01

11

Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to the flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft, Mercury was the least investigated and most poorly known terrestrial planet (Kuiper 1970, Devine 1972). Observational difficulties caused by its proximity to the Sun as viewed from Earth caused the planet to remain a small, vague disk exhibiting little surface contrast or details, an object for which only three major facts were known: 1. its bulk density is similar to that of Venus and Earth, much greater than that of Mars and the Moon; 2. its surface reflects electromagnetic radiation at all wavelengths in the same manner as the Moon (taking into account differences in their solar distances); and 3. its rotation period is in 2/3 resonance with its orbital period. Images obtained during the flyby by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 (and the two subsequent flybys on 21 September 1974 and 16 March 1975) revealed Mercury's surface in detail equivalent to that available for the Moon during the early 1960's from Earth-based telescopic views. Additionally, however, information was obtained on the planet's mass and size, atmospheric composition and density, charged-particle environment, and infrared thermal radiation from the surface, and most significantly of all, the existence of a planetary magnetic field that is probably intrinsic to Mercury was established. In the following, this new information is summarized together with results from theoretical studies and ground-based observations. In the quantum jumps of knowledge that have been characteristic of "space-age" exploration, the previously obscure body of Mercury has suddenly come into sharp focus. It is very likely a differentiated body, probably contains a large Earth-like iron-rich core, and displays a surface remarkably similar to that of the Moon, which suggests a similar evolutionary history.

Gault, D. E.; Burns, J. A.; Cassen, P.; Strom, R. G.

1977-01-01

12

Hydride compositions  

DOEpatents

Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung, W.

1994-01-01

13

Selenium hydride atomization, fate of free atoms and spectroscopic temperature in miniature diffusion flame atomizer studied by atomic absorption spectrometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanism of hydride atomization and the fate of free atoms was investigated in the miniature diffusion flame. Selenium hydride was used as a model for the other hydrides. Mercury vapor was employed as an analyte to study physical processes, such as macroscopic movements and free atom diffusion, controlling the distribution of free analyte atoms in the observation volume, separately

J. Dedina; A. D'Ulivo; L. Lampugnani; T. Matoušek; R. Zamboni

1998-01-01

14

Modelling of hydride cracking  

SciTech Connect

Zirconium alloys may be susceptible to hydride formation under certain service conditions, due to hydrogen diffusion and precipitation in the presence of stress concentrations and temperature gradients. The inhomogeneous brittle hydride platelets that form are modeled as plane defects of zero thickness, with fracture toughness less than that of the matrix. A fracture criterion based on sufficient energy and stress is proposed for either delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under constant loading conditions, or hydride cracking at rising loads, such as in a fracture toughness test. The fracture criterion is validated against available experimental data concerning initiation of hydride fracture in smooth specimens, and DHC in cracked specimens under various loading and temperature conditions.

Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R. [Ontario Hydro Technology, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Glinka, G.; Dubey, R.N. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-12-01

15

Multistage metal hydride compressor  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydride compressors can compress hydrogen to high pressures without using mechanical moving parts. They are particularly suited for tritium applications because they require minimal maintenance. A three-stage metal hydride compressor which can compress hydrogen from 14.7 to 20,000 psia has been demonstrated. The design principle and experimental results are presented.

Heung, L.K.

1986-01-01

16

Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

1987-01-01

17

Mechanically alloyed metal hydride systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mechanosynthesis of metal hydrides is a new field in which important progress has been reported. In this paper, we present recent developments in mechanosynthesis of magnesium-based hydrides for storage applications. The effect of intense milling on magnesium and magnesium hydrides is presented. The influence of various additives on hydrogen-sorption properties is discussed with special emphasis on nanocomposite MgH2+5 at.%V, where hydrogen-storage characteristics, cycling properties and the mechanism of hydrogen desorption are presented. The production of novel nanocrystalline porous structures by mechanical alloying followed by a leaching technique is discussed. Hot ball-milling, as a new method for rapid synthesis of alloys, is also presented. Finally, two other methods of production of metal hydrides are discussed. One is reactive milling where metal hydrides are synthesized by mechanical alloying under hydrogen pressure, while the other is milling elemental hydrides to produce complex hydrides.

Huot, J.; Liang, G.; Schulz, R.

2001-04-01

18

Mercury Quest  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this module, students pretend they have been hired as an environmental consulting firm to deliver testimony for the hearing to develop a mercury pollution reduction plan for the State. In order to accomplish this task their consulting company must: inventory and assess current sources of mercury pollution to the extent feasible, including both (fictitious) Ramford County and regional sources of mercury pollution; review the current science on mercury deposition, transport, and exposure pathways; review the current science on the impacts of mercury pollution on public health and ecosystems; review existing mercury pollution policies in other states and in the US; and review strategies for clean up and reduction of exposure to mercury.

19

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOEpatents

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, Moshe (Haifa, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Mendelsohn, Marshall H. (Woodridge, IL); Sheft, Irving (Oak Park, IL)

1981-01-01

20

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOEpatents

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

1980-01-21

21

17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

22

SFRSF: Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This South Florida Restoration Science Forum page discusses the problem with mercury in restoring habitats and ecosystems in southern Florida. This study looks at the origin of mercury in the water and atmosphere, and how Everglades restoration will affect mercury risks. Managing water quality and quantity to reduce risks, and understanding the food web to determine entry points and biomagnification are also discussed. Locations where mercury toxicity is above the healthy limit are identified. There are links for more information provided.

23

Hydrogenation using hydrides and acid  

DOEpatents

A process for the non-catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds, which contain at least one reducible functional group, which comprises reacting the organic compound, a hydride complex, preferably a transition metal hydride complex or an organosilane, and a strong acid in a liquid phase.

Bullock, R. Morris (Wading River, NY)

1990-10-30

24

Got Mercury?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/cu m in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting 30 days or less or 0.01 mg/cu m mercury vapor for exposures lasting more than 30 days. We also encourage the use of alternative devices that do not contain mercury.

Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

2009-01-01

25

Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.  

SciTech Connect

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

2006-11-01

26

Metal hydride-air battery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portable metal-hydride fueled fuel cell systems, producing regulated 28VDC output at 30 watts and 60 watts, have been built. The systems are easily refuelable with pellets of solid sodium aluminum hydride and water to generate hydrogen. Ambient air, supplied by natural convection, is the oxidant. The energy density approaches 960 watt-hours per pound of fuel. A power conditioning unit provides

M. Onischak; B. S. Baker

1975-01-01

27

Decomposition kinetics of plutonium hydride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kinetic data for decomposition of PuH⁠ââ provides insight into a possible mechanism for the hydriding and dehydriding reactions of plutonium. The fact that the rate of the hydriding reaction, K\\/sub H\\/, is proportional to P¹² and the rate of the dehydriding process, K\\/sub D\\/, is inversely proportional to P¹² suggests that the forward and reverse reactions proceed by opposite

J. M. Haschke; J. L. Stakebake

1979-01-01

28

Low density metal hydride foams  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

Maienschein, Jon L. (Oakland, CA); Barry, Patrick E. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1991-01-01

29

Hydrogen recovery with metal hydrides  

SciTech Connect

Air Products pursued hydride technology because hydrides first came to our attention as a unique technology which could safely store hydrogen. The preliminary economics for using available hydrides to store hydrogen in motor vehicles were not encouraging at that time. However, the possibilities for using hydrides to selectively separate hydrogen from other components occurred to us. The authors obtained a DOE contract to study metal alloys which could be used to effectively store hydrogen fuel in motor vehicles, an interest of DOE at that time. They concurrently continued independent studies on the use of hydrides for hydrogen separation. It became obvious during initial stages, that to develop hydride technology would require a partner with metallurgical background and facilities. They teamed up with MPD Technology, a wholly owned subsidiary of International Nickel. This joint R and D program has been in progress for the past three years. During this time it has taken this technology from a laboratory curiosity to a successful pilot unit currently operating at Air Products' New Orleans ammonia plant where it is selectively removing hydrogen from the ammonia purge gas stream.

Santangelo, J.G.; Chen, G.T.

1982-03-01

30

Mercury Thermometer Replacement Alternatives Thermometer Description Non-Mercury Non-Mercury Non-Mercury  

E-print Network

Mercury Thermometer Replacement Alternatives Length Thermometer Description Non-Mercury Non-Mercury Non-Mercury Range / Division VWR-Enviro-Safe® Fisherbrand® Brooklyn Thermometer Company Inc. Total/A #12;Mercury Thermometer Replacement Alternatives Length Thermometer Description Non-Mercury Non-Mercury

31

Bulk Hydrides and Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Zirconium alloys are susceptible to engineering problems associated with the uptake of hydrogen throughout their design lifetime in nuclear reactors. Understanding of hydrogen embrittlement associated with the precipitation of brittle hydride phases and a sub-critical crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is required to provide the engineering justifications for safe reactor operation. The nature of bulk zirconium hydrides at low concentrations (< 100 wt. ppm) is subject to several contradictory descriptions in the literature associated with the stability and metastability of gamma-phase zirconium hydride. Due to the differing volume expansions (12-17%) and crystallography between gamma and delta hydride phases, it is suggested that the matrix yield strength may have an effect on the phase stability. The present work indicated that although yield strength can shift the phase stability, other factors such as microstructure and phase distribution can be as or more important. This suggests that small material differences are the reason for the literature discrepancies. DHC is characterised by the repeated precipitation, growth, fracture of brittle hydride phases and subsequent crack arrest in the ductile metal. DHC growth is associated primarily the ability of hydrogen to diffuse under a stress induced chemical potential towards a stress raiser. Knowledge of the factors controlling DHC are paramount in being able to appropriately describe DHC for engineering purposes. Most studies characterise DHC upon cooling to the test temperature. DHC upon heating has not been extensively studied and the mechanism by which it occurs is somewhat controversial in the literature. This work shows that previous thermo-mechanical processing of hydrided zirconium can have a significant effect on the dissolution behaviour of the bulk hydride upon heating. DHC tests with gamma-quenched, furnace cooled-delta and reoriented bulk hydrides upon heating and DHC upon cooling suggest that the amount of hydrogen in solution is the primary factor controlling the occurrence of DHC and consistent with the postulation that the stress induced chemical potential is the driving force for DHC.

Tulk, Eric F.

32

Solar energy storage by metal hydride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metal hydride systems for long-term solar thermal energy storage are examined. Various materials for solar heat storage for architectural applications are reviewed, including water, pebble beds, insulators such as rock wool, glass wool and synthetic resins, molten salts and reaction heat storage systems, of which the metal hydride system is considered the most effective. The thermodynamics of metal hydride systems

S. Ono; M. Yamaguchi; T. Ohta

1979-01-01

33

Method of producing a chemical hydride  

DOEpatents

A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-11-13

34

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOEpatents

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, Leslie D. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01

35

Mercury: Health Effects  

MedlinePLUS

... toxicological profile for mercury . Top of page Elemental mercury effects Elemental (metallic) mercury primarily causes health effects ... 0370.htm . Top of page Effects of other mercury compounds (inorganic and organic) High exposures to inorganic ...

36

Got Mercury?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed through the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may be completely vaporized when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. Using an existing study, we estimated mercury vapor releases from lamps that are not in operation during missions lasting less than or equal to 30 days; whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from lamps that are operating or being used during missions lasing more than 30 days. Based on mercury toxicity, the Johnson Space Center's Toxicology Group recommends stringent safety controls and verifications for any hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting less than or equal to 30 days, or concentrations greater than 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting more than 30 days.

Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.; McCoy, Torin; Garcia, Hector

2010-01-01

37

Mercury Contamination  

PubMed Central

IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

Thompson, Marcella R.

2013-01-01

38

Mercury in Schools  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site explains the importance of mercury as a school and community issue and helps to identify where it is most likely to be found. There is information about online graduate courses for teachers on the environmental and health impacts of mercury; a Powerpoint presentation on mercury in schools; a mercury I.Q. test; and a mercury curriculum. The Taking Action section focuses on pollution prevention, spills and safety, mercury related legislation and school collection programs. There are also links to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency mercury programs and information on fish consumption advisories, mercury spill incident case studies, mercury collection programs and agency contact information for specific regions.

39

Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

Perry, J. L.

1988-09-01

40

Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

Perry, J. L.

1988-01-01

41

Mercury Calculator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive calculator produced by Teachers' Domain helps you determine the mercury levels in various types of fish, and enables you to make more informed choices about which fish are safe to eat and which should be avoided or eaten infrequently.

Foundation, Wgbh E.

2010-12-23

42

Mercury's Messenger  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury

Chapman, Clark R.

2004-01-01

43

Mercury's magnetosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

The presentation summarizes the current understanding of the structure and dynamics of the Mercury's magnetosphere. The planet possesses a small internal magnetic field, which is usually strong enough to stand off the solar wind stream at some altitude above the subsolar surface, resulting in a plasma cavity, that is, a magnetosphere around the planet. However, during strong storm intervals caused

H. Laakso

2003-01-01

44

Revealing Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size-frequency distribution suggest that smooth plains on Mercury's surface range in age from the end of the period of heavy impact bombardment to as young as perhaps 1 billion years; these ongoing measurements are helping to elucidate the volcanic history of the planet. Mercury's global tectonic history is also revealed by the MESSENGER image and laser altimeter data. Significant evidence for global contraction was seen in Mariner 10 images in the form of widespread lobate scarps. The MESSENGER images show that contractional features are the dominant tectonic landform globally, and the inferred average contractional strain is at least one third greater than previously inferred from Mariner 10 observations. Only three exceptions to the dominance of contractional deformation have been found to date: extensional troughs that include prominent basin-radial systems documented in two basins, the Pantheon Fossae within the 1500-km-diameter Caloris basin and a similar set of features within a newly-imaged 700-km-diameter basin, and a circumferential trough system within the smaller, younger Raditladi basin. That these extensional tectonic features are rare on Mercury, and that they are not seen within basins elsewhere in the Solar System, pose important constraints on the thermal and mechanical evolution of Mercury's interior.

Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

2009-04-01

45

Hydrogen /Hydride/-air secondary battery  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in a hydrogen-air secondary battery seems promising. However, in an unpressurized cell, more stable hydrides that LaNi5H6 must be selected. Partial substitutions of nickel by aluminium or manganese increase the stability of hydrides. Combined with an air reversible electrode, a specific energy close to 100 Wh/kg can be expected.

Sarradin, J.; Bronoel, G.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Achard, J. C.

1979-01-01

46

Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

1980-01-01

47

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOEpatents

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, L.D.

1980-03-13

48

Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

Thompson, W. W. (inventor)

1978-01-01

49

Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and beryllium hydride polymer  

E-print Network

Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and berylliumH and beryllium hydride Be2H4 . First, employing a Wannier-function-based approach, the systems are studiedH and the beryllium hydride polymer Be2H4 . As a simple, but due to its ionic character, non- trivial model polymer

Birkenheuer, Uwe

50

Lightweight hydrides for automotive storage of hydrogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary objectives of the considered investigations are related to the reduction of the dissociation temperature of lightweight materials, and the development of new lightweight hydrides containing little, if any, critical material. Attention is given to the characteristics of metal hydrides, the characteristics of a magnesium-base alloy which is to be employed in hydrogen storage systems for automobiles, aspects of alloy development, and the evaluation of magnesium hydride alloys with the aid of a hydride cycling rig. New information concerning the effect of cycling on magnesium alloys is discussed.

Rohy, D. A.; Nachman, J. F.; Argabright, T. A.

51

Mercury in the Environment  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Through hands-on activities, help your students understand the new EPA regulations on mercury emissions, identify a major human-related source of mercury in the environment and summarize the dangers of mercury in humans.

Jason McGraw (;)

2007-09-25

52

MERCURY IN TREE RINGS  

EPA Science Inventory

Contamination caused by release of mercury into the environment is a growing concern. This release occurs due to a variety of anthropogenic activities and natural sources. After release, mercury undergoes complicated chemical transformations. The inorganic forms of mercury releas...

53

Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface  

SciTech Connect

The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

2009-07-15

54

Mercury's MESSENGER  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A salient feature of our species is the impetus to explore. Now that most of our own planet is well explored, the Space Age has opened the heavens for our excursions. One of the most challenging space exploration missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury. This article outlines the scientists' current knowledge of the innermost planet and describes the MESSENGER spacecraft and mission.

Chapman, Clark R.

2004-03-01

55

Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application  

Microsoft Academic Search

Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride

J. L. Perry

1988-01-01

56

Magnesium hydride-promoted dearomatisation of pyridine.  

PubMed

Reaction of pyridine with well defined magnesium hydride species results in heterocycle dearomatisation by a hydride transfer which occurs with the formation of magnesium compounds containing 1,2- and 1,4-dihydropyridide anions as the respective kinetic and thermodynamic products. PMID:20959940

Hill, Michael S; MacDougall, Dugald J; Mahon, Mary F

2010-12-14

57

Mercury's Magnetosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Among the major discoveries made by the Mariner 10 mission to the inner planets was the existence of an intrinsic magnetic field at Mercury with a dipole moment of approx. 300 nT R(sup 3, sub M). This magnetic field is sufficient to stand off the solar wind at an altitude of about 1 R(sub M) (i.e. approx. 2439 km). Hence, Mercury possesses a 'magnetosphere' from which the so]ar wind plasma is largely excluded and within which the motion of charged particles is controlled by the planetary magnetic field. Despite its small size relative to the magnetospheres of the other planets, a Mercury orbiter mission is a high priority for the space physics community. The primary reason for this great interest is that Mercury unlike all the other planets visited thus far, lacks a significant atmosphere; only a vestigial exosphere is present. This results in a unique situation where the magnetosphere interacts directly with the outer layer of the planetary crust (i.e. the regolith). At all of the other planets the topmost regions of their atmospheres become ionized by solar radiation to form ionospheres. These planetary ionospheres then couple to electrodynamically to their magnetospheres or, in the case of the weakly magnetized Venus and Mars, directly to the solar wind. This magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling is mediated largely through field-aligned currents (FACs) flowing along the magnetic field lines linking the magnetosphere and the high-latitude ionosphere. Mercury is unique in that it is expected that FACS will be very short lived due to the low electrical conductivity of the regolith. Furthermore, at the earth it has been shown that the outflow of neutral atmospheric species to great altitudes is an important source of magnetospheric plasma (following ionization) whose composition may influence subsequent magnetotail dynamics. However, the dominant source of plasma for most of the terrestrial magnetosphere is the 'leakage'of solar wind across the magnetopause and more direct entry through the northern and southern cusps. Although Mariner 10 did not return plasma composition measurements, the Hermean magnetosphere should be ideal for measuring the manner and rate of solar wind plasma entry due to the lack of strong internal atmospheric sources. Finally, the solar wind conditions experienced by Mercury as it orbits the Sun at 0.31 to 0.47 AU are quite different from those typically encountered by the Earth. This may allow for new understanding of the external factors affecting the transfer of mass, momentum and energy from the solar wind to planetary magnetospheres. This article provides a brief overview of what is now known about Mercury's magnetosphere and why it is a priority target for future planetary missions.

Slavin, J. A.

1999-01-01

58

Vibrational spectrum of magnesium hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The vibrational spectrum of hydrogen atoms in magnesium hydride has been studied by means of inelastic-neutron and Raman-scattering experiments between 12 and 295 K. After careful evaluation of multiple scattering and multiphonon contributions, we provide a vibrational frequency spectrum up to 180 meV and the mean-square displacement of hydrogen atoms. The inelastic light scattering spectra of MgH2 powders show three Raman allowed modes (A1g, B1g, and Eg) and some smaller features that can be related with second-order and disorder-induced processes.

Santisteban, J. R.; Cuello, G. J.; Dawidowski, J.; Fainstein, A.; Peretti, H. A.; Ivanov, A.; Bermejo, F. J.

2000-07-01

59

Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control\\/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury

Patanjali Varanasi

2009-01-01

60

Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof  

DOEpatents

In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

2010-11-23

61

Mercury contamination extraction  

DOEpatents

Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

2009-09-15

62

To Mercury dynamics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Present significance of the study of rotation of Mercury considered as a core-mantle system arises from planned Mercury missions. New high accurate data on Mercury's structure and its physical fields are expected from BepiColombo mission (Anselmi et al., 2001). Investigation of resonant rotation of Mercury, begun by Colombo G. (1966), will play here main part. New approaches to the study

Yu. V. Barkin; J. M. Ferrandiz

2004-01-01

63

Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

DOEpatents

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S. (Tampa, FL); Niemann, Michael U. (Venice, FL); Goswami, D. Yogi (Tampa, FL); Stefanakos, Elias K. (Tampa, FL)

2012-04-10

64

Interstellar Hydride Spectroscopy with Herschel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Herschel satellite is now giving access with unprecedented sensitivity to the THz spectral range. In particular ground state lines of simple neutral and ionized hydrides have been detected in a wide range of interstellar environments, leading to a renewed understanding of the formation processes of interstellar molecules in the diffuse interstellar medium. In this talk, I will present recent results obtained with the Herschel HIFI and PACS instruments on the carbon, oxygen and nitrogen hydrides. I will discuss how CH and HF can be used as tracers of molecular hydrogen in the diffuse interstellar matter, the new diagnostic capabilities of the cosmic ray ionization rate opened by the OH^+ and H_2O^+ molecular ions, and the role of the dissipation of turbulence in the production of the CH^+ and SH^+ reactive ions. Figure 1: Example of Herschel/HIFI spectra towards the massive star forming region G10.6--0.4. The diffuse interstellar matter along the line of sight towards this massive object is producing multiple absortion features from ˜ 6 to˜ 50 km/s while the emission or absortion signals between -20 to 5 km/s are caused by the massive source itself.

Gerin, Maryvonne

2011-06-01

65

Mercury and health care  

PubMed Central

Mercury is toxic heavy metal. It has many characteristic features. Health care organizations have used mercury in many forms since time immemorial. The main uses of mercury are in dental amalgam, sphygmomanometers, and thermometers. The mercury once released into the environment can remain for a longer period. Both acute and chronic poisoning can be caused by it. Half of the mercury found in the atmosphere is human generated and health care contributes the substantial part to it. The world has awakened to the harmful effects of mercury. The World Health Organization and United Nations Environmental Programme (UNEP) have issued guidelines for the countries’ health care sector to become mercury free. UNEP has formed mercury partnerships between governments and other stakeholders as one approach to reducing risks to human health and the environment from the release of mercury and its compounds to the environment. Many hospitals are mercury free now. PMID:21120080

Rustagi, Neeti; Singh, Ritesh

2010-01-01

66

Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides  

DOEpatents

The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

1983-12-08

67

Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

1991-01-01

68

Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure  

MedlinePLUS

How much mercury spilled in a room will make air in the room unsafe? Any amount of mercury spilled indoors can ... in a small bedroom. EPA cleaning up a mercury spill at a house. What is Elemental Mercury? ...

69

76 FR 13851 - National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants; Proposed Rule Federal...Pollutants: Mercury Emissions From Mercury Cell Chlor-Alkali Plants AGENCY: Environmental...NESHAP) for mercury emissions from mercury cell chlor-alkali plants (Mercury Cell...

2011-03-14

70

A classical but new kinetic equation for hydride transfer reactions.  

PubMed

A classical but new kinetic equation to estimate activation energies of various hydride transfer reactions was developed according to transition state theory using the Morse-type free energy curves of hydride donors to release a hydride anion and hydride acceptors to capture a hydride anion and by which the activation energies of 187 typical hydride self-exchange reactions and more than thirty thousand hydride cross transfer reactions in acetonitrile were safely estimated in this work. Since the development of the kinetic equation is only on the basis of the related chemical bond changes of the hydride transfer reactants, the kinetic equation should be also suitable for proton transfer reactions, hydrogen atom transfer reactions and all the other chemical reactions involved with breaking and formation of chemical bonds. One of the most important contributions of this work is to have achieved the perfect unity of the kinetic equation and thermodynamic equation for hydride transfer reactions. PMID:23917398

Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Deng, Fei-Huang; Yang, Jin-Dong; Li, Xiu-Tao; Chen, Qiang; Lei, Nan-Ping; Meng, Fan-Kun; Zhao, Xiao-Peng; Han, Su-Hui; Hao, Er-Jun; Mu, Yuan-Yuan

2013-09-28

71

Isotope effects on hydride transfer reactions from transition metal hydrides to trityl cation. An inverse isotope effect for a hydride transfer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kinetic isotope effects are useful in mechanistic studies, since they can provide insight into the transition state of the reaction being examined. Hydride (H⁻) transfer reactions between carbons are pertinent to the chemistry of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) analogues. Kinetic and mechanistic studies have established details of hydride transfers from 1,4-dihydropyridines and related hydride donors to carbon-based hydride acceptors

Tan-Yun Cheng; R. Morris Bullock

1999-01-01

72

Heat transfer enhancement in metal hydride systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An attempt has been made to enhance the heat transfer of hydrogen storage metal hydride systems by the addition of small fraction of high conductivity materials in various configurations. Results indicate that the form of the enhancement material rather than its composition is the more critical factor. The addition of over 6% aluminum foam enhances the effective thermal conductivity of a hydride bed by a factor of 2.6.

Rosso, M. J., Jr.; Strickland, G.

73

Thermal conductivity of metal hydride beds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental results on the thermal conductivity and hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior of the TiMn1.5 hydride are correlated by means of a kinetic theory of gas and equilibrium behaviors. The effective thermal conductivity of the hydride is defined as the sum of two independent terms related to pressure and composition, and an empirical equation based on the experimental data is

S. Suda; N. Kobayashi; K. Yoshida

1981-01-01

74

A Metal Hydride Mobile Air Conditioning System  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes the development of an electrical compressor-driven air conditioning system for automotive applications. The system uses the thermal properties of reversible metal hydride alloys, which are retained within advanced-design hydride heat exchangers. Calculations on system performance predict high energy efficiency in a package of competitive size and cost. A proof-of-principle prototype has been constructed and bench tested. Measurements

Daniela Magnetto; Stefano Mola; Centro Ricerche Fiat; David H. DaCosta; Mark Golben; Matthew Rosso

75

Mercury Contamination of Aquatic Ecosystems  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) factsheet contains information about US mercury contamination. Issues discussed include how mercury becomes a toxicological problem through bioaccumulation, human effects of mercury toxicity, and levels of atmospheric mercury. Mercury levels in fish are examined to determine how mercury gets into the environment and into the food chain.

Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Rickert, D. A.

76

New Jersey mercury regulations  

SciTech Connect

Mercury, or quicksilver, and its major ore cinnabar (HgS) have been known for thousands of years. Health effects from mercury such as dementia were known as early as the late 19th century ({open_quotes}mad as a hatter{close_quotes}). In the 1960`s and 1970`s, reported levels of mercury in tuna reawakened public awareness of mercury pollution. In the 1970`s, major epidemics of acute mercury poisoning were reported in Japan and Iraq. These incidents highlighted the extreme health risks, such as kidney damage, birth defects, and death, associated with severe mercury poisoning. Fetuses and young children are particularly vulnerable since mercury poisoning can damage growing neural tissues. Recently, the perception of mercury as a dangerous pollutant has been on the rise. Advisories warning the public to avoid or reduce the consumption of freshwater fish caught in specific waterbodies due to mercury contamination have been issued in numerous states. The discovery of mercury in {open_quotes}pristine{close_quotes} lakes in the United States, Canada, and Scandinavia, remote from industry and any known mercury sources, has focused attention on atmospheric emissions of mercury as potential significant sources of mercury.

Elias, D.F.; Corbin, W.E. [RTP Environmental Associates, Inc., Green Brook, NJ (United States)

1996-12-31

77

Global Trends in Mercury Management  

PubMed Central

The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

Choi, Kyunghee

2012-01-01

78

METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides  

E-print Network

METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides J. J. Rhyne and G. E on the rare earth site. The rare earth spins disorder at a temperature lower than the bulk Tc in ErFe2 H3 5 per formula unit assuming complete occupation of 3 tetrahedral sites. The heavy rare earth (RFe2

Boyer, Edmond

79

Mercury and Neptune  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this project you will learn about the solar system and how Mercury and Neptune are alike and different. How are the planets, Mercury and Neptune, alike and different? Use your Venn Diagram to write how Mercury and Neptune are different in the outer circles and how the planets are alike where the circles overlap. Begin by reviewing the Solar System. Notice where Mercury and Neptune are compared to the ...

Simpson, Ms.

2009-10-21

80

MERCURY IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury is released from a variety of sources and exhibits a complicated chemistry. According to the Mercury Study Report to Congress, mercury fluxes and budgets in water, soil, and other media have increased by a factor of two to five over pre-industrial levels. The primary expo...

81

Dental amalgam and mercury  

SciTech Connect

This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

Mackert, J.R. Jr. (Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States))

1991-08-01

82

Mercury Surveillance Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Background on mercury exposure is presented including forms, sources, permissible exposure limits, and physiological effects. The purpose of the Mercury Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Mercury Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

1993-01-01

83

Mercury Calibration System  

Microsoft Academic Search

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

2009-01-01

84

MERCURY SPECIATION AND CAPTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

The speciation of mercury has a major impact on its removal in air pollution control equipment. The oxidized forms of mercury, mercuric chloride (HgCl2) in particular, is highly water-soluble and is easier to capture in wet FGD systems than elemental mercury (Hg0), which is not w...

85

Exploring Mercury: MESSENGER's Mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, launched on 3 August 2004, is well into its voyage of discovery. The mission, spacecraft, and payload are designed to answer six fundamental questions regarding the innermost planet, thus initiating a new era in our understanding of the terrestrial planets; (1) Why is Mercury so dense? (2) What is Mercury's

Deborah Domingue; S. C. Solomon; R. L. McNutt; R. E. Gold; J. C. Leary; D. G. Grant

2006-01-01

86

Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-print Network

This thesis contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). This pursuit involves ...

Shuffler, Carter Alexander

2004-01-01

87

Thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fuels in BWR's  

E-print Network

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project being completed by UC Berkeley and MIT to assess the possible benefits of using hydride fuel in light water nuclear reactors (LWR's). More specifically, this ...

Creighton, John Everett

2005-01-01

88

Reactivity of yttrium carboxylates toward alkylaluminum hydrides.  

PubMed

Yttrocene-carboxylate complex [Cp*2Y(OOCAr(Me))] (Cp*=C5Me5, Ar(Me) =C6H2Me3-2,4,6) was synthesized as a spectroscopically versatile model system for investigating the reactivity of alkylaluminum hydrides towards rare-earth-metal carboxylates. Equimolar reactions with bis-neosilylaluminum hydride and dimethylaluminum hydride gave adduct complexes of the general formula [Cp*2Y(?-OOCAr(Me))(?-H)AlR2] (R=CH2SiMe3, Me). The use of an excess of the respective aluminum hydride led to the formation of product mixtures, from which the yttrium-aluminum-hydride complex [{Cp*2Y(?-H)AlMe2(?-H)AlMe2(?-CH3)}2] could be isolated, which features a 12-membered-ring structure. The adduct complexes [Cp*2Y(?-OOCAr(Me))(?-H)AlR2] display identical (1)J(Y,H) coupling constants of 24.5 Hz for the bridging hydrido ligands and similar (89)Y NMR shifts of ?=-88.1 ppm (R=CH2SiMe3) and ?=-86.3 ppm (R=Me) in the (89)Y DEPT45 NMR experiments. PMID:24151216

Schädle, Christoph; Fischbach, Andreas; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Törnroos, Karl W; Anwander, Reiner

2013-11-25

89

Hydride-containing molten salts and their technology implications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydride-conducting molten salts such as LiH in eutectic LiCl-KCl are attractive electrolyte systems for intermediate-temperature applications. The chemically reducing characteristics of these hydride melts provide a unique method to clean metal surfaces. The high conductivity of these hydride melts makes them the best electrolytes for hydrogen-based energy applications at intermediate temperatures. We will review some earlier work on hydride-conducting molten

Bor Y. Liaw

1993-01-01

90

Scope on Skies: Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This month, Mercury will start becoming visible over the western horizon shortly after sunset. If you have students observe Mercury, they should do so at approximately the same time for each observation. During the first half of the month, Mercury will appear higher above the horizon and set a bit later each day. Students can also note that Mercury appears brighter following superior conjunction than when it is close to inferior conjunction. Despite its greater distance following superior conjunction, Mercury will be in nearly a full phase and will reflect more sunlight and appear brighter than when it is closer to us, but as a thin crescent.

Riddle, Bob

2008-01-01

91

Mercury pollution in China  

SciTech Connect

With a long history of mercury mining and use and a rapidly growing economy that relies heavily on coal for heat and energy, China faces an enormous challenge to reduce pollution from this toxic metal. The authors delineate what is known about the extent of the problem, regulatory steps are being taken to reduce mercury pollution, and next steps for environmental researchers. It addresses issues of mercury pollution from mercury and gold mining, coal combustion and the chemical industry. Data on dietary intake of mercury is also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 photos.

Gui-Bin Jiang; Jian-Bo Shi; Xin-Bin Feng [Chinese Academy of Sciences (China). State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology

2006-06-15

92

Gold Hydride Complexes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803842  

E-print Network

Gold Hydride Complexes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803842 Reactions of a Stable Monomeric Gold(I) Hydride Complex** Emily Y. Tsui,* Peter Müller, and Joseph P. Sadighi Gold hydride complexes have been postulated as intermediates in a number of homogeneous gold- catalyzed reactions,[1] but relatively little is known about

Müller, Peter

93

Scattering law of a magnesium hydride moderator  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metal hydrides have long been considered possible moderator and pre-moderator materials for neutron sources. These materials have hydrogen density comparable to liquid hydrogen or light water. They usually do not undergo phase transitions in the desired operating range of 0-300 K, and display reasonable resistance to radiation damage. Magnesium hydride is such a simple, robust hydride system. To assess its neutronic usefulness as a moderator material, we determined experimentally the total scattering cross-section of the material. We compared our theoretical results to the experimental total neutron cross-section and to the data from quasi-elastic neutron scattering experiments, and produced a scattering kernel suitable for neutron transport calculations.

Muhrer, G.; Hartl, M.; Daemen, L.; Tovesson, F.; Schnegg, A.; Russina, M.; Schachinger, E.

2011-02-01

94

Mercury Calibration System  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on actual capabilities of the current calibration technology. As part of the current effort, WRI worked with Thermo Fisher elemental mercury calibrator units to conduct qualification experiments to demonstrate their performance characteristics under a variety of conditions and to demonstrate that they qualify for use in the CEM calibration program. Monitoring of speciated mercury is another concern of this research. The mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are comprised of both elemental and oxidized mercury. Current CEM analyzers are designed to measure elemental mercury only. Oxidized mercury must first be converted to elemental mercury prior to entering the analyzer inlet in order to be measured. CEM systems must demonstrate the ability to measure both elemental and oxidized mercury. This requires the use of oxidized mercury generators with an efficient conversion of the oxidized mercury to elemental mercury. There are currently two basic types of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) generators used for this purpose. One is an evaporative HgCl{sub 2} generator, which produces gas standards of known concentration by vaporization of aqueous HgCl{sub 2} solutions and quantitative mixing with a diluent carrier gas. The other is a device that converts the output from an elemental Hg generator to HgCl{sub 2} by means of a chemical reaction with chlorine gas. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer system involves reaction of elemental mercury vapor with chlorine gas at an elevated temperature. The draft interim protocol for oxidized mercury units involving reaction with chlorine gas requires the vendors to demonstrate high efficiency of oxidation of an elemental mercury stream from an elemental mercury vapor generator. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer unit is designed to operate at the power plant stack at the probe outlet. Following oxidation of elemental mercury from reaction with chlorine gas, a high temperature module reduces the mercuric chloride back to elemental mercury. WRI conducted work with a custom laboratory configured stand-alone oxidized mercury generator unit prov

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

2009-03-11

95

Mercury: The World Closest to the Sun.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses various topics related to the geology of Mercury including the origin of Mercury's magnetism, Mercury's motions, volcanism, scarps, and Mercury's violent birth and early life. Includes a table comparing Mercury's orbital and physical data to that of earth's. (JN)

Cordell, Bruce M.

1984-01-01

96

Process for low mercury coal  

DOEpatents

A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Grimes, R. William (Laramie, WY); Tweed, Robert E. (Laramie, WY)

1995-01-01

97

Process for low mercury coal  

DOEpatents

A process is described for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal. 4 figures.

Merriam, N.W.; Grimes, R.W.; Tweed, R.E.

1995-04-04

98

A hydride-rich magnesium cluster.  

PubMed

High-de-hydride! A straightforward reaction between a magnesium silylamido/N-heterocyclic carbene adduct and phenylsilane provides a {Mg(4)H(6)} cluster molecule that may be regarded as a combination of two magnesium dihydride and two magnesium monohydride moieties. PMID:19405069

Arrowsmith, Merle; Hill, Michael S; MacDougall, Dugald J; Mahon, Mary F

2009-01-01

99

Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof  

DOEpatents

Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

2009-05-05

100

Mercury exposure of gold mining workers in the northwest of Iran.  

PubMed

Mercury exposure is a health concern in the occupational settings like gold mining and chloralkali industries and blood and urine levels of mercury are used as exposure indicators. In this study, blood and urine concentrations of mercury were determined using hydride generation atomic absorption spectrophotometery (HGAAS) in sixteen gold miners with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The patients treated with two chelating agents, dimercaprol and D-penicillamine. The mean serum mercury levels before and after chelation therapy were 208.14 ?g/L(-1) and 10.50 ?g/L(-1), respectively. The mean urinary mercury levels before and after chelation therapy were 134.70 ?g/L(-1) and 17.23 ?g/L(-1), respectively. The results of this study showed that there are significant differences between concentration of blood and urine mercury before and after intervention (p<0.005). There were no significant differences between in the biochemistry parameters of patients before and after treatment. This study indicated that the gold miners in the northwest of Iran had been exposed to high levels of mercury vapors [Hg((0))]. PMID:24191337

Mostafazadeh, Babak; Kiani, Amir; Mohamadi, Ebrahim; Shaki, Fatemeh; Shirazi, Farshad Hosein

2013-11-01

101

Mercury toxicity in plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury poisoning has become a problem of current interest as a result of environmental pollution on a global scale. Natural\\u000a emissions of mercury form two-thirds of the input; manmade releases form about one-third. Considerable amounts of mercury\\u000a may be added to agricultural land with sludge, fertilizers, lime, and manures. The most important sources of contaminating\\u000a agricultural soil have been the

Manomita Patra; Archana Sharma

2000-01-01

102

Substorms on Mercury?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Qualitative similarities between some of the variations in the Mercury encounter data and variations in the corresponding regions of the earth's magnetosphere during substorms are pointed out. The Mariner 10 data on Mercury show a strong interaction between the solar wind and the plant similar to a scaled down version of that for the earth's magnetosphere. Some of the features observed in the night side Mercury magnetosphere suggest time dependent processes occurring there.

Siscoe, G. L.; Ness, N. F.; Yeates, C. M.

1974-01-01

103

Project Mercury: A Chronology  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This internet version of an historical NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) publication contains information about Project Mercury, the first manned space flight program in the United States. This document chronicles the three major phases of the Mercury program - conception, research and development, and operation. It includes major events leading to the project, the objectives of each Project Mercury test, flight data and launch summaries. Also provided is a daily log of events and occurrences that took place during this project.

Grimwood, James

1963-01-01

104

Mercury, Venus, and Earth!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

You will compare and contrast Mercury, Venus, and Earth. While looking at these different websites, use the information to fill in your handout of a column chart and on the back answer the questions you are asked on here. First view this website and record on your chart the distance from the sun Mercury,Venus, and Earth are. Now, learn about Mercury! What is the surface ...

Bschiffer

2009-10-21

105

Mercury Chamber Considerations  

E-print Network

Mercury Chamber Considerations V. Graves IDS-NF Target Studies July 2011 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury Chamber Considerations, July 2011 Flow Loop Review · 1 cm dia nozzle, 20 m/s jet requires 1.57 liter/sec mercury flow (94.2 liter/min, 24.9 gpm). · MERIT experiment

McDonald, Kirk

106

Missions to Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a very difficult planet to observe from the Earth, and space missions that target Mercury are essential for a comprehensive\\u000a understanding of the planet. At the same time, it is also difficult to orbit because it is deep inside the Sun’s gravitational\\u000a well. Only one mission has visited Mercury; that was Mariner 10 in the 1970s. This paper

André Balogh; Réjean Grard; Sean C. Solomon; Rita Schulz; Yves Langevin; Yasumasa Kasaba; Masaki Fujimoto

107

Missions to Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a very difficult planet to observe from the Earth, and space missions that target Mercury are essential for a comprehensive\\u000a understanding of the planet. At the same time, it is also difficult to orbit because it is deep inside the Sun’s gravitational\\u000a well. Only one mission has visited Mercury; that was Mariner 10 in the 1970s. This paper

André Balogh; Réjean Grard; Sean C. Solomon; Rita Schulz; Yves Langevin; Yasumasa Kasaba; Masaki Fujimoto

2007-01-01

108

Peru Mercury Inventory 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in other products such as batteries and computer electronics is not recycled and may ultimately be released to the environment.

Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

2007-01-01

109

DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL\\/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES  

Microsoft Academic Search

An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb

E Hansen; E Eric Frickey; L Leung Heung

2004-01-01

110

Mercury in the environment  

SciTech Connect

Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

2008-08-06

111

The Nine Planets: Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page of Nine Planets highlights details about the planet Mercury. Information includes planet diameter, mass, distance from the Sun, orbit, and mythology. Also covered are composition, surface features, atmosphere and magnetic field data, and the results of exploration spacecraft. The site provides links to images, movies, and more Mercury facts. Unanswered questions about the planet are also discussed.

Arnett, Bill

112

Mercury in the environment  

ScienceCinema

Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

2010-01-08

113

MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

Slavin, James A.

2008-01-01

114

MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD) is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001 2005 time frame. ORD will use it to ...

115

Getting Mercury out of Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

1999

116

Mercury Jet Studies Tristan Davenne  

E-print Network

Mercury Jet Studies Tristan Davenne Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Joint UKNF, INO, UKIERI meeting mercury target and reported a radial velocity at surface of mercury jet due to proton beam is 36m/s #12;Numerical simulation of Sievers & Pugnat Result Click on image above to watch video of 2cm mercury target

McDonald, Kirk

117

Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

2012-11-01

118

HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

K. McCoy

2000-12-12

119

Uranium–zirconium hydride fuel properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Properties of the two-phase hydride U0.3ZrH1.6 pertinent to performance as a nuclear fuel for LWRs are reviewed. Much of the available data come from the Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) program of 4 decades ago and from the more restricted data base prepared for the TRIGA research reactors some 3 decades back. Transport, mechanical, thermal and chemical properties are summarized.

D. Olander; Ehud Greenspan; Hans D. Garkisch; Bojan Petrovic

2009-01-01

120

Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

Lowery, Eric

1995-01-01

121

Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion in lithium hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrogen is considered a promising candidate to achieve an alternative source to overcome future energy supply problems. Very recently, an ab initio molecular dynamics study of the hydrogen diffusion in sodium and lithium hydrides appeared by Ramzan and Ahuja [J. Appl. Phys. 106, 016104 (2009)]. Here, we alternatively report the calculation of the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in LiH in terms of a thermodynamical model. The resulting values agree fairly well with experimental data.

Dologlou, Elisabeth

2010-04-01

122

Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect

This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

Clark, E.A.

1992-09-21

123

Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels  

SciTech Connect

This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

Clark, E.A.

1992-09-21

124

Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy, we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at T = 140 K within ˜30 min. 120 °C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

2013-10-01

125

Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

Slavin, James A.

2010-01-01

126

Mercury in the ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

This treatise on the environmental dispersion of mercury emphasizes the importance of ''mercury-consciousness'' in the present-day world, where rapidly expanding metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial developments are causing widespread contamination of the atmosphere, soil, and water by this metal and its toxic organic derivatives. Concepts concerning the mechanism of mercury dispersion and methyl-mercury formation in the physico-biological ecosystem are discussed in detail and a substantial body of data on the degree and nature of the mercury contamination of various plants, fish, and land animals by industrial and urban effluents is presented. Various analytical methods for the estimation of mercury in inorganic and organic samples are presented. These serve as a ready guide to the selection of the correct method for analyzing environmental samples. This book is reference work in mercury-related studies. It is written to influence industrial policies of governments in their formulation of control measures to avoid the recurrence of human tragedies such as the well-known Minamata case in Japan, and the lesser known cases in Iraq, Pakistan, and Guatamala.

Mitra, S.

1986-01-01

127

Exploring the Planets: Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains most of the up-to-date information known about the planet Mercury. Facts about the planet include: mean distance from Sun, length of year, rotation period, mean orbital velocity, inclination of axis, average temperature (day and night), and diameter. The site explains why earth-based views of Mercury are so poor and describes the surface of the planet on the basis of probe photographs. The photographs do not prove whether the material on the surface is impact ejecta or volcanic. However, a colored digital mosaic of Mercury taken by Mariner 10 suggests that at least some of the mercurian smooth plains are the products of volcanism.

128

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-11-07

129

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1991-06-18

130

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1989-01-01

131

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01

132

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01

133

Mercury: Laws and Regulations  

MedlinePLUS

... time EPA has ever regulated mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Top of page Clean Water ... use at more than half of the nation's coal-fired power plants. Read the press release | Learn ...

134

Mercury Releases and Spills  

MedlinePLUS

... of page Hazardous Waste Site Cleanup Cleaning Up Superfund and Other Hazardous Waste Sites Where Mercury is ... managed by EPA: EPA Cleanup and Redevelopment Programs Superfund is the Federal government’s program to clean up ...

135

Interior Evolution of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interior evolution of Mercury—the innermost planet in the solar system, with its exceptional high density—is poorly known. Our current knowledge of Mercury is based on observations from Mariner 10's three flybys. That knowledge includes the important discoveries of a weak, active magnetic field and a system of lobate scarps that suggests limited radial contraction of the planet during the last 4 billion years. We review existing models of Mercury's interior evolution and further present new 2D and 3D convection models that consider both a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity and core cooling. These studies provide a framework for understanding the basic characteristics of the planet's internal evolution as well as the role of the amount and distribution of radiogenic heat production, mantle viscosity, and sulfur content of the core have had on the history of Mercury's interior.

Breuer, Doris; Hauck, Steven A.; Buske, Monika; Pauer, Martin; Spohn, Tilman

136

Mercury Jet Magnetometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is allowed to flow through a narrow non-conducting pipe provided with two pick-up electrodes at the ends of a diameter. In the presence of a magnetic field an e.m.f. is induced in the moving mercury. The potential difference detected between the electrodes is due to the component of the local magnetic field perpendicular to the pipe axis and to

Alexander Kolin

1945-01-01

137

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05

138

Electrochemical investigation of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

One of the problems regarding the use of hydrogen as an energy carrier is related to storage. One approach for a solution is related to the use of solid metal hydrides. Many studies regarding the formation of metal hydrides have included the conduction of absorption experiments in which hydrogen from the gas phase reacts with solid alloys. However, electrochemical methods

C. M. Luedecke; G. Deublein; R. A. Huggins

1985-01-01

139

Hydride-Containing Molten Salts and their Technology Implications.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Hydride-conducting molten salts such as LiH in eutectic LiCl-KCl are attractive electrolyte systems for intermediate-temperature applications. The chemically reducing characteristics of these hydride melts provide a unique method to clean metal surfaces. ...

B. Y. Liaw

1993-01-01

140

DISPROPORTIONATION RESISTANT ALLOY DEVELOPMENT FOR HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSION  

E-print Network

DISPROPORTIONATION RESISTANT ALLOY DEVELOPMENT FOR HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSION Mark Golben David H compressor is an absorption-based system that uses the properties of reversible metal hydride alloys to silently and cleanly compress hydrogen; hydrogen is absorbed into an alloy bed at ambient temperature and

141

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-print Network

water reactor (PWR) core designs utilizes uranium-thorium-thorium-zirconium hydride matrix, which is one of the critical parameters affecting fabrication and in-reactorthorium-zirconium hydrides, (UThZr 4 )H 1.7 and (UTh 2 Zr 6 )H 1.3 , were irradiated at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01

142

Solid-state gadolinium-magnesium hydride optical switch  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optical switching properties of gadolinium-magnesium hydride have been demonstrated in a solid-state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35% with virtually zero transmission, while with negative polarization, the visible transmission exceeds 25% at 650 nm. The switching is reversible, with intermediate optical properties between the transparent and reflecting states.

Armitage, R.; Rubin, M.; Richardson, T.; O'Brien, N.; Chen, Yong

1999-09-01

143

Lithium hydride anode for use in alkaline batteries  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery comprising an aqueous alkaline electrolyte, an anode comprising a lithium hydride layer in contact with a current collector, the aqueous electrolyte being sufficiently concentrated so as to minimize the decomposition of the lithium hydride layer to hydrogen.

Juda, W.

1987-04-28

144

Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride  

DOEpatents

Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

Sullivan, Richard W. (Denver, CO)

1980-01-01

145

Mercury Research in the USGS  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Announcements, publications, and science activities by the US Geological Survey (USGS) regarding the widespread contaminant mercury are available at this metasite from the USGS. The site brings together links to METAALICUS, a US-Canada joint mercury assessment project, the USGS page on mercury contamination of aquatic ecosystems, nationwide fish advisories, and the EPA's Mercury Report to Congress. Tables giving locations, status and contact information for USGS mercury projects can be read in .pdf or .xls format. USGS's mercury research is part of their Mineral Resources Division.

146

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOEpatents

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

1997-10-21

147

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOEpatents

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard J. (Aurora, CO); Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Marmaro, Roger W. (Littleton, CO); Wilson, Kevin G. (Littleton, CO)

1997-01-01

148

Mercury CEM Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMS) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks. The power industry desires to conduct at least a full year of monitoring before the formal monitoring and reporting requirement begins on January 1, 2009. It is important for the industry to have available reliable, turnkey equipment from CEM vendors. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor generators. The generators are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 requires that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2007). Traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury generators (EPA 2007). The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of generators by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the generator models that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury generators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one generator with another and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define generator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. WRI is focusing efforts to determine actual generator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol. The protocol will then be further revised by EPA based on what can actually be achieved with the generators. Another focus of the study is to evaluate approaches for field verification of generator performance. Upcoming work includes evaluation of oxidized mercury calibration generators, for which a separate protocol will be prepared by EPA. In addition, the variability of the spectrometers/analyzers under various environmental conditions needs to be defined and understood better. A main objective of the current work is to provide data on the performance and capabilities of elemental mercury generator/calibration systems for the development of realistic NIST traceability protocols for mercury vapor standards for continuous emission CEM calibration. This work is providing a direct contribution to the enablement of continuous emissions monitoring at coal-fired power plants in conformance with the CAMR. EPA Specification 12 states that mercury CEMs must be calibrated with NIST-traceable standards (Federal Register 2005). The initial draft of an elemental mercury generator traceability protocol was circulated by EPA in May 2007 for comment, and an interim protocol was issued in August 2007 (EPA 2007). Initially it was assumed that the calibration and implementation of mercury CEMs would be relatively simple, and implementation would follow the implementation of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} monitoring, and sulfur emissions cap and trade. However, mercury has proven to be significantly more difficult

John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

2008-02-29

149

Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

2013-06-01

150

Modular hydride beds for mobile applications  

SciTech Connect

Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

1997-08-01

151

Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

2013-05-01

152

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks  

E-print Network

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks Part 1 b After you finish the video and the above questions by humans) sources. 2. How does mercury travel from its source into the tissue of sharks? 3. What are some

Miami, University of

153

Mercury (Environmental Health Student Portal)  

MedlinePLUS

The Basics Mercury — sometimes called quicksilver — is a natural metal. It’s a shiny, silver liquid that can evaporate into an invisible ... to breathe it in without knowing it. When mercury combines with other chemical elements, it creates compounds, ...

154

Surface passivation of metal hydrides for applications  

SciTech Connect

Properties and characteristics of hydriding alloys are strongly dependent on surface compositions and morphologies. For instance, oxides such as La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on AB{sub 5} alloys and ZrO{sub 2} on AB{sub 2}, AB, and body-centered-cubic (BCC) alloys act as the barriers for the conversion of molecular and ionic hydrogen to atomic hydrogen at the surface, thus reducing the kinetics in both the gas-solid and electrochemical reactions. Alloy surfaces chemically treated by an aqueous F-ion containing solution have been developed to solve such problems. F-treated surfaces exhibit significantly improved characteristics in regard to the hydrogen uptakes and the protection against impurities and electrolyte solution. In addition, highly conductive metallic Ni layers can be formed on the surface of the alloy particles by the fluorination. The authors report the properties and characteristics of fluorinated hydriding alloys, mainly of a typical AB{sub 2} Laves phase material which represents the difficult activation characteristics and poor long-term durability during electrochemical charge/discharge cycles.

Suda, S.; Li, Z.P.; Sun, Y.M.; Liu, B.H.; Gao, X.P. [Kogakuin Univ., Hachioji, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Environmental and Chemical Engineering

1998-12-31

155

A study of hydriding kinetics of metal hydrides using a physically based model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The reaction of hydrogen with metals to form metal hydrides has numerous potential energy storage and management applications. The metal hydrogen system has a high volumetric energy density and is often reversible with a high cycle life. The stored hydrogen can be used to produce energy through combustion, reaction in a fuel cell, or electrochemically in metal hydride batteries. The high enthalpy of the metal-hydrogen reaction can also be used for rapid heat removal or delivery. However, improving the often poor gravimetric performance of such systems through the use of lightweight metals usually comes at the cost of reduced reaction rates or the requirement of pressure and temperature conditions far from the desired operating conditions. In this work, a 700 bar Sievert system was developed at the Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory to study the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of high pressure hydrogen absorption under near-ambient temperatures. This system was used to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of TiCrMn, an intermetallic metal hydride of interest due to its ambient temperature performance for vehicular applications. A commonly studied intermetallic hydride, LaNi5, was also characterized as a base case for the phase field model. The analysis of the data obtained from such a system necessitate the use of specialized techniques to decouple the measured reaction rates from experimental conditions. These techniques were also developed as a part of this work. Finally, a phase field model of metal hydride formation in mass-transport limited interstitial solute reactions based on the regular solution model was developed and compared with measured kinetics of LaNi5 and TiCrMn. This model aided in the identification of key reaction features and was used to verify the proposed technique for the analysis of gas-solid reaction rates determined volumetrically. Additionally, the phase field model provided detailed quantitative predictions of the effects of multidimensional phase growth and transitions between rate-limiting processes on the experimentally determined reaction rates. Unlike conventional solid state reaction analysis methods, this model relies fully on rate parameters based on the physical mechanisms occurring in the hydride reaction and can be extended to reactions in any dimension.

Voskuilen, Tyler G.

156

Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds  

SciTech Connect

Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H{sub 2})Co(dedpe){sub 2}][BF{sub 4}].

Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

2011-12-05

157

Hot temperatures line lists for metal hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ExoMol project is an ERC funded project set up with the purpose of calculating high quality theoretical molecular line list data to facilitate the emerging field of exoplanet and cool star atmospheric haracterisation [1]. Metal hydrides are important building blocks of interstellar physical chemistry. For molecular identification and characterisation in astrophysical sources, one requires accurate and complete spectroscopic data including transitional frequencies and intensities in the form of a line list. The ab initio methods offer the best opportunity for detailed theoretical studies of free diatomic metal hydrides and other simple hydride molecules. In this contribution we present progress on theoretical line lists for AlH, CrH, MgH, NiH, NaH and TiH obtained from first principles, applicable for a large range of temperatures up to 3500 K. Among the hydrides, AlH is of special interest because of a relatively high cosmic abundance of aluminium. The presence of AlH has been detected in the spectra of M-type and S-type stars as well as in sunspots (See [2] and references therein). CrH is a molecule of astrophysical interest; under the classification scheme developed by Kirkpatrick et al [3], CrH is of importance in distinguishing L type brown dwarfs. It has been proposed that theoretical line-lists of CrH and CrD could be used to facilitate a 'Deuterium test' for use in distinguishing planets, brown dwarfs and stars [5] and also it has been speculated that CrH exists in sunspots [4] but a higherquality hot-temperature line-list is needed to confirm this finding. The presence of MgH in stellar spectra is well documented through observation of the A2 ! X 2+ and B0 2+ ! X 2+ transitions. Different spectral features of MgH have been used as an indicator for the magnesium isotope abundances in the atmospheres of different stars from giants to dwarfs including the Sun, to measure the temperature of stars, surface gravity, stars' metal abundance, gravitational, as well as for a deuterium test (see [6] and references therein). MgH is an important part of stellar atmospheric models. NiH is predicted to be the most common nickelbearing molecule [7] and was indentified in sunspot spectra around 15 000 cm-1 (646 cm) over 40 years ago [8]. Knowledge of 58NiH/60NiH isotopologue ratio in stellar spectra is used to test models of supernovae and star formation [9]. The spectra of metal hydrides such can be very complicated due to the large-number of interacting electronic states, to the importance of electron correlation, relativistic and spin-orbit effects and of the various couplings between angular momenta. Via the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the Schrödinger equation describing the state of a molecule can be factorised into an 'electronic' component and a nuclear (i.e., rotational-vibrational) component. The former is solved using the ab initio quantum chemistry package MOLPRO, yielding potential energy, dipole and transition moment, and spin-orbit curves. The resulting coupled-surface ro-vibronic problem was then solved using the in-house computer program DUO, which is based on expansion in Hund's case (a) wave functions. Potential curves and couplings were then refined semi-empirically using the available experimental spectroscopic data.

Gorman, M.; Lodi, L.; Leyland, P. pC; Hill, C.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

2013-09-01

158

Reference Atmosphere for Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

Killen, Rosemary M.

2002-01-01

159

MERCURY IN MARINE LIFE DATABASE  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of the Mercury in Marine Life Project is to organize information on estuarine and marine species so that EPA can better understand both the extent of monitoring for mercury and level of mercury contamination in the biota of coastal environments. This report follows a ...

160

ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION  

EPA Science Inventory

The current state of our scientific understanding the mercury cycle tells us that most of the mercury getting into fish comes from atmospheric deposition, but methylation of that mercury in aquatic systems is required for the concentrations in fish to reach harmful levels. We st...

161

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-print Network

Mercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 #12 Evaluation of Cavitation Resistance of Type 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Using a Vibratory Horn," J. Nucl Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source," Oak Ridge National

McDonald, Kirk

162

Source-apportionment for atmospheric mercury deposition: Where does the mercury in mercury deposition come from?  

E-print Network

(p) - is moderately susceptible to dry and wet deposition Ionic mercury ­ also called Reactive Gaseous Mercury or RGM a given source type, there can be big differences ­ depending on process type, fuels and raw materials

163

Follow that mercury!  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

Linero, A.A. [Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

2008-07-01

164

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOEpatents

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, M.G.

1984-04-20

165

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOEpatents

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, Marshall G. (Woodside, CA)

1985-01-01

166

Air–metal hydride secondary battery with long cycle life  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the evaluation of a novel air–metal hydride rechargeable battery. A copper plated MmNi3.5Co0.7Al0.7Mn0.1 alloy was used as the active material in the metal hydride electrode. The metal hydride electrode was charged and discharged via a gas diffusion electrode based on a La0.6Ca0.4CoO3 perovskite (supported on carbon) as the catalyst for both oxygen reduction (discharge) and oxygen evolution (charge).

D Chartouni; N Kuriyama; T Kiyobayashi; J Chen

2002-01-01

167

Group IV a metal hydride catalysts and preparation thereof  

SciTech Connect

Benzene, or an alkylbenzene, is hydrogenated by reaction with hydrogen in the presence of a Group IVa or Va metal hydride catalyst. The catalyst may be a simple hydride such as ZrH/sub 2/ or a hydride of an alloy such as Cu/sub 3/Zr or may be a complex material. One complex material is the reaction product of a Group IVa or Va metal halide, such as ZrCl/sub 4/ with an alkyllithium or aryllithium, such as n-butyllithium, in a hydrocarbon solvent.

Pez, G. P.

1985-04-30

168

Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles  

SciTech Connect

A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

Klein, J.E.

1992-10-29

169

Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

Schmitt, R.

1981-01-01

170

Mosaic Postcards from Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On its journey to become the first spacecraft to orbit Mercury, NASA’s MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has followed a trajectory that included three flybys of the innermost planet. During the flybys, images captured by the Mercury Dual Imaging System revealed parts of the planet’s surface never before seen at close range, as well as high-resolution views of craters, crater rays, scarps, faults, and volcanic vents and flows. To help students and teachers better understand this revealing new look at Mercury, the MESSENGER Education and Public Outreach team will share these high-resolution images of Mercury's surface throughout the upcoming Year of the Solar System. By means of an intriguing format that mimics methods used by the MESSENGER team, a series of images printed at large postcard size will each highlight a small "slice" of Mercury, such as a crater or fault. The individual cards can then be pieced together, puzzle-style, on a poster-sized grid to reveal a larger mosaic view of the planet. Each card contains engaging text, the URL for an accompanying website, and coordinates for that region of the planet, helping students understand scientific concepts related to and revealed by MESSENGER's journey. The first set of cards will feature scarps, volcanic plains, the topography of a crater and the composition of its interior units, rayed craters, nested craters, and a deposit produced by explosive volcanic eruptions. Cards will be available for free on the accompanying website, distributed by MESSENGER Educator Fellows, or handed out at meetings, conferences, and workshops.

Hallau, K. G.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J.; Goldstein, J.; Hirshon, B.; Solomon, S. C.; Vanhala, H.; Weir, H. M.; Messenger Education; Public Outreach Team

2010-12-01

171

Influence of expansion of metal hydride during hydriding–dehydriding cycles  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanical behavior of metal hydride reactor and the mechanism of the advent of strain caused by Ti0.71Zr0.29Mn0.8CrCu0.2 alloy expansion have been studied using pressure vessel controlled to be no pressure difference between the inner and outer wall of the reactor tube occurred. Strain gauges were set on the various locations in the reactor. The change of strain was continuously

T Saito; K Suwa; T Kawamura

1997-01-01

172

Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston University have demonstrated the technical viability of the process and have provided data for the cost analyses that have been performed. We also concluded that a carbothermic process could also produce magnesium at acceptable costs. The use of slurry as a medium to carry chemical hydrides has been shown during this project to offer significant advantages for storing, delivering, and distributing hydrogen: • Magnesium hydride slurry is stable for months and pumpable. • The oils of the slurry minimize the contact of oxygen and moisture in the air with the metal hydride in the slurry. Thus reactive chemicals, such as lithium hydride, can be handled safely in the air when encased in the oils of the slurry. • Though magnesium hydride offers an additional safety feature of not reacting readily with water at room temperatures, it does react readily with water at temperatures above the boiling point of water. Thus when hydrogen is needed, the slurry and water are heated until the reaction begins, then the reaction energy provides heat for more slurry and water to be heated. • The reaction system can be relatively small and light and the slurry can be stored in conventional liquid fuel tanks. When transported and stored, the conventional liquid fuel infrastructure can be used. • The particular metal hydride of interest in this project, magnesium hydride, forms benign byproducts, magnesium hydroxide (“Milk of Magnesia”) and magnesium oxide. • We have estimated that a magnesium hydride slurry system (including the mixer device and tanks) could meet the DOE 2010 energy density goals. ? During the investigation of hydriding techniques, we learned that magnesium hydride in a slurry can also be cycled in a rechargeable fashion. Thus, magnesium hydride slurry can act either as a chemical hydride storage medium or as a rechargeable hydride storage system. Hydrogen can be stored and delivered and then stored again thus significantly reducing the cost of storing and delivering hydrogen. Further evaluation and development of this concept will be performed as follow-on work under a

McClaine, Andrew W.

2008-09-30

173

US EPA: Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors to this Web site from the US Environmental Protection Agency can learn about the ecological and health concerns associated with mercury. In addition to the resources available on the main Web page, the site also contains a teaching guide. Educators are invited to help "students learn about the health and environmental concerns associated with mercury, find out where it is in their school and homes, and help school officials and family members do something about it." The activities are designed for high school students, but could be modified for younger students.

174

Interior Evolution of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interior evolution of Mercury—the innermost planet in the solar system, with its exceptional high density—is poorly known. Our current knowledge of Mercury is based on observations from Mariner 10’s three flybys. That knowledge includes the important discoveries of a weak, active magnetic field and a system of lobate scarps that suggests limited radial contraction of the planet during the last 4 billion years. We review existing models of Mercury’s interior evolution and further present new 2D and 3D convection models that consider both a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity and core cooling. These studies provide a framework for understanding the basic characteristics of the planet’s internal evolution as well as the role of the amount and distribution of radiogenic heat production, mantle viscosity, and sulfur content of the core have had on the history of Mercury’s interior. The existence of a dynamo-generated magnetic field suggests a growing inner core, as model calculations show that a thermally driven dynamo for Mercury is unlikely. Thermal evolution models suggest a range of possible upper limits for the sulfur content in the core. For large sulfur contents the model cores would be entirely fluid. The observation of limited planetary contraction (˜1-2 km)—if confirmed by future missions—may provide a lower limit for the core sulfur content. For smaller sulfur contents, the planetary contraction obtained after the end of the heavy bombardment due to inner core growth is larger than the observed value. Due to the present poor knowledge of various parameters, for example, the mantle rheology, the thermal conductivity of mantle and crust, and the amount and distribution of radiogenic heat production, it is not possible to constrain the core sulfur content nor the present state of the mantle. Therefore, it is difficult to robustly predict whether or not the mantle is conductive or in the convective regime. For instance, in the case of very inefficient planetary cooling—for example, as a consequence of a strong thermal insulation by a low conductivity crust and a stiff Newtonian mantle rheology—the predicted sulfur content can be as low as 1 wt% to match current estimates of planetary contraction, making deep mantle convection likely. Efficient cooling—for example, caused by the growth of a crust strongly in enriched in radiogenic elements—requires more than 6.5 wt% S. These latter models also predict a transition from a convective to a conductive mantle during the planet’s history. Data from future missions to Mercury will aid considerably our understanding of the evolution of its interior.

Breuer, Doris; Hauck, Steven A.; Buske, Monika; Pauer, Martin; Spohn, Tilman

2007-10-01

175

ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

2009-04-23

176

Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The sources of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief flybys certainly include Mercury’s proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet’s lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute. In particular, Mercury’s very brief Dungey cycle, ~ 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation, allows for very rapid transitions to new equilibrium states. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury’s magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury’s tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

Slavin, J. A.

2010-12-01

177

Novel Hydride Transfer Catalysis for Carbohydrate Conversions  

SciTech Connect

5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), an important versatile sugar derivative has been synthesized from glucose using catalytic amounts of CrCl2 in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidizolium chloride. Glycerol and glyceraldehyde were tested as sugar model compounds. Glycerol is unreactive and does not interfere with glucose conversion. Glyceraldehyde is reactive and does interfere with glucose conversion in competitive experiments. MnCl2 or FeCl2 catalyze dehydration of glyceraldehyde dimer to form compound I, a cyclic hemiacetal with an exocyclic double bond. Upon aqueous work-up I forms pyruvaldehyde. CrCl2 or VCl3 further catalyze a hydride transfer of I to form lactide. Upon aqueous work-up lactide is converted to lactic acid.

Holladay, John E.; Brown, Heather M.; Appel, Aaron M.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

2008-04-03

178

Self-Consistent-Field Calculation on Lithium Hydride for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a self-consistent-field-linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital calculation on the valence electrons of lithium hydride using the method of Roothaan. This description is intended for undergraduate physics students.

Rioux, Frank; Harriss, Donald K.

1980-01-01

179

Transient analysis of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-print Network

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project led by U. C. Berkeley for which MIT is to perform the thermal hydraulic and economic analyses. A parametric study has been performed to determine the optimum ...

Trant, Jarrod Michael

2004-01-01

180

Metal Hydride Chemical Heat Pumps for Industrial Use  

E-print Network

Hydriding alloys are intermetallic absorbent compounds which have the remarkable quality of absorbing very large quantities of hydrogen gas per unit volume of metallic powder. The absorption and desorption of hydrogen are exothermic and endothermic...

Ally, M. R.; Rebello, W. J.; Rosso, M. J., Jr.

1984-01-01

181

Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Being Developed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Lewis Research Center has contracted with Electro Energy, Inc., to develop a bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery design for energy storage on low-Earth-orbit satellites. The objective of the bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery development program is to approach advanced battery development from a systems level while incorporating technology advances from the lightweight nickel electrode field, hydride development, and design developments from nickel-hydrogen systems. This will result in a low-volume, simplified, less-expensive battery system that is ideal for small spacecraft applications. The goals of the program are to develop a 1-kilowatt, 28-volt (V), bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery with a specific energy of 100 watt-hours per kilogram (W-hr/kg), an energy density of 250 W-hr/liter and a 5-year life in low Earth orbit at 40-percent depth-of-discharge.

Manzo, Michelle A.

1998-01-01

182

High-pressure synthesis of noble metal hydrides.  

PubMed

The formation of hydride phases in the noble metals copper, silver, and gold was investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction at high hydrogen pressures. In the case of copper, a novel hexagonal hydride phase, Cu2H, was synthesised at pressures above 18.6 GPa. This compound exhibits an anti-CdI2-type structure, where hydrogen atoms occupy every second layer of octahedral interstitial sites. In contrast to chemically produced CuH, this phase does not show a change in compressibility compared to pure copper. Furthermore, repeated compression (after decomposition of Cu2H) led to the formation of cubic copper hydride at 12.5 GPa, a phenomenon attributed to an alteration of the microstructure during dehydrogenation. No hydrides of silver (up to 87 GPa) or gold (up to 113 GPa) were found at both room and high temperatures. PMID:23574244

Donnerer, Christian; Scheler, Thomas; Gregoryanz, Eugene

2013-04-01

183

Structure and bonding of second-row hydrides  

E-print Network

The atomic orbitals, hybridization and chemical bonding of the most common hydrides of boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen are described. This can be very instructive for beginning students in chemistry and chemical physics.

Blinder, S M

2014-01-01

184

Pi-systems as simultaneous hydride and hydrogen bond acceptors.  

PubMed

A theoretical study of the hydride bond complexes with tetrafluoro- and tetracyanoethylene, C2F4 and C2(CN)4, has been carried out by means of density functional theory (DFT) and ab initio methods, up to the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computational level. In addition, the ternary complexes formed by an additional standard hydrogen bond donor, such as hydrogen fluoride, have been explored. The results show that the hydride bond complexes are stable and an electron transfer took place from the hydride to the C2F4 and C2(CN)4 molecules. While these molecules are not able to form stable complexes between the pi-electrons and hydrogen bond donors, the presence of the hydrides in the opposite face of the pi-system of C2F4 stabilizes the ternary complexes showing cooperativity effects. PMID:18593106

Alkorta, Ibon; Blanco, Fernando; Elguero, Jose

2008-07-24

185

APPLIED MERCURY CAPTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

The first purpose of this project is to complete bench and pilot scale testing of promising mercury sorbents. This work would apply findings from fundamental, mechanistic efforts over the past three years that have developed sorbents which show improved capture of elemental and ...

186

Mercury Shopping Cart Interface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

2006-01-01

187

Mercury and Venus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students explore Mercury and Venus, the first and second planets nearest the Sun. They learn about the planets' characteristics, including their differences from Earth. Students also learn how engineers are involved in the study of planets by designing equipment and spacecraft to go where it is too dangerous for humans.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

188

Hazards of Mercury.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Common concern for the protection and improvement of the environment and the enhancement of human health and welfare underscore the purpose of this special report on the hazards of mercury directed to the Secretary's Pesticide Advisory Committee, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The report summarizes the findings of a ten-member study…

Environmental Research, 1971

1971-01-01

189

MERCURY SPECIATION AND CAPTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

In December 2000, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) announced its intent to regulate mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utility steam generating plants. Maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements are to be proposed by December 2003 and finali...

190

The Mercury Orbiter mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

A Mercury Orbiter is considered by the European Space Agency as one of the cornerstones of its Horizons 2000 programme. The scientific objectives of this mission are both planetary and magnetospheric. The spacecraft and mission concepts which resulted from the ESA assessment study and an outline of the forthcoming activities are presented.

R. Grard

1997-01-01

191

ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental contamination from mercury has been recognized for decades as a growing problem to humans and wildlife. It is released from a variety of sources, exhibits a complicated chemistry, and proceeds via several different pathways to humans and wildlife. According to the...

192

Biological Methylation of Mercury in Aquatic Organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

FRESHWATER fish, especially pike (Esox lucius), from Sweden sometimes contain abnormally large amounts of mercury1. It was initially concluded to be either inorganic mercury or phenyl mercury, which are known to be released as industrial wastes, but later it was shown that the mercury was present almost entirely as methyl mercury (CH3Hg+)2. A possible explanation is that living organisms have

S. Jensen; A. JERNELÖV

1969-01-01

193

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process  

SciTech Connect

The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-04-01

194

Ab-Initio Study of the Group 2 Hydride Anions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The beryllium hydride (BeH)- dimer has recently been shown to be surprisingly strongly bound, with an electronic structure which is highly dependent on internuclear separation. At the equilibrium distance, the negative charge is to be found on the beryllium atom, despite the higher electronegativity of the hydrogen. The current study expands this investigation to the other Group 2 hydrides, and attempts to explain these effects. M. Verdicchio, G. L. Bendazzoli, S. Evangelisti, T. Leininger J. Phys. Chem. A, 117, 192, (2013)

Harris, Joe P.; Wright, Timothy G.; Manship, Daniel R.

2013-06-01

195

Mercury Information Clearinghouse  

SciTech Connect

The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through analysis and quality assurance programs; and (4) Create and maintain an information clearinghouse to ensure that all parties can keep informed on global mercury research and development activities.

Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

2006-03-31

196

Hydride-containing molten salts and their technology implications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydride-conducting molten salts such as LiH in eutectic LiCl-KCl are attractive electrolyte systems for intermediate-temperature applications. The chemically reducing characteristics of these hydride melts provide a unique method to clean metal surfaces. The high conductivity of these hydride melts makes them the best electrolytes for hydrogen-based energy applications at intermediate temperatures. We will review some earlier work on hydride-conducting molten salts and their potential applications in energy technology. We will also describe some recent work on these hydride-containing molten salts for energy conversion and storage applications, including hydrogen sensing and hydrogen storage, electrochemical characterizations, and thermodynamic and kinetic investigations of metal-hydrogen reactions. More recently, lithium deuteride containing eutectic LiCl-KCl melts have been used for excess heat production by the process of electrolysis to charge deuterium into metal matrix such as Pd and Ti. From these studies we illustrate the prospects of this hydride molten salt technology and its implications for the use in intermediate-temperature electro-chemical energy conversion configurations. It will also reveal some interesting electrochemical aspects involved in the processes.

Liaw, Bor Y.

1993-03-01

197

AIR PASSIVATION OF METAL HYDRIDE BEDS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydride beds offer compact, safe storage of tritium. After metal hydride beds have reached the end of their useful life, the beds will replaced with new beds and the old beds prepared for disposal. One acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the material inside the bed not be pyrophoric. To determine the pyrophoric nature of spent metal hydride beds, controlled air ingress tests were performed. A simple gas handling manifold fitted with pressure transducers and a calibrated volume were used to introduce controlled quantities of air into a metal hydride bed and the bed temperature rise monitored for reactivity with the air. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 scc air was consumed by the bed (0.08 scc per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12th cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water.

Klein, J; R. H. Hsu, R

2007-07-02

198

Effect of niobium additions on initial hydriding kinetics of uranium  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To study the behavior of hydrogen corrosion at the surface of U, U-2.5 wt%Nb alloy and U-5.7 wt%Nb, a gas-solid reaction system with an in situ microscope was designed. The nucleation and growth of the hydride of the alloy were continuously observed and recorded by a computer. The different characteristics of the hydrides on U metal and U-2.5 wt%Nb showed that the later alloy is more susceptible to hydrogen corrosion than the former. The growth rate of hydride of U-2.5 wt%Nb, calculated by measuring the perimeter of the hydride spots recorded by the in situ microscope, exhibited a reaction temperature dependency in the range of 40-160 °C, for pressure of 0.8 × 105 Pa. An Arrhenius plot for growth rate versus temperature yielded activation energy of 24.34 kJ/mol for the hydriding of U-2.5 wt%Nb alloy. The maximum hydriding rate was obtained at 125 °C, whose thermodynamics reason was discussed.

Li, Ruiwen; Wang, Xiaolin

2014-06-01

199

Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

2013-09-30

200

A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan  

EPA Science Inventory

LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

201

Electrochemical behaviour of intermetallic-based metal hydrides used in Ni\\/metal hydride (MH) batteries: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen storage alloys are a group of new functional intermetallics which can be used in heat pumps, catalysts, hydrogen sensors and Ni\\/MH batteries. The development of Ni\\/MH (Metal Hydride) batteries based on MH negative electrodes has seen considerable activity in recent years. Batteries based on such hydride materials have some major advantages over the more conventional lead–acid and nickel–cadmium systems.

F Feng; M Geng; D. O Northwood

2001-01-01

202

Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with five different oxidation catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 mug/m 3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO 2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400°C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. alpha-iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but gamma-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

Varanasi, Patanjali

203

A MODELLING FRAMEWORK FOR MERCURY CYCLING IN LAKE MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A time dependent mercury model was developed to describe mercury cycling in Lake Michigan. The model addresses dynamic relationships between net mercury loadings and the resulting concentrations of mercury species in the water and sediment. The transformations among three mercury...

204

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOEpatents

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01

205

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOEpatents

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

Greenhalgh, W.O.

1987-02-27

206

What You Need to Know about Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

When you think of mercury, you probably think of the red or silver liquid inside of a thermometer. When you put the thermometer in your mouth, the mercury tells you how high your temperature is. Mercury ...

207

MERCURY DEPOSITION AND LAKE QUALITY TRENDS  

EPA Science Inventory

Watershed factors influence the differing trends in mercury residue levels. Fish mercury concentrations show positive correlations with water color, methylmercury concentrations, and plankton mercury, and negative correlations with pH and alkalinity....

208

Field experience with mercury monitors  

SciTech Connect

With US mercury regulations pending and control technologies in the full-scale demonstration stage, accurate and reliable measurement of mercury in flue gas is becoming more important than ever. This article compares the results of field measurements of commercially available mercury monitors to approved reference methods. A key but not-so-surprising finding: not all mercury monitors are created equal. Four commercial continuous and semi-continuous mercury CEMs and three sorbent trap (ST) systems were compared at Allegheny Energy's coal-fired Armstrong Power Station. The results were compared to the US and EU standard EN-13211 reference methods. All the monitors and traps tested performed very well and all the methods were close in terms of precision, but somewhat higher precision was obtained on low-mercury coal. 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Sarunac, N.; Cipriano, D.; Ryan, J.; Schakenbach, J. [Lehigh University Energy Research Center (United States)

2007-08-15

209

[Mercury (and...) through the centuries].  

PubMed

Mercury has a long history, fascinating in its many aspects. Through the centuries--from ancient times to the present day--the metal in its various forms, also known under the name "quicksilver", accompanied the man and was used for diversified purposes. Today, mercury is employed in manufacturing thermometers, barometers, vacuum pumps and explosives. It is also used in silver and gold mining processes. Mercury compounds play a significant role in dentistry, pharmaceutical industry and crop protection. The contemporary use of mercury markedly decreases, but historically speaking, the archives abound in materials that document facts and events occurring over generations and the immense intellectual effort aiming at discovering the true properties and mechanisms of mercury activity. Mercury toxicity, manifested in destruction of biological membranes and binding of the element with proteins, what disturbs biochemical processes occurring in the body, was discovered only after many centuries of the metal exerting its effect on the lives of individuals and communities. For centuries, mercury was present in the work of alchemists, who searched for the universal essence or quintessence and the so-called philosopher's stone. In the early modern era, between the 16th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to manufacture mirrors. Mercury compounds were employed as a medication against syphilis, which plagued mankind for more than four hundred years--from the Middle Ages till mid 20th century, when the discovery of penicillin became the turning point. This extremely toxic therapy resulted in much suffering, individual tragedies, chronic poisonings leading to fatalities and dramatic sudden deaths. In the last fifty years, there even occurred attempts of mentally imbalanced individuals at injecting themselves with metallic mercury, also as a performance-enhancing drug. Instances of mass mercury poisoning occurred many times in the past in consequence of eating food products poisoned with organic mercury compounds originating from the natural environment. PMID:21863739

K?ys, Ma?gorzata

2010-01-01

210

The Mercury dual orbiter mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Mercury Orbiter (MeO) will carry out a full range of particles, fields, and planetary imaging science at Mercury. Present mission plans call for a launch in 1999 with a flight time of about 4.5 years. By means of multiple Venus and Mercury gravitational assists, the mission can be accomplished with present U.S. launch vehicles and a very large payload

D. N. Baker; J. A. Slavin

1990-01-01

211

Computational modelling of the volatile hydride fragmentation in a dielectric barrier discharge atomizer.  

PubMed

In this study, we present a model whereby a fragmentation of arsenic hydride in a rectangular dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) atomizer is investigated. The aim is to elucidate the distribution of the intermediates species and generated free analyte atoms along atomizer channel, which is required to decide the optimal position for spectrometric data acquisition. Simulation results indicate that formation of intermediate species and free arsenic atoms is initiated in the first section of atomization channel before reaching the section between the electrodes. Moreover, concentration of free arsenic atoms saturates to a maximum and does not vary thereafter along atomization channel. This result could be attributed to the presence of abundance of hydrogen radicals along atomization channel which limits recombination reactions and ultimately maintains free atom life, which is so useful for analytical purposes. This outcome suggests an approach for radial data acquisition from any position along DBD atomization channel with same sensitivity. Furthermore, this result indicates that DBD atomizer is appropriate for analytical purposes and competitive to other well known atomization tools such as a quartz cell atomizer. The model has been verified experimentally upon examining arsenic and mercury qualitatively from applying chemical vapour generation techniques. Approximately similar results obtained from three radial positions along the atomization channel, whereas a significant increase in signal intensity observed when applying axial viewing by 22 and 40% for arsenic and mercury respectively. Furthermore, a quantitative determination for arsenic is also tried; however, the results were found not useful for model validation due to the hydrogen magnification effect on the recorded spectrum. PMID:23173925

Abdul-Majeed, Wameath S; Zimmerman, William B

2013-03-01

212

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01

213

Mercury in the national parks  

USGS Publications Warehouse

One thing is certain: Even for trained researchers, predicting mercury’s behavior in the environment is challenging. Fundamentally it is one of 98 naturally occurring elements, with natural sources, such as volcanoes, and concentrated ore deposits, such as cinnabar. Yet there are also human-caused sources, such as emissions from both coal-burning power plants and mining operations for gold and silver. There are elemental forms, inorganic or organic forms, reactive and unreactive species. Mercury is emitted, then deposited, then re-emitted—thus earning its mercurial reputation. Most importantly, however, it is ultimately transferred into food chains through processes fueled by tiny microscopic creatures: bacteria.

Pritz, Colleen Flanagan; Eagles-Smith, Collin; Krabbenhoft, David

2014-01-01

214

Mercury Information Clearinghouse  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC

Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

2006-01-01

215

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOEpatents

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-Heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-Rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2011-08-30

216

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOEpatents

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting of flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Beijing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Berkeley, CA)

2009-01-20

217

Method for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-04-09

218

Method for scavenging mercury  

DOEpatents

Disclosed herein is a method for removing mercury from a gas stream comprising contacting the gas stream with a getter composition comprising bromine, bromochloride, sulphur bromide, sulphur dichloride or sulphur monochloride and mixtures thereof. In one preferred embodiment the getter composition is adsorbed onto a sorbent. The sorbent may be selected from the group consisting flyash, limestone, lime, calcium sulphate, calcium sulfite, activated carbon, charcoal, silicate, alumina and mixtures thereof. Preferred is flyash, activated carbon and silica.

Chang, Shih-ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, Shou-heng (Kaohsiung, TW); Liu, Zhao-rong (Bejing, CN); Yan, Naiqiang (Burkeley, CA)

2010-07-13

219

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01

220

Method for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01

221

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-07-16

222

The planet Mercury (1971)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The physical properties of the planet Mercury, its surface, and atmosphere are presented for space vehicle design criteria. The mass, dimensions, mean density, and orbital and rotational motions are described. The gravity field, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and charged particles in the planet's orbit are discussed. Atmospheric pressure, temperature, and composition data are given along with the surface composition, soil mechanical properties, and topography, and the surface electromagnetic and temperature properties.

1972-01-01

223

PREPRINT submitted to Journal of Physics B Electronic structure of the Magnesium hydride  

E-print Network

PREPRINT submitted to Journal of Physics B Electronic structure of the Magnesium hydride molecular: 31.15.AR,31.15.Ct,31.50.Be,31.50.Df #12; Electronic structure of the Magnesium hydride molecular ion

Recanati, Catherine

224

Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

Zollars, G. F.

1980-01-01

225

Neutral and Ionized Hydrides in Star-Forming Regions. Observations with Herschel/HIFI  

E-print Network

, an ion, or another hydride. Hydrides are the most basic molecules through which astrochemistry develops further. They are of fundamental importance for astrochemistry (reviews, e.g., in refs 2 and 3

226

Synthesis and small molecule chemistry of the niobaziridine-hydride functional group  

E-print Network

Chapter 1. Synthesis and Divergent Reactivity of the Niobaziridine-Hydride Functional Group The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of the niobaziridine-hydride complex Nb(H)([eta]²-t- ]Bu(H)C=NAr)(N[Np]Ar)? (la-H; ...

Figueroa, Joshua S

2005-01-01

227

Hydrides of DyCo/sub 3/  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen desorption isotherms have been measured in the system DyCo/sub 3/H/sub x/ for 0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 4.25 at temperatures of 0/sup 0/, 20/sup 0/, 40/sup 0/, 60/sup 0/, and 80/sup 0/C. Pressure plateaus on the isotherms indicate the existence of two hydride phases in addition to the terminal hydrogen-saturated metal ..cap alpha.. phase. Both exhibit a wide range of solid solutions. The ..beta.. phase runs from x = 1 to x = 1.83, while the ..gamma.. phase runs from 3.1 to at least 4.25. The ..cap alpha.. phase is very narrow. At 20/sup 0/C the plateau pressures are 3 torr and 54 torr, and the heats of absorption are -11.43 and -9.75 kcal/mole(H/sub 2/) respectively. From the temperature dependence of the isotherms, the partial molar heats and entropies of absorption and the heats and entropies of formation have been calculated as a function of x.

Kierstead, H.A.

1980-01-01

228

Mercury biotransformations and their potential for remediation of mercury contamination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bacterially mediated ionic mercury reduction to volatile Hg0 was shown to play an important role in the geochemical cycling of mercury in a contaminated freshwater pond. This process, and the degradation of methylmercury, could be stimulated to reduce the concentration of methylmercury that is available for accumulation by biota. A study testing the utility of this approach is described.

Tamar Barkay; Ralph Turner; Erwan Saouter; Joanne Horn

1992-01-01

229

Metal hydride electrode for high energy density sealed nickel-metal hydride battery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

By choosing an appropriate hydrogen storage alloy for a negative electrode with a higher density than a cadmium electrode, there is a possibility of greatly increasing the energy density of a nickel-metal hydride Ni-H(MH) battery system over that of nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) battery system of approximately the same cell voltage. Thus with an MmNi5 (Mm: abbreviation for mish metal) alloy system having a CaCu5 type of crystal structure as the object of study, the alloy composition and its homogenization, electrode structure etc. were studied and the high capacity metal hydride electrodes were used in the Ni-H(MH). Although a sealed Ni-H(MH) cylindrical cell was built and achieved a high initial capacity, this decreased with repeated charge-discharge cycles. To investigate the cause of this deterioration, the composition of the alloy and the effect of etching treatment of the powder surface were analyzed by SEM photos and X-ray diffraction patterns. The results made it clear that an Ni-H(MH) cell of AA (R6) size with a discharge capacity of 1.05 to 1.1 Ah, that is, with an energy density approximately 40 percent higher than an Ni-Cd cell, and with a long life exceeding 500 complete charge-discharge cycles could be achieved.

Ogawa, Hiromichi; Ikoma, Munehisa; Kawano, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Isao

230

Solid-State Gadolinium-Magnesium Hydride Optical Switch R. Armitage  

E-print Network

Solid-State Gadolinium-Magnesium Hydride Optical Switch R. Armitage Lawrence Berkeley National The optical switching properties of gadolinium-magnesium hydride have been demonstrated in a solid and reflecting states. Keywords: gadolinium-magnesium; electrochromic hydride; optical switching device. 2 #12;A

231

Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

ONISCHAK

1976-01-01

232

Paraboloid model of Mercury's magnetosphere  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new “Paraboloidal” model of Mercury's magnetospheric magnetic field based upon the earlier terrestrial model and using similar techniques is developed. The model describes the field of Mercury's dipole, which is considered to be offset from the planet's center; the magnetopause currents driven by the solar wind; and the tail current system including the cross-tail currents and their closure currents

I. I. Alexeev; E. S. Belenkaya; S. Yu. Bobrovnikov; J. A. Slavin; M. Sarantos

2008-01-01

233

Mercury and autism: Accelerating Evidence?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The causes of autism and neurodevelopmental disorders are unknown. Genetic and environmental risk factors seem to be involved. Because of an observed increase in autism in the last decades, which parallels cumulative mercury expo- sure, it was proposed that autism may be in part caused by mercury. We review the evidence for this proposal. Several epidemiological studies failed to find

Joachim Mutter; Johannes Naumann; Rainer Schneider; Harald Walach; Boyd Haley

2005-01-01

234

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks  

E-print Network

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks Part 2 a Using a subset of data collected on RJD shark research trips, you will analyze the mercury levels found in the Florida Sharks we catch. Based on your, and hypothesize why that might be. You will also be able to determine whether eating shark is a risk to human

Miami, University of

235

Mercury Removal from Waste Oils  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was effectively removed from the oil via sorption using SAMMS.The method was demonstrated on a large scale using ORNL waste oil contaminated with mercury. This technology is ready for further demonstration and implementation when the SAMMS material is available in large quantities.

Cummins, R.L.; Klasson, T.; Taylor, P.A.

1999-06-20

236

Mercury Removal from Waste Organics  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was effectively removed from the oil via sorption using SAMMS.The method was demonstrated on a large scale using ORNL waste oil contaminated with mercury. This technology is ready for further demonstration and implementation when the SAMMS material is available in large quantities.

Cummins, R.L.; Klasson, T.; Taylor, P.A.

1999-02-28

237

Mercury in Canadian prairie ducks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissues of 190 ducks, shot on the Canadian prairie during the hunting seasons of 1969 and 1970, were analyzed for mercury residues. Residue levels of over 0.5 ppm were found only in breast muscle of common mergansers (Mergus merganser). Livers contained, on the average, 2.9 times as much mercury as breast muscles. Primary feathers contained, on the average, 12 times

K. Vermeer; F. A. J. Armstrong

1972-01-01

238

Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation\\/Chlorination Reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control\\/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury

Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

2008-01-01

239

RMP Mercury Strategy 06-03-09.doc Page 1 of 5 RMP MERCURY STRATEGY  

E-print Network

RMP Mercury Strategy 06-03-09.doc Page 1 of 5 RMP MERCURY STRATEGY Mercury is a pollutant of high the information most urgently needed by managers to find remedies to the Bay's mercury problem. The focus of total mercury in the Bay are expected to slowly decline over coming decades. The premise

240

CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.  

PubMed

The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface. PMID:22433948

Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

2012-04-28

241

Models for Metal Hydride Particle Shape, Packing, and Heat Transfer  

E-print Network

A multiphysics modeling approach for heat conduction in metal hydride powders is presented, including particle shape distribution, size distribution, granular packing structure, and effective thermal conductivity. A statistical geometric model is presented that replicates features of particle size and shape distributions observed experimentally that result from cyclic hydride decreptitation. The quasi-static dense packing of a sample set of these particles is simulated via energy-based structural optimization methods. These particles jam (i.e., solidify) at a density (solid volume fraction) of 0.665+/-0.015 - higher than prior experimental estimates. Effective thermal conductivity of the jammed system is simulated and found to follow the behavior predicted by granular effective medium theory. Finally, a theory is presented that links the properties of bi-porous cohesive powders to the present systems based on recent experimental observations of jammed packings of fine powder. This theory produces quantitative experimental agreement with metal hydride powders of various compositions.

Kyle C. Smith; Timothy S. Fisher

2012-05-04

242

Mercury: Beethoven Quadrangle, H-7  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury: Computer Photomosaic of the Beethoven Quadrangle, H-7 The Beethoven Quadrangle, named for the 19th century classical German composer, lies in Mercury's Equatorial Mercator located between longitude 740 to 1440. The Mariner 10 spacecraft imaged the region during its initial flyby of the planet. The Image Processing Lab at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory produced this photomosaic using computer software and techniques developed for use in processing planetary data. The images used to construct the Beethoven Quadrangle were taken as Mariner 10 flew passed Mercury. The Mariner 10 spacecraft was launched in 1974. The spacecraft took images of Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury in March and September 1974 and March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 images of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon during its mission. The Mariner 10 Mission was managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science in Washington, D.C.

2000-01-01

243

Alternatives to the mercury sphygmomanometer.  

PubMed

The mercury sphygmomanometer was introduced over 100 years ago. Mercury, however, is a potent human neurotoxin. An international effort has developed to eliminate health-care sources of mercury--the thermometer and sphygmomanometer--and replace them with less toxic alternatives. There is concern regarding the accuracy of these alternative devices. We conducted a literature review of articles published between 1995 and 2009 evaluating the accuracy of mercury, aneroid, and oscillometric blood pressure devices. Mercury sphygmomanometers fared the best although they do not always perform as expected, failing calibration tests between 1 and 28 per cent of the time. Up to 61 per cent of aneroid sphygmomanometers failed. Recently calibrated aneroid devices performed well. Oscillometric devices were less studied and their performance was variable. All three devices showed variable performance. They should be validated before purchase and calibrated on a regular basis. PMID:21109765

Buchanan, Susan; Orris, Peter; Karliner, Joshua

2011-02-01

244

High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

Holland, Patrick L. [Yale University] [Yale University

2013-08-29

245

THE CHEMICAL CYCLE AND BIOACCUMULATION OF MERCURY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because it is very toxic and accumulates in organisms, particularly in fish, mercury is an important pollutant and one of the most studied. Nonetheless we still have an incomplete understanding of the factors that control the bioconcentration of mercury. Elemental mercury is efficiently transported as a gas around the globe, and even remote areas show evidence of mercury pollution originating

Francois M. M. Morel; Anne M. L. Kraepiel; Marc Amyot

1998-01-01

246

Methods for dispensing mercury into devices  

DOEpatents

A process for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1987-04-28

247

Environmental Geochemistry of Mercury Mines in Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey fact sheet investigates potential environmental contamination around naturally occurring, mercury-rich mineral deposits in Alaska. Testing of mercury levels in streams and sediments is described, as well as mercury levels in fish downstream from mines and the environmental effects of mercury entering the food chain.

248

Methods for dispensing mercury into devices  

DOEpatents

A process is described for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury. 2 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1987-04-28

249

The chemistry of atmospheric mercury: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The atmosphere is an important transient reservoir of mercury. In addition to its great capacity, the chemical processes transforming mercury between the elemental and divalent states strongly influence the transport characteristics and deposition rate of this toxic metal back to the ground. Modeling efforts to assess global cycling of mercury require an in-depth knowledge of atmospheric mercury chemistry. This review

Che-Jen Lin; Simo O. Pehkonen

1999-01-01

250

Elemental mercury removal using a wet scrubber  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is emitted into the environment by both natural and human activities. Acute and chronic exposure to mercury and methyl mercury in humans results in central nervous system damage, kidney damage, and even death. Although some Hg emission sources have been regulated, coal-fired utilities have not been. In anticipation of federal regulations on mercury

E. Gonzalez; C. D. Livengood; K. Martin; M. H. Mendelsohn; C. Q. Zhou

1999-01-01

251

Mercury Spill Information and Response Guidance  

E-print Network

Mercury Spill Information and Response Guidance Background Information Mercury can be found, plumbing traps and vacuum pumps. When mercury is spilled, it forms beads or droplets that can accumulate mercury vapors can be very dangerous, depending on the amount inhaled and the length of exposure

Holland, Jeffrey

252

Heat treatment of cadmium mercury telluride  

SciTech Connect

A method for the heat treatment of cadmium mercury telluride homogeneous single crystals is disclosed wherein the crystals are heated and maintained at a temperature in the range of from about 300 K to below the solidus temperature of the composition trea in the presence of mercury, the vapor pressure of mercury being less than the saturation vapor pressure of mercury.

Micklethwaite, W.F.

1983-02-22

253

Elemental Mercury Spills  

PubMed Central

Sources of elemental mercury (Hg0) include old natural gas regulators, manometers, sphygmomanometers, thermometers, and thermostats. Causes of Hg0 spills include improper storage, container breakage, children playing with Hg0, the breakage of devices containing Hg0, and ritualistic use of Hg0. Inhalation is the primary exposure route for Hg0. Mercury released into the environment can enter lakes and streams, where bacteria convert it into methylmercury, which bioaccumulates in fish. Chronic exposure to Hg0 vapors can damage the kidneys and neurologic system. Short-term exposure to high levels of Hg0 vapors may cause lung damage, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, increases in blood pressure or heart rate, skin rashes, and eye irritation, among other effects. Minimizing Hg0 dispersal is important after an Hg0 spill. Tracking by shoes or apparel or vacuuming can spread Hg0, increasing airborne concentrations and cleanup costs. The Illinois Department of Public Health’s response to an Hg0 spill depends on the size of the spill. Airborne concentrations after large spills are mapped with a mercury vapor analyzer (MVA). The cleanup begins with the spill site and any hot spots that were identified with the MVA. Hard surfaces can usually be cleaned, but contaminated porous items must be discarded. Leaving marginally contaminated items outdoors for a month or more during warm weather may dissipate the Hg0. After a cleanup, clearance sampling is conducted to determine if further cleanup is needed. The best way to prevent Hg0 spills is reduce its use. PMID:16451846

Baughman, Thomas A.

2006-01-01

254

Cycle performance of a silver-metal hydride cell  

SciTech Connect

Cycling experiments were conducted on a silver oxide-metal hydride cell Previous work on this system determined the influence of electrolyte concentration on rate capability, charge retention and cycle life. The emphasis of this work was placed on enhancing the cycle life of this system. Cells were assembled using sintered silver and AB{sub 5} metal hydride electrodes. Cycle data were collected on flooded cells containing 31 and 45% KOH. A major variable in the improvement of the cycle performance was the silver migration barrier material.

Lipka, S.M.; Nechev, K.S. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States). Dept. of Ocean Engineering

1996-11-01

255

Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

Silver, G.L.

1984-05-18

256

Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions.  

PubMed

Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, BxAlyHz(-), were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms. PMID:24784280

Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K

2014-04-28

257

Reference Atmosphere for Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of this three year proposal are: (1) to calculate the likely diffusive flux of Ar and He from the interior of Mercury for representative crustal compositions; (2) compute a reasonable estimate of the fractional escape flux of photoions for the likely range of field conditions; and (3) to calculate the capture rate of solar wind ions into the atmosphere. The morphology of the magnetosphere in response to the solar wind and the IMF is the crucial boundary condition for the flux of ions to the surface. We have tackled problem (1) using a multipath diffusion code, and problems (2) and (3) using a combination of MHD and kinetic plasma dynamics.

Killen, Rosemary M.

2002-01-01

258

Transit of Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It isn't every day that one gets to view a transit of Mercury. In fact, it's an event that only occurs approximately twelve times a century. For those of you who missed this event on November 8th, the researchers and scientists at the Exploratorium in San Francisco have created this program that contains the complete event and offer it to visitors to this lovely website. The transit was recorded from Kitt Peak in Arizona, and visitors to the site can watch a brief introduction to the program, and then watch various images from the webcast, complete with audio commentary at the beginning of each hour of coverage.

2006-01-01

259

Fluorescent sensor for mercury  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22

260

Geothermal hazards - Mercury emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Enthusiasm for intensified geothermal exploration may induce many participants to overlook a long-term potential toxicity hazard possibly associated with the tapping of magmatic steam. The association of high atmospheric Hg levels with geothermal activity has been established both in Hawaii and Iceland, and it has been shown that mercury can be introduced into the atmosphere from fumaroles, hot springs, and magmatic sources. These arguments, extended to thallium, selenium, and other hazardous elements, underscore the need for environmental monitoring in conjunction with the delivery of magmatic steam to the surface.

Siegel, S. M.; Siegel, B. Z.

1975-01-01

261

The magnetosphere of Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Data provided by the Mariner-10 spacecraft on the properties of Mercurian magnetosphere are examined. These observations indicate that the Mercurian magnetosphere has a magnetopause and a bow shock which are quite similar to their terrestrial counterparts, although much smaller. However, due to the absence of any significant atmosphere or ionosphere, the flow of current in the Mercurian magnetosphere is different from the patterns at the earth. Many questions regarding the intrinsic magnetic field properties of Mercury remain unanswered, such as the existence of radiation belts, magnetic storms, the size of auroral regions, the mechanism of global magnetospheric convection, and the source of plasma.

Russell, C. T.; Baker, D. N.; Slavin, J. A.

1988-01-01

262

An Electrolytic Method to Form Zirconium Hydride Phases in Zirconium Alloys with Morphologies Similar to Hydrides Formed in Used Nuclear Fuel  

E-print Network

AN ELECTROLYTIC METHOD TO FORM ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE PHASES IN ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS WITH MORPHOLOGIES SIMILAR TO HYDRIDES FORMED IN USED NUCLEAR FUEL A Thesis by SAMUEL HOUSTON KUHR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2012 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering ii An Electrolytic Method to Form Zirconium Hydride Phases...

Kuhr, Samuel Houston

2012-10-19

263

49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). 173.164 Section 173.164 Transportation...Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing...

2013-10-01

264

49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). 173.164 Section 173.164 Transportation...Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing...

2012-10-01

265

49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). 173.164 Section 173.164 Transportation...Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing...

2010-10-01

266

49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). 173.164 Section 173.164 Transportation...Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing...

2011-10-01

267

A Mercury Transport and Fate Model for Mass Budget Assessment of Mercury Cycling in Lake Michigan  

EPA Science Inventory

A mercury mass balance model was developed to describe and evaluate the fate, transport, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. Coupling with total suspendable solids (TSS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the mercury transport and fate model simulates...

268

Mercury toxicity and neurodegenerative effects.  

PubMed

Mercury is among the most toxic heavy metals and has no known physiological role in humans. Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic. Mercury has been used by man since ancient times. Among the earliest were the Chinese and Romans, who employed cinnabar (mercury sulfide) as a red dye in ink (Clarkson et al. 2007). Mercury has also been used to purify gold and silver minerals by forming amalgams. This is a hazardous practice, but is still widespread in Brazil's Amazon basin, in Laos and in Venezuela, where tens of thousands of miners are engaged in local mining activities to find and purify gold or silver. Mercury compounds were long used to treat syphilis and the element is still used as an antiseptic,as a medicinal preservative and as a fungicide. Dental amalgams, which contain about 50% mercury, have been used to repair dental caries in the U.S. since 1856.Mercury still exists in many common household products around the world.Examples are: thermometers, barometers, batteries, and light bulbs (Swain et al.2007). In small amounts, some organo mercury-compounds (e.g., ethylmercury tiosalicylate(thimerosal) and phenylmercury nitrate) are used as preservatives in some medicines and vaccines (Ballet al. 2001).Each mercury form has its own toxicity profile. Exposure to Hg0 vapor and MeHg produce symptoms in CNS, whereas, the kidney is the target organ when exposures to the mono- and di-valent salts of mercury (Hg+ and Hg++, respectively)occur. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury produces stomatitis, erethism and tremors. Chronic MeHg exposure induced symptoms similar to those observed in ALS, such as the early onset of hind limb weakness (Johnson and Atchison 2009).Among the organic mercury compounds, MeHg is the most biologically available and toxic (Scheuhammer et a!. 2007). MeHg is neurotoxic, reaching high levels of accumulation in the CNS; it can impair physiological function by disrupting endocrine glands (Tan et a!. 2009).The most important mechanism by which mercury causes toxicity appears to bemitochondrial damage via depletion of GSH (Nicole et a!. 1998), coupled with binding to thiol groups ( -SH), which generates free radicals. Mercury has a high affinity for thiol groups ( -SH) and seleno groups ( -SeH) that are present in amino acids as cysteine and N-acetyl cysteine, lipoic acid, proteins, and enzymes. N-acetylcysteine and cysteine are precursors for the biosynthesis of GSH, which is among the most powerful intracellular antioxidants available to protect against oxidative stress and inflammation.Mercury and methylmercury induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which reduces ATP synthesis and increases lipid, protein and DNA peroxidation. The content of metallothioneines, GSH, selenium and fish high in omega-3 fatty acids appear to be strongly related with degree of inorganic and organic mercury toxicity, and with the protective detoxifying mechanisms in humans. In conclusion, depletion of GSH,breakage of mitochondria, increased lipid peroxidation, and oxidation of proteins and DNA in the brain, induced by mercury and his salts, appear to be important factors in conditions such as ALS and AD (Bains and Shaw 1997; Nicole eta!. 1998;Spencer eta!. 1998; Alberti et a!. 1999). PMID:24515807

Carocci, Alessia; Rovito, Nicola; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Genchi, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

269

Uranium Hydride Nucleation Kinetics: Effects of Oxide Thickness and Vacuum Outgassing  

SciTech Connect

Many factors such as impurities in the oxide and metal, microstructure, gas impurities, and oxide thickness may influence the rate and location of the nucleation of hydride on uranium. This work has concentrated on isolating one of these variables, the oxide thickness, and measuring the effect of the oxide thickness on uranium hydride nucleation. Uranium samples, all from the same lot, were prepared with different oxide thicknesses. The oxide thickness was measured using Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy. Oxidized uranium samples were then exposed to ultra-high purity hydrogen gas under constant volume conditions. Decreases in pressure indicated hydrogen uptake by the sample. The time for hydride nucleation--as well as the maximum hydriding rate--was then calculated from the measured decreases in pressure. The time to nucleate a hydride was found to increase whereas the maximum hydriding rate was found to decrease with increasing oxide thickness. The density of hydride pits also decreased with increasing oxide thickness. The observed results support the argument that the nucleation of hydride is controlled somewhat by diffusion of hydrogen through the oxide layer. Vacuum outgassing of samples, thereby removing the oxide impurities and keeping the oxide thickness constant, dramatically decreased the nucleation time and increased the maximum hydriding rate. Again, this is consistent with hydrogen diffusion through the oxide controlling the nucleation of hydride. Impurities in the oxide layer can decrease the diffusivity of hydrogen and therefore delay the nucleation of uranium hydride.

David F. Teter; Robert J. Hanrahan; Christopher J. Wetteland

2001-03-01

270

Comparison of hydrogen elimination from molecular zinc and magnesium hydride clusters.  

PubMed

In analogy to the previously reported tetranuclear magnesium hydride cluster with a bridged dianionic bis-?-diketiminate ligand, a related zinc hydride cluster has been prepared. The crystal structures of these magnesium and zinc hydride complexes are similar: the metal atoms are situated at the corners of a tetrahedron in which the vertices are bridged either by dianionic bis-?-diketiminate ligands or hydride ions. Both structures are retained in solution and show examples of H(-)???H(-) NMR coupling (Mg: 8.5?Hz; Zn: 16.0?Hz). The zinc hydride cluster [NN-(ZnH)2]2 thermally decomposes at 90?°C and releases 1.8?equivalents of H2 . In contrast to magnesium hydride clusters, there is no apparent relationship between cluster size and thermal decomposition temperature for the zinc hydrides. DFT calculations reproduced the structure of the zinc hydride cluster reasonably well and charge density analysis showed no bond paths between the hydride ions. This contrasts with calculations on the analogous magnesium hydride cluster in which a counter-intuitive H(-)???H(-) bond path was observed. Forcing a reduced H(-)???H(-) distance in the zinc hydride cluster, however, gave rise to a H(-)???H(-) bond path. Such weak interactions could play a role in H2 desorption. The presumed molecular product after H2 release, a Zn(I) cluster, could not be characterized experimentally but DFT calculations predicted a cluster with two localized Zn-Zn bonds. PMID:25066656

Intemann, Julia; Sirsch, Peter; Harder, Sjoerd

2014-08-25

271

Determination of fracture strength of ?-zirconium hydrides embedded in zirconium matrix at high temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The fracture strength of ?-zirconium hydrides embedded in a zirconium matrix was determined at temperatures between 25 °C and 250 °C by ring tensile tests using Zircaloy-2 tubes. Essentially all of the present hydrides in the tubes were re-oriented in the radial direction by a temperature cycling treatment and then tensile stress was applied perpendicular to the hydrides to ensure that brittle fracture would occur at the hydrides. The hydrides failed in a brittle manner below 100 °C where-as the zirconium matrix itself underwent ductile fracture without hydride cracking at temperatures above 200 °C under plane stress condition. Brittle fracture of the hydrides continued to occur at temperatures up to 250 °C under plane strain condition, suggesting that the upper limit temperature for hydride fracture, Tupper, was raised by the triaxial stress state under the plane strain condition. The apparent fracture strength of the hydrides, ?hydridef, was determined at temperatures below Tupper from the measured fracture strength of the tubes, making a correction for the compressive transformation stress in the hydrides. ?hydridef was about 710 MPa at temperatures between 25 °C and 250 °C at both plane stress and plane strain conditions. The temperature dependency was very small in this temperature range. Tupper was almost equivalent to the cross-over temperature between ?hydridef and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), which suggests that, at temperatures above Tupper, the zirconium matrix would undergo ductile fracture before the stress in the hydride is raised above ?hydridef, since UTS is smaller than ?hydridef.

Kubo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.; Uchikoshi, H.

2013-04-01

272

Mercury content of Illinois soils  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For a survey of Illinois soils, 101 cores had been collected and analyzed to determine the current and background elemental compositions of Illinois soils. Mercury and other elements were determined in six samples per core, including a surface sample from each core. The mean mercury content in the surface samples was 33 ?? 20 ??g/kg soil, and the background content was 20 ?? 9 ??g/kg. The most probable sources of mercury in these soils were the parent material, and wet and dry deposition of Hg0 and Hg2+ derived from coal-burning power plants, other industrial plants, and medical and municipal waste incinerators. Mercury-bearing sewage sludge or other fertilizers applied to agricultural fields could have been the local sources of mercury. Although the mercury content correlated with organic carbon content or clay content in individual cores, when all the data were considered, there was no strong correlation between mercury and either the organic carbon or the clay-size content.

Dreher, G.B.; Follmer, L.R.

2004-01-01

273

Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis.  

PubMed

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 ?g kg(-1)) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 ?g kg(-1)). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark-in pyroclastic wounds-and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 ?g kg(-1)) and bark (6.0 ?g kg(-1)) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species. PMID:23760570

Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

2013-08-01

274

Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 ?g kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 ?g kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 ?g kg-1) and bark (6.0 ?g kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

2013-08-01

275

Heat-mass flow enhancement system for a metal hydride assembly  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Southern California Gas Company and Solar Turbines Incorporated are cooperating in the development and demonstration of a metal hydride/chemical heat pump (MHHP). In the design of the MHHP, heat transfer was considered to be the key technical study area. The goal of this effort is improved heat transfer and reduced thermal mass in a hydride heat exchanger/containment assembly. Phase 1 resulted in the detailed design of an advanced hydride heat exchanger. Phase 2 consisted of the experimental verification of the hydride alloy design data, fabrication of the hydride heat exchanger module components, heat transfer testing of the single heat exchanger element and preliminary performance testing of the entire module. Phase 3 was devoted to the complete characterization of the hydride heat exchanger modules through further operation and testing. A review of other possible hydride heat transfer concepts was also conducted in Phase 2.

Argabright, T. A.

1985-02-01

276

MESSENGER'S First Flyby of Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th close flyby of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER'S first flyby on January 14th, 2008 will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

Slavin, James A.

2008-01-01

277

Seasonal variations in Mercury’s dayside calcium exosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer on the MESSENGER spacecraft has observed calcium emission in Mercury’s exosphere on a near-daily basis since March 2011. During MESSENGER’s primary and first extended missions (March 2011 - March 2013) the dayside calcium exosphere was measured over eight Mercury years. We have simulated these data with a Monte Carlo model of exospheric source processes to show that (a) there is a persistent source of energetic calcium located in the dawn equatorial region, (b) there is a seasonal dependence in the calcium source rate, and (c) there are no obvious year-to-year variations in the near-surface dayside calcium exosphere.

Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, Rosemary M.; McClintock, William E.; Merkel, Aimee W.; Vervack, Ronald J.; Cassidy, Timothy A.; Sarantos, Menelaos

2014-08-01

278

Atomic hydrogen desorption from thin palladium hydride films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It has been proved that hydrogen atoms desorb from the surface of a decomposing thin palladium hydride film. A thin gold film deposited and sintered in situ was used as a selective adsorbent for atomic hydrogen. The TDMS (thermal desorption mass spectrometry) technique was applied to detect the adsorption of hydrogen on gold and to determine the amount adsorbed.

Lisowski, W.; Nowicka, E.; Wolfram, Z.; Du?, R.

1988-01-01

279

Oriented xenon hydride molecules in the gas phase  

Microsoft Academic Search

The production of the xenon hydride molecules HXeX with X = I and Cl in the gas phase is reviewed. These molecules are generated by the photolysis of the hydrogen halide HI and HCl molecules on the surface of large xenon Xen clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations show that the flexible H atoms react with the heavy XeX moiety and form

Udo Buck; Michal Fárník

2006-01-01

280

Photoelectron spectroscopy of phosphorus hydride anions Kent M. Ervina  

E-print Network

, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Department of Chemistry February 2005; published online 13 May 2005 Negative-ion photoelectron spectroscopy is applied to the PH apply negative-ion photoelectron spec- troscopy to a series of phosphorus hydride anions, PH- , PH2

Lineberger, W. Carl

281

Structural and Electronic Properties of Magnesium Hydride Surfaces.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mg--MgH2 system is of considerable interest in hydrogen technology, though the hydride forms very slowly. The microscopic mechanisms of hydriding/dehydriding Mg are not yet fully understood. In particular, transmission electron microscopy experimentsootnotetextB. Bokhonov et al., Mat. Lett. 5, 218 (1987); A. Altmann and T. Schober, Scripta Met. 25, 723 (1991). have shown differences in the relative orientation between the MgH2 lattice and the (hexagonal) Mg substrate during the formation process [ ,100)hydride; | ; (0001)Mg,, and the decomposition one [ ,110)hydride; | ; (0001)Mg,. In order to contribute to the understanding of the above orientation differences, and in general of the reactions occurring at the MgH2 surface, we have performed a comparative study of the unrelaxed and relaxed (100) and (110) surfaces. The electronic structure has been calculated using the LAPW method, and the chemical bonding has been obtained from the corresponding Wannier functions. Bonding at the surface differs from that of the bulk, and strongly depends on surface orientation and relaxation.

Posternak, Michel A.

2005-03-01

282

The importance of vibrations in modelling complex metal hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crystalline materials have zero point energy (ZPE) associated with phonon vibrations. This ZPE not only significantly alters the energetics of reactions involving complex metal hydrides, but also alters the equilibrium structure of these materials as determined by first principles calculations. This paper focuses on the structural effect of ZPE in the potential hydrogen storage material LiBH4.

Terry J. Frankcombe

2007-01-01

283

Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite  

DOEpatents

An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

Congdon, James W. (Aiken, SC)

2009-03-17

284

MERCURY STABILITY IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine whether the presence of mercury and 188 other trace substances, referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), in the stack emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric utility power plants poses an unacceptable public health risk (1). The EPA's conclusions and recommendations were presented in two reports: Mercury Study Report to Congress and Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units-Final Report to Congress. The first congressional report addressed both human health and the environmental effects of anthropogenic mercury emissions, while the second report addressed the risk to public health posed by emissions of HAPs from steam electricity-generating units. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is also required by the CAAAs to investigate mercury and determine a safe threshold level of exposure. Recently the National Academy of Sciences has also been commissioned by Congress to complete a report, based the available scientific evidence, regarding safe threshold levels of mercury exposure. Although the EPA reports did not state that mercury controls on coal-fired electric power stations should be required given the current state of the art, they did indicate that EPA views mercury as a potential threat to human health. It is likely that major sources of mercury emissions, including fossil-fired combustion systems, will be controlled at some point. In fact, municipal waste combustion units are already regulated. In anticipation of additional control measures, much research has been done (and continues) regarding the development of control technologies for mercury emitted from stationary sources to the atmosphere. Most approaches taken to date involve sorbent injection technologies or improve upon removal of mercury using existing technologies such as flue gas desulfurization scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators. Depending on the fly ash chemistry and the form of mercury present in the flue gas, some of these existing technologies can be effective at capturing vapor-phase mercury from the flue gas stream. Although much research has been done on enhancing the removal of mercury from flue gas streams, little research has focused on what happens to the mercury when it is captured and converted and/or transferred to a solid or aqueous solution. The stability (or mobility) of mercury in this final process is critical and leads to the questions, What impact will the increased concentration of mercury have on utilization, disposal, and reuse? and Is the mercury removed from the flue gas really removed from the environment or rereleased at a later point? To help answer these questions, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement did a series of experiments using thermal desorption and leaching techniques. This report presents the results from these tests.

John H. Pavlish

1999-07-01

285

MESSENGER Observations of Calcium in Mercury’s Exosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Ultraviolet and Visible Spectrometer (UVVS) channel of the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer (MASCS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft has made near-daily observations of calcium in Mercury’s exosphere since orbital observations began in March 2011. UVVS is a scanning grating monochrometer that measures resonantly scattered emission from Ca at 422.7 nm. The data have shown that the principal source of atomic Ca in the exosphere is located in the dawn equatorial sector. Calcium is seen to originate from a small region at high temperature 50,000 K), possibly as a product of the dissociation of calcium-bearing molecules ejected from the surface. Data collected over 8 Mercury years during MESSENGER’s 1-year primary and 1-year first extended missions have indicated that the source strength varies with Mercury’s true anomaly. The Ca flux from the surface is greatest near perihelion and weakest near aphelion, but there is little year-to-year variation in the source strength. The expected calcium source mechanisms, including micrometeoroid impact vaporization, ion sputtering, and dawn vaporization of material deposited on the nightside, do not appear to be consistent with the observations.

Burger, Matthew H.; Killen, R. M.; McClintock, W. E.; Merkel, A. W.; Vervack, R. J.; Sarantos, M.; Cassidy, T. A.

2013-10-01

286

5-year review of Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) is to develop hydrogen storage materials with engineering properties that allow the use of these materials in a way that satisfies the DOE/FreedomCAR Program system requirements for automotive hydrogen storage. The Center is a multidisciplinary and collaborative effort with technical interactions divided into two broad areas: (1) mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials) and (2) materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized). Driving all of this work are the hydrogen storage system specifications outlined by the FreedomCAR Program for 2010 and 2015. The organization of the MHCoE during the past year is show in Figure 1. During the past year, the technical work was divided into four project areas. The purpose of the project areas is to organize the MHCoE technical work along appropriate and flexible technical lines. The four areas summarized are: (1) Project A - Destabilized Hydrides, The objective of this project is to controllably modify the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption reactions in light metal hydrides using hydride destabilization strategies; (2) Project B - Complex Anionic Materials, The objective is to predict and synthesize highly promising new anionic hydride materials; (3) Project C - Amides/Imides Storage Materials, The objective of Project C is to assess the viability of amides and imides (inorganic materials containing NH{sub 2} and NH moieties, respectively) for onboard hydrogen storage; and (4) Project D - Alane, AlH{sub 3}, The objective of Project D is to understand the sorption and regeneration properties of AlH{sub 3} for hydrogen storage.

Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2010-05-01

287

Hydride transfer catalyzed by xylose isomerase: mechanism and quantum effects.  

PubMed

We have applied molecular dynamics umbrella-sampling simulation and ensemble-averaged variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (EA-VTST/MT) to calculate the reaction rate of xylose-to- xylulose isomerization catalyzed by xylose isomerase in the presence of two Mg2+ ions. The calculations include determination of the free energy of activation profile and ensemble averaging in the transmission coefficient. The potential energy function is approximated by a combined QM/MM/SVB method involving PM3 for the quantum mechanical (QM) subsystem, CHARMM22 and TIP3P for the molecular mechanical (MM) environment, and a simple valence bond (SVB) local function of two bond distances for the hydride transfer reaction. The simulation confirms the essential features of a mechanism postulated on the basis of kinetics and X-ray data by Whitlow et al. (Whitlow, M.; Howard, A. J.; Finzel, B. C.; Poulos, T. L.; Winborne, E.; Gilliland, G. L. Proteins 1991, 9, 153) and Ringe, Petsko, and coworkers (Labie, A.; Allen, K.-N.; Petsko, G. A.; Ringe, D. Biochemistry 1994, 33, 5469). This mechanism involves a rate-determining 1,2-hydride shift with prior and post proton transfers. Inclusion of quantum mechanical vibrational energy is important for computing the free energy of activation, and quantum mechanical tunneling effects are essential for computing kinetic isotope effects (KIEs). It is found that 85% of the reaction proceeds by tunneling and 15% by overbarrier events. The computed KIE for the ratio of hydride to deuteride transfer is in good agreement with the experimental results. The molecular dynamics simulations reveal that proton and hydride transfer reactions are assisted by breathing motions of the mobile Mg2+ ion in the active site, providing evidence for concerted motion of Mg2+ during the hydride transfer step. PMID:12497598

Garcia-Viloca, Mireia; Alhambra, Cristóbal; Truhlar, Donald G; Gao, Jiali

2003-01-30

288

76 FR 75446 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...11-AWP-14] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace at Mercury, Desert Rock Airport, Mercury, NV. Decommissioning of the Mercury...

2011-12-02

289

DIETARY METHYL MERCURY EXPOSURE IN AMERICAN KESTRELS; PILOT STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Anthropogenic mercury emissions have increased atmospheric mercury levels about threefold since the advent of industrial activity. Atmospheric deposition is the primary source of mercury in the environment hence mercury contamination has increased in similar fashion. Methyl mercu...

290

Socioeconomic consequences of mercury use and pollution.  

PubMed

In the past, human activities often resulted in mercury releases to the biosphere with little consideration of undesirable consequences for the health of humans and wildlife. This paper outlines the pathways through which humans and wildlife are exposed to mercury. Fish consumption is the major route of exposure to methylmercury. Humans can also receive toxic doses of mercury through inhalation of elevated concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury. We propose that any effective strategy for reducing mercury exposures requires an examination of the complete life cycle of mercury. This paper examines the life cycle of mercury from a global perspective and then identifies several approaches to measuring the benefits of reducing mercury exposure, policy options for reducing Hg emissions, possible exposure reduction mechanisms, and issues associated with mercury risk assessment and communication for different populations. PMID:17408190

Swain, Edward B; Jakus, Paul M; Rice, Glenn; Lupi, Frank; Maxson, Peter A; Pacyna, Jozef M; Penn, Alan; Spiegel, Samuel J; Veiga, Marcello M

2007-02-01

291

Discovery of the Mercury Isotopes  

E-print Network

Forty mercury isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

D. Meierfrankenfeld; M. Thoennessen

2009-12-01

292

Mercurial Risks from Acid's Reign.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discussed are the sources, and harmful effects of methylmercury. Research on this problem is reviewed. Suggestions to help anglers reduce their mercury consumption from fish they catch are provided. (CW)

Raloff, Janet

1991-01-01

293

Mercury Telluride and Cadmium Telluride  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A semiconductor's usefulness is determined by how atoms are ordered within the crystal's underlying three-dimensional structure. While this mercury telluride and cadmium telluride alloy sample mixes completely in Earth -based laboratories, convective flows prevent them from mixing uniformly.

2004-01-01

294

Unlocking the Secrets of Mercury  

NASA Video Gallery

Of all the rocky planets, Mercury is the smallest and densest, the one with the oldest surface, and the one with the largest daily surface temperature variations. It is also the least explored! Joi...

295

Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean  

E-print Network

The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

Lamborg, Carl

296

The Mercury Dual Orbiter mission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mercury Orbiter (MeO) will carry out a full range of particles, fields, and planetary imaging science at Mercury. Present mission plans call for a launch in 1999 with a flight time of about 4.5 years. By means of multiple Venus and Mercury gravitational assists, the mission can be accomplished with present U.S. launch vehicles and a very large payload can be placed in orbit around Mercury. The dual-spacecraft concept will permit outstanding scientific study of solar cosmic rays and the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere from 0.3 AU to 1.0 AU. Modest enhancements to the planned magnetospheric instruments and utilization of onboard solar instruments will permit unique investigation of solar particle acceleration and transport with the MeO spacecraft.

Baker, D. N.; Slavin, J. A.

1990-01-01

297

Development of a Potential Surface for Simulation of Proton and Hydride Transfer Reactions in Solution: Application to NADH Hydride Transfer  

E-print Network

the potential energy surface. Classical free energy curves in both acetonitrile and water are calculatedDevelopment of a Potential Surface for Simulation of Proton and Hydride Transfer Reactions; In Final Form: March 26, 1997X This paper presents a new augmented molecular mechanical potential

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

298

Mercury orbiter transport study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A data base and comparative performance analyses of alternative flight mode options for delivering a range of payload masses to Mercury orbit are provided. Launch opportunities over the period 1980-2000 are considered. Extensive data trades are developed for the ballistic flight mode option utilizing one or more swingbys of Venus. Advanced transport options studied include solar electric propulsion and solar sailing. Results show the significant performance tradeoffs among such key parameters as trip time, payload mass, propulsion system mass, orbit size, launch year sensitivity and relative cost-effectiveness. Handbook-type presentation formats, particularly in the case of ballistic mode data, provide planetary program planners with an easily used source of reference information essential in the preliminary steps of mission selection and planning.

Friedlander, A. L.; Feingold, H.

1977-01-01

299

In situ mercury stabilization  

SciTech Connect

BNL Royalty Project Internal Status Report. The funds from the allotment of royalty income were used to experimentally explore feasibility of related, potential new techniques based on the Environmental Sciences Department successful technology licensed for the ex situ treatment of mercury. Specifically, this work is exploring the concept of using Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) in an in situ application to stabilize and/or remove mercury (Hg) from surficial soil. Patent disclosure forms have been filed for this process. Soil was artificially spiked with 500 ppm Hg and a series of experiments were set up in which SPC rods were placed in the center of a mass of this soil. Some experiments were conducted at 20 C and others at 50 C. After times ranging from 11 to 24 days, these experiments were opened, photographed and the soil was sampled from discrete locations in the containers. The soil and SPC samples were analyzed for Fe and Hg by x-ray fluorescence. The Hg profile in the soil was significantly altered, with concentrations along the outer edge of the soil reduced by as much as 80% from the starting concentration. Conversely, closer to the treatment rod containing SPC, concentrations of Hg were significantly increased over the original concentration. Preliminary results for elevated temperature sample are shown graphically in Figure 2. Apparently the Hg had migrated toward the SPC and reacted with sulfur to form Hg S. This appears to be a reaction between gaseous phases of both S and Hg, with Hg having a greater vapor pressure. The concentration of low solubility HgS (i.e., low leaching properties) developed within 11 days at 50 C and 21 days at 20 C, confirming the potential of this concept.

Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Adams, J.

2004-09-01

300

Mercury ion thruster technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mercury Ion Thruster Technology program was an investigation for improving the understanding of state-of-the-art mercury ion thrusters. Emphasis was placed on optimizing the performance and simplifying the design of the 30 cm diameter ring-cusp discharge chamber. Thruster performance was improved considerably; the baseline beam-ion production cost of the optimized configuration was reduced to Epsilon (sub i) perspective to 130 eV/ion. At a discharge propellant-utilization efficiency of 95 percent, the beam-ion production cost was reduced to about 155 eV/ion, representing a reduction of about 40 eV/ion over the corresponding value for the 30 cm diameter J-series thruster. Comprehensive Langmuir-probe surveys were obtained and compared with similar measurements for a J-series thruster. A successful volume-averaging scheme was developed to correlate thruster performance with the dominant plasma processes that prevail in the two thruster designs. The average Maxwellian electron temperature in the optimized ring-cusp design is as much as 1 eV higher than it is in the J-series thruster. Advances in ion-extraction electrode fabrication technology were made by improving materials selection criteria, hydroforming and stress-relieving tooling, and fabrications procedures. An ion-extraction performance study was conducted to assess the effect of screen aperture size on ion-optics performance and to verify the effectiveness of a beam-vectoring model for three-grid ion optics. An assessment of the technology readiness of the J-series thruster was completed, and operation of an 8 cm IAPS thruster using a simplified power processor was demonstrated.

Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

1989-01-01

301

Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily) harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

Wilson, Bruce E.; Palanisamy, Giri; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris; Green, James

2010-01-01

302

Recent geologic activity on Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since the MESSENGER spacecraft was inserted into orbit about Mercury in March 2011, global and targeted high-resolution image data sets have been acquired. These images support the conclusion that internal geological activity on Mercury did not end early in planetary history, as had generally been previously thought, but continued to geologically recent times. Three lines of evidence point to recent geological activity on Mercury. (1) There are smooth plains with surface areas up to 1.5×105 km2 that postdate young (morphological class 1) craters, indicating probable Kuiperian-aged volcanism. No volcanic vents, fissures, or flow fronts have been identified on these plains, suggesting that they are products of low-viscosity lavas, consistent with komatiite-like compositions of large areas on Mercury indicated by MESSENGER X-Ray Spectrometer observations. (2) Young lobate scarps transect class 1 craters as large as 30 km in diameter, indicating comparably recent crustal contraction. (3) A number of fresh-appearing, high-reflectance, irregularly shaped and rimless shallow depressions interpreted as pyroclastic vents have few superposed craters, suggesting that they have been recently active. Growing evidence from geological and geochemical observations indicates that Mercury's interior contains a higher abundance of volatile materials than was previously appreciated. Together these findings support the inference that Mercury experienced relatively recent volcanism and tectonic deformation, and the possibility that the planet is geologically active today cannot be discounted.

Xiao, Z.; Strom, R. G.; Blewett, D. T.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Chabot, N. L.; Banks, M. E.; Chapman, C. R.

2011-12-01

303

Hydride structures in Ti-aluminides subjected to high temperature and hydrogen pressure charging conditions  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The distribution and chemistry of hydrides produced in single and dual phase alloys with a composition near TiAl have been investigated by using a combination of TEM and X-ray diffraction techniques. The alloys were exposed at 650 C to 13.8 MPa of gaseous H2 for 100 h. In the single-phase gamma alloy, large hydrides preferentially nucleated on the grain boundaries and matrix dislocations and a population of small hydrides was distributed throughout the matrix. X-ray and electron diffraction patterns from these hydrides indicated that they have an fcc structure with a lattice parameter of 0.45 nm. EDAX analysis of the hydrides showed that they were enriched in Ti. The hydrides were mostly removed by vacuum annealing at 800 C for 24 h. On dissolution of the hydrides, the chemistry of hydride-free regions of the grain boundary returned to the matrix composition, suggesting that Ti segregation accompanied the hydride formation rather than Ti enrichment causing the formation of the hydride.

Legzdina, D.; Robertson, I. M.; Birnbaum, H. K.

1991-01-01

304

Mercury in Natural Waters: A Mini-Review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury in fish is a concern as for human health. Understanding mercury toxicity, however, requires an understanding of mercury speciation. Monomethylmercury is known to be the most concerning mercury species. This mini-review first covers an introductory toxicology of mercury. As human exposure to monomethylmercury is mainly through fish and as monomethylmercury concentrations in fish are related to inorganic mercury loads,

Aliyar Mousavi; Rose D. Chávez; Abdul-Mehdi S. Ali; Stephen E. Cabaniss

2011-01-01

305

Efficient catalysis by MgCl2 in hydrogen generation via hydrolysis of Mg-based hydride prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis.  

PubMed

Magnesium chloride efficiently catalyzed the hydrolysis of Mg-based hydride prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis. Hydrogen yield of 1635 mL g(-1) was obtained (MgH(2)), i.e. with 96% conversion in 30 min at 303 K. PMID:22538836

Zhao, Zelun; Zhu, Yunfeng; Li, Liquan

2012-06-01

306

Mercury after three MESSENGER flybys  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) space-craft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, is the first space probe to visit the planet Mercury in more than 30 years. MESSENGER flew by the innermost planet twice in 2008 and once last fall. The flybys confirmed that Mercury's internal magnetic field is dominantly dipolar, with a vector moment closely aligned with the spin axis. MESSENGER detected mag-nesium in Mercury's exosphere, demonstrated that Mercury's anti-sunward neutral tail contains multiple species, and revealed that the distributions of sodium, calcium, and magnesium in the exosphere and tail vary differently with latitude, time of day, and Mercury's position in or-bit, signatures of multiple source processes. MESSENGER's laser altimeter showed that the equatorial topographic relief of Mercury exceeds 5 km, revealed an equatorial ellipticity aligned with the ellipticity in Mercury's gravitational potential, and documented the form of numer-ous impact craters and fault scarps. MESSENGER images provided evidence for widespread volcanism, and candidate sites for volcanic centers were identified. In addition, newly imaged lobate scarps and other tectonic landforms support the hypothesis that Mercury contracted globally in response to interior cooling. The ˜1500-km-diameter Caloris basin, viewed in its entirety for the first time by MESSENGER, was the focus for concentrations of volcanic cen-ters, some with evidence of pyroclastic deposits, and widespread contractional and extensional deformation; smooth plains interior and exterior to the basin are demonstrably younger than the basin-forming event. The ˜700-km-diameter Rembrandt basin, less volcanically infilled than Caloris, was likewise a focus for concentrated magmatic and deformational activity. A ˜290-km-diameter basin contains interior plains that are among the youngest volcanic material on the planet. The nearly global observations of Mercury surface units distinguishable by color and composition enforce the significance of the largely volcanic smooth plains, which occupy ˜40% of the surface area, and of low-reflectance material, occupying ˜15% of the surface area and located primarily in deposits excavated by impact, consistent with having originated at depth. Reflectance spectra show no evidence for FeO in surface silicates, and reflectance and color imaging observations support earlier inferences that Mercury's surface material consists dominantly of iron-poor, calcium-magnesium silicates with an admixture of spectrally neutral opaque minerals. In support of the hypothesis that those opaque minerals are iron-titanium oxides, MESSENGER's neutron spectrometer showed that the surface abundance of iron plus titanium is comparable to that of some lunar mare regions. MESSENGER's three flybys re-vealed that Mercury's magnetosphere is more dynamic and responsive to imposed solar wind conditions than that of any other solar system body, and they showed that the planet of-ten experiences conditions favorable to direct impact of solar wind plasma onto the surface, an important contributor to Mercury's exosphere and space weathering of surface materials. MESSENGER is now on course for insertion into orbit about Mercury in March 2011, and one Earth-year of orbital observations is planned for the remainder of the nominal mission.

Solomon, Sean C.; Bedini, Peter D.; Anderson, Brian J.; Prockter, Louise M.; Blewett, David T.; Evans, Larry G.; Gold, Robert E.; Murchie, Scott L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Phillips, Roger J.; Zuber, Maria T.

307

Mercury levels in fishes from some Missouri lakes with and without known mercury pollution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercurial fungicides used in golf greens can lead to elevated mercury levels in fish from lakes receiving greens drainage. The largemouth bass is the most sensitive indicator with levels ranging from 1-7 mg mercury\\/g of wet tissue in fish taken from lakes that receive drainage from treated greens. Many lakes with no known source of mercury contamination produce bass that

S. R. Koirtyohann; R. Meers; L. K. Graham

1974-01-01

308

Global Mercury Science and Policy: Assessing the Salience, Credibility and Legitimacy of the Global Mercury Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury pollution has been the subject of much scientific research and policy debate for several decades. The Global Mercury Assessment published in 2002 concluded that mercury is a significant human health and environmental pollution issue and that international policy action is needed to reduce the risks of mercury to human health and the environment. This scientific assessment was widely accepted

N. E. Selin

2006-01-01

309

Groundwater Modeling Of Mercury Pollution At A Former Mercury Cell Chlor Alkali Facility In Pavoldar, Kazakhstan  

EPA Science Inventory

In Kazakhstan, there is a serious case of mercury pollution near the city of Pavlodar from an old mercury cell chlor-alkali plant. The soil, sediment, and water is severly contaminated with mercury and mercury compounds as a result of the industrial activity of this chemical pla...

310

Mercury-Mercury Tunneling Junctions. 1. Electron Tunneling Across Symmetric and Asymmetric Alkanethiolate Bilayers  

E-print Network

Mercury-Mercury Tunneling Junctions. 1. Electron Tunneling Across Symmetric and Asymmetric by bringing in contact two small (3 Ã? 10-3 cm2) mercury drop electrodes in a 5-20% (v/v) hexadecane solution incorporating alkanethiolate-type monolayer films. The results reported below convince us that the mercury

Majda, Marcin

311

Mercury - the hollow planet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image from orbit. Although the vent itself may have been excavated partly by explosive volcanism, the most recent event is collapse of a 7 km wide zone in the south centre of the vent. The sharpness of features within this (unmuted either by regolith-forming processes or by fall of volcanic ejecta) suggests that this collapse considerably post-dates the rest of the vent interior. It could reflect a late-stage minor 'throat clearing' explosive eruption, but (in the absence of evidence of associated volcanic ejecta) more likely reflects collapse into a void within the volcanic conduit, itself a result of magma-drainage. A class of 'hole' that is so far conspicuous by its absence on Mercury is sinuous rilles (as opposed to much straighter tectonic grabens) or aligned skylights representing collapsed or partly-collapsed drained lava tubes. Tube-fed flows are to be expected during emplacement of volcanic plains, and it will be surprising if no examples are revealed on MESSENGER and BepiColombo high-resolution images.

Rothery, D. A.

2012-04-01

312

Effect of hydride orientation on fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrogen embrittlement is one of the major degradation mechanisms for high burnup fuel cladding during reactor service and spent fuel dry storage, which is related to the hydrogen concentration, morphology and orientation of zirconium hydrides. In this work, the J-integral values for X-specimens with different hydride orientations are measured to evaluate the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding. The toughness values for Zry-4 cladding with various percentages of radial hydrides are much smaller than those with circumferential hydrides only in the same hydrogen content level at 25 °C. The fractograghic features reveal that the crack path is influenced by the orientation of zirconium hydride. Moreover, the fracture toughness measurements for X-specimens at 300 °C are not sensitive to a variation in hydride orientation but to hydrogen concentration.

Hsu, Hsiao-Hung; Tsay, Leu-Wen

2011-01-01

313

An Acute Mercuric Mercury Poisoning: Chemical Speciation of Hair Mercury Shows a Peak of Inorganic Mercury Value  

Microsoft Academic Search

A woman ingested a dose of sublimate (approximately 0.9 g) in an attempted suicide. She survived and recovered in response to a combination of therapies including chelate (BAL) therapy, plasma exchange, haemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis.Serum inorganic mercury concentration, urinary inorganic mercury excretion and hair inorganic and organic mercury and selenium concentrations, along the length from the scalp to the distal

T. Suzuki; T. Hongo; N. Matsuo; H. Imai; M. Nakazawa; T. Abe; Y. Yamamura; M. Yoshida; H. Aoyama

1992-01-01

314

Atmospheric Mercury: Emissions, Transport/Fate,  

E-print Network

in fish Humans and wildlife affected primarily by eating fish containing mercury Best documented impacts important mercury exposure pathway for most humans and wildlife For many aquatic ecosystems, much

315

MESSENGER observations of Mercury's magnetic field structure  

E-print Network

We present a baseline, time-averaged model for Mercury's magnetosphere, derived from MESSENGER Magnetometer data from 24 March to 12 December 2011, comprising the spacecraft's first three Mercury years in orbit around the ...

Johnson, Catherine L.

316

Mercury Levels in Infants Receiving Routine Immunizations  

MedlinePLUS

... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Mercury Levels in Infants Receiving Routine Immunizations Study I: Infant Metabolism of Thimerosal versus Methyl Mercury NIAID-supported studies at the University of Rochester ...

317

Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products  

MedlinePLUS

... Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Articulos en Espanol Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products Search the Consumer ... these products on Flickr. Signs and Symptoms of Mercury Poisoning irritability shyness tremors changes in vision or ...

318

Global Biogeochemical Cycling of Mercury: A Review  

E-print Network

, land-atmosphere interactions, pollution Abstract Mercury pollution poses global human health and environmental risks. Although mercury is naturally present in the environment, human ac- tivities, such as coal

319

MERCURY IN AN INSECTIVOROUS BIRD SPECIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury distributions within ecosystems must be examined to determine exposure and risk to wildlife in specific areas. In the current study, we examined exposure and uptake of mercury in nestling prothonotary warblers (protonitaria citrea) inhabiting two National Priority List (...

320

Understanding Thimerosal, Mercury, and Vaccine Safety  

MedlinePLUS

... found an association between thimerosal in vaccines and autism. • There are two different compounds that contain mercury: ... available. Was thimerosal in vaccines a cause of autism? Reputable scientific studies have shown that mercury in ...

321

Composition and structure of sputter deposited erbium hydride thin films  

SciTech Connect

Erbium hydride thin films are grown onto polished, a-axis {alpha} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) substrates by reactive ion beam sputtering and analyzed to determine composition, phase and microstructure. Erbium is sputtered while maintaining a H{sub 2} partial pressure of 1.4 x 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Growth is conducted at several substrate temperatures between 30 and 500 C. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analyses after deposition show that the H/Er areal density ratio is approximately 3:1 for growth temperatures of 30, 150 and 275 C, while for growth above {approximately}430 C, the ratio of hydrogen to metal is closer to 2:1. However, x-ray diffraction shows that all films have a cubic metal sublattice structure corresponding to that of ErH{sub 2}. RBS and Auger electron that sputtered erbium hydride thin films are relatively free of impurities.

ADAMS,DAVID P.; ROMERO,JUAN A.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; FLORO,JERROLD A.; BANKS,JAMES C.

2000-05-10

322

Quantum molecular dynamics simulation of hydrogen diffusion in zirconium hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The behavior of hydrogen in zirconium hydride in the high-temperature range has been investigated using the quantum molecular dynamics method. The ? phases of compositions ZrH1.75 and ZrH2 and the liquid phase are considered. The self-diffusion coefficients of hydrogen are calculated as a function of the temperature in the range from 1000 to 6000 K. For the ZrH1.75 and ZrH2 hydrides, the obtained values are close to each other. At temperatures of 1000-2000 K, the hydrogen diffusion is determined not only by the mobility of hydrogen atoms but also by the transition from the energetically favorable tetrahedral positions into the excited state. The obtained values of the diffusion coefficients in the temperature range of 1000-1200 K are in good agreement with the experimental data.

Yanilkin, A. V.

2014-09-01

323

Compton scattering study of the electronic structure of magnesium hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compton scattering measurements have been made on magnesium hydride (MgH2) using the 59.54-keV gamma rays from a 300-mCi 241Am source at a scattering angle of 150°. Two different theoretical approaches have been used for comparison with the experimental data. In the first approach, the Compton profile of the valence electrons in MgH2 was calculated by the pseudopotential orthogonalized-plane-wave (OPW) method, including core orthogonalization. In the second approach, the Compton profile of MgH2 was calculated using the tight-binding linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) method, including large overlaps. Both calculations yielded profiles which are in fairly good agreement with the experimental isotropic profile. The results indicate that the ionic picture of MgH2 is not simple since its outer electrons are extended. Possible implications of the production process of the hydride are briefly discussed.

Felsteiner, J.; Heilper, M.; Gertner, I.; Tanner, A. C.; Opher, R.; Berggren, K.-F.

1981-05-01

324

Nb clusters formation in Nb-doped magnesium hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to analyze the Nb coordination and clustering in Nb-doped (5 at. %) h-Mg film samples deposited by rf magnetron sputtering. Results show that the catalytic effect of the Nb doping in the H2 absorption and desorption kinetics is connected with the formation of Nb nanoclusters dispersed in the host matrix. The H2 desorption from ?-MgH2 is favored by local elastic stresses produced by ?-NbH0.89 clusters on the MgH2 matrix that reduces the stability of the hydride phase and by preferential paths in the nanocomposite hydride.

Checchetto, R.; Bazzanella, N.; Miotello, A.; Maurizio, C.; D'Acapito, F.; Mengucci, P.; Barucca, G.; Majni, G.

2005-08-01

325

Preparation of hydride complexes of ruthenium with bidentate phosphite ligands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydride complex RuH2(PFFP)2 (1) [PFFP=(CF3CH2O)2PN(CH3)N(CH3)P(OCH2CF3)2] was prepared by allowing the compound RuCl4(bpy)·H2O (bpy=1,2-bipyridine) to react first with the phosphite PFFP and then with NaBH4. Chloro-complex RuCl2(PFFP)2 (2) was also prepared, either by reacting RuCl4(bpy)·H2O with PFFP and zinc dust or by substituting triphenylphosphine with PFFP in the precursor complex RuCl2(PPh3)3. Hydride derivative RuH2(POOP)2 (3) (POOP=Ph2POCH2CH2OPPh2) was prepared by reacting compound

Jorge Bravo; Jesús Castro; Soledad García-Fontán; Ma Carmen Rodríguez-Martínez; Gabriele Albertin; Stefano Antoniutti; Alessandro Manera

2007-01-01

326

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOEpatents

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, Clay E. (Knoxville, TN); Vass, Arpad A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01

327

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOEpatents

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, C.E.; Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.

1997-01-28

328

X-ray diffraction analysis of titanium hydrides in commercial titanium alloys  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.Commercial a titanium alloys with 0.01–0.03% H have a complex phase composition and contain precipitates of saturated and unsaturated cubic hydrides, and also regions of the matrix supersaturated with hydrogen.2.Under ordinary conditions, no hydrides are precipitated in a+ß alloys with the same hydrogen concentration. Titanium hydrides may be precipitated during welding and with application of stresses in zones with an

N. V. Ageev; A. A. Babaréko; E. B. Rubina; S. Ya. Betsofen; L. A. Bunin

1976-01-01

329

High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.  

PubMed

For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanovi?, Borislav

2009-01-01

330

BepiColombo - A Mission to Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

The BepiColombo Mission has been identified by the European Space Agency as its fifth Cornerstone within the Horizon 2000+ plan. The goal of this challenging mission is the investigation of Mercury by using two spacecraft operating in parallel. These are the so-called Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and the Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). A third craft, i.e. a Mercury Lander (MSE),

R. Schricke; M. Steckling; M. Gotsmann

2002-01-01

331

Mercury bioaccumulation in Lavaca Bay, Texas  

E-print Network

, Western Limfjord, Denmark, were performed to measure mercury accumulation under two situations (RIISGARD, and FAMME, 1986). In one experiment, shrimp were fed mercury contaminated mussels and exposed to clean seawater. The second set of shrimp were... exposed to seawater containing 0. 98 ppb Hg2+ and 0. 02 ppb CH3Hg+ while being fed uncontaminated mussels. When shrimp consumed contaminated food they accumulated mercury over time, with a retention efficiency for organic mercury of 75'%%d, compared...

Palmer, Sally Jo

2012-06-07

332

Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems.

Meagher, Richard B.

2004-12-01

333

Ballistic Mercury orbiter mission via Venus and Mercury gravity assists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It is shown that it is possible to deliver a payload of 600 to 2000 kg to a 300-km circular orbit at Mercury using presently available NASA Space Transportation Systems and a single-stage bipropellant chemical rocket. This superior payload performance is attained by swingbys of Venus, plus (more importantly), the use of the reverse Delta-V/EGA process. In contrast to the Delta-V/EGA process (used to boost the launch energy by returning to earth for a gravity assist), the reverse Delta-V/EGA process reduces the Mercury approach energy each time a spacecraft makes a near-resonant return to Mercury for a gravity assist and reduces the orbit-capture Delta-V requirement. The mission sequences for such high-performance missions are described, and example mission opportunities for the years 1990 to 2010 are presented.

Yen, C.-W. L.

1986-01-01

334

Ballistic Mercury orbiter mission via Venus and Mercury gravity assists  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper shows that it is possible to deliver a payload of 600 to 2000 kg to a 300-km circular orbit at Mercury, using the presently available NASA STS and a single-stage bipropellant chemical rocket. This superior payload performance is attained by swingbys of Venus, plus more importantly, the use of the reverse Delta-V/EGA process. In contrast to the familiar Delta-V/EGA process used to boost the launch energy by returning to earth for a gravity assist, the reverse process reduces the Mercury approach energy each time a spacecraft makes a near-resonant return to Mercury for a gravity assist and reduces the orbit-capture Delta-V requirement. The mission sequences for such high-performance missions are described, and example mission opportunities for the years 1990 to 2010 are presented.

Yen, Chen-Wan Liu

1989-01-01

335

Mercury Continuous Emmission Monitor Calibration  

SciTech Connect

Mercury continuous emissions monitoring systems (CEMs) are being implemented in over 800 coal-fired power plant stacks throughput the U.S. Western Research Institute (WRI) is working closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to facilitate the development of the experimental criteria for a NIST traceability protocol for dynamic elemental mercury vapor calibrators/generators. These devices are used to calibrate mercury CEMs at power plant sites. The Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) which was published in the Federal Register on May 18, 2005 and vacated by a Federal appeals court in early 2008 required that calibration be performed with NIST-traceable standards. Despite the vacature, mercury emissions regulations in the future will require NIST traceable calibration standards, and EPA does not want to interrupt the effort towards developing NIST traceability protocols. The traceability procedures will be defined by EPA. An initial draft traceability protocol was issued by EPA in May 2007 for comment. In August 2007, EPA issued a conceptual interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. The protocol is based on the actual analysis of the output of each calibration unit at several concentration levels ranging initially from about 2-40 {micro}g/m{sup 3} elemental mercury, and in the future down to 0.2 {micro}g/m{sup 3}, and this analysis will be directly traceable to analyses by NIST. The EPA traceability protocol document is divided into two separate sections. The first deals with the qualification of calibrator models by the vendors for use in mercury CEM calibration. The second describes the procedure that the vendors must use to certify the calibrators that meet the qualification specifications. The NIST traceable certification is performance based, traceable to analysis using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry (ID/ICP/MS) performed by NIST in Gaithersburg, MD. The outputs of mercury calibrators are compared to one another using a nesting procedure which allows direct comparison of one calibrator with another at specific concentrations and eliminates analyzer variability effects. The qualification portion of the EPA interim traceability protocol requires the vendors to define calibrator performance as affected by variables such as pressure, temperature, line voltage, and shipping. In 2007 WRI developed and conducted a series of simplified qualification experiments to determine actual calibrator performance related to the variables defined in the qualification portion of the interim protocol.

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster; Joseph Rovani

2009-03-12

336

Mercury bioremediation by mercury accumulating Enterobacter sp. cells and its alginate immobilized application  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effective microbial remediation of the mercury necessitates the mercury to be trapped within the cells without being recycled\\u000a back to the environment. The study describes a mercury bioaccumulating strain of Enterobacter sp., which remediated mercury from the medium simultaneous to its growth. The transmission electron micrographs and electron\\u000a dispersive X-ray analysis revealed the accumulation of remediated mercury as nano-size

Arvind Sinha; Sunil Kumar Khare

337

Ag enhances optical and switching properties of gadolinium hydride films  

Microsoft Academic Search

An improvement of the optical properties of switchable mirrors is obtained by incorporating of silver (Ag) into the palladium (Pd) cap layer of nanocrystalline gadolinium hydride system Gd\\/GdH3. Two methods for modification of Pd layer with Ag are employed. The first method is the forming of an AgPd binary alloy. The second method is the forming of Ag\\/Pd bilayer. In

E. Shalaan; A. A. Al-Ghamdi

2010-01-01

338

Oxidation kinetics of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products  

Microsoft Academic Search

The oxidation behavior of hydride-bearing uranium metal corrosion products from Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) fuel plates was studied using thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in environments of Ar–4%O2, Ar–9%O2, and Ar–20%O2. Ignition of corrosion product samples from two moderately corroded plates was observed between 125°C and 150°C in all environments. The rate of oxidation above the ignition temperature was found to

Terry C Totemeier; Robert G Pahl; Steven M Frank

1999-01-01

339

Isotope Effect in the Spectrum of Cadmium Hydride  

Microsoft Academic Search

IN an earlier paper1, I dealt with the structure of different band systems in the spectrum of cadmium hydride. In several respects, however, my analysis suffered from incomplete resolution of the spectrum, especially regarding the isotope splitting of the band lines. Recently I repeated the investigation, using a large concave grating in the third order (0.6 A.\\/mm.). Much work was

Erik Svensson

1933-01-01

340

Influence of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the absence of an atmosphere and proximity to the Sun, Mercury's surface temperature varies laterally by several 100s K, even when averaged over long time periods. The dominant variation in time-averaged surface T occurs from pole to equator (~225 K) [1]. The resonant relationship between Mercury's orbit and rotation results in a smaller longitudinal variation (~100 K) [1]. Here we demonstrate, using models of mantle convection in a 3-D spherical shell, that this stationary lateral variation in surface temperature has a small but significant influence on mantle convection and on the lateral variation of heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). We evaluate the possible observational signature of this laterally-varying convection in terms of boundary topography, stress distribution, gravity and moment of inertia tensor. We furthermore test whether the lateral variation in CMB flux is capable of driving a thermal wind dynamo, i.e., weak dynamo action with no internally-driven core convective motions. For Mercury's mantle we assume a dry olivine rheology including both diffusion creep and disclocation creep with rheological parameters such as activation energy and volume taken from the synthesis of [2]. We assume decaying radiogenic heat sources with the same concentration as in the bulk silicate Earth, and a parameterised model of core cooling. The models are run for 4.5 Ga from a relatively hot initial state with random initial perturbations. We use the code StagYY, which uses a finite-volume discretization on a spherical yin-yang grid and a multigrid solver [3]. Results in spherical axisymmetric geometry, compare a case with constant surface temperature to one with a latitude-dependent surface temperature. The system forms about 3 convection cells from pole to equator. Although the results look similar to first order, in the latitude-dependent case the convection is noticably more sluggish and colder towards the pole. In CMB flux, both cases display large oscillations due to convection cells. A pole-to-equator trend is superimposed on this for the case with laterally-varying surface temperature. Although the amplitude of this long-wavelength variation is smaller than that of the within-cell variation, its long-wavelength nature might be effective in driving thermal winds in the core. Results in a full 3-D spherical shell indicate that convection adopts a cellular structure with a polygonal network of downwellings and plume-like upwellings, as is usually obtained for stagnant lid convection, for example, in the recent 3-D spherical Mercury models of [4]. This is in notable contrast to the models of [5], in which linear upwellings were obtained. This difference could be because the initial perturbations used by [5] used a small number of low-order spherical harmonics, i.e., a long-wavelength pattern with particular symmetries, whereas our initial perturbations are random white noise. The origin of this difference requires further investigation. The pattern of CMB heat flux shows a strong l=2, m=0 pattern, again with superimposed small-scale variations due to convection cells. The surface geoid displays an very dominant (2,0) pattern, which would be a strong diagnostic of this behaviour. These models are being further analysed for boundary topography and stress distribution. Models of planetary dynamos have traditionally depended upon the concept that secular cooling and internal radioactive decay are responsible for genererating convective fluid motions within the core [e.g. 6]. Some models, of Earth's dynamo in particular, also include thermal winds --shear flows driven by heat flux variations along the core-mantle boundary -- that modify the dynamo process [e.g. 7]. We have now shown, following the work of [8], that thermal winds themselves are capable of driving dynamo action in planetary cores (Fig. 4). In fully self-consistent, three-dimensional models, we find that thermal wind dynamos do not require a net heat flux to emanate from the core and can operate even when the core fluid is neutrally stratifie

Tackley, P. J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Aubert, J.

2009-04-01

341

Environmental mercury measurement by immunoassay  

SciTech Connect

Immunochemical-based analytical methods are commonly used in the medical diagnostic field, but only recently have they been adapted for field-portable environmental applications. BioNebraska has developed an immunoassay, based upon a novel monoclonal antibody to mercuric ions, for the detection of mercury in environmental samples. The user-friendly BiMelyze Mercury Tube Immunoassay generates semi-quantitative results rapidly and economically relative to traditional analytical methods. In this presentation the authors will demonstrate the use of this method with environmental matrices and discuss ongoing in-house and independent field results. Sample preparation and analysis can be completed in the field for numerous samples in less than 40 minutes. Mercury is first extracted from the sample by digestion using a separate kit available from Bio-Nebraska. The inherent limit of detection for mercuric ions in aqueous samples is 0.25 ppb and 0.5 ppm for soils. The method is highly selective for mercury with essentially no interference by other metals or matrices. Thus, the assay is well-suited for low-cost, real-time, user friendly field screening of mercury in soils, sediment and water producing results that correlate well with traditional analytical methods.

Schweitzer, C.; Carlson, L.; Holmquist, B.; Riddell, M.; Wylie, D. [BioNebraska, Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States)

1995-12-31

342

MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

343

MERCURY IN LAKE MICHIGAN ECOSYSTEM COMPONENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury is a toxic bioaccumulative substance in aquatic ecosystems. National fish advisories for mercury increased 115% from 1993 to 2001 and fish consumption is now a major health concern. The Lake Michigan Mass Balance Study measured the concentrations of mercury in the atmosph...

344

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Barometer means an instrument...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2013-07-01

345

Mercury and selenium interaction: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews studies on mercury and selenium interaction. It includes the effects of selenium on mercury toxicity on the organism, organ\\/tissue, and subcellular levels. The paper also touches on possible mechanisms for the protective action of selenium against mercury toxicity and deals briefly with the synergism between the two elements. 71 references.

M. L. Cuvin-Aralar; R. W. Furness

1991-01-01

346

Mercury Thermometer Replacements in Chemistry Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The consequences of broken mercury-in-glass thermometers in academic laboratories results in various health and environmental hazards, which needs to be replaced, by long-stem digital thermometers and non-mercury glass thermometers. The factors that should be considered during the mercury replacement process are types of applications in the…

Foster, Barbara L.

2005-01-01

347

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Definitions . The definitions...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2010-07-01

348

What's all the Fuss about Mercury?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mercury tends to vaporize when exposed to air. The warmer the air, the more quickly it vaporizes. Although swallowing mercury can be a problem, the greater risk results from inhalation and skin absorption. Symptoms and health-related problems can result within hours of exposure. Spilled mercury settles in cracks and absorbent material such as…

Roy, Ken

2004-01-01

349

Shedding some light on mercury lamps  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Environmental Science and Technology article discusses the problem created when mercury-containing lamps are not recycled. The article provides statistics on the amount of bulbs being disposed and the quantity of mercury that may be improperly disposed. It also suggests possible solution to the potentially hazardous mercury disposal. The article features in-text links to related topics.

Online, Environmental S.; Society, American C.

350

Don't Mess with Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this short video from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, learn how to avoid mercury hazards. Graphics and animations illustrate the liquid appearance of elemental mercury and warn viewers about the dangers of exposure. Hear about how you should not touch mercury and how it can contaminate objects in the home. A background essay, discussion questions, and standards correlations are also provided.

2010-08-31

351

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Definitions . The definitions...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2011-07-01

352

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Barometer means an instrument...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2012-07-01

353

3, 35253541, 2003 Modelling of Mercury  

E-print Network

ACPD 3, 3525­3541, 2003 Modelling of Mercury with the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model J. H and Physics Discussions Modelling of mercury with the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model J. H. Christensen, J Correspondence to: J. H. Christensen (jc@dmu.dk) 3525 #12;ACPD 3, 3525­3541, 2003 Modelling of Mercury

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

354

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition  

E-print Network

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition Noelle E. Selin and Christopher D. Holmes mercury oxidation [Selin & Jacob, Atmos. Env. 2008] 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 Influences on Mercury Wet Deposition · Hg wet dep = f(precipitation, [Hg(II)+Hg(P)]) Correlation (r2) between

Selin, Noelle Eckley

355

Mercury: Recovering Forgotten Passwords Using Personal Devices  

E-print Network

Mercury: Recovering Forgotten Passwords Using Personal Devices Mohammad Mannan1 , David Barrera2, and to allow forgotten passwords to be securely restored, we present a scheme called Mercury. Its primary mode and revealed to the user. A prototype implementation of Mercury is available as an Android application. 1

Van Oorschot, Paul

356

2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Data Reorganization  

E-print Network

© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Data Reorganization Interface (DRI) Data Reorganization Interface (DRI) Kenneth Cain Jr. Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Status update for the DRI-1.0 standard since Sep. 2002 publication Outline

Kepner, Jeremy

357

2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance  

E-print Network

© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance Predictions and Trends for RISC Applications Luke Cico (lcico@mc.com) Mark Merritt (mmerritt@mc.com) Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Chelmsford, MA 01824 #12;© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Goals of PresentationGoals of Presentation

Kepner, Jeremy

358

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

E-print Network

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury Noelle Eckley Selin *Reprinted from Mercury in the Environment: Pattern and Process (Chapter 5) pp. 73-80 Copyright © 2012 with kind, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury NOELLE ECKLEY SELIN and their distribution in the atmosphere. This includes

359

Preliminary ISAS Mercury orbiter mission design  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper shows the recent results of ISAS Mercury orbiter mission study conducted by ISAS Mercury Exploration Working Group. Two options are under study; 1) A Spacecraft which utilizes Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) as a primary propulsion system for interplanetary transfer phase as well as Mercury orbit insertion phase and 2) Conventional chemical propulsion spacecraft.

Hiroshi Yamakawa; Hirobumi Saito; Jun'ichiro Kawaguchi; Yasunori Kobayashi; Hajime Hayakawa; Toshinori Mukai

1999-01-01

360

Interaction of Mercury with the solar wind  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of our 3D MHD simulation of the solar wind flow around Mercury are presented. Mercury is a planet with a highly eccentric orbit which leads to a high variability of the parameters of the solar wind impinging on the planet. Mariner 10 fly-bys detected an intrinsic magnetic field of Mercury. This intrinsic magnetic moment is responsible for the

K. Kabin; T. I. Gombosi; D. L. Dezeeuw; K. G. Powell

1998-01-01

361

Mercury baseline levels in Flemish soils (Belgium)  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is important to establish contaminant levels that are normally present in soils to provide baseline data for pollution studies. Mercury is a toxic element of concern. This study was aimed at assessing baseline mercury levels in soils in Flanders. In a previous study, mercury contents in soils in Oost-Vlaanderen were found to be significantly above levels reported elsewhere. For

Filip M. G. Tack; Thomas Vanhaesebroeck; Marc G. Verloo; Kurt Van Rompaey; Eric Van Ranst

2005-01-01

362

Uranium metal reactions with hydrogen and water vapour and the reactivity of the uranium hydride produced  

SciTech Connect

Within the nuclear industry, metallic uranium has been used as a fuel. If this metal is stored in a hydrogen rich environment then the uranium metal can react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride which can be pyrophoric when exposed to air. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has been carrying out a programme of research for Sellafield Limited to investigate the conditions required for the formation and persistence of uranium hydride and the reactivity of the material formed. The experimental results presented here have described new results characterising uranium hydride formed from bulk uranium at 50 and 160 C. degrees and measurements of the hydrolysis kinetics of these materials in liquid water. It has been shown that there is an increase in the proportion of alpha-uranium hydride in material formed at lower temperatures and that there is an increase in the rate of reaction with water of uranium hydride formed at lower temperatures. This may at least in part be attributable to a difference in the reaction rate between alpha and beta-uranium hydride. A striking observation is the strong dependence of the hydrolysis reaction rate on the temperature of preparation of the uranium hydride. For example, the reaction rate of uranium hydride prepared at 50 C. degrees was over ten times higher than that prepared at 160 C. degrees at 20% extent of reaction. The decrease in reaction rate with the extent of reaction also depended on the temperature of uranium hydride preparation.

Godfrey, H. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Workington Laboratory, Havelock Road, Derwent Howe, Cumbria, CA14 3YQ (United Kingdom); Broan, C.; Goddard, D.; Hodge, N.; Woodhouse, G. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Salwick, Preston, Lancashire, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Diggle, A. [Sellafield Limited, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Orr, R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01

363

Measurement and modeling of strain fields in zirconium hydrides precipitated at a stress concentration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen adsorption into zirconium, as a result of corrosion in aqueous environments, leads to the precipitation of a secondary brittle hydride phase. These hydrides tend to first form at stress concentrations such as fretting flaws or cracks in engineering components, potentially degrading the structural integrity of the component. One mechanism for component failure is a slow crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC), where hydride fracture occurs followed by crack arrest in the ductile zirconium matrix. The current work employs both an experimental and a modeling approach to better characterize the effects and behavior of hydride precipitation at such stress concentrations. Strains around stress concentrations containing hydrides were mapped using High Energy X-ray Diffraction (HEXRD). These studies highlighted important differences in the behavior of the hydride phase and the surrounding zirconium matrix, as well as the strain associated with the precipitation of the hydride. A finite element model was also developed and compared to the X-ray strain mapping results. This model provided greater insight into details that could not be obtained directly from the experimental approaches, as well as providing a framework for future modeling to predict the effects of hydride precipitation under varied conditions.

Allen, Gregory B.; Kerr, Matthew; Daymond, Mark R. (Queens)

2012-10-23

364

Hydrogen pressures and dissociation enthalpies of americium and curium hydrides determined by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

A Knudsen effusion mass spectrometric technique has been developed for the study of milligram-sized samples of metal hydrides. This new technique is necessary for the determination of the dissociation pressures and thermal stabilities of hydrides of the scarce and highly radioactive transplutonium elements. The sensitivity of this technique was such that experiments could be carried out with as little as {approximately} 50 {mu} mol of metal. Dissociation pressures were determined for americium and curium hydrides; studies were also made with selected lanthanide hydrides, for comparison. The decomposition thermodynamics of these materials are discussed.

Gibson, J.K.; Haire, R.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-25

365

Superconductive sodalite-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures  

PubMed Central

Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H2 fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH6 a body-centered cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual “sodalite” cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H2 of electrons donated by Ca forming an “H4” unit as the building block in the construction of the three-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone center. The resultant dynamic Jahn–Teller effect helps to enhance electron–phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH6. A superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of 220–235 K at 150 GPa obtained from the solution of the Eliashberg equations is the highest among all hydrides studied thus far. PMID:22492976

Wang, Hui; Tse, John S.; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

2012-01-01

366

Electronic structure of ternary rhodium hydrides with lithium and magnesium.  

PubMed

Chemical bonding in and electronic structure of lithium and magnesium rhodium hydrides are studied theoretically using DFT methods. For Li3RhH4 with planar complex RhH4 structural units, Crystal Orbital Hamilton Populations reveal significant Rh?Rh interactions within infinite one-dimensional ? 1 [RhH4] stacks in addition to strong rhodium?hydrogen bonding. These metal?metal interactions are considerably weaker in the hypothetical, heavier homologue Na3RhH4. Both compounds are small-band gap semiconductors. The electronic structures of Li3RhH6 and Na3RhH6 with rhodium surrounded octahedrally by hydrogen, on the other hand, are compatible with a classical complex hydride model according to the limiting ionic formula (M+)3[RhH6]3? without any metal?metal interaction between the 18-electron hydridorhodate complexes. In MgRhH, building blocks of the composition (RhH2)4 are formed with strong rhodium?hydrogen and significant rhodium?rhodium bonding (bond lengths of 298 pm within Rh4 squares). These units are linked together to infinite two-dimensional layers ? 2 [(RhH2/2)4] via common hydrogen atoms. Li3RhH4 and MgRhH are accordingly examples for border cases of chemical bonding where the classical picture of hydridometalate complexes in complex hydrides is not sufficient to properly describe the chemical bonding situation. PMID:24372174

Becker, Jonas Nils; Bauer, Jessica; Giehr, Andreas; Chu, Pui Ieng; Kunkel, Nathalie; Springborg, Michael; Kohlmann, Holger

2014-01-21

367

Materials for Hydrogen Storage: From Nanostructures to Complex Hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The limited supply of fossil fuels, its adverse effect on the environment, and growing worldwide demand for energy has necessitated the search for new and clean sources of energy. The possibility of using hydrogen to meet this growing energy need has rekindled interest in the study of safe, efficient, and economical storage of hydrogen. This talk will discuss the issues and challenges in storing hydrogen in light complex hydrides and discuss the role of nanostructuring and catalysts that can improve the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen. In particular, we will discuss how studies of clusters can help elucidate the fundamental mechanisms for hydrogen storage and how these can be applied in Boron Nitride and Carbon nanocages and how metallization of these nanostructures is necessary to store hydrogen with large gravimetric density. We will also discuss the properties of complex light metal hydrides such as alanates and magnesium hydrides that can store up to 18 wt % hydrogen, although the temperature where hydrogen desorbs is rather high. Using first principles calculations, we will provide a fundamental understanding of the electronic structure and stability of these systems and how it is affected due to catalysts. It is hoped that the understanding gained here can be useful in designing better catalysts as well as hosts for hydrogen storage.

Jena, Puru

2006-03-01

368

Mercury from mineral deposits and potential environmental impact  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mercury deposits are globally distributed in 26 mercury mineral belts. Three types of mercury deposits occur in these belts: silica-carbonate, hot-spring, and Almaden. Mercury is also produced as a by-product from several types of gold-silver and massive sulfide deposits, which account for 5% of the world's production. Other types of mineral deposits can be enriched in mercury and mercury phases present are dependent on deposit type. During processing of mercury ores, secondary mercury phases form and accumulate in mine wastes. These phases are more soluble than cinnabar, the primary ore mineral, and cause mercury deposits to impact the environment more so than other types of ore deposits enriched in mercury. Release and transport of mercury from mine wastes occur primarily as mercury-enriched particles and colloids. Production from mercury deposits has decreased because of environmental concerns, but by-product production from other mercury-enriched mineral deposits remains important.

Rytuba, J.J.

2003-01-01

369

Anthropogenic mercury emissions in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An inventory of mercury emissions from anthropogenic activities in China is compiled for the year 1999 from official statistical data. We estimate that China's emissions were 536 (±236) t of total mercury. This value includes open biomass burning, but does not include natural sources or re-emission of previously deposited mercury. Approximately 45% of the Hg comes from non-ferrous metals smelting, 38% from coal combustion, and 17% from miscellaneous activities, of which battery and fluorescent lamp production and cement production are the largest. Emissions are heaviest in Liaoning and Guangdong Provinces, where extensive smelting occurs, and in Guizhou Province, where there is much small-scale combustion of high-Hg coal without emission control devices. Emissions are gridded at 30×30 min spatial resolution. We estimate that 56% of the Hg in China is released as Hg 0, 32% as Hg 2+, and 12% as Hg p. Particulate mercury emissions are high in China due to heavy burning of coal in residential and small industrial settings without PM controls. Emissions of Hg 2+ from coal-fired power plants are high due to the absence of flue-gas desulfurization units, which tend to dissolve the soluble divalent mercury. Metals smelting operations favor the production of elemental mercury. Much of the Hg is released from small-scale activities in rather remote areas, and therefore the activity levels are quite uncertain. Also, emissions test data for Chinese sources are lacking, causing uncertainties in Hg emission factors and removal efficiencies. Overall, we calculate an uncertainty level of ±44% (95% confidence interval) in the estimate of total emissions. We recommend field testing of coal combustors and smelters in China to improve the accuracy of these estimates.

Streets, David G.; Hao, Jiming; Wu, Ye; Jiang, Jingkun; Chan, Melissa; Tian, Hezhong; Feng, Xinbin

370

Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

2011-01-01

371

A Study of Magnesium Hydride Thin Film Phase Transition Kinetics Using In-Situ Hydriding/Dehydriding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnesium is an attractive material for hydrogen storage because it stores an appreciable amount of hydrogen (7.6 wt.%) as magnesium hydride (MgH2), is abundant in the earth's crust and is relatively inexpensive. Understanding of the structural changes and associated kinetics for the magnesium/magnesium hydride phase transition is crucial to engineering practical metal hydride hydrogen storage materials involving magnesium. A thin film architecture allows us to deposit and analyze precisely controlled structures in order to gain insight into the kinetic mechanisms present in the phase change. Using UHV sputter deposition onto a variety of substrates we have grown Mg thin films with varying degrees of structural texture and orientation. Using x-ray diffraction with in-situ sample heating we see evidence for a solid phase epitaxial (SPE) regrowth mechanism for the Mg regrowing from the MgH2 in epitaxial Mg thin films and observe kinetic differences for the discharging of films with different Mg orientations (Mg c-axis in/out of the sample plane). We also determined the crystallographic orientation correlation for the Mg to MgH2 transition in our epitaxial thin films. Here we also present our recent work examining and analyzing the kinetics for sample charging utilizing a variety of methods.

Kelly, Stephen; Kelekar, Raj; Giffard, Hermione; Clemens, Bruce

2007-03-01

372

Shepard Hoisted from Mercury Capsule  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A U.S. Marine helicopter recovery team hoists astronaut Alan Shepard from his Mercury spacecraft after a successful flight and splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean. On May 5th 1961, Alan B. Shepard Jr. became the first American to fly into space. His Freedom 7 Mercury capsule flew a suborbital trajectory lasting 15 minutes 22 seconds. His spacecraft landed in the Atlantic Ocean where he and his capsule were recovered by helicopter and transported to the awaiting aircraft carrier U.S.S. Lake Champlain.

1961-01-01

373

Apparatus for control of mercury  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for reducing mercury in industrial gases such as the flue gas produced by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal adds hydrogen sulfide to the flue gas in or just before a scrubber of the industrial process which contains the wet scrubber. The method and apparatus of the present invention is applicable to installations employing either wet or dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization systems. The present invention uses kraft green liquor as a source for hydrogen sulfide and/or the injection of mineral acids into the green liquor to release vaporous hydrogen sulfide in order to form mercury sulfide solids.

Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH)

2001-01-01

374

The three modern faces of mercury.  

PubMed Central

The three modern "faces" of mercury are our perceptions of risk from the exposure of billions of people to methyl mercury in fish, mercury vapor from amalgam tooth fillings, and ethyl mercury in the form of thimerosal added as an antiseptic to widely used vaccines. In this article I review human exposure to and the toxicology of each of these three species of mercury. Mechanisms of action are discussed where possible. Key gaps in our current knowledge are identified from the points of view both of risk assessment and of mechanisms of action. PMID:11834460

Clarkson, Thomas W

2002-01-01

375

Preservation of samples for dissolved mercury  

SciTech Connect

Water samples for dissolved mercury require special treatment because of the high chemical mobility and volatility of this element. Widespread use of mercury and its compounds has provided many avenues for contamination of water. Two laboratory tests were done to determine the relative permeabilities of glass and plastic sample bottles to mercury vapor. Plastic containers were confirmed to be quite permeable to airborne mercury, glass containers were virtually impermeable. Methods of preservation include the use of various combinations of acids, oxidants, and complexing agents. The combination of nitric acid and potassium dichromate successfully preserved mercury in a large variety of concentrations and dissolved forms. Because this acid-oxidant preservative acts as a sink for airborne mercury and plastic containers are permeable to mercury vapor, glass bottles are preferred for sample collection. To maintain a healthy work environment and minimize the potential for contamination of water samples, mercury and its compounds are isolated from the atmosphere while in storage. Concurrently, a program to monitor environmental levels of mercury vapor in areas of potential contamination is needed to define the extent of mercury contamination and to assess the effectiveness of mercury clean-up procedures.

Hamlin, S.N. (Geological Survey, Sacramento, CA (United States))

1989-04-01

376

Cases of mercury exposure, bioavailability, and absorption.  

PubMed

Mercury is a unique element that, unlike many metals, has no essential biological function. It is liquid at room temperature and is 13.6 times heavier than water. Its unique physical properties have been exploited for a variety of uses such as in mercury switches, thermostats, thermometers, and other instruments. Its ability to amalgamate with gold and silver are used in mining these precious metals and as a dental restorative. Its toxic properties have been exploited for medications, preservatives, antiseptics, and pesticides. For these reasons there have been many industrial uses of mercury, and occupational exposures of workers and industrial emissions and effluents contaminating air, water, soil, and ultimately food chains have long been a matter of great public health concern. This paper examines briefly six cases representing various forms of exposure to different species of mercury, and indicates the methodological issues in estimating exposure, bioavailability and absorption; these cases include Minamata disease in Japan, organic mercury poisoning in Iraq, methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in the Amazon, dimethylmercury (PMM) in the laboratory, an elemental mercury spill in Cajamarca, Peru, and a mercury-contaminated building in Hoboken, NJ, USA. Other scenarios that are not described include occupational exposure to mercury salts, mercurial preservatives in vaccines, cultural and ritualistic uses of mercury, and mercury in dental amalgams. PMID:12915150

Gochfeld, Michael

2003-09-01

377

Mercury capture in bench-scale absorbers  

SciTech Connect

This paper gives,a brief overview of research being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the capture of mercury by both dry sorbents and wet scrubbers. The emphasis in the research is on development of a better understanding of the key factors that control the capture of mercury. Future work is expected to utilize that information for the development of new or modified process concepts featuring enhanced mercury capture capabilities. The results and conclusions to date from the Argonne -research on dry sorbents can be summarized as follows: lime hydrates, either regular or high-surface-area, are `not effective in removing mercury; mercury removals are enhanced by the addition of activated carbon; mercury removals with activated carbon decrease with increasing temperature, larger particle size, and decreasing mercury concentration in the gas; and chemical pretreatment (e.g., with sulfur or (CaCl{sub 2}) can greatly increase the removal capacity of activated carbon. Preliminary results from the wet scrubbing research include: no removal of elemental mercury is obtained under normal scrubber operating conditions; mercury removal is improved by the addition of packing or production of smaller gas bubbles to increase the gas-liquid contact area; polysulfide solutions do not appear promising for enhancing mercury removal in typical FGC systems; stainless steel packing appears to have beneficial properties for mercury removal and should be investigated further; and other chemical additives may offer greatly enhanced removals.

Livengood, C.D.; Huang, H.S.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Wu, J.M.

1994-08-01

378

Mercury biogeochemistry: Paradigm shifts, outstanding issues and research needs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Half a century of mercury research has provided scientists and policy makers with a detailed understanding of mercury toxicology, biogeochemical cycling and past and future impacts on human exposure. The complexity of the global biogeochemical mercury cycle has led to repeated and ongoing paradigm shifts in numerous mercury-related disciplines and outstanding questions remain. In this review, we highlight some of the paradigm shifts and questions on mercury toxicity, the risks and benefits of seafood consumption, the source of mercury in seafood, and the Arctic mercury cycle. We see a continued need for research on mercury toxicology and epidemiology, for marine mercury dynamics and ecology, and for a closer collaboration between observational mercury science and mercury modeling in general. As anthropogenic mercury emissions are closely tied to the energy cycle (in particular coal combustion), mercury exposure to humans and wildlife are likely to persist unless drastic emission reductions are put in place.

Sonke, Jeroen E.; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Dommergue, Aurélien

2013-05-01

379

Relativity and the mercury battery.  

PubMed

Comparative, fully relativistic (FR), scalar relativistic (SR) and non-relativistic (NR) DFT calculations attribute about 30% of the mercury-battery voltage to relativity. The obtained percentage is smaller than for the lead-acid battery, but not negligible. PMID:21750825

Zaleski-Ejgierd, Patryk; Pyykkö, Pekka

2011-10-01

380

Mercury Telluride and Cadmium Telluride  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A semiconductor's usefulness is determined by how atoms are ordered within the crystal's underlying three-dimensional structure. While this mercury telluride and cadmium telluride alloy sample mixes completely in Earth -based laboratories, convective flows prevent them from mixing uniformly. In space, the ingredients mix more homogenously, resulting in a superior product.

2004-01-01

381

Atmospheric mercury—An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a broad overview and synthesis of current knowledge and understanding pertaining to all major aspects of mercury in the atmosphere. The significant physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of this element and its environmentally relebant species encountered in the atmosphere are examined. Atmospheric pathways and processes considered herein include anthropogenic as well as natural sources of Hg emissions

William H. Schroeder; John Munthe

1998-01-01

382

MERCURY STABILITY IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine whether the presence of mercury and 188 other trace substances, referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), in the stack emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric utility power plants poses an unacceptable public health risk (1). The EPA's conclusions and recommendations were

John H. Pavlish

1999-01-01

383

Catalytic regeneration of mercury sorbents.  

PubMed

Traditionally, mercury sorbents are disposed of in landfills, which may lead to contamination of soil and groundwater. In this work, the regeneration of activated carbon (AC) as a mercury sorbent was investigated. The decomposition of HgCl2 on the surface of pure AC was studied, as well as sorbent which has been treated with FeCl3 or NaCl. In all cases, the sorbent is found to be structurally stable through a single regeneration, which is verified through BET, XRD, and XPS analysis. The desorption of mercury from the sorbent is found to follow Henry's law. Additionally, a kinetic analysis suggests that although the presence of activated carbon lowers the energy requirement for the desorption of mercury, it significantly decreases the rate by decreasing the concentration of the HgCl2. FeCl3 and NaCl both promoted the decomposition of HgCl2, but FeCl3 did so more significantly, increasing the rate constants by a factor of 10 and decreasing the activation energy for the decomposition of HgCl2 by 14% to 40%. PMID:24121636

Bentley, Mark; Fan, Maohong; Dutcher, Bryce; Tang, Mingchen; Argyle, Morris D; Russell, Armistead G; Zhang, Yulong; Sharma, M P; Swapp, Susan M

2013-11-15

384

A comparison of mercury cycling in Lakes Michigan and Superior  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury cycling in Lake Superior and Lake Michigan was evaluated based on measurements of mercury levels, modeling of evasional fluxes, and development of first-order mass balance models. Total mercury, methylmercury, and dissolved gaseous mercury were measured on sampling cruises in Lake Michigan (2005) and Lake Superior (2006). Average total mercury concentrations in unfiltered surface water were higher in Lake Michigan

Jeffrey D. Jeremiason; Linda A. Kanne; Tara A. Lacoe; Melissa Hulting; Matt F. Simcik

2009-01-01

385

Environmental and Toxicological Concerns of Dental Amalgam and Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

An evaluation of mercury emission estimates from dental sources indicates that reported emissions have been significantly underestimated. U.S. mercury emissions from dental sources probably range from about 6 to 12 tons annually, significantly different from the 0.6 tons recently reported by the EPA. Mercury emissions from dental sources include mercury released from dental offices, mercury released from household sewage and

Louis M. Scarmoutzos; Owen E. Boyd

386

Mercury contamination in the oil and gas industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury contamination of surficial soils and building structures is concern to the oil, natural gas, and utility industries. Spillage from mercury-filled manometers that measure pipeline pressures is a major source of mercury contamination. Because of its chemical characteristics, the mobility of mercury within the soil posed significant health and environmental impacts. Inorganic mercury strongly adsorbs onto fine soil particles and

W. Oberle; L. Warfield; J. Manship

1993-01-01

387

Photoelectron Spectra and Valence Shell Orbital Structures of Groups V and VI Hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Photoelectron spectra are reported for the hydrides of group V and VI elements. Vibrational structure has been observed in bands associated with all but the inner-most valence orbitals. It has been used to obtain changes in bond angles or bond distances which result from the ionization of successive molecular orbitals. Ionization from the inner (1a1) orbitals of the hydrides has

A. W. Potts; W. C. Price

1972-01-01

388

Bulk and surface energetics of crystalline lithium hydride: Benchmarks from quantum Monte Carlo and quantum chemistry  

E-print Network

-structure technique that al- low one to go beyond DFT and achieve better accuracy: quantum Monte Carlo QMCBulk and surface energetics of crystalline lithium hydride: Benchmarks from quantum Monte Carlo hydride can be computed by the complementary techniques of quantum Monte Carlo QMC and wave

Alfè, Dario

389

Phase-field simulation of hydride precipitation in bi-crystalline zirconium  

E-print Network

the precipitation process, different variants are arranged in such a way that the free energy is minimized. The aPhase-field simulation of hydride precipitation in bi-crystalline zirconium X.Q. Ma a , S.Q. Shi a Abstract The morphological evolution of c-hydride precipitation and growth in a zirconium bi

Chen, Long-Qing

390

Overview of nickel metal hydride battery technology for aerospace applications. Technical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

For thirty years, the scientific community has investigated using intermetallic metal hydrides as hydrogen reservoirs and electrodes for secondary batteries. They are now replacing nickel-cadmium batteries in small electronics and may become attractive for aerospace applications. Metal hydride batteries do not require high-pressure containers, and prismatic cell designs are possible. With alloying, a wide range of operational temperatures can be

Wasz

1996-01-01

391

Opening of a Post Doctoral Position Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications  

E-print Network

Opening of a Post Doctoral Position Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications, Nanotechnology and Microsystems of the National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", is seeking on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications in connection with the « Fast, reliable and cost

392

Surface Modification to Improve Hydrogen Entry Efficiency and Storage Capabilities of Metal Hydride Alloys  

E-print Network

Engineering, University of South Carolina Objectives: To develop anode materials for Ni-MH cells with high) Recognize the importance of particle pulverization and corrosion processes in developing high cycle life Metal Hydride Test Station (top) and alloy oxidation in bare metal hydrides (bottom) #12;Ni-MH Battery

Popov, Branko N.

393

Develop improved metal hydride technology for the storage of hydrogen. Final technical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The overall objective was to develop commercially viable metal hydrides capable of reversibly storing at least 3 wt.% hydrogen for use with PEM fuel cells and hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (HICE) applications. Such alloys are expected to result in system capacities of greater than 2 wt.%, making metal hydride storage systems (MHSS`s) a practical means of supplying hydrogen for

Sapru

1998-01-01

394

Enhancement of heat and mass transfer in metal hydride beds with the addition of Al plates  

E-print Network

parameters, such as the thickness of hydride bed and the inlet pressure. List of symbols C hydrogen] y vertical coordinate [m] Greek symbols b plateau hysteresis factor porosity of powder d thickness The applications of metal hydride span a wide variety of technologies, e.g., energy conversion, chemical compres

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

395

Silicon nanowires as a rechargeable template for hydride transfer in redox biocatalysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report a new possible application of hydrogen-terminated silicon nanowires (H-SiNWs) as a rechargeable template for hydride transfer in redox biocatalysis. H-SiNWs transfer hydride efficiently to regenerate NADH by oxidizing Si-Hx bonds. The oxidized H-SiNWs were readily recharged for the continuous regeneration of NADH and enzymatic reactions.

Lee, Hwa Young; Kim, Jae Hong; Son, Eun Jin; Park, Chan Beum

2012-11-01

396

Developmental study of mercury effects on the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)  

PubMed Central

Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals such as mercury is one of the most important human problems. It might have severe teratogenic effects on embryonic development. Some pharmacological and physiological aspects of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) are similar to humans. So the stages of egg to adult fruit fly, as a developmental model, were employed in the study. Wild adult insects were maintained in glass dishes containing standard medium at 25 °C in complete darkness. Five pairs of 3-day old flies were then transferred to standard culture dishes containing different concentrations of mercury ion. They were removed after 8 hours. We considered the following: The rate of larvae becoming pupae and pupae to adults; the time required for the development; the hatching rate in the second generation without mercury in the culture; the morphometric changes during development in both length and width of the eggs through two generations; larvae, pupae and adult thorax length and width. The results showed that mercury in culture (20–100 mg/l) increase the duration of larvae (p<0.01) and pupae (p<0.01) development, the rate of larvae becoming pupae (p<0.001); pupae maturation (p<0.05), the hatching rate (p<0.01), the length (p<0.05) and width of larvae (p<0.01) and pupae (p<0.001) and the length in the adult thorax (p<0.01) decreased significantly. There was no effect upon the size of eggs. There were also no larvae hatching in concentrations of 200 mg/l of mercury. Negative effects of mercury as a heavy metal are possibly due to the interference of this metal in cellular signaling pathways, such as: Notch signaling and protein synthesis during the period of development. Since it bonds chemically with the sulfur hydride groups of proteins, it causes damage to the cell membrane and decreases the amount of RNA. This is the cause of failure of many enzyme mechanisms. PMID:24170977

Abnoos, Hamideh; Mahdavi-shahri, Naser; Haddad, Farhang; Jalal, Razieh

2013-01-01

397

The Plasma Environment at Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury is the least explored terrestrial planet, and the one subjected to the highest flux of solar radiation in the heliosphere. Its highly dynamic, miniature magnetosphere contains ions from the exosphere and solar wind, and at times may allow solar wind ions to directly impact the planet's surface. Together these features create a plasma environment that shares many features with, but is nonetheless very different from, that of Earth. The first in situ measurements of plasma ions in the Mercury space environment were made only recently, by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) during the MESSENGER spacecraft's three flybys of the planet in 2008-2009 as the probe was en route to insertion into orbit about Mercury earlier this year. Here. we present analysis of flyby and early orbital mission data with novel techniques that address the particular challenges inherent in these measurements. First. spacecraft structures and sensor orientation limit the FIPS field of view and allow only partial sampling of velocity distribution functions. We use a software model of FIPS sampling in velocity space to explore these effects and recover bulk parameters under certain assumptions. Second, the low densities found in the Mercury magnetosphere result in a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio for many ions. To address this issue, we apply a kernel density spread function to guide removal of background counts according to a background-signature probability map. We then assign individual counts to particular ion species with a time-of-flight forward model, taking into account energy losses in the carbon foil and other physical behavior of ions within the instrument. Using these methods, we have derived bulk plasma properties and heavy ion composition and evaluated them in the context of the Mercury magnetosphere.

Raines, James M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gloeckler, George; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menalos; Sprague, Anne L.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.

2011-01-01

398

The Challenge of Observing Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many ALPO members continue to observe Mercury with a higher quality of drawings and images.Some albedo features were identified and showed in good agreement with the IAU surface chart prepared by Murry, Smith and Dolfus. Also, the ALPO section has received excellent observations of Mercury within the region from 280 to 360 degrees W longitude. This area is not mapped by the Mariner 10 and not yet imaged by the MESSENGER spacecraft. One feature may be prominent called 'Skinakas basin'. The location of this area is about 280 degrees W longitude and a bit north of equator. It is sort of a nickname and it is not approved by the IAU. It has an unusual marking, quite large and circular in appearance. This may be the darkest albedo feature of the unseen side. Further west and south of "Skinakas basin', there are numerous white areas. They show up as bright spots. The only explanation for these bright spots may be the crater ejecta rays. These features have good contrast under the high sun. We don't see the crater themselves, but we can see the effect of the surrounded area. About three to four large crater ejecta rays can be counted in one large area between 300 degrees W and 360 degrees W of the unmapped portion of the surface. Finally, it took us 33 years for us to return to Mercury after the Mariner 10 spacecraft. Now the MESSENGER probe provided new information. Amateurs have their fair share too observing Mercury at the same time with the MESSENGER. Amateurs have imaged Mercury with high resolution showing major features that match up quite well. The viewing angle of the spacecraft was almost the same line of sight as seen from earth. So, they look nearly identical and close enough for comparison.

Melillo, Frank J.

2009-01-01

399

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation  

SciTech Connect

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal.

Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Engineering Div.

1996-05-01

400

Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy  

SciTech Connect

The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

Garlea, Elena [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Choo, H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, G Y [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Clausen, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brown, D. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Park, Jae-Sung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2010-01-01

401

A mechanical-force-driven physical vapour deposition approach to fabricating complex hydride nanostructures.  

PubMed

Nanoscale hydrides desorb and absorb hydrogen at faster rates and lower temperatures than bulk hydrides because of their high surface areas, abundant grain boundaries and short diffusion distances. No current methods exist for the direct fabrication of nanoscale complex hydrides (for example, alanates, borohydrides) with unique morphologies because of their extremely high reducibility, relatively low thermodynamic stability and complicated elemental composition. Here, we demonstrate a mechanical-force-driven physical vapour deposition procedure for preparing nanoscale complex hydrides without scaffolds or supports. Magnesium alanate nanorods measuring 20-40?nm in diameter and lithium borohydride nanobelts measuring 10-40?nm in width are successfully synthesised on the basis of the one-dimensional structure of the corresponding organic coordination polymers. The dehydrogenation kinetics of the magnesium alanate nanorods are improved, and the nanorod morphology persists through the dehydrogenation-hydrogenation process. Our findings may facilitate the fabrication of such hydrides with improved hydrogen storage properties for practical applications. PMID:24663074

Pang, Yuepeng; Liu, Yongfeng; Gao, Mingxia; Ouyang, Liuzhang; Liu, Jiangwen; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Min; Pan, Hongge

2014-01-01

402

Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae  

SciTech Connect

Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H. (Saskatchewan)

2013-04-08

403

Partition and Tempospatial Variation of Gaseous and Particulate Mercury at a Unique Mercury-Contaminated Remediation Site  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the seasonal variation and spatial distribution of gaseous and particulate mercury at a unique mercury-contaminated remediation site located at the near-coastal region of Tainan City, Taiwan. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), particulate mercury (PTM), and dustfall mercury (DFM) were measured at six nearby sites from November 2009 to September 2010. A newly issued Method for Sampling and Analyzing

Yi-Hsiu Jen; Chung-Shin Yuan; Yuan-Chung Lin; Chang-Gai Lee; Chung-Hsuang Hung; Cheng-Mou Tsai; Hsieh-Hung Tsai; Iau-Ren Ie

2011-01-01

404

Materials for Hydrogen Storage: From Complex Hydrides to Functionalized Nanostructures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The world wide effort for a transition to renewable and clean (i.e. carbon-free) form of energy has resulted in an upsurge of interest in harnessing and utilizing Hydrogen. Apart from being the most abundant element in the universe, hydrogen offers many advantages over other fuels: it is non-toxic, clean to use, and packs more energy per mass than any other fuel. Hydrogen energy production, storage and distribution constitute a multi-disciplinary area of research. Coming to the material issues for solid state storage of hydrogen, the most desirable criteria are high storage capacity, satisfactory kinetics, and optimal thermodynamics. Complex hydrides involving light metals, such as Alanates, Imides, Borates, Amidoboranes etc. show impressive gravimetric efficiencies, although the hydrogen desorption temperatures turn out to be rather high. Apart from complex hydrides, there are other kinds of novel materials that have been investigated, e.g. carbon based materials activated with nano-catalysts, clathrate hydrates, metal-organic complexes, and more recently nanostructured cages viz. fullerenes and nanotubes decorated with simple or transition metals that serve to attract hydrogen in molecular form. In this talk, after giving a broad overview on hydrogen economy, I shall focus on first-principles design of materials for hydrogen storage, from complex hydrides to various kinds of functinalized nanostructures, and discuss the recent results obtained in our laboratory [1-6]. Some outstanding issues and challenges, like how to circumvent the problem of metal clustering on surface, or how to bring down the hydrogen desorption temperature etc. will be discussed.

Das, G. P.

2011-07-01

405

Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system  

SciTech Connect

A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.

Paxton, B.K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1995-09-01

406

Magnesium hydrides and the dearomatisation of pyridine and quinoline derivatives.  

PubMed

Reactions of the ?-diketiminato n-butyl magnesium complex, [HC{(Me)CN(2,6-(i)Pr(2)C(6)H(3))}(2)Mg(n)Bu], with a range of substituted pyridines and fused-ring quinolines in the presence of PhSiH(3) has been found to result in dearomatisation of the N-heterocyclic compounds. This reaction is proposed to occur through the formation of an unobserved N-heterocycle-coordinated magnesium hydride and subsequent hydride transfer via the C2-position of the heterocycle prior to hydride transfer to the C4-position and formation of thermodynamically-favoured magnesium 1,4-dihydropyridides. This reaction is kinetically suppressed for 2,6-dimethylpyridine while the kinetic product, the 1,2-dihydropyridide derivative, was isolated through reaction with 4-methylpyridine (4-methylpyridine), in which case the formation of the 1,4-dihyropyridide is prevented by the presence of the 4-methyl substituent. X-ray structures of the products of these reactions with 4-methylpyridine, 3,5-dimethylpyridine and iso-quinoline comprise a pseudo-tetrahedral magnesium centre while the regiochemistry of the particular dearomatisation reaction is determined by the substitution pattern of the N-heterocycle under observation. The compounds are all air-sensitive and exposure of the magnesium derivatives of dearomatised pyridine and 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) to air resulted in ligand rearomatisation and the formation of dimeric ?(2)-?(2)-?(2)-peroxomagnesium compounds which have also been subject to analysis by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. An unsuccessful extension of this chemistry to N-heterocycle hydrosilylation is suggested to be a consequence of the low basicity of the silane reagent in comparison to the pyridine substrates which effectively impedes any further interaction with the magnesium centres. PMID:21986998

Hill, Michael S; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; MacDougall, Dugald J; Mahon, Mary F; Weetman, Catherine

2011-12-14

407

Environmental Mercury and Its Toxic Effects  

PubMed Central

Mercury exists naturally and as a man-made contaminant. The release of processed mercury can lead to a progressive increase in the amount of atmospheric mercury, which enters the atmospheric-soil-water distribution cycles where it can remain in circulation for years. Mercury poisoning is the result of exposure to mercury or mercury compounds resulting in various toxic effects depend on its chemical form and route of exposure. The major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) is largely through eating contaminated fish, seafood, and wildlife which have been exposed to mercury through ingestion of contaminated lower organisms. MeHg toxicity is associated with nervous system damage in adults and impaired neurological development in infants and children. Ingested mercury may undergo bioaccumulation leading to progressive increases in body burdens. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of individual organ systems associated with mercury poisoning. Mercury has profound cellular, cardiovascular, hematological, pulmonary, renal, immunological, neurological, endocrine, reproductive, and embryonic toxicological effects. PMID:24744824

Rice, Kevin M.; Walker, Ernest M.; Wu, Miaozong; Gillette, Chris

2014-01-01

408

Emission and deposition of atmospheric mercury vapor  

SciTech Connect

We have studied three industrial sources of atmospheric mercury: the chloralkali, cinnabar mining, and electric power generation industries. Samples were collected in the stack, plume, and ambient air of a coal-fired power plant. Mercury vapor was the dominant form of mercury in all samples, and was not converted to particle-associated forms during plume interactions. Because of these characteristics, mercury is inefficiently removed by conventional means during fossil fuel combustion. Contamination of aquatic environments by direct discharges from chloralkali plants is well known. Our work identified an unrecognized source of mercury to the environment, atmospheric emission of the vapor from stored waste deposits. Results indicated that atmospheric and aquatic emissions were comparable, and that losses from defunct plants could approach those from active plants. Studies at the Almaden mercury mine in Spain indicated that mercury vapor is emitted from mercury-rich soils, and that the emission rates are temperature dependent and influenced by vegetation cover. Plants grown on these soils accumulate mercury via the roots from soil mercury, and the leaves by a

Lindberg, S.E.

1984-01-01

409

Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Development Project  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reviews the development of the Electro Energy, Inc.'s bipolar nickel metal hydride battery. The advantages of the design are that each cell is individually sealed, and that there are no external cell terminals, no electrode current collectors, it is compatible with plastic bonded electrodes, adaptable to heat transfer fins, scalable to large area, capacity and high voltage. The design will allow for automated flexible manufacturing, improved energy and power density and lower cost. The development and testing of the battery's component are described. Graphic presentation of the results of many of the tests are included.

Cole, John H.

1999-01-01

410

Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides  

DOEpatents

A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

Zidan, Ragaiy

2013-06-25

411

N-Heterocyclic carbene boranes are good hydride donors.  

PubMed

The nucleophilicity parameters (N) of 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazol-2-ylidene borane and 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene borane are 9.55 and 11.88. This places N-heterocyclic carbene boranes (NHC-boranes) among the most nucleophilic classes of neutral hydride donors. Reductions of highly electron-poor C?N and C?C bonds provide hydrogenation products along with new, stable borylated products. The results suggest that NHC-boranes have considerable untapped potential as neutral organic reductants. PMID:22149270

Horn, Markus; Mayr, Herbert; Lacôte, Emmanuel; Merling, Everett; Deaner, Jordan; Wells, Sarah; McFadden, Timothy; Curran, Dennis P

2012-01-01

412

Regional Scale Photochemical Model Evaluation of Total Mercury Wet Deposition and Speciated Ambient Mercury  

EPA Science Inventory

Methylmercury is a known neurotoxin with deleterious health effects on humans and wildlife. Atmospheric deposition is the largest source of mercury loading to most terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Regional scale air quality models are needed to quantify mercury deposition resu...

413

REACTOR MATERILAS STUDY. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF METAL HYDRIDES. Quarterly Report No. 2 for January 1, 1959 to March 31, 1959  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ease of preparation of relatively large crack-free hydrided ; specimens was found to be largely dependent on the phsse state of the hydride at ; the hydriding temperature. Cracking apparently resulted from hydrogen ; concentration gradients (with resulting phase concentration gradients) within a ; two phase region. The control of grinding cracks in the preparation of hydrided ; tensile

R. L. Beck; W. M. Mueller

1959-01-01

414

Explaining Mercury’s density through magnetic erosion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In protoplanetary disks, dust grains rich in metallic iron can attract each other magnetically. If they are magnetized to values near saturation, the magnetically induced collision speeds are high enough to knock off the non-magnetized, loosely bound silicates. This process enriches the surviving portions of the dust grains in metallic iron, which further enhances the magnetically mediated collisions. The magnetic enhancement to the collisional cross-section between the iron rich dust results in rapid grain growth leading to planetesimal formation. While this process of knocking off silicates, which we term “magnetic erosion”, occurs only in a very limited portion of a protoplanetary disk, it is a possible explanation for Mercury’s disproportionately large iron core.

Hubbard, Alexander

2014-10-01

415

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2012-04-01

416

21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device...

2011-04-01

417

21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device...

2013-04-01

418

21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device...

2012-04-01

419

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2013-04-01

420

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2011-04-01

421

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2011-07-01

422

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2010-04-01

423

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2013-07-01

424

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2010-07-01

425

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2012-07-01

426

21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device...

2010-04-01

427

21 CFR 872.3080 - Mercury and alloy dispenser.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Mercury and alloy dispenser. 872.3080 Section...DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3080 Mercury and alloy dispenser. (a) Identification. A mercury and alloy dispenser is a device...

2014-04-01

428

3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR EXTRACTING MERCURY VISIBLE IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. (OCTOBER, 1995) - McCormick Group Mine, Mercury Retort, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

429

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2014-04-01

430

Interactions between mercury and dissolved organic matter--a review.  

PubMed

Dissolved organic matter (DOM) interacts very strongly with mercury, affecting its speciation, solubility, mobility, and toxicity in the aquatic environment. Strong binding of mercury by DOM is attributed to coordination of mercury at reduced sulfur sites within the organic matter, which are present at concentrations much higher than mercury concentrations found in most natural waters. The ability of organic matter to enhance the dissolution and inhibit the precipitation of mercuric sulfide, a highly insoluble solid, suggests that DOM competes with sulfide for mercury binding. This is confirmed by very high conditional stability constants for mercury-organic sulfur (RSHg+) complexes (10(25)-10(32)) recently reported in literature. DOM appears to play a key role in the photochemical reduction of ionic mercury to elemental mercury and subsequent reoxidation of elemental mercury to ionic mercury, thus affecting volatilization loss and bioavailability of mercury to organisms. DOM affects the production and bioaccumulation of methylmercury, the most bioaccumulative mercury species in fish. PMID:14987930

Ravichandran, Mahalingam

2004-04-01

431

Atmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A  

E-print Network

Atmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A Glacial Ice Core Record of Natural, and U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin District Mercury Research Laboratory, Middleton, Wisconsin 53562 Mercury (Hg) contamination of aquatic ecosystems and subsequent methylmercury bioaccumulation

432

Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging Mission  

E-print Network

MESSENGER Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging Mission Frequently Asked Mercury's characteristics and environment during two complementary mission phases. The mission's primary goal is to increase our understanding of Mercury's density, geologic history, magnetic field, core

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

433

Ballistic Mercury orbiter mission via Venus and Mercury gravity assists  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper shows that it is possible to deliver a payload of 600 to 2000 kg to a 300-km circular orbit at Mercury, using the presently available NASA STS and a single-stage bipropellant chemical rocket. This superior payload performance is attained by swingbys of Venus, plus more importantly, the use of the reverse Delta-V\\/EGA process. In contrast to the familiar

Chen-Wan Liu Yen

1989-01-01

434

Ballistic Mercury orbiter mission via Venus and Mercury gravity assists  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is shown that it is possible to deliver a payload of 600 to 2000 kg to a 300-km circular orbit at Mercury using presently available NASA Space Transportation Systems and a single-stage bipropellant chemical rocket. This superior payload performance is attained by swingbys of Venus, plus (more importantly), the use of the reverse Delta-V\\/EGA process. In contrast to the

C.-W. L. Yen

1986-01-01

435

Mercury Flow Through the Mercury-Containing Lamp Sector of the Economy of the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction: This Scientific Investigations Report examines the flow of mercury through the mercury-containing lamp sector of the U.S. economy in 2001 from lamp manufacture through disposal or recycling. Mercury-containing lamps illuminate commercial and industrial buildings, outdoor areas, and residences. Mercury is an essential component in fluorescent lamps and high-intensity discharge lamps (high-pressure sodium, mercury-vapor, and metal halide). A typical fluorescent lamp is composed of a phosphor-coated glass tube with electrodes located at either end. Only a very small amount of the mercury is in vapor form. The remainder of the mercury is in the form of either liquid mercury metal or solid mercury oxide (mercury oxidizes over the life of the lamp). When voltage is applied, the electrodes energize the mercury vapor and cause it to emit ultraviolet energy. The phosphor coating absorbs the ultraviolet energy, which causes the phosphor to fluoresce and emit visible light. Mercury-containing lamps provide more lumens per watt than incandescent lamps and, as a result, require from three to four times less energy to operate. Mercury is persistent and toxic within the environment. Mercury-containing lamps are of environmental concern because they are widely distributed throughout the environment and are easily broken in handling. The magnitude of lamp sector mercury emissions, estimated to be 2.9 metric tons per year (t/yr), is small compared with the estimated mercury losses of the U.S. coal-burning and chlor-alkali industries, which are about 70 t/yr and about 90 t/yr, respectively.

Goonan, Thomas G.

2006-01-01

436

Final Report Mercury in the Environment and Patterns of Mercury Deposition  

E-print Network

-------------------------------------------------------------- Part 1: A Summary and Review Mercury Emissions, Deposition and Air Chemistry Basic Atmospheric; Browne and Fang 1978), but the major removal mechanism is by oxidation of Hg(0) to divalent mercury Hg(II), also known as reactive gaseous mercury or RGM, which subsequently deposits. Common oxidants are ozone

437

ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

2011-07-18

438

First-principles modelling of magnesium titanium hydrides.  

PubMed

Mixing Mg with Ti leads to a hydride Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2) with markedly improved (de)hydrogenation properties for x ? 0.8, as compared to MgH(2). Optically thin films of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2) have a black appearance, which is remarkable for a hydride material. In this paper we study the structure and stability of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2), x = 0-1 by first-principles calculations at the level of density functional theory. We give evidence for a fluorite to rutile phase transition at a critical composition x(c) = 0.8-0.9, which correlates with the experimentally observed sharp decrease in (de)hydrogenation rates at this composition. The densities of states of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2) have a peak at the Fermi level, composed of Ti d states. Disorder in the positions of the Ti atoms easily destroys the metallic plasma, however, which suppresses the optical reflection. Interband transitions result in a featureless optical absorption over a large energy range, causing the black appearance of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2). PMID:21386386

Er, Süleyman; van Setten, Michiel J; de Wijs, Gilles A; Brocks, Geert

2010-02-24

439

Physics of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physical aspects of the hydrogenation-dehydrogenation mechanisms of metal-metal hydride systems were examined. Experimental investigation was conducted for magnesium hydride as a case study. Theoretical analysis and computational study were carried out. The kinetics of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation of traditionally prepared Mg-MgH_2 and chemically synthesized Mg-MgH_2 were experimentally investigated. A detailed investigation was carried out to determine the reasons for the improved performance of a chemically synthesized Mg-MgH _2 previously reported by Bogdanovic and co-workers. A scanning electron microscope was used to examine the surface morphology of the samples. The surface of chemically prepared samples appeared to be covered with micro-spheroidal beads ranging in radius between 0.5 ?m and 0.05 ?m formed in a fractal-like configuration. Theoretical analysis indicated that the unusual surface structure of the chemically prepared samples could be responsible for the rapid uptake and release of hydrogen. The uptake and release enhancement is believed to be partially due to the substantial increase in the surface area and partially due fast diffusion into the smaller particles. The effect of the addition of nickel to the surface was also investigated. Theoretical analysis was carried out. Models for the process at the surface as well as in the bulk were developed. Diffusion equation was examined taking into account the diffusion coefficient being function of concentration. A non-linear differential equation resulted for this case. The differential equation was numerically solved.

Abdelfattah-Zidan, Ragaiy

440

Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

DOEpatents

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S; Niemann, Michael U; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K

2013-05-14

441

Gas phase contributions to topochemical hydride reduction reactions  

SciTech Connect

Alkali and alkali earth hydrides have been used as solid state reductants recently to yield many interesting new oxygen-deficient transition metal oxides. These reactions have tacitly been assumed to be a solid phase reaction between the reductant and parent oxide. We have conducted a number of experiments with physical separation between the reductant and oxides, and find that in some cases reduction proceeds even when the reagents are physically separated, implying reactions with in-situ generated H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, getter mechanisms. Our findings change our understanding of these topochemical reactions, and should enhance the synthesis of additional new oxides and nanostructures. - Graphical abstract: Topochemical reductions with hydrides: Solid state or gas phase reaction? Display Omitted - Highlights: • SrFeO{sub 2} and LaNiO{sub 2} were prepared by topochemical reduction of oxides. • Separating the reducing agent (CaH{sub 2}, Mg metal) from the oxide still results in reduction. • Such topochemical reactions can occur in the gas phase.

Kobayashi, Yoji [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Li, Zhaofei [Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hirai, Kei [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Tassel, Cédric [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Ushinomiya-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8302 (Japan); Loyer, François [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226 Université de Rennes 1-CNRS, équipe CSM, Bât. 10B, Campus de Beaulieu, 263, Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Ichikawa, Noriya [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Abe, Naoyuki [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamamoto, Takafumi [Department of Energy and Hydrocarbon Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Shimakawa, Yuichi [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); and others

2013-11-15

442

Bistable equilibrium points of mercury body burden  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last century mercury levels in the global environment have tripled as a result of increased pollution from industrial, occupational, medicinal and domestic uses \\\\cite{BaMe03}. Glutathione is known to be the main agent responsible for the excretion of mercury (we refer to \\\\cite{Thim05}, \\\\cite{ZalBar99} and \\\\cite{Lyn02}). It has also been shown that mercury inhibits glutathione synthetase (an enzyme acting

Houman Owhadiand; Areen Boulos

2006-01-01

443

Treaty to Curb Mercury Pollution Adopted  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The international Minamata Convention on Mercury to protect human health and the environment from anthropogenic emissions and releases of mercury and mercury compounds was formally adopted at a 10 October meeting in Minamata, Japan. The legally binding treaty, currently signed by 92 countries, comes 57 years after the government of Japan officially acknowledged, in 1956, the existence of Minamata disease, which was caused by eating seafood contaminated with methylmercury compounds discharged into Minamata Bay in southern Japan.

Showstack, Randy

2013-10-01

444

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOEpatents

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01

445

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOEpatents

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04

446

The Price of a Mercury Mine  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This radio broadcast discusses the health problems associated with the town of Idrija, Slovenia, which was a center for mercury mining for about 500 years. A Slovenian chemist and expert in mercury points out that the citizens of Idrija, proud of their industrial heritage, are reluctant to connect the health problems they experience with exposure to mercury. The clip is 2 minutes in length and is available in MP3 format.

Karl, John

2012-08-20

447

Mercury exposure in protein A immunoadsorption  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Immunoadsorption is increasingly used to treat antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. To prevent microbial growth during storage, reusable protein A-Sepharose gel columns are primed with ethyl mercury thiosalicylate (thiomersal, 0.1% solu- tion) and rinsed with phosphate buffer before use. In this study, we tested the hypothesis of systemic mercury exposure in protein A immunoadsorption. Methods. Whole blood mercury levels were measured

Ludwig Kramer; Edith Bauer; Martin Jansen; Daniela Reiter; Kurt Derfler; Andreas Schaffer

2004-01-01

448

Mercury-Contaminated Sediments Affect Amphipod Feeding  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 125-mile reach of the South River, Virginia, was contaminated with mercury during the first half of the 20th century. As\\u000a increased concentrations of mercury have persisted, researchers have carefully studied its distribution in the river biota\\u000a and estimated associated risks. The present study evaluated the influence of mercury on feeding rate and uptake by the amphipod\\u000a Hyalella azteca. The

Mirco Bundschuh; Jochen P. Zubrod; Frank Seitz; Michael C. Newman; Ralf Schulz

2011-01-01

449

A low cost Mercury orbiter mission  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to Mercury's small mass and position deep within the solar gravitational well, an orbiter mission poses difficult performance requirements (i.e. ?V, thermal extremes). However, Yen (JPL) showed that with extended trip times, substantial Mercury missions are feasible. Low cost, quick concept-to-launch, high quality, and reliability are balanced in constraining a small spacecraft mission to Mercury. The primary science objective

Kenneth J. Ely; Wallace T. Fowler; Byron D. Tapley

1995-01-01

450

40 CFR Appendix Xiii to Part 266 - Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units XIII Appendix XIII to...App. XIII Appendix XIII to Part 266—Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed...

2013-07-01

451

40 CFR Appendix Xiii to Part 266 - Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units XIII Appendix XIII to...App. XIII Appendix XIII to Part 266—Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed...

2012-07-01

452

40 CFR Appendix Xiii to Part 266 - Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units XIII Appendix XIII to...App. XIII Appendix XIII to Part 266—Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed...

2011-07-01

453

40 CFR Appendix Xiii to Part 266 - Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed in Exempt Mercury Recovery Units XIII Appendix XIII to...App. XIII Appendix XIII to Part 266—Mercury Bearing Wastes That May Be Processed...

2010-07-01

454

Space Weathering Processes on Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Like the Moon, Mercury has no atmosphere to protect it from the harsh space environment and therefore it is expected that it will incur the effects of space weathering. These weathering processes are capable of both creating regolith and altering its optical properties. However, there are many important differences between the environments of Mercury and the Moon. These environmental differences will almost certainly affect the weathering processes as well as the products of those processes. It should be possible to observe the effects of these differences in Vis/NIR spectra of the type expected to be returned by MESSENGER. More importantly, understanding these weathering processes and their consequences is essential for evaluating the spectral data returned from MESSENGER and other missions in order to determine the mineralogy and the iron content of the Mercurian surface. Theoretical and experimental work has been undertaken in order to better understand these consequences.

Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.

2002-01-01

455

Investigation of mercury thruster isolators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury ion thruster isolator lifetime tests were performed using different isolator materials and geometries. Tests were performed with and without the flow of mercury through the isolators in an oil diffusion pumped vacuum facility and cryogenically pumped bell jar. The onset of leakage current in isolators occurred in time intervals ranging from a few hours to many hundreds of hours. In all cases, surface contamination was responsible for the onset of leakage current and subsequent isolator failure. Rate of increase of leakage current and the leakage current level increased approximately exponentially with isolator temperature. Careful attention to shielding techniques and the elimination of sources of metal oxides appear to have eliminated isolator failures as a thruster life limiting mechanism.

Mantenieks, M. A.

1973-01-01

456

Trends in mercury concentrations in New York State fish.  

PubMed

Atmospheric emissions of mercury in the US are being reduced, but worldwide mercury emissions remain high. Mercury is also being removed from many consumer items. Changes over time in mercury concentrations in fish remain important to resource managers and the general public. There is hope that mercury concentrations in fish will decline, and the number of fish consumption advisories due to mercury will decrease. We compared mercury concentrations in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a group of Adirondack lakes with data collected 12-17 years earlier and found variable responses among lakes. We observed an average decline of 14% in yellow perch mercury concentrations over the past 15 years. PMID:19330274

Simonin, Howard A; Loukmas, Jefferey J; Skinner, Lawrence C; Roy, Karen M; Paul, Eric A

2009-08-01

457

Mercury in turtles from the Asian food trade.  

E-print Network

??Mercury contamination threatens many ecosystems worldwide. Methyl mercury bioaccumulates at each trophic level, and biomagnifies within individuals over time. Long-lived turtles often occupy high trophic… (more)

Green, Aaliyah

2007-01-01

458

Hollow Promises: A Window into Mercury’s Surface Mineralogy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Early in its orbital operations at Mercury, the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft’s Mercury Dual-Imaging System (MDIS) began imaging "hollows" on the walls, rims, floors, and central peaks of impact craters. Hollows are shallow, irregular, rimless, flat-floored depressions, often with bright interiors and halos, are fresh in appearance, and have less steeply sloped spectral reflectance with wavelength than typical for Mercury. MDIS wide-angle camera (WAC) images obtained with eight narrow-band color filters from 433.2 nm to 996.2 nm of hollows in the craters Dominici (center latitude 1.38°N, longitude 323.5°E, ~20 km diameter), Hopper (12.4°S, 304.1°E, ~35 km), and Mistral (4.7°N, 305.4°E, ~100 km) have sufficient spatial resolution and repeatable color sets to examine spectral reflectance properties. The reflectance data, expressed as I/F, where I is light reflected from Mercury's surface and F is incident sunlight, were corrected for global geometric effects. Hollows on the south crater wall and rim of Dominici have well-defined depressions and halos that are a factor of ~1.4 brighter across the spectral range measured than those in the crater center. Hollows in the center of Dominici are factor of ~1.2 brighter than those in Hopper and Mistral. Eight color sets of Dominici show evidence for a spectral absorption feature centered near 700 nm in the hollows terrain. Three color sets of Hopper hollows show a spectral absorption feature diminished in depth compared to that for the Dominici hollows; the Mistral hollows show no discernible spectral absorption in two color sets. The reflectance differences are likely due to relative age of the hollows. At Dominici, we postulate that the hollows on the southern wall and rim were exposed to the local environment through a process of slumping of overlying material; it is likely that fresh material susceptible to hollow formation is regularly exposed. Local and global processes darken the hollows and diminish the spectral absorption feature. From laboratory reflectance studies of temperature effects on spectral properties of sulfides, these observations suggest that the hollows mineralogy incorporates low-density MgS.

Vilas, Faith; Domingue, Deborah L.; Helbert, Joern; D'Amore, Mario; Izenberg, Noam R.; Murchie, Scott L.; Klima, Rachel L.; Stockstill-Cahill, Karen R.; Sprague, Ann L.; Vaughan, William M.; Head, James W.

2014-11-01

459

Mercury contribution to an adirondack lake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elevated copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in the upper 10 to 20 cm of sediment sampled from Cranberry Lake, a large Adirondack lake, are attributed to atmospheric contributions. Pb-210 and pollen core data, however, suggest Cranberry Lake also received mercury discharges during the turn of the century when the area was the center of extensive lumbering and related activities. Elevated mercury concentrations in Cranberry Lake smallmouth bass derived from remobilization from mercury-contaminated bottom sediments which increased the bioavailability to Cranberry Lake organisms. Mercury remobilization and accumulation by fish are promoted by fluctuating pH values resulting from acid precipilation.

Scrudato, R. J.; Long, D.; Weinbloom, Robert

1987-10-01

460

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOEpatents

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01

461

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOEpatents

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01

462

Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

1988-01-01

463

Mercury contribution to an Adirondack lake  

SciTech Connect

Elevated copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in the upper 10 to 20 cm of sediment sampled from Cranberry Lake, a large Adirondack lake, are attributed to atmospheric contributions. Pb-210 and pollen core data, however, suggest Cranberry Lake also received mercury discharges during the turn of the century when the area was the center of extensive lumbering and related activities. Elevated mercury concentrations in Cranberry Lake smallmouth bass derived from remobilization from mercury-contaminated bottom sediments which increased the bioavailability to Cranberry Lake organisms. Mercury remobilization and accumulation by fish are promoted by fluctuating pH values resulting from acid precipitation.

Scrudato, R.J. (State Univ. of New York, Oswego (United States)); Long, D. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)); Weinbloom, R. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany (United States))

1987-01-01

464

Mercury audit at Rocky Mountain Arsenal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an environmental compliance audit to identify potential mercury-containing equipment in 261 building and 197 tanks at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA). The RMA, located near Denver, Colorado, is undergoing clean up and decommissioning by the Department of the Army. Part of the decommissioning procedure is to ensure that all hazardous wastes are properly identified and disposed of. The purpose of the audit was to identify any mercury spills and mercury-containing instrumentation. The audit were conducted from April 7, 1992, through July 16, 1992, by a two-person team. The team interviewed personnel with knowledge of past uses of the buildings and tanks. Information concerning past mercury spills and the locations and types of instrumentation that contain mercury proved to be invaluable for an accurate survey of the arsenal. The team used a Jerome{reg_sign} 431-X{trademark} Mercury Vapor Analyzer to detect spills and confirm locations of mercury vapor. Twelve detections were recorded during the audit and varied from visible mercury spills to slightly elevated readings in the corners of rooms with past spills. The audit also identified instrumentation that contained mercury. All data have been incorporated into a computerized data base that is compatible with the RMA data base.

Smith, S.M.; Jensen, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, G.M. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-02-01

465

Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to control the chemical speciation, electrochemical state, transport, and aboveground binding of mercury in order to manage this toxicant. To advance this mercury phytoremediation strategy, our planned research focuses on the following Specific Aims: (1) to increase the transport of mercury to aboveground tissue; (2) to identify small mercury binding peptides that enhance hyperaccumulation aboveground; (3) to test the ability of multiple genes acting together to enhance resistance and hyperaccumulation; (4) to construct a simple molecular system for creating male/female sterility, allowing engineered grass, shrub, and tree species to be released indefinitely at contaminated sites; (5) to test the ability of transgenic cottonwood and rice plants to detoxify ionic mercury and prevent methylmercury release from contaminated sediment; and (6) to initiate field testing with transgenic cottonwood and rice for the remediation of methylmercury and ionic mercury. The results of these experiments will enable the phytoremediation of methyl- and ionic mercury by a wide spectrum of deep-rooted, fast-growing plants adapted to diverse environments. We have made significant progress on all six of these specific aims as summarized below.

Meagher, Richard B.

2005-06-01

466

A Mercury orbiter mission design  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper presents the results of the first stage of a Mercury Orbiter Mission Concept Definition study originated by NASA, with emphasis on a proposed end-to-end mission scenario. The science rationale and the strawman payload are presented, along with the spacecraft design based on a novel use of conventional technology that eliminates the need for high-cost high-risk technology development. A

Chen-Wan L. Yen; David H. Collins; Scott A. Meyer

1989-01-01

467

Investigating Atmospheric Mercury with the U.S. Geological Survey Mobile Mercury Laboratory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Atmospheric mercury is thought to be an important source of mercury present in fish, resulting in numerous local, statewide, tribal, and province-wide fish consumption advisories in the United States and Canada (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2007a). To understand how mercury occurs in the atmosphere and its potential to be transferred from the atmosphere to the biosphere, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been investigating sources and forms of atmospheric mercury, especially in locations where the amount of mercury deposited from precipitation is above average.

Kolker, Allan

2007-01-01

468

Toward a Unified Understanding of Mercury and Methylated Mercury from the World's Oceans  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Marine fish and shellfish are the main source of toxic methylmercury exposure for humans. As recently as decade ago, very limited aqueous methylated mercury data were available from marine settings, resulting in a generally poor understanding of the processes controlling mercury in pelagic marine food webs. Recent oceanographic cruises have significantly improved availability of reliable measurements of methylated mercury and total mercury in seawater. This presentation will focus on vertical seawater profiles collected to depths 1000 m from three recent sampling efforts in collaboration with the CLIVAR Repeat Hydrography Program sponsored by NOAA including: 1) the northeastern Pacific (P16N cruise from Honolulu, Hawaii to Kodiak, Alaska); (2) the southern Indian Ocean (I5 cruise from Cape Town, South Africa, to Fremantle, Australia); and, (3) the Southern Ocean cruise (S4P from McMurdo, Antarctica, to Punta Arenas, Chile). Analytical results presented were all derived from the USGS Mercury Research Lab (http://wi.water.usgs.gov/mercury-lab). Supporting data derived from these cruises on water mass ages, nutrients, carbon and dissolved oxygen provide an opportunity to develop a stronger understanding of the biogeochemical factors controlling oceanic distributions of mercury and methylated mercury. Whole-water, median total mercury, and methylated mercury concentrations for the northern Pacific, southern Indian, and Southern Ocean were 1.10, 0.80, and 1.65 pM, , and 0.11, 0.08, and 0.32 pM, respectively. For all three oceans, vertical profiles of total mercury generally show the lowest concentrations in the surface mixed layer, and concentration maxima at the 700-1000 m depths. Surface depletion of total mercury is attributed to photo-chemical reduction and evasion of gaseous elemental mercury as well as scavenging by settling particulate matter, the main vector of transport to the subsurface ocean. Methylated mercury in all the ocean profiles reveal distinct mid-profile concentration maxima, however, the depth of the maxima are more varied than the total mercury profiles (150 - 700m). Also, our observed distribution of methylated mercury highly correlated with organic carbon remineralization rates (OCRR) in the North Pacific and Indian Oceans. Interestingly, we find the highest methylated mercury concentrations in the Southern Ocean, suggesting the possibility of unique mechanisms for methylmercury production, preservation, and degradation in polar ecosystems such as cold water temperatures, extended periods of sea ice cover, and annual atmospheric mercury depletion events. We are using these data to better link oceanic production of bioaccumulative mercury to models for atmospheric and oceanic transport and bioaccumulation. This will ultimately lead to a better understanding of mercury levels in consumable fish and shell fish.

McNutt, M. K.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Landing, W. M.; Sunderland, E. M.

2012-12-01

469

The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

1981-01-01

470

Strong Binding Environments for Mercury in Peat  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury toxicity to humans and wildlife largely originates in bacterial generation of methylmercury in the aquatic environment. Methylmercury may be inhibited from forming if mercury(II) is bound to reduced sulfur in dissolved or solid natural organic matter. Mercury(II)-reduced sulfur bonds are the strongest type of binding between mercury and natural organic matter, but the molecular configurations and binding strengths have still not been fully characterized despite many recent investigations using synchrotron-based analytical capabilities and competitive ligand experimentation. Also, at the low but toxic concentration levels of mercury(II) in the environment, characterization with these approaches is difficult. Using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy at liquid He temperature we have obtained new information on the binding environment of mercury(II) adsorbed to peat obtained from the Florida Everglades at five mercury concentrations ranging from 60 to 99,000 ppm. These data were complemented with X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure spectroscopy for the speciation of reduced sulfur. At mercury(II) concentrations of 60 and 350 ppm the dominant binding occurred in structures similar to those observed for some metallothioneins. At concentrations of 4000 ppm, mercury(II) occurred mainly in a linear arrangement bonded to two sulfurs. At higher concentrations, mercury(II) was bound to two oxygens in a five-membered chelate ring structure. The new binding configuration observed at 60 and 350 ppm is likely more stable than any reported previously, suggesting that peat may be a good material to apply in remediating environments contaminated with mercury.

Nagy, K. L.; Manceau, A.; Ryan, J. N.; Aiken, G. R.

2008-12-01

471

Relationship between dietary mercury intake and blood mercury level in Korea.  

PubMed

This study was performed to evaluate the effect of dietary factors for mercury exposure by comparing with blood mercury concentration. Study population consisted of 1,866 adults (839 men and 1,027 women) in randomly-selected 30 districts in southeast Korea. Dietary mercury intake was calculated from food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) on seafood items and 24 hr recall record. Blood mercury concentration was measured with atomic absorption spectrometry. Mean age of the subjects was 43.5 ± 14.6 yr. The FFQ showed that mercury-laden fish (tuna, shark) and frequently-eating fish (squid, belt fish, mackerel) were important in mercury intake from fish species. The recall record suggested that fish and shellfish was a highest group (63.1%) of mercury intake and had a wide distribution in the food groups. In comparison with the blood mercury concentration, age group, sex, household income, education, drinking status and coastal area were statistically significant (P < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, coefficient from the FFQ (? = 0.003) had greater effect on the blood mercury than the recall record (? = 0.002), but the effect was restricted (adjusted R(2) = 0.234). Further studies with more precise estimation of dietary mercury intake were required to evaluate the risk for mercury exposure by foods and assure risk communication with heavily-exposed group. PMID:24550642

You, Chang-Hun; Kim, Byoung-Gwon; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Sang-Ah; Kim, Rock-Bum; Seo, Jeong-Wook; Hong, Young-Seoub

2014-02-01

472

Fly ash properties and mercury sorbent affect mercury release from curing concrete  

SciTech Connect

The release of mercury from concrete containing fly ashes from various generator boilers and powdered activated carbon sorbent used to capture mercury was measured in laboratory experiments. Release of gaseous mercury from these concretes was less than 0.31% of the total quantity of mercury present. The observed gaseous emissions of mercury during the curing process demonstrated a dependency on the organic carbon content of the fly ash, with mercury release decreasing with increasing carbon content. Further, lower gaseous emissions of mercury were observed for concretes incorporating ash containing activated carbon sorbent than would be expected based on the observed association with organic carbon, suggesting that the powdered activated carbon more tightly binds the mercury as compared to unburned carbon in the ash. Following the initial 28-day curing interval, mercury release diminished with time. In separate leaching experiments, average mercury concentrations leached from fly ash concretes were less than 4.1 ng/L after 18 h and 7 days, demonstrating that less than 0.02% of the mercury was released during leaching. 25 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Danold W. Golightly; Chin-Min Cheng; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker; William E. Wolfe [State University, Columbus, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science

2009-04-15

473

Human Exposure and Health Effects of Inorganic and Elemental Mercury  

PubMed Central

Mercury is a toxic and non-essential metal in the human body. Mercury is ubiquitously distributed in the environment, present in natural products, and exists extensively in items encountered in daily life. There are three forms of mercury, i.e., elemental (or metallic) mercury, inorganic mercury compounds, and organic mercury compounds. This review examines the toxicity of elemental mercury and inorganic mercury compounds. Inorganic mercury compounds are water soluble with a bioavailability of 7% to 15% after ingestion; they are also irritants and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. Upon entering the body, inorganic mercury compounds are accumulated mainly in the kidneys and produce kidney damage. In contrast, human exposure to elemental mercury is mainly by inhalation, followed by rapid absorption and distribution in all major organs. Elemental mercury from ingestion is poorly absorbed with a bioavailability of less than 0.01%. The primary target organs of elemental mercury are the brain and kidney. Elemental mercury is lipid soluble and can cross the blood-brain barrier, while inorganic mercury compounds are not lipid soluble, rendering them unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. Elemental mercury may also enter the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory pathway. The blood mercury is a useful biomarker after short-term and high-level exposure, whereas the urine mercury is the ideal biomarker for long-term exposure to both elemental and inorganic mercury, and also as a good indicator of body burden. This review discusses the common sources of mercury exposure, skin lightening products containing mercury and mercury release from dental amalgam filling, two issues that happen in daily life, bear significant public health importance, and yet undergo extensive debate on their safety. PMID:23230464

Zheng, Wei

2012-01-01

474

3 - 14 Micron Spectral Structure of Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Observations of Mercury were made using the Aerospace BASS on March 21 and May 12 1998 from the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Mercury was at 18 degrees E and 25 degrees W elongation, respectively. The approximate center of the region observed was at equatorial latitudes in both instances and at about 73 degrees longitude in March

D. K. Lynch; A. L. Sprague; K. L. Donaldson; R. W. Russell; C. J. Rice; A. L. Mazuk

1998-01-01

475

Experimental constraints on Mercury's core composition  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent discovery of high S concentrations on the surface of Mercury by spacecraft measurements from the MESSENGER mission provides the potential to place new constraints on the composition of Mercury's large metallic core. In this work, we conducted a set of systematic equilibrium metal-silicate experiments that determined the effect of different metallic compositions in the Fe-S-Si system on the S concentration in the coexisting silicate melt. We find that metallic melts with a range of S and Si combinations can be in equilibrium with silicate melts with S contents consistent with Mercury's surface, but that such silicate melts contain Fe contents lower than measured for Mercury's surface. If Mercury's surface S abundance is representative of the planet's bulk silicate composition and if the planet experienced metal-silicate equilibrium during planetary core formation, then these results place boundaries on the range of possible combinations of Si and S that could be present as the light elements in Mercury's core and suggest that Mercury's core likely contains Si. Except for core compositions with extreme abundances of Si, bulk Mercury compositions calculated by using the newly determined range of potential S and Si core compositions do not resemble primitive meteorite compositions.

Chabot, Nancy L.; Wollack, E. Alex; Klima, Rachel L.; Minitti, Michelle E.

2014-03-01

476

MULTIPOLLUTANT MERCURY AND ACID GASES CONTROL TECHNOLOGY  

EPA Science Inventory

Plans are to continue testing for acid gas, mercury and NOx removal on baseline CFB operation with lime slurry, then use modified lime hydrates and slurries, and modified calcium silicates as additives for enhanced mercury and SO2 removal. Also, data from a coal-fired utility b...

477

MERCURY IN MINING CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS DOCUMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury deposits in mines have shown to pose a significant hazard to residents and wildlife where drainage from these deposits enters the ecosystem through streams and rivers. For this reason, the extent of mercury contamination in the United States is of significant environment...

478

EMISSION RATES OF MERCURY FROM LATEX PAINTS  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper gives results of tests of latex paints containing organic mercury additives in small environmental test chambers to determine the emission rates of mercury. Five paints were evaluated: two contained phenyl mercuric acetate (PMA); and the other three, different additives...

479

Atmospheric Mercury: Emissions, Transport/Fate,  

E-print Network

at Collaborative Meeting on Modeling Mercury in Freshwater Environments Niagara Falls, NY, January 19-20, 2006 Dr for 2000 and 1995: Pacyna, J. and E. Pacyna. Journal of Air and Waste Management Association (in prep. 2005 waste incin metallurgical cement chloralkali other manuf other U.S. Anthopogenic Mercury Emissions, 1999

480

America's top fifty power plant mercury pollutants  

SciTech Connect

The fifty most-polluting coal-burning power plants in the United States emitted twenty tons of mercury into the air in 2007. Of the ten highest-emitting plants, all but one reported an increase as compared to 2006. Coal-fired power plants are the single largest source of mercury air pollution in the U.S., accounting for roughly 40 per cent of all mercury emissions. This report rates the power plants both in terms of sheer mercury pollution and mercury pollution adjusted per kilowatt hour. It also outlines the ways in which mercury removal is achievable with existing technology. Activated carbon injection, which is commercially available and has been tested, can achieve mercury reductions of 90 per cent (and better when coupled with a fabric filter for particulate control) on both bituminous and sub-bituminous coals. In addition, mercury can be significantly reduced as a 'co-benefit' of controls for other pollutants, such as fabric filters, flue gas desulphurization, and selective catalytic reduction. 3 tabs.

NONE

2008-11-15