These are representative sample records from Science.gov related to your search topic.
For comprehensive and current results, perform a real-time search at Science.gov.
1

Synthesis and application of hydride silica composites for rapid and facile removal of aqueous mercury.  

PubMed

The adsorption of ionic mercury(II) from aqueous solution on functionalized hydride silicon materials was investigated. The adsorbents were prepared by modification of mesoporous silica C-120 with triethoxysilane or by converting alkoxysilane into siloxanes by reaction with acetic acid. Mercury adsorption isotherms at 208C are reported, and maximum mercury loadings were determined by Langmuir fitting. Adsorbents exhibited efficient and rapid removal of ionic mercury from aqueous solution, with a maximum mercury loading of approximately 0.22 and 0.43 mmol of Hg g1 of silica C-120 and polyhedraloligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) xerogel, respectively. Adsorption efficiency remained almost constant from pH 2.7 to 7. These inexpensive adsorbents exhibiting rapid assembly, low pH sensitivity, and high reactivity and capacity, are potential candidates as effective materials for mercury decontamination in natural waters and industrial effluents. PMID:24255011

Katok, Kseniia V; Whitby, Raymond L D; Fayon, Franck; Bonnamy, Sylvie; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Cundy, Andrew B

2013-12-16

2

Analysis of total mercury in human tissues prepared by microwave decomposition using a hydride generator system coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer  

Microsoft Academic Search

A fast and efficient procedure has been developed for the analysis of total mercury in human tissues and blood using a hydride vapor generator system coupled to an atomic absorption spectrometer (HVG–AA). Tissue and blood samples were digested in a pressurized microwave decomposition system and the digest diluted prior to formation of free mercury vapor and analysis by atomic absorption.

Xenophon Cominos; Sotiris Athanaselis; Artemis Dona; Antonios Koutselinis

2001-01-01

3

Quantifying uncertainty in measurement of mercury in suspended particulate matter by cold vapor technique using atomic absorption spectrometry with hydride generator.  

PubMed

As a result of rapid industrialization several chemical forms of organic and inorganic mercury are constantly introduced to the environment and affect humans and animals directly. All forms of mercury have toxic effects; therefore accurate measurement of mercury is of prime importance especially in suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected through high volume sampler (HVS). In the quantification of mercury in SPM samples several steps are involved from sampling to final result. The quality, reliability and confidence level of the analyzed data depends upon the measurement uncertainty of the whole process. Evaluation of measurement uncertainty of results is one of the requirements of the standard ISO/IEC 17025:2005 (European Standard EN IS/ISO/IEC 17025:2005, issue1:1-28, 2006). In the presented study the uncertainty estimation in mercury determination in suspended particulate matter (SPM) has been carried out using cold vapor Atomic Absorption Spectrometer-Hydride Generator (AAS-HG) technique followed by wet chemical digestion process. For the calculation of uncertainty, we have considered many general potential sources of uncertainty. After the analysis of data of seven diverse sites of Delhi, it has been concluded that the mercury concentration varies from 1.59?±?0.37 to 14.5?±?2.9 ng/m(3) with 95% confidence level (k?=?2). PMID:24083104

Singh, Nahar; Ahuja, Tarushee; Ojha, Vijay Narain; Soni, Daya; Tripathy, S Swarupa; Leito, Ivo

2013-01-01

4

Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Papers are presented on future observations of and missions to Mercury, the photometry and polarimetry of Mercury, the surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry, the Goldstone radar observations of Mercury, the radar observations of Mercury, the stratigraphy and geologic history of Mercury, the geomorphology of impact craters on Mercury, and the cratering record on Mercury and the origin of impacting objects. Consideration is also given to the tectonics of Mercury, the tectonic history of Mercury, Mercury's thermal history and the generation of its magnetic field, the rotational dynamics of Mercury and the state of its core, Mercury's magnetic field and interior, the magnetosphere of Mercury, and the Mercury atmosphere. Other papers are on the present bounds on the bulk composition of Mercury and the implications for planetary formation processes, the building stones of the planets, the origin and composition of Mercury, the formation of Mercury from planetesimals, and theoretical considerations on the strange density of Mercury.

Vilas, Faith (editor); Chapman, Clark R. (editor); Matthews, Mildred Shapley (editor)

1988-01-01

5

Validation of a hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry methodology for determination of mercury in fish designed for application in the Brazilian national residue control plan.  

PubMed

In the present study, a method for the determination of mercury (Hg) in fish was validated according to ISO/IEC 17025, INMETRO (Brazil), and more recent European recommendations (Commission Decision 2007/333/EC and 2002/657/EC) for implementation in the Brazilian Residue Control Plan (NRCP) in routine applications. The parameters evaluated in the validation were investigated in detail. The results obtained for limit of detection and quantification were respectively, 2.36 and 7.88 ?g kg(-1) of Hg. While the recovery varies between 90-96%. The coefficient of variation was of 4.06-8.94% for the repeatability. Furthermore, a comparison using an external proficiency testing scheme was realized. The results of method validated for the determination of the mercury in fish by Hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry were considered suitable for implementation in routine analysis. PMID:24007488

Damin, Isabel C F; Santo, Maria A E; Hennigen, Rosmari; Vargas, Denise M

2013-01-01

6

Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This lithograph shows mosaic images of Mercury, captured by the Mariner 10 spacecraft. The images are accompanied by a brief description and history, some statistical facts, and a list of significant dates in the exploration of Mercury.

7

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... several forms. Metallic mercury is a shiny, silver-white, odorless liquid. If heated, it is a colorless, odorless gas. It also combines with other elements to form powders or crystals. Mercury is in many products. Metallic ...

8

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... aimed to continue agency efforts to reduce mercury pollution, as part of the international commitments of the ... and processing is a major cause of air pollution from mercury. EPA and Argonne National Laboratory worked ...

9

Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

... and fluid loss, kidney failure, and likely death. Chronic brain damage from organic mercury is difficult to ... MJ, eds. Haddad and Winchester's Clinical Management of Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders ...

10

Mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

New findings on the environmental fate of Hg indicate that lakes can be contaminated by long distance transport on mercury vapor in the atmosphere and that higher levels of Me Hg in fish are associated with acidification of lakes and with the creation of hydroelectric reservoirs. Considerable progress has been made in the understanding of the disposition and metabolism of

Thomes W. Clarkson

1989-01-01

11

Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Prior to the flight of the Mariner 10 spacecraft, Mercury was the least investigated and most poorly known terrestrial planet (Kuiper 1970, Devine 1972). Observational difficulties caused by its proximity to the Sun as viewed from Earth caused the planet to remain a small, vague disk exhibiting little surface contrast or details, an object for which only three major facts were known: 1. its bulk density is similar to that of Venus and Earth, much greater than that of Mars and the Moon; 2. its surface reflects electromagnetic radiation at all wavelengths in the same manner as the Moon (taking into account differences in their solar distances); and 3. its rotation period is in 2/3 resonance with its orbital period. Images obtained during the flyby by Mariner 10 on 29 March 1974 (and the two subsequent flybys on 21 September 1974 and 16 March 1975) revealed Mercury's surface in detail equivalent to that available for the Moon during the early 1960's from Earth-based telescopic views. Additionally, however, information was obtained on the planet's mass and size, atmospheric composition and density, charged-particle environment, and infrared thermal radiation from the surface, and most significantly of all, the existence of a planetary magnetic field that is probably intrinsic to Mercury was established. In the following, this new information is summarized together with results from theoretical studies and ground-based observations. In the quantum jumps of knowledge that have been characteristic of "space-age" exploration, the previously obscure body of Mercury has suddenly come into sharp focus. It is very likely a differentiated body, probably contains a large Earth-like iron-rich core, and displays a surface remarkably similar to that of the Moon, which suggests a similar evolutionary history.

Gault, D. E.; Burns, J. A.; Cassen, P.; Strom, R. G.

1977-01-01

12

[Cloud Point extraction for determination of mercury in Chinese herbal medicine by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with optimization using Box-Behnken design].  

PubMed

Cloud point extraction (CPE) is proposed as a pre-concentration procedure for the determination of Hg in Chinese herbal medicine samples by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Hg2+ was reacted with dithizone to form hydrophobic chelate under the condition of pH. Using Triton X-114, as surfactant, chelate was quantitatively extracted into small volume of the surfactant-rich phase by heating the solution in a water bath for 15 min and centrifuging. Four variables including pH, dithizone concentration, Triton X-114 concentration and equilibrium temperature (T) showed the significant effect on extraction efficiency of total Hg evaluated by single-factor experiment, and Box-Behnken design and response surface method- ology were adopted to further investigate the mutual interactions between these variables and to identify their optimal values that would generate maximum extraction efficiency. The results showed that the binomial was used to fit the response to experimental levels of each variable. ALL linear, quadratic terms of four variables, and interactions between pH and Trion X-114, pH and di- thizone affected the response value(extraction efficiency) significantly at 5% level. The optimum extraction conditions were as follows: pH 5.1, Triton X-114 concentration of 1.16 g x L(-1), dithizone concentration of 4.87 mol x L(-1), and T 58.2 degrees C, the predicted value of fluorescence was 4528.74 under the optimum conditions, and the experimental value had only 2.1% difference with it. Under the conditions, fluorescence was linear to mercury concentration in the range of 1-5 microg x L(-1). The limit of detection obtained was 0.01247 microg x L(-1) with the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) for six replicate determinations of 1.30%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of Hg in morindae Radix, Andrographitis and dried tangerine samples with the recoveries of 95.0%-100.0%. Apparently Box-Behnken design combined with response surface analysis method was considered to be well used for optimization of the cloud point extraction. PMID:25474972

Wang, Mei; Li, Shan; Zhou, Jian-dong; Xu, Ying; Long, Jun-biao; Yang, Bing-yi

2014-08-01

13

[Cloud Point extraction for determination of mercury in Chinese herbal medicine by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry with optimization using Box-Behnken design].  

PubMed

Cloud point extraction (CPE) is proposed as a pre-concentration procedure for the determination of Hg in Chinese herbal medicine samples by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Hg2+ was reacted with dithizone to form hydrophobic chelate under the condition of pH. Using Triton X-114, as surfactant, chelate was quantitatively extracted into small volume of the surfactant-rich phase by heating the solution in a water bath for 15 min and centrifuging. Four variables including pH, dithizone concentration, Triton X-114 concentration and equilibrium temperature (T) showed the significant effect on extraction efficiency of total Hg evaluated by single-factor experiment, and Box-Behnken design and response surface method- ology were adopted to further investigate the mutual interactions between these variables and to identify their optimal values that would generate maximum extraction efficiency. The results showed that the binomial was used to fit the response to experimental levels of each variable. ALL linear, quadratic terms of four variables, and interactions between pH and Trion X-114, pH and di- thizone affected the response value(extraction efficiency) significantly at 5% level. The optimum extraction conditions were as follows: pH 5.1, Triton X-114 concentration of 1.16 g x L(-1), dithizone concentration of 4.87 mol x L(-1), and T 58.2 degrees C, the predicted value of fluorescence was 4528.74 under the optimum conditions, and the experimental value had only 2.1% difference with it. Under the conditions, fluorescence was linear to mercury concentration in the range of 1-5 microg x L(-1). The limit of detection obtained was 0.01247 microg x L(-1) with the relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) for six replicate determinations of 1.30%. The proposed method was successfully applied to determination of Hg in morindae Radix, Andrographitis and dried tangerine samples with the recoveries of 95.0%-100.0%. Apparently Box-Behnken design combined with response surface analysis method was considered to be well used for optimization of the cloud point extraction. PMID:25508751

Wang, Mei; Li, Shan; Zhou, Jian-dong; Xu, Ying; Long, Jun-biao; Yang, Bing-yi

2014-08-01

14

Hydride compositions  

DOEpatents

A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01

15

Multistage metal hydride compressor  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydride compressors can compress hydrogen to high pressures without using mechanical moving parts. They are particularly suited for tritium applications because they require minimal maintenance. A three-stage metal hydride compressor which can compress hydrogen from 14.7 to 20,000 psia has been demonstrated. The design principle and experimental results are presented.

Heung, L.K.

1986-01-01

16

Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

1987-01-01

17

Hydrogen recovery with metal hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air Products pursued hydride technology because hydrides first came to our attention as a unique technology which could safely store hydrogen. The preliminary economics for using available hydrides to store hydrogen in motor vehicles were not encouraging at that time. However, the possibilities for using hydrides to selectively separate hydrogen from other components occurred to us. The authors obtained a

J. G. Santangelo; G. T. Chen

1982-01-01

18

Boron hydride polymer coated substrates  

DOEpatents

A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

1986-08-27

19

Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts  

DOEpatents

A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

1980-01-21

20

17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

21

Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition  

DOEpatents

A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01

22

Subporphyrinato Boron(III) Hydrides.  

PubMed

Subporphyrinato boron(III) hydrides were prepared by reduction of subporphyrinato boron(III) methoxides with diisobutylaluminum hydride (DIBAL-H) in good yields. The authenticity of the B-H bond has been unambiguously confirmed by a (1)H NMR signal that appears as a broad quartet at -2.27 ppm with a large coupling constant with the central (11)B, characteristic B-H infrared stretching frequencies, and single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Red shifts in the corresponding absorption and fluorescence profiles are accounted for in terms of the electron-donating nature of the B-hydride. The hydridic character of subporphyrinato boron(III) hydrides has been demonstrated by the production of H2 via reaction with water or HCl, and controlled reductions of aromatic aldehydes and imines in the presence of a catalytic amount of Ph3C[B(C6F5)4]. PMID:25563966

Tsurumaki, Eiji; Sung, Jooyoung; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

2015-01-28

23

Use metal hydrides to recover hydrogen  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article demonstrates the technical feasibility of a hydride separation process from the idea stage through a pilot unit operated on-site on an ammonia purge-gas stream. The proposed hydrogen separation process makes use of the reversible and selective absorption capability of metal hydrides. Attrition (powder formation) of the hydride material, heat management, and deactivation of the hydride by certain contaminants

J. G. Santangelo; G. T. Chen

1983-01-01

24

Got Mercury?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many of the operational and payload lighting units used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury. If these devices were damaged on-orbit, elemental mercury could be released into the cabin. Although there are plans to replace operational units with alternate light sources, such as LEDs, that do not contain mercury, mercury-containing lamps efficiently produce high quality illumination and may never be completely replaced on orbit. Therefore, exposure to elemental mercury during spaceflight will remain possible and represents a toxicological hazard. Elemental mercury is a liquid metal that vaporizes slowly at room temperature. However, it may be completely vaporized at the elevated operating temperatures of lamps. Although liquid mercury is not readily absorbed through the skin or digestive tract, mercury vapors are efficiently absorbed through the respiratory tract. Therefore, the amount of mercury in the vapor form must be estimated. For mercury releases from lamps that are not being operated, we utilized a study conducted by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Quality to calculate the amount of mercury vapor expected to form over a 2-week period. For longer missions and for mercury releases occurring when lamps are operating, we conservatively assumed complete volatilization of the available mercury. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, both short-term and long-term exposures to mercury vapors are possible. Acute exposure to high concentrations of mercury vapors can cause irritation of the respiratory tract and behavioral symptoms, such as irritability and hyperactivity. Chronic exposure can result in damage to the nervous system (tremors, memory loss, insomnia, etc.) and kidneys (proteinurea). Therefore, the JSC Toxicology Group recommends that stringent safety controls and verifications (vibrational testing, etc.) be applied to any hardware that contains elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/cu m in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting 30 days or less or 0.01 mg/cu m mercury vapor for exposures lasting more than 30 days. We also encourage the use of alternative devices that do not contain mercury.

Meyers, Valerie E.; McCoy, J. Torin; Garcia, Hector D.; James, John T.

2009-01-01

25

Mercury and Your Health  

MedlinePLUS

... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury? What is Metallic Mercury? Toxicological ... PDF - 3.6MB) En Español (PDF - 1.8MB) Mercury Resources CDC’s Fourth National Report on Human Exposure ...

26

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

2003-03-10

27

Electrochemical behavior of metal hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Metal hydride electrodes are of particular interest owing to their potential and practical application in batteries. A large\\u000a number of hydrogen storage materials has been characterized so far. This paper deals with the effect of the chemical nature\\u000a and stoichiometry of specific alloy families (AB5, A2B, AB\\/AB2 and AB2) on the hydride stability, hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics of

J. Kleperis; G. Wójcik; A. Czerwinski; J. Skowronski; M. Kopczyk; M. Beltowska-Brzezinska

2001-01-01

28

Low density metal hydride foams  

DOEpatents

Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

Maienschein, Jon L. (Oakland, CA); Barry, Patrick E. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1991-01-01

29

Decomposition kinetics of plutonium hydride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kinetic data for decomposition of PuH⁠ââ provides insight into a possible mechanism for the hydriding and dehydriding reactions of plutonium. The fact that the rate of the hydriding reaction, K\\/sub H\\/, is proportional to P¹² and the rate of the dehydriding process, K\\/sub D\\/, is inversely proportional to P¹² suggests that the forward and reverse reactions proceed by opposite

J. M. Haschke; J. L. Stakebake

1979-01-01

30

Physics of hydride fueled PWR  

Microsoft Academic Search

The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w\\/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6

Francesco Ganda

2008-01-01

31

Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and remain constant in the tensile direction during the second precipitation regime. This could be due to the fact that the face of reoriented hydride platelet is in compression once these platelets have grown to a sufficient size. The second goal of this study was to perform a spatially resolved study of the effect of a stress concentration such as a notch or a crack on hydride reorientation. Using SEM and image analysis, it was found that a sharp crack induces a different hydride microstructure than a blunt notch. In the case of sharp crack, hydrides are more localized and align more with the defect than for blunt notches. The hydride connectivity also increases close to a stress concentration which will assist in crack propagation during DHC. Using TEM, the microstructure of hydrides grown near crack tips were observed to be similar to that of circumferential hydrides grown in the bulk. The orientation relationship studied with SEM and micro-X-ray diffraction was found to be in most cases ?(111)// ?(0002) for hydrides grown both near and far from stress concentrations. Using the same micro-X-ray diffraction technique local hydride and matrix elastic strains were measured and observed to vary significantly from grain to grain. It was however observed that hydrides grown close to the stress concentration are in tension in the face of the platelet, similar to reoriented hydrides, while those grown far from the stress concentration are in tension, similar to circumferential hydrides. The orders of magnitude of the measured strains in the hydrides and the zirconium matrix compared well to those predicted by finite element models. This study shows that it is possible to study hydride dissolution and precipitation in-situ using time-dependent techniques. It was found that the precipitation temperature is lowered by hydride reorientation. The evolution of hydride strains during precipitation was found to be different for unstressed, stressed and reoriented hydrides. The reoriented hydride fraction and connectivity increase with number of cycles which could lead to mor

Colas, Kimberly B.

32

Physics of hydride fueled PWR  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6 by thorium hydride along with addition of some IFBA. The replacement of 25 v/o of ZrH 1.6 by ThH2 along with use of IFBA was identified as the preferred design approach as it gives a slight cycle length gain whereas use of erbium burnable poison results in a cycle length penalty. The feasibility of a single recycling plutonium in PWR in the form of U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 has also been assessed. This fuel was found superior to MOX in terms of the TRU fractional transmutation---53% for U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 versus 29% for MOX---and proliferation resistance. A thorough investigation of physics characteristics of hydride fuels has been performed to understand the reasons of the trends in the reactivity coefficients. The second part of this work assessed the feasibility of multi-recycling plutonium in PWR using hydride fuel. It was found that the fertile-free hydride fuel PuH2-ZrH1.6, enables multi-recycling of Pu in PWR an unlimited number of times. This unique feature of hydride fuels is due to the incorporation of a significant fraction of the hydrogen moderator in the fuel, thereby mitigating the effect of spectrum hardening due to coolant voiding accidents. An equivalent oxide fuel PuO2-ZrO2 was investigated as well and found to enable up to 10 recycles. The feasibility of recycling Pu and all the TRU using hydride fuels were investigated as well. It was found that hydride fuels allow recycling of Pu+Np at least 6 times. If it was desired to recycle all the TRU in PWR using hydrides, the number of possible recycles is limited to 3; the limit is imposed by positive large void reactivity feedback.

Ganda, Francesco

33

Mercury Bubbles  

Microsoft Academic Search

I HAVE on several occasions noticed the beautiful bubbles described by Mr. Wright and Sir William Crookes (pp. 8 and 37). On each occasion I was purifying mercury in the following way. I half filled a rather large Woulffe's bottle with mercury and poured on to it weak nitric acid. Then, in order to keep, the whole in a state

A. T. Hare

1908-01-01

34

APEX telescope observations of hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrides are key ingredients of interstellar chemistry since they are the initial products of chemical networks that lead to the formation of more complex molecules. The fundamental rotational transitions of light hydrides fall into the submillimeter wavelength range. Using the APEX telescope, we observed the long sought hydrides SH+ and OH+ in absorption against the strong continuum source Sagittarius B2(M). Both, absorption from Galactic center gas as well as absorption from diffuse clouds in intervening spiral arms in a large velocity range are observed. The detected absorption of a continuous velocity range on the line-of-sight shows these hydrides to be an abundant component of diffuse clouds. In addition, we used the strongest submillimeter dust continuum sources in the inner Galaxy to serve as background candles for a systematic census of these hydrides in diffuse clouds and massive star forming regions of our Galaxy and initial results of this survey are presented. For this survey, the CHAMP+ array receiver as well as the MPIfR THz receiver was used. We will discuss the scientific potential of the first THz atmospheric window from 1.0 to 1.1 THz for observations from the Chajnantor high site.

Wyrowski, F.; Menten, K.; Gusten, R.; Belloche, A.; Klein, T.; Leinz, C.

2011-05-01

35

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOEpatents

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, Leslie D. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01

36

Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production  

DOEpatents

A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

2014-03-25

37

Got Mercury?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many lamps used in various spacecraft contain elemental mercury, which is efficiently absorbed through the lungs as a vapor. The liquid metal vaporizes slowly at room temperature, but may be completely vaporized when lamps are operating. Because current spacecraft environmental control systems are unable to remove mercury vapors, we considered short-term and long-term exposures. Using an existing study, we estimated mercury vapor releases from lamps that are not in operation during missions lasting less than or equal to 30 days; whereas we conservatively assumed complete vaporization from lamps that are operating or being used during missions lasing more than 30 days. Based on mercury toxicity, the Johnson Space Center's Toxicology Group recommends stringent safety controls and verifications for any hardware containing elemental mercury that could yield airborne mercury vapor concentrations greater than 0.1 mg/m3 in the total spacecraft atmosphere for exposures lasting less than or equal to 30 days, or concentrations greater than 0.01 mg/m3 for exposures lasting more than 30 days.

Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.; McCoy, Torin; Garcia, Hector

2010-01-01

38

Determination of mercury in fish tissue using a minianalyzer based on cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry at the 184.9 nm line.  

PubMed

A sensitive method was proposed and optimized for the determination of total mercury in fish tissue by using wet digestion, followed by cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry (CVAAS) at the main resonance line of mercury (184.9 nm). The measurements were made using a new type of a non-dispersive mercury minianalyzer. This instrument was initially designed and built for atmospheric mercury-vapor detection. For determining mercury in aqueous samples, the minianalyzer was linked with a mercury/hydride system, Perkin Elmer Model MHS-10. To check the method, the analyzed samples were spiked with a standard solution of mercury. The recoveries of mercury spiked to wet fish tissue were >90% for 0.5 - 0.8 g samples. The results showed a better sensitivity (about 2.5 times higher) when using the mercury absorption line at 184.9 nm compared with the sensitivity obtained by conventional CVAAS at 253.7 nm. PMID:17878589

Rizea, Maria-Cristina; Bratu, Maria-Cristina; Danet, Andrei Florin; Bratu, Adrian

2007-09-01

39

Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites  

SciTech Connect

Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the ?-Ce to ?-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

Brierley, Martin, E-mail: martin.brierley@awe.co.uk [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire, RG7 4PR, United Kingdom and The School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [The School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

2014-05-15

40

Mercury Contamination  

PubMed Central

IN BRIEF A residential elemental mercury contamination incident in Rhode Island resulted in the evacuation of an entire apartment complex. To develop recommendations for improved response, all response-related documents were examined; personnel involved in the response were interviewed; policies and procedures were reviewed; and environmental monitoring data were compiled from specific phases of the response for analysis of effect. A significant challenge of responding to residential elemental mercury contamination lies in communicating risk to residents affected py a HazMat spill. An ongoing, open and honest dialogue is emphasized where concerns of the public are heard and addressed, particularly when establishing and/or modifying policies and procedures for responding to residential elemental mercury contamination. PMID:23436951

Thompson, Marcella R.

2013-01-01

41

Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

Perry, J. L.

1988-01-01

42

Metal hydride composition and method of making  

DOEpatents

A dimensionally stable hydride composition and a method for making such a composition. The composition is made by forming particles of a metal hydride into porous granules, mixing the granules with a matrix material, forming the mixture into pellets, and sintering the pellets in the absence of oxygen. The ratio of matrix material to hydride is preferably between approximately 2:1 and 4:1 by volume. The porous structure of the granules accommodates the expansion that occurs when the metal hydride particles absorb hydrogen. The porous matrix allows the flow of hydrogen therethrough to contact the hydride particles, yet supports the granules and contains the hydride fines that result from repeated absorption/desorption cycles.

Congdon, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01

43

Magnetic Properties of Plutonium Hydride and Deuteride  

Microsoft Academic Search

Magnetic investigations on plutonium hydride (PuH2.74) and deuteride (PuD2.74) have shown these compounds to be either ferromagnetic, like the corresponding uranium compounds, or ferrimagnetic. The Curie temperatures of plutonium hydride and deuteride are the same, within experimental error, and are 107°K. The magnetic moment for the hydride and deuteride are greater than 0.24 and 0.13 Bohr magnetons per mole of

C. E. Olsen; T. A. Sandenaw; B. T. MATTHIAst

1963-01-01

44

Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

Thompson, W. W. (inventor)

1978-01-01

45

Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

1980-01-01

46

Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator  

DOEpatents

A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

Christensen, L.D.

1980-03-13

47

Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and beryllium hydride polymer  

E-print Network

Ab initio treatment of electron correlations in polymers: Lithium hydride chain and berylliumH and beryllium hydride Be2H4 . First, employing a Wannier-function-based approach, the systems are studiedH and the beryllium hydride polymer Be2H4 . As a simple, but due to its ionic character, non- trivial model polymer

Birkenheuer, Uwe

48

Lightweight hydrides for automotive storage of hydrogen  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The primary objectives of the considered investigations are related to the reduction of the dissociation temperature of lightweight materials, and the development of new lightweight hydrides containing little, if any, critical material. Attention is given to the characteristics of metal hydrides, the characteristics of a magnesium-base alloy which is to be employed in hydrogen storage systems for automobiles, aspects of alloy development, and the evaluation of magnesium hydride alloys with the aid of a hydride cycling rig. New information concerning the effect of cycling on magnesium alloys is discussed.

Rohy, D. A.; Nachman, J. F.; Argabright, T. A.

49

Mercury's Messenger  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Forty years after Mariner 2, planetary exploration has still only just begun, and many more missions are on drawing boards, nearing the launch pad, or even en route across interplanetary space to their targets. One of the most challenging missions that will be conducted this decade is sending the MESSENGER spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury

Chapman, Clark R.

2004-01-01

50

Mercury Calculator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive calculator produced by Teachers' Domain helps you determine the mercury levels in various types of fish, and enables you to make more informed choices about which fish are safe to eat and which should be avoided or eaten infrequently.

WGBH Educational Foundation

2010-12-23

51

MERCURY IN TREE RINGS  

EPA Science Inventory

Contamination caused by release of mercury into the environment is a growing concern. This release occurs due to a variety of anthropogenic activities and natural sources. After release, mercury undergoes complicated chemical transformations. The inorganic forms of mercury releas...

52

Kinetics of hydride front in Zircaloy-2 and H release from a fractional hydrided surface  

SciTech Connect

The authors study the hydriding process on commercial nuclear fuel claddings from their inner surface using an ultrahigh vacuum method. The method allows determining the incubation and failure times of the fuel claddings, as well as the dissipated energy and the partial pressure of the desorbed H{sub 2} from the outer surface of fuel claddings during the hydriding process. The correlation between the hydriding dissipated energy and the amount of zirconium hydride (formed at different stages of the hydriding process) leads to a near t{sup 1/2} potential law corresponding to the time scaling of the reaction for the majority of the tested samples. The calibrated relation between energy and hydride thickness allows one to calculate the enthalpy of the {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} phase. The measured H{sub 2} desorption from the external surface is in agreement with a proposed kinetic desorption model from the hydrides precipitated at the surface.

Diaz, M.; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, A.; Moya, J. S.; Remartinez, B.; Perez, S.; Sacedon, J. L. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Iberdrola, Tomas Redondo 3, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

2009-07-15

53

Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.  

SciTech Connect

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

2007-08-01

54

Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition  

DOEpatents

An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

Walker, Franklin E. (18 Shadow Oak Rd., Danville, CA 94526); Wasley, Richard J. (4290 Colgate Way, Livermore, CA 94550)

1981-01-01

55

Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof  

DOEpatents

In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

2010-11-23

56

Interstellar Hydride Spectroscopy with Herschel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Herschel satellite is now giving access with unprecedented sensitivity to the THz spectral range. In particular ground state lines of simple neutral and ionized hydrides have been detected in a wide range of interstellar environments, leading to a renewed understanding of the formation processes of interstellar molecules in the diffuse interstellar medium. In this talk, I will present recent results obtained with the Herschel HIFI and PACS instruments on the carbon, oxygen and nitrogen hydrides. I will discuss how CH and HF can be used as tracers of molecular hydrogen in the diffuse interstellar matter, the new diagnostic capabilities of the cosmic ray ionization rate opened by the OH^+ and H_2O^+ molecular ions, and the role of the dissipation of turbulence in the production of the CH^+ and SH^+ reactive ions. Figure 1: Example of Herschel/HIFI spectra towards the massive star forming region G10.6--0.4. The diffuse interstellar matter along the line of sight towards this massive object is producing multiple absortion features from ˜ 6 to˜ 50 km/s while the emission or absortion signals between -20 to 5 km/s are caused by the massive source itself.

Gerin, Maryvonne

2011-06-01

57

Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

DOEpatents

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S. (Tampa, FL); Niemann, Michael U. (Venice, FL); Goswami, D. Yogi (Tampa, FL); Stefanakos, Elias K. (Tampa, FL)

2012-04-10

58

Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides  

DOEpatents

The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

1983-12-08

59

Mercury contamination extraction  

DOEpatents

Mercury is removed from contaminated waste by firstly applying a sulfur reagent to the waste. Mercury in the waste is then permitted to migrate to the reagent and is stabilized in a mercury sulfide compound. The stable compound may then be removed from the waste which itself remains in situ following mercury removal therefrom.

Fuhrmann, Mark (Silver Spring, MD); Heiser, John (Bayport, NY); Kalb, Paul (Wading River, NY)

2009-09-15

60

MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY.  

EPA Science Inventory

The USEPA's ORD is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001-2005 time frame. ORD will use it to prepare a multi-year mercury research implementation plan in 2001. The Mercury R...

61

Computational Modeling of Uranium Hydriding and Complexes  

SciTech Connect

Uranium hydriding is one of the most important processes that has received considerable attention over many years. Although many experimental and modeling studies have been carried out concerning thermochemistry, diffusion kinetics and mechanisms of U-hydriding, very little is known about the electronic structure and electronic features that govern the U-hydriding process. Yet it is the electronic feature that controls the activation barrier and thus the rate of hydriding. Moreover the role of impurities and the role of the product UH{sub 3} on hydriding rating are not fully understood. An early study by Condon and Larson concerns with the kinetics of U-hydrogen system and a mathematical model for the U-hydriding process. They proposed that diffusion in the reactant phase by hydrogen before nucleation to form hydride phase and that the reaction is first order for hydriding and zero order for dehydriding. Condon has also calculated and measures the reaction rates of U-hydriding and proposed a diffusion model for the U-hydriding. This model was found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental reaction rates. From the slopes of the Arrhenius plot the activation energy was calculated as 6.35 kcal/mole. In a subsequent study Kirkpatrick formulated a close-form for approximate solution to Condon's equation. Bloch and Mintz have proposed the kinetics and mechanism for the U-H reaction over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. They have discussed their results through two models, one, which considers hydrogen diffusion through a protective UH{sub 3} product layer, and the second where hydride growth occurs at the hydride-metal interface. These authors obtained two-dimensional fits of experimental data to the pressure-temperature reactions. Kirkpatrick and Condon have obtained a linear solution to hydriding of uranium. These authors showed that the calculated reaction rates compared quite well with the experimental data at a hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Powell et al. have studied U-hydriding in ultrahigh vacuum and obtained the linear rate data over a wide range of temperatures and pressures. They found reversible hydrogen sorption on the UH{sub 3} reaction product from kinetic effects at 21 C. This demonstrates restarting of the hydriding process in the presence of UH{sub 3} reaction product. DeMint and Leckey have shown that Si impurities dramatically accelerate the U-hydriding rates. We report our recent results of relativistic computations that vary from complete active space multi-configuration interaction (CAS-MCSCF) followed by multi-reference configuration interaction (MRSDCI) computations that included up to 50 million configurations for modeling of uranium-hydriding with cluster models will be presented.

Balasubramanian, K; Siekhaus, W J; McLean, W

2003-02-03

62

Determination of Arsenic and Mercury in Chinese Medicinal Herbs by Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Closed-Vessel Microwave Digestion  

Microsoft Academic Search

A simple method was developed for the determination of trace arsenic and mercury in Chinese medicinal herbs. The samples were digested in closed?Teflon vessels in a microwave oven, and followed with hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometric measurements. The experimental conditions for the digestion were carefully optimized using an orthogonal design. The accuracy of the method was validated by recovery experiments,

Zhou Long; Juanjuan Xin; Xiandeng Hou

2004-01-01

63

Mercury Quick Facts: Health Effects of Mercury Exposure  

MedlinePLUS

How much mercury spilled in a room will make air in the room unsafe? Any amount of mercury spilled indoors can ... in a small bedroom. EPA cleaning up a mercury spill at a house. What is Elemental Mercury? ...

64

Heat transfer enhancement in metal hydride systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An attempt has been made to enhance the heat transfer of hydrogen storage metal hydride systems by the addition of small fraction of high conductivity materials in various configurations. Results indicate that the form of the enhancement material rather than its composition is the more critical factor. The addition of over 6% aluminum foam enhances the effective thermal conductivity of a hydride bed by a factor of 2.6.

Rosso, M. J., Jr.; Strickland, G.

65

Hydriding combustion synthesis of TiFe  

Microsoft Academic Search

Titanium iron (TiFe) is one of the most attractive metal hydrides because of abundant and low cost raw materials and moderate conditions for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation; however, it has not been practically used due to time-consuming and energy-consuming activation treatment. Aiming to improve the initial activity of TiFe, we applied hydriding combustion synthesis (HCS), which has attractive advantages for the

I. Saita; M. Sato; H. Uesugi; T. Akiyama

2007-01-01

66

Red and blue shifted hydridic bonds.  

PubMed

By performing MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio calculations for a large set of dimer systems possessing a R-H hydridic bond involved in diverse types of intermolecular interactions (dihydrogen bonds, hydride halogen bonds, hydride hydrogen bonds, and charge-assisted hydride hydrogen bonds), we show that this is rather an elongation than a shortening that a hydride bond undergoes on interaction. Contrary to what might have been expected on the basis of studies in uniform electric field, this elongation is accompanied by a blue instead of red shift of the R-H stretching vibration frequency. We propose that the "additional" elongation of the R-H hydridic bond results from the significant charge outflow from the sigma bonding orbital of R-H that weakens this bond. The more standard red shift obtained for stronger complexes is explained by means of the Hermansson's formula and the particularly strong electric field produced by the H-acceptor molecule. PMID:25043253

Jab?o?ski, Miros?aw

2014-09-15

67

METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides  

E-print Network

METALLIC HYDRIDES. Magnetic properties of laves-phase rare earth hydrides J. J. Rhyne and G. E on the rare earth site. The rare earth spins disorder at a temperature lower than the bulk Tc in ErFe2 H3 5 per formula unit assuming complete occupation of 3 tetrahedral sites. The heavy rare earth (RFe2

Boyer, Edmond

68

Global Trends in Mercury Management  

PubMed Central

The United Nations Environmental Program Governing Council has regulated mercury as a global pollutant since 2001 and has been preparing the mercury convention, which will have a strongly binding force through Global Mercury Assessment, Global Mercury Partnership Activities, and establishment of the Open-Ended Working Group on Mercury. The European Union maintains an inclusive strategy on risks and contamination of mercury, and has executed the Mercury Export Ban Act since December in 2010. The US Environmental Protection Agency established the Mercury Action Plan (1998) and the Mercury Roadmap (2006) and has proposed systematic mercury management methods to reduce the health risks posed by mercury exposure. Japan, which experienced Minamata disease, aims vigorously at perfection in mercury management in several ways. In Korea, the Ministry of Environment established the Comprehensive Plan and Countermeasures for Mercury Management to prepare for the mercury convention and to reduce risks of mercury to protect public health. PMID:23230466

Choi, Kyunghee

2012-01-01

69

New Jersey mercury regulations  

SciTech Connect

Mercury, or quicksilver, and its major ore cinnabar (HgS) have been known for thousands of years. Health effects from mercury such as dementia were known as early as the late 19th century ({open_quotes}mad as a hatter{close_quotes}). In the 1960`s and 1970`s, reported levels of mercury in tuna reawakened public awareness of mercury pollution. In the 1970`s, major epidemics of acute mercury poisoning were reported in Japan and Iraq. These incidents highlighted the extreme health risks, such as kidney damage, birth defects, and death, associated with severe mercury poisoning. Fetuses and young children are particularly vulnerable since mercury poisoning can damage growing neural tissues. Recently, the perception of mercury as a dangerous pollutant has been on the rise. Advisories warning the public to avoid or reduce the consumption of freshwater fish caught in specific waterbodies due to mercury contamination have been issued in numerous states. The discovery of mercury in {open_quotes}pristine{close_quotes} lakes in the United States, Canada, and Scandinavia, remote from industry and any known mercury sources, has focused attention on atmospheric emissions of mercury as potential significant sources of mercury.

Elias, D.F.; Corbin, W.E. [RTP Environmental Associates, Inc., Green Brook, NJ (United States)

1996-12-31

70

Determination of mercury by furnace atomic nonthermal excitation spectrometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The determination of Hg using different variants of the Furnace Atomic Nonthermal Excitation Spectrometry (FANES) is described. In the direct analysis of micro volumes of solutions, the results could be improved by working with chemical modifiers for the stabilization of Hg during the thermal pretreatment. The best results were obtained using Ir and Pd as modifiers, with absolute detection limits of 4 and 12 pg, respectively. The determination of mercury in sample volumes up to 10 ml could be achieved by coupling a cold vapour generation system and an amalgam attachment to the FANES source. A detection limit of 22 ng/l was obtained with this technique. The best results were obtained by using the cold vapour generation technique and in situ enrichment of Hg onto the modified inner surface of the graphite tube of the FANES source. Using Ir for permanent impregnation of the tube a detection limit of 0.0009 ?;g/l was found. The influence of hydride forming elements on the determination of mercury by the technique of vapour generation and in situ enrichment was studied. A reduction of the concentration of NaBH 4 to 0.002% m/v made it possible to determine traces of mercury in presence of a high excess of hydride forming elements without any depression of the Hg emission intensity. The results were validated using standard reference materials.

Dittrich, K.; Franz, T.; Wennrich, R.

1994-12-01

71

Mercury Releases and Spills  

MedlinePLUS

... about local collection programs . For information on recycling compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) and other mercury-containing ... Right-to-Know” reporting on hazardous and toxic chemicals. Top of page Mercury Response Guidebook (for Emergency ...

72

Hydride dissociation energies of six-membered heterocyclic organic hydrides predicted by ONIOM-G4Method.  

PubMed

Hydride dissociation energy is of great importance in understanding the hydride-donating abilities of organic hydrides. Although the hydride dissociation energies of some organic hydrides have been experimentally measured, much less attention has been focused on the investigation of these quantities from the first principles of physics. Herein, we developed an ONIOM-G4 method and carefully benchmarked this new method against 48 experimental hydride dissociation energies of diverse bulky molecules. It was found that with the combined methods of the HF/6-31+G(d,p)//IEFPCM/Bondi1.15 solvation model, the ONIOM-G4 method can predict the hydride dissociation energies with an error bar of only 1.7 kcal/mol. With the newly developed ONIOM-G4 method, we then systematically studied the hydride dissociation energies of six categories of biologically and pharmaceutically important six-membered heterocyclic organic hydrides, namely, the organic hydrides containing 1,4-dihydropyridine, 1,4-dihydropyrazine, 1,4-oxazine, 1,4-thiazine, 4H-pyran, and 4H-thiopyran ring structures. An extensive hydride dissociation energy scale containing over 100 six-memebered heterocyclic organic hydrides has been established, which may find applications in both synthetic organic chemistry and mechanistic studies of various chemical or biological processes involving transferring of the hydride anion. PMID:22146106

Shi, Jing; Huang, Xiong-Yi; Wang, Hua-Jing; Fu, Yao

2012-01-23

73

Thin-film metal hydrides.  

PubMed

The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

2008-12-01

74

Thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fuels in BWR's  

E-print Network

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project being completed by UC Berkeley and MIT to assess the possible benefits of using hydride fuel in light water nuclear reactors (LWR's). More specifically, this ...

Creighton, John Everett

2005-01-01

75

Mercury Surveillance Program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Background on mercury exposure is presented including forms, sources, permissible exposure limits, and physiological effects. The purpose of the Mercury Surveillance Program at LeRC is outlined, and the specifics of the Medical Surveillance Program for Mercury Exposure at LeRC are discussed.

1993-01-01

76

MERCURY IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury is released from a variety of sources and exhibits a complicated chemistry. According to the Mercury Study Report to Congress, mercury fluxes and budgets in water, soil, and other media have increased by a factor of two to five over pre-industrial levels. The primary expo...

77

Mercury in the environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Problems in assessing mercury concentrations in environmental materials are discussed. Data for situations involving air, water, rocks, soils, sediments, sludges, fossil fuels, plants, animals, foods, and man are drawn together and briefly evaluated. Details are provided regarding the toxicity of mercury along with tentative standards and guidelines for mercury in air, drinking water, and food.

Fulkerson, W.; Lyon, W. S.; Shults, W. D.; Wallace, R. A.

1972-01-01

78

Dental amalgam and mercury  

SciTech Connect

This paper looks at the issues of the current amalgam controversy: the daily dose of mercury from amalgam, hypersensitivity to mercury, claims of adverse effects from amalgam mercury and alleged overnight 'cures.' In addition, the toxicity and allergenicity of the proposed alternative materials are examined with the same kind of scrutiny applied by the anti-amalgam group to dental amalgam. 100 references.

Mackert, J.R. Jr. (Department of Restorative Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta (United States))

1991-08-01

79

High H? ionic conductivity in barium hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H?) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm?1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

2015-01-01

80

High H(-) ionic conductivity in barium hydride.  

PubMed

With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H(-)) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm(-1) at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on. PMID:25485988

Verbraeken, Maarten C; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T S

2015-01-01

81

Reactivity of yttrium carboxylates toward alkylaluminum hydrides.  

PubMed

Yttrocene-carboxylate complex [Cp*2Y(OOCAr(Me))] (Cp*=C5Me5, Ar(Me) =C6H2Me3-2,4,6) was synthesized as a spectroscopically versatile model system for investigating the reactivity of alkylaluminum hydrides towards rare-earth-metal carboxylates. Equimolar reactions with bis-neosilylaluminum hydride and dimethylaluminum hydride gave adduct complexes of the general formula [Cp*2Y(?-OOCAr(Me))(?-H)AlR2] (R=CH2SiMe3, Me). The use of an excess of the respective aluminum hydride led to the formation of product mixtures, from which the yttrium-aluminum-hydride complex [{Cp*2Y(?-H)AlMe2(?-H)AlMe2(?-CH3)}2] could be isolated, which features a 12-membered-ring structure. The adduct complexes [Cp*2Y(?-OOCAr(Me))(?-H)AlR2] display identical (1)J(Y,H) coupling constants of 24.5 Hz for the bridging hydrido ligands and similar (89)Y NMR shifts of ?=-88.1 ppm (R=CH2SiMe3) and ?=-86.3 ppm (R=Me) in the (89)Y DEPT45 NMR experiments. PMID:24151216

Schädle, Christoph; Fischbach, Andreas; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Törnroos, Karl W; Anwander, Reiner

2013-11-25

82

Sealed metal-hydride batteries for aerospace applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nickel and silver-metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications by Eagle-Picher. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems. Nickel-metal hydride batteries have twice the gravimetric energy density of nickel-cadmium batteries and twice the volumetric energy density of nickel-hydrogen batteries. Silver-metal hydride batteries have the potential of three times the energy density of

Dwaine Coates; R. D. Wright

1992-01-01

83

Hydrides versus competing options for storing hydrogen in energy systems  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydrides present many possibilities for energy storage because of their ability to store hydrogen safely and at modest pressure. We have compared hydrogen storage in metal hydrides to other forms of hydrogen storage. Comparisons have been made using technical performance, cost, and safety as the criteria. Hydrides applications and alternatives for vehicular applications, chemical heat pumps, engines, peak shaving, and others are discussed.

Swisher, J.H.; Johnson, E.D.

1980-04-07

84

Gold Hydride Complexes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803842  

E-print Network

Gold Hydride Complexes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803842 Reactions of a Stable Monomeric Gold(I) Hydride Complex** Emily Y. Tsui,* Peter Müller, and Joseph P. Sadighi Gold hydride complexes have been postulated as intermediates in a number of homogeneous gold- catalyzed reactions,[1] but relatively little is known about

Müller, Peter

85

Multiple hydride reduction pathways in isoflavonoids  

PubMed Central

Background Isoflavonoids are of interest owing to their appearance in metabolic pathways of isoflavones, and their estrogenic and other physiological properties, making them promising lead compounds for drug design. Results The reduction of isoflavones by various hydride reagents occurs by a 1,4-pathway in contrast to ordinary ?-alkoxy-?,?-unsaturated ketones. Isoflavan-4-ones, cis- and trans-isoflavan-4-ols, ?-methyldeoxybenzoins or 1,2-diphenylprop-2-en-1-ols are obtained depending on the hydride reagent, mostly in good yields. The stereoselective reduction of isoflavan-4-ones is also discussed. Conclusion The work described in this paper shows that most structural types of reduced isoflavonoids are now reliably available in satisfactory or good yields by hydride reductions to be used as authentic reference compounds in analytical and biological studies. PMID:16934147

Salakka, Auli K; Jokela, Tuija H; Wähälä, Kristiina

2006-01-01

86

Delayed hydride cracking of zirconium alloys  

SciTech Connect

High-strength zirconium alloys are susceptible to a mechanism for crack initiation and propagation termed delayed hydride cracking (DHC). In these alloys, it is possible to generate a large enough stress gradient so that hydrogen moves to the highly stressed areas. Therefore, hydrides precipitate and grow in these areas. When the tensile stress is sufficiently great, crack initiation starts at some of these hydrides. Crack propagation occurs by repeating the same process at the crack tip. Of concern for the chemical process industries is the DHC of Zr-2.5Nb welds. Results of long-term tests and case histories indicate that stress relieving is one of the major measures for preventing DHC, provided that ASME mechanical requirements are met.

Yau, T.L. [Teledyne Wah Chang, Albany, OR (United States); Webster, R.T. [Webster (R.T.), Scio, OR (United States)

1995-10-01

87

Scope on Skies: Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This month, Mercury will start becoming visible over the western horizon shortly after sunset. If you have students observe Mercury, they should do so at approximately the same time for each observation. During the first half of the month, Mercury will appear higher above the horizon and set a bit later each day. Students can also note that Mercury appears brighter following superior conjunction than when it is close to inferior conjunction. Despite its greater distance following superior conjunction, Mercury will be in nearly a full phase and will reflect more sunlight and appear brighter than when it is closer to us, but as a thin crescent.

Riddle, Bob

2008-01-01

88

Mercury pollution in China  

SciTech Connect

With a long history of mercury mining and use and a rapidly growing economy that relies heavily on coal for heat and energy, China faces an enormous challenge to reduce pollution from this toxic metal. The authors delineate what is known about the extent of the problem, regulatory steps are being taken to reduce mercury pollution, and next steps for environmental researchers. It addresses issues of mercury pollution from mercury and gold mining, coal combustion and the chemical industry. Data on dietary intake of mercury is also reported. 50 refs., 2 figs., 2 photos.

Gui-Bin Jiang; Jian-Bo Shi; Xin-Bin Feng [Chinese Academy of Sciences (China). State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology

2006-06-15

89

Mechanisms of hydride abstractions by quinones.  

PubMed

The kinetics of the hydride abstractions by 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-p-benzoquinone (DDQ) from 13 C-H hydride donors (acyclic 1,4-dienes, cyclohexa-1,4-dienes, dihydropyridines), tributylstannane, triphenylstannane, and five borane complexes (amine-boranes, carbene-boranes) have been studied photometrically in dichloromethane solution at 20 °C. Analysis of the resulting second-order rate constants by the correlation log k2(20 °C) = sN(E + N) ( J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2001 , 123 , 9500 ) showed that the hydride abstractions from the C-H donors on one side and the Sn-H and B-H hydride donors on the other follow separate correlations, indicating different mechanisms for the two reaction series. The interpretation that the C-H donors transfer hydrogen to the carbonyl oxygen of DDQ while Sn-H and B-H hydride donors transfer hydride to a cyano-substituted carbon of DDQ is supported by quantum-chemical intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations and isotope labeling experiments of the reactions of D8-cyclohexa-1,4-diene, Bu3SnD, and pyridine·BD3 with 2,5-dichloro-p-benzoquinone. The second-order rate constants of the reactions of tributylstannane with different quinones correlate linearly with the electrophilicity parameters E of the quinones, which have previously been derived from the reactions of quinones with ?-nucleophiles. The fact that the reactions of Bu3SnH with quinones and benzhydrylium ions are on the same log k2 vs E (electrophilicity) correlation shows that both reaction series proceed by the same mechanism and illustrates the general significance of the reactivity parameters E, N, and sN for predicting rates of polar organic reactions. PMID:25196576

Guo, Xingwei; Zipse, Hendrik; Mayr, Herbert

2014-10-01

90

Atomistic potentials for palladium-silver hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New embedded-atom method potentials for the ternary palladium-silver-hydrogen system are developed by extending a previously developed palladium-hydrogen potential. The ternary potentials accurately capture the heat of mixing and structural properties associated with solid solution alloys of palladium-silver. Stable hydrides are produced with properties that smoothly transition across the compositions. Additions of silver to palladium are predicted to alter the properties of the hydrides by decreasing the miscibility gap and increasing the likelihood of hydrogen atoms occupying tetrahedral interstitial sites over octahedral interstitial sites.

Hale, L. M.; Wong, B. M.; Zimmerman, J. A.; Zhou, X. W.

2013-06-01

91

Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model. Version 2  

E-print Network

Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model. In second version of the article we assume that K40 concentration distributes in the Earth uniformly.

Leonid Bezrukov

2014-02-12

92

[Chronic occupational metallic mercurialism].  

PubMed

This is a review on current knowledge of chronic occupational mercurialism syndrome. Major scientific studies and reviews on clinical manifestation and physiopathology of mercury poisoning were evaluated. The search was complemented using Medline and Lilacs data. Erethism or neuropsychological syndrome, characterized by irritability, personality change, loss of self-confidence, depression, delirium, insomnia, apathy, loss of memory, headaches, general pain, and tremors, is seen after exposure to metallic mercury. Hypertension, renal disturbances, allergies and immunological conditions are also common. Mercury is found in many different work processes: industries, gold mining, and dentistry. As prevention measures are not often adopted there is an increasing risk of mercury poisoning. The disease has been under diagnosed even though 16 clinical forms of mercury poisoning are described by Brazilian regulations. Clinical diagnosis is important, especially because abnormalities in the central nervous, renal and immunological systems can be detected using current medical technology, helping to develop the knowledge and control measures for mercurialism. PMID:12488928

Faria, Marcília de Araújo Medrado

2003-02-01

93

1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. OPERATIONS IN THE GLOVE BOX IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH INCLUDED HYDRIDING OF PLUTONIUM AND HYDRIDE SEPARATION. IN THE FOREGROUND, THE VACUUM MONITOR CONTROL PANEL MEASURED TEMPERATURES WITHIN THE GLOVEBOX. THE CENTER CONTROL PANEL REGULATED THE FURNACE INSIDE THE GLOVE BOX USED IN THE HYDRIDING PROCESSES. THIS EQUIPMENT WAS ESSENTIAL TO THE HYDRIDING PROCESS, AS WELL AS OTHER GLOVE BOX OPERATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Laboratory, North-central section of industrial area at 79 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

94

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks  

E-print Network

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks Part 1 b After you finish the video and the above questions Resources: EPA General Info on Mercury - http://www.epa.gov/mercury/about.htm FDA Mercury Levels in Seafood.htm World Health Organization Key Facts on Mercury - http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs361

Miami, University of

95

Effect of yttrium on nucleation and growth of zirconium hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Addition of yttrium in zirconium causes precipitates of yttrium, which form two types of particles and are oxidized upon heat treatment. One type of particles with sub-micrometer scale sizes has a low population, whereas the other with nano scale sizes has a high population and cluster distribution. Owing to strong affinity of yttrium to hydrogen, the nanoparticles, mostly within the grains of the Zr-Y alloy, attract nucleation of hydrides at the clusters of the nanoparticles and cause preferential distribution of intragranular hydrides. In comparison with that of Zr, additional nanoparticles in the Zr-Y alloy impede further growth of hydride precipitates during hydriding. It is deduced that the impediment of growing hydride precipitates by the nanoparticles is developed during an auto-catalytic nucleation process, which leads to formation of thin and intragranular hydrides, favorable to mitigation of hydride embrittlement.

Li, Changji; Xiong, Liangyin; Wu, Erdong; Liu, Shi

2015-02-01

96

Effects of ?-hydride precipitation at a crack tip on crack propagation in delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-2  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Delayed hydride cracking (DHC) of Zircaloy-2 is one possible mechanism for the failure of boiling water reactor fuel rods in ramp tests at high burnup. Analyses were made for hydrogen diffusion around a crack tip to estimate the crack velocity of DHC in zirconium alloys, placing importance on effects of precipitation of ?-hydride. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride, which was strictly analyzed using a finite element computer code. Then, stress-driven hydrogen diffusion under the altered stress distribution was analyzed by a differential method. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Finally, crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. The stress distribution around the crack tip is significantly altered by precipitation of hydride. Overlapping of external stress and hydride precipitation at a crack tip induces two stress peaks; one at a crack tip and the other at the front end of the hydride precipitate. Since the latter is larger than the former, more hydrogen diffuses to the front end of the hydride precipitate, thereby accelerating hydride growth compared with that in the absence of the hydride. These results indicated that, after hydride was formed in front of the crack tip, it grew almost steadily accompanying the interaction of hydrogen diffusion, hydride growth and the stress alteration by hydride precipitation. Crack velocity was estimated from the calculated hydrogen flux into the crack tip as a function of temperature, stress intensity factor and material strength. There was qualitatively good agreement between calculation results and experimental data. Macroscopic stress, ?c in a fiber reinforced composite with fibers aligned in a loading direction can be expressed as follows: ?c = ?fVf + ?m (1 - Vf), where suffices f, m and c refer to fiber, matrix and composite, respectively, and Vf is volume fraction of fibers.

Kubo, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

2013-08-01

97

Hydride Reorientation and Delayed Hydride Cracking of Spent Fuel Rods in Dry Storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of thermal creep during vacuum drying of spent fuel rods on hydride reorientation and their delayed hydride cracking (DHC) susceptibility. To these ends, we analyzed Tsai’s thermal creep results of irradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding segments from two pressurized water reactors and Simpson and Ells’ observation where zirconium alloy cladding tube failed during long-term storage at room temperature. On cooling under 190 MPa, the spent fuel rods crept to 3.5 pct strain during vacuum drying showed large radial hydrides, while the ones crept to 0.35 pct strain had very fine radial hydrides. Thus, it is suggested that prior creep deformation promotes hydride reorientation in spent fuel rods on cooling after vacuum drying. Evidence for this suggestion is provided by a model experiment. Considering Kim’s DHC model and experimental facts showing precipitation of hydrides even at room temperature at stress raisers, we suggest that spent fuel rods would fail by DHC in dry storage if stress raisers are present inside the cladding on cooling to below 180 °C, and then axial splits of the failed spent fuel rods would occur by DHC due to fuel expansion by UO2 oxidation.

Kim, Young S.

2009-12-01

98

Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof  

DOEpatents

Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

2006-10-17

99

Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof  

DOEpatents

Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

2009-05-05

100

Hydride fuel for LWRs—Project overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

This special issue of Nuclear Engineering and Design consists of a dozen papers that summarize the research accomplished in the DOE NERI Program sponsored project NERI 02-189 entitled “Use of Solid Hydride Fuel for Improved Long-Life LWR Core Designs”. The primary objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of improving the performance of pressurised water reactor (PWR) and

E. Greenspan; M. Fratoni; F. Ganda; F. Ginex; D. Olander; N. Todreas; P. Diller; P. Ferroni; J. Malen; A. Romano; C. Shuffler; J. Trant; B. Petrovic; H. Garkisch

2009-01-01

101

Mercury: The World Closest to the Sun.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses various topics related to the geology of Mercury including the origin of Mercury's magnetism, Mercury's motions, volcanism, scarps, and Mercury's violent birth and early life. Includes a table comparing Mercury's orbital and physical data to that of earth's. (JN)

Cordell, Bruce M.

1984-01-01

102

Mercury Calibration System  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Performance Specification 12 in the Clean Air Mercury Rule (CAMR) states that a mercury CEM must be calibrated with National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST)-traceable standards. In early 2009, a NIST traceable standard for elemental mercury CEM calibration still does not exist. Despite the vacature of CAMR by a Federal appeals court in early 2008, a NIST traceable standard is still needed for whatever regulation is implemented in the future. Thermo Fisher is a major vendor providing complete integrated mercury continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) systems to the industry. WRI is participating with EPA, EPRI, NIST, and Thermo Fisher towards the development of the criteria that will be used in the traceability protocols to be issued by EPA. An initial draft of an elemental mercury calibration traceability protocol was distributed for comment to the participating research groups and vendors on a limited basis in early May 2007. In August 2007, EPA issued an interim traceability protocol for elemental mercury calibrators. Various working drafts of the new interim traceability protocols were distributed in late 2008 and early 2009 to participants in the Mercury Standards Working Committee project. The protocols include sections on qualification and certification. The qualification section describes in general terms tests that must be conducted by the calibrator vendors to demonstrate that their calibration equipment meets the minimum requirements to be established by EPA for use in CAMR monitoring. Variables to be examined include linearity, ambient temperature, back pressure, ambient pressure, line voltage, and effects of shipping. None of the procedures were described in detail in the draft interim documents; however they describe what EPA would like to eventually develop. WRI is providing the data and results to EPA for use in developing revised experimental procedures and realistic acceptance criteria based on actual capabilities of the current calibration technology. As part of the current effort, WRI worked with Thermo Fisher elemental mercury calibrator units to conduct qualification experiments to demonstrate their performance characteristics under a variety of conditions and to demonstrate that they qualify for use in the CEM calibration program. Monitoring of speciated mercury is another concern of this research. The mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are comprised of both elemental and oxidized mercury. Current CEM analyzers are designed to measure elemental mercury only. Oxidized mercury must first be converted to elemental mercury prior to entering the analyzer inlet in order to be measured. CEM systems must demonstrate the ability to measure both elemental and oxidized mercury. This requires the use of oxidized mercury generators with an efficient conversion of the oxidized mercury to elemental mercury. There are currently two basic types of mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) generators used for this purpose. One is an evaporative HgCl{sub 2} generator, which produces gas standards of known concentration by vaporization of aqueous HgCl{sub 2} solutions and quantitative mixing with a diluent carrier gas. The other is a device that converts the output from an elemental Hg generator to HgCl{sub 2} by means of a chemical reaction with chlorine gas. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer system involves reaction of elemental mercury vapor with chlorine gas at an elevated temperature. The draft interim protocol for oxidized mercury units involving reaction with chlorine gas requires the vendors to demonstrate high efficiency of oxidation of an elemental mercury stream from an elemental mercury vapor generator. The Thermo Fisher oxidizer unit is designed to operate at the power plant stack at the probe outlet. Following oxidation of elemental mercury from reaction with chlorine gas, a high temperature module reduces the mercuric chloride back to elemental mercury. WRI conducted work with a custom laboratory configured stand-alone oxidized mercury generator unit prov

John Schabron; Eric Kalberer; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson; Ryan Boysen; William Schuster

2009-03-11

103

Ductility Evaluation of As-Hydrided and Hydride Reoriented Zircaloy-4 Cladding under Simulated Dry-Storage Condition  

SciTech Connect

Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage expose cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to normal operation in-reactor and pool storage under these conditions. Radial hydrides could precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. As a means of simulating this behavior, unirradiated hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were fabricated by a gas charging method to levels that encompass the range of hydrogen concentrations observed in current used fuel. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression test (RCT) method at various temperatures to evaluate the sample s ductility for both as-hydrided and post-hydride reorientation treated specimens. As-hydrided samples with higher hydrogen concentration (>800 ppm) resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. Increasing RCT temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the as-hydrided cladding. A systematic radial hydride treatment was conducted at various pressures and temperatures for the hydrided samples with H content around 200 ppm. Following the radial hydride treatment, RCTs on the hydride reoriented samples were conducted and exhibited lower ductility compared to as-hydrided samples.

Yan, Yong [ORNL] [ORNL; Plummer, Lee K [ORNL] [ORNL; Ray, Holly B [ORNL] [ORNL; Cook, Tyler S [ORNL] [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01

104

Process for low mercury coal  

DOEpatents

A process for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Grimes, R. William (Laramie, WY); Tweed, Robert E. (Laramie, WY)

1995-01-01

105

Process for low mercury coal  

DOEpatents

A process is described for producing low mercury coal during precombustion procedures by releasing mercury through discriminating mild heating that minimizes other burdensome constituents. Said mercury is recovered from the overhead gases by selective removal. 4 figures.

Merriam, N.W.; Grimes, R.W.; Tweed, R.E.

1995-04-04

106

Mercury's South Pole  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

After passing Mercury the first time and making a trip around the Sun, Mariner 10 again flew by Mercury on September 21 at 1:59 PMPDT. This encounter brought the spacecraft in front of Mercury in the southern hemisphere.

In this frame south is down, the south pole is located on the right hand edge of the large crater that has only its rim sticking up into the light (Chao Meng Fu crater). When this frame (FDS 166902) was acquired Mariner 10 was about 83,000 km from Mercury.

The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

1974-01-01

107

Mercury-induced renal effects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury (Hg, CAS Number 7439-97-6) is a naturally-occurring metal that has an atomic number of 80 and an atomic weight of\\u000a 200.6. Many different organic and inorganic mercury compounds are found in nature because of mercury’s ability to form covalent\\u000a and ionic bonds with other chemicals. Mercury exists in three forms in three oxidation states (0, +1, +2): elemental mercury

Bruce A. Fowler; Margaret H. Whittaker; Carl-Gustaf Elinder

108

Mercury Chamber Considerations  

E-print Network

Mercury Chamber Considerations V. Graves IDS-NF Target Studies July 2011 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury Chamber Considerations, July 2011 Flow Loop Review · 1 cm dia nozzle, 20 m/s jet requires 1.57 liter/sec mercury flow (94.2 liter/min, 24.9 gpm). · MERIT experiment

McDonald, Kirk

109

Mercury in the environment  

SciTech Connect

Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

2008-08-06

110

MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. Mercury's magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed dri-fi paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts; the characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short possibly coupling kinetic and fluid modes; magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to directly impact the dayside regolith; inductive currents in Mercury's interior should act to modify the solar In addition, Mercury's magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionosphere. This lack of an ionosphere is thought to be the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short lived, approx. 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 in Mercury's magnetic tail. In this seminar, we review what we think we know about Mercury's magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team's strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic magnetosphere.

Slavin, James A.

2008-01-01

111

Mercury in the environment  

ScienceCinema

Abbott works for Idaho National Laboratory as an environmental scientist. Using state-of-thescienceequipment, he continuously samples the air, looking for mercury. In turn, he'll analyzethis long-term data and try to figure out the mercury's point of or

Idaho National Laboratory - Mike Abbott

2010-01-08

112

Mercury in the Amazon.  

PubMed

Release and spreading of mercury from gold mining is a widespread problem in the Amazon area. Today we have rather good knowledge of the mercury situation. Tens of investigations have considered mainly concentrations in fish and human hair. Metallic mercury is used for amalgamation of gold, and the mercury is released by evaporation at reburning sites. The first extraction (burning) is performed in the field at the garimpos and the second (reburning) in gold shops in towns. This practice may cause severe exposure to elemental mercury by inhalation for people working with gold purification. Mercury is also released in substantial amounts to rivers and lakes. This mercury may be bioaccumulated as methylmercury in aquatic food chains. Predatory fish often contain mercury in concentrations that far exceed the safety norms in Brazil. As many people eat fish daily, there is a high exposure to methylmercury. Neurological disorders have been found in exposed persons. Methylmercury concentrations in hair are often at levels that may cause clinical symptoms of Minamata disease. The greatest health hazard index values have been estimated for people eating contaminated fish. PMID:9666740

Lodenius, M; Malm, O

1998-01-01

113

Atmospheric Deposition of Mercury  

EPA Science Inventory

With the advent of the industrial era, the amount of mercury entering the global environment increased dramatically. Releases of mercury in its elemental form from gold mines and chlor-alkali plants, as sulfides such as mercaptans and agricultural chemicals, and as volatile emiss...

114

MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Office of Research and Development (ORD) is pleased to announce the availability of its Mercury Research Strategy. This strategy guides ORD's mercury research program and covers the FY2001 2005 time frame. ORD will use it to ...

115

Mercury and Pregnancy  

MedlinePLUS

... made when mercury in the air gets into water. The mercury in the air comes from natural sources (such as volcanoes) and man-made sources (such as burning coal and other pollution). You can get methylmercury in your body by ...

116

HYDRIDE-INDUCED EMBRITTLEMENT IN METALS - STRESS AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A robust mathematical model for the hydrogen embrittlement of hydride forming metals has been developed. The model takes into account the coupling of the operating physical processes, namely: (i) hydrogen diffusion, (ii) hydride precipitation, (iii) non-mechanical energy flow, and (iv) hydride\\/solid-solution deformation. Crack growth is simulated by using a new version of de-cohesion model with time-dependent energy of de-cohesion due

A. G. Varias; A. R. Massih

117

HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

K. McCoy

2000-12-12

118

Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities  

SciTech Connect

We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; /Fermilab; Ciovati, G.; / /Jefferson Lab; Wu, G.; /Argonne

2011-10-01

119

Metal hydride characteristics by Zr and Ti  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen absorption experiments were carried out using zirconium (Zr) and titanium (Ti) in the form of a metal sponge, strip\\u000a and rod to investigate the metal hydride characteristics. The Zr and Ti sponges showed a high hydrogen absorption capacity\\u000a despite a low reaction temperature. The H\\/M, which indicates the capacity of hydrogen absorption, was measured at 2.0 for\\u000a the Zr\\/Ti

Sung Ho Lee; Jae Hyung Yoo; Hongsuk Chung

2001-01-01

120

NMR study of the plutonium hydride system  

Microsoft Academic Search

An NMR study was conducted on protons in the nonstoichiometric plutonium hydride system, PuHx. The following compositions were studied: x=1.78, 2.35, 2.65, and 2.78. The line shapes, Knight shifts (K), spin-spin relaxation times (T2), and spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) were measured in the temperature range of 77-300 K. The results indicate the existence of paramagnetic phases at high temperatures, with

G. Cinader; D. Zamir; Z. Hadari

1976-01-01

121

Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

Lowery, Eric

1995-01-01

122

Hydrogen and deuterium diffusion in lithium hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hydrogen is considered a promising candidate to achieve an alternative source to overcome future energy supply problems. Very recently, an ab initio molecular dynamics study of the hydrogen diffusion in sodium and lithium hydrides appeared by Ramzan and Ahuja [J. Appl. Phys. 106, 016104 (2009)]. Here, we alternatively report the calculation of the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients of hydrogen and deuterium in LiH in terms of a thermodynamical model. The resulting values agree fairly well with experimental data.

Dologlou, Elisabeth

2010-04-01

123

Fe induced hydride formation in ZrPd2  

SciTech Connect

We show via first-principles calculations that the electronic structure of ZrPd{sub 2}, which does not form a hydride, can be modified by partial substitution of Fe for Pd, leading to a material that forms a hydride. We also show that PdZr{sub 2}, which forms a very stable hydride, can also be modified by Fe addition to lower the enthalpy of hydride formation. These results are explained in terms of electronic structure, specifically electronegativity, charge transfer, and s-d bonding, and clearly have implications in the search of new materials for hydrogen storage.

Gupta, Michele [Universite Paris Sud, Orsay, France; Gupta, Raju [CEA, Saclay, France; Singh, David J [ORNL

2008-01-01

124

Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

1981-01-01

125

Atomic absorption spectroscopy for mercury, automated by sequential injection and miniaturized in lab-on-valve system.  

PubMed

Sodium borohydride-based hydride generation was automated by using programmable flow within the lab-on-valve module. Mercury vapor, generated in the reaction mixture, was extracted in a gas/liquid separator. The gas-expansion separator was miniaturized and compared with the performance of a novel gas separator that exploits the combination of Venturi effect and reduced pressure. Cold vapor atomic spectroscopy was used as a model system, with detection of mercury by absorption at 254 nm and limit of detection of 9 microg of Hg/L, using 300 microL of sample and 100 microL of borohydride. This work introduces, for the first time, sequential injection technique for hydride generation, highlights advantages of using programmable flow, and outlines means for miniaturization of assays based on spectroscopy of volatile species. PMID:16097748

Erxleben, Holger; Ruzicka, Jaromir

2005-08-15

126

MERCURY MULTI-YEAR PLAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A 1997 EPA Mercury Study Report to Congress discussed the magnitude of mercury emissions in the United States, and concluded that a plausible link exists between human activities that release mercury from industrial and combustion sources in the United States and methyl mercury c...

127

Getting Mercury out of Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide was prepared while working with many Massachusetts schools to remove items that contain mercury and to find suitable alternatives. It contains fact sheets on: mercury in science laboratories and classrooms, mercury in school buildings and maintenance areas, mercury in the medical office and in medical technology classrooms in vocational…

1999

128

Mercury Jet Studies Tristan Davenne  

E-print Network

Mercury Jet Studies Tristan Davenne Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Joint UKNF, INO, UKIERI meeting mercury target and reported a radial velocity at surface of mercury jet due to proton beam is 36m/s #12;Numerical simulation of Sievers & Pugnat Result Click on image above to watch video of 2cm mercury target

McDonald, Kirk

129

(Mercury as an environmental pollutant)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The traveler attended the conference Mercury as an Environmental Pollutant'' and presented a technical poster entitled Biotransformations of Mercury in Contaminated and Control Streams in Relation to the Abundance of Microbial Gene Sequences Encoding Mercury Resistance.'' Although a great deal of the subject matter of the conference dealt with the biogeochemical cycling of mercury in aquatic and terrestrial systems which

1990-01-01

130

Mercury Effects, Sources and Control Measures  

E-print Network

Mercury Effects, Sources and Control Measures Prepared by Alan B. Jones, Brooks Rand, Ltd., Seattle ................................................................................................................................1 MERCURY SOURCES....................................................................................................................................................................................8 Mercury dumping from naval vessels

131

Development of Hydride Absorber for Fast Reactor—Application of Hafnium Hydride to Control Rod of Large Fast Reactor—  

Microsoft Academic Search

The application of hafnium hydride (Hf-hydride) to a control rod for a large fast reactor where the B4C control rod is originally employed is studied. Three types of Hf-hydride control rods are designed. The control rod worth and its change during the burnup are evaluated for different hydrogen-to-hafnium ratios and are compared with those of the original B4C control rod.

Tomohiko IWASAKI; Kenji KONASHI

2009-01-01

132

Organic mercury compounds and autoimmunity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on in vitro studies and short-term in vivo studies, all mercurials were for a long time considered as prototypic immunosuppressive substances. Recent studies have confirmed that organic mercurials such as methyl mercury (MeHg) and ethyl mercury (EtHg) are much more potent immunosuppressors than inorganic mercury (Hg). However, Hg interacts with the immune system in the presence of a susceptible

Said Havarinasab; Per Hultman

2005-01-01

133

Mercury in the ecosystem  

SciTech Connect

This treatise on the environmental dispersion of mercury emphasizes the importance of ''mercury-consciousness'' in the present-day world, where rapidly expanding metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial developments are causing widespread contamination of the atmosphere, soil, and water by this metal and its toxic organic derivatives. Concepts concerning the mechanism of mercury dispersion and methyl-mercury formation in the physico-biological ecosystem are discussed in detail and a substantial body of data on the degree and nature of the mercury contamination of various plants, fish, and land animals by industrial and urban effluents is presented. Various analytical methods for the estimation of mercury in inorganic and organic samples are presented. These serve as a ready guide to the selection of the correct method for analyzing environmental samples. This book is reference work in mercury-related studies. It is written to influence industrial policies of governments in their formulation of control measures to avoid the recurrence of human tragedies such as the well-known Minamata case in Japan, and the lesser known cases in Iraq, Pakistan, and Guatamala.

Mitra, S.

1986-01-01

134

Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

Slavin, James A.

2010-01-01

135

Inorganic: the other mercury.  

PubMed

There is a broad array of mercury species to which humans may be exposed. While exposure to methylmercury through fish consumption is widely recognized, the public is less aware of the sources and potential toxicity of inorganic forms of mercury. Some oral and laboratory thermometers, barometers, small batteries, thermostats, gas pressure regulators, light switches, dental amalgam fillings, cosmetic products, medications, cultural/religious practices, and gold mining all represent potential sources of exposure to inorganic forms of mercury. The route of exposure, the extent of absorption, the pharmacokinetics, and the effects all vary with the specific form of mercury and the magnitude and duration of exposure. If exposure is suspected, a number of tissue analyses can be conducted to confirm exposure or to determine whether an exposure might reasonably be expected to be biologically significant. By contrast with determination of exposure to methylmercury, for which hair and blood are credible indicators, urine is the preferred biological medium for the determination of exposure to inorganic mercury, including elemental mercury, with blood normally being of value only if exposure is ongoing. Although treatments are available to help rid the body of mercury in cases of extreme exposure, prevention of exposure will make such treatments unnecessary. Knowing the sources of mercury and avoiding unnecessary exposure are the prudent ways of preventing mercury intoxication. When exposure occurs, it should be kept in mind that not all unwanted exposures will result in adverse health consequences. In all cases, elimination of the source of exposure should be the first priority of public health officials. PMID:18044248

Risher, John F; De Rosa, Christopher T

2007-11-01

136

Global change and mercury  

USGS Publications Warehouse

More than 140 nations recently agreed to a legally binding treaty on reductions in human uses and releases of mercury that will be signed in October of this year. This follows the 2011 rule in the United States that for the first time regulates mercury emissions from electricity-generating utilities. Several decades of scientific research preceded these important regulations. However, the impacts of global change on environmental mercury concentrations and human exposures remain a major uncertainty affecting the potential effectiveness of regulatory activities.

Krabbenhoft, David P.; Sunderland, Elsie M.

2013-01-01

137

Exploring the Planets: Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site contains most of the up-to-date information known about the planet Mercury. Facts about the planet include: mean distance from Sun, length of year, rotation period, mean orbital velocity, inclination of axis, average temperature (day and night), and diameter. The site explains why earth-based views of Mercury are so poor and describes the surface of the planet on the basis of probe photographs. The photographs do not prove whether the material on the surface is impact ejecta or volcanic. However, a colored digital mosaic of Mercury taken by Mariner 10 suggests that at least some of the mercurian smooth plains are the products of volcanism.

138

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05

139

Safety aspects of tritium storage in metal hydride form  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air or nitrogen ingress accident scenarios into JET tritium storage containers, filled with uranium or intermetallic compound (IMC) hydrides, are discussed based on the experimentally determined kinetics of the reaction of these hydrides with air, Oâ and Nâ. Reaction of uranium with air can occur at room temperature. For the initiation of the reactions of uranium with Nâ or of

A. N. Perevezentsev; A. C. Bell; R. Lasser; L. A. Rivkis

1995-01-01

140

A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high

S. R. Ovshinsky; M. A. Fetcenko; J. Ross

1993-01-01

141

The two-stage metal hydride heat transformer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Metal hydrides can be utilized as working materials in different types ofprocesses in the field of energy technology. Among others, thermally driven heat transformationdevices are very promising solutions for the rational use of energy. Main applications forthermodynamic metal hydride machines are the heat transformer for generation of hightemperatures, or the heat pump\\/refrigerator for generation of both high and low temperatures.Such

E Willers; M Groll

1999-01-01

142

Local-spectrum-modified fast reactor cores with hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

the application of different hydride materials to core components except for the driver fuel assembly is studied to achieve high core performances for fast reactor by reducing neutron energy and increasing reaction rates locally. The mixtures of absorber materials such as Gd and Zr-hydride are employed to control materials to increase reactivity worth. An optimized composition and layout of the

Yokoyama Tsugio; Konashi Kenji; Iwasaki Tomohiko; Terai Takayuki; Yamawaki Michio

2006-01-01

143

Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride  

DOEpatents

Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

Sullivan, Richard W. (Denver, CO)

1980-01-01

144

Mercury Poisoning Linked to Skin Products  

MedlinePLUS

... skin products taken from store shelves contained mercury . Photos of some illegal mercury-containing products are shown ... Lightening Products Found to Contain Mercury (includes product photos) Texas DSHS Warns of Mercury Poisoning Linked to ...

145

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01

146

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01

147

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-11-07

148

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1991-06-18

149

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOEpatents

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1989-01-01

150

Hair mercury concentrations and associated factors in an electronic waste recycling area, Guiyu, China  

SciTech Connect

Objective: Toxic heavy metals are released to the environment constantly from unregulated electronic waste (e-waste) recycling in Guiyu, China, and thus may contribute to the elevation of mercury (Hg) and other heavy metals levels in human hair. We aimed to investigate concentrations of mercury in hair from Guiyu and potential risk factors and compared them with those from a control area where no e-waste processing occurs. Methods: A total of 285 human hair samples were collected from three villages (including Beilin, Xianma, and Huamei) of Guiyu (n=205) and the control area, Jinping district of Shantou city (n=80). All the volunteers were administered a questionnaire regarding socio-demographic characteristics and other possible factors contributed to hair mercury concentration. Hair mercury concentration was analyzed by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). Results: Our results suggested that hair mercury concentrations in volunteers of Guiyu (median, 0.99; range, 0.18–3.98 ?g/g) were significantly higher than those of Jinping (median, 0.59; range, 0.12–1.63 ?g/g). We also observed a higher over-limit ratio (>1 ?g/g according to USEPA) in Guiyu than in Jinping (48.29% vs. 11.25%, P<0.001). Logistic regression model showed that the variables of living house also served as an e-waste workshop, work related to e-waste, family income, time of residence in Guiyu, the distance between home and waste incineration, and fish intake were associated with hair mercury concentration. After multiple stepwise regression analysis, in the Guiyu samples, hair mercury concentration was found positively associated with the time residence in Guiyu (?=0.299, P<0.001), and frequency of shellfish intake (?=0.184, P=0.016); and negatively associated with the distance between home and waste incineration (?=?0.190, P=0.015) and whether house also served as e-waste workshop (?=?0.278, P=0.001). Conclusions: This study investigated human mercury exposure and suggested elevated hair mercury concentrations in an e-waste recycling area, Guiyu, China. Living in Guiyu for a long time and work related to e-waste may primarily contribute to the high hair mercury concentrations. -- Highlights: • Mercury levels in hair samples from Guiyu and risk factors were assessed. • The recruitments from Guiyu were exposed to high levels of mercury. • Primitive e-waste recycling resulted in high mercury exposure of local people.

Ni, Wenqing [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Chen, Yaowen [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)] [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China); Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoling [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Zhang, Gairong [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China)] [Central Laboratory of Shantou University, Shantou 515063, Guangdong (China); Luo, Jiayi [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Wu, Kusheng, E-mail: kswu@stu.edu.cn [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)

2014-01-15

151

Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

2013-06-01

152

Mercury: Basic Information  

MedlinePLUS

... of these compounds are generated as byproducts from pollution control activities at gold mines or in waste. ... a variety of programs designed to reduce mercury pollution and impacts. Most of EPA's environmental regulations and ...

153

Modular hydride beds for mobile applications  

SciTech Connect

Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

1997-08-01

154

Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof  

DOEpatents

An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Yu, Conrad (Antioch, CA)

2010-08-10

155

Development of a Potential Surface for Simulation of Proton and Hydride Transfer Reactions in Solution: Application to NADH Hydride Transfer  

E-print Network

Development of a Potential Surface for Simulation of Proton and Hydride Transfer Reactions that incorporates significant quantum mechanical effects for proton and hydride transfer reactions in solution to that of the product during the reaction. Moreover, in order to incorporate changes in bond order and hybridization

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

156

Elemental mercury exposure: peripheral neurotoxicity.  

PubMed Central

Nerve conduction tests were performed on the right ulnar nerve of factory workers exposed to elemental mercury vapour. Time integrated urine mercury indices were used to measure the degree of exposure. Workers with prolonged distal latencies had significantly higher urine mercury concentrations when compared with those with normal latencies. Significant correlations between increasing urine mercury concentrations and prolonged motor and sensory distal latencies were established. Elemental mercury can affect both motor and sensory peripheral nerve conduction and the degree of involvement may be related to time-integrated urine mercury concentrations. PMID:6279139

Levine, S P; Cavender, G D; Langolf, G D; Albers, J W

1982-01-01

157

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOEpatents

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber.

Durham, Michael D. (Castle Rock, CO); Schlager, Richard J. (Aurora, CO); Sappey, Andrew D. (Golden, CO); Sagan, Francis J. (Lakewood, CO); Marmaro, Roger W. (Littleton, CO); Wilson, Kevin G. (Littleton, CO)

1997-01-01

158

Method and apparatus for monitoring mercury emissions  

DOEpatents

A mercury monitoring device that continuously monitors the total mercury concentration in a gas. The device uses the same chamber for converting speciated mercury into elemental mercury and for measurement of the mercury in the chamber by radiation absorption techniques. The interior of the chamber is resistant to the absorption of speciated and elemental mercury at the operating temperature of the chamber. 15 figs.

Durham, M.D.; Schlager, R.J.; Sappey, A.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Marmaro, R.W.; Wilson, K.G.

1997-10-21

159

GEOCHEMICAL FACTORS GOVERNING METHYL MERCURY PRODUCTION IN MERCURY CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS  

EPA Science Inventory

Bench scale experiments were conducted to improve our understanding of aquatic mercury transformation processes (biotic and abiotic), specifically those factors which govern the production of methyl mercury (MeHg) in sedimentary environments. The greatest cause for concern regar...

160

Mercury pollution in Malaysia.  

PubMed

Although several studies have been published on levels of mercury contamination of the environment, and of food and human tissues in Peninsular Malaysia, there is a serious dearth of research that has been performed in East Malaysia (Sabah and Sarawak). Industry is rapidly developing in East Malaysia, and, hence, there is a need for establishing baseline levels of mercury contamination in environmental media in that part of the country by performing monitoring studies. Residues of total mercury and inorganic in food samples have been determined in nearly all previous studies that have been conducted; however, few researchers have analyzed samples for the presence of methlymercury residues. Because methylmercury is the most toxic form of mercury, and because there is a growing public awareness of the risk posed by methylmercury exposure that is associated with fish and seafood consumption, further monitoring studies on methylmercury in food are also essential. From the results of previous studies, it is obvious that the economic development in Malaysia, in recent years, has affected the aquatic environment of the country. Primary areas of environmental concern are centered on the rivers of the west Peninsular Malaysian coast, and the coastal waters of the Straits of Malacca, wherein industrial activities are rapidly expanding. The sources of existing mercury input to both of these areas of Malaysia should be studied and identified. Considering the high levels of mercury that now exists in human tissues, efforts should be continued, and accelerated in the future, if possible, to monitor mercury contamination levels in the coastal states, and particularly along the west Peninsular Malaysian coast. Most studies that have been carried out on mercury residues in environmental samples are dated, having been conducted 20-30 years ago; therefore, the need to collect much more and more current data is urgent. Furthermore, establishing baseline levels of mercury exposure to humans in Malaysia will be useful in establishing the levels at which detrimental effects in both humans and marine life may occur, and therefore the levels at which warning should be raised or limits established. In particular, we believe that two or three monitoring centers should be established in Peninsular Malaysia, and one in East Malaysia for the specific purpose of monitoring for the presence of hazardous environmental chemicals, and particularly monitoring for heavy metals such as mercury that reach food that is subject to consistent human consumption. PMID:22610296

Hajeb, Parvaneh; Jinap, S; Ismail, Ahmad; Mahyudin, Nor Ainy

2012-01-01

161

New horizons in boron hydride chemistry  

SciTech Connect

Pentaborane and diborane undergo hydrogen isotope exchange with deuterated aromatic hydrocarbons. Lewis acid catalyzed hydrogen isotope exchange between benzene-d/sub 6/ and pentaborane forms exclusively 1-DB/sub 5/H/sub 8/ at ambient temperature. In uncatalyzed exchanges, pentaborane reacts with benzene-d/sub 6/ to produce 1,2,3,4,5-D/sub 5/B/sub 5/H/sub 4/ at +45/sup 0/C, and B/sub 5/D/sub 9/ at + 120/sup 0/C. This thermally induced hydrogen isotope exchange apparently occurs via a reversible hydroboration of the aromatic ring. Halopentaboranes are converted to the parent pentaborane using tributyltin hydride as the halogen reducing agent under mild conditions and in high yields. Tributyltin hydride also reacts with other haloboranes and halometalloboranes. Deuterated pentaboranes are produced from halopentaboranes and tributyltin deuteride. Mechanistic features of this hydrogen-halogen exchange system are discussed. A new aminoborane, bis(dimethylamino)tetraborane, has been synthesized. On the basis of physical and spectroscopic data, a structure having the classical tetraborane framework is proposed, with two bridge hydrogen atoms replaced by dimethylamino groups. Solvent and temperature effects on the /sup 11/B and /sup 1/H NMR spectra of decaborane have been observed. Solvent polarizability is the major factor affecting chemical shifts. /sup 11/B-/sup 1/H/sub bridge/ and /sup 11/B-/sup 11/B coupling in decaborane can be measured at the B position.

Kunz, J.C.

1985-01-01

162

MESSENGER: Exploring Mercury's Magnetosphere  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet s miniature magnetosphere since the brief flybys of Mariner 10. Mercury s magnetosphere is unique in many respects. The magnetosphere of Mercury is among the smallest in the solar system; its magnetic field typically stands off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. For this reason there are no closed drift paths for energetic particles and, hence, no radiation belts. The characteristic time scales for wave propagation and convective transport are short and kinetic and fluid modes may be coupled. Magnetic reconnection at the dayside magnetopause may erode the subsolar magnetosphere allowing solar wind ions to impact directly the regolith. Inductive currents in Mercury s interior may act to modify the solar wind interaction by resisting changes due to solar wind pressure variations. Indeed, observations of these induction effects may be an important source of information on the state of Mercury s interior. In addition, Mercury s magnetosphere is the only one with its defining magnetic flux tubes rooted in a planetary regolith as opposed to an atmosphere with a conductive ionospheric layer. This lack of an ionosphere is probably the underlying reason for the brevity of the very intense, but short-lived, - 1-2 min, substorm-like energetic particle events observed by Mariner 10 during its first traversal of Mercury s magnetic tail. Because of Mercury s proximity to the sun, 0.3 - 0.5 AU, this magnetosphere experiences the most extreme driving forces in the solar system. All of these factors are expected to produce complicated interactions involving the exchange and re-cycling of neutrals and ions between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and regolith. The electrodynamics of Mercury s magnetosphere are expected to be equally complex, with strong forcing by the solar wind, magnetic reconnection at the magnetopause and in the tail, and the pick-up of planetary ions all driving field-aligned electric currents. However, these field-aligned currents do not close in an ionosphere, but in some other manner. In addition to the insights- into magnetospheric physics offered by study of the solar wind - Mercury system, quantitative specification of the "external" magnetic field generated by magnetospheric currents is necessary for accurate determination of the strength and multi-polar decomposition of Mercury s intrinsic magnetic field. MESSENGER S highly capable instrumentation and broad orbital coverage will greatly advance our understanding of both the origin of Mercury s magnetic field and the acceleration of charged particles in small magnetospheres. In. this article, we review what is known about Mercury s magnetosphere and describe the MESSENGER science team s strategy for obtaining answers to the outstanding science questions surrounding the interaction of the solar wind with Mercury and its small, but dynamic, magnetosphere.

Slavin, James A.; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Acuna, Mario H.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Koehn, Patrick L.; Korth, Haje; Levi, Stefano; Mauk, Barry H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

2005-01-01

163

Hot temperatures line lists for metal hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ExoMol project is an ERC funded project set up with the purpose of calculating high quality theoretical molecular line list data to facilitate the emerging field of exoplanet and cool star atmospheric haracterisation [1]. Metal hydrides are important building blocks of interstellar physical chemistry. For molecular identification and characterisation in astrophysical sources, one requires accurate and complete spectroscopic data including transitional frequencies and intensities in the form of a line list. The ab initio methods offer the best opportunity for detailed theoretical studies of free diatomic metal hydrides and other simple hydride molecules. In this contribution we present progress on theoretical line lists for AlH, CrH, MgH, NiH, NaH and TiH obtained from first principles, applicable for a large range of temperatures up to 3500 K. Among the hydrides, AlH is of special interest because of a relatively high cosmic abundance of aluminium. The presence of AlH has been detected in the spectra of M-type and S-type stars as well as in sunspots (See [2] and references therein). CrH is a molecule of astrophysical interest; under the classification scheme developed by Kirkpatrick et al [3], CrH is of importance in distinguishing L type brown dwarfs. It has been proposed that theoretical line-lists of CrH and CrD could be used to facilitate a 'Deuterium test' for use in distinguishing planets, brown dwarfs and stars [5] and also it has been speculated that CrH exists in sunspots [4] but a higherquality hot-temperature line-list is needed to confirm this finding. The presence of MgH in stellar spectra is well documented through observation of the A2 ! X 2+ and B0 2+ ! X 2+ transitions. Different spectral features of MgH have been used as an indicator for the magnesium isotope abundances in the atmospheres of different stars from giants to dwarfs including the Sun, to measure the temperature of stars, surface gravity, stars' metal abundance, gravitational, as well as for a deuterium test (see [6] and references therein). MgH is an important part of stellar atmospheric models. NiH is predicted to be the most common nickelbearing molecule [7] and was indentified in sunspot spectra around 15 000 cm-1 (646 cm) over 40 years ago [8]. Knowledge of 58NiH/60NiH isotopologue ratio in stellar spectra is used to test models of supernovae and star formation [9]. The spectra of metal hydrides such can be very complicated due to the large-number of interacting electronic states, to the importance of electron correlation, relativistic and spin-orbit effects and of the various couplings between angular momenta. Via the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, the Schrödinger equation describing the state of a molecule can be factorised into an 'electronic' component and a nuclear (i.e., rotational-vibrational) component. The former is solved using the ab initio quantum chemistry package MOLPRO, yielding potential energy, dipole and transition moment, and spin-orbit curves. The resulting coupled-surface ro-vibronic problem was then solved using the in-house computer program DUO, which is based on expansion in Hund's case (a) wave functions. Potential curves and couplings were then refined semi-empirically using the available experimental spectroscopic data.

Gorman, M.; Lodi, L.; Leyland, P. pC; Hill, C.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Tennyson, J.

2013-09-01

164

Determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury in mercury ores  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A method for the determination of mercurous chloride and total mercury on the same sample is described. The mercury minerals are volatilized in a glass tube and brought into intimate contact with granulated sodium carbonate. The chlorine is fixed as sodium chloride, determined with silver nitrate, and computed to mercurous chloride. The mercury is collected on a previously weighed gold coil and weighed.

Fahey, J.J.

1937-01-01

165

Neuropsychological Functioning after Mercury Exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

Visuographic and self-reported emotional changes were observed in dentists with elevated mercury levels. Although these changes were mild, their presence suggests subtoxic hazards associated with dental practice and underscore a continual need for maintaining mercury hygiene.

Barbara P. Uzzell

1988-01-01

166

Fracture Resistance of a Zirconium Alloy with Reoriented Hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Zirconium alloy cladding materials typically contain circumferential hydrides that may be reoriented to align along the radial direction when the cladding tubes are heated above and then cooled below the solvus temperature. The objectives of this study were to investigate the critical stress levels required to cause hydride reorientation (HRT) and to characterize the fracture resistance of Zircaloy-2 after hydride reorientation. HRT heat-treatment was performed on hydrogen-charged Zircaloy-2 specimens at 593 K (320 °C) or 623 K (350 °C) for 1 to 2 hours, followed by cooling to 473 K (200 °C). Fracture testing was conducted on hydride-reoriented three-point bend specimens at 473 K (200 °C) using an in situ loading stage inside a scanning electron microscope. Direct observations indicated that the reoriented hydrides, which ranged from ?1 to 22 ?m in lengths, were more prone to fracture at larger sizes (>10 ?m) compared to smaller sizes (<0.5 ?m). The reoriented hydrides reduced fracture resistance through a void nucleation, growth, and coalescence process at the crack tip. The resulting crack-resistance curves for Zircaloy-2 with reoriented hydrides decrease from 38 to 21 MPa(m)1/2 with increasing hydrogen contents from 51 to 1265 wt ppm hydrogen.

Chan, Kwai S.; He, Xihua; Pan, Yi-Ming

2015-01-01

167

Small satellite nickel-hydrogen and nickel-metal hydride power applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nickel and silver-metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems. Nickel-metal hydride batteries have twice the gravimetric energy density of nickel-cadmium and twice the volumetric energy density of nickel-hydrogen. Silver-metal hydride batteries have the potential of three times the energy density of nickel-metal hydride and exhibit

William Dean Cook; Dwaine Coates

1993-01-01

168

Molecular Rare-Earth-Metal Hydrides in Non-Cyclopentadienyl Environments.  

PubMed

Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available. PMID:25413985

Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

2014-11-20

169

Investigating the recycling of nickel hydride battery scrap  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

New nickel hydride alloys have been developed to replace the cadmium-containing negative electrodes of nickel-cadmium batteries. The new, cadmium free alloys promise enhanced electrochemical properties as well as reduced environmental toxicity. Rechargeable batteries using nickel hydride electrodes are strong candidates for electric vehicle applications. The U.S. Bureau of Mines is investigating hydrometallurgical technology that separates and recovers purified metallic components present in nickel hydride battery scrap. A preliminary investigation of acid dissolution and metal recovery techniques using whole batteries and electrode rolls has shown potential options that will allow the successful recycling of much of the battery fabrication scrap.

Lyman, Jane W.; Palmer, Glenn R.

1993-05-01

170

Mercury (Environmental Health Student Portal)  

MedlinePLUS

... how mercury was and is used in industry, human health effects, and harmful effects on the environment, especially where ... environment, and potential risks to the environment and human health. Mercury ... where Mercury is found and how it can effect our health.

171

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks  

E-print Network

Bioaccumulation of Mercury in Sharks Part 2 a Using a subset of data collected on RJD shark research trips, you will analyze the mercury levels found in the Florida Sharks we catch. Based on your analysis, you will be able to conclude which species have the highest levels of mercury contamination

Miami, University of

172

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-print Network

Mercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 #12 Evaluation of Cavitation Resistance of Type 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Using a Vibratory Horn," J. Nucl Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source," Oak Ridge National

McDonald, Kirk

173

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-print Network

Mercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010. Manneschmidt, Preliminary Evaluation of Cavitation Resistance of Type 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Using. Pawel, "Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Potential Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury

McDonald, Kirk

174

Student Exposure to Mercury Vapors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the problem of mercury vapors caused by spills in high school and college laboratories. Describes a study which compared the mercury vapor levels of laboratories in both an older and a newer building. Concludes that the mercurial contamination of chemistry laboratories presents minimal risks to the students. (TW)

Weber, Joyce

1986-01-01

175

ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY TRANSPORT AND DEPOSITION  

EPA Science Inventory

The current state of our scientific understanding the mercury cycle tells us that most of the mercury getting into fish comes from atmospheric deposition, but methylation of that mercury in aquatic systems is required for the concentrations in fish to reach harmful levels. We st...

176

MERCURY IN MARINE LIFE DATABASE  

EPA Science Inventory

The purpose of the Mercury in Marine Life Project is to organize information on estuarine and marine species so that EPA can better understand both the extent of monitoring for mercury and level of mercury contamination in the biota of coastal environments. This report follows a ...

177

Reference Atmosphere for Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We propose that Ar-40 measured in the lunar atmosphere and that in Mercury's atmosphere is due to current diffusion into connected pore space within the crust. Higher temperatures at Mercury, along with more rapid loss from the atmosphere will lead to a smaller column abundance of argon at Mercury than at the Moon, given the same crustal abundance of potassium. Because the noble gas abundance in the Hermean atmosphere represents current effusion, it is a direct measure of the crustal potassium abundance. Ar-40 in the atmospheres of the planets is a measure of potassium abundance in the interiors, since Ar-40 is a product of radiogenic decay of K-40 by electron capture with the subsequent emission of a 1.46 eV gamma-ray. Although the Ar-40 in the Earth's atmosphere is expected to have accumulated since the late bombardment, Ar-40 in the atmospheres of Mercury and the Moon is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Thus, the argon content in the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury is representative of current effusion rather than accumulation over the lifetime of the planet.

Killen, Rosemary M.

2002-01-01

178

Sensing Mercury for Biomedical and Environmental Monitoring  

PubMed Central

Mercury is a very toxic element that is widely spread in the atmosphere, lithosphere, and surface water. Concentrated mercury poses serious problems to human health, as bioaccumulation of mercury within the brain and kidneys ultimately leads to neurological diseases. To control mercury pollution and reduce mercury damage to human health, sensitive determination of mercury is important. This article summarizes some current sensors for the determination of both abiotic and biotic mercury. A wide array of sensors for monitoring mercury is described, including biosensors and chemical sensors, while piezoelectric and microcantilever sensors are also described. Additionally, newly developed nanomaterials offer great potential for fabricating novel mercury sensors. Some of the functional fluorescent nanosensors for the determination of mercury are covered. Afterwards, the in vivo determination of mercury and the characterization of different forms of mercury are discussed. Finally, the future direction for mercury detection is outlined, suggesting that nanomaterials may provide revolutionary tools in biomedical and environmental monitoring of mercury. PMID:22346707

Selid, Paul D.; Xu, Hanying; Collins, E. Michael; Face-Collins, Marla Striped; Zhao, Julia Xiaojun

2009-01-01

179

ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.

Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

2009-04-23

180

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOEpatents

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, Marshall G. (Woodside, CA)

1985-01-01

181

Water displacement mercury pump  

DOEpatents

A water displacement mercury pump has a fluid inlet conduit and diffuser, a valve, a pressure cannister, and a fluid outlet conduit. The valve has a valve head which seats in an opening in the cannister. The entire assembly is readily insertable into a process vessel which produces mercury as a product. As the mercury settles, it flows into the opening in the cannister displacing lighter material. When the valve is in a closed position, the pressure cannister is sealed except for the fluid inlet conduit and the fluid outlet conduit. Introduction of a lighter fluid into the cannister will act to displace a heavier fluid from the cannister via the fluid outlet conduit. The entire pump assembly penetrates only a top wall of the process vessel, and not the sides or the bottom wall of the process vessel. This insures a leak-proof environment and is especially suitable for processing of hazardous materials.

Nielsen, M.G.

1984-04-20

182

Mercury's Cratered Terrain  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cratered terrain very similar to that on the Moon is portrayed in this TV photo (FDS 27431) of Mercury taken by Mariner 10 on March 29 from a range of 31,000 kilometers (19,300 miles). The large flat-floored crater at right is about 100 kilometers (62 miles) in diameter-about the dame size as the lunar crater Copernicus. Numerous small craters and linear grooves radial to the crater probably are ejecta thrown from the crater by impact. The surface is illuminated from the left.

The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

1974-01-01

183

Mercury's Heavily Cratered Surface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As Mariner 10 approached Mercury at nearly seven miles per second on March 29, it's TV camera took this picture (FDS 27371) from an altitude of 35,000 kilometers (21,700 miles) The picture shows a heavily-cratered surface with many low hills. The large valley to the right is seven kilometers (4 1/2 miles) wide and more than 100 kilometers (62 miles) long. The large flat-floored crater near the right is about 80 kilometers (50 miles) in diameter.

The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

1974-01-01

184

Follow that mercury!  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

Linero, A.A. [Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

2008-07-01

185

Process for production of a metal hydride  

SciTech Connect

A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2014-08-12

186

Electronic structures of silicene fluoride and hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Silicene is the graphene-like silicon nanosheet, which has been synthesized very recently [B. Lalmi, H. Oughaddou, H. Enriquez, A. Kara, S. Vizzini, B. Ealet, and B. Aufray, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 223109 (2010)]. Using first-principles calculations, we systematically investigate the structures and properties of fluorinated and hydrogenated silicene, the silicon analogues of graphane. Different from the carbon-counterpart, the fluorination prefers the conformation with a zigzag-line buckling, while the hydrogenation keeps the chair conformation similar to graphane. A direct band gap is opened in the silicene fluoride, and the gap values can be continuously modulated by the strain. While for the hydride, a strain-induced indirect-to-direct band gap transition is found.

Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

2012-02-01

187

Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

1972-01-01

188

Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.  

SciTech Connect

Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

2005-11-01

189

Dehydriding reactions of mixed complex hydrides  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dehydriding reactions of the mixtures LiBH 4 + 2LiNH 2 and LiAlH 4 + 2LiNH 2 were investigated. The new pathways confirmed for the dehydriding reactions were LiBH 4 + 2LiNH 2 ? Li 3BN 2 + 4H 2 and LiAlH 4 + 2LiNH 2 ? Li 3AlN 2 + 4H 2 in which 11.9 and 9.6 mass% of hydrogen can be desorbed theoretically. The quantities of desorbed hydrogen were deduced experimentally to be approximately 7.9-9.5 and 4.1 mass% for the mixtures of LiBH 4 + 2LiNH 2 and LiAlH 4 + 2LiNH 2, respectively. The dehydriding temperature of LiBH 4 reduces by 150 K by mixing 2 M LiNH 2. An exothermic peak was observed at a slightly higher temperature of the dehydriding reaction; however, this peak might be due to the solidification of the product after the dehydriding reaction and not due to the exothermic dehydriding reaction. Although the first-step dehydriding reaction of LiAlH 4 is exothermic, the mixture of LiAlH 4 + 2LiNH 2 exhibits an endothermic dehydriding reaction. These results suggest that the stability of the dehydriding reactions of complex hydrides can be controlled by introducing new pathways that are produced by mixing. Two criteria for selecting complex hydrides that are mixed together for producing new pathways were proposed from the viewpoints of both the melting/dehydriding temperatures and the products of the dehydriding reactions.

Nakamori, Y.; Ninomiya, A.; Kitahara, G.; Aoki, M.; Noritake, T.; Miwa, K.; Kojima, Y.; Orimo, S.

190

Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Being Developed  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Lewis Research Center has contracted with Electro Energy, Inc., to develop a bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery design for energy storage on low-Earth-orbit satellites. The objective of the bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery development program is to approach advanced battery development from a systems level while incorporating technology advances from the lightweight nickel electrode field, hydride development, and design developments from nickel-hydrogen systems. This will result in a low-volume, simplified, less-expensive battery system that is ideal for small spacecraft applications. The goals of the program are to develop a 1-kilowatt, 28-volt (V), bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery with a specific energy of 100 watt-hours per kilogram (W-hr/kg), an energy density of 250 W-hr/liter and a 5-year life in low Earth orbit at 40-percent depth-of-discharge.

Manzo, Michelle A.

1998-01-01

191

Artificial exomuscle investigations for applications--metal hydride.  

PubMed

In pursuing the development of bionic devices, Victhom identified a need for technologies that could replace current motorized systems and be better integrated into the human body motion. The actuators used to obtain large displacements are noisy, heavy, and do not adequately reproduce human muscle behavior. Subsequently, a project at Victhom was devoted to the development of active materials to obtain an artificial exomuscle actuator. An exhaustive literature review was done at Victhom to identify promising active materials for the development of artificial muscles. According to this review, metal hydrides were identified as a promising technology for artificial muscle development. Victhom's investigations focused on determining metal hydride actuator potential in the context of bionics technology. Based on metal hydride properties and artificial muscle requirements such as force, displacement and rise time, an exomuscle was built. In addition, a finite element model, including heat and mass transfer in the metal hydride, was developed and implemented in FEMLAB software. PMID:18458414

Crevier, Marie-Charlotte; Richard, Martin; Rittenhouse, D Matheson; Roy, Pierre-Olivier; Bédard, Stéphane

2007-03-01

192

Transient analysis of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-print Network

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project led by U. C. Berkeley for which MIT is to perform the thermal hydraulic and economic analyses. A parametric study has been performed to determine the optimum ...

Trant, Jarrod Michael

2004-01-01

193

Self-Consistent-Field Calculation on Lithium Hydride for Undergraduates.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a self-consistent-field-linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital calculation on the valence electrons of lithium hydride using the method of Roothaan. This description is intended for undergraduate physics students.

Rioux, Frank; Harriss, Donald K.

1980-01-01

194

Life test results of hydride compressors for cryogenic refrigerators  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A development status assessment is made, from the viewpoint of system durability, for the hydride compressors used in such cryogenic refrigerators as that of the JPL, which has operated at 29 K for 500 hours and at lower temperatures for over 1000. Attention is given to a novel hydride compressor unit which has operated through 35,000 cycles and exhibits negligible degradation of check valves, hydride particle size, and expansion valves. The power requirement for liquid hydrogen cooling can be halved through the use of recuperative hot water heating methods, making this system comparable in power use to liquid hydrogen refrigeration systems operating on electricity. Due to the lack of moving parts in hydride refrigerator designs, potential service lifetimes of many years, and perhaps decades, are being projected.

Jones, J. A.; Golben, P. M.

1984-01-01

195

The development of lightweight hydride alloys based on magnesium  

SciTech Connect

The development of a magnesium based hydride material is explored for use as a lightweight hydrogen storage medium. It is found that the vapor transport of magnesium during hydrogen uptake greatly influences the surface and hydride reactions in these alloys. This is exploited by purposely forming near-surface phases of Mg{sub 2}Ni on bulk Mg-Al-Zn alloys which result in improved hydrogen adsorption and desorption behavior. Conditions were found where these near-surface reactions yielded a complex and heterogeneous microstructure that coincided with excellent bulk hydride behavior. A Mg-Al alloy hydride is reported with near atmospheric plateau pressures at temperatures below 200{degrees}C. Additionally, a scheme is described for low temperature in-situ fabrication of Mg{sub 2}Ni single phase alloys utilizing the high vapor pressure of Mg.

Guthrie, S.E.; Thomas, G.J.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Bauer, W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-02-01

196

Development of a metal hydride electrode waste treatment process  

SciTech Connect

Manufacturing residues of metal hydride electrodes for nickel - metal hydride batteries were chemically processed to recover the metal part and heat treated for the organic part. Chemical recovery yielded Ni-Co alloy after electrolysis of the solution and hydroxides of other metal, mainly rare earths. The organic part, pyrolyzed at 700 C, led to separation between carbon and fluorinated matter. Infrared coupling at the output of the pyrolysis furnace was used to identify the pyrolysis gases.

Bianco, J.C.; Martin, D.; Ansart, F.; Castillo, S.

1999-12-01

197

Method of selective reduction of halodisilanes with alkyltin hydrides  

DOEpatents

The invention relates to the selective and sequential reduction of halodisilanes by reacting these compounds at room temperature or below with trialkyltin hydrides or dialkyltin dihydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. The alkyltin hydrides selectively and sequentially reduce the Si-Cl, Si-Br or Si-I bonds while leaving intact the Si-Si and Si-F bonds present.

D'Errico, John J. (Fenton, MI); Sharp, Kenneth G. (Midland, MI)

1989-01-01

198

Method of selective reduction of polyhalosilanes with alkyltin hydrides  

DOEpatents

The invention relates to the selective and stepwise reduction of polyhalosilanes by reacting at room temperature or below with alkyltin hydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. Alkyltin hydrides selectively and stepwise reduce the Si--Br, Si--Cl, or Si--I bonds while leaving intact any Si--F bonds. When two or more different halogens are present on the polyhalosilane, the halogen with the highest atomic weight is preferentially reduced.

Sharp, Kenneth G. (Midland, MI); D'Errico, John J. (Fenton, MI)

1989-01-01

199

Hydrogen segregation and lattice reorientation in palladium hydride nanowires  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study palladium hydride nanowires of different sizes and hydrogen concentrations at 300 K using molecular dynamic simulations. Strong surface segregation of hydrogen with a depletion zone behind is observed in the palladium hydride nanowires. We also show that lattice reorientation is controlled by the hydrogen concentration as well as the nanowire size. The interplay of surface stresses and hydrogen induced stresses is responsible for the observations.

He, J. H.; Knies, D. L.; Hubler, G. K.; Grabowski, K. S.; Tonucci, R. J.; Dechiaro, L. F.

2012-10-01

200

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process  

SciTech Connect

The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-04-01

201

Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride\\/Dehydride Process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The low-pressure hydride\\/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced

Rueben L. Gutierrez

2001-01-01

202

Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

2013-09-30

203

Local-spectrum-modified fast reactor cores with hydrides  

SciTech Connect

the application of different hydride materials to core components except for the driver fuel assembly is studied to achieve high core performances for fast reactor by reducing neutron energy and increasing reaction rates locally. The mixtures of absorber materials such as Gd and Zr-hydride are employed to control materials to increase reactivity worth. An optimized composition and layout of the control materials has shown the feature of burnable poison even in the fast reactor where the reaction rate of absorber nuclides is increased enough to annihilate themselves at the end of cycles. The radial blanket made of the mixture of oxide uranium and Zr hydride is examined to decrease the required thickness as well as to achieve a non-proliferation feature in plutonium isotope compositions in discharged fuels. The shielding performance of radial shield made of Zr-hydride is evaluated to decrease the whole core diameter. Special fuel assemblies mixed with minor actinides and Zr-hydride located at the core peripherals are studied to transmute the minor actinides to fissionable materials effectively. The results has indicates that the application of the hydride materials will increase the core performances twice or triple in general. (authors)

Tsugio, Yokoyama [Aitel Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama, 235-8523 (Japan); Kenji, Konashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki-ken, 311-1313 (Japan); Tomohiko, Iwasaki [Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Tohoku Universiyt, Aoba 6-6-01-2, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Takayuki, Terai [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8656 (Japan); Michio, Yamawaki [Department of Applied Science, Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259- 1292 (Japan)

2006-07-01

204

Biological Methylation of Mercury in Aquatic Organisms  

Microsoft Academic Search

FRESHWATER fish, especially pike (Esox lucius), from Sweden sometimes contain abnormally large amounts of mercury1. It was initially concluded to be either inorganic mercury or phenyl mercury, which are known to be released as industrial wastes, but later it was shown that the mercury was present almost entirely as methyl mercury (CH3Hg+)2. A possible explanation is that living organisms have

S. Jensen; A. JERNELÖV

1969-01-01

205

Acute mercurial pneumonitis  

PubMed Central

Milne, J., Christophers, A., and de Silva, Pamela (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 334-338. Acute mercurial pneumonitis. Mercury vapour has been shown to cause acute effects on the lung when inhaled in high concentrations. Four men, exposed to mercury inside a tank, developed, hours later, signs and symptoms of an acute febrile illness with severe pulmonary irritation, characterized by fever, rigors, cough, dyspnoea, and tightness in the chest. A review of the literature revealed that this syndrome had been described and investigated previously in fewer than 20 cases during the past 40 years, and is apparently little known. Fatalities have been described, particularly in children, and necropsy evidence has consistently revealed the pattern of an acute diffuse interstitial pneumonitis, accompanied by profuse fibrinous exudation and erosion of the bronchial and bronchiolar lining. The two common features in all reports are the heating of mercury or the entering into a confined space, or both. Adequate respiratory protection by an efficient air-supplied respirator is mandatory in industrial circumstances of the kind described in this report. PMID:5488692

Milne, James; Christophers, Allen; Silva, Pamela De

1970-01-01

206

Hazards of Mercury.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Common concern for the protection and improvement of the environment and the enhancement of human health and welfare underscore the purpose of this special report on the hazards of mercury directed to the Secretary's Pesticide Advisory Committee, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. The report summarizes the findings of a ten-member study…

Environmental Research, 1971

1971-01-01

207

Mercury Shopping Cart Interface  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury Shopping Cart Interface (MSCI) is a reusable component of the Power User Interface 5.0 (PUI) program described in another article. MSCI is a means of encapsulating the logic and information needed to describe an orderable item consistent with Mercury Shopping Cart service protocol. Designed to be used with Web-browser software, MSCI generates Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) pages on which ordering information can be entered. MSCI comprises two types of Practical Extraction and Report Language (PERL) modules: template modules and shopping-cart logic modules. Template modules generate HTML pages for entering the required ordering details and enable submission of the order via a Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) post. Shopping cart modules encapsulate the logic and data needed to describe an individual orderable item to the Mercury Shopping Cart service. These modules evaluate information entered by the user to determine whether it is sufficient for the Shopping Cart service to process the order. Once an order has been passed from MSCI to a deployed Mercury Shopping Cart server, there is no further interaction with the user.

Pfister, Robin; McMahon, Joe

2006-01-01

208

Mercury s Magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Mariner 10 observations firmly established the presence of a small intrinsic magnetic field (M ~ 300 nT-Rm4 ) at Mercury that interacts with the solar wind to create a miniature terrestrial-type magnetosphere. Mercury's close proximity to the sun (i.e., 0.3-0.5 AU) is expected to result in strong external forcing by the solar wind that will vary in a systematic manner during the Mercurian year due to its large orbital eccentricity. The short duration of the two Mariner 10 passes through this small magnetosphere, about 1 hr in total, severely limited the opportunities to observe its dynamics. However, clear evidence of substorm activity was obtained in the form of coincident magnetic field dipolarization and energetic particle injection events in the near-tail. The brief, several minute duration of these substorm-like events has generally been attributed to the highly resistive nature of Mercury's regolith and the short time scales it implies for "line-tying". This talk will review the Mariner 10 measurements and the subsequent data analysis. Special emphasis will be placed upon the impact of conditions within the inner heliosphere , the large size of Mercury relative to its magnetosphere, and the lack of an ionosphere upon the flow of energy flow through this coupled solar wind - magnetosphere - regolith system. Finally, the prospects for progress when new measurements become available from the MESSENGER and BepiColombo Missions early in the next decade will be briefly described.

Slavin, J.

209

ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY RESEARCH  

EPA Science Inventory

Environmental contamination from mercury has been recognized for decades as a growing problem to humans and wildlife. It is released from a variety of sources, exhibits a complicated chemistry, and proceeds via several different pathways to humans and wildlife. According to the...

210

MERCURY CEMS: TECHNOLOGY UPDATE  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper reviews the technologies involved with continuous emission monitors (CEMs) for mercury (Hg) which are receiving incresed attention and focus. Their potential use as a compliance assurance tool is of particular interest. While Hg CEMs are currently used in Europe for com...

211

Mercury's South Pole  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury's south pole was photographed by one of Mariner 10's TV cameras as the spacecraft made its second close flyby of the planet September 21. The pole is located inside the large crater (180 kilometers, 110 miles) on Mercury's limb (lower center). The crater floor is shadowed and its far rim, illuminated by the sun, appears to de disconnected from the edge of the planet. Just above and to the right of the South Pole is a double ring basin about 100 kilometers (125 miles) in diameter. A bright ray system, splashed out of a 50 kilometer (30 mile) crater is seen at upper right. The stripe across the top is an artifact introduced during computer processing. The picture (FDS 166902) was taken from a distance of 85,800 kilometers (53,200 miles) less than two hours after Mariner 10 reached its closest point to the planet.

The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

1974-01-01

212

Mercury and Venus  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Students explore Mercury and Venus, the first and second planets nearest the Sun. They learn about the planets' characteristics, including their differences from Earth. Students also learn how engineers are involved in the study of planets by designing equipment and spacecraft to go where it is too dangerous for humans.

Integrated Teaching And Learning Program

213

Surface features on Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high-resolution study of the surface of Mercury with a 2.388 GHz radar reveals the existence of hills and valleys with heights (depths) of about 1 km. There is also evidence supporting the existence of craters with diameters of about 50 km and depths of about 700 m.

Zohar, S.; Goldstein, R. M.

1974-01-01

214

Mercury Information Clearinghouse  

SciTech Connect

The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through analysis and quality assurance programs; and (4) Create and maintain an information clearinghouse to ensure that all parties can keep informed on global mercury research and development activities.

Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

2006-03-31

215

Trialkylborane-Assisted CO2 Reduction by Late Transition Metal Hydrides  

PubMed Central

Trialkylborane additives promote reduction of CO2 to formate by bis(diphosphine) Ni(II) and Rh(III) hydride complexes. The late transition metal hydrides, which can be formed from dihydrogen, transfer hydride to CO2 to give a formate-borane adduct. The borane must be of appropriate Lewis acidity: weaker acids do not show significant hydride transfer enhancement, while stronger acids abstract hydride without CO2 reduction. The mechanism likely involves a pre-equilibrium hydride transfer followed by formation of a stabilizing formate-borane adduct. PMID:21909178

Miller, Alexander J. M.; Labinger, Jay A.; Bercaw, John E.

2011-01-01

216

Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The accuracy of solar system tests of gravitational theory could be very much improved by range and Doppler measurements to a Small Mercury Relativity Orbiter. A nearly circular orbit at roughly 2400 km altitude is assumed in order to minimize problems with orbit determination and thermal radiation from the surface. The spacecraft is spin-stabilized and has a 30 cm diameter de-spun antenna. With K-band and X-band ranging systems using a 50 MHz offset sidetone at K-band, a range accuracy of 3 cm appears to be realistically achievable. The estimated spacecraft mass is 50 kg. A consider-covariance analysis was performed to determine how well the Earth-Mercury distance as a function of time could be determined with such a Relativity Orbiter. The minimum data set is assumed to be 40 independent 8-hour arcs of tracking data at selected times during a two year period. The gravity field of Mercury up through degree and order 10 is solved for, along with the initial conditions for each arc and the Earth-Mercury distance at the center of each arc. The considered parameters include the gravity field parameters of degree 11 and 12 plus the tracking station coordinates, the tropospheric delay, and two parameters in a crude radiation pressure model. The conclusion is that the Earth-Mercury distance can be determined to 6 cm accuracy or better. From a modified worst-case analysis, this would lead to roughly 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the knowledge of the precession of perihelion, the relativistic time delay, and the possible change in the gravitational constant with time.

Bender, Peter L.; Vincent, Mark A.

1989-01-01

217

A mercury transport and fate model (LM2-mercury) for mass budget assessment of mercury cycling in Lake Michigan  

EPA Science Inventory

LM2-Mercury, a mercury mass balance model, was developed to simulate and evaluate the transport, fate, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. The model simulates total suspended solids (TSS), disolved organic carbon (DOC), and total, elemental, divalent, ...

218

A MODELLING FRAMEWORK FOR MERCURY CYCLING IN LAKE MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

A time dependent mercury model was developed to describe mercury cycling in Lake Michigan. The model addresses dynamic relationships between net mercury loadings and the resulting concentrations of mercury species in the water and sediment. The transformations among three mercury...

219

MERCURY USAGE AND ALTERNATING IN THE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS INDUSTRIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Many industries have already found alternatives for mercury or have greatly decreased mercury use. owever, the unique electromechanical and photoelectric properties of mercury and mercury compounds have made replacement of mercury difficult in some applications. his study was ini...

220

MERCURY USAGE AND ALTERNATIVES IN THE ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS INDUSTRIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Many industries have already found alternatives for mercury or have greatly decreased mercury use. However, the unique electromechanical and photoelectric properties of mercury and mercury compounds have made replacement of mercury difficult in some applications. This study was i...

221

Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with five different oxidation catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 mug/m 3 using a diffusion tube as the source of Hg0(g). All experiments were conducted using 4% O2 in nitrogen mix as a reaction gas, and other reactants (HCl, H2O and SO2, NO 2, Br2) were added as required. The fixed bed reactor was operated over a temperature range of 200 to 400°C. In each experiment, the reactor effluent was analyzed using the modified Ontario-Hydro method. After each experiment, fly ash particles were also analyzed for mercury. The results show that the ability of fly ash to adsorb and/or oxidize mercury is primarily dependent on its carbon, iron and calcium content. There can be either one or more than one key component at a particular temperature and flue gas condition. Surface area played a secondary role in effecting the mercury transformations when compared to the concentration of the key component in the fly ash. Amount carbon and surface area played a key important role in the adsorption of mercury. Increased concentration of gases in the flue gas other than oxygen and nitrogen caused decreased the amount of mercury adsorbed on carbon surface. Mercury adsorption by iron oxide primarily depended on the crystalline structure of iron oxide. alpha-iron oxide had no effect on mercury adsorption or oxidation under most of the flue gas conditions, but gamma-iron oxide adsorbed mercury under most of the flue gas conditions. Bromine is a very good oxidizing agent for mercury. But in the presence of calcium oxide containing fly ashes, all the oxidized mercury would be reduced to elemental form. Among the catalysts, it was observed that presence of free lattice chlorine in the catalyst was very important for the oxidation of mercury. But instead of using the catalyst alone, using it along with carbon may better serve the purpose by providing the adsorption surface for mercury and also some extra surface area for the reaction to occur (especially for fly ashes with low surface area).

Varanasi, Patanjali

222

Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury System  

E-print Network

Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury System Praveen Krishnamurthy, Jeremy Buhler, Roger Chamberlain, Mark Franklin, Kwame Gyang, and Joseph Lancaster, "Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury on the Mercury System Praveen Krishnamurthy, Jeremy Buhler, Roger Chamberlain, Mark Franklin, Kwame Gyang

Chamberlain, Roger

223

What You Need to Know about Mercury  

MedlinePLUS

When you think of mercury, you probably think of the red or silver liquid inside of a thermometer. When you put the thermometer in your mouth, the mercury tells you how high your temperature is. Mercury ...

224

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOEpatents

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and thence quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal. 1 fig.

Greenhalgh, W.O.

1987-02-27

225

Recovery of mercury from acid waste residues  

DOEpatents

Mercury can be recovered from nitric acid-containing fluids by reacting the fluid with aluminum metal to produce mercury metal, and then quenching the reactivity of the nitric acid prior to nitration of the mercury metal.

Greenhalgh, Wilbur O. (Richland, WA)

1989-01-01

226

Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

Patel, N.; Hambley, D. [National Nuclear Laboratory (United Kingdom); Clarke, S.A. [Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom); Simpson, K.

2013-07-01

227

Neutrino Factory Mercury Flow Loop  

E-print Network

Neutrino Factory Mercury Flow Loop V. GravesV. Graves C. Caldwell IDS-NF Videoconference March 9, 2010 #12;Flow Loop Review · 1 cm dia nozzle, 20 m/s jet requires 1.57 liter/sec mercury flow (94 2 liter/min 24 9 gpm)mercury flow (94.2 liter/min, 24.9 gpm). · MERIT experiment showed that a pump

McDonald, Kirk

228

[Mercury (and...) through the centuries].  

PubMed

Mercury has a long history, fascinating in its many aspects. Through the centuries--from ancient times to the present day--the metal in its various forms, also known under the name "quicksilver", accompanied the man and was used for diversified purposes. Today, mercury is employed in manufacturing thermometers, barometers, vacuum pumps and explosives. It is also used in silver and gold mining processes. Mercury compounds play a significant role in dentistry, pharmaceutical industry and crop protection. The contemporary use of mercury markedly decreases, but historically speaking, the archives abound in materials that document facts and events occurring over generations and the immense intellectual effort aiming at discovering the true properties and mechanisms of mercury activity. Mercury toxicity, manifested in destruction of biological membranes and binding of the element with proteins, what disturbs biochemical processes occurring in the body, was discovered only after many centuries of the metal exerting its effect on the lives of individuals and communities. For centuries, mercury was present in the work of alchemists, who searched for the universal essence or quintessence and the so-called philosopher's stone. In the early modern era, between the 16th and 19th centuries, mercury was used to manufacture mirrors. Mercury compounds were employed as a medication against syphilis, which plagued mankind for more than four hundred years--from the Middle Ages till mid 20th century, when the discovery of penicillin became the turning point. This extremely toxic therapy resulted in much suffering, individual tragedies, chronic poisonings leading to fatalities and dramatic sudden deaths. In the last fifty years, there even occurred attempts of mentally imbalanced individuals at injecting themselves with metallic mercury, also as a performance-enhancing drug. Instances of mass mercury poisoning occurred many times in the past in consequence of eating food products poisoned with organic mercury compounds originating from the natural environment. PMID:21863739

K?ys, Ma?gorzata

2010-01-01

229

Mercury emissions from coal combustion.  

PubMed

Mercury liberated during coal combustion can be either discharged as vapor in the flue as or retained in the furnace ash. About 90 percent (by weight) of the mercury released from a furnace fired with pulverized coal appears to be in the vapor phase, and 10 percent remains with the furnace residual ash. For a 700-megawatt unit, approximately 2.5 kilograms of mercury per day are released. PMID:17790413

Billings, C E; Matson, W R

1972-06-16

230

CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC PROPERTIES AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF TITANIUM HYDRIDE LAYERS GROWN ON TITANIUM IMPLANTS  

E-print Network

CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC PROPERTIES AND MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF TITANIUM HYDRIDE LAYERS GROWN ON TITANIUM, Switzerland Keywords: SLA treated titanium - bone-anchored dental implants - transmission and scanning electron microscopy - titanium hydride sub-surface layer - epitaxy Abstract Commercially pure titanium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

231

Synthesis and small molecule chemistry of the niobaziridine-hydride functional group  

E-print Network

Chapter 1. Synthesis and Divergent Reactivity of the Niobaziridine-Hydride Functional Group The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of the niobaziridine-hydride complex Nb(H)([eta]²-t- ]Bu(H)C=NAr)(N[Np]Ar)? (la-H; ...

Figueroa, Joshua S

2005-01-01

232

PREPRINT submitted to Journal of Physics B Electronic structure of the Magnesium hydride  

E-print Network

PREPRINT submitted to Journal of Physics B Electronic structure of the Magnesium hydride molecular: 31.15.AR,31.15.Ct,31.50.Be,31.50.Df #12; Electronic structure of the Magnesium hydride molecular ion

Recanati, Catherine

233

Remediation of mercury contaminated sites - A review.  

PubMed

Environmental contamination caused by mercury is a serious problem worldwide. Coal combustion, mercury and gold mining activities and industrial activities have led to an increase in the mercury concentration in soil. The objective of this paper is to present an up-to-date understanding of the available techniques for the remediation of soil contaminated with mercury through considering: mercury contamination in soil, mercury speciation in soil; mercury toxicity to humans, plants and microorganisms, and remediation options. This paper describes the commonly employed and emerging techniques for mercury remediation, namely: stabilization/solidification (S/S), immobilization, vitrification, thermal desorption, nanotechnology, soil washing, electro-remediation, phytostabilization, phytoextraction and phytovolatilization. PMID:22579459

Wang, Jianxu; Feng, Xinbin; Anderson, Christopher W N; Xing, Ying; Shang, Lihai

2012-06-30

234

Lead, cadmium, arsenic and mercury in canned tuna fish marketed in Tehran, Iran.  

PubMed

Abstract Fifty-four canned tuna fish samples corresponding to 10 widely used different brands were purchased from local markets in Tehran, Iran during 2012-2013 and analyzed on heavy metals. Mercury was determined by a direct mercury analyser (DMA) without any sample preparation. For analysis of other elements samples were digested using a microwave apparatus. Lead and cadmium were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS) and arsenic via hydride vapour generation (HG-AAS). All samples had arsenic and mercury contamination. Arsenic levels showed a range of 0.25 -1.42 mg kg(-1), which might be due to lack of national and international limits for arsenic in canned tuna fish. Lead and cadmium were measured in a small number of samples with a mean of 0.053±0.058 mg kg(-1) and 0.013±0.015 mg kg(-1), respectively. Results obtained for these heavy metals in all samples were lower than the corresponding limits, whereas arsenic and mercury contents might raise some attention. PMID:25443538

Andayesh, Shirin; Hadiani, Mohammad Rasoul; Mousavi, Zahra; Shoeibi, Shahram

2014-12-01

235

Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG-H- (RG = He-Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, MIIaH- (MIIa = Be-Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be-He complex. While the RG-H- and Be-He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH- and MgH- species, the other MIIaH- species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns2) and H-(1s2). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the MIIaH- species than for RG-H-. Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the MIIaH- species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the MIIa atom to move away from the incoming H-.

Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Breckenridge, W. H.; Wright, Timothy G.

2014-02-01

236

Radio Emissions At Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury may produce cyclotron radio emissions (up to~10-20 kHz) from mildly ener- getic electrons in its most highly magnetized (polar) regions, and possible synchrotron radiation (up to a few MHz?) from more energetic electrons. Cyclotron emissions would be trapped in the magnetospheric cavity, and we attempt to estimate their in- tensity by extrapolating a scaling law established for the other solar system plane- tary radio emissions. In paralel, solar radio emissions (from interplanetary transient shocks, CMEs, and energetic particle streams) observed in the vicinity of Mercury could be a good index of solar activity, to be correlated with the Hemrean magne- tospheric response. We summarize the experimental requirements corresponding to these scientific objectives and present a possible contribution to a Radio and Plasma Wave Electric-field (RPW-E) instrument on BepiColombo/MMO.

Zarka, P.; Bougeret, J.-L.; Issautier, K.; Maksimovic, M.; Manning, R.; Meyer, N.; Moncuquet, M.

237

Model magnetosphere of Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A three-dimensional quantitative model of Mercury's magnetosphere based on Mariner 10 data is presented. The model assumes that the Mercury surface magnetic field consists of a dipole, a quadrupole, and an octupole. The dipole moment is determined, noting that the intensity of the quadrupole moment is 45% of the dipole, and that of the octupole moment is 29% of the dipole. The model meets four critical tests: (1) it produces the smallest residuals, (2) it can reproduce the crossing of a tail current sheet by Mariner 10, (3) all planetary field lines are confined inside the model magnetosphere, and (4) the size of the model agrees with the magnetopause crossings observed from Mariner 10. In addition, the plasma characteristics and regions of quiet and disturbed signatures observed from Mariner 10 are discussed.

Whang, Y. C.

1979-01-01

238

Distribution of Total Mercury and Methyl Mercury in Water, Sediment, and Fish from South Florida Estuaries  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   Concentrations of total mercury and methyl mercury were determined in sediment and fish collected from estuarine waters\\u000a of Florida to understand their distribution and partitioning. Total mercury concentrations in sediments ranged from 1 to 219\\u000a ng\\/g dry wt. Methyl mercury accounted for, on average, 0.77% of total mercury in sediment. Methyl mercury concentrations were\\u000a not correlated with total mercury

K. Kannan; R. F. Lee; H. L. Windom; P. T. Heitmuller; J. M. Macauley; J. K. Summers

1998-01-01

239

Chinese puzzle molecule: a 15?hydride, 28?copper atom nanoball.  

PubMed

The syntheses of the first rhombicuboctahedral copper polyhydride complexes [Cu28 (H)15 (S2 CNR)12 ]PF6 (NR=N(n) Pr2 or aza-15-crown-5) are reported. These complexes were analyzed by single-crystal X-ray and one by neutron diffraction. The core of each copper hydride nanoparticle comprises one central interstitial hydride and eight outer-triangular-face-capping hydrides. A further six face-truncating hydrides form an unprecedented bridge between the inner and outer copper atom arrays. The irregular inner Cu4 tetrahedron is encapsulated within the Cu24 rhombicuboctahedral cage, which is further enclosed by an array of twelve dithiocarbamate ligands that subtends the truncated octahedron of 24?sulfur atoms, which is concentric with the Cu24 rhombicuboctahedron and Cu4 tetrahedron about the innermost hydride. For these compounds, an intriguing, albeit limited, H2 evolution was observed at room temperature, which is accompanied by formation of the known ion [Cu8 (H)(S2 CNR)6 ](+) upon exposure of solutions to sunlight, under mild thermolytic conditions, and on reaction with weak (or strong) acids. PMID:24803070

Edwards, Alison J; Dhayal, Rajendra S; Liao, Ping-Kuei; Liao, Jian-Hong; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Piltz, Ross O; Kahlal, Samia; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C W

2014-07-01

240

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01

241

Method for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the .sup.196 Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01

242

Method for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-04-09

243

Apparatus for mercury refinement  

DOEpatents

The effluent from mercury collected during the photochemical separation of the [sup 196]Hg isotope is often contaminated with particulate mercurous chloride, Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2]. The use of mechanical filtering via thin glass tubes, ultrasonic rinsing with acetone (dimethyl ketone) and a specially designed cold trap have been found effective in removing the particulate (i.e., solid) Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] contaminant. The present invention is particularly directed to such filtering. 5 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Speer, R.; George, W.A.

1991-07-16

244

Uncratered Area on Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A dark, smooth, relatively uncratered area on Mercury was photographed (FDS 226) two hours after Mariner 10 flew by the planet on March 29 from a range of 86,000 kilometers (54,000 miles). Above and to the left of center is a surface similar to the mane material of Earth's moon. It embays and covers rougher, older, heavily cratered topography like that, which can be seen in both upper corners of this picture. The history of heavy cratering seems to be followed by volcanic filling, similar to the process on the Moon. The prominent, sharp crater with a central peak (center) is 30 kilometers (19 miles) across. It is located on the upper left edge of a very bright surface area. The bright crater, to its right is 10 kilometers (6 miles) in diameter. The sun is from the right.

The Mariner 10 mission, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for NASA's Office of Space Science, explored Venus in February 1974 on the way to three encounters with Mercury-in March and September 1974 and in March 1975. The spacecraft took more than 7,000 photos of Mercury, Venus, the Earth and the Moon.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Northwestern University

1974-01-01

245

STANDARDIZED TESTING PROGRAM FOR EMERGENT CHEMICAL HYDRIDE AND CARBON STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES  

E-print Network

hydride and carbon nanotube systems to date fall slightly short of the DOE energy density goals of 6STANDARDIZED TESTING PROGRAM FOR EMERGENT CHEMICAL HYDRIDE AND CARBON STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES Richard hydride/carbon hydrogen storage systems. The development of a standardized protocol and testing system

246

Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

ONISCHAK

1976-01-01

247

Hydrogen storage systems based on hydride materials with enhanced thermal conductivity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reaction of hydrogen gas with a metal to form a metal hydride is exothermic. If the heat released is not removed from the system, the resulting temperature rise of the hydride will reduce the hydrogen absorption rate. Hence, hydrogen storage systems based on hydride materials must include a way to remove the heat generated during the absorption process. The

Hui Wang; Ajay K. Prasad; Suresh G. Advani

248

VOLATILITY OF MERCURY FROM SOILS AMENDED WITH VARIOUS MERCURY COMPOUNDS  

EPA Science Inventory

A study was conducted to determine the rate of mercury volatilization from soils freshly amended with mercury compounds. Mercuric nitrate, mercuric chloride, mercuric acetate, mercuric oxide, and mercuric sulfide were used in conjunction with three soils: a loamy sand, a sand loa...

249

CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.  

PubMed

The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface. PMID:22433948

Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

2012-04-28

250

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01

251

A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved.

Ovshinsky, S. R.; Fetcenko, M. A.; Ross, J.

1993-04-01

252

Fly Ash and Mercury Oxidation\\/Chlorination Reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control\\/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury

Sukh Sidhu; Patanjali Varanasi

2008-01-01

253

Mercury in Canadian prairie ducks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tissues of 190 ducks, shot on the Canadian prairie during the hunting seasons of 1969 and 1970, were analyzed for mercury residues. Residue levels of over 0.5 ppm were found only in breast muscle of common mergansers (Mergus merganser). Livers contained, on the average, 2.9 times as much mercury as breast muscles. Primary feathers contained, on the average, 12 times

K. Vermeer; F. A. J. Armstrong

1972-01-01

254

RMP Mercury Strategy 06-03-09.doc Page 1 of 5 RMP MERCURY STRATEGY  

E-print Network

RMP Mercury Strategy 06-03-09.doc Page 1 of 5 RMP MERCURY STRATEGY Mercury is a pollutant of high the information most urgently needed by managers to find remedies to the Bay's mercury problem. The focus of total mercury in the Bay are expected to slowly decline over coming decades. The premise

255

Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2 , and AlH3 , and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6 , Na3AlH6 , LiAlH4 , NaAlH4 , and Mg(AlH4)2 , using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-particle band gaps varying from 3.5eV in AlH3 to 6.6eV in

M. J. van Setten; V. A. Popa; G. A. de Wijs; G. Brocks

2007-01-01

256

Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions.  

PubMed

Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, BxAlyHz(-), were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms. PMID:24784280

Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K

2014-04-28

257

Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions  

SciTech Connect

Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Li, Xiang [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States)] [Center for Space Science and Technology, University of Maryland–Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21250 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry and Physics, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K. [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

2014-04-28

258

Materials science of Mg-Ni-based new hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

.   One of the advantageous functional properties of Mg alloys (or compounds) is to exhibit the reversible hydriding reaction.\\u000a In this paper, we present our systematic studies regarding the relationship between nanometer- or atomistic-scale structures\\u000a and the specific hydriding properties of the Mg-Ni binary system, such as(1) nanostructured (n)-Mg2Ni, (2) a mixture of n-Mg2Ni and amorphous (a)-MgNi,(3) pure a-MgNi, and(4)

S. Orimo; H. Fujii

2001-01-01

259

Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces  

DOEpatents

A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

Silver, G.L.

1984-05-18

260

Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides  

SciTech Connect

We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

Sharma, Ramesh [Dept. of Physics, Feroze Gandhi Insititute of Engineering and Technology, Raebareli-229001 (India); Shukla, Seema, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Dwivedi, Shalini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com; Sharma, Yamini, E-mail: sharma.yamini62@gmail.com [Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Dept. of Physics Feroze Gandhi College, Raebareli-229001 (India)

2014-04-24

261

Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry hyphenated system for organic mercury determination: A step forward  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were determined on line using flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry without neither requiring a pre-treatment with chemical oxidants, nor UV/MW additional post column interface, nor organic solvents, nor complexing agents, such as cysteine. Inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury were detected by atomic fluorescence spectrometry in an Ar/H 2 miniaturized flame after sodium borohydride reduction to Hg 0, monomethylmercury hydride and ethylmercury hydride, respectively. The effect of mercury complexing agent such as cysteine, ethylendiaminotetracetic acid and HCl with respect to water and Ar/H 2 microflame was investigated. The behavior of inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury and their cysteine-complexes was also studied by continuous flow-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry in order to characterize the reduction reaction with tetrahydroborate. When complexed with cysteine, inorganic mercury, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separately quantified varying tetrahydroborate concentration due to a lack of selectivity, and their speciation requires a pre-separation stage (e.g. a chromatographic separation). If not complexed with cysteine, monomethylmercury and ethylmercury cannot be separated, as well, but their sum can be quantified separately with respect to inorganic mercury choosing a suitable concentration of tetrahydroborate (e.g. 10 - 5 mol L - 1 ), thus allowing the organic/inorganic mercury speciation. The detection limits of the flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method were about 45 nmol L - 1 (as mercury) for all the species considered, a relative standard deviation ranging between 1.8 and 2.9% and a linear dynamic range between 0.1 and 5 ?mol L - 1 were obtained. Recoveries of monomethylmercury and ethylmercury with respect to inorganic mercury were never less than 91%. Flow injection-chemical vapor generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry method was validated by analyzing the TORT-1 certificate reference material, which contains only monomethylmercury, and obtaining 83 ± 5% of monomethylmercury recovered, respectively. This method was also applied to the determination of monomethylmercury in saliva samples.

Angeli, Valeria; Biagi, Simona; Ghimenti, Silvia; Onor, Massimo; D'Ulivo, Alessandro; Bramanti, Emilia

2011-11-01

262

OBSERVATION AND MECHANISM OF HYDRIDE IN ZIRCALOY-4 AND LOCAL HYDRIDE RE-ORIENTATION INDUCED BY HIGH PRESSURE AT HIGH TEMPERATURES  

SciTech Connect

Hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were produced by a gas charging method to desired amounts of hydrogen. For low hydrogen content samples, the hydrided platelets appear elongated and needle-like, orientated in the circumferential direction. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression method at various temperatures. Samples with higher hydrogen concentration resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. The trend between temperature and ductility was also very clear: increasing temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the hydrided cladding. A single through-wall crack was observed for a hydrided sample having very high hydrogen concentration under ring compression testing. For samples having lower hydrogen concentrations, the fracture surfaces traversed both circumferential and radial directions, and for which voids were observed near the hydrides. Mechanical tests to study hydride reorientation in these samples are under way, and the results will be reported in the near future.

Yan, Yong [ORNL] [ORNL; Blackwell, Andrew S [ORNL] [ORNL; Plummer, Lee K [ORNL] [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL] [ORNL; Gorti, Sarma B [ORNL] [ORNL; Clarno, Kevin T [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01

263

Methods for dispensing mercury into devices  

DOEpatents

A process is described for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury. 2 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1987-04-28

264

THE CHEMICAL CYCLE AND BIOACCUMULATION OF MERCURY  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because it is very toxic and accumulates in organisms, particularly in fish, mercury is an important pollutant and one of the most studied. Nonetheless we still have an incomplete understanding of the factors that control the bioconcentration of mercury. Elemental mercury is efficiently transported as a gas around the globe, and even remote areas show evidence of mercury pollution originating

Francois M. M. Morel; Anne M. L. Kraepiel; Marc Amyot

1998-01-01

265

Mercury and the Gold Country Angler Survey  

E-print Network

#12;#12;Mercury and the Gold Rush #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Gold Country Angler Survey A Pilot Study to Assess Mercury Exposure from Sport Fish Consumption in the Sierra Nevada Carrie Monohan, Ph.D. #12;Mercury and the Gold Rush Deer Creek 1908 Greenhorn Creek 2011 Mercury was used during

266

Mercury Speciation in the Presence of Polysulfides  

E-print Network

Mercury Speciation in the Presence of Polysulfides J E N N Y A Y L A J A Y , * , F R A N C¸ O I Environmental mercury methylation appears modulated by sulfide concentrations, possibly via changes in mercury, there has been much recent interest in quantifying the chemical speciation and lipid solubility of mercury

Morel, François M. M.

267

Mercury Pollution in the Marine Environment  

E-print Network

Mercury Pollution in the Marine Environment The Coastal and Marine Mercury Ecosystem Research stakeholders to form C-MERC, the Coastal and Marine Mercury Ecosystem Research Collaborative. The goal was to review current knowledge--and knowledge gaps--relating to a global environmental health problem, mercury

Shepherd, Simon

268

The chemistry of atmospheric mercury: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

The atmosphere is an important transient reservoir of mercury. In addition to its great capacity, the chemical processes transforming mercury between the elemental and divalent states strongly influence the transport characteristics and deposition rate of this toxic metal back to the ground. Modeling efforts to assess global cycling of mercury require an in-depth knowledge of atmospheric mercury chemistry. This review

Che-Jen Lin; Simo O. Pehkonen

1999-01-01

269

Methods for dispensing mercury into devices  

DOEpatents

A process for dispensing mercury into devices which requires mercury. Mercury is first electrolytically separated from either HgO or Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 and plated onto a cathode wire. The cathode wire is then placed into a device requiring mercury.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1987-04-28

270

Mercury Spill Information and Response Guidance  

E-print Network

Mercury Spill Information and Response Guidance Background Information Mercury can be found, plumbing traps and vacuum pumps. When mercury is spilled, it forms beads or droplets that can accumulate mercury vapors can be very dangerous, depending on the amount inhaled and the length of exposure

Holland, Jeffrey

271

Environmental Geochemistry of Mercury Mines in Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This U.S. Geological Survey fact sheet investigates potential environmental contamination around naturally occurring, mercury-rich mineral deposits in Alaska. Testing of mercury levels in streams and sediments is described, as well as mercury levels in fish downstream from mines and the environmental effects of mercury entering the food chain.

272

Mercury emissions from geothermal power plants.  

PubMed

Geothermal steam used for power production contains significant quantities of volatile mercury. Much of this mercury escapes to the atmosphere as elemental mercury vapor in cooling tower exhausts. Mercury emissions from geothermal power plants, on a per megawatt (electric) basis, are comparable to releases from coal-fired power plants. PMID:860131

Robertson, D E; Crecelius, E A; Fruchter, J S; Ludwick, J D

1977-06-01

273

Hydrogen storage in metal hydrides. Final report, September 1989-March 1990  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this program was to develop an economical process for producing a lightweight hydrogen storage medium by the chemical vapor inflitration (CVI) of a metal hydride former into a reticulated foam substrate. An investigation was conducted to determine the most favorable precursors for forming the candidate hydride-forming materials, along with optimization of their transport and deposition parameters. A substrate optimization study was also performed in order to derive the greatest surface area-to-volume ratio from the resulting metal hydride-forming foam. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was performed on a metal foam sample to determine its hydriding capability. Results were inconclusive, showing only slight if any hydriding.

DelaRosa, M.J.

1990-08-01

274

Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions  

SciTech Connect

We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H{sup ?} (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} (M{sub IIa} = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H{sup ?} and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH{sup ?} and MgH{sup ?} species, the other M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns{sup 2}) and H{sup ?}(1s{sup 2}). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} species than for RG–H{sup ?}. Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M{sub IIa}H{sup ?} species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M{sub IIa} atom to move away from the incoming H{sup ?}.

Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G., E-mail: Tim.Wright@nottingham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Breckenridge, W. H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

2014-02-28

275

Elemental Mercury Spills  

PubMed Central

Sources of elemental mercury (Hg0) include old natural gas regulators, manometers, sphygmomanometers, thermometers, and thermostats. Causes of Hg0 spills include improper storage, container breakage, children playing with Hg0, the breakage of devices containing Hg0, and ritualistic use of Hg0. Inhalation is the primary exposure route for Hg0. Mercury released into the environment can enter lakes and streams, where bacteria convert it into methylmercury, which bioaccumulates in fish. Chronic exposure to Hg0 vapors can damage the kidneys and neurologic system. Short-term exposure to high levels of Hg0 vapors may cause lung damage, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, increases in blood pressure or heart rate, skin rashes, and eye irritation, among other effects. Minimizing Hg0 dispersal is important after an Hg0 spill. Tracking by shoes or apparel or vacuuming can spread Hg0, increasing airborne concentrations and cleanup costs. The Illinois Department of Public Health’s response to an Hg0 spill depends on the size of the spill. Airborne concentrations after large spills are mapped with a mercury vapor analyzer (MVA). The cleanup begins with the spill site and any hot spots that were identified with the MVA. Hard surfaces can usually be cleaned, but contaminated porous items must be discarded. Leaving marginally contaminated items outdoors for a month or more during warm weather may dissipate the Hg0. After a cleanup, clearance sampling is conducted to determine if further cleanup is needed. The best way to prevent Hg0 spills is reduce its use. PMID:16451846

Baughman, Thomas A.

2006-01-01

276

Fluorescent sensor for mercury  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

2011-11-22

277

Reference Atmosphere for Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objectives of this three year proposal are: (1) to calculate the likely diffusive flux of Ar and He from the interior of Mercury for representative crustal compositions; (2) compute a reasonable estimate of the fractional escape flux of photoions for the likely range of field conditions; and (3) to calculate the capture rate of solar wind ions into the atmosphere. The morphology of the magnetosphere in response to the solar wind and the IMF is the crucial boundary condition for the flux of ions to the surface. We have tackled problem (1) using a multipath diffusion code, and problems (2) and (3) using a combination of MHD and kinetic plasma dynamics.

Killen, Rosemary M.

2002-01-01

278

Geothermal hazards - Mercury emission  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Enthusiasm for intensified geothermal exploration may induce many participants to overlook a long-term potential toxicity hazard possibly associated with the tapping of magmatic steam. The association of high atmospheric Hg levels with geothermal activity has been established both in Hawaii and Iceland, and it has been shown that mercury can be introduced into the atmosphere from fumaroles, hot springs, and magmatic sources. These arguments, extended to thallium, selenium, and other hazardous elements, underscore the need for environmental monitoring in conjunction with the delivery of magmatic steam to the surface.

Siegel, S. M.; Siegel, B. Z.

1975-01-01

279

Transit of Mercury  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

It isn't every day that one gets to view a transit of Mercury. In fact, it's an event that only occurs approximately twelve times a century. For those of you who missed this event on November 8th, the researchers and scientists at the Exploratorium in San Francisco have created this program that contains the complete event and offer it to visitors to this lovely website. The transit was recorded from Kitt Peak in Arizona, and visitors to the site can watch a brief introduction to the program, and then watch various images from the webcast, complete with audio commentary at the beginning of each hour of coverage.

2006-01-01

280

The influence of hydride on fracture toughness of recrystallized Zircaloy-4 cladding  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work, RXA cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to target hydrogen content levels between 150 and 800 wppm (part per million by weight). The strings of zirconium hydrides observed in the cross sections are mostly oriented in the circumferential direction. The fracture toughness of hydrided RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding was measured to evaluate its hydride embrittlement susceptibility. With increasing hydrogen content, the fracture toughness of hydrided RXA cladding decreases at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Moreover, highly localized hydrides (forming a hydride rim) aggravate the degradation of the fracture properties of RXA Zircaloy-4 cladding at both 25 °C and 300 °C. Brittle features in the form of quasi-cleavages and secondary cracks were observed on the fracture surface of the hydride rim, even for RXA cladding tested at 300 °C.

Hsu, Hsiao-Hung; Chiang, Ming-Feng; Chen, Yen-Chen

2014-04-01

281

Elemental mercury exposure in early pregnancy  

SciTech Connect

We present a case of first-trimester elemental mercury exposure and review the literature to demonstrate that the reproductive toxicity of mercury varies depending on the form of mercury to which one is exposed. It appears that elemental mercury exposure poses less of a reproductive threat than the well-known hazards of exposure to organic mercurials. It is critical to determine the form of exposure when counseling patients at risk.15 references.

Thorp, J.M. Jr.; Boyette, D.D.; Watson, W.J.; Cefalo, R.C. (Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill NC (United States))

1992-05-01

282

A Mercury Transport and Fate Model for Mass Budget Assessment of Mercury Cycling in Lake Michigan  

EPA Science Inventory

A mercury mass balance model was developed to describe and evaluate the fate, transport, and biogeochemical transformations of mercury in Lake Michigan. Coupling with total suspendable solids (TSS) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), the mercury transport and fate model simulates...

283

49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). 173.164 Section 173.164 Transportation...Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing...

2012-10-01

284

49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). 173.164 Section 173.164 Transportation...Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing...

2011-10-01

285

49 CFR 173.164 - Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury).  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

... 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mercury (metallic and articles containing mercury). 173.164 Section 173.164 Transportation...Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.164 Mercury (metallic and articles containing...

2010-10-01

286

Hydride formation in a Ni-base superalloy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

X-ray diffraction, optical- and scanning-electron metallographic and microhardness studies have been conducted in pure Ni and a Ni-base alloy (HASTELLOY Alloy C-276) in an effort to determine if hydrides form in the alloy during cathodic charging in the presence of a strong H-recombination poison. The studies indicate that hydrides do form and that the extent of surface damage caused by them is a function of the alloy thermomechanical state. In the annealed alloy, hydrides produce a network of crystallographic cracks. In the 50 pct cold-worked alloy, extensive intergranular blistering and lamellar peeling are observed in addition to the crack network. In the cold-worked and aged alloy, damage similar to, but less extensive than, that of the cold-worked alloy is found. The average depth of damage penetration may be accounted for by the bulk diffusion of H in the alloy. It is not clear whether the observed susceptibility of the cold-worked and aged alloy to H embrittlement can be attributed to hydride formation.

Lunarska-Borowiecka, Ellina; Fiore, Nicholas F.

1981-01-01

287

Hydride generation from the Exide load-leveling cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Stibine and arsine evolution from lead-acid cells in a 36-kWh Exide load-leveling module was measured as this module approached 1900 cycles of operation. A gas-collection apparatus enabled us to determine the maximum and average rates for evolution of both toxic hydrides. Hydride generation began once the cell voltage exceeded 2.4 V. The maximum rate for arsine occurred just above 2.5 V and consistently preceded the peak rate for stibine for each sampled cell. The average rates of hydride generation were found to be 175 g/min for stibine and 12.6 g/min for arsine. The former rate proved to be the critical value in determining safe ventilation requirements for cell off-gases. The minimum airflow requirement was calculated to be 340 L/min per cell. Projections for a hypothetical 1-MWh Exide battery without an abatement system indicated that the normal ventilation capacity in the Battery Energy Storage Test facility provides nearly five times the airflow needed for safe hydride removal.

Marr, J. J.; Smaga, J. A.

1987-05-01

288

Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite  

DOEpatents

An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

Congdon, James W. (Aiken, SC)

2009-03-17

289

Growth of gallium nitride by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the growth of GaN thick films by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy (HVPE). Emphasis is placed on recent developments, including the growth of nondegenerate material, characterization of film properties and suitability of such films for epitaxial device overgrowths. Films up to 74 ?m thick have been deposited on sapphire substrates with no evidence of thermally induced cracking and a

R. J. Molnar; W. Götz; L. T. Romano; N. M. Johnson

1997-01-01

290

Mercury toxicity and neurodegenerative effects.  

PubMed

Mercury is among the most toxic heavy metals and has no known physiological role in humans. Three forms of mercury exist: elemental, inorganic and organic. Mercury has been used by man since ancient times. Among the earliest were the Chinese and Romans, who employed cinnabar (mercury sulfide) as a red dye in ink (Clarkson et al. 2007). Mercury has also been used to purify gold and silver minerals by forming amalgams. This is a hazardous practice, but is still widespread in Brazil's Amazon basin, in Laos and in Venezuela, where tens of thousands of miners are engaged in local mining activities to find and purify gold or silver. Mercury compounds were long used to treat syphilis and the element is still used as an antiseptic,as a medicinal preservative and as a fungicide. Dental amalgams, which contain about 50% mercury, have been used to repair dental caries in the U.S. since 1856.Mercury still exists in many common household products around the world.Examples are: thermometers, barometers, batteries, and light bulbs (Swain et al.2007). In small amounts, some organo mercury-compounds (e.g., ethylmercury tiosalicylate(thimerosal) and phenylmercury nitrate) are used as preservatives in some medicines and vaccines (Ballet al. 2001).Each mercury form has its own toxicity profile. Exposure to Hg0 vapor and MeHg produce symptoms in CNS, whereas, the kidney is the target organ when exposures to the mono- and di-valent salts of mercury (Hg+ and Hg++, respectively)occur. Chronic exposure to inorganic mercury produces stomatitis, erethism and tremors. Chronic MeHg exposure induced symptoms similar to those observed in ALS, such as the early onset of hind limb weakness (Johnson and Atchison 2009).Among the organic mercury compounds, MeHg is the most biologically available and toxic (Scheuhammer et a!. 2007). MeHg is neurotoxic, reaching high levels of accumulation in the CNS; it can impair physiological function by disrupting endocrine glands (Tan et a!. 2009).The most important mechanism by which mercury causes toxicity appears to bemitochondrial damage via depletion of GSH (Nicole et a!. 1998), coupled with binding to thiol groups ( -SH), which generates free radicals. Mercury has a high affinity for thiol groups ( -SH) and seleno groups ( -SeH) that are present in amino acids as cysteine and N-acetyl cysteine, lipoic acid, proteins, and enzymes. N-acetylcysteine and cysteine are precursors for the biosynthesis of GSH, which is among the most powerful intracellular antioxidants available to protect against oxidative stress and inflammation.Mercury and methylmercury induce mitochondrial dysfunction, which reduces ATP synthesis and increases lipid, protein and DNA peroxidation. The content of metallothioneines, GSH, selenium and fish high in omega-3 fatty acids appear to be strongly related with degree of inorganic and organic mercury toxicity, and with the protective detoxifying mechanisms in humans. In conclusion, depletion of GSH,breakage of mitochondria, increased lipid peroxidation, and oxidation of proteins and DNA in the brain, induced by mercury and his salts, appear to be important factors in conditions such as ALS and AD (Bains and Shaw 1997; Nicole eta!. 1998;Spencer eta!. 1998; Alberti et a!. 1999). PMID:24515807

Carocci, Alessia; Rovito, Nicola; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania; Genchi, Giuseppe

2014-01-01

291

Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 ?g kg-1) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 ?g kg-1). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark—in pyroclastic wounds—and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 ?g kg-1) and bark (6.0 ?g kg-1) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species.

Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

2013-08-01

292

Mercury content of Illinois soils  

USGS Publications Warehouse

For a survey of Illinois soils, 101 cores had been collected and analyzed to determine the current and background elemental compositions of Illinois soils. Mercury and other elements were determined in six samples per core, including a surface sample from each core. The mean mercury content in the surface samples was 33 ?? 20 ??g/kg soil, and the background content was 20 ?? 9 ??g/kg. The most probable sources of mercury in these soils were the parent material, and wet and dry deposition of Hg0 and Hg2+ derived from coal-burning power plants, other industrial plants, and medical and municipal waste incinerators. Mercury-bearing sewage sludge or other fertilizers applied to agricultural fields could have been the local sources of mercury. Although the mercury content correlated with organic carbon content or clay content in individual cores, when all the data were considered, there was no strong correlation between mercury and either the organic carbon or the clay-size content.

Dreher, G.B.; Follmer, L.R.

2004-01-01

293

Volcanic mercury in Pinus canariensis.  

PubMed

Mercury (Hg) is a toxic element that is emitted to the atmosphere by both human activities and natural processes. Volcanic emissions are considered a natural source of mercury in the environment. In some cases, tree ring records taken close to volcanoes and their relation to volcanic activity over time are contradictory. In 1949, the Hoyo Negro volcano (La Palma-Canary Islands) produced significant pyroclastic flows that damaged the nearby stand of Pinus canariensis. Recently, 60 years after the eruption, we assessed mercury concentrations in the stem of a pine which survived volcano formation, located at a distance of 50 m from the crater. We show that Hg content in a wound caused by pyroclastic impacts (22.3 ?g kg(-1)) is an order of magnitude higher than the Hg concentrations measured in the xylem before and after the eruption (2.3 ?g kg(-1)). Thus, mercury emissions originating from the eruption remained only as a mark-in pyroclastic wounds-and can be considered a sporadic and very high mercury input that did not affect the overall Hg input in the xylem. In addition, mercury contents recorded in the phloem (9.5 ?g kg(-1)) and bark (6.0 ?g kg(-1)) suggest that mercury shifts towards non-living tissues of the pine, an aspect that can be related to detoxification in volcanism-adapted species. PMID:23760570

Rodríguez Martín, José Antonio; Nanos, Nikos; Miranda, José Carlos; Carbonell, Gregoria; Gil, Luis

2013-08-01

294

Modeling the obliquity of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury is the target of the space missions MESSENGER and BepiColombo, that will in particular observe its rotation to get information on its internal structure. This requires a rigorous modelization of this rotation. A difficulty comes from the obliquity of Mercury, that behaves adiabatically, and so is tough to simulate over a short timescale without generating free oscillations. These free oscillations are due to the inaccuracy of the initial conditions, that are difficult to determine because they correspond to an equilibrium of the complete, perturbed problem. We here propose formulae linking the long-term behavior of the obliquity of Mercury with its gravity parameters C20, C22 and C/(MR2), based on Peale's (1981) formula. We use for that a fitted precessional motion of Mercury that we include in averaged rotational equations, and we show that the solutions extracted can be used in a realistic simulation suitable to a space mission. We estimate that these solutions induce an error lower than 3% in the modelization of Mercury's obliquity. Thus, an inversion of the observed orientation of Mercury could lead to an uncertainty of 3% on Mercury's inertial polar momentum, if we neglect the other sources of error.

Noyelles, Benoît; D'Hoedt, Sandrine

2012-01-01

295

MESSENGER'S First Flyby of Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The MESSENGER mission to Mercury offers our first opportunity to explore this planet's miniature magnetosphere since Mariner 10's brief fly-bys in 1974-5. The magnetosphere of Mercury is the smallest in the solar system with its magnetic field typically standing off the solar wind only - 1000 to 2000 km above the surface. An overview of the MESSENGER mission and its January 14th close flyby of Mercury will be provided. Primary science objectives and the science instrumentation will be described. Initial results from MESSENGER'S first flyby on January 14th, 2008 will be discussed with an emphasis on the magnetic field and charged particle measurements.

Slavin, James A.

2008-01-01

296

Distribution of total mercury and methyl mercury in water, sediment, and fish from South Florida estuaries  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Concentrations of total mercury and methyl mercury were determined in sediment and fish collected from estuarine waters of Florida to understand their distribution and partitioning. Total mercury concentrations in sediments ranged from 1 to 219 ng/g dry wt. Methyl mercury accounted for, on average, 0.77% of total mercury in sediment. Methyl mercury concentrations were not correlated with total mercury or organic carbon content in sediments. The concentrations of total mercury in fish muscle were between 0.03 and 2.22 (mean: 0.31) ??g/g, wet wt, with methyl mercury contributing 83% of total mercury. Methyl mercury concentrations in fish muscle were directly proportional to total mercury concentrations. The relationship of total and methyl mercury concentrations in fish to those of sediments from corresponding locations was fish-species dependent, in addition to several abiotic factors. Among fish species analyzed, hardhead catfish, gafftopsail catfish, and sand seatrout contained the highest concentrations of mercury. Filtered water samples from canals and creeks that discharge into the Florida Bay showed mercury concentrations of 3-7.4 ng/L, with methyl mercury accounting for <0.03-52% of the total mercury. Consumption of fish containing 0.31 ??g mercury/g wet wt, the mean concentration found in this study, at rates greater than 70 g/day, was estimated to be hazardous to human health.

Kannan, K.; Smith, R.G., Jr.; Lee, R.F.; Windom, H.L.; Heitmuller, P.T.; Macauley, J.M.; Summers, J.K.

1998-01-01

297

Distribution of total mercury and methyl mercury in water, sediment, and fish from south Florida estuaries.  

PubMed

Concentrations of total mercury and methyl mercury were determined in sediment and fish collected from estuarine waters of Florida to understand their distribution and partitioning. Total mercury concentrations in sediments ranged from 1 to 219 ng/g dry wt. Methyl mercury accounted for, on average, 0.77% of total mercury in sediment. Methyl mercury concentrations were not correlated with total mercury or organic carbon content in sediments. The concentrations of total mercury in fish muscle were between 0.03 and 2.22 (mean: 0.31) micrograms/g, wet wt, with methyl mercury contributing 83% of total mercury. Methyl mercury concentrations in fish muscle were directly proportional to total mercury concentrations. The relationship of total and methyl mercury concentrations in fish to those of sediments from corresponding locations was fish-species dependent, in addition to several abiotic factors. Among fish species analyzed, hardhead catfish, gafftopsail catfish, and sand seatrout contained the highest concentrations of mercury. Filtered water samples from canals and creeks that discharge into the Florida Bay showed mercury concentrations of 3-7.4 ng/L, with methyl mercury accounting for < 0.03-52% of the total mercury. Consumption of fish containing 0.31 microgram mercury/g wet wt, the mean concentration found in this study, at rates greater than 70 g/day, was estimated to be hazardous to human health. PMID:9469852

Kannan, K; Smith, R G; Lee, R F; Windom, H L; Heitmuller, P T; Macauley, J M; Summers, J K

1998-02-01

298

MERCURY STABILITY IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

SciTech Connect

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine whether the presence of mercury and 188 other trace substances, referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), in the stack emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric utility power plants poses an unacceptable public health risk (1). The EPA's conclusions and recommendations were presented in two reports: Mercury Study Report to Congress and Study of Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions from Electric Utility Steam Generating Units-Final Report to Congress. The first congressional report addressed both human health and the environmental effects of anthropogenic mercury emissions, while the second report addressed the risk to public health posed by emissions of HAPs from steam electricity-generating units. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is also required by the CAAAs to investigate mercury and determine a safe threshold level of exposure. Recently the National Academy of Sciences has also been commissioned by Congress to complete a report, based the available scientific evidence, regarding safe threshold levels of mercury exposure. Although the EPA reports did not state that mercury controls on coal-fired electric power stations should be required given the current state of the art, they did indicate that EPA views mercury as a potential threat to human health. It is likely that major sources of mercury emissions, including fossil-fired combustion systems, will be controlled at some point. In fact, municipal waste combustion units are already regulated. In anticipation of additional control measures, much research has been done (and continues) regarding the development of control technologies for mercury emitted from stationary sources to the atmosphere. Most approaches taken to date involve sorbent injection technologies or improve upon removal of mercury using existing technologies such as flue gas desulfurization scrubbers, fabric filters, and electrostatic precipitators. Depending on the fly ash chemistry and the form of mercury present in the flue gas, some of these existing technologies can be effective at capturing vapor-phase mercury from the flue gas stream. Although much research has been done on enhancing the removal of mercury from flue gas streams, little research has focused on what happens to the mercury when it is captured and converted and/or transferred to a solid or aqueous solution. The stability (or mobility) of mercury in this final process is critical and leads to the questions, What impact will the increased concentration of mercury have on utilization, disposal, and reuse? and Is the mercury removed from the flue gas really removed from the environment or rereleased at a later point? To help answer these questions, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement did a series of experiments using thermal desorption and leaching techniques. This report presents the results from these tests.

John H. Pavlish

1999-07-01

299

DIETARY METHYL MERCURY EXPOSURE IN AMERICAN KESTRELS; PILOT STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Anthropogenic mercury emissions have increased atmospheric mercury levels about threefold since the advent of industrial activity. Atmospheric deposition is the primary source of mercury in the environment hence mercury contamination has increased in similar fashion. Methyl mercu...

300

76 FR 75446 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...11-AWP-14] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mercury, NV AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...SUMMARY: This action amends Class E airspace at Mercury, Desert Rock Airport, Mercury, NV. Decommissioning of the Mercury...

2011-12-02

301

The Use of Bacteria for Remediation of Mercury Contaminated Groundwater  

EPA Science Inventory

Many processes of mercury transformation in the environment are bacteria mediated. Mercury properties cause some difficulties of remediation of mercury contaminated environment. Despite the significance of the problem of mercury pollution, methods of large scale bioremediation ...

302

Socioeconomic consequences of mercury use and pollution.  

PubMed

In the past, human activities often resulted in mercury releases to the biosphere with little consideration of undesirable consequences for the health of humans and wildlife. This paper outlines the pathways through which humans and wildlife are exposed to mercury. Fish consumption is the major route of exposure to methylmercury. Humans can also receive toxic doses of mercury through inhalation of elevated concentrations of gaseous elemental mercury. We propose that any effective strategy for reducing mercury exposures requires an examination of the complete life cycle of mercury. This paper examines the life cycle of mercury from a global perspective and then identifies several approaches to measuring the benefits of reducing mercury exposure, policy options for reducing Hg emissions, possible exposure reduction mechanisms, and issues associated with mercury risk assessment and communication for different populations. PMID:17408190

Swain, Edward B; Jakus, Paul M; Rice, Glenn; Lupi, Frank; Maxson, Peter A; Pacyna, Jozef M; Penn, Alan; Spiegel, Samuel J; Veiga, Marcello M

2007-02-01

303

Postoperative Systemic Dissemination of Injected Elemental Mercury  

PubMed Central

There were only a few reports of mercury on pulmonary artery. However, there is no data on surgery related mercury dissemination. The objective of the present article is to describe one case of postoperative injected mercury dissemination. A 19-year-old man presented severe neck pain including meningeal irritation sign and abdominal pain after injection of mercury for the purpose of suicide. Radiologic study showed injected mercury in the neck involving high cervical epidural space and subcutaneous layer of abdomen. Partial hemilaminectomy and open mercury evacuation of spinal canal was performed. For the removal of abdominal subcutaneous mercury, C-arm guided needle aspiration was done. After surgery, radiologic study showed disseminated mercury in the lung, heart, skull base and low spinal canal. Neck pain and abdominal pain were improved after surgery. During 1 month after surgery, there was no symptom of mercury intoxication except increased mercury concentration of urine, blood and hair. We assumed the bone work during surgery might have caused mercury dissemination. Therefore, we recommend minimal invasive surgical technique for removal of injected mercury. If open exposures are needed, cautious surgical technique to prohibit mercury dissemination is necessary and normal barrier should be protected to prevent the migration of mercury. PMID:21607187

Kang, Suk-Hyung; Moon, Kyung-Yoon

2011-01-01

304

CAPSULE REPORT: AQUEOUS MERCURY TREATMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

This report describes established technologies and identifies evolving methods for treating aqueous mercury. The information provided encompasses full-, pilot- and bench-scale treatment results as presented in the technical literature. The report describes alternative technologi...

305

Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean  

E-print Network

The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

Lamborg, Carl

306

Mercury Telluride and Cadmium Telluride  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A semiconductor's usefulness is determined by how atoms are ordered within the crystal's underlying three-dimensional structure. While this mercury telluride and cadmium telluride alloy sample mixes completely in Earth -based laboratories, convective flows prevent them from mixing uniformly.

2004-01-01

307

Cavitation in a Mercury Target  

SciTech Connect

Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

West, C.D.

2000-09-01

308

"Cavitation in a Mercury Target"  

SciTech Connect

Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

West, C.D.

2000-09-06

309

Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Metal hydride materials have been intensively studied for hydrogen storage applications. In addition to potential hydrogen economy applications, metal hydrides offer a wide variety of other interesting properties. For example, hydrogen-dominant materials, which are hydrides with the highest hydrogen content for a particular metal/semimetal composition, are predicted to display high-temperature superconductivity. On the other side of the spectrum are hydrides with small amounts of hydrogen (0.1 - 1 at.%) that are investigated as viable magnetic, thermoelectric or semiconducting materials. Research of metal hydride materials is generally important to gain fundamental understanding of metal-hydrogen interactions in materials. Hydrogenation of Zintl phases, which are defined as compounds between an active metal (alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth) and a p-block metal/semimetal, were attempted by a hot sintering method utilizing an autoclave loaded with gaseous hydrogen (< 9 MPa). Hydride formation competes with oxidative decomposition of a Zintl phase. The oxidative decomposition, which leads to a mixture of binary active metal hydride and p-block element, was observed for investigated aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) containing Zintl phases. However, a new phase Li2Al was discovered when Zintl phase precursors were synthesized. Using the single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD), the Li2Al was found to crystallize in an orthorhombic unit cell (Cmcm) with the lattice parameters a = 4.6404(8) Å, b = 9.719(2) Å, and c = 4.4764(8) Å. Increased demand for materials with improved properties necessitates the exploration of alternative synthesis methods. Conventional metal hydride synthesis methods, like ball-milling and autoclave technique, are not responding to the demands of finding new materials. A viable alternative synthesis method is the application of high pressure for the preparation of hydrogen-dominant materials. Extreme pressures in the gigapascal ranges can open access to new metal hydrides with novel structures and properties, because of the drastically increased chemical potential of hydrogen. Pressures up to 10 GPa can be easily achieved using the multi-anvil (MA) hydrogenations while maintaining sufficient sample volume for structure and property characterization. Gigapascal MA hydrogenations using ammonia borane (BH3

Puhakainen, Kati

310

Efficient catalysis by MgCl2 in hydrogen generation via hydrolysis of Mg-based hydride prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis.  

PubMed

Magnesium chloride efficiently catalyzed the hydrolysis of Mg-based hydride prepared by hydriding combustion synthesis. Hydrogen yield of 1635 mL g(-1) was obtained (MgH(2)), i.e. with 96% conversion in 30 min at 303 K. PMID:22538836

Zhao, Zelun; Zhu, Yunfeng; Li, Liquan

2012-06-01

311

Rapid mercury assays  

SciTech Connect

We have developed rapid assays with the potential of detecting mercury in environmental samples. our methods combine the simple ELISA-format with the selective, high affinity complexation of mercuric ions by sulfur-containing ligands. The first assay is based on a sandwich chelate formed by a protein-bound ligand immobilized on the wells of a microliter plate, mercuric ion of the analyzed sample, and another ligand conjugated to a reporter enzyme. The second assay involves competition between mercuric ions and an organomercury-conjugate to bind to a chelating conjugate. Several sulfur containing chelators (e.g., dithiocarbamates) and organomercurials linked to macromolecular carriers have been investigated in these assay formats. The assays detect mercuric ions in ppb/high ppt concentrations with high selectivity.

Szurdoki, S.; Kido, H.; Hammock, B.D. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1996-10-01

312

Webcam images of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accompanying images of Mercury were obtained on the morning of 2006 August 19, during a short interval of good seeing. The telescope used was a 10-inch (250mm) Orion Optics (UK) Newtonian on a Vixen GP-DX mount, coupled with a Tele Vue ?5 Powermate to give a sufficiently large image scale. The camera was an ATIK 1 HS II black & white webcam, with a Baader IR-pass filter transmitting wavelengths longer than 685nm. Five movie files in .avi format were recorded over a half-hour period, after which the seeing deteriorated. The observations were made in full daylight: the dark background results from clipping the histogram during processing of the stacked images.

Hooker, C.

2006-12-01

313

Mercury orbiter transport study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A data base and comparative performance analyses of alternative flight mode options for delivering a range of payload masses to Mercury orbit are provided. Launch opportunities over the period 1980-2000 are considered. Extensive data trades are developed for the ballistic flight mode option utilizing one or more swingbys of Venus. Advanced transport options studied include solar electric propulsion and solar sailing. Results show the significant performance tradeoffs among such key parameters as trip time, payload mass, propulsion system mass, orbit size, launch year sensitivity and relative cost-effectiveness. Handbook-type presentation formats, particularly in the case of ballistic mode data, provide planetary program planners with an easily used source of reference information essential in the preliminary steps of mission selection and planning.

Friedlander, A. L.; Feingold, H.

1977-01-01

314

Mercury Toolset for Spatiotemporal Metadata  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury (http://mercury.ornl.gov) is a set of tools for federated harvesting, searching, and retrieving metadata, particularly spatiotemporal metadata. Version 3.0 of the Mercury toolset provides orders of magnitude improvements in search speed, support for additional metadata formats, integration with Google Maps for spatial queries, facetted type search, support for RSS (Really Simple Syndication) delivery of search results, and enhanced customization to meet the needs of the multiple projects that use Mercury. It provides a single portal to very quickly search for data and information contained in disparate data management systems, each of which may use different metadata formats. Mercury harvests metadata and key data from contributing project servers distributed around the world and builds a centralized index. The search interfaces then allow the users to perform a variety of fielded, spatial, and temporal searches across these metadata sources. This centralized repository of metadata with distributed data sources provides extremely fast search results to the user, while allowing data providers to advertise the availability of their data and maintain complete control and ownership of that data. Mercury periodically (typically daily)harvests metadata sources through a collection of interfaces and re-indexes these metadata to provide extremely rapid search capabilities, even over collections with tens of millions of metadata records. A number of both graphical and application interfaces have been constructed within Mercury, to enable both human users and other computer programs to perform queries. Mercury was also designed to support multiple different projects, so that the particular fields that can be queried and used with search filters are easy to configure for each different project.

Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Palanisamy, Giri; Green, James; Wilson, Bruce; Rhyne, B. Timothy; Lindsley, Chris

2010-06-01

315

In situ mercury stabilization  

SciTech Connect

BNL Royalty Project Internal Status Report. The funds from the allotment of royalty income were used to experimentally explore feasibility of related, potential new techniques based on the Environmental Sciences Department successful technology licensed for the ex situ treatment of mercury. Specifically, this work is exploring the concept of using Sulfur Polymer Cement (SPC) in an in situ application to stabilize and/or remove mercury (Hg) from surficial soil. Patent disclosure forms have been filed for this process. Soil was artificially spiked with 500 ppm Hg and a series of experiments were set up in which SPC rods were placed in the center of a mass of this soil. Some experiments were conducted at 20 C and others at 50 C. After times ranging from 11 to 24 days, these experiments were opened, photographed and the soil was sampled from discrete locations in the containers. The soil and SPC samples were analyzed for Fe and Hg by x-ray fluorescence. The Hg profile in the soil was significantly altered, with concentrations along the outer edge of the soil reduced by as much as 80% from the starting concentration. Conversely, closer to the treatment rod containing SPC, concentrations of Hg were significantly increased over the original concentration. Preliminary results for elevated temperature sample are shown graphically in Figure 2. Apparently the Hg had migrated toward the SPC and reacted with sulfur to form Hg S. This appears to be a reaction between gaseous phases of both S and Hg, with Hg having a greater vapor pressure. The concentration of low solubility HgS (i.e., low leaching properties) developed within 11 days at 50 C and 21 days at 20 C, confirming the potential of this concept.

Fuhrmann, M.; Kalb, P.; Adams, J.

2004-09-01

316

Mercury ion thruster technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Mercury Ion Thruster Technology program was an investigation for improving the understanding of state-of-the-art mercury ion thrusters. Emphasis was placed on optimizing the performance and simplifying the design of the 30 cm diameter ring-cusp discharge chamber. Thruster performance was improved considerably; the baseline beam-ion production cost of the optimized configuration was reduced to Epsilon (sub i) perspective to 130 eV/ion. At a discharge propellant-utilization efficiency of 95 percent, the beam-ion production cost was reduced to about 155 eV/ion, representing a reduction of about 40 eV/ion over the corresponding value for the 30 cm diameter J-series thruster. Comprehensive Langmuir-probe surveys were obtained and compared with similar measurements for a J-series thruster. A successful volume-averaging scheme was developed to correlate thruster performance with the dominant plasma processes that prevail in the two thruster designs. The average Maxwellian electron temperature in the optimized ring-cusp design is as much as 1 eV higher than it is in the J-series thruster. Advances in ion-extraction electrode fabrication technology were made by improving materials selection criteria, hydroforming and stress-relieving tooling, and fabrications procedures. An ion-extraction performance study was conducted to assess the effect of screen aperture size on ion-optics performance and to verify the effectiveness of a beam-vectoring model for three-grid ion optics. An assessment of the technology readiness of the J-series thruster was completed, and operation of an 8 cm IAPS thruster using a simplified power processor was demonstrated.

Beattie, J. R.; Matossian, J. N.

1989-01-01

317

IntroductionIntroduction Mercury: Monitoring Patients with ParkinsonMercury: Monitoring Patients with Parkinson''s Diseases Disease  

E-print Network

IntroductionIntroduction Mercury: Monitoring Patients with ParkinsonMercury: Monitoring Patients's Disease EvaluationEvaluation Mercury ArchitectureMercury Architecture Mercury is a wireless sensor network and disconnections Node Behavior Hardware PlatformHardware Platform Usage Scenario InternetInternet http://fiji.eecs.harvard.edu/Mercury

Chen, Yiling

318

Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to control the chemical speciation, electrochemical state, transport, and aboveground binding of mercury in order to manage this toxicant.

Meagher, Richard B.

2005-06-01

319

Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride fraction decreases with increasing hydrogen content although the radial hydride content remains constant (for levels above 200 wt.ppm). The precipitation of reoriented hydrides under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation occurs at a lower temperature than the precipitation of in-plane (circumferential) hydrides in unstressed samples. The effects of cycling on the precipitation temperature when precipitating reoriented hydrides are small. When radial hydrides precipitate under stress, during the first precipitation stage at high temperature the hydride strains become tensile in the direction perpendicular to the hydride platelet face. During the second precipitation regime, these strains remain constant in tension. This indicates a different hydride strain state for reoriented hydrides than for circumferential hydrides. The magnitude of the tensile hydride strain in the transverse direction as measured by the change in d-spacing in the reoriented hydride face increases with cycling, potentially because of the increasing reoriented hydride fraction. The analysis of the FWHM confirms the observed 'signature' of hydride reorientation in a mixed population of hydrides as previously observed in the literature. Once the hydride population is fully reoriented, the FWHM decreases due to the fact that a single population of reoriented hydrides is now present. The strain distribution in this single population is smaller than for a mixed population of circumferential and reoriented hydrides.

Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

2013-09-01

320

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

2009-03-10

321

SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...  

EPA Science Inventory

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

322

SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..  

EPA Science Inventory

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

323

Hydriding and dehydriding characteristics of LiBH{sub 4} and transition metals-added magnesium hydride  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Hydriding reaction curves under 12 bar H{sub 2}, and dehydriding reaction curves under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}, at 593 K at the 1st cycle for MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti and MgH{sub 2}. Highlights: ? Addition of Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti to MgH{sub 2} to increase reaction rates. ? Sample preparation by reactive mechanical grinding. ? At n = 2, the sample absorbed 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. ? Analysis of rate-controlling step for dehydriding of the sample at n = 3. - Abstract: In this study, MgH{sub 2} was used as a starting material instead of Mg. Ni, Ti, and LiBH{sub 4} with a high hydrogen-storage capacity of 18.4 wt% were added. A sample with a composition of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The activation of MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti was completed after the first hydriding–dehydrding cycle. The hydriding rate decreases as the temperature increases due to the decrease in the driving force for the hydriding reaction. At the 1st cycle, the sample desorbs 1.45 wt% H for 10 min, 2.54 wt% H for 20 min, 3.13 wt% H for 30 min, and 3.40 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 1.0 bar H{sub 2}. At the 2nd cycle, the sample absorbs 3.84 wt% H for 5 min, 3.96 wt% H for 10 min, and 4.05 wt% H for 60 min at 593 K under 12 bar H{sub 2}. MgH{sub 2}–10Ni–2LiBH{sub 4}–2Ti after reactive mechanical grinding contained MgH{sub 2}, Mg, Ni, TiH{sub 1.924}, and MgO phases. The reactive mechanical grinding of Mg with Ni, LiBH{sub 4}, and Ti is considered to create defects on the surface and in the interior of Mg (to facilitate nucleation), and to reduce the particle size of Mg (to shorten diffusion distances of hydrogen atoms). The formation of Mg{sub 2}Ni during hydriding–dehydriding cycling increases the hydriding and dehydriding rates of the sample.

Song, Myoung Youp, E-mail: songmy@jbnu.ac.kr [Division of Advanced Materials Engineering, Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research Center, Engineering Research Institute, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Young Jun; Lee, Seong Ho [Department of Materials Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, 567 Baekje-daero, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju, 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hye Ryoung [Faculty of Applied Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbongdong, Bukgu, Gwangju, 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-15

324

Mercury-Mercury Tunneling Junctions. 1. Electron Tunneling Across Symmetric and Asymmetric Alkanethiolate Bilayers  

E-print Network

Mercury-Mercury Tunneling Junctions. 1. Electron Tunneling Across Symmetric and Asymmetric by bringing in contact two small (3 Ã? 10-3 cm2) mercury drop electrodes in a 5-20% (v/v) hexadecane solution incorporating alkanethiolate-type monolayer films. The results reported below convince us that the mercury

Majda, Marcin

325

Groundwater Modeling Of Mercury Pollution At A Former Mercury Cell Chlor Alkali Facility In Pavoldar, Kazakhstan  

EPA Science Inventory

In Kazakhstan, there is a serious case of mercury pollution near the city of Pavlodar from an old mercury cell chlor-alkali plant. The soil, sediment, and water is severly contaminated with mercury and mercury compounds as a result of the industrial activity of this chemical pla...

326

Mercury: Aspects of its ecology and environmental toxicity. [physiological effects of mercury compound contamination of environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was conducted to determine the effects of mercury pollution on the environment. The possible sources of mercury contamination in sea water are identified. The effects of mercury on food sources, as represented by swordfish, are analyzed. The physiological effects of varying concentrations of mercury are reported. Emphasis is placed on the situation existing in the Hawaiian Islands.

Siegel, S. M.

1973-01-01

327

Sediment Microbial Community Composition and Mercury Methylation at Four California Mercury Mines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury contamination is a globally significant problem. An important transformation in the mercury cycle is the conversion of inorganic mercury to methylmercury, a potent neurotoxin and bioaccumulant. This transformation is primarily bacterially-mediated, and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) have been specifically implicated as key mercury methylators in lake and estuarine sediments. This study used Phospholipid Fatty Acid (PLFA) analysis to investigate sediment

K. M. Batten

2001-01-01

328

Assessment of mercury presence and exposure in a lighthouse with a mercury drive system  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is common practice for lighthouses with large Fresnel lenses to use mercury baths as a low-friction rotation mechanism. Some recent acute mercury poisonings and incidents of abnormal behavior in lighthouse keepers have drawn attention to the potential for chronic mercury poisoning in these workplaces. This study evaluated the distribution of mercury in a lighthouse on the Canadian west coast,

C. Vannetten; K. E. Teschke

1988-01-01

329

Electronic structure and optical properties of lightweight metal hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the dielectric functions of the series of simple hydrides LiH, NaH, MgH2, and AlH3, and of the complex hydrides Li3AlH6, Na3AlH6, LiAlH4, NaAlH4, and Mg(AlH4)2, using first-principles density-functional theory and GW calculations. All compounds are large gap insulators with GW single-particle band gaps varying from 3.5 eV in AlH3 to 6.6 eV in LiAlH4. Despite considerable differences between

Setten van M. J; V. A. Popa; Wijs de G. A; G. Brocks

2007-01-01

330

Reversible metal-hydride phase transformation in epitaxial films.  

PubMed

Metal-hydride phase transformations in solids commonly proceed with hysteresis. The extrinsic component of hysteresis is the result of the dissipation of energy of internal stress due to plastic deformation and fracture. It can be mitigated on the nanoscale, where plastic deformation and fracture are suppressed and the transformation proceeds through formation and evolution of coherent phases. However, the phase coherency introduces intrinsic thermodynamic hysteresis, preventing reversible transformation. In this paper, it is shown that thermodynamic hysteresis of coherent metal-hydride transformation can be eliminated in epitaxial film due to substrate constraint. Film-substrate interaction leads to formation of heterophase polydomain nanostructure with variable phase fraction which can change reversibly by varying temperature in a closed system or chemical potential in an open system. PMID:25671335

Roytburd, Alexander L; Boyerinas, Brad M; Bruck, Hugh A

2015-03-11

331

Composition and structure of sputter deposited erbium hydride thin films  

SciTech Connect

Erbium hydride thin films are grown onto polished, a-axis {alpha} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) substrates by reactive ion beam sputtering and analyzed to determine composition, phase and microstructure. Erbium is sputtered while maintaining a H{sub 2} partial pressure of 1.4 x 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Growth is conducted at several substrate temperatures between 30 and 500 C. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analyses after deposition show that the H/Er areal density ratio is approximately 3:1 for growth temperatures of 30, 150 and 275 C, while for growth above {approximately}430 C, the ratio of hydrogen to metal is closer to 2:1. However, x-ray diffraction shows that all films have a cubic metal sublattice structure corresponding to that of ErH{sub 2}. RBS and Auger electron that sputtered erbium hydride thin films are relatively free of impurities.

ADAMS,DAVID P.; ROMERO,JUAN A.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; FLORO,JERROLD A.; BANKS,JAMES C.

2000-05-10

332

Hydride-induced embrittlement and fracture in metals—e)ect of stress and temperature distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model for the hydrogen embrittlement of hydride forming metals has been de- veloped. The model takes into account the coupling of the operating physical processes, namely: (i) hydrogen di)usion, (ii) hydride precipitation, (iii) non-mechanical energy 4ow and (iv) hydride=solid-solution deformation. Material damage and crack growth are also simulated by using de-cohesion model, which takes into account the time

A. G. Varias; A. R. Massiha

333

High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications  

PubMed Central

For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanovi?, Borislav

2009-01-01

334

Internal dynamics of complex hydrides of the LBH 4 type  

Microsoft Academic Search

The internal dynamics of complex hydrides of light alkali metals of the LBH4 type (L = Li, Na) with regard for the transitions of the L+ cation between the four energetically equivalent equilibrium positions with respect to the BH\\u000a 4\\u000a ?\\u000a anion is analyzed on the basis of symmetry-group chain methods. A rigorous model for the description of the energy

A. V. Burenin

2004-01-01

335

On X-ray Emission from Highly Loaded Hydrides  

Microsoft Academic Search

X-ray emission (1-2 keV) has been observed in various experiments using electrolytic or plasma methods for loading of hydride targets such as Pd-D to atom ratios > 0.8. Intensities vary from very low-level emission up to laser-like focused beams, depending on experimental conditions(A.G. Lipson et al, JETP Letters, (submitted)). Bremsstralung during thermalization of energetic alphas\\/protons created by nuclear reactions in

George H. Miley; Heinrich Hora; Nie Luo; Andrei Lipson

2004-01-01

336

Ground-state energy and relativistic corrections for positronium hydride  

SciTech Connect

Variational calculations of the ground state of positronium hydride (HPs) are reported, including various expectation values, electron-positron annihilation rates, and leading relativistic corrections to the total and dissociation energies. The calculations have been performed using a basis set of 4000 thoroughly optimized explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions. The relative accuracy of the variational energy upper bound is estimated to be of the order of 2x10{sup -10}, which is a significant improvement over previous nonrelativistic results.

Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

2011-07-15

337

Yttrium and lanthanum hydride films with switchable optical properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

We discovered that yttrium-, lanthanum- and rare earth-hydride films exhibit remarkable optical properties near their metal–insulator transition: the dihydrides are metallic and shiny while the trihydrides are semiconducting and transparent. The transition between the shiny and transparent state is reversible and can simply be induced by changing the H2 gas pressure or the voltage in an electrolytic cell. No deterioration

R Griessen; J. N Huiberts; M Kremers; A. T. M van Gogh; N. J Koeman; J. P Dekker; P. H. L Notten

1997-01-01

338

Pu 2O 3 and the plutonium hydriding process  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of cubic Pu2O3 in the corrosion of PuO2-coated Pu by H2 was investigated. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate that nucleation of hydriding is promoted by formation of Pu2O3 sites in the oxide layer. The nucleation mechanism based on diffusion of hydrogen through the PuO2 layer was evaluated and an alternative mechanism based on formation of catalytic Pu2O3 sites

L. N. Dinh; J. M. Haschke; C. K. Saw; P. G. Allen; W. McLean

2011-01-01

339

Thermodynamic properties of the cubic plutonium hydride solid solution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pressure, temperature, and composition data for the cubic solid solution plutonium hydride phase, PuH\\/sub x\\/, have been measured by microbalance methods. Integral enthalpies and entropies of formation have been evaluated for the composition range 1.90 less than or equal to X less than or equal to 3.00. At 550°K, ..delta..H° \\/sub f\\/(PuH\\/sub x\\/(s)) varies linearly from approximately (-38 +- 1)

Haschke

1981-01-01

340

Mercury Air Pollution Reflected in Ocean Fish  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Mercury Air Pollution Reflected in Ocean Fish, Study Says Concentrations in ... mercury in the open ocean is fallout from air pollution, especially from coal-fired power plants and artisanal ...

341

MERCURY IN AN INSECTIVOROUS BIRD SPECIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Mercury distributions within ecosystems must be examined to determine exposure and risk to wildlife in specific areas. In the current study, we examined exposure and uptake of mercury in nestling prothonotary warblers (protonitaria citrea) inhabiting two National Priority List (...

342

Mercury contamination study for flight system safety  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects and prevention of possible mercury pollution from the failure of solar electric propulsion spacecraft using mercury propellant were studied from tankage loading of post launch trajector injection. During preflight operations and initial flight mode there is little danger of mercury pollution if proper safety precautions are taken. Any spillage on the loading, mating, transportation, or launch pad areas is obvious and can be removed by vacuum cleaning soil and chemical fixing. Mercury spilled on Cape Kennedy ground soil will be chemically complexed and retained by the sandstone subsoil. A cover layer of sand or gravel on spilled mercury which has settled to the bottom of a water body adjacent to the system operation will control and eliminate the formation of toxic organic mercurials. Mercury released into the earth's atmosphere through leakage of a fireball will be diffused to low concentration levels. However, gas phase reactions of mercury with ozone could cause a local ozone depletion and result in serious ecological hazards.

Gorzynski, C. S., Jr.; Maycock, J. N.

1972-01-01

343

MERCURY RESEARCH STRATEGY (WORKSHOP REVIEW DRAFT)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Mercury Research Strategy describes a research program that provides information, methods, models, and data to address key scientific questions of greatest concern to EPA, reducing uncertainties currently limiting the Agency's ability to assess and manage mercury and methylme...

344

Mercury - the hollow planet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mercury is turning out to be a planet characterized by various kinds of endogenous hole (discounting impact craters), which are compared here. These include volcanic vents and collapse features on horizontal scales of tens of km, and smaller scale depressions ('hollows') associated with bright crater-floor deposits (BCFD). The BCFD hollows are tens of metres deep and kilometres or less across and are characteristically flat-floored, with steep, scalloped walls. Their form suggests that they most likely result from removal of surface material by some kind of mass-wasting process, probably associated with volume-loss caused by removal (via sublimation?) of a volatile component. These do not appear to be primarily a result of undermining. Determining the composition of the high-albedo bluish surface coating in BCFDs will be a key goal for BepiColombo instruments such as MIXS (Mercury Imaging Xray Spectrometer). In contrast, collapse features are non-circular rimless pits, typically on crater floors (pit-floor craters), whose morphology suggests collapse into void spaces left by magma withdrawal. This could be by drainage of either erupted lava (or impact melt) or of shallowly-intruded magma. Unlike the much smaller-scale BCFD hollows, these 'collapse pit' features tend to lack extensive flat floors and instead tend to be close to triangular in cross-section with inward slopes near to the critical angle of repose. The different scale and morphology of BCFD hollows and collapse pits argues for quite different modes of origin. However, BCFD hollows adjacent to and within the collapse pit inside Scarlatti crater suggest that the volatile material whose loss was responsible for the growth of the hollows may have been emplaced in association with the magma whose drainage caused the main collapse. Another kind of volcanic collapse can be seen within a 25 km-wide volcanic vent outside the southern rim of the Caloris basin (22.5° N, 146.1° E), on a 28 m/pixel MDIS NAC image from orbit. Although the vent itself may have been excavated partly by explosive volcanism, the most recent event is collapse of a 7 km wide zone in the south centre of the vent. The sharpness of features within this (unmuted either by regolith-forming processes or by fall of volcanic ejecta) suggests that this collapse considerably post-dates the rest of the vent interior. It could reflect a late-stage minor 'throat clearing' explosive eruption, but (in the absence of evidence of associated volcanic ejecta) more likely reflects collapse into a void within the volcanic conduit, itself a result of magma-drainage. A class of 'hole' that is so far conspicuous by its absence on Mercury is sinuous rilles (as opposed to much straighter tectonic grabens) or aligned skylights representing collapsed or partly-collapsed drained lava tubes. Tube-fed flows are to be expected during emplacement of volcanic plains, and it will be surprising if no examples are revealed on MESSENGER and BepiColombo high-resolution images.

Rothery, D. A.

2012-04-01

345

The Reactivity Patterns of Low-Coordinate Iron Hydride Complexes  

PubMed Central

We report a survey of the reactivity of the first isolable iron-hydride complexes with a coordination number less than five. The high-spin iron(II) complexes [(?-diketiminate)Fe(?-H)]2 react rapidly with representative cyanide, isocyanide, alkyne, N2, alkene, diazene, azide, CO2, carbodiimide and Brønsted acid containing substrates. The reaction outcomes fall into three categories: (1) addition of Fe-H across a multiple bond of the substrate, (2) reductive elimination of H2 to form iron(I) products, and (3) protonation of the hydride to form iron(II) products. The products include imide, isocyanide, vinyl, alkyl, azide, triazenido, benzo[c]cinnoline, amidinate, formate, and hydroxo complexes. These results expand the range of known bond transformations at iron complexes. Additionally, they give insight into the elementary transformations that may be possible at the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenases, which may have hydride ligands on high-spin, low coordinate metal atoms. PMID:18444648

Yu, Ying; Sadique, Azwana R.; Smith, Jeremy M.; Dugan, Thomas R.; Cowley, Ryan E.; Brennessel, William W.; Flaschenriem, Christine J.; Bill, Eckhard; Cundari, Thomas R.; Holland, Patrick L.

2008-01-01

346

Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.

Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

2011-04-01

347

Superconductive sodalite-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures  

PubMed Central

Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H2 fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH6 a body-centered cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual “sodalite” cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H2 of electrons donated by Ca forming an “H4” unit as the building block in the construction of the three-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone center. The resultant dynamic Jahn–Teller effect helps to enhance electron–phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH6. A superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of 220–235 K at 150 GPa obtained from the solution of the Eliashberg equations is the highest among all hydrides studied thus far. PMID:22492976

Wang, Hui; Tse, John S.; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

2012-01-01

348

Delayed hydride cracking of spent fuel rods in dry storage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Failures of zirconium alloy cladding tubes during a long-term storage at room temperature were first reported by Simpson and Ells in 1974, which remains unresolved by the old delayed hydride cracking (DHC) models. Using our new DHC model, we examined failures of cladding tubes after their storage at room temperature. Stress-induced hydride phase transformation from ? to ? at a crack tip creates a difference in hydrogen concentration between the bulk region and the crack tip due to a higher hydrogen solubility of the ?-hydride, which is a driving force for DHC at low temperatures. Accounting for our new DHC model and the failures of zirconium alloy cladding tubes during long-term storage at room temperature, we suggest that the spent fuel rods to be stored either in an isothermal condition or in a slow cooling condition would fail by DHC during their dry storage upon cooling to below 180 °C. Further works are recommended to establish DHC failure criterion for the spent fuel rods that are being stored in dry storage.

Kim, Young Suk

2008-08-01

349

Structure and properties of complex hydride perovskite materials  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Perovskite materials host an incredible variety of functionalities. Although the lightest element, hydrogen, is rarely encountered in oxide perovskite lattices, it was recently observed as the hydride anion H?, substituting for the oxide anion in BaTiO3. Here we present a series of 30 new complex hydride perovskite-type materials, based on the non-spherical tetrahydroborate anion BH4? and new synthesis protocols involving rare-earth elements. Photophysical, electronic and hydrogen storage properties are discussed, along with counterintuitive trends in structural behaviour. The electronic structure is investigated theoretically with density functional theory solid-state calculations. BH4-specific anion dynamics are introduced to perovskites, mediating mechanisms that freeze lattice instabilities and generate supercells of up to 16 × the unit cell volume in AB(BH4)3. In this view, homopolar hydridic di-hydrogen contacts arise as a potential tool with which to tailor crystal symmetries, thus merging concepts of molecular chemistry with ceramic-like host lattices. Furthermore, anion mixing BH4??X? (X?=Cl?, Br?, I?) provides a link to the known ABX3 halides.

Schouwink, Pascal; Ley, Morten B.; Tissot, Antoine; Hagemann, Hans; Jensen, Torben R.; Smr?ok, ?ubomír; ?erný, Radovan

2014-12-01

350

Structure and properties of complex hydride perovskite materials.  

PubMed

Perovskite materials host an incredible variety of functionalities. Although the lightest element, hydrogen, is rarely encountered in oxide perovskite lattices, it was recently observed as the hydride anion H(-), substituting for the oxide anion in BaTiO3. Here we present a series of 30 new complex hydride perovskite-type materials, based on the non-spherical tetrahydroborate anion BH4(-) and new synthesis protocols involving rare-earth elements. Photophysical, electronic and hydrogen storage properties are discussed, along with counterintuitive trends in structural behaviour. The electronic structure is investigated theoretically with density functional theory solid-state calculations. BH4-specific anion dynamics are introduced to perovskites, mediating mechanisms that freeze lattice instabilities and generate supercells of up to 16 × the unit cell volume in AB(BH4)3. In this view, homopolar hydridic di-hydrogen contacts arise as a potential tool with which to tailor crystal symmetries, thus merging concepts of molecular chemistry with ceramic-like host lattices. Furthermore, anion mixing BH4(-)?X(-) (X(-)=Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) provides a link to the known ABX3 halides. PMID:25490884

Schouwink, Pascal; Ley, Morten B; Tissot, Antoine; Hagemann, Hans; Jensen, Torben R; Smr?ok, Lubomír; Cerný, Radovan

2014-01-01

351

Uranium metal reactions with hydrogen and water vapour and the reactivity of the uranium hydride produced  

SciTech Connect

Within the nuclear industry, metallic uranium has been used as a fuel. If this metal is stored in a hydrogen rich environment then the uranium metal can react with the hydrogen to form uranium hydride which can be pyrophoric when exposed to air. The UK National Nuclear Laboratory has been carrying out a programme of research for Sellafield Limited to investigate the conditions required for the formation and persistence of uranium hydride and the reactivity of the material formed. The experimental results presented here have described new results characterising uranium hydride formed from bulk uranium at 50 and 160 C. degrees and measurements of the hydrolysis kinetics of these materials in liquid water. It has been shown that there is an increase in the proportion of alpha-uranium hydride in material formed at lower temperatures and that there is an increase in the rate of reaction with water of uranium hydride formed at lower temperatures. This may at least in part be attributable to a difference in the reaction rate between alpha and beta-uranium hydride. A striking observation is the strong dependence of the hydrolysis reaction rate on the temperature of preparation of the uranium hydride. For example, the reaction rate of uranium hydride prepared at 50 C. degrees was over ten times higher than that prepared at 160 C. degrees at 20% extent of reaction. The decrease in reaction rate with the extent of reaction also depended on the temperature of uranium hydride preparation.

Godfrey, H. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Workington Laboratory, Havelock Road, Derwent Howe, Cumbria, CA14 3YQ (United Kingdom); Broan, C.; Goddard, D.; Hodge, N.; Woodhouse, G. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Preston Laboratory, Springfields, Salwick, Preston, Lancashire, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Diggle, A. [Sellafield Limited, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Orr, R. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01

352

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOEpatents

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, Clay E. (Knoxville, TN); Vass, Arpad A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01

353

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

DOEpatents

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate the mercury to the amalgamating metal; removing the metallic source from the mercury-contaminated matrix; and heating the metallic source to vaporize the mercury in a closed system to capture the mercury vapors.

Easterly, C.E.; Vass, A.A.; Tyndall, R.L.

1997-01-28

354

Removal of mercury from chloralkali electrolysis wastewater by a mercury-resistant Pseudomonas putida strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mercury-resistant bacterial strain which is able to reduce ionic mercury to metallic mercury was used to remediate in laboratory columns mercury-containing wastewater produced during electrolytic production of chlorine. Factory effluents from several chloralkali plants in Europe were analyzed, and these effluents contained total mercury concentrations between 1.6 and 7.6 mg\\/liter and high chloride concentrations and had pH values which

H. von Canstein; Y. Li; K. N. Timmis; W.-D. DECKWER; I. Wagner-Doebler

1999-01-01

355

Ballistic Mercury orbiter mission via Venus and Mercury gravity assists  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper shows that it is possible to deliver a payload of 600 to 2000 kg to a 300-km circular orbit at Mercury, using the presently available NASA STS and a single-stage bipropellant chemical rocket. This superior payload performance is attained by swingbys of Venus, plus more importantly, the use of the reverse Delta-V/EGA process. In contrast to the familiar Delta-V/EGA process used to boost the launch energy by returning to earth for a gravity assist, the reverse process reduces the Mercury approach energy each time a spacecraft makes a near-resonant return to Mercury for a gravity assist and reduces the orbit-capture Delta-V requirement. The mission sequences for such high-performance missions are described, and example mission opportunities for the years 1990 to 2010 are presented.

Yen, Chen-Wan Liu

1989-09-01

356

REPLACE YOUR MERCURY THERMOMETERS BEFORE THEY BREAK!  

E-print Network

alternatives that are safe and less toxic. Mercury Thermometers · Mercury thermometers eventually break thermometer can detectably pollute 5 million gallons of San Francisco Bay water. Non-Mercury Thermometers waste. For more information please call: 723-1308 See our web site at www.stanford.edu/dept/EHS #12;

357

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Barometer means an instrument...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2012-07-01

358

3, 35253541, 2003 Modelling of Mercury  

E-print Network

ACPD 3, 3525­3541, 2003 Modelling of Mercury with the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model J. H and Physics Discussions Modelling of mercury with the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model J. H. Christensen, J Correspondence to: J. H. Christensen (jc@dmu.dk) 3525 #12;ACPD 3, 3525­3541, 2003 Modelling of Mercury

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

359

2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance  

E-print Network

© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Delivered Performance Predictions and Trends for RISC Applications Luke Cico (lcico@mc.com) Mark Merritt (mmerritt@mc.com) Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Chelmsford, MA 01824 #12;© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Goals of PresentationGoals of Presentation

Kepner, Jeremy

360

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury  

E-print Network

Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury Noelle Eckley Selin *Reprinted from Mercury in the Environment: Pattern and Process (Chapter 5) pp. 73-80 Copyright © 2012 with kind, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury NOELLE ECKLEY SELIN and their distribution in the atmosphere. This includes

361

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Definitions . The definitions...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2010-07-01

362

Mercury Chamber NF-IDS Meeting  

E-print Network

Mercury Chamber Update V. Graves NF-IDS Meeting October 4, 2011 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury Chamber Update Oct 2011 Starting Point: Coil and Shielding Concept IDS120H #12;3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Mercury Chamber Update Oct 2011

McDonald, Kirk

363

Mercury: Recovering Forgotten Passwords Using Personal Devices  

E-print Network

Mercury: Recovering Forgotten Passwords Using Personal Devices Mohammad Mannan1 , David Barrera2, and to allow forgotten passwords to be securely restored, we present a scheme called Mercury. Its primary mode and revealed to the user. A prototype implementation of Mercury is available as an Android application. 1

Van Oorschot, Paul

364

Mercury and selenium interaction: A review  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews studies on mercury and selenium interaction. It includes the effects of selenium on mercury toxicity on the organism, organ\\/tissue, and subcellular levels. The paper also touches on possible mechanisms for the protective action of selenium against mercury toxicity and deals briefly with the synergism between the two elements. 71 references.

M. L. Cuvin-Aralar; R. W. Furness

1991-01-01

365

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Barometer means an instrument...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2013-07-01

366

2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Data Reorganization  

E-print Network

© 2003 Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Data Reorganization Interface (DRI) Data Reorganization Interface (DRI) Kenneth Cain Jr. Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. High Performance Embedded Computing (HPEC Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. Status update for the DRI-1.0 standard since Sep. 2002 publication Outline

Kepner, Jeremy

367

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition  

E-print Network

Constraining Mercury Oxidation Using Wet Deposition Noelle E. Selin and Christopher D. Holmes mercury oxidation [Selin & Jacob, Atmos. Env. 2008] 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 60 90 120 150 30 Influences on Mercury Wet Deposition · Hg wet dep = f(precipitation, [Hg(II)+Hg(P)]) Correlation (r2) between

Selin, Noelle Eckley

368

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Barometer means an instrument...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2014-07-01

369

Mercury Thermometer Replacements in Chemistry Laboratories  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The consequences of broken mercury-in-glass thermometers in academic laboratories results in various health and environmental hazards, which needs to be replaced, by long-stem digital thermometers and non-mercury glass thermometers. The factors that should be considered during the mercury replacement process are types of applications in the…

Foster, Barbara L.

2005-01-01

370

40 CFR 721.10068 - Elemental mercury.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Elemental mercury. 721.10068 Section 721.10068...Substances § 721.10068 Elemental mercury. (a) Definitions . The definitions...1) The chemical substance elemental mercury (CAS. No. 7439-97-6) is...

2011-07-01

371

What's all the Fuss about Mercury?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mercury tends to vaporize when exposed to air. The warmer the air, the more quickly it vaporizes. Although swallowing mercury can be a problem, the greater risk results from inhalation and skin absorption. Symptoms and health-related problems can result within hours of exposure. Spilled mercury settles in cracks and absorbent material such as…

Roy, Ken

2004-01-01

372

Ecological effects of mercury in aquatic ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

As a result of former mining operations, roughly 100 tons of mercury were released into Clear Lake, California. In 1992 the authors conducted a baseline survey designed to evaluate the levels and potential effects of mercury within this aquatic ecosystem. Both surficial sediments and cores confirm a clear exponential decline in total mercury and methyl mercury as a function of distance from the mine site. The ratio of methyl/total mercury in surficial sediments, however, increases exponentially as a function of distance from the mine. Declines in total mercury in water were not as steep as for sediments. Plankton, oligochaetes and chironomids also exhibited exponential declines in total mercury but not methyl mercury as a function of distance from the mine. Patterns of invertebrate population and community level parameters will be discussed in relation to mercury and other potential pollutants. Fish showed increasing mercury levels with increasing body size and the following species specific differences: carp < silversides < channel catfish < largemouth bass. Some higher than expected levels of methyl mercury were found at sites distant from the mine. An hypothesis to explain these methyl mercury distributions as a function of bioavailability will be presented.

Suchanek, T.H.; Richerson, P.J. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Division of Environmental Studies

1994-12-31

373

MODELING MERCURY CONTROL WITH POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON  

EPA Science Inventory

The paper presents a mathematical model of total mercury removed from the flue gas at coal-fired plants equipped with powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection for Mercury control. The developed algorithms account for mercury removal by both existing equipment and an added PAC in...

374

Influence of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Due to the absence of an atmosphere and proximity to the Sun, Mercury's surface temperature varies laterally by several 100s K, even when averaged over long time periods. The dominant variation in time-averaged surface T occurs from pole to equator (~225 K) [1]. The resonant relationship between Mercury's orbit and rotation results in a smaller longitudinal variation (~100 K) [1]. Here we demonstrate, using models of mantle convection in a 3-D spherical shell, that this stationary lateral variation in surface temperature has a small but significant influence on mantle convection and on the lateral variation of heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB). We evaluate the possible observational signature of this laterally-varying convection in terms of boundary topography, stress distribution, gravity and moment of inertia tensor. We furthermore test whether the lateral variation in CMB flux is capable of driving a thermal wind dynamo, i.e., weak dynamo action with no internally-driven core convective motions. For Mercury's mantle we assume a dry olivine rheology including both diffusion creep and disclocation creep with rheological parameters such as activation energy and volume taken from the synthesis of [2]. We assume decaying radiogenic heat sources with the same concentration as in the bulk silicate Earth, and a parameterised model of core cooling. The models are run for 4.5 Ga from a relatively hot initial state with random initial perturbations. We use the code StagYY, which uses a finite-volume discretization on a spherical yin-yang grid and a multigrid solver [3]. Results in spherical axisymmetric geometry, compare a case with constant surface temperature to one with a latitude-dependent surface temperature. The system forms about 3 convection cells from pole to equator. Although the results look similar to first order, in the latitude-dependent case the convection is noticably more sluggish and colder towards the pole. In CMB flux, both cases display large oscillations due to convection cells. A pole-to-equator trend is superimposed on this for the case with laterally-varying surface temperature. Although the amplitude of this long-wavelength variation is smaller than that of the within-cell variation, its long-wavelength nature might be effective in driving thermal winds in the core. Results in a full 3-D spherical shell indicate that convection adopts a cellular structure with a polygonal network of downwellings and plume-like upwellings, as is usually obtained for stagnant lid convection, for example, in the recent 3-D spherical Mercury models of [4]. This is in notable contrast to the models of [5], in which linear upwellings were obtained. This difference could be because the initial perturbations used by [5] used a small number of low-order spherical harmonics, i.e., a long-wavelength pattern with particular symmetries, whereas our initial perturbations are random white noise. The origin of this difference requires further investigation. The pattern of CMB heat flux shows a strong l=2, m=0 pattern, again with superimposed small-scale variations due to convection cells. The surface geoid displays an very dominant (2,0) pattern, which would be a strong diagnostic of this behaviour. These models are being further analysed for boundary topography and stress distribution. Models of planetary dynamos have traditionally depended upon the concept that secular cooling and internal radioactive decay are responsible for genererating convective fluid motions within the core [e.g. 6]. Some models, of Earth's dynamo in particular, also include thermal winds --shear flows driven by heat flux variations along the core-mantle boundary -- that modify the dynamo process [e.g. 7]. We have now shown, following the work of [8], that thermal winds themselves are capable of driving dynamo action in planetary cores (Fig. 4). In fully self-consistent, three-dimensional models, we find that thermal wind dynamos do not require a net heat flux to emanate from the core and can operate even when the core fluid is neutrally stratifie

Tackley, P. J.; Aurnou, J. M.; Aubert, J.

2009-04-01

375

Radar Imagery of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radar observations of Mercury have yielded important results including the discovery of the 3:2 spin:orbit resonance [1] discovery of distinct large surface roughness features [2] measurement of the perihelion advance (as a test of general relativity) [3] ephemeris improvements [4] information on shape [5] topography [6] and more recent constraints on the spin and orbit state [7]. But perhaps the most stunning discoveries have come from mapping experiments made possible by the Goldstone/VLA radarand improvements in the Random Long Code techniques in monostatic experiments [8]. These experiments provide maps of radar reflectivity across most of the visible disk of the planet and have been used to infer the presence of polar ices and large fresh impact craters among other features [9]. We will present a summary of the knowledge gained from these radar mapping observations recent results and plans for future experiments. [1] Dyce et al. 1967. [2] Zohar & Goldstein 1974. [3] Anderson et al. 1991. [4] Jurgens et al. 1998. [5] Anderson et al. 1996. [6] Harmon et al. 1986; Slade et al. 1997. [7] Margot et al. 2002. [8] Muhleman et al. 1995; Harmon 2002. [9] Butler et al. 1993; Harmon et al. 2001; Harmon 1997.

Butler, Bryan J.; Harmon, John K.; Slade, Martin A.

376

Synthesis of Highly Active Mg-BASED Hydrides Using Hydriding Combustion Synthesis and NbF5 Additives  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Superiority of the hydriding combustion (HC) technique over conventional metallurgical approach to the synthesis of cost-effective Mg based hydrides, which show promise as hydrogen storage materials, is well known. In the present research, we report further improvements in HC prepared Mg-based materials, achieved by optimizing the preparative parameters of HC and by catalytic addition. Mg90-Ni60-C40 composites prepared using optimized processing parameters were ball-milled with NbF5 (10 h) and characterized for their micro-structural and hydriding properties. The ball-milled/catalyzed powder showed decreased crystallinity with CNTs on its surfaces. Surface area of the ball-milled powder decreased to almost half of the as-HC powder, while TG analysis revealed a four-fold decrease in the desorption temperature of the milled powder compared to that of the as-HC prepared powder. Activated samples achieved the maximum absorption/desorption limits (5.3 wt.%) at as low as 100°C, underlining the possibility of the use of these materials in portable hydrogen storage devices.

Chourashiya, M. G.; Park, C. N.; Park, C. J.

2012-09-01

377

Multiscale magnetic turbulence at Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A set of statistical-physical tools is used to investigate multiscale magnetic field fluctuations recorded by MESSENGER spacecraft in the near-Mercury space environment, with the emphasis on key boundary regions participating in the solar wind - magnetosphere interaction. The analysis reveals the presence of a highly turbulent and extended foreshock system filled with packets of ULF oscillations and active current sheets, broad-band intermittent fluctuations in the magnetosheath, ion-kinetic turbulence in the central plasma sheet of Mercury's magnetotail, and kinetic-scale fluctuations in the inner current sheet encountered at the outbound (dawn side) magnetopause. The obtained statistics suggest that turbulence at this planet is strongly affected by non-MHD effects introduced by finite sizes of cyclotron orbits of the constituting ion species. Physical mechanisms of these effects and their influence on the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetic field remain to be clarified.

Uritsky, Vadim; Slavin, James; Boardsen, Scott; Sundberg, Torbjorn; Raines, James; Gershman, Daniel; Zurbuchen, Thomas; Khazanov, George; Anderson, Brian; Korth, Haje

2014-05-01

378

Combining Electronic Structure Methods with the Calculation of Hydrogen Vibrational Wavefunctions: Application to Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase  

E-print Network

: Application to Hydride Transfer in Liver Alcohol Dehydrogenase Simon P. Webb, Pratul K. Agarwal, and Sharon of benzyl alcohol catalyzed by liver alcohol dehydrogenase (LADH). The hydride transfer from the benzyl

Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

379

Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

2011-01-01

380

Anthropogenic mercury emissions in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An inventory of mercury emissions from anthropogenic activities in China is compiled for the year 1999 from official statistical data. We estimate that China's emissions were 536 (±236) t of total mercury. This value includes open biomass burning, but does not include natural sources or re-emission of previously deposited mercury. Approximately 45% of the Hg comes from non-ferrous metals smelting, 38% from coal combustion, and 17% from miscellaneous activities, of which battery and fluorescent lamp production and cement production are the largest. Emissions are heaviest in Liaoning and Guangdong Provinces, where extensive smelting occurs, and in Guizhou Province, where there is much small-scale combustion of high-Hg coal without emission control devices. Emissions are gridded at 30×30 min spatial resolution. We estimate that 56% of the Hg in China is released as Hg 0, 32% as Hg 2+, and 12% as Hg p. Particulate mercury emissions are high in China due to heavy burning of coal in residential and small industrial settings without PM controls. Emissions of Hg 2+ from coal-fired power plants are high due to the absence of flue-gas desulfurization units, which tend to dissolve the soluble divalent mercury. Metals smelting operations favor the production of elemental mercury. Much of the Hg is released from small-scale activities in rather remote areas, and therefore the activity levels are quite uncertain. Also, emissions test data for Chinese sources are lacking, causing uncertainties in Hg emission factors and removal efficiencies. Overall, we calculate an uncertainty level of ±44% (95% confidence interval) in the estimate of total emissions. We recommend field testing of coal combustors and smelters in China to improve the accuracy of these estimates.

Streets, David G.; Hao, Jiming; Wu, Ye; Jiang, Jingkun; Chan, Melissa; Tian, Hezhong; Feng, Xinbin

381

The three modern faces of mercury.  

PubMed Central

The three modern "faces" of mercury are our perceptions of risk from the exposure of billions of people to methyl mercury in fish, mercury vapor from amalgam tooth fillings, and ethyl mercury in the form of thimerosal added as an antiseptic to widely used vaccines. In this article I review human exposure to and the toxicology of each of these three species of mercury. Mechanisms of action are discussed where possible. Key gaps in our current knowledge are identified from the points of view both of risk assessment and of mechanisms of action. PMID:11834460

Clarkson, Thomas W

2002-01-01

382

Shepard Hoisted from Mercury Capsule  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A U.S. Marine helicopter recovery team hoists astronaut Alan Shepard from his Mercury spacecraft after a successful flight and splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean. On May 5th 1961, Alan B. Shepard Jr. became the first American to fly into space. His Freedom 7 Mercury capsule flew a suborbital trajectory lasting 15 minutes 22 seconds. His spacecraft landed in the Atlantic Ocean where he and his capsule were recovered by helicopter and transported to the awaiting aircraft carrier U.S.S. Lake Champlain.

1961-01-01

383

Apparatus for control of mercury  

DOEpatents

A method and apparatus for reducing mercury in industrial gases such as the flue gas produced by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal adds hydrogen sulfide to the flue gas in or just before a scrubber of the industrial process which contains the wet scrubber. The method and apparatus of the present invention is applicable to installations employing either wet or dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization systems. The present invention uses kraft green liquor as a source for hydrogen sulfide and/or the injection of mineral acids into the green liquor to release vaporous hydrogen sulfide in order to form mercury sulfide solids.

Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Bailey, Ralph T. (Uniontown, OH)

2001-01-01

384

Combined on-board hydride slurry storage and reactor system and process for hydrogen-powered vehicles and devices  

DOEpatents

An on-board hydride storage system and process are described. The system includes a slurry storage system that includes a slurry reactor and a variable concentration slurry. In one preferred configuration, the storage system stores a slurry containing a hydride storage material in a carrier fluid at a first concentration of hydride solids. The slurry reactor receives the slurry containing a second concentration of the hydride storage material and releases hydrogen as a fuel to hydrogen-power devices and vehicles.

Brooks, Kriston P; Holladay, Jamelyn D; Simmons, Kevin L; Herling, Darrell R

2014-11-18

385

Global Mercury Pathways in the Arctic Ecosystem  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The sudden depletions of atmospheric mercury which occur during the Arctic spring are believed to involve oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury, Hg(0), rendering it less volatile and more soluble. The Hg(II) oxidation product(s) are more susceptible to deposition, consistent with the observation of dramatic increases in snow mercury levels during depletion events. Temporal correlations with ozone depletion events and the proliferation of BrO radicals support the hypothesis that oxidation of Hg(0) occurs in the gas phase and results in its conversion to RGM (Reactive Gaseous Mercury). The mechanisms of Hg(0) oxidation and particularly Hg(II) reduction are as yet unproven. In order to evaluate the feasibility of proposed chemical processes involving mercury in the Arctic atmosphere and its pathway after deposition on the snow from the air, we investigated mercury speciation in air and snow pack at Resolute, Nunavut, Canada (latitude 75° N) prior to and during snow melt during spring 2003. Quantitative, real-time information on emission, air transport and deposition were combined with experimental studies of the distribution and concentrations of different mercury species, methyl mercury, anions, total organic carbon and total inorganic carbon in snow samples. The effect of solar radiation and photoreductants on mercury in snow samples was also investigated. In this work, we quantify mercury removed from the air, and deposited on the snow and the transformation to inorganic and methyl mercury.

Lahoutifard, N.; Lean, D.

2003-12-01

386

Interpreting hair mercury levels in individual patients.  

PubMed

Evaluation of mercury exposure in an individual patient ideally includes the presenting history, physical examination, consideration of the differential diagnosis, and mercury analysis of blood and urine specimens. Analysis of mercury in hair specimens may supply useful supplemental information about exposure to organic compounds such as methylmercury, particularly to help reconstruct the pattern of prior exposure. The most appropriate specimen is generally terminal-type hair from the occipital-neck junction, clamped to maintain strand alignment, and oriented to the scalp. Hair from the initial 0.5 cm adjacent to the scalp represents on average 1-3 wk before collection, and consideration of the time frame represented by the specimen is an important part of the evaluation. Literature reports describe hair mercury levels as high as 2400 microg/g. Hair mercury level is usually <1 microg/g in individuals who do not eat fish but may be >30 microg/g in those who frequently consume fish with high mercury content. Hair mercury level is often not correlated with blood mercury concentration or symptoms of mercury toxicity, and reports of hair contamination by exogenous mercury are not uncommon. Hair mercury level is notoriously prone to misinterpretation and should be used with an understanding of its limitations. PMID:16951265

Nuttall, Kern L

2006-01-01

387

Cases of mercury exposure, bioavailability, and absorption.  

PubMed

Mercury is a unique element that, unlike many metals, has no essential biological function. It is liquid at room temperature and is 13.6 times heavier than water. Its unique physical properties have been exploited for a variety of uses such as in mercury switches, thermostats, thermometers, and other instruments. Its ability to amalgamate with gold and silver are used in mining these precious metals and as a dental restorative. Its toxic properties have been exploited for medications, preservatives, antiseptics, and pesticides. For these reasons there have been many industrial uses of mercury, and occupational exposures of workers and industrial emissions and effluents contaminating air, water, soil, and ultimately food chains have long been a matter of great public health concern. This paper examines briefly six cases representing various forms of exposure to different species of mercury, and indicates the methodological issues in estimating exposure, bioavailability and absorption; these cases include Minamata disease in Japan, organic mercury poisoning in Iraq, methylmercury (MeHg) exposure in the Amazon, dimethylmercury (PMM) in the laboratory, an elemental mercury spill in Cajamarca, Peru, and a mercury-contaminated building in Hoboken, NJ, USA. Other scenarios that are not described include occupational exposure to mercury salts, mercurial preservatives in vaccines, cultural and ritualistic uses of mercury, and mercury in dental amalgams. PMID:12915150

Gochfeld, Michael

2003-09-01

388

Worldwide trend of atmospheric mercury since 1995  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concern about the adverse effects of mercury on human health and ecosystems has led to tightening emission controls since the mid 1980s. But the resulting mercury emissions reductions in many parts of the world are believed to be offset or even surpassed by the increasing emissions in rapidly industrializing countries. Consequently, concentrations of atmospheric mercury are expected to remain roughly constant. Here we show that the worldwide atmospheric mercury concentrations have decreased by about 20 to 38 % since 1996 as indicated by long-term monitoring at stations in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres combined with intermittent measurements of latitudinal distribution over the Atlantic Ocean. The total reduction of the atmospheric mercury burden of this magnitude within 14 years is unusually large among most atmospheric trace gases and is at odds with the current mercury emission inventories with nearly constant anthropogenic emissions over this period. This suggests a major shift in the biogeochemical cycle of mercury including oceans and soil reservoirs. Decreasing reemissions from the legacy of historical mercury emissions are the most likely explanation for this decline since the hypothesis of an accelerated oxidation rate of elemental mercury in the atmosphere is not supported by the observed trends of other trace gases. Acidification of oceans, climate change, excess nutrient input and pollution may also contribute by their impact on the biogeochemistry of ocean and soils. Consequently, models of the atmospheric mercury cycle have to include soil and ocean mercury pools and their dynamics to be able to make projections of future trends.

Slemr, F.; Brunke, E.-G.; Ebinghaus, R.; Kuss, J.

2011-05-01

389

Worldwide trend of atmospheric mercury since 1995  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concern about the adverse effects of mercury on human health and ecosystems has led to tightening emission controls since the mid 1980s. But the resulting mercury emissions reductions in many parts of the world are believed to be offset or even surpassed by the increasing emissions in rapidly industrializing countries. Consequently, concentrations of atmospheric mercury are expected to remain roughly constant. Here we show that the worldwide atmospheric mercury concentration have decreased by about 20 to 38% since 1996 as indicated by long term monitoring at stations in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres combined with intermittent measurements of latitudinal distribution over the Atlantic Ocean. The total reduction of the atmospheric mercury burden of this magnitude within 14 yrs is unprecedented among most of atmospheric trace gases and is at odds with the current mercury emission inventories with nearly constant emissions over the period. It suggests a major shift in the biogeochemical cycle of mercury including oceans and soil reservoirs. Decreasing reemissions from the legacy of historical mercury emissions are the most likely explanation for this decline since the hypothesis of an accelerated oxidation rate of elemental mercury in the atmosphere is not supported by the observed trends of other trace gases. Consequently, models of the atmospheric mercury cycle have to include soil and ocean mercury pools and their dynamics to be able to make projections of future trends.

Slemr, F.; Brunke, E.-G.; Ebinghaus, R.; Kuss, J.

2011-01-01

390

Synthesis, Structure, and Electronic Properties of Monomeric and Dimeric Trispyrazolylborate Platinum(II) Hydride Complexes  

E-print Network

Platinum(II) Hydride Complexes Stefan Reinartz, Mu-Hyun Baik, Peter S. White, Maurice Brookhart cationic platinum(II) monohydride complexes of the type [2-((Hpz*)BHpz*2)Pt- (H)(L)][BAr4] [L ) MeCN (4 and spectroscopic features. Dimeric hydride- bridged platinum complexes in particular have been extensively studied

Baik, Mu-Hyun

391

Opening of a Post Doctoral Position Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications  

E-print Network

Opening of a Post Doctoral Position Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications, Nanotechnology and Microsystems of the National Center for Scientific Research "Demokritos", is seeking on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage applications in connection with the « Fast, reliable and cost

392

FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: ;\\u000a1)\\u0009Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs

Ehud Greenspan; Neil Todreas; Temitope Taiwo

2009-01-01

393

Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides  

DOEpatents

A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2008-06-10

394

ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES  

E-print Network

397 ANALYSIS OF THE ELECTRON EXCITATION SPECTRA IN HEAVY RARE EARTH METALS, HYDRIDES AND OXIDES C thin evaporated foils of heavy rare earths (Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in three different chemical states (metal, hydride and oxide) exhibit two main peaks due to collective « plasmon » excitations

Boyer, Edmond

395

Mercury biogeochemistry: Paradigm shifts, outstanding issues and research needs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Half a century of mercury research has provided scientists and policy makers with a detailed understanding of mercury toxicology, biogeochemical cycling and past and future impacts on human exposure. The complexity of the global biogeochemical mercury cycle has led to repeated and ongoing paradigm shifts in numerous mercury-related disciplines and outstanding questions remain. In this review, we highlight some of the paradigm shifts and questions on mercury toxicity, the risks and benefits of seafood consumption, the source of mercury in seafood, and the Arctic mercury cycle. We see a continued need for research on mercury toxicology and epidemiology, for marine mercury dynamics and ecology, and for a closer collaboration between observational mercury science and mercury modeling in general. As anthropogenic mercury emissions are closely tied to the energy cycle (in particular coal combustion), mercury exposure to humans and wildlife are likely to persist unless drastic emission reductions are put in place.

Sonke, Jeroen E.; Heimbürger, Lars-Eric; Dommergue, Aurélien

2013-05-01

396

Abatement of Gas-Phase Mercury—Recent Developments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Among various pollutants, mercury has a significant impact on the environment, human beings, and wildlife with its different forms, namely, elemental mercury (Hg), oxidized mercury (Hg), and particle-bound mercury (Hgp). Mercury dispersions mainly occur from coal burning, which is the world's major energy source. Among the three forms, Hg and Hgp are relatively easy to remove from the flue gas

Benjaram M. Reddy; Naga Durgasri; Thallada Vinod Kumar; Suresh K. Bhargava

2012-01-01

397

Isotopic Fractionation of Mercury in Great Lakes Precipitation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury (Hg) is a hazardous bioaccumulative neurotoxin, and atmospheric deposition is a primary way in which mercury enters terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. However, the chemical processes and transport regimes that mercury undergoes from emission to deposition are not well understood. Thus the use of mercury isotopes to characterize the biogeochemical cycling of mercury is a rapidly growing area of study.

L. E. Gratz; G. J. Keeler; J. D. Blum; L. S. Sherman

2009-01-01

398

Influences on Mercury Bioaccumulation Factors for the Savannah River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads) are a regulatory instrument designed to reduce the amount of mercury entering a water body and ultimately to control the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish. TMDLs are based on a BAF (bioaccumulation factor), which is the ratio of methyl mercury in fish to dissolved methyl mercury in water. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous

Paller

2003-01-01

399

Influences on Mercury Bioaccumulation Factors for the Savannah River  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury TMDLs (Total Maximum Daily Loads) are a regulatory instrument designed to reduce the amount of mercury entering a water body and ultimately to control the bioaccumulation of mercury in fish. TMDLs are based on a BAF (bioaccumulation factor), which is the ratio of methyl mercury in fish to dissolved methyl mercury in water. Analysis of fish tissue and aqueous

M. H. Paller; J. A. Bowers; J. W. Littrell; A. V. Guanlao

2004-01-01

400

Hydride-phase formation and its influence on fatigue crack propagationbehavior in a Zircaloy-4 alloy  

SciTech Connect

The hydride-phase formation and its influence on the fatigue behavior of a Zircaloy-4 alloy charged with hydrogen gas are investigated. First, the microstructure and fatigue crack propagation rate of the alloy in the as-received condition are studied. Second, the formation and homogeneous distribution of delta zirconium hydride ( -ZrH2) in the bulk, and its effect on the fatigue crack propagation rate are presented. The results show that in the presence of hydrides the zirconium alloy exhibits reduced toughness and enhanced crack growth rates. Finally, the influence of a pre-existing fatigue crack in the specimen and the subsequent hydride formation were investigated. The residual lattice strain profile around the fatigue crack tip was measured using neutron diffraction. The combined effects of residual strains and hydride precipitation on the fatigue behavior are discussed.

Garlea, Elena [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Choo, H. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, G Y [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Clausen, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brown, D. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Park, Jae-Sung [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rack, P. D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2010-01-01

401

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by hydride formation  

SciTech Connect

Analytical and numerical models of uranium ignition assisted by the oxidation of uranium hydride are described. The models were developed to demonstrate that ignition of large uranium ingots could not occur as a result of possible hydride formation during storage. The thermodynamics-based analytical model predicted an overall 17 C temperature rise of the ingot due to hydride oxidation upon opening of the storage can in air. The numerical model predicted locally higher temperature increases at the surface; the transient temperature increase quickly dissipated. The numerical model was further used to determine conditions for which hydride oxidation does lead to ignition of uranium metal. Room temperature ignition only occurs for high hydride fractions in the nominally oxide reaction product and high specific surface areas of the uranium metal.

Totemeier, T.C.; Hayes, S.L. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Engineering Div.

1996-05-01

402

Developmental study of mercury effects on the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster)  

PubMed Central

Environmental pollution caused by heavy metals such as mercury is one of the most important human problems. It might have severe teratogenic effects on embryonic development. Some pharmacological and physiological aspects of fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) are similar to humans. So the stages of egg to adult fruit fly, as a developmental model, were employed in the study. Wild adult insects were maintained in glass dishes containing standard medium at 25 °C in complete darkness. Five pairs of 3-day old flies were then transferred to standard culture dishes containing different concentrations of mercury ion. They were removed after 8 hours. We considered the following: The rate of larvae becoming pupae and pupae to adults; the time required for the development; the hatching rate in the second generation without mercury in the culture; the morphometric changes during development in both length and width of the eggs through two generations; larvae, pupae and adult thorax length and width. The results showed that mercury in culture (20–100 mg/l) increase the duration of larvae (p<0.01) and pupae (p<0.01) development, the rate of larvae becoming pupae (p<0.001); pupae maturation (p<0.05), the hatching rate (p<0.01), the length (p<0.05) and width of larvae (p<0.01) and pupae (p<0.001) and the length in the adult thorax (p<0.01) decreased significantly. There was no effect upon the size of eggs. There were also no larvae hatching in concentrations of 200 mg/l of mercury. Negative effects of mercury as a heavy metal are possibly due to the interference of this metal in cellular signaling pathways, such as: Notch signaling and protein synthesis during the period of development. Since it bonds chemically with the sulfur hydride groups of proteins, it causes damage to the cell membrane and decreases the amount of RNA. This is the cause of failure of many enzyme mechanisms. PMID:24170977

Abnoos, Hamideh; Mahdavi-shahri, Naser; Haddad, Farhang; Jalal, Razieh

2013-01-01

403

ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen storage is one of the greatest challenges for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods; the direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

Fewox, C; Ragaiy Zidan, R; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B

2008-12-31

404

ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen storage is one of the challenges to be overcome for implementing the ever sought hydrogen economy. Here we report a novel cycle to reversibly form high density hydrogen storage materials such as aluminium hydride. Aluminium hydride (AlH{sub 3}, alane) has a hydrogen storage capacity of 10.1 wt% H{sub 2}, 149 kg H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} volumetric density and can be discharged at low temperatures (< 100 C). However, alane has been precluded from use in hydrogen storage systems because of the lack of practical regeneration methods. The direct hydrogenation of aluminium to form AlH{sub 3} requires over 10{sup 5} bars of hydrogen pressure at room temperature and there are no cost effective synthetic means. Here we show an unprecedented reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically, using alkali metal alanates (e.g. NaAlH{sub 4}, LiAlH{sub 4}) in aprotic solvents. To complete the cycle, the starting alanates can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride being the other compound formed in the electrochemical cell. The process of forming NaAlH{sub 4} from NaH and Al is well established in both solid state and solution reactions. The use of adducting Lewis bases is an essential part of this cycle, in the isolation of alane from the mixtures of the electrochemical cell. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to pure, unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum.

Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

2009-01-09

405

Optical properties of metal-hydride switchable films  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1996 we discovered that yttrium-, lanthanum-, and rare-earth-hydride (REHx) films [1] protected by a thin palladium layer, exhibit spectacular changes in their optical properties when the hydrogen concentration x is increased from 2 to 3. For example, a 500 nm thick YH2 film is metallic and shiny while YH3 is yellowish and transparent. The transition is reversible, fast [2, 3], and can simply be induced by adding or removing hydrogen from the gas phase, an electrolyte or from an H containing liquid. The optical switching that occurs near the metal-insulator transition of these hydrides is remarkably robust as it is not affected by structural or compositional disorder. It occurs in polycrystalline and epitaxial films, in alloys with cubic or hexagonal crystal structures,and deuterides [4] switch as well as hydrides. At small length scales epitaxial YHx films exhibit surprising structural properties which open the way to pixel-by-pixel optical switching [5]. Colour-neutral switchable mirrors based on RE-Mg alloys [6] can be used in all-solid-state switchable devices. Newest results for Rare-Earth free switchable mirrors will be presented. [1] J. N. Huiberts, R. Griessen, J. H. Rector, R. J. Wijngaarden, J. P. Dekker, D. G. de Groot and N. J. Koeman, Nature 380 (1996) 231; [2] S. J. van der Molen, J. W. J. Kerssemakers, J. H. Rector, N. J. Koeman, B. Dam, R. Griessen, J. Appl. Phys. 86 (1999) 6107; [3] F. J. A. den Broeder, S. J. van der Molen, et al., Nature 394 (1998)656; [4] A. T. M. van Gogh, E. S. Kooij, R. Griessen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83 (1999) 4614; [5] J. W. J. Kerssemakers, S. J. van der Molen and R. Griessen, Nature 406 (2000) 489; [6] P. van der Sluis, M. Ouwerkerk and P. A. Duine, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70 (1997) 3356.

Griessen, Ronald

2001-03-01

406

MERCURY STABILITY IN THE ENVIRONMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAAs) require the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to determine whether the presence of mercury and 188 other trace substances, referred to as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), in the stack emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric utility power plants poses an unacceptable public health risk (1). The EPA's conclusions and recommendations were

John H. Pavlish

1999-01-01

407

PERCEPTION OF MERCURY RISK INFORMATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Approximately 8% of American women have blood Mercury levels exceeding the EPA reference dose (a dose below which symptoms would be unlikely). The children of these women are at risk of neurological deficits (lower IQ scores) primarily because of the mother's consumption of conta...

408

Atmospheric mercury—An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a broad overview and synthesis of current knowledge and understanding pertaining to all major aspects of mercury in the atmosphere. The significant physical, chemical, and toxicological properties of this element and its environmentally relebant species encountered in the atmosphere are examined. Atmospheric pathways and processes considered herein include anthropogenic as well as natural sources of Hg emissions

William H. Schroeder; John Munthe

1998-01-01

409

Recent BAA studies of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 2000, BAA observers have contributed several hundred CCD and webcam images of the innermost planet to the Section. Early results were published by R. M. Steele and the writer. As NASA's Messenger spacecraft nears its first encounter with Mercury, this seems the right time to illustrate what has been achieved in the last few years.

McKim, R. J.

2008-02-01

410

Mercury Telluride and Cadmium Telluride  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A semiconductor's usefulness is determined by how atoms are ordered within the crystal's underlying three-dimensional structure. While this mercury telluride and cadmium telluride alloy sample mixes completely in Earth -based laboratories, convective flows prevent them from mixing uniformly. In space, the ingredients mix more homogenously, resulting in a superior product.

2004-01-01

411

Electrochemical process and production of novel complex hydrides  

DOEpatents

A process of using an electrochemical cell to generate aluminum hydride (AlH.sub.3) is provided. The electrolytic cell uses a polar solvent to solubilize NaAlH.sub.4. The resulting electrochemical process results in the formation of AlH.sub.3. The AlH.sub.3 can be recovered and used as a source of hydrogen for the automotive industry. The resulting spent aluminum can be regenerated into NaAlH.sub.4 as part of a closed loop process of AlH.sub.3 generation.

Zidan, Ragaiy

2013-06-25

412

Pu 2O 3 and the plutonium hydriding process  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The role of cubic Pu 2O 3 in the corrosion of PuO 2-coated Pu by H 2 was investigated. Experiments were conducted to demonstrate that nucleation of hydriding is promoted by formation of Pu 2O 3 sites in the oxide layer. The nucleation mechanism based on diffusion of hydrogen through the PuO 2 layer was evaluated and an alternative mechanism based on formation of catalytic Pu 2O 3 sites via the Pu-PuO 2 reaction is proposed. The possibility of active participation of other impurities and inclusions in the dioxide is also discussed.

Dinh, L. N.; Haschke, J. M.; Saw, C. K.; Allen, P. G.; McLean, W., II

2011-01-01

413

Structural Stability of Complex Hydrides: LiBH4 Revisited  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A systematic approach to study the phase stability of LiBH4 based on ab initio calculations is presented. Three thermodynamically stable phases are identified and a new phase of Cc symmetry is proposed for the first time for a complex hydride. The x-ray diffraction pattern and vibrational spectra of the Cc structure agree well with recently reported experimental data on LiBH4. Calculations of the free energy at finite temperatures suggest that the experimentally proposed P63mc phase is unstable at T>0 K.

?odziana, Zbigniew; Vegge, Tejs

2004-09-01

414

Modeling of Gallium Nitride Hydride Vapor Phase Epitaxy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A reactor model for the hydride vapor phase epitaxy of GaN is presented. The governing flow, energy, and species conservation equations are solved in two dimensions to examine the growth characteristics as a function of process variables and reactor geometry. The growth rate varies with GaCl composition but independent of NH3 and H2 flow rates. A change in carrier gas for Ga source from H2 to N2 affects the growth rate and uniformity for a fixed reactor configuration. The model predictions are in general agreement with observed experimental behavior.

Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

1997-01-01

415

Chemical Form Matters: Differential Accumulation of Mercury Following Inorganic and Organic Mercury Exposures in Zebrafish Larvae  

SciTech Connect

Mercury, one of the most toxic elements, exists in various chemical forms each with different toxicities and health implications. Some methylated mercury forms, one of which exists in fish and other seafood products, pose a potential threat, especially during embryonic and early postnatal development. Despite global concerns, little is known about the mechanisms underlying transport and toxicity of different mercury species. To investigate the impact of different mercury chemical forms on vertebrate development, we have successfully combined the zebrafish, a well-established developmental biology model system, with synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence imaging. Our work revealed substantial differences in tissue-specific accumulation patterns of mercury in zebrafish larvae exposed to four different mercury formulations in water. Methylmercury species not only resulted in overall higher mercury burdens but also targeted different cells and tissues than their inorganic counterparts, thus revealing a significant role of speciation in cellular and molecular targeting and mercury sequestration. For methylmercury species, the highest mercury concentrations were in the eye lens epithelial cells, independent of the formulation ligand (chloride versus L-cysteine). For inorganic mercury species, in absence of L-cysteine, the olfactory epithelium and kidney accumulated the greatest amounts of mercury. However, with L-cysteine present in the treatment solution, mercuric bis-L-cysteineate species dominated the treatment, significantly decreasing uptake. Our results clearly demonstrate that the common differentiation between organic and inorganic mercury is not sufficient to determine the toxicity of various mercury species.

Korbas, Malgorzata; MacDonald, Tracy C.; Pickering, Ingrid J.; George, Graham N.; Krone, Patrick H. (Saskatchewan)

2013-04-08

416

The Plasma Environment at Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mercury is the least explored terrestrial planet, and the one subjected to the highest flux of solar radiation in the heliosphere. Its highly dynamic, miniature magnetosphere contains ions from the exosphere and solar wind, and at times may allow solar wind ions to directly impact the planet's surface. Together these features create a plasma environment that shares many features with, but is nonetheless very different from, that of Earth. The first in situ measurements of plasma ions in the Mercury space environment were made only recently, by the Fast Imaging Plasma Spectrometer (FIPS) during the MESSENGER spacecraft's three flybys of the planet in 2008-2009 as the probe was en route to insertion into orbit about Mercury earlier this year. Here. we present analysis of flyby and early orbital mission data with novel techniques that address the particular challenges inherent in these measurements. First. spacecraft structures and sensor orientation limit the FIPS field of view and allow only partial sampling of velocity distribution functions. We use a software model of FIPS sampling in velocity space to explore these effects and recover bulk parameters under certain assumptions. Second, the low densities found in the Mercury magnetosphere result in a relatively low signal-to-noise ratio for many ions. To address this issue, we apply a kernel density spread function to guide removal of background counts according to a background-signature probability map. We then assign individual counts to particular ion species with a time-of-flight forward model, taking into account energy losses in the carbon foil and other physical behavior of ions within the instrument. Using these methods, we have derived bulk plasma properties and heavy ion composition and evaluated them in the context of the Mercury magnetosphere.

Raines, James M.; Gershman, Daniel J.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Gloeckler, George; Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; Killen, Rosemary M.; Sarantos, Menalos; Sprague, Anne L.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.

2011-01-01

417

Mercury (micro)biogeochemistry in polar environments.  

PubMed

The contamination of polar regions with mercury that is transported as inorganic mercury from lower latitudes has resulted in the accumulation of methylmercury in the food chain of polar environments, risking the health of humans and wildlife. This problem is likely to be particularly severe in coastal marine environments where active cycling occurs. Little is currently known about how mercury is methylated in polar environments. Relating observations on mercury deposition and transport through polar regions to knowledge of the microbiology of cold environments and considering the principles of mercury transformations as have been elucidated in temperate aquatic environments, we propose that in polar regions (1) variable pathways for mercury methylation may exist, (2) mercury bioavailability to microbial transformations may be enhanced, and (3) microbial niches within sea ice are sites where active microorganisms are localized in proximity to high concentrations of mercury. Thus, microbial transformations, and consequently mercury biogeochemistry, in the Arctic and Antarctic are both unique and common to these processes in lower latitudes, and understanding their dynamics is needed for the management of mercury-contaminated polar environments. PMID:17199802

Barkay, Tamar; Poulain, Alexandre J

2007-02-01

418

Environmental Mercury and Its Toxic Effects  

PubMed Central

Mercury exists naturally and as a man-made contaminant. The release of processed mercury can lead to a progressive increase in the amount of atmospheric mercury, which enters the atmospheric-soil-water distribution cycles where it can remain in circulation for years. Mercury poisoning is the result of exposure to mercury or mercury compounds resulting in various toxic effects depend on its chemical form and route of exposure. The major route of human exposure to methylmercury (MeHg) is largely through eating contaminated fish, seafood, and wildlife which have been exposed to mercury through ingestion of contaminated lower organisms. MeHg toxicity is associated with nervous system damage in adults and impaired neurological development in infants and children. Ingested mercury may undergo bioaccumulation leading to progressive increases in body burdens. This review addresses the systemic pathophysiology of individual organ systems associated with mercury poisoning. Mercury has profound cellular, cardiovascular, hematological, pulmonary, renal, immunological, neurological, endocrine, reproductive, and embryonic toxicological effects. PMID:24744824

Rice, Kevin M.; Walker, Ernest M.; Wu, Miaozong; Gillette, Chris

2014-01-01

419

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors  

SciTech Connect

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

Not Available

1993-05-01

420

Mercury exposure from interior latex paint  

SciTech Connect

Many paint companies have used phenylmercuric acetate as a preservative to prolong the shelf life of interior latex paint. In August 1989, acrodynia, a form of mercury poisoning, occurred in a child exposed to paint fumes in a home recently painted with a brand containing 4.7 mmol of mercury per liter (at that time the Environmental Protection Agency's recommended limit was 1.5 mmol or less per liter). To determine whether the recent use of that brand of paint containing phenylmercuric acetate was associated with elevated indoor-air and urinary mercury concentrations, we studied 74 exposed persons living in 19 homes recently painted with the brand and 28 unexposed persons living in 10 homes not recently painted with paint containing mercury. The paint samples from the homes of exposed persons contained a median of 3.8 mmol of mercury per liter, and air samples from the homes had a median mercury content of 10.0 nmol per cubic meter (range, less than 0.5 to 49.9). No mercury was detected in paint or air samples from the homes of unexposed persons. The median urinary mercury concentration was higher in the exposed persons (4.7 nmol of mercury per millimole of creatinine; range, 1.4 to 66.5) than in the unexposed persons (1.1 nmol per millimole; range, 0.02 to 3.9; P less than 0.001). Urinary mercury concentrations within the range that we found in exposed persons have been associated with symptomatic mercury poisoning. We found that potentially hazardous exposure to mercury had occurred among persons whose homes were painted with a brand of paint containing mercury at concentrations approximately 2 1/2 times the Environmental Protection Agency's recommended limit.

Agocs, M.M.; Etzel, R.A.; Parrish, R.G.; Paschal, D.C.; Campagna, P.R.; Cohen, D.S.; Kilbourne, E.M.; Hesse, J.L. (Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (USA))

1990-10-18

421

Mercury volatilization from salt marsh sediments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In situ volatilization fluxes of gaseous elemental mercury, Hg(0), were estimated for tidally exposed salt marsh sediments in the summer at the urban/industrial Secaucus High School Marsh, New Jersey Meadowlands (Secaucus, New Jersey) and in the early autumn at a regional background site in the Great Bay estuary (Tuckerton, New Jersey). Estimated daytime sediment-air mercury volatilization fluxes at the Secaucus High School Marsh ranged from -375 to +677 ng m-2 h-1 and were positive (land to air flux) in 16 out of 20 measurement events. At the Great Bay estuary, mercury fluxes measured continuously over a 48-h period ranged from -34 to +81 ng m-2 h-1 and were positive during the day and negative at night. At both sites, mercury volatilization fluxes peaked at midday, and cumulative mercury fluxes exhibited strong positive correlations with cumulative solar radiation (r2 = 0.97, p < 0.01) consistent with a light-driven mercury volatilization efficiency of about 15 ng Hg mol PAR-1 or about 0.06 ng Hg kJ-1. No significant correlations were found between mercury fluxes and wind speed, air temperature, or tide height at either site. Thus despite a tenfold difference in sediment mercury concentration, photochemistry appears to be the dominant factor controlling mercury volatilization from these salt marsh sediments. The average mercury volatilization flux estimated for the Great Bay salt marsh in this study (17 ng m-2 h-1) compares well with other micrometeorological mercury fluxes for nonpoint source contaminated salt marsh and forest soils (8-18 ng m-2 h-1) and is more than 10 times higher than the average mercury emission flux from land (˜1 ng m-2 h-1). Annual mercury emissions from salt marsh wetlands may be comparable to individual industrial emissions sources in coastal states of the eastern United States.

Smith, Lora M.; Reinfelder, John R.

2009-06-01

422

The effects of phosphorous donor ligand substitution on the reactivity of anionic group 6 transition metal carbonyl hydrides  

E-print Network

W(p-H)(CO)4{L)(PPh )] Bridging Hydride in THF Solution 35 37 47 A Comparison of Selectivity in the Reduction of Linear and Branched RBr by Anionic Group 6 Metal Hydrides 57 VI GC Yields for Reductions Using Various Acids with the Hydrides PPN HM(CO)4L... region of Na HW(CO)4P(OMe) in THF solution at 22'C Infrared spectrum of the car bonyl region of bridging hydride [AuW(rr-H)(CO)?(P(OMe) }(PPh )] 34 48 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION The P-donor ligand substituted hydrides of the gnoup 6 transition metals...

Lusk, Richard Jay

2012-06-07

423

RECOVERY OF MERCURY FROM CONTAMINATED LIQUID WASTES  

SciTech Connect

Mercury was widely used in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons facilities, resulting in a broad range of mercury-contaminated wastes and wastewaters. Some of the mercury contamination has escaped to the local environment, particularly at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where approximately 330 metric tons of mercury were discharged to the environment between 1953 and 1963 (TN & Associates, 1998). Effective removal of mercury contamination from water is a complex and difficult problem. In particular, mercury treatment of natural waters is difficult because of the low regulatory standards. For example, the Environmental Protection Agency has established a national ambient water quality standard of 12 parts-per-trillion (ppt), whereas the standard is 1.8 ppt in the Great Lakes Region. In addition, mercury in the environment is typically present in several different forms, but sorption processes are rarely effective with more than one or two of these forms. To meet the low regulatory discharge limits, an effective sorption process must be able to address all forms of mercury present in the water. One approach is to apply different sorbents in series depending on the mercury speciation and the regulatory discharge limits. ADA Technologies, Inc. has developed four new sorbents to address the variety of mercury species present in industrial discharges and natural waters. Three of these sorbents have been field tested on contaminated creek water at the Y-12 Plant. Two of these sorbents have been successfully demonstrated very high removal efficiencies for soluble mercury species, reducing mercury concentrations at the outlet of a pilot-scale system to less than 12 ppt for as long as six months. The other sorbent tested at the Y-12 Plant targeted colloidal mercury not removed by standard sorption or filtration processes. At the Y-12 Plant, colloidal mercury appears to be associated with iron, so a sorbent that removes mercury-iron complexes in the presence of a magnetic field was evaluated. Field results indicated good removal of this mercury fraction from the Y-12 waters. In addition, this sorbent is easily regenerated by simply removing the magnetic field and flushing the columns with water. The fourth sorbent is still undergoing laboratory development, but results to date indicate exceptionally high mercury sorption capacity. The sorbent is capable of removing all forms of mercury typically present in natural and industrial waters, including Hg{sup 2+}, elemental mercury, methyl mercury, and colloidal mercury. The process possesses very fast kinetics, which allows for higher flow rates and smaller treatment units. These sorbent technologies, used in tandem or individually depending on the treatment needs, can provide DOE sites with a cost-effective method for reducing mercury concentrations to very low levels mandated by the regulatory community. In addition, the technologies do not generate significant amounts of secondary wastes for disposal. Furthermore, the need for improved water treatment technologies is not unique to the DOE. The new, stringent requirements on mercury concentrations impact other government agencies as well as the private sector. Some of the private-sector industries needing improved methods for removing mercury from water include mining, chloralkali production, chemical processing, and medical waste treatment. The next logical step is to deploy one or more of these sorbents at a contaminated DOE site or at a commercial facility needing improved mercury treatment technologies. A full-scale deployment is planned in fiscal year 2000.

Robin M. Stewart

1999-09-29

424

IMPROVED PROCEDURE FOR DETERMINING MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM MERCURY CELL CHLOR-ALKALI PLANTS  

EPA Science Inventory

An analytical procedure for determining the mercury emissions from mercury cell-chlor-alkali plants is described. This procedure was developed to correct problems in an analytical procedure promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency. This improved analytical procedure was...

425

Bio-affecting mercury detection using mercury resistance gene module fused with bioluminescence reporter genes.  

PubMed

Bioluminescence sensor systems were developed for monitoring environmental mercury contamination. The biological mercury measurement sensor systems were constructed by DNA recombination technique. A bacterial mercury-resistant operon (meroperon) from Pseudomonas sp. K-6y4 and a bacterial bioluminescence operon (lux operon) from an ocean bacterium Vibrio fischeri were fused in avector plasmid. The resulting recombinant plasmids were cloned in Escherichia coli cells. The bioluminescence sensor systems responded to mercury chloride of 0.1 nM to 100 nM. The mercury bioluminescence sensor developed in this study can be used for monitoring of the bio-affecting mercury instead of total mercury that is measured by conventional analytical equipment. The fundamental feature of the bioluminescence sensor system is attractive for use as a monitoring system for bio-affecting environmental mercury contamination. PMID:12523762

Yamagata, T; Ishii, M; Narita, M; Huang, G C; Endo, G

2002-01-01

426

3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

3. VIEW EAST OF TAILINGS OF MERCURY RETORT. SCOOP FOR EXTRACTING MERCURY VISIBLE IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. (OCTOBER, 1995) - McCormick Group Mine, Mercury Retort, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

427

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2013-07-01

428

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2010-07-01

429

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2012-07-01

430

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2013-04-01

431

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2010-04-01

432

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2014-04-01

433

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2012-04-01

434

Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging Mission  

E-print Network

MESSENGER Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging Mission Frequently Asked Mercury's characteristics and environment during two complementary mission phases. The mission's primary goal is to increase our understanding of Mercury's density, geologic history, magnetic field, core

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

435

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2011-07-01

436

Atmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A  

E-print Network

Atmospheric Mercury Deposition during the Last 270 Years: A Glacial Ice Core Record of Natural, and U.S. Geological Survey, Wisconsin District Mercury Research Laboratory, Middleton, Wisconsin 53562 Mercury (Hg) contamination of aquatic ecosystems and subsequent methylmercury bioaccumulation

437

21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical mercury thermometer.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clinical mercury thermometer. 880.2920 Section 880...Monitoring Devices § 880.2920 Clinical mercury thermometer. (a) Identification. A clinical mercury thermometer is a device used to...

2011-04-01

438

40 CFR 273.4 - Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicability-Mercury-containing equipment. 273.4 Section...MANAGEMENT General § 273.4 Applicability—Mercury-containing equipment. (a) Mercury-containing equipment covered under this...

2014-07-01

439

CURRENT METHODS AND RESEARCH STRATEGIES FOR MODELING ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY  

EPA Science Inventory

The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury cycle is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. Current efforts toward numerical modeling of atmospheric mercury are hindered by an incomplete understanding of emissions, atmosp...

440

Measurement of nuclear fuel pin hydriding utilizing epithermal neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of hydrogen or zirconium hydriding in fuel cladding has long been of interest to the nuclear power industry. The detection of this hydrogen currently requires either destructive analysis (with sensitivities down to 1 {mu}g/g) or nondestructive thermal neutron radiography (with sensitivities on the order of a few weight percent). The detection of hydrogen in metals can also be determined by measuring the slowing down of neutrons as they collide and rapidly lose energy via scattering with hydrogen. This phenomenon is the basis for the {open_quotes}notched neutron spectrum{close_quotes} technique, also referred to as the Hysen method. This technique has been improved with the {open_quotes}modified{close_quotes} notched neutron spectrum technique that has demonstrated detection of hydrogen below 1 {mu}g/g in steel. The technique is nondestructive and can be used on radioactive materials. It is proposed that this technique be applied to the measurement of hydriding in zirconium fuel pins. This paper summarizes a method for such measurements.

Miller, W.H. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Farkas, D.M.; Lutz, D.R. [General Electric Co., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

1996-12-31

441

Method of generating hydrogen-storing hydride complexes  

DOEpatents

A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

Srinivasan, Sesha S; Niemann, Michael U; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K

2013-05-14

442

First-principles modelling of magnesium titanium hydrides.  

PubMed

Mixing Mg with Ti leads to a hydride Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2) with markedly improved (de)hydrogenation properties for x ? 0.8, as compared to MgH(2). Optically thin films of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2) have a black appearance, which is remarkable for a hydride material. In this paper we study the structure and stability of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2), x = 0-1 by first-principles calculations at the level of density functional theory. We give evidence for a fluorite to rutile phase transition at a critical composition x(c) = 0.8-0.9, which correlates with the experimentally observed sharp decrease in (de)hydrogenation rates at this composition. The densities of states of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2) have a peak at the Fermi level, composed of Ti d states. Disorder in the positions of the Ti atoms easily destroys the metallic plasma, however, which suppresses the optical reflection. Interband transitions result in a featureless optical absorption over a large energy range, causing the black appearance of Mg(x)Ti((1 - x))H(2). PMID:21386386

Er, Süleyman; van Setten, Michiel J; de Wijs, Gilles A; Brocks, Geert

2010-02-24

443

ACCEPTABILITY ENVELOPE FOR METAL HYDRIDE-BASED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The design and evaluation of media based hydrogen storage systems requires the use of detailed numerical models and experimental studies, with significant amount of time and monetary investment. Thus a scoping tool, referred to as the Acceptability Envelope, was developed to screen preliminary candidate media and storage vessel designs, identifying the range of chemical, physical and geometrical parameters for the coupled media and storage vessel system that allow it to meet performance targets. The model which underpins the analysis allows simplifying the storage system, thus resulting in one input-one output scheme, by grouping of selected quantities. Two cases have been analyzed and results are presented here. In the first application the DOE technical targets (Year 2010, Year 2015 and Ultimate) are used to determine the range of parameters required for the metal hydride media and storage vessel. In the second case the most promising metal hydrides available are compared, highlighting the potential of storage systems, utilizing them, to achieve 40% of the 2010 DOE technical target. Results show that systems based on Li-Mg media have the best potential to attain these performance targets.

Hardy, B.; Corgnale, C.; Tamburello, D.; Garrison, S.; Anton, D.

2011-07-18

444

Mercury Flow Through the Mercury-Containing Lamp Sector of the Economy of the United States  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction: This Scientific Investigations Report examines the flow of mercury through the mercury-containing lamp sector of the U.S. economy in 2001 from lamp manufacture through disposal or recycling. Mercury-containing lamps illuminate commercial and industrial buildings, outdoor areas, and residences. Mercury is an essential component in fluorescent lamps and high-intensity discharge lamps (high-pressure sodium, mercury-vapor, and metal halide). A typical fluorescent lamp is composed of a phosphor-coated glass tube with electrodes located at either end. Only a very small amount of the mercury is in vapor form. The remainder of the mercury is in the form of either liquid mercury metal or solid mercury oxide (mercury oxidizes over the life of the lamp). When voltage is applied, the electrodes energize the mercury vapor and cause it to emit ultraviolet energy. The phosphor coating absorbs the ultraviolet energy, which causes the phosphor to fluoresce and emit visible light. Mercury-containing lamps provide more lumens per watt than incandescent lamps and, as a result, require from three to four times less energy to operate. Mercury is persistent and toxic within the environment. Mercury-containing lamps are of environmental concern because they are widely distributed throughout the environment and are easily broken in handling. The magnitude of lamp sector mercury emissions, estimated to be 2.9 metric tons per year (t/yr), is small compared with the estimated mercury losses of the U.S. coal-burning and chlor-alkali industries, which are about 70 t/yr and about 90 t/yr, respectively.

Goonan, Thomas G.

2006-01-01

445

Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Complex metal hydrides are the most promising candidate materials for onboard hydrogen storage. The practicality of this class of materials is counter-poised on three critical attributes: reversible hydrogen storage capacity, high hydrogen uptake/release kinetics, and favorable hydrogen uptake/release thermodynamics. While a majority of modern metallic hydrides that are being considered are those that meet the criteria of high theoretical storage capacity, the challenges lie in addressing poor kinetics, thermodynamics, and reversibility. One emerging strategy to resolve these issues is via nanostructuring or nano-confinement of complex hydrides. By down-sizing and scaffolding them to retain their nano-dimensions, these materials are expected to improve in performance and reversibility. This area of research has garnered immense interest lately and there is active research being pursued to address various aspects of nanostructured complex hydrides. The research effort documented here is focused on a detailed investigation of the effects of nano-confinement on aspects such as the long range atomic hydrogen diffusivities, localized hydrogen dynamics, microstructure, and dehydrogenation mechanism of sodium alanate. A wide variety of microporous and mesoporous materials (metal organic frameworks, porous silica and alumina) were investigated as scaffolds and the synthesis routes to achieve maximum pore-loading are discussed. Wet solution infiltration technique was adopted using tetrahydrofuran as the medium and the precursor concentrations were found to have a major role in achieving maximum pore loading. These concentrations were optimized for each scaffold with varying pore sizes and confinement was quantitatively characterized by measuring the loss in specific surface area. This work is also aimed at utilizing neutron and synchrotron x-ray characterization techniques to study and correlate multi-scale material properties and phenomena. Some of the most advanced instruments were utilized for this work and their data collection and analysis are reported. Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments were conducted at NIST Center for Neutron Research to characterize atomic hydrogen diffusion in bulk and nano-confined NaAlH4. It was observed that upon confinement of NaAlH4, a significantly higher fraction of hydrogen atoms were involved in diffusive motion on the pico-second to nano-second timescales. However, the confinement had no impact on the lattice diffusivities (jump/hopping rates) of atomic hydrogen, indicating that the improved hydrogen release rates were not due to any kinetic destabilization effects. Instead, the investigation strongly suggested thermodynamic destabilization as the major effect of nano-confinement. The local interaction of the metal sites in metal organic frameworks with the infiltrated hydride was studied using extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy technique. The experiments were conducted at Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices at Louisiana State University. The metal sites were found to be chemically un-altered, hence ruling out any catalytic role in the dehydrogenation at room temperatures. The fractal morphology of NaAlH4 was characterized by ultra-small angle x-ray scattering experiments performed at Argonne National Lab. The studies quantitatively estimated the extent of densification in the course of one desorption cycle. The particle sizes were found to increase two-fold during heat treatment. Also, the nano-confinement procedure was shown to produce dense mass fractals as opposed to pristine NaAlH4, exhibiting a surface fractal morphology. Based on this finding, a new method to identify confined material from un-confined material in nano-composites was developed and is presented. Preliminary results of modeling and correlating multi-scale phenomena using a phase-field approach are also presented as the foundation for future work.

NaraseGowda, Shathabish

446

Amended Silicated for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect

Amended Silicates{trademark}, a powdered, noncarbon mercury-control sorbent, was tested at Duke Energy's Miami Fort Station, Unit 6 during the first quarter of 2006. Unit 6 is a 175-MW boiler with a cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The plant burns run-of-the-river eastern bituminous coal with typical ash contents ranging from 8-15% and sulfur contents from 1.6-2.6% on an as-received basis. The performance of the Amended Silicates sorbent was compared with that for powdered activated carbon (PAC). The trial began with a period of baseline monitoring during which no sorbent was injected. Sampling during this and subsequent periods indicated mercury capture by the native fly ash was less than 10%. After the baseline period, Amended Silicates sorbent was injected at several different ratios, followed by a 30-day trial at a fixed injection ratio of 5-6 lb/MMACF. After this period, PAC was injected to provide a comparison. Approximately 40% mercury control was achieved for both the Amended Silicates sorbent and PAC at injection ratios of 5-6 lbs/MMACF. Higher injection ratios did not achieve significantly increased removal. Similar removal efficiencies have been reported for PAC injection trials at other plants with cold-side ESPs, most notably for plants using medium to high sulfur coal. Sorbent injection did not detrimentally impact plant operations and testing confirmed that the use of Amended Silicates sorbent does not degrade fly ash quality (unlike PAC). The cost for mercury control using either PAC or Amended Silicates sorbent was estimated to be equivalent if fly ash sales are not a consideration. However, if the plant did sell fly ash, the effective cost for mercury control could more than double if those sales were no longer possible, due to lost by-product sales and additional cost for waste disposal. Accordingly, the use of Amended Silicates sorbent could reduce the overall cost of mercury control by 50% or more versus PAC for locations where fly ash is sold as a by-product.

James Butz; Thomas Broderick; Craig Turchi

2006-12-31

447

Method for the removal and recovery of mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present invention is an enhanced method for the removal and recovery of mercury from mercury-contaminated matrices. The method involves contacting a mercury-contaminated matrix with an aqueous dispersant solution derived from specific intra-amoebic isolates to release the mercury from the mercury-contaminated matrix and emulsify the mercury; then, contacting the matrix with an amalgamating metal from a metal source to amalgamate

C. E. Easterly; A. A. Vass; R. L. Tyndall

1997-01-01

448

Mercury Replacement Program It is the policy of California State University, Fullerton to remove mercury containing  

E-print Network

Mercury Replacement Program I. Policy It is the policy of California State University, Fullerton to remove mercury containing devices throughout campus, insofar as is reasonably possible, and provide, the University has an obligation to safeguard employees from the potential health effects of mercury vapor while

de Lijser, Peter

449

An Analysis of Simulated Wet Deposition of Mercury from the North American Mercury Model Intercomparison Study  

EPA Science Inventory

A previous intercomparison of atmospheric mercury models in North America has been extended to compare simulated and observed wet deposition of mercury. Three regional-scale atmospheric mercury models were tested; CMAQ, REMSAD and TEAM. These models were each employed using thr...

450

Mercury transformations in coal combustion flue gas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury chlorination [i.e., formation of HgCl2(g)] is generally assumed to be the dominant mercury-transformation mechanism in coal combustion flue gas. Other potential mechanisms involve mercury interactions with ash particle surfaces where reactive chemical species, oxidation catalysts, and active sorption sites are available to transform Hg0(g) to Hg2+X(g) (e.g., where X is Cl2 or O) as well as Hg0(g) and HgCl2(g)

Kevin C. Galbreath; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

2000-01-01

451

Future of national mercury rule now uncertain  

SciTech Connect

This February, a federal appeals court tossed out the Clean Air Mercury Rule and its cap-and-trade program and ordered that mercury be regulated more stringly as a hazardous air pollutant. While the EPA regroups, state energy and environmental regulators will have an opportunity to look closely at recent power plant permits for guidance. This article reviews the technology options and regulatory approach for mercury control used on recently permitted and currently operating coal-fired plants. 6 tabs.

Wedig, C.; Frazier, W.; Begg, E. [The Shaw Group (United States)

2008-05-15

452

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOEpatents

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Makarewicz, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Meredith, Paul F. (Knoxville, TN)

1986-01-01

453

Process for removing mercury from aqueous solutions  

DOEpatents

A process for removing mercury from water to a level not greater than two parts per billion wherein an anion exchange material that is insoluble in water is contacted first with a sulfide containing compound and second with a compound containing a bivalent metal ion forming an insoluble metal sulfide. To this treated exchange material is contacted water containing mercury. The water containing not more than two parts per billion of mercury is separated from the exchange material.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Makarewicz, M.A.; Meredith, P.F.

1985-03-04

454

Mercury in polar bears from Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Alaskan polar bear (Ursus maritimus) muscle and liver samples collected in 1972 were analyzed for total mercury. Bears north of Alaska had more mercury than bears west of Alaska. The only difference between young and adult animals was in the northern area where adults had more mercury in liver tissue than young animals. Levels were probably not high enough to be a serious threat to bears.

Lentfer, J.W.; Galster, W.A.

1987-04-01

455

The Arctic: a sink for mercury  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mercury is a persistent, toxic and bio-accumulative pollutant of global interest. Its main mass in the troposphere is in the form of elemental gas-phase mercury. Rapid, near-complete depletion of mercury has been observed during spring in the atmospheric boundary layer of frozen marine areas in Arctic, sub-Arctic and Antarctic locations. It is strongly correlated with ozone depletion. To date, evidence

Parisa A. Ariya; Ashu P. Dastoor; Marc Amyot; William H. Schroeder; Leonard Barrie; Kurt Anlauf; Farhad Raofie; Andrew Ryzhkov; Didier Davignon; Janick Lalonde; Alexandra Steffen

2004-01-01

456

Surface composition of Mercury from reflectance spectrophotometry  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The controversies surrounding the existing spectra of Mercury are discussed together with the various implications for interpretations of Mercury's surface composition. Special attention is given to the basic procedure used for reducing reflectance spectrophotometry data, the factors that must be accounted for in the reduction of these data, and the methodology for defining the portion of the surface contributing the greatest amount of light to an individual spectrum. The application of these methodologies to Mercury's spectra is presented.

Vilas, Faith

1988-01-01

457

Development of a used fuel cladding damage model incorporating circumferential and radial hydride responses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

At the completion of the fuel drying process, used fuel Zry4 cladding typically exhibits a significant population of ?-hydride inclusions. These inclusions are in the form of small platelets that are generally oriented both circumferentially and radially within the cladding material. There is concern that radially-oriented hydride inclusions may weaken the cladding material and lead to issues during used fuel storage and transportation processes. A high fidelity model of the mechanical behavior of hydrides has utility in both designing fuel cladding to be more resistant to this hydride-induced weakening and also in suggesting modifications to drying, storage, and transport operations to reduce the impact of hydride formation and/or the avoidance of loading scenarios that could overly stress the radial inclusions. We develop a mechanical model for the Zry4-hydride system that, given a particular morphology of hydride inclusions, allows the calculation of the response of the hydrided cladding under various loading scenarios. The model treats the Zry4 matrix material as J2 elastoplastic, and treats the hydrides as platelets oriented in predefined directions (e.g., circumferentially and radially). The model is hosted by the Albany analysis framework, where a finite element approximation of the weak form of the cladding boundary value problem is solved using a preconditioned Newton-Krylov approach. Instead of forming the required system Jacobian operator directly or approximating its action with a differencing operation, Albany leverages the Trilinos Sacado package to form the Jacobian via automatic differentiation. We present results that describe the performance of the model in comparison with as-fabricated Zry4 as well as HB Robinson fuel cladding. Further, we also present performance results that demonstrate the efficacy of the overall solution method employed to host the model.

Chen, Qiushi; Ostien, Jakob T.; Hansen, Glen

2014-04-01

458

Trends in mercury concentrations in New York State fish.  

PubMed

Atmospheric emissions of mercury in the US are being reduced, but worldwide mercury emissions remain high. Mercury is also being removed from many consumer items. Changes over time in mercury concentrations in fish remain important to resource managers and the general public. There is hope that mercury concentrations in fish will decline, and the number of fish consumption advisories due to mercury will decrease. We compared mercury concentrations in yellow perch (Perca flavescens) from a group of Adirondack lakes with data collected 12-17 years earlier and found variable responses among lakes. We observed an average decline of 14% in yellow perch mercury concentrations over the past 15 years. PMID:19330274

Simonin, Howard A; Loukmas, Jefferey J; Skinner, Lawrence C; Roy, Karen M; Paul, Eric A

2009-08-01

459

THE EFFECT OF MERCURY CONTROLS ON WALLBOARD MANUFACTURE  

SciTech Connect

Pending EPA regulations may mandate 70 to 90% mercury removal efficiency from utility flue gas. A mercury control option is the trapping of oxidized mercury in wet flue gas desulfurization systems (FGD). The potential doubling of mercury in the FGD material and its effect on mercury volatility at temperatures common to wallboard manufacture is a concern that could limit the growing byproduct use of FGD material. Prediction of mercury fate is limited by lack of information on the mercury form in the FGD material. The parts per billion mercury concentrations prevent the identification of mercury compounds by common analytical methods. A sensitive analytical method, cold vapor atomic fluorescence, coupled with leaching and thermodecomposition methods were evaluated for their potential to identify mercury compounds in FGD material. The results of the study suggest that the mercury form is dominated by the calcium sulfate matrix and is probably associated with the sulfate form in the FGD material. Additionally, to determine the effect of high mercury concentration FGD material on wallboard manufacture, a laboratory FGD unit was built to trap the oxidized mercury generated in a simulated flue gas. Although the laboratory prepared FGD material did not contain the mercury concentrations anticipated, further thermal tests determined that mercury begins to evolve from FGD material at 380 to 390 F, consequently dropping the drying temperature should mitigate mercury evolution if necessary. Mercury evolution is also diminished as the weight of the wallboard sample increased. Consequently, mercury evolution may not be a significant problem in wallboard manufacture.

Sandra Meischen

2004-07-01

460

Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air  

PubMed Central

Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

2014-01-01

461

Mercury contribution to an Adirondack lake  

SciTech Connect

Elevated copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in the upper 10 to 20 cm of sediment sampled from Cranberry Lake, a large Adirondack lake, are attributed to atmospheric contributions. Pb-210 and pollen core data, however, suggest Cranberry Lake also received mercury discharges during the turn of the century when the area was the center of extensive lumbering and related activities. Elevated mercury concentrations in Cranberry Lake smallmouth bass derived from remobilization from mercury-contaminated bottom sediments which increased the bioavailability to Cranberry Lake organisms. Mercury remobilization and accumulation by fish are promoted by fluctuating pH values resulting from acid precipitation.

Scrudato, R.J. (State Univ. of New York, Oswego (United States)); Long, D. (Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)); Weinbloom, R. (New York State Dept. of Health, Albany (United States))

1987-01-01

462

Mercury contribution to an adirondack lake  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Elevated copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in the upper 10 to 20 cm of sediment sampled from Cranberry Lake, a large Adirondack lake, are attributed to atmospheric contributions. Pb-210 and pollen core data, however, suggest Cranberry Lake also received mercury discharges during the turn of the century when the area was the center of extensive lumbering and related activities. Elevated mercury concentrations in Cranberry Lake smallmouth bass derived from remobilization from mercury-contaminated bottom sediments which increased the bioavailability to Cranberry Lake organisms. Mercury remobilization and accumulation by fish are promoted by fluctuating pH values resulting from acid precipilation.

Scrudato, R. J.; Long, D.; Weinbloom, Robert

1987-10-01

463

[Elemental mercury embolism in the lung].  

PubMed

Elemental mercury embolism to the lung - a case report A case of deliberate parenteral self-injection of elemental mercury in a drug-addict 18 years old man is presented. Chest x-ray films showed mercury deposits in the lungs, as well as around the injection site. At follow-up at 2 years, he was well, with none of the renal, gastrointestinal, or neurologic effects that can result from the oxidation of mercury. The clinical and radiological course of the patient is described. PMID:16108159

Botnaru, V; Gavriliuc, A; Mihalache, Violeta; Tuceac, Carolina

2004-01-01

464

Apparatus for isotopic alteration of mercury vapor  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for enriching the isotopic Hg content of mercury is provided. The apparatus includes a reactor, a low pressure electric discharge lamp containing a fill including mercury and an inert gas. A filter is arranged concentrically around the lamp. In a preferred embodiment, constant mercury pressure is maintained in the filter by means of a water-cooled tube that depends from it, the tube having a drop of mercury disposed in it. The reactor is arranged around the filter, whereby radiation from said lamp passes through the filter and into said reactor. The lamp, the filter and the reactor are formed of a material which is transparent to ultraviolet light.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Gloucester, MA); Marcucci, Rudolph V. (Danvers, MA)

1988-01-01

465

Sorbents for mercury removal from flue gas  

SciTech Connect

A review of the various promoters and sorbents examined for the removal of mercury from flue gas is presented. Commercial sorbent processes are described along with the chemistry of the various sorbent-mercury interactions. Novel sorbents for removing mercury from flue gas are suggested. Since activated carbons are expensive, alternate sorbents and/or improved activated carbons are needed. Because of their lower cost, sorbent development work can focus on base metal oxides and halides. Additionally, the long-term sequestration of the mercury on the sorbent needs to be addressed. Contacting methods between the flue gas and the sorbent also merit investigation.

Granite, Evan J.; Hargis, Richard A.; Pennline, Henry W.

1998-01-01

466

Mercury audit at Rocky Mountain Arsenal  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an environmental compliance audit to identify potential mercury-containing equipment in 261 building and 197 tanks at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA). The RMA, located near Denver, Colorado, is undergoing clean up and decommissioning by the Department of the Army. Part of the decommissioning procedure is to ensure that all hazardous wastes are properly identified and disposed of. The purpose of the audit was to identify any mercury spills and mercury-containing instrumentation. The audit were conducted from April 7, 1992, through July 16, 1992, by a two-person team. The team interviewed personnel with knowledge of past uses of the buildings and tanks. Information concerning past mercury spills and the locations and types of instrumentation that contain mercury proved to be invaluable for an accurate survey of the arsenal. The team used a Jerome{reg_sign} 431-X{trademark} Mercury Vapor Analyzer to detect spills and confirm locations of mercury vapor. Twelve detections were recorded during the audit and varied from visible mercury spills to slightly elevated readings in the corners of rooms with past spills. The audit also identified instrumentation that contained mercury. All data have been incorporated into a computerized data base that is compatible with the RMA data base.

Smith, S.M.; Jensen, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Anderson, G.M. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-02-01

467

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOEpatents

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01

468

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOEpatents

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01

469

Phytoremediation of Ionic and Methyl Mercury Pollution  

SciTech Connect

Phytoremediation is defined as the use of plants to extract, resist, detoxify, and/or sequester toxic environmental pollutants. The long-term goal of the proposed research is to develop and test highly productive, field-adapted plant species that have been engineered for the phytoremediation of mercury. A variety of different genes, which should enable plants to clean mercury polluted sites are being tested as tools for mercury phytoremediation, first in model laboratory plants and then in potential field species. Several of these genes have already been shown to enhance mercury phytoremediation. Mercury pollution is a serious, world-wide problem affecting the health of human and wildlife populations. Environmentally, the most serious mercury threat is the production of methylmercury (CH3Hg+) by native bacteria at mercury contaminated wetland sites. Methylmercury is inherently more toxic than metallic (Hg(0)) or ionic (Hg(II)) mercury, and because methylmercury is prolifically biomagnified up the food chain, it poses the most immediate danger to animal populations. We have successfully engineered two model plants, Arabidopsis and tobacco, to use the bacterial merB gene to convert methylmercury to less toxic ionic mercury and to use the bacterial merA gene to further detoxify ionic mercury to the least toxic form of mercury, metallic mercury. Plants expressing both MerA and MerB proteins detoxify methylmercury in two steps to the metallic form. These plants germinate, grow, and set seed at normal growth rates on levels of methylmercury or ionic mercury that are lethal to normal plants. Our newest efforts involve engineering plants with several additional bacterial and plant genes that allow for higher levels of mercury resistance and mercury hyperaccumulation. The potential for these plants to hyperaccumulate mercury was further advanced by developing constitutive, aboveground, and root-specific gene expression systems. Our current strategy is to engineer plants to control the chemical speciation, electrochemical state, transport, and aboveground binding of mercury in order to manage this toxicant. To advance this mercury phytoremediation strategy, our planned research focuses on the following Specific Aims: (1) to increase the transport of mercury to aboveground tissue; (2) to identify small mercury binding peptides that enhance hyperaccumulation aboveground; (3) to test the ability of multiple genes acting together to enhance resistance and hyperaccumulation; (4) to construct a simple molecular system for creating male/female sterility, allowing engineered grass, shrub, and tree species to be released indefinitely at contaminated sites; (5) to test the ability of transgenic cottonwood and rice plants to detoxify ionic mercury and prevent methylmercury release from contaminated sediment; and (6) to initiate field testing with transgenic cottonwood and rice for the remediation of methylmercury and ionic mercury. The results of these experiments will enable the phytoremediation of methyl- and ionic mercury by a wide spectrum of deep-rooted, fast-growing plants adapted to diverse environments. We have made significant progress on all six of these specific aims as summarized below.

Meagher, Richard B.

2005-06-01

470

Space Weathering Processes on Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Like the Moon, Mercury has no atmosphere to protect it from the harsh space environment and therefore it is expected that it will incur the effects of space weathering. These weathering processes are capable of both creating regolith and altering its optical properties. However, there are many important differences between the environments of Mercury and the Moon. These environmental differences will almost certainly affect the weathering processes as well as the products of those processes. It should be possible to observe the effects of these differences in Vis/NIR spectra of the type expected to be returned by MESSENGER. More importantly, understanding these weathering processes and their consequences is essential for evaluating the spectral data returned from MESSENGER and other missions in order to determine the mineralogy and the iron content of the Mercurian surface. Theoretical and experimental work has been undertaken in order to better understand these consequences.

Noble, S. K.; Pieters, C. M.

2002-01-01

471

Modelling the magnetosphere of Mercury  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A model magnetosphere for Mercury is presented using an upstream image-dipole and nightside 2-dimensional tail current sheet method. The tail field is represented by an analytical formulation. Magnetic field data from the Mercury 1 encounter by Mariner 10 in March 1974 are used to determine quantitative parameters of the model magnetosphere, using the method of least squares. The magnetopause crossing points directly observed are used to determine the size of the magnetosphere, and the solar wind conditions are used to determine the magnetospheric field at the stagnation point. The model produces a magnetosphere-like region with planetary field lines that are confined in nearly circular cross-sections transverse to the sun-planet line. Results are used to show geometry, field line configuration, and contours of constant field intensity inside the magnetosphere.

Whang, Y. C.; Ness, N. F.

1975-01-01

472

Effect of silicon impurities and heat treatment on uranium hydriding rates  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Several experiments were run to identify variables that affect the hydriding rate of depleted uranium. Only two factors affecting hydriding rate were found: temperature (and time) of the final heat treatment, and silicon content. Increasing the time and temperature of alpha-phase anneals increased the reaction rate, and annealing in the beta-phase greatly increased the reaction rate over alpha-phase annealing. Silicon contents of up to 100 wppm cause dramatic increases in the hydride reaction rate for both alpha- and beta-phase annealed samples.

DeMint, A. L.; Leckey, J. H.

2000-10-01

473

The storage of hydrogen in the form of metal hydrides: An application to thermal engines  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The possibility of using LaNi56, FeTiH2, or MgH2 as metal hydride storage sytems for hydrogen fueled automobile engines is discussed. Magnesium copper and magnesium nickel hydrides studies indicate that they provide more stable storage systems than pure magnesium hydrides. Several test engines employing hydrogen fuel have been developed: a single cylinder motor originally designed for use with air gasoline mixture; a four-cylinder engine modified to run on an air hydrogen mixture; and a gas turbine.

Gales, C.; Perroud, P.

1981-01-01

474

Mercury in the North Atlantic  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reactive mercury (Hg) concentrations (0.80±0.44 pM), measured during a cruise in the sub-polar North Atlantic (50–70°N) in August 1993 were lower those of more southerly regions of this ocean. A large fraction of the Hg in the surface waters was elemental Hg (Hg°; 88% of the reactive Hg, on average; 0.65±0.50 pM). Little dimethylmercury (DMHg) or monomethylmercury (MMHg) was found

R. P Mason; K. R Rolfhus; W. F Fitzgerald

1998-01-01

475

Children's health and mercury exposure  

Microsoft Academic Search

The reason why mercury is dangerous is that once released into the environment it cannot be removed and is rapidly transformed by microorganisms into organic compounds that tend to bioaccumulate and biomagnify in animals. The principal organic compound is methylmercury (MeHg). The primary route of exposure to MeHg for humans is consumption of fish. The safe dose (reference dose, RfD)

Roberto Ronchetti; Moniek Zuurbier; Milos Jesenak; JANNA G. KOPPE; Ubah Farah Ahmed; Sandra Ceccatelli; Maria Pia Villa

2006-01-01

476

Whole-ecosystem study shows rapid fish-mercury response to changes in mercury deposition.  

PubMed

Methylmercury contamination of fisheries from centuries of industrial atmospheric emissions negatively impacts humans and wildlife worldwide. The response of fish methylmercury concentrations to changes in mercury deposition has been difficult to establish because sediments/soils contain large pools of historical contamination, and many factors in addition to deposition affect fish mercury. To test directly the response of fish contamination to changing mercury deposition, we conducted a whole-ecosystem experiment, increasing the mercury load to a lake and its watershed by the addition of enriched stable mercury isotopes. The isotopes allowed us to distinguish between experimentally applied mercury and mercury already present in the ecosystem and to examine bioaccumulation of mercury deposited to different parts of the watershed. Fish methylmercury concentrations responded rapidly to changes in mercury deposition over the first 3 years of study. Essentially all of the increase in fish methylmercury concentrations came from mercury deposited directly to the lake surface. In contrast, <1% of the mercury isotope deposited to the watershed was exported to the lake. Steady state was not reached within 3 years. Lake mercury isotope concentrations were still rising in lake biota, and watershed mercury isotope exports to the lake were increasing slowly. Therefore, we predict that mercury emissions reductions will yield rapid (years) reductions in fish methylmercury concentrations and will yield concomitant reductions in risk. However, a full response will be delayed by the gradual export of mercury stored in watersheds. The rate of response will vary among lakes depending on the relative surface areas of water and watershed. PMID:17901207

Harris, Reed C; Rudd, John W M; Amyot, Marc; Babiarz, Christopher L; Beaty, Ken G; Blanchfield, Paul J; Bodaly, R A; Branfireun, Brian A; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Graydon, Jennifer A; Heyes, Andrew; Hintelmann, Holger; Hurley, James P; Kelly, Carol A; Krabbenhoft, David P; Lindberg, Steve E; Mason, Robert P; Paterson, Michael J; Podemski, Cheryl L; Robinson, Art; Sandilands, Ken A; Southworth, George R; St Louis, Vincent L; Tate, Michael T

2007-10-16

477

Ion trajectories in Mercury's magnetosphere  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The atmosphere of Mercury is eroded quickly by photoionization and electron impact ionization. Resulting ions are affected by both magnetic and electric field forces due to their small energy. The escape flux of these ions from Mercury's magnetosphere is believed to respond to the degree of solar wind - Hermean magnetosphere interaction. We present the structure of the Hermean magnetosphere obtained by the Toffoletto-Hill (JGR 98, 1339, 1993) model of an open magnetosphere, and supplement it with the Ding et al. (Phys. Space Plasmas, 1996) potential solver to represent the convection electric field. We follow thousands of Na and K ions in a tight grid of magnetic and electric fields at Mercury. Ions are created with a spatial distribution given from the neutral distribution to cover the entire dayside, and are launched at the surface, with an isotropic angular distribution. The initial energy is taken to be ˜1eV. We calculate the loci of points where the ions reimpact the planetary surface. We conclude that the dawn-dusk asymmetry and high-latitude enhancements in the sodium atmosphere are perpetuated by the pattern of ion redistribution due to a predominant dawn to dusk electric field. The solar wind ion sputtering effect will further amplify atmospheric patchiness.

Sarantos, M.; Reiff, P.; Killen, R.

2003-04-01

478

First Spacecraft Orbit of Mercury  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

After a 7.9-billion-kilometer flight since its launch on 3 August 2004—which included flybys of Earth, Venus, and Mercury—NASA's MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft entered a planned, highly elliptical orbit around the closest planet to our Sun on 17 March. Engineers in the mission operations center at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) in Laurel, Md., which manages the mission for NASA, received radiometric signals indicating a successful orbit insertion at 9:10 P.M. local time. "Tonight we will have orbited the fifth planet in the solar system. This is a major accomplishment," Ed Weiler, NASA assistant administrator for the Science Mission Directorate, said at a 17 March public forum at JHU/APL, noting that spacecraft have previously entered orbit around several other planets. "You only go into orbit for the first time around Mercury once in human history, and that is what was accomplished tonight."

Showstack, Randy

2011-03-01

479

The Zr20Nb-H phase diagram and the characterisation of hydrides in ?-Zr  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this work a combination of synchrotron X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry have been used to characterise the Zr20Nb-H phase diagram and hydrides in ?-Zr. A single hydride phase, termed ?' was found to be present in ?-Zr over a wide range of H concentrations up to 1559 wppm. ?'-hydride had an orthorhombic crystal structure with the composition ZrH0.4 ± 0.2, and was found to be stable during heating to 450 °C; it can therefore be considered the equilibrium hydride in ?-Zr. Accompanying hydride nucleation is a volumetric strain of 10.4% that is accommodated elastically and plastically by the ?-Zr. The body-centre cubic to orthorhombic martensitic transformation is analogous to the Au-Cd system where the basal plane in the hydride is constructed from the (0 1 1)? to give the Bain correspondence. There are strong similarities between the Zr20Nb-H and Nb-H phase diagrams with the former having a lower solubility for H at room temperature, ˜130 wppm and ˜290 wppm respectively. The room temperature solubility difference between body-centre cubic Nb and ?-Zr can be attributed to their electron configurations and the reduction in energy associated with the metallic Zr/Nb-H bonding. The hydrides were found to have a plate morphology and consisted of sub-platelets analogous to ?-hydride in ?-Zr. The hydride had an orthorhombic crystal structure and the (0?(0,[0?[0 and [1?[ orientation relationship with the ?-Zr matrix, consistent with the Au-Cd system. gamma;'-hydride formation was accompanied by a volumetric strain of 10.4% that is accommodated elastically and plastically in the matrix. Sympathetic hydride nucleation occurs in the elastic strain field of the parent hydride. In all instances the long axis of the hydride was consistent with the <0 1 1>?. beta;-Zr has a H solubility of 128 ± 5 wppm at room temperature and considerably higher than ?-Zr. The solubility difference between the BCC and HCP structures can be attributed to the size and number of tetrahedral sites within the respective lattices. In the absence of Nb, the H solubility in ?-Zr would be considerably lower. The Zr-20Nb-H and Nb-H phase diagrams are similar. However, BCC-Nb has a higher H solubility than ?-Zr as a result of their different electron configurations. The ?/? + ?' solvus reaches a plateau at a H concentration of ˜1400 wppm; this is consistent with the concentration at which the enthalpy of formation of BCC ZrH becomes negative. Only one hydride phase, ?' was found in the Zr-20Nb-H system. This phase had the composition ZrH0.4±0.2 and was stable at all the temperatures evaluated. It is analogous to the ?-NbH in the Nb-H system. There was a small hysteresis in the TSSd and TSSp temperatures. This can be attributed to the narrow temperature range over which the hydride forms (˜80 °C) and the smaller volumetric strain for the nucleation of ?'-hydride in ?-Zr than ?-hydride in ?-Zr.

Barrow, L.; Barrow, A. T. W.; Almer, J.; Daymond, M. R.

2013-11-01

480

DEVELOPMENT OF A FABRICATION PROCESS FOR SOL-GEL/METAL HYDRIDE COMPOSITE GRANULES  

SciTech Connect

An external gelation process was developed to produce spherical granules that contain metal hydride particles in a sol-gel matrix. Dimensionally stable granules containing metal hydrides are needed for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification that require columns containing metal hydrides. Gases must readily flow through the metal hydride beds in the columns. Metal hydrides reversibly absorb and desorb hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes. This is accompanied by significant volume changes that cause the metal hydride to break apart or decrepitate. Repeated cycling results in very fine metal hydride particles that are difficult to handle and contain. Fine particles tend to settle and pack making it more difficult to flow gases through a metal hydride bed. Furthermore, the metal hydrides can exert a significant force on the containment vessel as they expand. These problems associated with metal hydrides can be eliminated with the granulation process described in this report. Small agglomerates of metal hydride particles and abietic acid (a pore former) were produced and dispersed in a colloidal silica/water suspension to form the feed slurry. Fumed silica was added to increase the viscosity of the feed slurry which helped to keep the agglomerates in suspension. Drops of the feed slurry were injected into a 27-foot tall column of hot ({approx}70 C), medium viscosity ({approx}3000 centistokes) silicone oil. Water was slowly evaporated from the drops as they settled. The drops gelled and eventually solidified to form spherical granules. This process is referred to as external gelation. Testing was completed to optimize the design of the column, the feed system, the feed slurry composition, and the operating parameters of the column. The critical process parameters can be controlled resulting in a reproducible fabrication technique. The residual silicone oil on the surface of the granules was removed by washing in mineral spirits. The granules were dried in air at 40 C. The granules were heated to 230 C for 30 minutes in argon to remove the remaining water and organic materials. The resulting product was spherical composite granules (100 to 2000 micron diameter) with a porous silica matrix containing small agglomerates of metal hydride particles. Open porosity in the silica matrix allows hydrogen to permeate rapidly through the matrix but the pores are small enough to contain the metal hydride particles. Additional porosity around the metal hydride particles, induced using abietic acid as a pore former, allows the particles to freely expand and contract without fracturing the brittle sol-gel matrix. It was demonstrated that the granules readily absorb and desorb hydrogen while remaining integral and dimensionally stable. Microcracking was observed after the granules were cycled in hydrogen five times. The strength of the granules was improved by coating them with a thin layer of a micro-porous polymer sol-gel that would allow hydrogen to freely pass through the coating but would filter out metal hydride poisons such as water and carbon monoxide. It was demonstrated that if a thin sol-gel coating was applied after the g